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Sample records for low-dose levels study

  1. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  2. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 μSv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, μSv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, μSv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  3. Dietary supplementation with low-dose omega-3 fatty acids reduces salivary tumor necrosis factor-α levels in patients with chronic periodontitis: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskiner, I; Saygun, I; Bal, V; Serdar, M; Kantarci, A

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on physiological processes and on a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including periodontal diseases. In this study, we evaluated the impact of omega-3 PUFAs in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP) on salivary markers in patients with chronic periodontitis. Thirty systemically healthy subjects with chronic periodontitis were enrolled and randomly allocated into two groups. The control group (n = 15) was treated with SRP + placebo whereas the test group was treated with SRP and dietary supplementation of low-dose omega-3 PUFAs (6.25 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 19.19 mg docosahexaenoic acid). Clinical parameters were taken at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 mo following therapy. Saliva samples were obtained at the same time intervals and analyzed for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Both groups showed significant changes in clinical parameters in response to treatment compared to baseline with no significant difference between groups. Salivary TNF-α levels showed a statistically significant decrease in the test group at 6 mo compared to the control group. Salivary SOD levels increased significantly at 3 and 6 mo in the test group and at 6 mo in placebo groups compared to baseline with no statistically significant differences between the groups. The results demonstrated that dietary supplementation with low-dose omega-3 PUFAs improves salivary TNF-α without any significant impact on clinical parameters in patients with chronic periodontitis, suggesting that the systemic benefits of dietary omega-3 PUFAs may not be translated to periodontal health. (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT02719587). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Study of genomic instability induced by low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoane, A.; Crudeli, C.; Dulout, F.

    2006-01-01

    The crews of commercial flights and services staff of radiology and radiotherapy from hospitals are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Genomic instability includes those adverse effects observed in cells, several generations after the exposure occurred. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of genomic instability by very low doses of ionizing radiation [es

  5. Low dose multi-detector CT of the chest (iLEAD Study): Visual ranking of different simulated mAs levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Krummenauer, Frank; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Detailed evaluation of the lung parenchyma might be impaired by use of low dose CT as image noise increases and subsequently image quality decreases. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of visual perception of differences in image quality and noise at low dose chest CT. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients suffering from emphysema underwent CT (Aquilion-16, 120 kV, 150 mAs, 1 mm-collimation). Original raw data were used for simulation of 10 different mAs settings from 10 mAs to 100 mAs in 10 mAs increments. Three representative hard copy images (carina, 4 cm above, 5 cm below) were printed for evaluation of lung parenchyma (high-resolution kernel, lung window) and mediastinum (soft-kernel, soft tissue window). Ranking of expected low mAs level was performed for lung and soft tissue separately based on visual perception by three-blinded chest radiologist independently. Results were compared to the real simulated mAs. Results: The accuracy for correct ranking of the original 150 mAs scan was 89% for lung and 86% for soft tissue while it was 99% for the simulated 10 mAs for both windows. In comparison to the lowest mAs a significant error increase was found for the lung at 60-100 mAs (with error increase of 30-47%) for reader-I; 60-100 mAs for (33-64%) for reader-II and 70-100 mAs (38-57%) for reader-III. For the soft tissue: 60-150 mAs (with error increase of 28-63%) for reader-I; 50-100 mAs (35-56%) for reader-II and 50-90 mAs (35-40%) for reader-III. Conclusion: Simulated dose levels below 60 mAs (=42 mAs eff ) were clearly differentiated from higher dose levels by all readers. Therefore, imaging doses could be lowered down to 60 mAs without a diagnostically relevant increase in noise impairing image quality.

  6. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  7. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  8. Advance of study on hormesis of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    There have been growing interests in recent years over the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on human. The paper gives a brief review on the LDR studies, which include LDR-induced hormesis and adaptive response, LDR experiments in vivo or in vitro and epidemiologic investigation, and clinical applications of LDR as well

  9. Decline of HIV antigen levels in cerebrospinal fluid during treatment with low-dose zidovudine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gans, J.; Lange, J. M.; Derix, M. M.; de Wolf, F.; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J. K.; Danner, S. A.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Cload, P.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    Six HIV-antigenaemic patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex were studied to assess the effect of treatment with low-dose zidovudine (250 mg) in 6-hourly doses on HIV antigen (HIV-Ag) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). HIV-Ag was detected in CSF of three patients before treatment. These

  10. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  11. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p.) 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.). IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v.) prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical) given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. PMID:22114930

  12. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayado Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p. 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.. IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v. prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA.

  13. A new study on the effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, M.; Jammet, H.

    1986-01-01

    A study conducted by prof. Rose has investigated mortality among 39540 employees of the UKAEA, from 1946 to 1978. The three main points are: 1. General mortality and mortality from malignant diseases are lower than in the population of England and Wales (74 and 79 per cent respectively), thus showing no major difference between workers monitored for exposure to radiation and other workers. 2. For monitored workers, the only death cause for which there is a statistically significant correlation with radiation exposure is prostate cancer; there are many cases especially in workers with doses exceeding 0.05 Sv (5 rem) and monitored for tritium. Such a correlation has never been found in any other epidemiologic survey of workers exposed to low-level doses, Hanford (USA) workers especially; conversely, mortality from either multiple myeloma or pancreas cancer is not found here. These facts plead for a cautious interpretation of the results as a whole. 3. A linear representation of the variations of leukemia and cancer mortality vs exposure results in lines, the slopes of which are 3 times higher than those of the lines adopted by ICRP; however, the 95% confidence intervals (-2.7 + 12.4 and -22 + 52.5) are such that the results are compatible with a null effect (slope 0) and even with a benefic effect (negative slope). They are therefore compatible with ICRP estimations. A recent attempt to evaluate the two main investigations on low-dose occupational exposures (UKAEA and Hanford) suggests a dose-response relationship very near that of ICRP [fr

  14. Cytogenetic damage at low doses and the problem of bioindication of chronic low level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, E.B.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis undertaken by us of the experimentally observed cellular responses to low dose irradiation has shown that the relationship between the yield of induced cytogenetic damage and radiation dose within low dose range is non-linear and universal in character. Because of the relationship between the yield of cytogenetic damage and dose within low dose range is non-linear, the aberration frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry in the most important in terms of practical application case. The cytogenetic damage frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry also because of the probability of synergistic and antagonistic interaction effects of the different nature factors simultaneously acting on test-object in real conditions is high within low dose (concentration) range. In our experimental study of the regularities in the yield of structural mutations in conditions of combined influence of ionizing radiation, heavy metals and pesticides it was found that synergistic and antagonistic effects are mainly induced in conditions of combined action of low exposure injuring agents. Experiments on agricultural plants were carried out in 1986-1989 at the 30-km zone around Chernobyl NPP. It was shown that chronic low dose exposure could cause an inheritable destabilization of genetic structures expressing in increase of cytogenetic damage and yield karyotypic variability in offspring's of irradiated organisms. Obviously exactly this circumstance is the reason of the phenomenon found in our researches of significant time delay of cytogenetic damage reduction rate from radioactive pollution reduction rate from time past from the accident moment. Research of cytogenetic damage of reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) plant organs of the Pinus sylvestris tree micropopulations growing in contrast by radioactive pollution level sites of the 30-km ChNPP zone and also in the vicinity of the industrial plant > for processing and temporary storage of

  15. A systematic review of Bisphenol A "low dose" studies in the context of human exposure: a case for establishing standards for reporting "low-dose" effects of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Hanson-Drury, Sesha

    2013-12-01

    Human exposure to the chemical Bisphenol A is almost ubiquitous in surveyed industrialized societies. Structural features similar to estrogen confer the ability of Bisphenol A (BPA) to bind estrogen receptors, giving BPA membership in the group of environmental pollutants called endocrine disruptors. References by scientists, the media, political entities, and non-governmental organizations to many toxicity studies as "low dose" has led to the belief that exposure levels in these studies are similar to humans, implying that BPA is toxic to humans at current exposures. Through systematic, objective comparison of our current, and a previous compilation of the "low-dose" literature to multiple estimates of human external and internal exposure levels, we found that the "low-dose" moniker describes exposures covering 8-12 orders of magnitude, the majority (91-99% of exposures) being greater than the upper bound of human exposure in the general infant, child and adult U.S. Population. "low dose" is therefore a descriptor without specific meaning regarding human exposure. Where human exposure data are available, for BPA and other environmental chemicals, reference to toxicity study exposures by direct comparison to human exposure would be more informative, more objective, and less susceptible to misunderstanding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Operator dependency of the radiation exposure in cardiac interventions: feasibility of ultra low dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emre Ozpelit, Mehmet; Ercan, Ertugrul; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, Istemihan; Yilmaz, Akar; Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozyurtlu, Ferhat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mean radiation exposure in invasive cardiology varies greatly between different centres and interventionists. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the EURATOM Council stipulate that, despite reference values, 'All medical exposure for radiodiagnostic purposes shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). The purpose of this study is to establish the effects of the routine application of ALARA principles and to determine operator and procedure impact on radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Materials and methods: A total of 240 consecutive cardiac interventional procedures were analysed. Five operators performed the procedures, two of whom were working in accordance with ALARA principles (Group 1 operators) with the remaining three working in a standard manner (Group 2 operators). Radiation exposure levels of these two groups were compared. Results: Total fluoroscopy time and the number of radiographic runs were similar between groups. However, dose area product and cumulative dose were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared with Group 2. Radiation levels of Group 1 were far below even the reference levels in the literature, thus representing an ultra-low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Conclusion: By use of simple radiation reducing techniques, ultra-low-dose radiation exposure is feasible in interventional cardiology. Achievability of such levels depends greatly on operator awareness, desire, knowledge and experience of radiation protection. (authors)

  17. Intraocular levels of methotrexate after oral low-dose treatment in chronic uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchta, Joachim; Hattenbach, Lars-Olof; Baatz, Holger

    2005-01-01

    To determine the intraocular levels of methotrexate in low-dose treatment of noninfectious uveitis. One day after oral administration, the methotrexate level was measured in the aqueous humor and serum of a patient with noninfectious uveitis, who underwent cataract surgery. A fluorescence polarization immunoassay was used for determination. After oral administration, methotrexate was only measurable in aqueous humor but not in serum. In uveitis, orally administered low-dose methotrexate reaches detectable levels in aqueous humor, even in the absence of detectable levels in serum. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. What happens at very low levels of radiation exposure ? Are the low dose exposures beneficial ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Dalji

    2006-01-01

    . This adaptive response seems to be the manifestation of a protective effect that may reduce risk at very low doses. Current knowledge in molecular biology shows no evidence of a threshold effect for Stochastic Effects. Therefore, any level of radiation may be considered to cause them. Conversely, some studies show that low levels of irradiation are in fact beneficial to the health (Radiation Hormesis). However, in the absence of clear scientific evidence, the regulators adopted a conservative approach and consider all levels of radiation as being potentially damaging to the human body (LNT theory). According to LNT theory; the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation can be estimated by linear extrapolation from effects observed by linear extrapolation from effects observed by high doses. There is not any safe dose because even very low doses of ionizing radiation produce some biological effect. The results of many investigations do not support the LNT theory. Furthermore relationship between environmental radon concentrations and lung cancer even contradict this theory and clearly suggest a hermetic effect -radiation hormesis-. Although data are still incomplete, extensive epidemiological studies have indicated that radiation hormesis is really exist. In this review, contradictory evidence Linear No-Threshold Theory and Radiation Hormesis Effect is discussed

  19. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been devised to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats, and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines have been reviewed, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to human is discussed

  20. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    We have devised a method to extrapolate biological equilibrium levels between animal species and subsequently to humans. Our initial premise was based on the observation that radionuclide retention is normally a function of metabolism so that direct or indirect measures could be described by a power law based on body weights of test animal species. However, we found that such interspecies comparisons ought to be based on the coefficient of the power equation rather than on the exponential parameter. The method is illustrated using retention data obtained from five non-ruminant species (including humans) that were fed radionuclides with different properties. It appears that biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in man can be estimated using data from mice, rats and dogs. The need to extrapolate low-dose effects data obtained from small animals (usually rodents) to humans is not unique to radiation dosimetry or radiation protection problems. Therefore, researchers have reviewed some quantitative problems connected with estimating low-dose effects from other disciplines, both because of the concern about effects induced by the radionuclide moiety of a radiopharmaceutical and those of the nonradioactive component. The possibility of extrapolating low-dose effects calculated from animal studies to humans is discussed

  1. Studies of workers exposed to low doses of external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1991-04-01

    Currently, several epidemiologic studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to low levels of radiation are being conducted, and include studies of workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. This paper focuses on studies that evaluate the possible adverse effects resulting from external exposure to radiation. The radiation risk estimates that have been used to establish radiation protection standards for workers and others have been obtained mainly from studies of persons exposed at high doses and dose rates. However, questions remain with regard to the extrapolation process that has been necessary for estimating low-level radiation risks. Occupational studies provide a direct assessment of risk based on data on persons exposed at the actual levels of interest. If current risk estimates are correct, these studies have very little chance of detecting risk, but can still be used to provide useful upper limits on risks. The studies are also adequate to detect serious underestimation of risks. 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Comparative study of low dose 131I treatment in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Lan; Shan Menglin; Wang Junqi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the low dose 131 I therapy for Graves' disease we compared the results of 277 patients in our department with the report of Howarth D et al. Methods: 277 patients were classified as 45 Gy group and 77 Gy group according to the dose level. The results of these two groups were compared separately with results of 60 Gy group and 90 Gy group reported by Howarth D et al. Results: The euthyroidism rate and hypothyroidism rate among these four groups had no significant statistical difference after 6 months of 131 I therapy, but there were high significant statistical difference between our study and Howarth D research about euthyroidism rate and hypothyroidism rate 24 months later. Conclusion: The low dose 131 i management refered by Howarth D et al was an effective method for Graves' disease which could reduce or delay the incidence of hypothyroidism. Our study show that subsection on the foundation of this low dose procedure could further reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism and improve the euthyroidism rate. (authors)

  3. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses; Estudio de los Niveles de Radiacion en Zonas de Braquiterapia de Baja Tasa de Dosis del Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: navorf01@yahoo.es

    2006-07-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 {mu}Sv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, {mu}Sv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, {mu}Sv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  4. Better management of wheat allergy using a very low-dose food challenge: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yu; Yanagida, Noriyuki; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Low-dose reactive wheat-allergic children are at a high risk of a positive oral food challenge (OFC). The present study aimed to evaluate whether the results of a very low-dose (VL) OFC would contribute to better wheat allergy management in this population. We retrospectively reviewed wheat-allergic subjects who underwent a VL OFC with 2 g of udon noodles (equivalent to 53 mg of wheat protein) and had a previous allergic reaction to management of some low-dose reactive wheat-allergic children from complete avoidance to partial wheat intake. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual Perception Studies in CT images obtained lo low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adame Brooks, D.; Miller-Clemente, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper has as aims to describe a strategy to evaluate the diagnostic quality of obtained images of method for dose reduction, with the purpose of determining the dose value or values from which the image quality is significantly degraded making it insufficient for the diagnostic. To complement and have an estimate of the quality of the images we established a group of measures of objective type, and the diagnostic quality of the images was evaluated through a group of observers using the analysis ROC and LROC. For ROC and LROC analyzes the behavior of the area under the curve in relation to the four proposed dose levels was obtained. For high dose levels, detection was good. The values of area under the curve decreased as the dose rate decreased, falling to values indicating low accuracy in diagnosis. This result indicates that the area under the curve decreases by the dose rate. We conclude that the objective quality measures selected are representative of the changes that occur in the resulting image and provided information on changes in the perception of observers. The experiments ROC and LROC allowed determine the range of dose values from which the image degradation causes a low accuracy in the diagnostic. (Author)

  6. Low doses of ionizing radiation and risk of cardiovascular disease: A review of epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Bonaventure, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M.O.; Milliat, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background While cardiovascular risks associated with high level of ionizing radiation are well-established, long-term effects of low and medium levels of exposure, between 0 and 5 gray (Gy), on the cardiovascular system are debated. Methods Available literature was reviewed considering various populations, such as survivors of atomic bombs, nuclear workers, Chernobyl liquidators, radiologists and radiological technologists and patients exposed for medical reasons. Results A significant increased risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with low doses of ionizing radiation was observed in 13 studies among the 27 analyzed. The ischemic heart diseases risk was detailed in 16 studies and seven of them showed a significant increase. The cerebrovascular risk was significantly increased in five studies among the 12 considered. Conclusion Some epidemiological and experimental data are clearly in favour of an increased cardiovascular risk associated with exposure to low doses. However, given the multi-factorial origin of cardiovascular diseases and the lack of a clear pathophysiologic mechanism, epidemiological results have to be carefully interpreted. Further research should be conducted in this area. (authors)

  7. Study on cellular survival adaptive response induced by low dose irradiation of 153Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Xiao Dong

    1999-01-01

    The present study engages in determining whether low dose irradiation of 153 Sm could cut down the responsiveness of cellular survival to subsequent high dose exposure of 153 Sm so as to make an inquiry into approach the protective action of adaptive response by second irradiation of 153 Sm. Experimental results indicate that for inductive low dose of radionuclide 153 Sm 3.7 kBq/ml irradiated beforehand to cells has obvious resistant effect in succession after high dose irradiation of 153 Sm 3.7 x 10 2 kBq/ml was observed. Cells exposed to low dose irradiation of 153 Sm become adapted and therefore the subsequent cellular survival rate induced by high dose of 153 Sm is sufficiently higher than high dose of 153 Sm merely. It is evident that cellular survival adaptive response could be induced by pure low dose irradiation of 153 Sm only

  8. Studies on chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by very low-dose exposure to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Moriya, Junko; Nakai, Sayaka

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of potential hazard from environmental tritium to man becomes very important with increasing the development of nuclear-power industry. However, little data are available as to the determination on the genetic effect of tritium especially at the low levels. The object of the present study is to obtain quantitative data for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes, as an indicator for genetic risk estimation, induced by tritium at very low dose levels. Leukocyte cultures of human peripheral blood were chronically exposed for 48h to tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine using a wide range of tritium doses, and aberrations in lymphocyte chromosomes at the first metaphases were examined. In the experimental conditions, the types of aberrations induced by radiation emitted from both tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine were mostly chromatid types, such as chromatid gaps and deletions. The dose-response relations for chromatid breaks per cell exhibited unusual dose-dependency in both cases. It was demonstrated that at higher dose range the yields of chromatid breaks increased linearly with dose, while those at lower dose range were significantly higher than would be expected by a downward extraporation from the linear relation. Partial-hit or partial-target kinetics events appeared at very low dose exposure. (author)

  9. Studies of health effects of low dose radiation and its application to medicare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Ishida, Kenji; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Koana, Takao; Magae, Junji; Watanabe, Masami; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko

    2008-01-01

    The articles contain following 7 topics of low dose radiation effects. Studies of Health Effects of Low dose Radiation and Its Application to Medicare'', describes the indication of Rn therapy and investigations of its usefulness mechanism mainly in Misasa Spa, Okayama Pref. ''Challenges for the Paradigm Shift (CRIEPI Studies)'', introduces studies against the paradigm that radiation dose is linearly and proportionally hazardous. ''Studies of High Background Radiation Area (CRIEPI Studies)'', describes global HBRA studies on chromosome affection and effect of smoking in HBRA. ''Is the Radiation Effect on Man Proportional to Dose? (CRIEPI Studies)'', describes studies of immature sperm irradiated at low dose against Linear-Non-threshold Theory (LNT) hypothesis. ''Induction of Radiation Resistance by Low Dose Radiation and Assessment of Its Effect in Models of Human Diseases (CRIEPI Studies)'', explains the adoptive response in radiation effect, suppression of carcinogenesis and immune regulation by previous low dose radiation in the mouse, and improvement of diabetes in the db/db mouse. ''Modulation of Biological Effects of Low Dose Radiation: Adoptive Response, Bystander Effect, Genetic Instability and Radiation Hormesis'', summarizes findings of each item. ''Cancer Treatment with Low dose Radiation to the Whole Body'', describes basic studies in the mouse tumor in relation to suppression of carcinogenesis and metastasis, immune activation and treatment, and successful clinical studies in patients with ovary, colon cancers and malignant lymphoma where survival has been significantly improved: a base of recent European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) clinical trials. The mechanism is essentially based on immune activation of patients to cure the disease. (R.T.)

  10. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Loughlin, J.E.; Friedlander, E.R.; Clapp, R.W.; Fahey, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public

  11. Effect of low dose radiation on POMC transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Liu Shuzheng

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To disclose the changes in mRNA transcription level of POMC in the hypothalamus and immune organs after low dose radiation. Method: In situ hybridization was used to examine the changes of POMC mRNA transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs following whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays. Results: There was a basal expression of POMC mRNA in both the hypothalamus and immune organs. POMC mRNA-positive neutron were located in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. WBI with 75 mGy X-rays could significantly down-regulate the POMC transcription level that was remarkable within 1h and remained low in the observation period of 12h. POMC transcription level in mouse immune organs increased with time within 8h after irradiation and then began to decrease but still remained at a higher than normal level. The changes of POMC transcription level were more marked in the spleen than in other immune organs. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the immediate decrease of POMC transcription level in the hypothalamus might be the direct cause of the down-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis after WBI with 75 mGy X-rays, accompanied with an increase in POMC transcription in immune organs

  12. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-04-01

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates

  13. Acomparative Study Comparing Low-dose Step-up Versus Step-down in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Resistant to Clomiphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Peivandi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS is one of the most common cause of infertility in women. clomiphene is the first line of treatment. however 20% of patients are resistant to clomiphene. because of follicular hypersensitivity to gonadotropins in pcod, multiple follicular growth and development occurs which is cause of OHSS and multiple pregnancy. Our aim of this random and clinical study was comparation between step-down and low dose step-up methods for induction ovulation in clomiphene resistant. Methods: 60 cases were included 30 women in low-dose step-up group and 30 women in step-down group. In low-dose step-up HMG 75u/d and in step-down HMG 225u/d was started on 3th days of cycle, monitoring with vaginal sonography was done on 8th days of cycle. When follicle with>14 mm in diameter was seen HMG dose was continued in low-dose step-up and was decreased in step-down group. When follicle reached to 18mm in diameter, amp HCG 10000 unit was injected and IUI was performed 36 hours later. Results: Number of HMG ampules, number of follicles> 14mm on the day of HCG injection and level of serum estradiol was greater in low dose step up protocol than step down protocol(p<0/0001. Ovulation rate and pregnancy rate was greater in lowdose step up group than step down group with significant difference (p<0/0001. Conclusion: Our study showed that low-dose step-up regimen with HMG is effective for stimulating ovulation and clinical pregnancy but in view of monofollicular growth, the step down method was more effective and safe. In our study multifolliular growth in step-up method was higher than step-down method. We can predict possibility of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome syndrome in highly sensitive PCOS patients.

  14. Study on mechanism of decreased lipid peroxide by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Okazoe, Yoko; Akimaru, Kunihiro; Sato, E.F.; Utsumi, Kozo.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the effect of SOD on lipid peroxidation in biomembrane from V.E-deficient rats, in order to study the mechanism of increased SOD activities and decreased lipid peroxide by low dose irradiation. The following results were obtained. i. Active oxygen (O 2 - ) strongly enhances lipid peroxidations in biomembrane with the Fe 3+ as catalyst. ii. SOD evidently inhibits lipid peroxidations under above conditions. iii. We suggested that the effect of SOD enhanced by low dose irradiation results in inhibition of lipid peroxidation. (author)

  15. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  16. Effect of low dose gamma-radiation upon Newcastle disease virus antibody level in chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Gottstein, Z.; Ciglar Grozdanic, I.; Matanovic, K.; Miljanic, S.; Mazija, H.; Kraljevic, P.

    2009-01-01

    The specific antibody response against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs exposed to low dose gamma-radiation was studied. Materials and methods: Two groups of eggs of commercial meat chicken lines were irradiated with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation, respectively. The same number of eggs unexposed to gamma-radiation served as controls. After hatching the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation was not vaccinated while the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation was vaccinated on the 14 day. Specific serum anti-Newcastle disease virus antibodies were quantified by the hemagglutination inhibition assay with 4 HA units of Newcastle disease virus La Sota strain. Result: Specific antibody titres against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation and vaccinated on the 14 th day significantly increased on the 28 th day. Specific antibody titre against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation and non-vaccinated was significantly higher on the 1 st and 14 th day. Conclusion: Acute irradiation of heavy breeding chicken eggs with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation could have a stimulative effect on humoral immunity in chickens.

  17. Low-dose spironolactone reduces plasma fibulin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenburg Oxlund, Christina; Cangemi, Claudia; Henriksen, J E

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic patients with hypertension are at particularly high risk of vascular damage and consequently cardiovascular and renal disease. Fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is increased in arterial tissue and plasma from individuals with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate...... whether antihypertensive treatment with spironolactone changes plasma fibulin-1 levels. In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 119 patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension were included. A dose of spironolactone 25 mg or matching placebo was added to previous....... Treatment with low-dose spironolactone reduced plasma fibulin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension. This supports the hypothesis that the antihypertensive effect of the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker in part may be due to regression of vascular remodeling....

  18. Recent results on the linearity of the dose-response relationship for radiation-induced mutations in human cells by low dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, H.

    1987-01-01

    Five studies made by various authors in the last years are discussed, which are significant in that the response of human cells to low-dose irradiation is determined directly and not by extrapolation, and which also provide information on the mutagenic effects of low radiation doses. The results of these studies do not indicate any other than a linear response for induction of mutations by low-dose irradiation, nor are there any reasons observable for assuming the existence of a threshold dose. It is very likely therefore that cancer initiation at the low dose level also is characterized by a linear relationship. Although threshold dose levels cannot generally be excluded, and maybe are only too low to be detected by experiment, there is no plausible biophysical argument for assuming the existence of such microdose threshold. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Virtual Colonoscopy Screening With Ultra Low-Dose CT and Less-Stressful Bowel Preparation: A Computer Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Su; Li, Lihong; Fan, Yi; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2008-10-01

    Computed tomography colonography (CTC) or CT-based virtual colonoscopy (VC) is an emerging tool for detection of colonic polyps. Compared to the conventional fiber-optic colonoscopy, VC has demonstrated the potential to become a mass screening modality in terms of safety, cost, and patient compliance. However, current CTC delivers excessive X-ray radiation to the patient during data acquisition. The radiation is a major concern for screening application of CTC. In this work, we performed a simulation study to demonstrate a possible ultra low-dose CT technique for VC. The ultra low-dose abdominal CT images were simulated by adding noise to the sinograms of the patient CTC images acquired with normal dose scans at 100 mA s levels. The simulated noisy sinogram or projection data were first processed by a Karhunen-Loeve domain penalized weighted least-squares (KL-PWLS) restoration method and then reconstructed by a filtered backprojection algorithm for the ultra low-dose CT images. The patient-specific virtual colon lumen was constructed and navigated by a VC system after electronic colon cleansing of the orally-tagged residue stool and fluid. By the KL-PWLS noise reduction, the colon lumen can successfully be constructed and the colonic polyp can be detected in an ultra low-dose level below 50 mA s. Polyp detection can be found more easily by the KL-PWLS noise reduction compared to the results using the conventional noise filters, such as Hanning filter. These promising results indicate the feasibility of an ultra low-dose CTC pipeline for colon screening with less-stressful bowel preparation by fecal tagging with oral contrast.

  20. Effect of Exposure to Pill Contraceptive Low-dose Levels of Homocysteine and Nitric Oxide in Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is one of the public health priorities. Consumption of oral contraceptives increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and it still remains a concern. This study aimed to investigate the effect of exposure on pill contraceptive low-dose  levels on homocysteine and nitric oxide. methods: In this cohort ( retrospective+ prospective study, 100 women with normal menstrual cycle aged betwen 20-35 years old refered to health care centers of Yazd, Iran in 2015.  This study was conducted through face to face interviews by the researcher who asked for demographic and anthropometric characteristics. Anthropometic indices  was measured and the levels of homosysteine and nitric oxide was determined. The data were analyzed using t-test, chi- square test and ANOVA by SPSS 21. Results: The mean and standard deviation of homocysteine levels in the exposed group acompared to non-exposed group were (3/848±2/357 μmol/L and (3/284±1/616 μmol/L as well as the mean and standard deviation of nitric oxide in the exposed group were (p-value=0/41 and (181/360±90/44μM and in the non-exposed group were (162/654±90/913 μM and (p-value=0/29 , respectively.According to these results, there was not found any statistical significant  difference among these results. Conclusion: Taking low dose oral contraceptives in healthy women did not change any differences in homocysteine and nitric oxide levels as a modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  1. Randomized phase 2 study of low-dose decitabine vs low-dose azacitidine in lower-risk MDS and MDS/MPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias; Short, Nicholas J; Montalban-Bravo, Guillermo; Huang, Xuelin; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Qiao, Wei; Yang, Hui; Zhao, Chong; Kadia, Tapan; Borthakur, Gautam; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Sasaki, Koji; Estrov, Zeev; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Alvarado, Yesid; Komrokji, Rami; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Steensma, David P; DeZern, Amy; Roboz, Gail; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2017-09-28

    Hypomethylating agents (HMAs) improve survival in patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) but are less well-studied in lower-risk disease. We compared the safety and efficacy of low-dose decitabine vs low-dose azacitidine in this group of patients. Adults with low- or intermediate 1-risk MDS or MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, according to the International Prognostic Scoring System, were randomly assigned using a Bayesian adaptive design to receive either azacitidine 75 mg/m 2 intravenously/subcutaneously daily or decitabine 20 mg/m 2 intravenously daily for 3 consecutive days on a 28-day cycle. The primary outcome was overall response rate (ORR). Between November 2012 and February 2016, 113 patients were treated: 40 (35%) with azacitidine and 73 (65%) with decitabine. The median age was 70 years; 81% of patients were intermediate 1-risk patients. The median number of cycles received was 9. The ORRs were 70% and 49% ( P = .03) for patients treated with decitabine and azacitidine, respectively. Thirty-two percent of patients treated with decitabine became transfusion independent compared with 16% of patients treated with azacitidine ( P = .2). Cytogenetic response rates were 61% and 25% ( P = .02), respectively. With a median follow-up of 20 months, the overall median event-free survival was 18 months: 20 and 13 months for patients treated with decitabine and azacitidine, respectively ( P = .1). Treatment was well tolerated, with a 6-week mortality rate of 0%. The use of low-dose HMAs is safe and effective in patients with lower-risk MDS and MDS/MPN. Their effect on the natural history of lower-risk disease needs to be further studied. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (identifier NCT01720225). © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Low-dose radiation epidemiological studies: an assessment of methodological problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modan, B.

    1991-01-01

    The present report attempts to assess the problems inherent in the analysis of low dose radiation studies, with emphasis on possible sources of methodological errors in the published data, and the consequent relevance to risk estimates. The published data examined concerned populations exposed to nuclear sources such as fallout, weapons' test or in the vicinity of nuclear reactors, occupational exposure, intra-uterine diagnostic X-rays, scattered radiation following X-ray therapy and background irradiation. (UK)

  3. Low-dose intravenous alpha-2 agonists as adjuvants to spinal levobupivacaine: A randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Jetley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha-2 agonists have been used with spinal anesthesia for anxiolysis, analgesia, and hypnosis and for postoperative pain relief. These beneficial effects may, however, be offset by their propensity to prolong the duration of motor block and adversely affect hemodynamics when used in higher doses. This study compares the effects of low-dose premedication with intravenous (IV dexmedetomidine and IV clonidine with placebo, on spinal blockade duration, analgesia, and sedation with intrathecal levobupivacaine. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists Status I and II patients were randomly allocated into three groups: Group A (control received 10 ml normal saline IV, Group B received IV dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg, and Group C received IV clonidine 1.2 μg/kg over 10 min, before spinal anesthesia with 0.5% levobupivacaine. Hemodynamics, total duration of analgesia, onset and duration of sensory and motor block, visual analog scale score, and sedation score were assessed. Complications, if any, were noted. Results: The level of sensory block achieved was higher with dexmedetomidine (T4.2 ± 0.8 and clonidine (T4.4 ± 0.7 as compared to control (T5.1 ± 0.7; P< 0.001. Time to two segment regression was greater with dexmedetomidine (146.5 ± 12.5 min and clonidine (138.9 ± 17.4 min compared to control (90.1 ± 9.4; P< 0.001. Dexmedetomidine maximally prolonged the duration to first patient request for analgesia (245.2 ± 26.8 min, followed by clonidine (175.3 ± 20.1 min, P< 0.001 and control (121.3 ± 16.1 min, P< 0.001. The duration of motor block was similar in all three groups. Incidence of bradycardia was significantly greater with both dexmedetomidine and clonidine compared to saline (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Premedication with low-dose IV dexmedetomidine and clonidine prolonged sensory blockade and analgesic duration and provided

  4. Study of interaction of low doses of ionizing radiation with selected pesticides on Artemia franciscana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Špalková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to observe the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation, azoxystrobin and glyphosate separately as well as in their mutual combinations on the lethality of Artemia franciscana. Increasing intensity of agricultural production leads to continual exposure of animals to pesticide residues. Animals could be exposed to these negative factors in case of possible nuclear accident. A total of 1000 nauplia, randomly placed in 20 groups (1 control and 19 experimental groups, were irradiated with gamma rays (0, 20, 30, 40 or 50 Gy and were kept in solution of standardized sea water and standardized sea water with addition of pesticides (azoxystrobin at a concentration of 0.0001 g·l-1 and glyphosate at a concentration of 0.5 g·l-1 individually or in combination. A significant increase of lethality was observed after 48, 72 and 96 h of exposure to only azoxystrobin, but also in the group exposed to the combined effect of azoxystrobin and glyphosate at all time intervals. On the other hand, a significant decrease of lethality was observed in those groups exposed to ionizing radiation even at the dose of 30 Gy at all time intervals compared to non-irradiated groups. These results confirm the toxicity of azoxystrobin to aquatic organisms; non-toxicity of glyphosate to crustaceans and support the theory of radiation hormesis at the level of 30 Gy radiation dose.

  5. Studies on possibility for alleviation of lifestyle diseases by low-dose irradiation or radon inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, T.; Sakoda, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Nakagawa, S.; Toyota, T.; Nishiyama, Y.; Yamato, K.; Ishimori, Y.; Kawabe, A.; Hanamoto, K.; Taguchi, T.; Yamaoka, K.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies showed the possibility that activation of the anti-oxidative function alleviates various oxidative damages, which are related to lifestyle diseases. Results showed that, low-dose X-ray irradiation activated superoxide dismutase and inhibits oedema following ischaemia-reperfusion. To alleviate ischaemia-reperfusion injury with transplantation, the changes of the anti-oxidative function in liver graft using low-dose X-ray irradiation immediately after exenteration were examined. Results showed that liver grafts activate the anti-oxidative function as a result of irradiation. In addition, radon inhalation enhances the anti-oxidative function in some organs, and alleviates alcohol-induced oxidative damage of mouse liver. Moreover, in order to determine the most effective condition of radon inhalation, mice inhaled radon before or after carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) administration. Results showed that radon inhalation alleviates CCl 4 -induced hepatopathy, especially prior inhalation. It is highly possible that adequate activation of anti-oxidative functions induced by low-dose irradiation can contribute to preventing or reducing oxidative damages, which are related to lifestyle diseases. (authors)

  6. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Schullian, Peter; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Hörmann, Romed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A

    2017-05-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. • Ultra-low-dose MDCT protocols allowed more than 90 % reductions in dose. • Decreasing the dose generally increased density and noise. • Effect of IRT on density and noise varies with reconstruction kernel. • Accuracy of low-dose protocols for interpretation of bony anatomy not known. • Effect of low doses on accuracy of computer-aided design models unknown.

  7. A prospective cohort study on sustained effects of low-dose ecstasy use on the brain in new ecstasy users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Win, Maartje M. L.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Jager, Gerry; Vlieger, Erik-Jan P.; Olabarriaga, Sílvia D.; Lavini, Cristina; Bisschops, Ivo; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Booij, Jan; den Heeten, Gerard J.; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-01-01

    It is debated whether ecstasy use has neurotoxic effects on the human brain and what the effects are of a low dose of ecstasy use. We prospectively studied sustained effects (>2 weeks abstinence) of a low dose of ecstasy on the brain in ecstasy-naive volunteers using a combination of advanced MR

  8. CORK Study in Cystic Fibrosis: Sustained Improvements in Ultra-Low-Dose Chest CT Scores After CFTR Modulation With Ivacaftor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Nicola J; Einarsson, Gisli G; Twomey, Maria; Mooney, Denver; Mullane, David; NiChroinin, Muireann; O'Callaghan, Grace; Shanahan, Fergus; Murphy, Desmond M; O'Connor, Owen J; Shortt, Cathy A; Tunney, Michael M; Eustace, Joseph A; Maher, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Plant, Barry J

    2018-02-01

    Ivacaftor produces significant clinical benefit in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with the G551D mutation. Prevalence of this mutation at the Cork CF Centre is 23%. This study assessed the impact of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulation on multiple modalities of patient assessment. Thirty-three patients with the G551D mutation were assessed at baseline and prospectively every 3 months for 1 year after initiation of ivacaftor. Change in ultra-low-dose chest CT scans, blood inflammatory mediators, and the sputum microbiome were assessed. Significant improvements in FEV 1 , BMI, and sweat chloride levels were observed post-ivacaftor treatment. Improvement in ultra-low-dose CT imaging scores were observed after treatment, with significant mean reductions in total Bhalla score (P < .01), peribronchial thickening (P = .035), and extent of mucous plugging (P < .001). Reductions in circulating inflammatory markers, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were demonstrated. There was a 30% reduction in the relative abundance of Pseudomonas species and an increase in the relative abundance of bacteria associated with more stable community structures. Posttreatment community richness increased significantly (P = .03). Early and sustained improvements on ultra-low-dose CT scores suggest it may be a useful method of evaluating treatment response. It paralleled improvement in symptoms, circulating inflammatory markers, and changes in the lung microbiota. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    the normal upper range and is accompanied by adverse effects such as joint pain and glucose intolerance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a 16-week open-labelled prospective pilot study in six male HALS patients using a s.c. low-dose hGH, 0.7 mg day(-1), aiming to examine the impact on total and free IGF......-I and fat distribution. Glucose metabolism was examined by oral glucose tolerance tests and hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamps. RESULTS: Total IGF-I increased twofold (P

  10. A study on the effect of low doses gamma radiation on mushroom spawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajlouni, Said

    1993-03-01

    Mushroom spawn (Hybrid-521) was irradiated at room temperature using low doses of gamma radiation (50-600 rad). The spawn was then planted at two stages; first, after 24 hours of irradiation, and second after storage for three weeks at refrigeration temperature. Results of this study showed that the applied doses of gamma radiation did not have any stimulatory effect on mushroom growth or productivity. It was also noticed that mushroom production rate decreased when irradiated spawn was stored for three weeks prior to planting, as compared with spawn planted 24 hours after irradiation. (author). 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Thyroid hormone levels and hepatic enzyme activity in lactating dams after gestational exposure to low dose PBDE 47

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, S.N.; Grande, S.W.; Akkoc, Z.; Souza, C.A.M. de; Chahoud, I. [Charite Univ. Medical School Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dept. Toxicology, Campus Benjamin Franklin; Fidalgo-Neto, A.A. [Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Lab. of Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a class of widely used flame retardants, are found extensively in the environment (shown by several studies on sentinel animal species), as well as in humans. In rodents, technical commercial PBDE mixtures and individual congeners have shown to interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis, produce a mix-type induction of hepatic microsomal enzymes, disrupt spontaneous behaviour, impair learning and memory and alter the cholinergic transmitter system. In rat and mice, some technical PBDE commercial mixtures such as DE-71 and Bromkal 70 and the congener PBDE 47 have shown to decrease circulating thyroid hormone levels. PBDEs are also able to induce both hepatic phase I and phase II detoxification enzymes, demonstrated by several investigations in laboratory animals. For example, induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin-Odespenthylase (PROD) and uridinediphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT) has been shown in rodents and cell lines after exposure to technical mixtures or individual congeners. However, these studies deal with doses much higher than that found in human tissues, highlighting the importance of assessing the adverse effects of doses close to human exposure levels. PBDE 47 is the most predominant congener found in environmental and human samples (including human milk) and, therefore, hazard identification is extremely important for human risk assessment. We administered a single dose to gravid dams on gestation day 6 of either 140 {mu}g/kg BW or 700 {mu}g/kg BW of the congener, 2,2'4,4'-tetrabromo diphenyl ether (PBDE 47). These doses are pertinent to human exposure levels because a study by She et al. found a mean level of 33.3 {mu}g PBDE 47 /kg fat in human breast adipose tissue with a range from 7.01 to 196 {mu}g PBDE 47 /kg fat. In this study, thyroid hormone levels and hepatic enzyme activity were evaluated in lactating dams after in utero administration of low dose PBDE 47.

  12. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under spinal anesthesia: comparative study between conventional-dose and low-dose hyperbaric bupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imbelloni LE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni1, Raphael Sant'Anna2, Marcos Fornasari2, José Carlos Fialho21Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medecine Nova Esperança, Hospital de Mangabeira, João Pessoa, 2Hospital Rio Laranjeiras, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilBackground: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has the advantages of causing less postoperative pain and requiring a short hospital stay, and therefore is the treatment of choice for cholelithiasis. This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia using hyperbaric bupivacaine given as a conventional dose by lumbar puncture or as a low-dose by thoracic puncture.Methods: A total of 140 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease were randomized to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy with low-pressure CO2 pneumoperitoneum under spinal anesthesia using either conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia (hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg and fentanyl 20 mg or low-dose thoracic spinal anesthesia (hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg and fentanyl 20 µg. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative pain, complications, recovery time, and patient satisfaction at follow-up were compared between the two treatment groups.Results: All procedures were completed under spinal anesthesia, with no cases needing conversion to general anesthesia. Values for time for block to reach the T3 dermatomal level, duration of motor and sensory block, and hypotensive events were significantly lower with low-dose bupivacaine. Postoperative pain was higher for low-dose hyperbaric bupivacaine at 6 and 12 hours. All patients were discharged after 24 hours. Follow-up 1 week postoperatively showed all patients to be satisfied and to be keen advocates of spinal anesthesia.Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be performed successfully under spinal anesthesia. A small dose of hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg and 20 µg fentanyl provides adequate spinal anesthesia for laparoscopy and, in comparison with hyperbaric bupivacaine 15% and fentanyl 20 µg, causes markedly

  13. Ranitidine Can Potentiate The Prokinetic Effect Of Itopride At Low Doses- An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Aroosa Ishtiaq; Khan, Bushra Tayyaba; Khan, Asma; Khan, Qamar-Uz-Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Gastroparesis and GERD occur concomitantly in 40 percent of the cases. Prokinetic drugs and acid blockers are employed as the main treatment modality. Ranitidine is an acid blocker with additional prokinetic activity and Itopride is a known prokinetic drug. This study was designed to observe the synergistic potentiating prokinetic effect of Ranitidine on itopride on isolated duodenum of rabbits. Ranitidine (10-5-10-3) and itopride (10-6-10-5) were added in increasing concentrations to isolated duodenum of rabbits and contractions were recorded on PowerLab Data acquisition unit AHK/214. Cumulative dose response curves were constructed. The potentiating prokinetic effect of Ranitidine on itopride was seen by using a fixed dose of ranitidine and cumulatively enhancing doses of itopride on iWorx. Ranitidine and itopride produced a dose dependent reversible contraction of the isolated tissue of rabbits with ranitidine showing a max response of 0.124mV and itopride showing a maximum response of 0.131mV. Ranitidine was able to potentiate the prokinetic effect of itopride at low doses but at high dose the effect began to wane off. Ranitidine and itopride produce a statistically significant synergistic potentiating prokinetic effect at low doses in vitro.

  14. Better management of cow's milk allergy using a very low dose food challenge test: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yu; Yanagida, Noriyuki; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2015-07-01

    Low dose reactive cow's milk (CM) allergic children are at high risk of persistent CM allergy and a positive oral food challenge (OFC). The present study aimed to evaluate if the results of a very low dose (VL) OFC with these children contributes to better management of CM allergy. We retrospectively reviewed subjects with CM allergy who underwent a VL OFC with 3 mL heated CM and had a previous allergic reaction to management of some low dose reactive CM allergic children to change from complete avoidance to partial intake of CM. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on circulating microparticles levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A.; Al-Massarani, Gh.; Najjar, F.; Aljapawe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause disruption of cytoskeleton. Cytoskeleton disorganization results in circulating microvesicles (MVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the exposure to low-radiation and MVs levels in the peripheral blood of individuals working in radiation technology field.(author)

  16. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation on Bcl-2 transcription level of Peyer's patches in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Zheng Yongchen; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays on apoptosis in cells of mouse Peyer's patches and its molecular mechanism. Methods: RT-PCR was used to detect the changes of Bcl-2 transcription level. Agarose electrophoresis and flow cytometry were used to detect the changes of DNA and apoptotic bodies in Peyer's patches after WBI with different doses of X-rays. Results: The apoptotic was increased and Bcl-2 transcription level was decreased in Peyer's patches after 2 Gy X-rays. The apoptotic rate was decreased and Bcl-2 transcription level was increased in Peyer's patches after 75 mGy X-rays. Conclusion: Bcl-2 participates in the regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis in Peyer's patches

  17. Assessment of serum magnesium levels and its outcome in neonates of eclamptic mothers treated with low-dose magnesium sulfate regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Monalisa; Chaudhuri, Patralekha Ray; Mondal, Badal C.; Mitra, Sukumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita; Pramanik, Sushobhan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Magnesium historically has been used for treatment and/or prevention of eclampsia. Considering the low body mass index of Indian women, a low-dose magnesium sulfate regime has been introduced by some authors. Increased blood levels of magnesium in neonates is associated with increased still birth, early neonatal death, birth asphyxia, bradycardia, hypotonia, gastrointestinal hypomotility. The objective of this study was to assess safety of low-dose magnesium sulfate regimen in neonates of eclamptic mothers treated with this regimen. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study of 100 eclampsia patients and their neonates. Loading dose and maintenance doses of magnesium sulfate were administered to patients by combination of intravenous and intramuscular routes. Maternal serum and cord blood magnesium levels were estimated. Neonatal outcome was assessed. Results: Bradycardia was observed in 18 (19.15%) of the neonates, 16 (17.02%) of the neonates were diagnosed with hypotonia. Pearson Correlation Coefficient showed Apgar scores decreased with increase in cord blood magnesium levels. Unpaired t-test showed lower Apgar scores with increasing dose of magnesium sulfate. The Chi-square/Fisher's exact test showed significant increase in hypotonia, birth asphyxia, intubation in delivery room, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) care requirement, with increasing dose of magnesium sulfate. (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: Several neonatal complications are significantly related to increasing serum magnesium levels. Overall, the low-dose magnesium sulfate regimen was safe in the management of eclamptic mothers, without toxicity to their neonates. PMID:26600638

  18. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  19. Low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia (GISP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In this pilot study, aimed at exploring the feasibility of a large-scale trial of low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera (PV), 112 PV patients (42 females, 70 males. aged 17-80 years) were selected for not having a clear indication for, or contraindication to, aspirin treatment and randomized to receive oral aspirin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up duration was 16 +/- 6 months. Measurements of thromboxane A2 production during whole blood clotting demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity in patients receiving aspirin. Aspirin administration was not associated with any bleeding complication. Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study indicates that a biochemically effective regimen of antiplatelet therapy is well tolerated in patients with polycythaemia vera and that a large-scale placebo-controlled trial is feasible.

  20. Correlation between radon level and confounders of cancer. A note on epidemiological inference at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajnal, M.A.; Toth, E.; Hamori, K.; Minda, M.; Koteles, Gy.J.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine and further clarify the extent of radon and progeny induced carcinogenesis, both separated from and combined with other confounders and health risk factors. This work was financed by National Development Agency, Hungary, with GVOP-3.1.1.-2004-05-0384/3.0. Methods. A case-control study was conducted in a Hungarian countryside region where the proportion of houses with yearly average radon level above 200 Bq.m -3 was estimated to be higher than 20% by our preceding regional surveys. Radon levels were measured with CR39 closed etched detectors for three seasons separately yielding yearly average by estimating the low summer level. The detectors were placed in the bedrooms, where people were expected to spend one third of a day. 520 patients with diagnosed cancers were included in these measurements, amongst which 77 developed lung or respiratory cancers. The control group consisted 6333 individuals, above 30 years of age. Lifestyle risk factors of cancers were collected by surveys including social status, pollution from indoor heating, smoking and alcohol history, nutrition, exercise and mental health index 5. Except smoking and alcohol habits, these cofactors were only available for the control group. Comparing disease occurrences the authors selected the multivariate generalised linear models. The case and control proportions along a given factor are binomially distributed, thus the logit link function was used. For radon both log and linear terms were probed for. Results. Many known health confounders of cancers correlated with radon levels, with an estimated total net increase of 50-150 Bq m -3 with increased risks. For lung cancers the model with the terms radon, age, gender and smoking was found to have the lowest Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Heavy dependency on age, gender and smoking contribute largely to observed lung cancer incidence. However log linear relationship

  1. In vitro therapy study combined with low doses of radiation (Rn-222) and chemotherapy (taxol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, J.; Sainz, C.; Cos, S.; Gonzalez-Lamuno, D.

    2004-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the possibility that breast cancer cells show increased sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic agent taxol when they have been treated with low radiation doses from the gas radon. To this end, the cells were cultivated in a medium containing dissolved radon and then in a second medium containing a concentration of taxol. After the culture phase the surviving cells were counted and their viability was assessed. The results obtained indicate that the cells treated with low doses of radon exhibit increased sensitivity when treated with certain concentrations of taxol; in particular a lower survival rate and lower viability were observed in cells treated with radon and 50 nM of taxol in cells treated with the same concentration of taxol alone. These effects seem to result from the influence of the radon on the expression of apoptosis -related genes, which is complementary to the action of taxol on bcl-x related genes. (author)

  2. Assessing Leg length Discrepancy Using a Biplane Low Dose Imaging System. A Comparative Diagnostic Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janni; Mussmann, Bo Redder; Torfing, Trine

    study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of leg length (LL) measurements performed on low dose pre-view images acquired using a new bi-planar imaging system. The administered radiation dose from the pre-view image is approximately 20,17μGycm2 vs. 2670μGycm2 when acquiring the diagnostic image.......84) for the tibial measurements and the mean difference for total LLD was 0.01cm (p=0.92) and 0.03cm (p=0.73). All ICC calculations were >.99 indicating excellent inter- and intra-rater reliability. Conclusion. The results strongly imply that LL measurements performed on pre-view images acquired with a new bi...

  3. Study of morbidity in persons subjected to combined effect of low dose irradiation and alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashneva, N.I.; Zakharov, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Materials related to study of morbidity in persons from one of the controled areas subjected to combined effect of low dose ionizing radiation and alcohol are presented. The group under control included persons living in the same area but not misusing alcohol. The morbidity analysis for the period of two years before the accident showed that the number of morbidity cases and days characterized by incapacity for work among 100 working persons was 1.2 and 1.35 times higher as compared to persons not misusing alcohol. Two years after the accident these values constitute 1.6 and 1.75 correspondingly. It is established on the basis of the dispensary examnations, that taking into account other equal conditions the number of morbidity cases related to cardiovasular deseases among the persons misusing alcohol increased (11 % against 6.8 % bycontrol). The number of other chronic morbidity cases does not differ from control values. 7 refs.; 2 tabs

  4. Low dose irradiation and risk of leukaemia: A case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.; Bayrakova, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of low dose irradiation (medical X-ray diagnostic) on the developing of leukaemias in adults is investigated. The influence of non-radiation agents (occupational exposure to chemical carcinogens, past viral infections, family aggregations) to leukaemias are considered also. During this retrospective study 228 patients have been examined with the following diagnosis: acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myelogenous leukaemias, myelodisplastic syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (diagnosed between 1991-1993). Each case has been matched with two controls. Statistically significant increase has been found in the risk of developing leukaemias after X-ray diagnostic irradiation (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.14 ./. 3.46). Exposure to chemical agents is also associated with significant increase in the risk (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.25 ./. 2.86). (author)

  5. Low dose irradiation and biological defense mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Tsutomu; Sagan, L.A.; Aoyama, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    It has been generally accepted in the context of radiation protection that ionizing radiation has some adverse effect even at low doses. However, epidemiological studies of human populations cannot definitively show its existence or absence. Furthermore, recent studies of populations living in areas of different background radiation levels reported some decrease in adverse health effects at high background levels. Genetic studies of atomic bomb survivors failed to produce statistically significant findings on the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. A British study however, suggests that a father's exposure to low dose radiation on the job may increase his children's risk of leukemia. On the other hand, many experimental studies have raised the possibility that low doses of ionizing radiation may not be harmful or may even produce stimulating or adaptive responses. The term 'hormesis' has come to be used to describe these phenomena produced by low doses of ionizing radiation when they were beneficial for the organisms studied. At the end of the International Conference on Low Dose Irradiation one conclusion appeared to be justified: radiation produces an adaptive response, though it is not universally detected yet. The conference failed to obtain any consensus on risk assessment at low doses, but raised many problems to be dealt with by future studies. The editors therefore believe that the Proceedings will be useful for all scientists and people concerned with radiation protection and the biological effects of low-dose irradiation

  6. A feasibility study for image guided radiotherapy using low dose, high speed, cone beam X-ray volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Czajka, Jadwiga; Moore, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Image Guidance of patient set-up for radiotherapy can be achieved by acquiring X-ray volumetric images (XVI) with Elekta Synergy and registering these to the planning CT scan. This enables full 3D registration of structures from similar 3D imaging modalities and offers superior image quality, rotational set-up information and a large field of view. This study uses the head section of the Rando phantom to demonstrate a new paradigm of faster, lower dose XVI that still allows registration to high precision. Materials and methods: One high exposure XVI scan and one low exposure XVI scan were performed with a Rando Head Phantom. The second scan was used to simulate ultra low dose, fast acquisition, full and half scans by discarding a large number of projections before reconstruction. Dose measurements were performed using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and an ion chamber. The reconstructed XVI scans were automatically registered with a helical CT scan of the Rando Head using the volumetric, grey-level, cross-correlation algorithm implemented in the Syntegra software package (Philips Medical Systems). Reproducibility of the registration process was investigated. Results: In both XVI scans the body surface, bone-tissue and tissue air interfaces were clearly visible. Although the subjective image quality of the low dose cone beam scan was reduced, registration of both cone beam scans with the planning CT scan agreed within 0.1 mm and 0.1 deg. Dose to the patient was reduced from 28 mGy to less than 1 mGy and the equivalent scan speed reduced to one minute or less. Conclusions: Automatic 3D registration of high speed, ultra low dose XVI scans with the planning CT scan can be used for precision 3D patient set-up verification/image guidance on a daily basis with out loss of accuracy when compared to higher dose XVI scans

  7. Perinatal exposure to low-dose imidacloprid causes ADHD-like symptoms: Evidences from an invertebrate model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoyoung; Lee, Hee-Seok; Park, Yooheon

    2017-12-01

    The fundamental diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism consists of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, which lead to abnormal social interactions and repetitive and restricted behavior. Several food contaminants are suspected of being a possible contributing factor to the present-day increase in diseases, such as obesity and ADHD, and pesticides are also considered as a contributor to the increased prevalence of ADHD. Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid insecticide with lower toxicity to mammals. Based on recent reports on neurobehavioral studies using an invertebrate model system, we have assessed ADHD-related impairments to test the effects of low-dose exposure to imidacloprid in Drosophila melanogaster through behavior assays, such as abnormal social interaction, repetitive behaviors, and significant deficiency in locomotion in an open field arena, a decision-making process. Drosophila stocks were treated with imidacloprid at the level of 200 pM. Social interaction among the flies was disturbed by imidacloprid. Travelled distance and velocity was also increased by the treatment. The difference in velocity between the treatment group and the control group was significant, revealing that imidacloprid-exposed flies moved faster and longer than control flies. This study illustrated the behavioral deficiency in Drosophila due to the low-dose imidacloprid exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposure to low doses of 137cesium and nicotine during postnatal development modifies anxiety levels, learning, and spatial memory performance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés, Montserrat; Heredia, Luis; Serra, Noemí; Domingo, José L; Linares, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    Radiation therapy is a major cause of long-term complications observed in survivors of pediatric brain tumors. However, the effects of low-doses of ionizing radiation (IR) to the brain are less studied. On the other hand, tobacco is one of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Tobacco is not only a health concern for adults. It has also shown to exert deleterious effects on fetuses, newborns, children and adolescents. Exposure to nicotine (Nic) from smoking may potentiate the toxic effects induced by IR on brain development. In this study, we evaluated in mice the cognitive effects of concomitant exposure to low doses of internal radiation ( 137 Cs) and Nic during neonatal brain development. On postnatal day 10 (PND10), two groups of C57BL/6J mice were subcutaneously exposed to 137-Cesium ( 137 Cs) (4000 and 8000 Bq/kg) and/or Nic (100 μg/ml). At the age of two months, neurobehavior of mice was assessed. Results showed that exposure to IR-alone or in combination with Nic-increased the anxiety-like of the animals without changing the activity levels. Moreover, exposure to IR impaired learning and spatial memory. However, Nic administration was able to reverse this effect, but only at the low dose of 137 Cs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra' ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma' a A. [King Saud University, Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hoermann, Romed [Medical University of Innsbruck, Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  10. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A.; Hoermann, Romed

    2017-01-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  11. Primary study of quantitative measurement in different grades of COPD using low-dose multislice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yiming; Yin Jianzhong; Yang Wenjie; Tan Zhengshuai

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of airway measurement at the trunk of apical bronchus of right upper lobe in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and airway dimensions and lung density changes in different COPD stages. Methods: 1) Fifteen randomly selected COPD patients underwent low -dose chest multi -slice CT scan. The wall thickness-to-diameter ratio (TDR) and percentage wall area (WA%) at apical bronchus of right upper lobe section and mean TDR and WA% of small airway (<2 mm) were calculated. 2) Another fifty-five randomly selected COPD patients were divided into 4 groups on the basis of pulmonary function tests. There were sixteen patients with grade 1, sixteen patients with grade 2, fourteen patients with grade 3. and nine patients with grade 4. Fifteen non-COPD patients were selected as controls. The total lung was scanned with low-dose multi-slice CT during inspiration. The mean lung attenuation (MLA) and voxel index (VI) were measured. Inner area of bronchus (A i ), TDR and WA% of the apical bronchus of right upper lobe were measured. Results: 1) The TDR of the apical bronchus of right were smaller than the mean TDR of the small airways; The WA% of the apical bronchus of right were larger than the mean WA% of the small airways; but there were good correlation (r=0.793 and 0.784, respectively). 2) The MLA values were decreased with increase of COPD stage. The VI values were increased with increase of COPD stage. However, the values did not differ between adjacent stages. The luminal areas of stage 3-4 patients were smaller than that of other stages. There was no statistics difference in TDR between adjacent groups, except between stages 3 and 4. For WA%, the higher stage group had higher WA%. Conclusion: There were good correlations for TDR and WA% between the apical bronchus of right upper lobe and small airway. WA% is the most sensitive index for detecting thickened airway. (authors)

  12. Health effects of low-dose radiation on atomic workers: a case study of employer-directed research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, T.D.

    1980-01-01

    The 15-year history of a study on the health effects of low-dose radiation on workers at the Hanford Atomic Plant in Washington State demonstrates different facets of political control by employers over investigations of employee working conditions. Evidence obtained through the Freedom of Information Act shows that the original study, under the guidance of Dr. Thomas Mancuso, an experienced and respected occupational health epidemiologist, was proof to employees that their exposure levels were safe. When it turned out that the study might show an increase in cancer rates among plant employees, its control was transferred to the employer. Lessons from these events are that it may be necessary for organized labor to negotiate the conduct of occupational health investigations as part of negotiated settlements

  13. Utilization of the higher plants in a study on hereditary effect of low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Jun

    1976-01-01

    Some problems in a study of hereditary effect of low-dose irradiation, which used the higher plants (tradescantia, peas, etc.) as materials, were mentioned. Conditions to be used as materials were mentioned as follows: 1) the materials must have high radio-sensitivity, 2) the natural mutation of the materials must be low, 3) hereditary uniformity and stability of genes in the materials were important, and 4) in case of considering the materials as environmental radiation monitors, the observation period must be long and the duration from exposure to detection of mutation must be short. Tradescantia has most of these conditions, but the greatest fault is that the object of its observation is mutation of somatic cells, and hereditary study is impossible. Therefore, it is necessary to find out other materials in order to solve the problem whether there is a difference in relative frequency of chromosomal abnormalities, which occurrs in germinal cells and is transmitted to posterity, between low and high doses or not. (Serizawa, K.)

  14. Low-dose aspirin and risk of intracranial bleeds: An observational study in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Gaist, David; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; Bromley, Susan; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2017-11-28

    To quantify the risk of intracranial bleeds (ICBs) associated with new use of prophylactic low-dose aspirin using a population-based primary care database in the United Kingdom. A cohort of new users of low-dose aspirin (75-300 mg; n = 199,079) aged 40-84 years and a 1:1 matched cohort of nonusers of low-dose aspirin at baseline were followed (maximum 14 years, median 5.4 years) to identify incident cases of ICB, with validation by manual review of patient records or linkage to hospitalization data. Using 10,000 frequency-matched controls, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for current low-dose aspirin use (0-7 days before the index date [ICB date for cases, random date for controls]); reference group was never used. There were 1,611 cases of ICB (n = 743 for intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH], n = 483 for subdural hematoma [SDH], and n = 385 for subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]). RRs (95% CI) were 0.98 (0.84-1.13) for all ICB, 0.98 (0.80-1.20) for ICH, 1.23 (0.95-1.59) for SDH, and 0.77 (0.58-1.01) for SAH. No duration of use or dose-response association was apparent. RRs (95% CI) for ≥1 year of low-dose aspirin use were 0.90 (0.72-1.13) for ICH, 1.20 (0.91-1.57) for SDH, and 0.69 (0.50-0.94) for SAH. Low-dose aspirin is not associated with an increased risk of any type of ICB and is associated with a significantly decreased risk of SAH when used for ≥1 year. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Complex mixtures: Relevance of combined exposure to substances at low dose levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeman, W.R.; Krul, L.; Houben, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Upon analysis of chemically complex food matrices a forest of peaks is likely to be found. Identification of these peaks and concurrent determination of the toxicological relevance upon exposure is very time consuming, expensive and often requires animal studies. Recently, a safety assessment

  16. Accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, K W; Kang, E-Y; Yong, H S; Woo, O H; Lee, K Y; Oh, Y-W

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with application of iterative reconstruction (IR) according to nodule size, nodule density and CT tube currents, using artificial lung nodules within an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Eight artificial nodules (four diameters: 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; two CT densities: -630 HU that represents ground-glass nodule and +100 HU that represents solid nodule) were randomly placed inside a thoracic phantom. Scans were performed with tube current-time product to 10, 20, 30 and 50 mAs. Images were reconstructed with IR and filtered back projection (FBP). We compared volume estimates to a reference standard and calculated the absolute percentage error (APE). The APE of all nodules was significantly lower when IR was used than with FBP (7.5 ± 4.7% compared with 9.0 ±6.9%; p volumetry in low-dose CT by application of IR showed reliable accuracy in a phantom study. Lung nodule volumetry can be reliably applicable to all lung nodules including small, ground-glass nodules even in ultra-low-dose CT with application of IR. IR significantly improved the accuracy of lung nodule volumetry compared with FBP particularly for ground-glass (-630 HU) nodules. Volumetry in low-dose CT can be utilized in patient with lung nodule work-up, and IR has benefit for small, ground-glass lung nodules in low-dose CT.

  17. The experimental study and clinical application on the detection of pulmonary nodules with low-dose multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaohua; Ma Daqing; Zhang Zhongjia; Ji Jingling; Zhang Yansong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the detection rate of pulmonary nodules ,especially nodules ≤5 mm, in variable low-doses, and to evaluate the imaging quality of low-dose MSCT. Methods: Six postmortem specimens of patients with pneumoconiosis after necropsy were fixed at end-inspiratory volume. The fixed specimens were examined by using MSCT with standard dose (130 mA) and low-dose (50, 30, 10 mA, respectively). Low-dose MSCT scans of 40 asymptomatic volunteers and 60 patients with pulmonary metastasis were also examined with 30 mA. The numbers of pulmonary nodules less than 5 mm at standard-dose and different low-dose were recorded. Nodules were assessed by diagnostic confidence ('definite nodule', 'questionable nodule', and 'definite not nodule'). The number of images with artifact in specimens and in 40 volunteers and 60 patients with pulmonary metastasis were recorded. Results: In specimen's study, the Kappa values of groups of low-dose (50, 30, 10 mA) were 0.515, 0.242, and 0.154, respectively. The group of 50 mA had a good coincidence with standard-dose group by U test. The sensitivity of group 50, 30, 10 mA was 88.0%, 78.4%, and 75.0%, respectively. The positive predictive values of which were 98%, 94%, and 93%, respectively. The correction rates of which were 85%, 73%, and 69%, respectively. In specimens' images, subtle linear artifact was showed only in paravertebral lung field in 21 images of 31 at the group of 10 mA. Linear artifacts that affected small nodule detection were showed in lung apexes in 3 of 100 subjects. Conclusion: Low-dose MSCT is expected to improve early detection of lung cancer. Pulmonary nodules less than 5 mm could be reliably detected at 50 mA tube current in specimens. Low-dose CT (30 mA) showed satisfactory imaging quality in our study. Low-dose CT screening for lung cancer may be applied if situation permits. (authors)

  18. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Otsuka, Kensuke; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  19. Low dose effects of ionizing radiations in in vitro and in vivo biological systems: a multi-scale approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoccia, A.; Berardinelli, F.; Argazzi, E.; Balata, M.; Bedogni, R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term biological effects of low-dose radiation are little known nowadays and its carcinogenic risk is estimated on the assumption that risk remains linearly proportional to the radiation dose down to low-dose levels. However in the last 20 years this hypothesis has gradually begun to seem in contrast with a huge collection of experimental evidences, which has shown the presence of plethora of non-linear phenomena (including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance, adaptive response, and non-targeted phenomena like bystander effect and genomic instability) occurring after low-dose irradiation. These phenomena might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model currently used for cancer risk assessment through extrapolation from existing high-dose data. Moreover only few information is available regarding the effects induced on cryo preserved cells by multi-year background radiation exposure, which might induce a radiation-damage accumulation, due to the inhibition of cellular repair mechanisms. In this framework, the multi-year Excalibur (Exposure effects at low doses of ionizing radiation in biological culture) experiment, funded by INFN-CNS5, has undertaken a multi-scale approach investigation on the biological effects induced in in vitro and in vivo biological systems, in culture and cryo preserved conditions, as a function of radiation quality (X/γ-rays, protons, He-4 ions of various energies) and dose, with particular emphasis on the low-dose region and non-linear phenomena, in terms of different biological endpoints.

  20. The effects of low-dose radiotherapy on fresh osteochondral allografts: An experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Gönç

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In osteochondral massive allograft transplantations, the immune reaction of the host could be precluded with radiotherapy, and the side-effects can be prevented by low-dose fractionated regimen. The total dose of fractionated radiotherapy for an immune suppression should be adjusted not to damage the cartilage tissue, but to avoid articular degeneration in the long term.

  1. Studies on the stimulating effect of low dose irradiation on lymphocyte subsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Su Liaoyuan

    1994-01-01

    In the study, three kinds of monoclonal antibody were used to separate subsets of lymphocyte, and then the functional changes of the separated subsets after low dose irradiation (LDI) were studied. McAb CD4, CD8 and B were used to obtain CD 4 + , CD8 + and B cells respectively with 'Panning' method, the cells were irradiated with X-ray machine (200 kV, 10 mA) for 0, 0.02, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 Gy. 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to reflect functional changes of subsets after LDI. The results indicated that (1) three kinds of subsets could be stimulated by LDI (within 0.2 Gy). The peak effect for CD 4 + and B cells was induced by 0.1 Gy irradiation for CD8 + cell, the peak effect dose was 0.05 Gy; (2) between 0.02 Gy and 0.2 Gy, for same dose, the stimulating effect of CD4 + was higher than that of CD8 + . This result has an important significance in demonstrating the immune mechanism of radiation hormesis. The past viewpoint suggested that immune hormesis was caused by the damage of radiosensitive T cell (Ts) after LDI. Recently, some authors proved that no change of the ratio of Ts to T H existed after LDI. In the study presented, It is found that the values of 3 H-TdR incorporation in CD4 + was bigger than that in CD8 + after LDI. Obvious stimulating effect could still be observed after 0.2 Gy irradiation, it indicated that subsets separated by McAb could have a wide stimulating dose range for LDI

  2. Low dose irradiation facilitates hepatocellular carcinoma genesis involving HULC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Ge, Chang; Feng, Guoxing; Xiao, Huiwen; Dong, Jiali; Zhu, Changchun; Jiang, Mian; Cui, Ming; Fan, Saijun

    2018-03-24

    Irradiation exposure positive correlates with tumor formation, such as breast cancer and lung cancer. However, whether low dose irradiation induces hepatocarcinogenesis and the underlying mechanism remain poorly defined. In the present study, we reported that low dose irradiation facilitated the proliferation of hepatocyte through up-regulating HULC in vitro and in vivo. Low dose irradiation exposure elevated HULC expression level in hepatocyte. Deletion of heightened HULC erased the cells growth accelerated following low dose irradiation exposure. CDKN1, the neighbor gene of HULC, was down-regulated by overexpression of HULC following low dose irradiation exposure via complementary base pairing, resulting in promoting cell cycle process. Thus, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of low dose irradiation-induced hepatocarcinogenesis through HULC/CDKN1 signaling, and shed light on the potential risk of low dose irradiation for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in pre-clinical settings. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Donor-specific cell-based assays in studying sensitivity to low-dose radiation: a population-based perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora eIl'yasova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a linear no-threshold model is used to estimate health risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation, a prevalent exposure in the general population, because the direct estimation from epidemiological studies suffers from uncertainty. This model has been criticized based on unique biology of low-dose radiation. Whether the departure from linearity is toward increased or decreased risk is intensely debated. We present an approach based on individual radiosensitivity testing and discuss how individual radiosensitivity can be assessed with the goal to develop a quantifiable measure of cellular response that can be conducted via high-throughput population testing.

  4. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-α and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high......) , was prospectively analysed in fresh blood, and treatment-associated quantitative and qualitative changes were analysed. By the 4th vaccine, patients showed a marked increase in CD4+ CD25(high) T cell subset from 6% to 22% (P...

  5. Changes in peripheral blood level of regulatory T cells in patients with malignant melanoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, J; Brimnes, M K; Andersen, M H

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in peripheral blood regulatory T cell (Treg) levels were evaluated in 46 progressive patients with melanoma treated with a dendritic cell-based vaccine and concomitant low-dose IFN-a and IL-2. The regulatory subset of CD4 T cells, characterized by CD25(high......) , was prospectively analysed in fresh blood, and treatment-associated quantitative and qualitative changes were analysed. By the 4th vaccine, patients showed a marked increase in CD4+ CD25(high) T cell subset from 6% to 22% (P...

  6. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered low-dose rapamycin in healthy dogs: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jeanne C.; Allstadt, Sara D.; Fan, Timothy M.; Khanna, Chand; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina D.; LeBlanc, Amy K.; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacokinetics of orally administered rapamycin in healthy dogs. Animals 5 healthy purpose-bred hounds. Procedures The study consisted of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. In experiment 2, each dog received (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 5 days; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 3, 6, 24, 27, 30, 48, 51, 54, 72, 75, 78, 96, 96.5, 97, 98, 100, 102, 108, 120, 144, and 168 hours after the first dose. Blood rapamycin concentration was determined by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and non-compartmental analyses. Results Mean ± SD blood rapamycin terminal half-life, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 hours after dosing, and maximum concentration were 38.7 ± 12.7 h, 140 ± 23.9 ng•h/mL, and 8.39 ± 1.73 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 1, and 99.5 ± 89.5 h, 126 ± 27.1 ng•h/mL, and 5.49 ± 1.99 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters for rapamycin after administration of 5 daily doses differed significantly from those after administration of 1 dose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results indicated that oral administration of low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) rapamycin to healthy dogs achieved blood concentrations measured in ng/mL. The optimal dose and administration frequency of rapamcyin required to achieve therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing dogs, as well as toxicity after chronic dosing, needs to be determined. PMID:26709938

  7. Persistent Sexual Dysfunction and Suicidal Ideation in Young Men Treated with Low-Dose Finasteride: A Pharmacovigilance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayad K; Heran, Balraj S; Etminan, Mahyar

    2015-07-01

    Finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor, is marketed in a low dose (1 mg) as a popular therapy for androgenic alopecia in young men. As case reports and small surveys have suggested a link between persistent sexual dysfunction (SD) and suicidal ideation (SI) with low-dose finasteride, the aim of this study was to detect signals of SD and SI secondary to low-dose finasteride use in young men. Retrospective pharmacovigilance disproportionality analysis. United States Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. Low-dose finasteride-related adverse event reports for men aged 18-45 years that were submitted to the FAERS between 1998 and 2013 were retrieved. Multi-item Gamma Poisson Shrinker disproportionality analysis was applied to calculate the empirical Bayes geometric mean (EBGM) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) as an association metric between low-dose finasteride and the events of interest. Signals were defined as associations with thresholds of a CI lower limit of 2.0 or greater. Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms denoting to SD and SI were identified to reflect the outcome of interest. In total, of 4910 reports, 577 persistent SD and 39 SI adverse event reports (11.8% and 7.9%, respectively) were identified for young men using low-dose finasteride; 34 (87.2%) of the 39 men with SI also experienced SD. The majority of these events were serious (e.g., contributed to the patient's death, hospitalization, or disability). Low-dose finasteride was associated with more than expected reporting of SD in young men compared with reporting of these events with all other drugs within the database (EBGM 28.0, 95% CI 26.1-30.0). Disproportional reporting in SI events was noted, although it did not reach signal threshold (EBGM 1.72; 95% CI 1.31-2.23). Among serious SD events, 43% led to disability; 28% required medical intervention, including hospitalization; and 5% were life-threatening. Six fatal SD

  8. Studies on adaptive response of lymphocyte transformation induced by low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin; Zou Huawei

    1995-10-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated by mitogen in vitro for 24 h were exposed to low-dose γ-ray irradiation (0.5∼4.0 cGy, adaptive dose). They showed an adaptive response to the inhibition of 3 H-TdR incorporation by subsequent higher acute doses of γ-ray (challenge dose). At the interval of 24 h between adaptive dose and challenge dose, the strongest adaptive response induced by low-dose irradiation was found. It is also found that the response induced by 1.0 cGy of adaptive dose was more obvious than that by other doses and that 3.0 Gy of challenge dose produced the strongest adaptive response. As the challenge doses increased, the adaptive response reduced. (2 figs., 2 tabs.)

  9. Efficacy of low-dose cinacalcet on alternate days for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients: a single-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gojaseni P

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pongsathorn Gojaseni, Dolnapa Pattarathitinan, Anutra Chittinandana Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Bhumibol Adulyadej Hospital, Directorate of Medical Services, Royal Thai Air Force, Bangkok, Thailand Introduction: Cinacalcet is effective in reducing serum parathyroid hormone (PTH in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT. This study focused on testing whether a prescription of low-dose cinacalcet on alternate days could be an option for treatment of secondary HPT.Materials and methods: A retrospective clinical study was conducted on chronic maintenance hemodialysis patients. Patients with secondary HPT who received cinacalcet at a starting dose of 25 mg on alternate days were reviewed (low-dose group. Patients who were being treated with a standard dose of cinacalcet in the same period of time were selected as the control group. The primary outcome was difference in the percentage of patients achieving >30% reduction of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH levels at 16 weeks. The changes of serum iPTH and other biochemical data were also tested.Results: A total of 30 patients (16 low doses and 14 controls took part in the study. Baseline iPTH levels in the low-dose and control group were 1,065.9±477.7 and 1,214.1±497.6 pg/mL, respectively (p=0.413. The analysis showed that the percentage of patients who achieved the primary outcome showed little or no difference (33.3% in the low-dose group compared with 38.5% in the control group, p=1.0. Serum iPTH reduction during 16 weeks of study period in the low-dose and control group was 253.5±316.1 and 243.4±561.3 pg/mL, respectively (p=0.957. There was no difference in the adverse events between both groups.Conclusion: Among patients with secondary HPT, initial treatment with cinacalcet 25 mg on alternate days can decrease serum PTH levels. The role of low-dose cinacalcet in secondary HPT should be further determined in large-scale, randomized controlled trials. Keywords

  10. Once-daily dosing of saquinavir and low-dose ritonavir in HIV-1-infected individuals: a pharmacokinetic pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heeswijk, R. P.; Veldkamp, A. I.; Mulder, J. W.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Lange, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.; Hoetelmans, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of a once-daily dosing regimen of saquinavir soft gelatin capsules in combination with a low dose of ritonavir in HIV-1-infected individuals. Open-label, multi-dose, pharmacokinetic pilot study. Seven HIV-1-infected individuals who were treated with

  11. Positional variation of applicators during low dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul Ponni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to know the effect of variation in position of applicators to the dose received by the tumor volume, critical organs such as rectum and bladder and the correlation of variation on the clinical outcome.Material and methods: 36 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer, undergoing intracavitary brachythe - rapy (ICBT from October 2005 to December 2006 were the subjects of the study. Two pairs of orthogonal X-ray films were taken: one prior to loading of sources and the other after removal of sources. These patients were followed up as per the RTOG criteria.Results: The median duration of insertion was 25 hours with a median follow up period of 6.7 months. The translational variation of the applicator position for all patients was 3 mm and 1 mm (2 SD, respectively, in the patient’s lateral and antero-posterior direction. The rotational variation was 3 and 4 degrees (2 SD in the patient’s transverse and sagittal planes. Detailed analysis of source movement showed following changes in median dose: point A: 14%, point B: 2%, point P: 1%, Rectum 1: 3.5%, Rectum 2: 4% and Bladder: 9.1%. The incidence of rectal toxicity was 6/36(16.7% and that of bladder was 1/36 (2.8%. When the variables were grouped to evaluate the relationship, our study showed statistically significant relationship between: R2 and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.002, point A and rectal toxicity (Pearson: 0.792, lateral displacement/anteroposterior displacement and rectal toxicity (p value: 0.012/0.003, beta angle and R2 (p value: 0.002.Conclusions: The geometric relationships between the ICBT applicators and the critical structures vary during the course of low dose rate brachytherapy. Source movement does result in significant dose alterations in terms of increased rate of complications, but its impact on cure rates needs to be studied in the future.

  12. Low dose CBCT reconstruction via prior contour based total variation (PCTV) regularization: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingxuan; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Yawei; Zhang, You; Ren, Lei

    2018-04-01

    Purpose: compressed sensing reconstruction using total variation (TV) tends to over-smooth the edge information by uniformly penalizing the image gradient. The goal of this study is to develop a novel prior contour based TV (PCTV) method to enhance the edge information in compressed sensing reconstruction for CBCT. Methods: the edge information is extracted from prior planning-CT via edge detection. Prior CT is first registered with on-board CBCT reconstructed with TV method through rigid or deformable registration. The edge contours in prior-CT is then mapped to CBCT and used as the weight map for TV regularization to enhance edge information in CBCT reconstruction. The PCTV method was evaluated using extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom, physical CatPhan phantom and brain patient data. Results were compared with both TV and edge preserving TV (EPTV) methods which are commonly used for limited projection CBCT reconstruction. Relative error was used to calculate pixel value difference and edge cross correlation was defined as the similarity of edge information between reconstructed images and ground truth in the quantitative evaluation. Results: compared to TV and EPTV, PCTV enhanced the edge information of bone, lung vessels and tumor in XCAT reconstruction and complex bony structures in brain patient CBCT. In XCAT study using 45 half-fan CBCT projections, compared with ground truth, relative errors were 1.5%, 0.7% and 0.3% and edge cross correlations were 0.66, 0.72 and 0.78 for TV, EPTV and PCTV, respectively. PCTV is more robust to the projection number reduction. Edge enhancement was reduced slightly with noisy projections but PCTV was still superior to other methods. PCTV can maintain resolution while reducing the noise in the low mAs CatPhan reconstruction. Low contrast edges were preserved better with PCTV compared with TV and EPTV. Conclusion: PCTV preserved edge information as well as reduced streak artifacts and noise in low dose CBCT reconstruction

  13. Study on human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yan; Wang Guangjun; Wang Juan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) from bone marrow pretreated with low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: The cells were the hBM-MSC. They were exposed to X rays at the dose of 50 mGy, 75 mGy, 100 mGy (dose rate 12.5 mGy/min). The growth curve, cell cycle and apoptosis of hBM-MSC treated by LDR were investigated. The content changes of stem cell factor(SCF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), macrophage colony stimulating factor(M-CSF) secreted by hBM-MSC after treated by LDR were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. Results: The growth rates of hBM-MSC treated by LDR obviously increase from 72 h. The cell cycle and apoptosis were examined with FORTRAN Atomatic Checkout Systom. The results show that the G 0 /G 1 stage cells decrease after exposure to LDR, the percent of G 0 /G 1 stage cells of 75 mGy at 72 h is the lowest(30.86%). However, the S stage cells percentage gradually increase at 48 h and 72 h. The most one is 75 mGy group at 72 h, which reaches to 68.88%. The apoptosis percentages have increased tendency at 24 h and 48h in all dose groups, especially in 100 mGy at 24 h(25.99%), while have decreased tendency at 72 h and the most decreased group is the 50 mGy(6.8%), transient enhancement of apoptosis in the early stage and soon being decreased. The contents of SCF have increased tendency at 24 h, 48 h. As for IL-6, the contents in different dose groups at 24 h and 48 h have up-regulation. These groups, 50 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 75 mGy at 24 h, 48 h, 100 mGy at 24 h have statistical difference compared with their control groups respectively. The content of IL-6 has greatest enhancement at dose of 50 mGy. The contents of M-SCF in all the groups at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h except for the 50 mGy dose at 72 h have also been found increased. The greatest increased content occur in the 75 mGy dose group at 72 h. Conclusion: This conclusion show that LDR has hormesis effect on hBM-MSC in cell growth, cell cycle and content

  14. Comparing Patient Satisfaction and Intubating Conditions Using Succinylcholine or Low-Dose Rocuronium for Rigid Bronchoscopy: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezel-Ahmadi, Verena; Ghezel-Ahmadi, David; Mangen, Jacques; Bolukbas, Servet; Welker, Andreas; Kuerschner, Veit Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Schirren, Joachim; Beck, Grietje

    2015-09-01

    Despite its serious side effects, succinylcholine is commonly used for neuromuscular relaxation in short procedures, such as rigid bronchoscopy and tracheobronchial interventions. The application of low-dose rocuronium reversed by low-dose sugammadex might be a modern alternative. The aim of this study was to compare patient satisfaction, incidence of postoperative myalgia (POM) as well as intubating conditions of these two muscle relaxants for rigid bronchoscopy. A single-center, prospective-randomized, blinded study of 95 patients, scheduled for rigid bronchoscopy and tracheobronchial intervention was conducted. The patients were anesthetized with propofol, remifentanil and either low-dose succinylcholine (S) (0.5 mg/kg) or low-dose rocuronium (0.25 mg/kg) with sugammadex (RS) (0.5 mg/kg). All patients were evaluated on the first and second postinterventional day for their satisfaction with the treatment (rigid bronchoscopy) using a Numeric Analog Rating Scale (NAS 0-10) and the presence and severity of POM (NAS 1-4). Intubating conditions were assessed as excellent, good, or poor on the basis of position of vocal cords and reaction to insertion of the rigid bronchoscope. Patients in the S group were less satisfied with the treatment than patients in RS group (72.7 vs. 93.7%, p = 0.007). The incidence of POM on the first day after intervention was significantly higher in the S group then in the RS group (56.9% vs. 4.3%, p rocuronium in 75% of patients. The anesthetic drug costs were significantly higher in the RS group then in the S group (p rocuronium provided better patient satisfaction and less POM. But with the use of low-dose succinylcholine, the intubating conditions are more comfortable, and it is less expensive than rocuronium/sugammadex. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. New method for the induction of therapeutic amenorrhea: low dose endometrial afterloading irradiation. Clinical and hormonal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronroos, M.; Turunen, T.; Raekallio, J.; Ruotsalinen, P.; Salmi, T. (Turku Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology)

    1982-08-01

    The authors present a new method for the induction of therapeutic amenorrhea: low dose endometrial afterloading irradiation. The problem with this method has been how to inactivate the endometrium while maintaining the physiological function of the ovaries. In 5/29 young patients regular or irregular bleedings occurred after an endometrial dose of 11+-1 Gy. These subjects were given a repeat low dose intrauterine irradiation. Thereafter no bleedings were found in four out of five patients. Two to 9 years after the repeat irradiation the plasma levels of E/sub 1/, E/sub 2/, FSH and LH corresponded closely to those of healthy women in reproductive age in three out of five patients; some high plasma P levels indicated ovulation. In two patients the E/sub 1/, E/sub 2/, and P values were more likely postmenopausal but, on the other hand, FSH and LH values reproductive ones. 19 refs.

  16. A new method for the induction of therapeutic amenorrhea: low dose endometrial afterloading irradiation. Clinical and hormonal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronroos, M.; Turunen, T.; Raekallio, J.; Ruotsalinen, P.; Salmi, T.

    1982-01-01

    The authors present a new method for the induction of therapeutic amenorrhea: low dose endometrial afterloading irradiation. The problem with this method has been how to inactivate the endometrium while maintaining the physiological function of the ovaries. In 5/29 young patients regular or irregular bleedings occurred after an endometrial dose of 11+-1 Gy. These subjects were given a repeat low dose intrauterine irradiation. Thereafter no bleedings were found in four out of five patients. Two to 9 years after the repeat irradiation the plasma levels of E 1 , E 2 , FSH and LH corresponded closely to those of healthy women in reproductive age in three out of five patients; some high plasma P levels indicated ovulation. In two patients the E 1 , E 2 , and P values were more likely postmenopausal but, on the other hand, FSH and LH values reproductive ones. (author)

  17. A study on mice exposure dose for low-dose gamma-irradiation using glass dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Son, Tae Gen; Kim, Jung Ki; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kang, Yeong Rok [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Sang Hee [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The low dose radiation is done for a long period, thus researchers have to know the exact dose distribution for the irradiated mouse. This research has been conducted in order to find out methods in transmitting an exact dose to mouse in a mouse irradiation experiment carried out using {sup 137}C{sub s} irradiation equipment installed in the DIRAMS (Dongnam Institution of Radiological and Medical Sciences) research center. We developed a single mouse housing cage and shelf with adjustable geometric factors such as distance and angle from collimator. The measurement of irradiated dose showed a maximal 42% difference of absorbed dose from the desired dose in the conventional irradiation system, whereas only 6% difference of the absorbed dose was measured in the self-developed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi mice housing showed much difference of the absorbed dose in between head and body, compared to single mouse housing in the conventional irradiation system. This research may allow further research about biological effect assessment for the low dose irradiation using the self-developed mouse apartment to provide more exact doses which it tries to transmit, and to have more reliability for the biological analysis results.

  18. Subchronic exposure to low-doses of the nerve agent VX: Physiological, behavioral, histopathological and neurochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch-Shilderman, Eugenia; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Egoz, Inbal; Raveh, Lily; Allon, Nahum; Grauer, Ettie; Gilat, Eran; Weissman, Ben Avi

    2008-01-01

    The highly toxic organophosphorous compound VX [O-ethyl-S-(isoporopylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate] undergoes an incomplete decontamination by conventional chemicals and thus evaporates from urban surfaces, e.g., pavement, long after the initial insult. As a consequence to these characteristics of VX, even the expected low levels should be examined for their potential to induce functional impairments including those associated with neuronal changes. In the present study, we developed an animal model for subchronic, low-dose VX exposure and evaluated its effects in rats. Animals were exposed to VX (2.25 μg/kg/day, 0.05 LD 50 ) for three months via implanted mini osmotic pumps. The rapidly attained continuous and marked whole-blood cholinesterase inhibition (∼ 60%), fully recovered 96 h post pump removal. Under these conditions, body weight, blood count and chemistry, water maze acquisition task, sensitivity to the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine, peripheral benzodiazepine receptors density and brain morphology as demonstrated by routine histopathology, remained unchanged. However, animals treated with VX showed abnormal initial response in an Open Field test and a reduction (∼ 30%) in the expression of the exocytotic synaptobrevin/vesicle associate membrane protein (VAMP) in hippocampal neurons. These changes could not be detected one month following termination of exposure. Our findings indicate that following a subchronic, low-level exposure to the chemical warfare agent VX some important processes might be considerably impaired. Further research should be addressed towards better understanding of its potential health ramifications and in search of optimal countermeasures

  19. Basic study on low dose radiation effect: SOD activity of immune organs and hemogram in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kaneko, Ichiro; Mizutani, Takeo; Nakano, Kazushiro; Edamatsu, Rei; Mori, Akitane.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of low dose radiation on SOD activities of immune organs such as thymus, spleen, bone marrow in rats and hematological findings changes. Animals were exposed to radiation in a wholebody fashion, 4 hours before sacrifice. SOD activities in thymus and bone marrow cells from the rats X-ray irradiated at doses of 0.25∼0.50 Gy/10 min were enhanced in comparison with those of non-irradiated rats. The enhancement was also observed in spleen cells obtained from group of rats irradiated at 0.05 Gy/10 min. Radiation exposure with over 0.50 Gy/10 min gave rats inhibitory responses in those immune organs. The changes in homogram were not observed with γ-ray exposure of less than 0.10 Gy/10 min. (author)

  20. Study of the effects of low-dose radiation and rhEGF on growth of cultured human epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jicheng; Zhao Xiaoyu; Sheng Weihua; Tang Zhongyi

    1998-01-01

    In authors' study, the method of taking skin sample, mincing and trypsinizing the sample are presented. The cells were inoculated on adherent membrane or, for sublethally injured 3T3 cells, in culture dish fed with Eargles' medium supplemented with fetal calf serum and various growth-stimulating factors. The cultures were incubated at 37 degree C in an atmosphere containing 5% CO 2 . The medium was changed every three days. The cultured cells became confluent in about two weeks. At the same time, low-dose-radiation and rhEGF were used to influence the growth of the epithelial cells and to test the effects of dosage and concentration. The results showed that low-dose-radiation in the conditions like authors' study could enhance the growth of human epithelial cells just like rhEGF, and it has synergetic effects with rhEGF. The mechanism is discussed

  1. Low-Dose Aspirin Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in Women with Diabetes: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Sun; Kornelius, Edy; Chiou, Jeng-Yuan; Lai, Yung-Rung; Lo, Shih-Chang; Peng, Chiung-Huei; Huang, Chien-Ning

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose aspirin is commonly used for preventing cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes, but its association with cancer remains controversial. This study used a nationwide population-based reimbursement database to investigate the relationship between low-dose aspirin use and breast cancer incidence in women with diabetes. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using data retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2011. Women diagnosed as having diabetes with low-dose aspirin use (75-165 mg daily) were identified as the study population, whereas those without low-dose aspirin use were selected as the comparison group. We analyzed 148,739 patients with diabetes. Their mean age (standard deviation) was 63.3 (12.8) years. A total of 27,378 patients were taking aspirin. Overall, the use of aspirin in patients with diabetes reduced the risk of breast cancer by 18% (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.94) after adjustment for potential confounders, namely age and comorbidities. Specifically, a cumulative dose of aspirin exceeding 88,900 mg was observed to reduce the risk of breast cancer by 47% (HR, 0.53, 95% CI, 0.43-0.67); however, low (aspirin did not reduce the risk of breast cancer. Our findings suggest that a cumulative aspirin dosage of more than 88,900 mg daily was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in women with diabetes. However, additional studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  2. Low-Dose Aspirin Discontinuation and Risk of Cardiovascular Events: A Swedish Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Johan; Hedberg, Jakob; Thuresson, Marcus; Aarskog, Pernilla; Johannesen, Kasper Munk; Oldgren, Jonas

    2017-09-26

    There are increasing concerns about risks associated with aspirin discontinuation in the absence of major surgery or bleeding. We investigated whether long-term low-dose aspirin discontinuation and treatment gaps increase the risk of cardiovascular events. We performed a cohort study of 601 527 users of low-dose aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in the Swedish prescription register between 2005 and 2009 who were >40 years of age, were free from previous cancer, and had ≥80% adherence during the first observed year of treatment. Cardiovascular events were identified with the Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers. The first 3 months after a major bleeding or surgical procedure were excluded from the time at risk. During a median of 3.0 years of follow-up, 62 690 cardiovascular events occurred. Patients who discontinued aspirin had a higher rate of cardiovascular events than those who continued (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-1.41), corresponding to an additional cardiovascular event observed per year in 1 of every 74 patients who discontinue aspirin. The risk increased shortly after discontinuation and did not appear to diminish over time. In long-term users, discontinuation of low-dose aspirin in the absence of major surgery or bleeding was associated with a >30% increased risk of cardiovascular events. Adherence to low-dose aspirin treatment in the absence of major surgery or bleeding is likely an important treatment goal. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis: experiences from a retrospective East German bicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis. Methods We assessed the medical records of 1037 patients with painful gonarthritis who had undergone low-dose radiotherapy between 1981 and 2008. The subjective patient perception of the response to irradiation as graded immediately or up to two months after the completion of a radiotherapy series was evaluated and correlated with age, gender, radiological grading and the duration of symptoms before radiotherapy. Moreover, we performed a mail survey to obtain additional long-term follow-up information and received one hundred and six evaluable questionnaires. Results We assessed 1659 series of radiotherapy in 1037 patients. In 79.3% of the cases the patients experienced a slight, marked or complete pain relief immediately or up to two months after the completion of radiotherapy. Gender, age and the duration of pain before radiotherapy did not have a significant influence on the response to irradiation. In contrast, severe signs of osteoarthritis were associated with more effective pain relief. In more than 50% of the patients who reported a positive response to irradiation a sustained period of symptomatic improvement was observed. Conclusions Our results confirm that low-dose radiotherapy is an effective treatment for painful osteoarthritis of the knee. In contrast to an earlier retrospective study, severe signs of osteoarthritis constituted a positive prognostic factor for the response to irradiation. A randomized trial is urgently required to compare radiotherapy with other treatment modalities. PMID:23369282

  4. A prospective, open-label study of low-dose total skin electron beam therapy in mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Specht, Lena; Skovgaard, Gunhild L

    2008-01-01

    causes and did not complete treatment. Acute side effects included desquamation, xerosis, and erythema of the skin. No severe side effects were observed. CONCLUSION: Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy can induce complete and partial responses in Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides; however, the duration......PURPOSE: To determine the effect of low-dose (4 Gy) total skin electron beam therapy as a second-line treatment of Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides in a prospective, open-label study. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Ten patients (6 men, 4 women, average age 68.7 years [range, 55-82 years......]) with histopathologically confirmed mycosis fungoides T2-T4 N0-N1 M0 who did not achieve complete remission or relapsed within 4 months after treatment with psoralen plus ultraviolet-A were included. Treatment consisted of low-dose total skin electron beam therapy administered at a total skin dose of 4 Gy given in 4...

  5. Efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis: experiences from a retrospective East German bicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Stephanie; Müller, Klaus; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Wolf, Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Guido; Liebmann, André; Micke, Oliver; Flemming, Gert; Baaske, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis. We assessed the medical records of 1037 patients with painful gonarthritis who had undergone low-dose radiotherapy between 1981 and 2008. The subjective patient perception of the response to irradiation as graded immediately or up to two months after the completion of a radiotherapy series was evaluated and correlated with age, gender, radiological grading and the duration of symptoms before radiotherapy. Moreover, we performed a mail survey to obtain additional long-term follow-up information and received one hundred and six evaluable questionnaires. We assessed 1659 series of radiotherapy in 1037 patients. In 79.3% of the cases the patients experienced a slight, marked or complete pain relief immediately or up to two months after the completion of radiotherapy. Gender, age and the duration of pain before radiotherapy did not have a significant influence on the response to irradiation. In contrast, severe signs of osteoarthritis were associated with more effective pain relief. In more than 50% of the patients who reported a positive response to irradiation a sustained period of symptomatic improvement was observed. Our results confirm that low-dose radiotherapy is an effective treatment for painful osteoarthritis of the knee. In contrast to an earlier retrospective study, severe signs of osteoarthritis constituted a positive prognostic factor for the response to irradiation. A randomized trial is urgently required to compare radiotherapy with other treatment modalities

  6. Efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis: experiences from a retrospective East German bicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis. Methods We assessed the medical records of 1037 patients with painful gonarthritis who had undergone low-dose radiotherapy between 1981 and 2008. The subjective patient perception of the response to irradiation as graded immediately or up to two months after the completion of a radiotherapy series was evaluated and correlated with age, gender, radiological grading and the duration of symptoms before radiotherapy. Moreover, we performed a mail survey to obtain additional long-term follow-up information and received one hundred and six evaluable questionnaires. Results We assessed 1659 series of radiotherapy in 1037 patients. In 79.3% of the cases the patients experienced a slight, marked or complete pain relief immediately or up to two months after the completion of radiotherapy. Gender, age and the duration of pain before radiotherapy did not have a significant influence on the response to irradiation. In contrast, severe signs of osteoarthritis were associated with more effective pain relief. In more than 50% of the patients who reported a positive response to irradiation a sustained period of symptomatic improvement was observed. Conclusions Our results confirm that low-dose radiotherapy is an effective treatment for painful osteoarthritis of the knee. In contrast to an earlier retrospective study, severe signs of osteoarthritis constituted a positive prognostic factor for the response to irradiation. A randomized trial is urgently required to compare radiotherapy with other treatment modalities.

  7. LOW DOSE RISK, DECISIONS, and RISK COMMUNICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low-dose exposures. Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low-dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell; Geijer, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  9. Can results from animal studies be used to estimate dose or low-dose effects in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    A method has been developed based on animal data which appears useful in predicting biological equilibrium level for radionuclides in humans. It is shown that measures of whole-body retention, plasma concentration, short-term toxicity and cancer incidence can be projected, at least in limited circumstances, for some elements and organic compounds. Some of the procedures used for extrapolation in other fields as well as those from radiobiology are reviewed, the similarity procedure developed discussed, and a review provided of some of the issues in low-dose-effect modelling and the extrapolation of those data to humans

  10. Epidemiologic study on respiratory cancer among miners with low dose radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comba, P.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the project is the study of specific mortality causes among Italian miners, with special reference to respiratory malignancies. The contrast between observed and expected mortality rates for lung cancer of miners exposed to different levels of radiation provide figures for estimating the number of extra cases of lung cancer per working level month and person years of exposure. The study included 1357 subjects, 60 of whom were lost to follow-up. The total number of deceased subjects was 527; for 30 of them it was not possible to ascertain the cause of death. (R.P.) 2 refs., 3 tabs

  11. Determination of Effect of Low Dose Vs Moderate Dose of Clofibrate on the Decreasing in Serum Bilirubin Level in the Term Healthy Neonate

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ashkan Moslehi; Narges Pishva

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to determine the effect of low doses (25 mg/Kg) vs. moderate doses (50 mg/Kg) of clofibrate in treatment of non-hemolytic hyperbilirubin¬emia in healthy term neonates. Material & Methods: A clinical randomized controlled trial was performed in three groups of healthy term neonates. One group was treated with a single low dose of clofibrate (25 mg/Kg) while another group received a single moderate dose (50mg/kg) both orally plus phototherapy; the results wer...

  12. Phase I study of low-dose metronomic temozolomide for recurrent malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Eric T.; Timmons, Joshua; Callahan, Amy; O’Loughlin, Lauren; Giarusso, Bridget; Alsop, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment goal for recurrent malignant gliomas centers on disease stabilization while minimizing therapy-related side effects. Metronomic dosing of cytotoxic chemotherapy has emerged as a promising option to achieve this objective. This phase I study was performed using metronomic temozolomide (mTMZ) at 25 or 50 mg/m 2 /day continuously in 42-day cycles. Correlative studies were incorporated using arterial spin labeling MRI to assess tumor blood flow, analysis of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 activities in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as surrogates for tumor angiogenesis and invasion, as well as determination of CSF soluble interleukin-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Rα) levels as a marker of immune modulation. Nine subjects were enrolled and toxicity consisted of primarily grade 1 or 2 hematological and gastrointestinal side effects; only one patient had a grade 3 elevated liver enzyme level that was reversible. Tumor blood flow was variable across subjects and time, with two experiencing a transient increase before a decrease to below baseline level while one exhibited a gradual drop in blood flow over time. MMP-2 activity correlated with overall survival but not with progression free survival, while MMP-9 activity did not correlate with either outcome parameters. Baseline CSF sIL-2Rα level was inversely correlated with time from initial diagnosis to first progression, suggesting that subjects with higher sIL-2Rα may have more aggressive disease. But they lived longer when treated with mTMZ, probably due to drug-related changes in T-cell constituency. mTMZ possesses efficacy against recurrent malignant gliomas by altering blood flow, slowing invasion and modulating antitumor immune function

  13. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  14. Changing of expression level of fas-antigen (CD95), cytokines synthesis and production after irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, N.M.; Solntceva, O.S.; Bytchkova, N.V.; Nikiforov, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that bone marrow progenitor (CD34+), tymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are most radiosensitive than other cell types. Even low doses of radiation induce apoptosis. The investigators suggest that it is possible relationship between synthesis and production of cytokines and apoptotic process. With the purpose to determine correlation between expression of Fas-antigen and synthesis of cytokines after low doses irradiation the experiments by irradiation PBL of healthy persons in vitro were held. Cells were X-irradiated by 12,5, 25 and 50 cGy. In consequence of the experiments increasing of Fas-antigen was revealed. This increasing correlated with changing in synthesis and production of cytokines. Also the Chernobyl's accident liquidators (CAL) were investigated. After comparison data in the group CAL (I) with data in the control group (II) increasing of Fas-antigen expression was revealed. Also in I group was discovered increasing of the cell number sinthesied interleukine-4 (IL-4) and interleukine-6 (IL-6). Interleukine-lβ (IL-1 β) producing pell were decreased. These changes have been correlated with degree of immunodeficiency at CAL. These data allow to consider the apoptosis as cell mechanism included in pathogenesis of diseases, which can be showed later long time after irradiation. (author)

  15. Long-term follow-up study of compensated low-dose 131I therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridama, V.; McCormick, M.; Kaplan, E.L.; Fauchet, R.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    We treated 187 patients who had Graves' disease with low-dose radioactive iodide ( 131 I), using a protocol that included a compensation for thyroid size. The incidence of early hypothyroidism (12 per cent) was acceptably low in the first year after 131 I treatment, but we found a cumulative high incidence (up to 76 per cent) at the end of the 11th year. In contrast, the incidence of permanent hypothyroidism was relatively stable in 166 surgically treated patients, increasing from 19 to 27 per cent at the end of 11 years. Among 122 medically treated patients, only 40 per cent entered remission, and hypothyroidism developed in 2 per cent during the same period of follow-up. The long-term incidence of hypothyroidism in our patients treated with low-dose 131 I therapy was much higher than that found in earlier studies using a comparable dose. Our study suggests that it will be difficult to modify therapy with 131 I alone to produce both early control of thyrotoxicosis and a low incidence of hypothyroidism

  16. Biochemical and molecular study of genetic stability in tomatoes plants rom seeds treated with low doses of X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R; Gonzalez, LM; Chavez, Licet; Camejo, Yanelis; Gonzalez, Maria C; Fernandez, Arais

    2008-01-01

    For the extensive agricultural exploitation of vegetable radio stimulation, it is indispensable to study the genetic stability of treated varieties, having in mind X ray potentialities of inducing not only physiological but genetic changes as well. Therefore, biochemical and molecular markers were employed in tomato plants derived from irradiated seeds at low doses of X rays. For the biochemical analysis, peroxidases, polyphenoloxidases and dismutase superoxide isoenzymes were determined whereas the Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method based on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was used for the molecular analysis. When comparing the electrophoretic patterns from the control and irradiated treatments applied to the three enzymatic systems, there were not appreciable variations on the number of bands and their intensities, indicating the little variability induced in these systems by the low X ray doses. Also, from the molecular viewpoint, electrophoretic patterns showed a clear amplification of DNA by generating a total of 155 bands in all varieties studied. This molecular marker showed a high monomorphism independently of the treatments applied, with values ranging between 86 and 97 %, indicating that irradiation at low doses did not induce an important genetic variability and confirming its possible practical usefulness for stimulating some physiological processes without causing. (Author)

  17. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijts, Charlotte M; Santegoets, Saskia J; Eertwegh, Alfons J van den; Pijpers, Laura S; Haanen, John B; Gruijl, Tanja D de; Verheul, Henk M; Vliet, Hans J van der

    2011-01-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part). In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus induced Treg expansion in patients with metastatic renal cell

  18. Phase I-II study of everolimus and low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijts Charlotte M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC who progressed on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, the orally administered mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been shown to prolong progression free survival. Intriguingly, inhibition of mTOR also promotes expansion of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs that can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses in a clinically relevant way in various tumor types including RCC. This study intends to investigate whether the antitumor efficacy of everolimus can be increased by preventing the detrimental everolimus induced expansion of Tregs using a metronomic schedule of cyclophosphamide. Methods/design This phase I-II trial is a national multi-center study of different doses and schedules of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in combination with a fixed dose of everolimus in patients with mRCC not amenable to or progressive after a VEGF-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor containing treatment regimen. In the phase I part of the study the optimal Treg-depleting dose and schedule of metronomic oral cyclophosphamide when given in combination with everolimus will be determined. In the phase II part of the study we will evaluate whether the percentage of patients progression free at 4 months of everolimus treatment can be increased from 50% to 70% by adding metronomic cyclophosphamide (in the dose and schedule determined in the phase I part. In addition to efficacy, we will perform extensive immune monitoring with a focus on the number, phenotype and function of Tregs, evaluate the safety and feasibility of the combination of everolimus and cyclophosphamide, perform monitoring of selected angiogenesis parameters and analyze everolimus and cyclophosphamide drug levels. Discussion This phase I-II study is designed to determine whether metronomic cyclophosphamide can be used to counter the mTOR inhibitor everolimus

  19. Neuropsychological effects of chronic low-dose exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klett Martin

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to indoor air of private or public buildings contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs has raised health concerns in long-term users. This exploratory neuropsychological group study investigated the potential adverse effects of chronic low-dose exposure to specific air-borne low chlorinated PCBs on well-being and behavioral measures in adult humans. Methods Thirty employees exposed to indoor air contaminated with PCBs from elastic sealants in a school building were compared to 30 non-exposed controls matched for education and age, controlling for gender (age range 37–61 years. PCB exposure was verified by external exposure data and biological monitoring (PCB 28, 101, 138, 153, 180. Subjective complaints, learning and memory, executive function, and visual-spatial function was assessed by standardized neuropsychological testing. Since exposure status depended on the use of contaminated rooms, an objectively exposed subgroup (N = 16; PCB 28 = 0.20 μg/l; weighted exposure duration 17.9 ± 7 years was identified and compared with 16 paired controls. Results Blood analyses indicated a moderate exposure effect size (d relative to expected background exposure for total PCB (4.45 ± 2.44 μg/l; d = 0.4. A significant exposure effect was found for the low chlorinated PCBs 28 (0.28 ± 0.25 μg/l; d = 1.5 and 101 (0.07 ± 0.09 μg/l; d = 0.7. Although no neuropsychological effects exceeded the adjusted significance level, estimation statistics showed elevated effect sizes for several variables. The objectively exposed subgroup showed a trend towards increased subjective attentional and emotional complaints (tiredness and slowing of practical activities, emotional state as well as attenuated attentional performance (response shifting and alertness in a cued reaction task. Conclusion Chronic inhalation of low chlorinated PCBs that involved elevated blood levels was associated with a subtle attenuation of emotional well

  20. Metformin as an initial adjunct to low-dose liraglutide enhances the weight-decreasing potential of liraglutide in obese polycystic ovary syndrome: Randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensterle, Mojca; Goricar, Katja; Janez, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    Liraglutide (LIRA) treatment is associated with the dose-dependent reduction of weight. Higher doses are more effective than lower doses, although higher doses are also more poorly tolerated. Metformin may enhance the weight-lowering potential of LIRA via the stimulatory modulation of incretin in addition to its direct beneficial effects in PCOS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether metformin as an adjunct to low-dose LIRA affects body weight with increased efficacy compared with low-dose LIRA alone in obese patients with PCOS. In a 12-week study, 44 obese women with PCOS were randomly offered either combined treatment (COMBO) with 1,000 mg metformin twice a day and 1.2 mg LIRA once a day, or treatment with 1.2 mg LIRA alone. The primary outcome of treatment was an alteration in the levels of obesity. A total of 43 patients [aged 30.3±4.4 years; body mass index (BMI) 37.2±4.5 kg/m 2 ; mean ± standard deviation] completed the study. The subjects treated with COMBO lost on average 6.2±2.4 kg compared with a 3.8±3.5 kg weight loss in the patients treated with LIRA alone (P=0.024). The BMI decreased by 2.2±0.8 kg/m 2 in patients treated with COMBO and by 1.4±1.2 kg/m 2 in patients treated with LIRA alone (P=0.024). A clinically significant ≥5% weight reduction was achieved in 59.1% of patients treated with COMBO and 42.9% of patients treated with LIRA alone. Reductions in glucose levels following oral glucose tolerance testing, as well as in androstenedione levels in the COMBO group were significantly greater compared with those in the LIRA group. The side effects were mild and transient in the two treatment groups. A combination of metformin and low-dose LIRA was more effective than low-dose LIRA alone in reducing body weight in obese patients with PCOS.

  1. Study of dose effect relationship at low doses for non quantitative reactions of skin intestinal mucosa and lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutreix, J.; Wambersie, A.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the biological reactions observed in animal experiments or in clinical studies are non quantitative and they only allow assessing an inequality between the effects produced by different irradiations. The method used in non quantitative studies is actually based on the relative contribution of irreparable events and reparable to the cell killing. It provides for the cell population involved in non quantitative biological effects some data which can be expressed in term of a cell survival curve. Such data can be useful in Radiation therapy particularly for maximizing the difference between biological effects by a proper choice of the fraction size. The initial part of the cell survival curve, within the range of doses actually used appears to be a straight exponential. This should allow the extrapolation to very low doses in the range of interest to Radiation Protection

  2. Experimental study on active specific immunotherapy utilizing the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Imanaka, Kazufumi; Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Kimura, Shuji

    1982-01-01

    We have already reported the remarkable effect of the active specific immunotherapy utilizing cryopreserved tumor cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells prepared from a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue after cytoreductive radiotherapy. In the present study, the effect of a biological response modifier, OK-432 combined with this active specific immunotherapy was investigated. Twelve-week-aged female C3H/He mice transplanted with MM46 tumor cells were received local radiotherapy with the dose of 3,000 rads by high energy electron beam on the sixth day after inoculation. This active specific immunotherapy was performed on the thirteenth day, and daily dose of 1.0 KE of OK-432 was injected intraperitoneally from the thirteenth day to the seventeenth day. The inhibition of the tumor growth was observed in the group which received this active specific immunotherapy combined with a biological response modifier, OK-432 compared with that received this active specific immunotherapy alone. (author)

  3. Experimental study on active specific immunotherapy utilizing the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Kazufumi; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Kimura, Shuji

    1982-01-01

    We have already reported that the effectiveness of active specific immunotherapy using low-dose irradiated tumor cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of non-specific immunopotentiator combined with the active specific immunotherapy. Twelve-week-aged female C3H/He mice transplanted with MM46 tumor were received local radiotherapy with the dose of 3,000 rads by high energy electron beam on the sixth day after inoculation. Active specific immunotherapy was performed on the 13th day, and daily dose of 1.0 KE of OK-432 was injected intraperitoneally from the 13th day to the 17th day. The inhibition of the tumor growth and the elongation of survival period were noted in the group which received active specific immunotherapy combined with non-specific immunopotentiator, OK-432 compared with that active specific immunotherapy alone. (author)

  4. Experimental study on active specific immunotherapy utilizing the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Kazufumi; Tanaka, Koji; Sasai, Keisuke

    1984-01-01

    We have already reported the effectiveness of active specific immunotherapy based on the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue. In the present study, three kinds of immunotherapeutic methods subdivided by used cells were performed in order to compare each effectiveness. C3H/He mice bearing MM 46 tumor transplanted in the right hind paws received local irradiation with the dose of 3,000 rad on the 6th day, and the above-mentioned three methods, using tumor cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells combining lymphocytes which were all separated from the topical tumor tissue exposed to 2,000 rad, were applied respectively on the 14 th day. The most effective data were obtained from two groups treated by the immunotherapy with tumor cells combining lymphocytes, which virtually caused the longest survival and best tumor growth control. (author)

  5. Milk production and distribution in low-dose counties for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmel, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report identifies sources of milk consumed by residents of Ferry, Okanogan, and Stevens Counties. This information will be used by the Hanford thyroid Disease Study to determine whether thyroid disease has been increased among people exposed to past iodine--131 emissions from Hanford Site Facilities

  6. Cytogenetic studies in persons, professionally exposed to low doses ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanova, M.; Ivanov, B.; Khristova, M.; Praskova, L.; Mikhajlov, M.; Dovev, I.

    1981-01-01

    Cytogenetic techniques were used to examine peripheral lymphocytes taken from 33 subjects employed at the IRT-2000-Sofia Nuclear Reactor and exposed to mixed gamma and neutron radiation in its Zone A. Physical dosimetry data (from pen and film personnel dosimeters) showed the exposures to be below maximum permissible levels, in complience with Radiation Safety Norms in the P.R. of Bulgaria (1972). The subjects were distributed into three groups according to the length of their occupational experience as radiation workers. Comparisons were made with cytogenetic findings in the lymphocyte cultures taken from 30 subjects with no occupational radiation exposure. Radiation workers exhibited a significant increase in chromosomal damage of the chromosome and chromatid type. Subjects with 5-10 years of occupational experience had a higher degree of chromosomal damage than the less-than-5-years group. For persons with more than 10 years of occupational experience, however, no increase over controls could be ascertained in percentage of chromosomal damage. When radiation workers were re-distributed in accord with the exposures received, it was evident that the effect increased with the accumulated dose, the group with about 0.02 Sievert having nearly twice the aberrant cell percentage for the 0.01 Sievert group. In the group of up to 0.05 Sievert, the percentage of aberrant cells was in the order of that observed after exposure to 0.02 Sievert. From the findings in the analysis, radiation quality seemed to play no part in enliciting the cytogenetic response of peripheral lymphocytes. (A.B.)

  7. Significance of studies of low-dose radiation fallout in the western United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    The sum of evidence from these studies about the effects of nuclear testing is extremely modest. Lack of good dose information precluded any valuable scientific conclusions. The evidence indicating excesses of leukemia incidence beyond what would already be accepted as the leukemogenic effect of ionizing radiation is fragile. Similarly, the evidence presumed to indicate the absence of thyroid effects is unpersuasive, actually showing a weak but positive effect

  8. Preliminary study for development of low dose radiation shielding material using liquid silicon and metallic compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seo Goo; Lee, Sung Soo [Dept. of Medical Science, Graduate School of Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul [Div. of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Jin [SoonChunHyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sung Wook [Graduate school of SeJong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study measured and compared the protective clothing using Pb used for shielding in a diagnostic X-ray energy range, and the shielding rates of X-ray fusion shielding materials using Si and TiO{sub 2}. For the experiment, a pad type shielding with a thickness of 1 mm was prepared by mixing Si-TiO{sub 2}, and the X-ray shielding rate was compared with 0.5 mmPb plate of The shielding rate of shielding of 0.5 mmPb plate 95.92%, 85.26 % based on the case of no shielding under each 60kVp, 100kVp tube voltage condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 11 mm or more, and the shielding rate of 100% or more was confirmed at a thickness of 13 nn in 60kVp condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 17 mm or more, and a shielding rate of 0.5 mmPb plate was observed at a thickness of 23 mm in 100kVp condition. Through the results of this study, We could confirm the possibility of manufacturing radiation protective materials that does not contain lead hazard using various metallic compound and liquid Si. This study shows that possibility of liquid Si and other metallic compound can harmonize easily. Beside, It is flexible and strong to physical stress than Pb obtained radiation protective clothes. But additional studies are needed to increase the shielding rate and reduce the weight.

  9. Low-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Breast CT Using Spectral Shaping Filters: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Iodinated contrast-enhanced X-ray imaging of the breast has been studied with various modalities, including full-field digital mammography (FFDM), digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and dedicated breast CT. Contrast imaging with breast CT has a number of advantages over FFDM and DBT, including the lack of breast compression, and generation of fully isotropic 3-D reconstructions. Nonetheless, for breast CT to be considered as a viable tool for routine clinical use, it would be desirable to reduce radiation dose. One approach for dose reduction in breast CT is spectral shaping using X-ray filters. In this paper, two high atomic number filter materials are studied, namely, gadolinium (Gd) and erbium (Er), and compared with Al and Cu filters currently used in breast CT systems. Task-based performance is assessed by imaging a cylindrical poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom with iodine inserts on a benchtop breast CT system that emulates clinical breast CT. To evaluate detectability, a channelized hoteling observer (CHO) is used with sums of Laguerre-Gauss channels. It was observed that spectral shaping using Er and Gd filters substantially increased the dose efficiency (defined as signal-to-noise ratio of the CHO divided by mean glandular dose) as compared with kilovolt peak and filter settings used in commercial and prototype breast CT systems. These experimental phantom study results are encouraging for reducing dose of breast CT, however, further evaluation involving patients is needed.

  10. Does Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection with Low-Dose Lidocaine Cause Objective Upper Extremity Weakness? A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Zachary L; Nelson, Ariana; Kendall, Mark C; McCarthy, Robert J; Nagpal, Geeta; Walega, David R

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose local anesthetic is often used in cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (CIESI), yet its effect on upper extremity strength has not been studied. The presence of consequent weakness has potential implications for postprocedure safety. This study aimed to determine whether low-dose lidocaine in a C7-T1 CIESI causes objective weakness. Prospective case series. Academic pain center. Adults, cervical radicular pain. Participants underwent CIESI with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine (3 mL total injectate). Elbow flexion (EF), wrist extension (WE), elbow extension (EE), and handgrip strength were measured by dynamometry at baseline, 15 minutes, and 30 minutes postinjection. Changes in strength from baseline and the proportion of participants with a minimum perceptible change in EF, WE, EE, and handgrip strength (≥20%) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Twenty-seven participants were included. At 15 and 30 minutes postinjection, there was no within-participant difference in EF, WE, EE, and handgrip strength from baseline overall. Nonetheless, five (19%, 95% CI = 4-33) of the participants demonstrated a 20% or greater strength decrease in at least one myotomal distribution. A 20% or greater decrease in strength was present in left EF 4% (95% CI = 0-11%), right EF 7% (95% CI = 0-17%), left WE 4% (95% CI = 0-11%), and right WE 7% (95% CI = 0-17%). The present data suggest that CIESI with an injectate volume of 3 mL that includes 1 mL of 1% lidocaine may result in objective upper extremity weakness that is above the minimum threshold of perception in a subset of patients. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. An experimental study on the low-dose radiosensitivity of tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Sook; Koh, Kwang Joon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to aid in the radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients. For this study, radiation survival curves were generated for B16, MG-63 and YAC-1 cell lines using semiautomated MTT assay and Dye Exclusion Assay. Irradiation of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Gy were delivered at room temperature at a dose rate of 210.2 cGy/min using 60 COγ-ray irradiator ALDORADO 8. The viable cells were determined for each radiation dose and compared to control values. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The was significantly different absorbance at 10 Gy on B16 cell line in MTT assay (P<0.05). 2. There was significantly different absorbance at 4, 6, 8, 10 Gy on MG-63 cell line in MTT assay (P<0.05). 3. YAC-1 cell line was more sensitive than B16 or MG-63 cell line to all doses of radiation (P<0.05). 4. There was significantly different absorbance among all tumor cell lines except between B16 and MG-63 cell line at 2 Gy in MTT assay (P<0.05). 5. Good correlation was obtained between MTT assay and DEA (P<0.05). The efficient of correlation of B16, MG-63 and YAC-1 cell line was 0.845-0.824 and 0.906, respectively.

  12. Influence of warfarin and low-dose aspirin on the outcomes of geriatric patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage resulting from ground-level fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Nakatsukasa, Masashi; Miyatake, Satoru; Hirose, Yuichi

    2012-10-01

    Ground-level fall is the most common cause of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (TICH) in the elderly, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in that population. A retrospective study was carried out to evaluate whether the use of warfarin/low-dose aspirin (LDA) is predictive of unfavorable outcomes in geriatric patients who sustain a fall-induced TICH. Charts of 76 geriatric patients (≥ 65 years-of-age) with fall-induced TICH were reviewed. The number of patients taking warfarin and LDA was 12 and 21, respectively, whereas the other 43 took neither medication (non-user group). The frequency of patients with unfavorable outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 1-3) at discharge was calculated. Furthermore, variables predictive of unfavorable outcomes were identified by logistic regression analysis. The frequency of patients with unfavorable outcomes was 75% in the warfarin group, 33% in the LDA group and 27% in the non-user group, respectively. The risk of having unfavorable outcomes was significantly higher in the warfarin group compared with the LDA group (P = 0.03) and non-user group (P fall-induced TICH. The risk of TICH should be communicated properly to elderly taking warfarin. The information might be important not only to trauma surgeons who take care of injured elderly, but also to geriatric physicians who prescribe warfarin/LDA to them. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. Effect of cyclic, low dose pyrimethamine treatment in patients with Late Onset Tay Sachs: an open label, extended pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osher, Etty; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Sagie, Liora; Urshanski, Nataly; Sagiv, Nadav; Peleg, Leah; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Zimran, Ari; Elstein, Deborah; Navon, Ruth; Valevski, Avi; Stern, Naftali

    2015-04-17

    Late Onset Tay- Sachs disease (LOTS) is a rare neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease which results from mutations in the gene encoding the α subunit (HEXA) of β-hexosaminidase enzyme (HexA). At the present time, no effective treatment exists for LOTS and other neurodegenerative diseases involving the central nerve system (CNS). Pyrimethamine (PMT) was previously shown to act as a HexA chaperone in human fibroblasts in vitro carrying some (e.g., αG269S), but not all LOTS-related mutations. The present study assessed the effect of cyclic, low dose and long term pyrimethamine treatment on HexA in subjects with LOTS. In an open label trial in 4 LOTS patients, PMT was initiated at an average daily dose of ~2.7 mg and administered cyclically guided by blood lymphocyte HexA activity for a mean duration of 82.8 (±22.5; SD) weeks (~1.5 year). HexA activity rose in all subjects, with a mean peak increase of 2.24 folds (±0.52; SD) over baseline activity (range 1.87-3). The mean treatment time required to attain this peak was of 15.7 (±4.8; SD) weeks. Following increase in activity, HexA gradually declined with the continued use of PMT, which was then stopped, resulting in the return of HexA activity to baseline. A second cycle of PMT treatment was then initiated, resulting again in an increase in HexA activity. Three of the patients experienced a measurable neuropsychiatric deterioration whereas one subject remained entirely stable. Cyclic low dose of PMT can increase HexA activity in LOTS patients. However, the observed increase is repeatedly transient and not associated with discernible beneficial neurological or psychiatric effects.

  14. Single cell low dose studies of bystander cell killing with targeted ultrasoft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schettino, G.; Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Michael, B.D.; Wu, L.; Held, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Bystander responses have attracted considerable interest in the recent years and several investigations have reported a binary behavior with the effect triggered by very small doses and immediately reaching a plateau. The Ultrasoft X-ray Microprobe in operation at the GCI is a facility designed to precisely assess the biological response of individual cells in vitro irradiated with a sub-micron size X-ray beam . Although recent improvements have upgrade the facility with AlK and TiK X-rays, most of the bystander studies have been performed using CK X-rays of 278 eV. The high sensitivity and the accurate irradiation and revisiting of the individual samples allowed us to investigate specific characteristics of the bystander phenomenon. In particular, evidences of a dose dependency of cell killing by bystander effect have been found at doses below 0.2 Gy where no differences is observed between all cell and single cell irradiation. Recent improvements have also allowed us to individually identify the phase of the cell cycle of all samples exposed. Although the G2-S phase have been found the most sensitive in responding to the bystander signal (a factor of 1.3), cells in the G1 phase also respond significantly while the phase of the irradiated cell doesn't seem to play a critical role. The time scale of the bystander effect has also been investigated by irradiating the same sample(s) twice with a few hours gap between exposures. Results indicate that the bystander signal is transmitted within a few minutes from the irradiation as replacing the medium immediately after irradiation does not influence the response, and it doesn't depend on the number of cells irradiated (up to 5). However, after a resting time of a few hours (3 h), the system seems to reset itself and a second irradiation has been shown to trigger a further bystander effect. Finally, by considering the total amount of energy deposited in to the sample population as critical parameter (instead

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  17. Experimental study of low dose radiation stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan; Yang Shun; Zhang Ye; Zhang Mingzhi; Jiang Jiagui; Jiang Jianping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if low dose radiation can stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation in mice. Methods: Bone marrow cells were irradiated in vitro by different low dose radiation and then cultured in vitro. 3 H-TdR incorporation was used to measure the reproductive activity of cells, and then the radiation dose with the best stimulating effect was determined. The donator myeloid cells were exposed to low dose radiation before the recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation; then the irradiated myeloid cells were infused to the recipient; and lastly, the counts of peripheral blood cells (PBC) and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were monitored in order to observe the effect of low dose radiation on haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient animal after bone marrow transplantation. Results: The reproductive activity of the bone marrow cells irradiated by 6 and 8 cGy could be improved significantly in vitro. When the recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation of the myeloid cells after low dose radiation, the counts of BMMNC and PBC were higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Low dose radiation can stimulate the haematogenesis reconstitution of the recipient after bone marrow transplantation. (authors)

  18. Risk of solid cancer in low dose-rate radiation epidemiological studies and the dose-rate effectiveness factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Roy; Walsh, Linda; Azizova, Tamara; Rühm, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Estimated radiation risks used for radiation protection purposes have been based primarily on the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors who received brief exposures at high dose rates, many with high doses. Information is needed regarding radiation risks from low dose-rate (LDR) exposures to low linear-energy-transfer (low-LET) radiation. We conducted a meta-analysis of LDR epidemiologic studies that provide dose-response estimates of total solid cancer risk in adulthood in comparison to corresponding LSS risks, in order to estimate a dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). We identified 22 LDR studies with dose-response risk estimates for solid cancer after minimizing information overlap. For each study, a parallel risk estimate was derived from the LSS risk model using matching values for sex, mean ages at first exposure and attained age, targeted cancer types, and accounting for type of dosimetric assessment. For each LDR study, a ratio of the excess relative risk per Gy (ERR Gy -1 ) to the matching LSS ERR risk estimate (LDR/LSS) was calculated, and a meta-analysis of the risk ratios was conducted. The reciprocal of the resultant risk ratio provided an estimate of the DREF. The meta-analysis showed a LDR/LSS risk ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14, 0.57) for the 19 studies of solid cancer mortality and 0.33 (95% CI 0.13, 0.54) when three cohorts with only incidence data also were added, implying a DREF with values around 3, but statistically compatible with 2. However, the analyses were highly dominated by the Mayak worker study. When the Mayak study was excluded the LDR/LSS risk ratios increased: 1.12 (95% CI 0.40, 1.84) for mortality and 0.54 (95% CI 0.09, 0.99) for mortality + incidence, implying a lower DREF in the range of 1-2. Meta-analyses that included only cohorts in which the mean dose was LDR data provide direct evidence regarding risk from exposures at low dose rates as an important complement to the LSS risk estimates used

  19. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  20. Basal and meal-stimulated ghrelin, PYY, CCK levels and satiety in lean women with polycystic ovary syndrome: effect of low-dose oral contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arusoglu, Gulcan; Koksal, Gulden; Cinar, Nese; Tapan, Serkan; Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Yildiz, Bulent O

    2013-11-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide that stimulates food intake, whereas peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are anorexigenic gut hormones. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) appear to have alterations in appetite regulation. We aimed to determine whether fasting or meal-stimulated ghrelin, PYY, CCK, and satiety responses are different between lean PCOS patients and healthy women. We also aimed to assess the potential effect of oral contraceptive use on these hormones and satiety response. We conducted a prospective observational study in a university practice. Eighteen lean PCOS patients and 18 healthy control women matched for age and body mass index underwent measurements of circulating ghrelin, PYY, CCK, and satiety index (SI) before and after a standardized mixed meal at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes. For PCOS patients who were treated with ethinyl estradiol 30 μg/drospirenone 3 mg for 3 months, measurements were repeated. We measured ghrelin, PYY, and CCK levels and SI. At baseline, fasting ghrelin, PYY, CCK, and SI values in PCOS patients were not different from controls. Meal-stimulated PYY, CCK, and SI were also not different between the groups, whereas PCOS patients had significantly lower meal-stimulated ghrelin levels compared to controls (P = .04). Ghrelin, PYY, CCK, and SI did not show a significant change after treatment with ethinyl estradiol/drospirenone for 3 months. Basal and stimulated hunger and satiety hormones in lean PCOS patients are not different from lean healthy women, except for a lower meal-stimulated ghrelin response. Short-term use of a low-dose oral contraceptive does not have an effect on appetite regulation of PCOS.

  1. New use of low-dose aspirin and risk of colorectal cancer by stage at diagnosis: a nested case-control study in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rodríguez, Luis A; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; Bromley, Susan; Lanas, Angel; Cea Soriano, Lucía

    2017-09-07

    Evidence from clinical trial populations suggests low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Part of this reduction in risk might be due to protection against metastatic disease. We investigated the risk of CRC among new-users of low-dose aspirin (75-300 mg), including risk by stage at diagnosis. Using The Health Improvement Network, we conducted a cohort study with nested case-control analysis. Two cohorts (N = 170,336 each) aged 40-89 years from 2000 to 2009 and free of cancer were identified: i) new-users of low-dose aspirin, ii) non-users of low-dose aspirin, at start of follow-up, matched by age, sex and previous primary care practitioner visits. Patients were followed for up to 12 years to identify incident CRC. 10,000 frequency-matched controls were selected by incidence density sampling where the odds ratio is an unbiased estimator of the incidence rate ratio (RR). RRs with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Low-dose aspirin use was classified 'as-treated' independent from baseline exposure status to account for changes in exposure during follow-up. Current users of low-dose aspirin (use on the index date or in the previous 90 days) had a significantly reduced risk of CRC, RR 0.66 (95% CI 0.60-0.74). The reduction in risk was apparent across all age groups, and was unrelated to dose, indication, gender, CRC location or case-fatality status. Reduced risks occurred throughout treatment duration and with all low-dose aspirin doses. RRs by aspirin indication were 0.71 (0·63-0·79) and 0.60 (0.53-0.68) for primary and secondary cardiovascular protection, respectively. Among cases with staging information (n = 1421), RRs for current use of low-dose aspirin were 0.94 (0.66-1.33) for Dukes Stage A CRC, 0.54 (0.42-0.68) for Dukes B, 0.71 (0.56-0.91) for Dukes C, and 0.60 (0.48-0.74) for Dukes D. After 5 years' therapy, the RR for Dukes Stage A CRC was 0.53 (0.24-1.19). Patients starting low-dose aspirin therapy have a reduced

  2. Quantitative and informatics tools for studying the effect of low dose radiation on tissue and cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvin, B.; Yang, Q.; Fontenay, G.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The challenge of the post-genomic era is functional genomics, i.e., understanding how the genome is expressed to produce myriad cell phenotypes. To use genomic information to understand the biology of complex organisms, one must understand the dynamics of phenotype generation and maintenance. A phenotype is the result of selective expression of the genome. In order to define cell 'phenomes,' one would track the kinetics and quantities of multiple constituent proteins, their cellular context and morphological features in large populations. Our aim is to extend the development of the BioSig imaging bioinformatics system for understanding how ionizing radiation alters tissue homeostasis and responses in cell culture experiments. Given several thousand antibodies and reagents for differentiating cell-specific protein components, biological heterogeneity, and other variables that affect cellular responses, there is a clear requirements for managing images and information about these images. Our focus is on the development of (1) quantitative methods for protein expression either in tissue or cell culture studies, (2) a adequate data model that couples quantitative results with the experimental variables, and (3) browsing and visualization tools that enable exploration of large scale image data in feature space in the context of biological heterogeneity. The framework provides the basis for studying the effect of low-dose radiation on the cellular microenvironment, inter-cell communication, and the underlying mechanisms. In turn, this information can then be used to more accurately predict more complex multicellular biological responses following exposure to different types of inhibitors. The BioSig informatics approach to microscopy and quantitative image analysis has been used to build a more detailed picture of the signaling that occurs between cells, as a result of an exogenous stimulus such as radiation, or as a consequence of endogenous programs leading

  3. A prospective cohort study on sustained effects of low-dose ecstasy use on the brain in new ecstasy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Win, Maartje M L; Reneman, Liesbeth; Jager, Gerry; Vlieger, Erik-Jan P; Olabarriaga, Sílvia D; Lavini, Cristina; Bisschops, Ivo; Majoie, Charles B L M; Booij, Jan; den Heeten, Gerard J; van den Brink, Wim

    2007-02-01

    It is debated whether ecstasy use has neurotoxic effects on the human brain and what the effects are of a low dose of ecstasy use. We prospectively studied sustained effects (>2 weeks abstinence) of a low dose of ecstasy on the brain in ecstasy-naive volunteers using a combination of advanced MR techniques and self-report questionnaires on psychopathology as part of the NeXT (Netherlands XTC Toxicity) study. Outcomes of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and questionnaires on depression, impulsivity, and sensation seeking were compared in 30 subjects (12M, 21.8+/-3.1 years) in two sessions before and after first ecstasy use (1.8+/-1.3 tablets). Interval between baseline and follow-up was on average 8.1+/-6.5 months and time between last ecstasy use and follow-up was 7.7+/-4.4 weeks. Using 1H-MRS, no significant changes were observed in metabolite concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), and creatine (Cr), nor in ratios of NAA, Cho, and mI relative to Cr. However, ecstasy use was followed by a sustained 0.9% increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontoparietal white matter, a 3.4% decrease in apparent diffusion (ADC) in the thalamus and a sustained decrease in relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) in the thalamus (-6.2%), dorsolateral frontal cortex (-4.0%), and superior parietal cortex (-3.0%) (all significant at pecstasy users, although effect sizes were limited and clinical relevance questionable. As no indications were found for structural neuronal damage with the currently used techniques, our data do not support the concern that incidental ecstasy use leads to extensive axonal damage. However, sustained decreases in rrCBV and ADC values may indicate that even low ecstasy doses can induce prolonged vasoconstriction in some brain areas, although it is not known whether this effect is permanent. Additional studies are needed to

  4. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James

    2002-01-01

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation

  5. Low-Dose and Standard-Dose Unenhanced Helical Computed Tomography for the Assessment of Acute Renal Colic: Prospective Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Hwang, Im Kyung; Choi, Yo Won; Namkung, Sook; Kim, Heung Cheol; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Choi, Kuk Myung; Park, Ji Kang; Han, Tae Il; Kang, Weechang [Cheju National Univ. College of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of low-dose and standard-dose computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of ureteral stones. Material and Methods: Unenhanced helical CT was performed with both a standard dose (260 mAs, pitch 1.5) and a low dose (50 mAs, pitch 1.5) in 121 patients suspected of having acute renal colic. The two studies were prospectively and independently interpreted for the presence and location of ureteral stones, abnormalities unrelated to stone disease, identification of secondary signs, i.e. hydronephrosis and perinephric stranding, and tissue rim sign. The standard-dose CT images were interpreted by one reviewer and the low-dose CT images independently by two reviewers unaware of the standard-dose CT findings. The findings of the standard and low-dose CT scans were compared with the exact McNemar test. Interobserver agreements were assessed with kappa analysis. The effective radiation doses resulting from two different protocols were calculated by means of commercially available software to which the Monte-Carlo phantom model was given. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of standard-dose CT for detecting ureteral stones were 99%, 93%, and 98%, respectively, whereas for the two reviewers the sensitivity of low-dose CT was 93% and 95%, specificity 86%, and accuracy 92% and 94%. We found no significant differences between standard-dose and low-dose CT in the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing ureter stones ( P >0.05 for both). However, the sensitivity of low-dose CT for detection of 19 stones less than or equal to 2 mm in diameter was 79% and 68%, respectively, for the two reviewers. Low-dose CT was comparable to standard-dose CT in visualizing hydronephrosis and the tissue rim sign. Perinephric stranding was far less clear on low-dose CT. Low-dose CT had the same diagnostic performance as standard-dose CT in diagnosing alternative diseases. Interobserver agreement between the two low-dose CT reviewers in the diagnosis of

  6. Low dose irradiation reduces cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation stimulate development, growth, memory, sensual acuity, fecundity, and immunity (Luckey, T.D., ''Radiation Hormesis'', CRC Press, 1991). Increased immune competence reduces cancer mortality rates and provides increased average lifespan in animals. Decreased cancer mortality rates in atom bomb victims who received low dose irradiation makes it desirable to examine populations exposed to low dose irradiation. Studies with over 300,000 workers and 7 million person-years provide a valid comparison of radiation exposed and control unclear workers (Luckey, T.D., Nurture with Ionizing Radiation, Nutrition and Cancer, 34:1-11, 1999). Careful selection of controls eliminated any ''healthy worker effect''. The person-year corrected average indicated the cancer mortality rate of exposed workers was only 51% that of control workers. Lung cancer mortality rates showed a highly significant negative correlation with radon concentrations in 272,000 U.S. homes (Cohen, B.L., Health Physics 68:157-174, 1995). In contrast, radon concentrations showed no effect on lung cancer rates in miners from different countries (Lubin, J.H. Am. J. Epidemiology 140:323-332, 1994). This provides evidence that excessive lung cancer in miners is caused by particulates (the major factor) or toxic gases. The relative risk for cancer mortality was 3.7% in 10,000 Taiwanese exposed to low level of radiation from 60 Co in their steel supported homes (Luan, Y.C. et al., Am. Nuclear Soc. Trans. Boston, 1999). This remarkable finding needs further study. A major mechanism for reduced cancer mortality rates is increased immune competence; this includes both cell and humoral components. Low dose irradiation increases circulating lymphocytes. Macrophage and ''natural killer'' cells can destroy altered (cancer) cells before the mass becomes too large. Low dose irradiation also kills suppressor T-cells; this allows helper T-cells to activate killer cells and antibody producing cells

  7. Studies on the effect of low dose gamma irradiation on the chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of squid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojayanaik, Manjanaik; Naroth, Kavya; Shetty, Veena; Hiriyur, Somashekarappa

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the combined effect of low dose gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at refrigeration (+4℃) and frozen (-18℃) temperatures, on the shelf life extension of fresh squid. The study was based on microbiological and physico-chemical changes occurring in the squid samples. The biochemical parameters such as total volatile base nitrogen and trimethyl amine nitrogen values for irradiated squid samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose of 3 and 5 kGy (p<0.05). pH values of squid samples were affected by both irradiation dose and storage temperature (p<0.05). Total microbial load for non- irradiated (control) squid samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures. The results revealed that the combination of irradiation and low temperature storage resulted in a significant reduction of microbial growth and extend the shelf life of squid at refrigeration and frozen temperature to about 12 and 90 days respectively. (author)

  8. Longitudinal follow-up study of smoking-induced emphysema progression in low-dose CT screening of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Matsuhiro, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, N.

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a major public health problem that is predicted to be third leading cause of death in 2030. Although spirometry is traditionally used to quantify emphysema progression, it is difficult to detect the loss of pulmonary function by emphysema in early stage, and to assess the susceptibility to smoking. This study presents quantification method of smoking-induced emphysema progression based on annual changes of low attenuation volume (LAV) by each lung lobe acquired from low-dose CT images in lung cancer screening. The method consists of three steps. First, lung lobes are segmented using extracted interlobar fissures by enhancement filter based on fourdimensional curvature. Second, LAV of each lung lobe is segmented. Finally, smoking-induced emphysema progression is assessed by statistical analysis of the annual changes represented by linear regression of LAV percentage in each lung lobe. This method was applied to 140 participants in lung cancer CT screening for six years. The results showed that LAV progressions of nonsmokers, past smokers, and current smokers are different in terms of pack-year and smoking cessation duration. This study demonstrates effectiveness in diagnosis and prognosis of early emphysema in lung cancer CT screening.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations induced by low-dose γ-irradiation: Study of R-banded chromosomes of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.; Lefrancois, D.; Aurias, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of low-dose (0-0.5 Gy) γ-radiations was studied on R-banded chromosomes from lymphocytes of healthy donors of various ages. In cells from newborns, an increase of chromosome damage roughly proportional to the dose was found. In lymphocytes from young adults chromosomal aberrations were not detected at doses of 0.05 and 0.1 Gy, and in lymphocytes from old adults not even at 0.2 Gy. The difficulty in detecting aberrations in lymphocytes from adults is largely due to a considerable background of chromosomal anomalies which should be borne in mind in dosimetry studies. The rate of induction largely depends on the types of rearrangements. One-break terminal deletions are efficiently induced at 0.1 and 0.2 Gy and are the best indicators of exposure at these doses. At 0.5 Gy, the frequencies of 2-break lesions, i.e., dicentrics and reciprocal translocations, increase, whereas the of deletions decreases. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shinji

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population. (Tsunoda, M.)

  11. Contribution to the study of the effect of a low dose of gamma irradiation on seeds and tubers before planting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvy, A.

    1968-01-01

    From 1962 to 1965, 25 tests have been made with carrots (1 variety), radish (3 varieties), spinach (2 var.), tomatoes (2 var.), potatoes (2 var.), barley (2 var.), rice (3 var.) and corn (1 var.), with the object of studying the interest for agriculture of seed and tuber gamma irradiation at low dose before planting. These tests were made in the laboratory, in greenhouses and in the open field, all necessary care being taken for a valuable statistical analysis of- the results. Special attention was paid to the homogeneity of plant material by controlling more particularly moisture content of seeds and the storage conditions of tubers. The observations concerned germination, growth at early stages, development phases and yield of leaves, roots and fruit. Some stimulation cases are observed. For tomatoes, it is found that stimulation cases occur at extreme moisture content and not in the range of mean moisture content which corresponds to maximum radioresistance. The demonstration of these effects is related to varieties, complementary treatments, conditions of cultivation and observation criteria. In most cases, they are short-lived and suitable modifications of seed conditioning produce, upon controls, an effect equivalent to that of irradiation. In conclusion, it seems very unlikely - considering our cultivation methods - that seed and tuber irradiation before planting could be of interest for agriculture. (authors) [fr

  12. Experimental study on active specific immunotherapy utilizing the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue, 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Kazufumi; Gose, Kyuhei; Ichiyanagi, Akihiro

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of active specific immunotherapy prepared from a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue has already reported. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Mitomycin C-treated active specific immunotherapy. Twelve-week-aged female C3H/He mice transplanted with MM 46 tumors were exposed to local electron radiotherapy with a dose of 3,000 rad on the 5th day after tumor inoculation. Tumor cells prepared for active specific immunotherapy were pretreated with Mitomycin C at concentration of 20 μg/10 7 cells in Eagle MEM Earle containing 100 IU/ml penicillin. The cell suspension was incubated at 37 0 C for 15 minutes. Mitomycin C-treated active specific immunotherapy was performed on the 12th day. Antitumor effect was evaluated by the regression of the tumor and survival curve. The remarkable regression of the tumor and significant elongation of the survival period were observed in the group which received Mitomycin C-treated active specific immunotherapy and the group which received active specific immunotherapy without the treatment of Mitomycin C. (author)

  13. Experimental study on active specific immunotherapy utilizing the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue, 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Tomoho; Yoshida, Shoji

    1983-01-01

    We have already reported the remarkable effect of an active specific immunotherapy using cryopreserved tumor cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells prepared from a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue after cytoreductive radiotherapy. In the present study, the effect of a biological response modifier, OK-432 combined with the active specific immunotherapy was investigated. Twelve-week-aged female C3H/He mice transplanted with MM 46 tumor cells were received local radiotherapy with a dose of 3,000 rads by high energy electron beams on the fifth day after inoculation. The tumor cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells cryopreserved for two months were thawed and treated with mitomycin-C at concentration of 20 μg/10 7 cells at 37 0 C for 30 min. Then, these cells were injected subcutaneously into the left hind paws as a mitomycin C-treated, cryopreserved active specific immunotherapy on the thirteenth day, and daily dose of 1 KE of OK-432 was injected intraperitoneally from the sixth to the tenth days. The inhibition of the tumor growth was similarly observed in the group which received this active specific immunotherapy combined with a biological response modifier, OK-432. (author)

  14. A study of the indices of the peripheral blood of women, professionally exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliznakov, V.; Mikhajlov, M.A.; Serafimov, A.; Nikolov, A.

    1979-01-01

    The peripheral blood content in women, which, due to their occupation are exposed to low dose ionizing radiation effect, has been investigated. One hundred and ten women from 20 to 50 years of age and occupation service in a sphere of ionizing radiation from 6 months to 4 years (an average length of 2,5 years) were examined. The unequal external gamma irradiation was the fundamental factor of the radiation effect under conditions of occupational media. The mean annual dose did never exceed the maximum permissible limits. As control, a group of 106 clinically healthy women of the same age and working in the industry but not exposed to radiation effect, was formed. Hemoglobin quantity, erythrocytes and leukocytes number, differential count of leukocytes and thrombocytes number were analyzed. Not any statistically significant differences (p > 0,05) between the mean values of the studied parameters of the control group and this one of women exposed to occupational irradiation were observed. This analysis of the hematological parameters represents the first stage of the already undertaken dynamic examination of the health status of a new and relatively stable contingent of occupationally irradiated persons. (A.B.)

  15. Study on cancer induced by long-term exposure to low dose rate radiation and its treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Hamamatsu Univ. School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1980-06-01

    For the purpose of discovering measures to prevent carcinogenesis by exposure to low dose radiation, radiological and clinical studies were carried out on patients with previous thorotrast injection. X-ray findings of these patients were classified into 8 types; the amount of injected thorotrast was not proportional to the size of the liver or spleen. CT could visualize sites of lymph nodes where thorotrast was remained and intrahepatic distribution of thorotrast. CT was also useful for detecting hepatic carcinoma. The amounts of thorotrast in each organ were calculated from the measurement by the whole body counter, and interstitial thorotrast was identified by fluorescent x-ray analysis. Numerical chromosome aberrations were found in all 9 patients with thorotrast; structural chromosome aberrations were found in 3 of the 9 patients. The appearance rates of small nuclei and H-J bodies in the bone marrow were higher in these patients than in controls. When patients with thorotrast had liver failure, their conditions deteriorated rapidly. Amino acid transfusion by Fisher's description was effective for hepatic encephalopathy. Out of 170 necropsied cases with thorotrast, 112 had malignant tumors of the liver with statistically significance compared to the control population.

  16. The Protective Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin against Colorectal Cancer Is Unlikely Explained by Selection Bias: Results from Three Different Study Designs in Clinical Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Cea Soriano

    Full Text Available We conducted three differently designed nested case-control studies to evaluate whether the protective effect of low-dose aspirin against colorectal cancer (CRC is explained by selection bias.Using a large validated UK primary care database, we followed different cohorts of patients, who varied in their demographic and clinical characteristics, to identify first ever cases of CRC. In Studies 1 and 2, two cohorts were followed, i new users of low-dose aspirin at start of follow-up (N = 170,336 in Study 1, N = 171,527 in Study 2 and either ii non-users of low-dose aspirin (Study 1, N = 170,336 or new users of paracetamol (Study 2, N = 149,597 at start of follow-up. In Study 3 a single cohort of individuals näive to low-dose aspirin at the start of observation was followed. Controls were selected using incidence sampling and logistic regression used to obtain an unbiased estimate of the incidence rate ratio (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Low-dose aspirin exposure was analyzed 'as-treated' before the index date (CRC date for cases, random date for controls.In the three studies, median (maximum follow-up was 5.1 (12, 5.8 (12 and 7.5 (13 years, respectively. 3033 incident CRC cases were identified in Study 1, 3174 in Study 2, and 12,333 in Study 3. Current use of low-dose aspirin was associated with a significantly reduced risk of 34%, 29% and 31% in the three studies, respectively; corresponding RRs (95% CIs were 0.66 (0.60-0.73, 0.71 (0.63-0.80 and 0.69 (0.64-0.74. In each study, significantly reduced risks of CRC were seen when low-dose aspirin was used for primary or secondary cardiovascular disease prevention, in both sexes, and across all age groups evaluated.Low-dose aspirin is associated with a significantly reduced risk of CRC. The consistency of our findings across different studies makes selection bias an unlikely explanation.

  17. Low-dose factor VIII infusion in Chinese adult haemophilia A patients: pharmacokinetics evidence that daily infusion results in higher trough level than with every-other-day infusion with similar factor VIII consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, B; Lee, A; Fan, L; Li, K; Zhang, Y; Poon, M-C; Zhao, Y

    2017-05-01

    Pharmacokinetics (PK) modelling suggests improvement of trough levels are achieved by using more frequent infusion strategy. However, no clinical study data exists to confirm or quantify improvement in trough level, particularly for low-dose prophylaxis in patients with haemophilia A. To provide evidence that low dose daily (ED) prophylaxis can increase trough levels without increasing FVIII consumption compared to every-other-day (EOD) infusion. A cross-over study on 5 IU kg -1 FVIII daily vs. 10 IU kg -1 EOD infusions, each for 14 days was conducted at the PUMCH-HTC. On the ED schedule, trough (immediate prior to infusion), and peak FVIII:C levels (30 min after infusion) were measured on days 1-5; and trough levels alone on days 7, 9, 11 and 13. For the EOD schedule, troughs, peaks and 4-h postinfusion were measured on day 1; troughs and peaks on days 3, 5, and 7; troughs alone on days 9, 11 and 13 and 24-h postinfusion on days 2, 4 and 6. FVIII inhibitors were assessed on days 0 and 14 during both infusion schedules. Six patients were enrolled. PK evidence showed that daily prophylaxis achieved higher (~2 times) steady-state FVIII trough levels compared to EOD with the same total factor consumption. The daily prophylaxis had good acceptability among patients and reduced chronic pain in the joints in some patients. Our PK study shows low-dose factor VIII daily infusion results in higher trough level than with EOD infusion with similar factor VIII consumption in Chinese adult haemophilia A patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Study of low dose and dynamic multi-slice CT about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in sleeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jie; Qi Ji; Yin Jianzhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To perform Low dose dynamic MSCT(multi-slice CT) in sleeping obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients correcting the imprecise measure values in waking state, and to exactly analyse the location and extension of the dynamic changes about the condition. Methods: Sixteen OSAS patients were scanned both in waking and naturally sleeping period (end phase of inspiration and expiration). Measured at the narrowest part of the retropalatal (RP) and retroglossal (RG) and 5 mm under the tip of epiglottis at the epiglottal (EPG)at the end period of inspiration in sleeping, respectively, and compared the accurate position of the narrowest or occlusive level in 3 phases. All patients were also scanned using cine mode at the narrowest level at the end period of inspiration in sleeping to show the pharyngeal cavity changes during sleep. Results: The smallest XSA of RP region (M w =47.50 mm 2 , M e =73.00 mm 2 , M i =2.00 mm 2 ; Z we =2.897, P we =0.003; Z wi =4.192, P wi ie =4.538, P ie w =8.00 mm, M e =9.50 mm, M i =1.50 mm; Z we =1.933, P we =0.056; Z wi =3.720, P wi ie =4.230, P ie w =8.00 mm, M e =9.00 mm, M i =1.00 mm; Z we =1.210, P we =0.246; Z wi =4.203, P wi ie =4.557, P ie w =4.00 mm 3 , M e =5.50 mm 3 , M i =1.50 mm 3 ; Z we =1.576, P we =0.125; Z wi =3.532, P wi ie =4.077, P ie w =7.00 mm, M e =6.00 mm, M i =10.50 mm; Z we =0.557, P we =0.603; Z wi =2.541, P wi =0.011; Z ie =2.852, P ie =0.004) and RG regions (M w =5.00 mm, M e =3.00 mm, M i =9.50 mm; Z we =0.747, P we =0.482; Z wi =2.657, P wi =0.007; Z ie =3.075, P ie =0.001), were different between inspiration and expiration of sleeping or awake. The dynamic cine CT scan during sleeping could show pharyngeal change, clearly. Conclusion: At the end period of inspiration in sleeping, the location of narrow or obstructive of airway is the most precise and sensitive and the false negative at the waking could be obviously reduced. Low dose MSCT scan reduced exposure and expense. (authors)

  19. Prevalence of incidental or unexpected findings on low-dose CT performed during routine SPECT/CT nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Kelvin Kwok-Ho; Sutherland, Tom; Shafik-Eid, Raymond; Taubman, Kim; Schlicht, Stephen; Ramaseshan, Ganeshan

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) is often combined with ‘simultaneous’ low-dose CT (LDCT) to provide complementary anatomical and functional correlation. As a consequence, numerous incidental and unexpected findings may be detected on LDCT. Recognition of these findings and appropriate determination of their relevance can add to the utility of SPECT/CT. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and categorise the relevance of incidental and unexpected findings on LDCT scans performed as part of routine SPECT/CT studies. All available LDCT scans performed as part of SPECT/CT studies at St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne in the year 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Two qualified radiologists independently reviewed the studies and any previous available imaging and categorised any detected incidental findings. A total of 2447 LDCT studies were reviewed. The relevance of the findings was classified according to a modified version of a scale used in the Colonography Reporting and Data System: E1 = normal or normal variant (28.0%); E2 = clinically unimportant (63.5%); E3 = likely unimportant or incompletely characterised (6.2%); E4 = potentially important (2.5%). Imaging specialists need to be cognisant of incidental and unexpected findings present on LDCT studies performed as part of SPECT/CT. Appropriate categorisation of findings and communication of potentially important findings to referring clinicians should form part of routine practice. The overall prevalence of potentially significant incidental and unexpected findings in our series was 8.7% (E3, 6.2%; E4, 2.5%) and was comparable to rates in other published imaging series.

  20. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D.; Zaidi, Habib; Platon, Alexandra [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Community, Primary Care and Emergency Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Perneger, Thomas [University Hospital of Geneva, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. (orig.)

  1. Inter- and intrascanner variability of pulmonary nodule volumetry on low-dose 64-row CT : an anthropomorphic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, X.; Willemink, M. J.; Zhao, Y.; de Jong, P. A.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Greuter, M. J. W.; Vliegenthart, R.

    Objective: To assess inter- and intrascanner variability in volumetry of solid pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom using low-dose CT. Methods: Five spherical solid artificial nodules [diameters 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12mm; CT density 1100 Hounsfield units (HU)] were randomly placed

  2. Incidence of intracranial bleeds in new users of low-dose aspirin: a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, L; Gaist, D; Soriano-Gabarró, M; García Rodríguez, L A

    2017-06-01

    Essentials Intracranial bleeds (ICB) are serious clinical events that have been associated with aspirin use. Incidence rates of ICB were calculated among new-users of low-dose aspirin in the UK (2000-2012). Over a median follow-up of 5.58 years, the incidence of ICB was 0.08 per 100 person-years. Our estimates are valuable for inclusion in risk-benefit assessments of low-dose aspirin use. Background Low-dose aspirin protects against both ischemic cardiovascular (CV) events and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, low-dose aspirin may be associated with a slightly increased risk of intracranial bleeds (ICBs). Objectives To obtain the incidence rates of ICBs overall and by patient subgroups among new users of low-dose aspirin. Patients/Methods Using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) UK primary-care database (2000-2012), we identified a cohort of new users of low-dose aspirin aged 40-84 years (N = 199 079; mean age at start of follow-up, 63.9 years) and followed them for up to 14 years (median 5.58 years). Incident ICB cases were identified and validated through linkage to hospitalization data and/or review of THIN records with free-text comments. Incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results Eight hundred and eighty-one incident ICBs cases were identified: 407 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), 283 cases of subdural hematoma (SDH), and 191 cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Incidence rates per 100 person-years were 0.08 (95% CI 0.07-0.08) for all ICBs, 0.04 (95% CI 0.03-0.04) for ICH, 0.03 (95% CI 0.02-0.03) for SDH, and 0.02 (95% CI 0.01-0.02) for SAH. The ICB incidence rates per 100 person-years for individuals with an indication of primary CV disease prevention were 0.07 (95% CI 0.06-0.07) and 0.09 (95% CI 0.08-0.10) for secondary CV disease prevention. Incidence rates were higher in men for SDH, and higher in women for ICH and SAH. Conclusions Our results provide valuable estimates of the absolute ICB risk for

  3. Nonrandomized study comparing the effects of preoperative radiotherapy and daily administration of low-dose cisplatin with those radiotherapy alone for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hiroshi; Azegami, Takuya; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kurashina, Kenji; Tanaka, Kouichi; Kotani, Akira; Oguchi, Masahiko; Tamura, Minoru.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of preoperative radiotherapy and daily administration of low-dose cisplatin with those of radiotherapy alone for oral cancer. Ten patients underwent preoperative radiotherapy of 30 to 40 Gy with concomitant daily administration of low-dose cisplatin (5 mg/body or 5 mg/m 2 ). Ten patients received external radiotherapy alone. The locoregional response rates (complete response and partial response) did not differ significantly between the two groups (80% for combined therapy and 60% for radiotherapy alone). On histopathologic evaluation of surgical specimens, however, the combined-therapy group (80%) had a higher response rate than did the radiotherapy-alone group (10%; p<0.01). We conclude that daily administration of low-dose cisplatin enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy against primary tumors. We also suggested that combined therapy may be beneficial as an initial treatment for oral cancer before a planned operation. (author)

  4. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  5. Effects of lead administration at low doses by different routes on rat spleens. Study of response of splenic lymphocytes and tissue lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teijon, Cesar; Olmo, Rosa; Dolores Blanco, Maria; Romero, Arturo; Maria Teijon, Jose

    2003-09-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low doses of lead (200 ppm of PbAc{sub 2} for 4 weeks) on rat spleens using different routes of administration. The study has been carried out at different levels: a histological evaluation has been made, and alterations of cell proliferation, B and T lymphocyte subpopulations, and CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell subpopulations have been evaluated. Apoptosis and necrosis of lymphoid cells were also analysed. Furthermore, lysozyme activity was measured. Results indicate a large increase in spleen size when lead is administered by intraperitoneal injection, being this route in which lead causes larger modifications in all of the parameters measured. Lead administered orally causes histological modifications, such as an increase in the number of lymphocytes as well as edema. However, significant alterations in other parameters studied have not been detected. Lead administration by intraperitoneal route causes more evident histological modifications as well as an increase in the number of lymphocytes, and also induces a decrease in the percentage of B{sup +}, T{sup +} and CD4{sup +} cells, and an increase in CD8{sup +} cells. Cell death of splenic lymphocytes is not altered by lead. With regard to the immune innate response, lead behaves as an immunomodulator as can be deduced from data on lysozyme activity in tissue. Therefore, it is possible to affirm that the effect of low doses of lead depends on the route of administration. Thus, the intraperitoneal route, through which lead goes directly to the bloodstream, causes drastic effects, generating important immunological alterations.

  6. Effects of lead administration at low doses by different routes on rat spleens. Study of response of splenic lymphocytes and tissue lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teijon, Cesar; Olmo, Rosa; Dolores Blanco, Maria; Romero, Arturo; Maria Teijon, Jose

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low doses of lead (200 ppm of PbAc 2 for 4 weeks) on rat spleens using different routes of administration. The study has been carried out at different levels: a histological evaluation has been made, and alterations of cell proliferation, B and T lymphocyte subpopulations, and CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subpopulations have been evaluated. Apoptosis and necrosis of lymphoid cells were also analysed. Furthermore, lysozyme activity was measured. Results indicate a large increase in spleen size when lead is administered by intraperitoneal injection, being this route in which lead causes larger modifications in all of the parameters measured. Lead administered orally causes histological modifications, such as an increase in the number of lymphocytes as well as edema. However, significant alterations in other parameters studied have not been detected. Lead administration by intraperitoneal route causes more evident histological modifications as well as an increase in the number of lymphocytes, and also induces a decrease in the percentage of B + , T + and CD4 + cells, and an increase in CD8 + cells. Cell death of splenic lymphocytes is not altered by lead. With regard to the immune innate response, lead behaves as an immunomodulator as can be deduced from data on lysozyme activity in tissue. Therefore, it is possible to affirm that the effect of low doses of lead depends on the route of administration. Thus, the intraperitoneal route, through which lead goes directly to the bloodstream, causes drastic effects, generating important immunological alterations

  7. Accuracy and Precision of Three-Dimensional Low Dose CT Compared to Standard RSA in Acetabular Cups: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodén, Cyrus; Olivecrona, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The gold standard for detection of implant wear and migration is currently radiostereometry (RSA). The purpose of this study is to compare a three-dimensional computed tomography technique (3D CT) to standard RSA as an alternative technique for measuring migration of acetabular cups in total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods. With tantalum beads, we marked one cemented and one uncemented cup and mounted these on a similarly marked pelvic model. A comparison was made between 3D CT and standard RSA for measuring migration. Twelve repeated stereoradiographs and CT scans with double examinations in each position and gradual migration of the implants were made. Precision and accuracy of the 3D CT were calculated. Results. The accuracy of the 3D CT ranged between 0.07 and 0.32 mm for translations and 0.21 and 0.82° for rotation. The precision ranged between 0.01 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.06 and 0.29° for rotations, respectively. For standard RSA, the precision ranged between 0.04 and 0.09 mm for translations and 0.08 and 0.32° for rotations, respectively. There was no significant difference in precision between 3D CT and standard RSA. The effective radiation dose of the 3D CT method, comparable to RSA, was estimated to be 0.33 mSv. Interpretation. Low dose 3D CT is a comparable method to standard RSA in an experimental setting.

  8. Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for recurrent or progressive glioblastoma. Final report of a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, M.; Diletto, B.; Chiesa, S.; D' Agostino, G.R.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Ferro, M.; Valentini, V. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rome (Italy); Colosimo, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Maira, G.; Anile, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Evaluated in this study were the feasibility and the efficacy of concurrent low dose fractionated radiotherapy (LD-FRT) and chemotherapy as palliative treatment for recurrent/progressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Eligible patients had recurrent or progressive GBM, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, prior surgery, and standard radiochemotherapy treatment. Recurrence/progression disease during temozolomide (TMZ) received cisplatin (CDDP; 30 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, 15), fotemustine (FTM; 40 mg/m{sup 2} on days 2, 9, 16), and concurrent LD-FRT (0.3 Gy twice daily); recurrence/progression after 4 months from the end of adjuvant TMZ were treated by TMZ (150/200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5) concomitant with LD-FRT (0.4 Gy twice daily). Primary endpoints were safety and toxicity. A total of 32 patients were enrolled. Hematologic toxicity G1-2 was observed in 18.7% of patients and G3-4 in 9.4%. One patient (3.1%) had complete response, 3 (9.4%) had partial response, 8 (25%) had stable disease for at least 8 weeks, while 20 patients (62.5%) experienced progressive disease. The clinical benefit was 37.5%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5 and 8 months, respectively. Survival rate at 12 months was of 27.8%. LD-FRT and chemotherapy for recurrent/progressive GBM have a good toxicity profile and clinical outcomes, even though further investigation of this novel palliative treatment approach is warranted. (orig.)

  9. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With S-1 and Low-Dose Cisplatin for Inoperable Advanced Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikawa, Yoshiro; Kubota, Tetsuro; Kumagai, Koshi; Nakamura, Rieko; Kumai, Koichiro; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi; Kitajima, Masaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The results of a pilot study using S-1/low-dose cisplatin/radiotherapy led us to hypothesize that the initial chemoradiotherapy regimen would induce a 70% efficacy rate with a 10% pathologic complete response rate. Patients and Methods: Only patients with unresectable or incurable advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The patients received induction S-1 and cisplatin therapy with radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy alone. Results: Of the 30 patients recruited and assessed, 29 were eligible for clinical evaluation of measurable lesions. The response rate was 65.5%, with 19 with a partial response, 8 with no change, and 2 with progressive disease of 29 patients. Of the 30 patients recruited, 10 (33.3%) underwent stomach resection and D2 LN dissections. The pathologic complete response rate was 13.3% (4 patients), and the R0 resection rate was 100% (10 patients). The survival analysis showed a median survival time of 25 months. Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 66.7% for leukocytopenia, 33.3% for thrombocytopenia, 23.3% for nausea and appetite loss, and 6.7% for anemia, diarrhea, and renal dysfunction. Although all the patients had been hospitalized with a poor performance status with a giant tumor, 97% (29 of 30) could be discharged after the first cycle, resulting in an improvement in quality of life. Conclusion: Chemoradiotherapy could be a powerful regimen for controlling tumor progression in advanced gastric cancer, improving patients' quality of life with tolerable toxicity. A complete histologic response rate of >10% would be expected, even for large tumors with metastatic lesions

  10. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S Grosser

    Full Text Available Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET with computed tomography (CT. Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR on the image quality of the low-dose CT images.Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88 and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04. In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001.In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality.

  11. Treatment of age-related subfoveal choroidal neovascularization by low-dose external radiation. A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harino, Seiyo; Oshima, Yusuke; Tsujikawa, Kaoru; Oh, Ami; Sugimoto, Kiyoshi [Yodogawa Christian Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Murayama, Shigeyuki; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1997-04-01

    We applied low dose external beam radiation (6MV) to 17 eyes of 17 patients (Mean age 70.9 years, range 58-85) who had subfoveal choroidal neovascularization associated with age-related macular degeneration. None of the cases were suitable for photocoagulation according to the Macular Photo-coagulation Study protocol, and no feeding vessels underlying choroidal neovascular membrane could be detected. Corrected visual acuity ranged from 0.02 to 0.6 before treatment. The patients were divided into two groups. One group of 11 eyes was treated with 10 Gy and the other group of 6 eyes with 21 Gy. Mean follow up period was 347{+-}89 (mean{+-}standard deviation) days in the 10 Gy group and 312{+-}100 days in the 21 Gy group. We evaluated the outcome as `effective` if no progression in neovascular membrane was found by ophthalmoscopic and angiographic examination. Only 3 eyes (21%) of patients in the 10 Gy group and 2 eyes (33%) in 21 Gy group showed any effect. Although the rate of progression in choroidal neovascular membrane was significantly smaller in the 10 and 21 Gy group than in the controls, the corrected visual acuity in the treated group was not improved over that of the controls. No serious complications were seen. Only one case showed a stabilized neovascular membrane in the control group of 7 patients. Although the present results seem to be worse than those in previous reports, the efficacy of this treatment still needs to be evaluated because no beneficial strategies in the treatment of subfoveal neovascularization have been established. (author)

  12. Level of coenzyme A and the activity of certain dehydrogenases under chronic low dose X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkasova, L A; Novik, V A; Tsychun, G F [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziologii

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of long-term x ray irradiation (cumulative dose 50 R) on: the content of co-enzyme A (KoA) in the brain and liver, the activity of a number of oxydizing reducing enzymes in the brain mitochondria and heart muscle, and the blood glucocorticoid content. It was established that the metabolism of brain and liver KoA is quite stable, the enzymes of the brain tricarbonic acids and pyruvate-dehydrogenase cycle are labile.

  13. Short time effects of lithium low dose associated to 131I in the treatment of Graves' disease: preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, M.; Gauna, A.; Silva Croome, M.; Guillen, C.; Sartorio, G.

    2004-01-01

    The therapeutic dose of 131 I can increase the tirotoxicose. Although, the advice is the administration of the iodine in euthyroidism, this not always is possible. The lithium, in doses between 900 and 1200 mg/day is useful to help to the treatment with 131 I. These doses are proximity of atomic absorption spectrophotometrics, of the toxicity limits. Recently we have brought the utility of low doses of lithium in the treatment of the hyperthyroidism

  14. Low dose aspirin in the prevention of recurrent spontaneous preterm labour - the APRIL study: a multicenter randomized placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Laura; de Boer, Marjon A; de Groot, Christianne J M; Nijman, Tobias A J; Hemels, Marieke A C; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M; Bosmans, Judith E; Kok, Marjolein; van Laar, Judith O; Sueters, Marieke; Scheepers, Hubertina; van Drongelen, Joris; Franssen, Maureen T M; Sikkema, J Marko; Duvekot, Hans J J; Bekker, Mireille N; van der Post, Joris A M; Naaktgeboren, Christiana; Mol, Ben W J; Oudijk, Martijn A

    2017-07-14

    Preterm birth (birth before 37 weeks of gestation) is a major problem in obstetrics and affects an estimated 15 million pregnancies worldwide annually. A history of previous preterm birth is the strongest risk factor for preterm birth, and recurrent spontaneous preterm birth affects more than 2.5 million pregnancies each year. A recent meta-analysis showed possible benefits of the use of low dose aspirin in the prevention of recurrent spontaneous preterm birth. We will assess the (cost-)effectiveness of low dose aspirin in comparison with placebo in the prevention of recurrent spontaneous preterm birth in a randomized clinical trial. Women with a singleton pregnancy and a history of spontaneous preterm birth in a singleton pregnancy (22-37 weeks of gestation) will be asked to participate in a multicenter, randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled trial. Women will be randomized to low dose aspirin (80 mg once daily) or placebo, initiated from 8 to 16 weeks up to maximal 36 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome measure will be preterm birth, defined as birth at a gestational age (GA) aspirin is effective in preventing preterm birth, we expect that there will be cost savings, because of the low costs of aspirin. To evaluate this, a cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed comparing preventive treatment with aspirin with placebo. This trial will provide evidence as to whether or not low dose aspirin is (cost-) effective in reducing recurrence of spontaneous preterm birth. Clinical trial registration number of the Dutch Trial Register: NTR 5675 . EudraCT-registration number: 2015-003220-31.

  15. Fractional carbon dioxide laser versus low-dose UVA-1 phototherapy for treatment of localized scleroderma: a clinical and immunohistochemical randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, S M; Bosseila, M; Fawzy, M M; Abdel Halim, D M; Sayed, S S; Allam, R S H M

    2016-11-01

    Morphea is a rare fibrosing skin disorder that occurs as a result of abnormal homogenized collagen synthesis. Fractional ablative laser resurfacing has been used effectively in scar treatment via abnormal collagen degradation and induction of healthy collagen synthesis. Therefore, fractional ablative laser can provide an effective modality in treatment of morphea. The study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of fractional carbon dioxide laser as a new modality for the treatment of localized scleroderma and to compare its results with the well-established method of UVA-1 phototherapy. Seventeen patients with plaque and linear morphea were included in this parallel intra-individual comparative randomized controlled clinical trial. Each with two comparable morphea lesions that were randomly assigned to either 30 sessions of low-dose (30 J/cm 2 ) UVA-1 phototherapy (340-400 nm) or 3 sessions of fractional CO 2 laser (10,600 nm-power 25 W). The response to therapy was then evaluated clinically and histopathologically via validated scoring systems. Immunohistochemical analysis of TGF-ß1 and MMP1 was done. Patient satisfaction was also assessed. Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired (matched) samples and Spearman rank correlation equation were used as indicated. Comparing the two groups, there was an obvious improvement with fractional CO 2 laser that was superior to that of low-dose UVA-1 phototherapy. Statistically, there was a significant difference in the clinical scores (p = 0.001), collagen homogenization scores (p = 0.012), and patient satisfaction scores (p = 0.001). In conclusion, fractional carbon dioxide laser is a promising treatment modality for cases of localized morphea, with proved efficacy of this treatment on clinical and histopathological levels.

  16. Can low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of iodine contrast medium in a dynamic CT study of the liver?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Okada, Masahiro; Hyodo, Tomoko; Hidaka, Syojiro; Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Murakami, Takamichi, E-mail: murakami@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether low-dose dynamic CT of the liver with iterative reconstruction can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium. Materials and methods: This study was approved by our institutional review board. 113 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group A/group B (fifty-eight/fifty-five patients) underwent liver dynamic CT at 120/100 kV, with 0/40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with a contrast dose of 600/480 mg I/kg, respectively. Radiation exposure was estimated based on the manufacturer's phantom data. The enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma, vessels and the tumor-to-liver contrast of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) were compared between two groups. Two readers independently assessed the CT images of the hepatic parenchyma and HCCs. Results: The mean CT dose indices: 6.38/4.04 mGy, the dose-length products: 194.54/124.57 mGy cm, for group A/group B. The mean enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma and the tumor-to-liver contrast of HCCs with diameters greater than 1 cm in the post-contrast all phases did not differ significantly between two groups (P > 0.05). The enhancement values of vessels in group B were significantly higher than that in group A in the delayed phases (P < 0.05). Two reader's confidence levels for the hepatic parenchyma in the delayed phases and HCCs did not differ significantly between the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Low-dose dynamic CT with ASIR can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium without image quality degradation, compared to conventional dynamic CT without ASIR.

  17. Low-dose tacrolimus combined with donor-derived mesenchymal stem cells after renal transplantation: a prospective, non-randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Guang-hui; Chen, Zheng; Xu, Lu; Zhu, Jing-hui; Xiang, Peng; Ma, Jun-jie; Peng, Yan-wen; Li, Guang-hui; Chen, Xiao-yong; Fang, Jia-li; Guo, Yu-he; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Long-shan

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors, including tacrolimus, are largely responsible for advances in allotransplantation. However, the nephrotoxicity associated with these immunosuppressants impairs patients' long-term survival after renal allograft. Therefore, novel regimens that minimize or even eliminate calcineurin inhibitors could improve transplantation outcomes. In this pilot study, we investigated the use of low-dose tacrolimus in combination with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are immunosuppr...

  18. An In Vivo Study of Low-Dose Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application with Prolonged Clamping Drain Method in Total Knee Replacement: Clinical Efficacy and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paphon Sa-ngasoongsong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, combined intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA injection with clamping drain method showed efficacy for blood loss and transfusion reduction in total knee replacement (TKR. However, until now, none of previous studies revealed the effect of this technique on pharmacokinetics, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Materials and Methods. An experimental study was conducted, during 2011-2012, in 30 patients undergoing unilateral TKR. Patients received IA-TXA application and then were allocated into six groups regarding clamping drain duration (2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-hours. Blood and drainage fluid were collected to measure tranexamic acid (TXA level and related coagulation and fibrinolytic markers. Postoperative complication was followed for one year. Results. There was no significant difference of serum TXA level at 2 hour and 24 hour among groups (p<0.05. Serum TXA level at time of clamp release was significantly different among groups with the highest level at 2 hour (p<0.0001. There was no significant difference of TXA level in drainage fluid, postoperative blood loss, blood transfusion, and postoperative complications (p<0.05.  Conclusions. Low-dose IA-TXA application in TKR with prolonged clamping drain method is a safe and effective blood conservative technique with only minimal systemic absorption and without significant increase in systemic absorption over time.

  19. SU-E-T-34: An in Vivo Study On Pulsed Low Dose-Rate Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C; Chen, X; Zhang, P; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Re-irradiation with conventional radiotherapy techniques (CRT) may pose significant risks due to high accumulative radiation doses. Pulsed low dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been used in clinical trials for recurrent cancer treatment. In our previous studies, PLDR irradiation showed significantly lower toxicity than CRT, resulting in much longer survival of mice after PLDR total body irradiation (TBI) than conventional TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate tumor control efficacy of PLDR treatment for prostate cancer with an animal model of prostate cancer LNCaP. Methods: We used an orthotopic murine model of LNCaP cell line for this study. LNCaP cells were implanted into immune-suppressed male nude mice via surgery. We monitored the tumor growth with MRI. The tumor-bearing mice were allocated into a PLDR(n=9), CRT(n=7), and control group(n=7) randomly. The mice in the PLDR and CRT groups were irradiated with 2Gy dose for one time. For the CRT treatment, the mice received 2Gy at a dose-rate of 300 MU/minute. For the PLDR treatment, the 2Gy dose was further divided into ten pulses of 0.2Gy at the same dose-rate with an interval of 3 minutes between the pulses. Results: Sizable tumor growth delays were observed for the PLDR and CRT groups through weekly MRI scans. The mean values of the normalized tumor volumes (± standard deviation of the mean) were 1.53±0.07, 1.53±0.14, and 1.81±0.09 at one week after treatment, 2.28±0.13, 2.19±0.16, and 3.04±0.25 at two weeks after treatment, and 3.31±0.23, 3.14±0.24 and 4.62±0.49 at three weeks after treatment, for the PLDR, CRT, and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: The PLDR and CRT treatments showed comparable tumor control rates in this study. Our in vivo results indicate that PLDR may be a viable option for treating recurrent prostate cancer due to its equivalent tumor control but low normal tissue toxocities

  20. Study of a low-dose capsule filling process by dynamic and static tests for advanced process understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranzinger, S; Faulhammer, E; Scheibelhofer, O; Calzolari, V; Biserni, S; Paudel, A; Khinast, J G

    2018-04-05

    Precise filling of capsules with doses in the mg-range requires a good understanding of the filling process. Therefore, we investigated the various process steps of the filling process by dynamic and static mode tests. Dynamic tests refer to filling of capsules in a regular laboratory dosator filling machine. Static tests were conducted using a novel filling system developed by us. Three grades of lactose excipients were filled into size 3 capsules with different dosing chamber lengths, nozzle diameters and powder bed heights, and, in the dynamic mode, with two filling speeds (500, 3000 caps/h). The influence of the gap at the bottom of the powder container on the fill weight and variability was assessed. Different gaps resulted in a change in fill weight in all materials, although in different ways. In all cases, the fill weight of highly cohesive Lactohale 220 increased when decreasing the gap. Furthermore, experiments with the stand-alone static test tool indicated that this very challenging powder could successfully be filled without any pre-compression in the range of 5 mg-20 mg with acceptable RSDs. This finding is of great importance since for very fine lactose powders high compression ratios (dosing-chamber-length-to-powder-bed height compression ratios) may result in jamming of the piston. Moreover, it shows that the static mode setup is suitable for studying fill weight and variability. Since cohesive powders, such as Lactohale 220, are hard to fill, we investigated the impact of vibration on the process. Interestingly, we found no correlation between the reported fill weight changes in dynamic mode at 3000 cph and static mode using similar vibration. However, we could show that vibrations during sampling in the static mode dramatically reduced fill weight variability. Overall, our results indicate that by fine-tuning instrumental settings even very challenging powders can be filled with a low-dose dosator capsule filling machine. This study is a

  1. Singlet oxygen and ROS in a new light: low-dose subcellular photodynamic treatment enhances proliferation at the single cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez-Castro, Alfonso; Breitenbach, Thomas; Ogilby, Peter R

    2014-09-01

    Two-photon excitation of a sensitizer with a focused laser beam was used to create a spatially-localized subcellular population of reactive oxygen species, ROS, in single HeLa cells. The sensitizer used was protoporphyrin IX, PpIX, endogenously derived from 5-aminolevulinic acid delivered to the cells. Although we infer that singlet oxygen, O2(a(1)Δg), is one ROS produced upon irradiation of PpIX under these conditions, it is possible that the superoxide ion, O2(-˙), may also play a role in this system. With a "high" dose of PpIX-sensitized ROS, the expected death of the cell was observed. However, under "low dose" conditions, clear signs of cell proliferation were observed. The present results facilitate studies of ROS-mediated signalling in imaging-based single cell experiments.

  2. Daily low-dose/continuous capecitabine combined with neo-adjuvant irradiation reduces VEGF and PDGF-BB levels in rectal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, David; B e'Ery, Einat; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Koren, Claude; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal; Lavi, Idit; Shaked, Yuval

    2008-01-01

    Metronomic low-dose chemotherapy regimen was found to have an antiangiogenic effect in tumors. However, its effect on levels of circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is not fully explored. Materials and methods. The levels of both VEGF and PDGF-BB were measured in three time points, in the serum of 32 rectal carcinoma patients receiving daily reduced-dose/continuous capecitabine in combination with preoperative pelvic irradiation. Results. We found a significant decrease in VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels during the combination treatment (p<0.0001), followed by an increase in the successive rest-period (p<0.0001). In addition, substantial changes in platelets counts were observed during treatment in correlation with the changes of VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels. Discussion. These results suggest that combined chemo-irradiation affect levels of pro-angiogenic factors during treatment, and may reflect an anti-angiogenic window induced during this treatment. The potential implications of this inducible phenomenon, including a possible clinical benefit from the administration of long lasting metronomic chemotherapy immediately following combined chemo-irradiation, would warrant further investigation

  3. Safety of the Up-titration of Nifedipine GITS and Valsartan or Low-dose Combination in Uncontrolled Hypertension: the FOCUS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Bae; Shin, Joon-Han; Kim, Dong-Soo; Youn, Ho-Joong; Park, Seung Woo; Shim, Wan Joo; Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Dong-Woon; Lee, Hae-Young; Choi, Dong-Ju; Rim, Se-Joong; Lee, Sung-Yun; Kim, Ju-Han

    2016-04-01

    Doubling the dose of antihypertensive drugs is necessary to manage hypertension in patients whose disease is uncontrolled. However, this strategy can result in safety issues. This study compared the safety and efficacy of up-titration of the nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) with up-titration of valsartan monotherapy; these were also compared with low-dose combinations of the two therapies. This prospective, open-label, randomized, active-controlled, multicenter study lasted 8 weeks. If patients did not meet the target blood pressure (BP) after 4 weeks of treatment with low-dose monotherapy, they were randomized to up-titration of the nifedipine GITS dose from 30 mg (N30) to 60 mg or valsartan from 80 mg to 160 mg or they were randomized to receive a low-dose combination of N30 and valsartan 80 mg for another 4 weeks. BP variability was assessed by using the SD or the %CV of the short-term BP measured at clinic. Of the 391 patients (20~70 years with stage II or higher hypertension) screened for study inclusion, 362 patients who had 3 BP measurements were enrolled. The reduction in the mean systolic/diastolic BP from baseline to week 4 was similar in both low-dose monotherapy groups with either N30 or valsartan 80 mg. BP variability (SD) was unchanged with either therapy, but the %CV was slightly increased in the N30 group. There was no significant difference in BP variability either in SD or %CV between responders and nonresponders to each monotherapy despite the significant difference in the mean BP changes. The up-titration effect of nifedipine GTS from 30 to 60 mg exhibited an additional BP reduction, but this effect was not shown in the up-titration of valsartan from 80 to 160 mg. Although the difference in BP was obvious between high-dose nifedipine GTS and valsartan, the BP variability was unchanged between the 2 drugs and was similar to the low-dose combinations. There was a low rate of adverse events in all treatment groups. In addition

  4. Low-dose CT pulmonary angiography on a 15-year-old CT scanner: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Kaup

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Computed tomography (CT low-dose (LD imaging is used to lower radiation exposure, especially in vascular imaging; in current literature, this is mostly on latest generation high-end CT systems. Purpose To evaluate the effects of reduced tube current on objective and subjective image quality of a 15-year-old 16-slice CT system for pulmonary angiography (CTPA. Material and Methods CTPA scans from 60 prospectively randomized patients (28 men, 32 women were examined in this study on a 15-year-old 16-slice CT scanner system. Standard CT (SD settings were 100 kV and 150 mAs, LD settings were 100 kV and 50 mAs. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk, various anatomic landmarks, and image noise were quantitatively measured; contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR were calculated. Three independent blinded radiologists subjectively rated each image series using a 5-point grading scale. Results CT dose index (CTDI in the LD series was 66.46% lower compared to the SD settings (2.49 ± 0.55 mGy versus 7.42 ± 1.17 mGy. Attenuation of the pulmonary trunk showed similar results for both series (SD 409.55 ± 91.04 HU; LD 380.43 HU ± 93.11 HU; P = 0.768. Subjective image analysis showed no significant differences between SD and LD settings regarding the suitability for detection of central and peripheral PE (central SD/LD, 4.88; intra-class correlation coefficients [ICC], 0.894/4.83; ICC, 0.745; peripheral SD/LD, 4.70; ICC, 0.943/4.57; ICC, 0.919; all P > 0.4. Conclusion The LD protocol, on a 15-year-old CT scanner system without current high-end hardware or post-processing tools, led to a dose reduction of approximately 67% with similar subjective image quality and delineation of central and peripheral pulmonary arteries.

  5. Statistical and low dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The low dose response and the lower limit of detection of the Hanford dosimeter depend upon may factors, including the energy of the radiation, whether the exposure is to be a single radiation or mixed fields, annealing cycles, environmental factors, and how well various batches of TLD materials are matched in the system. A careful statistical study and sensitivity analysis were performed to determine how these factors influence the response of the dosimeter system. Estimates have been included in this study of the standard deviation of calculated dose for various mixed field exposures from 0 to 1000 mrem

  6. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  7. Deep convolutional neural networks for automatic coronary calcium scoring in a screening study with low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmann, Nikolas; Išgum, Ivana; Setio, Arnaud A. A.; de Vos, Bob D.; Ciompi, Francesco; de Jong, Pim A.; Oudkerk, Matthjis; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Viergever, Max A.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-03-01

    The amount of calcifications in the coronary arteries is a powerful and independent predictor of cardiovascular events and is used to identify subjects at high risk who might benefit from preventive treatment. Routine quantification of coronary calcium scores can complement screening programs using low-dose chest CT, such as lung cancer screening. We present a system for automatic coronary calcium scoring based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). The system uses three independently trained CNNs to estimate a bounding box around the heart. In this region of interest, connected components above 130 HU are considered candidates for coronary artery calcifications. To separate them from other high intensity lesions, classification of all extracted voxels is performed by feeding two-dimensional 50 mm × 50 mm patches from three orthogonal planes into three concurrent CNNs. The networks consist of three convolutional layers and one fully-connected layer with 256 neurons. In the experiments, 1028 non-contrast-enhanced and non-ECG-triggered low-dose chest CT scans were used. The network was trained on 797 scans. In the remaining 231 test scans, the method detected on average 194.3 mm3 of 199.8 mm3 coronary calcifications per scan (sensitivity 97.2 %) with an average false-positive volume of 10.3 mm3 . Subjects were assigned to one of five standard cardiovascular risk categories based on the Agatston score. Accuracy of risk category assignment was 84.4 % with a linearly weighted κ of 0.89. The proposed system can perform automatic coronary artery calcium scoring to identify subjects undergoing low-dose chest CT screening who are at risk of cardiovascular events with high accuracy.

  8. Ultra low-dose of gadobenate dimeglumine for late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging in acute myocardial infarction: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galea, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.galea@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Francone, Marco, E-mail: marco.francone@uniroma1.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Zaccagna, Fulvio, E-mail: f.zaccagna@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ciolina, Federica, E-mail: federica.ciolina@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Cannata, David, E-mail: davidrum@yahoo.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Pathology and Oncology, Policlinico Umberto I, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 315, 00161 Rome (Italy); Algeri, Emanuela, E-mail: emanuela_algeri@yahoo.com [Service de Radiologie et Imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Hôpital Cardiologique, Centre Hospitalier Régional et Universitaire de Lille, Avenue Oscar Lambret, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Agati, Luciano, E-mail: luciano.agati@uniroma1.it [Department of Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Nephrologic, Anestesiologic and Geriatric Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, Policlinico Umberto I, Via del Policlinico 165, 00161 Rome, Rome (Italy); and others

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We compared two gadolinium dose for late enhancement imaging in acute infarction. • We evaluated image quality both qualitatively and quantitatively. • Low dose regimen is feasible and provides better image quality at 5–10 min delay. • Standard dose warrants better image quality and should be routinely preferred. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using an ultra-low dose (0.05 mmol/kg of body weight [BW]) of high relaxivity contrast agent for late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Materials and methods: 17 consecutive patients (mean age, 60.1 ± 10.3 years) with ST-segment elevation AMI underwent two randomized cardiac magnetic resonance studies (exam intervals between 24 and 48 h) on a 1.5 T unit during the first week after the event using gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) at the dose of 0.1 mmol/kg BW (standard dose or SD group) and 0.05 mmol/kg BW (half dose or HD group). Image quality was qualitatively assessed. Quantitative analysis of LGE were performed by measuring signal intensity (SI), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the infarcted myocardium (IM), non-infarcted myocardium (N-IM) and left ventricular cavity (LVC) in images acquired at 1, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 20 min after administration of Gd-BOPTA using both contrast media protocol. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between IM and N-IM (CNR IM/N-IM) and between IM and LVC (CNR IM/LVC) were also quantified for each time point. Moreover the extent of infarcted myocardium was measured. Results: 102 LGE images were evaluated for each dose group. Quality score was significantly higher for SD at 1, 15 and 20 min (0.002 < p < 0.046) and for HD at 5 min (p = 0.013). SNR has been higher in the SD group compared to the HD group even though not statistically significant at any time-point for both IM (SD vs. HD: 87.7 ± 73 vs. 65 ± 66; 0.15 < p < 0.38) and N-IM (SD vs. HD: 22 ± 61 vs. 9.9 ± 6.5; 0.09 < p < 0.43). LVC SNR was

  9. Central image archiving and managements system for multicenter clinical studies: Lessons from low-dose CT for appendicitis trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, You Sun; Lee, Kyong Joon; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-03-15

    This special report aimed to document our experiences in implementing the Central Imaging Archiving and Management System (CIAMS) for a multicenter clinical trial, Low-dose CT for Appendicitis Trial (LOCAT), supported by the Korean Society of Radiology and Radiology Imaging Network of Korea for Clinical Research. LOCAT was a randomized controlled trial to determine whether low-dose CT is non-inferior to standard-dose CT with respect to the negative appendectomy rate in patients aged from 15 to 44 years. Site investigators downloaded the CT images from the site picture archiving and communication system servers, and uploaded the anonymized images to the primary server. CIAMS administrators inspected the images routed to the secondary server by a cross-check against image submission worksheets provided by the site investigators. The secondary server was automatically synchronized to the tertiary backup server. Up to June 2016, 2715 patients from 20 sites participated in LOCAT for 30 months. A total of 2539 patients' images (93.5%, 2539/2715) were uploaded to the primary server, 2193 patients' worksheets (80.8%, 2193/2715) were submitted, and 2163 patients' data (79.7%, 2163/2715) were finally monitored. No data error occurred.

  10. Comparative study on the efficiency of peracetic acid and chlorine dioxide at low doses in the disinfection of urban wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Giovanna; Sacchetti, Rossella; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica

    2008-01-01

    A comparison was made between the efficiency of low doses of peracetic acid (PAA: 1.5 mg/l) and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2): 1.5 and 2.0 mg/l) in the disinfection of secondary effluents of a wastewater treatment plant. Peracetic acid was seen to be more active than chlorine dioxide and less influenced by the organic content of the waste. Both PAA and ClO(2) (2.0 mg/l) lead to a higher reduction in total and faecal coliforms and E. coli than in phages (somatic coliphages and F-specific RNA bacteriophages) and enterococci. Detection of faecal coliforms and E. coli should therefore be accompanied by a search for these more resistant microorganisms when assessing the conformity of wastewater for irrigation use, or for discharge into surface waters. Coliphages are also considered suitable indicators of the presence of enteric viruses. Although the application of low doses of both disinfectants offers advantages in terms of costs and produces not significant quantities of byproducts, it is not sufficient to obtain wastewater suitable for irrigation according to the Italian norms (E. coli < 10/100 ml in 80 % of samples and <100/100 ml in the remaining samples). Around 65 % of the samples, however, presented concentrations of E. coli lower than the limit of 5,000/100 ml established by Italian norms for discharge into surface waters.

  11. The optimization of low-dose scanning protocols of 64-slice spiral CT in the adult chest: a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Wei; Huang Yao; Wu Ning

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality of chest low dose CT (LDCT) using automatic exposure control (AEC) and constant current. control (CCC) and explore a more reasonable scanning protocol. Methods: Two hundred and eighty participants were examined with 64 CT scanner at 7 centers in China. All were divided into 4 groups. Two groups underwent LDCT using AEC with standard deviation set at 25 (Al) and 30 (A2) respectively and the tube current ranged from 10 mA to 80 mA. The other two groups underwent LDCT using CCC with tube current set at 40 mA (Cl) and 50 mA (C2) respectively. The axial and MPR images were evaluated by two radiologists who were blinded to the scanning protocols. The radiation dose, noise and the image quality of the 4 groups were compared and analyzed statistically. Differences of radiation dose and noise among groups were determined with variance analysis and t test, image quality with Mann- Whitney test and the consistency of diagnosis with Kappa test. Results: There was a significant lower DLP in AEC group than in CCC group [(82.62±40.31) vs (110.81±18.21) mGy · cm (F=56.88, P 0.05]. The noisy of AEC group was higher than that of CCC group both on lung window (41.50±9.58 vs 40.86±7.03) and mediastinum window (41.19±7.83 vs 40.92±9.89), but there was no significant difference (F lung =0.835, P=0.476, F wediastinum =1.910, P=0.128). The quality score of axial image in AEC group was higher than that in CCC group (superior margin of the brachiocephalic vein level: 4.49± 0.56 vs 4.38±0.64, superior margin of the aortic arch: 4.86±0.23 vs 4.81±0.32, the right superior lobar bronchus Level: 4.87±0.27 vs 4.84±0.22, the right middle lobar bronchus Level: 4.90±0.25 vs 4.88±0.21) except on the right inferior pulmonary vein level (4.92±0.25 vs 4.93±0.17) and superior margin of the left diaphragmatic dome level (4.91±0.27 vs 4.93±0.22) on lung window, but no significant differences (F=0.076-1.748, P>0.05) were observed. A significant

  12. Chronic treatment of (R)-α-lipoic acid reduces blood glucose and lipid levels in high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin-induced metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelani, Hardik; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Nammi, Srinivas

    2017-06-01

    (R)- α -lipoic acid ( ALA ), an essential cofactor in mitochondrial respiration and a potential antioxidant, possesses a wide array of metabolic benefits including anti-obesity, glucose lowering, insulin-sensitizing, and lipid-lowering effects. In this study, the curative effects of ALA (100 mg/kg) on a spectrum of conditions related to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes ( T2D ) were investigated in a high-fat diet (HFD)-fed and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ)-induced rat model of metabolic syndrome and T2D . The marked rise in the levels of glucose, triglycerides, total-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and VLDL-cholesterol in the blood of HFD-fed and low-dose STZ-injected rats were significantly reduced by ALA treatment. Furthermore, ALA treatment significantly increased the serum HDL-cholesterol levels and tended to inhibit diabetes-induced weight reduction. Mathematical computational analysis revealed that ALA also significantly improved insulin sensitivity and reduced the risk of atherosclerotic lesions and coronary atherogenesis. This study provides scientific evidence to substantiate the use of ALA to mitigate the glucose and lipid abnormality in metabolic syndrome and T2D .

  13. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  14. Low-Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James; Slovic, Paul

    2001-01-01

    To conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low dose exposures. This involves the study of existing knowledge and the evaluation of science information presented within a variety of formats, as educational information, news media stories, and alternative communication methods (personal contact, small group interaction, email and internet, etc.). Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low- dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  15. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m 2 , 20 mg/m 2 , and 25 mg/m 2 were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m 2 ), II (20 mg/m 2 ), and III (25 mg/m 2 ), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 ± 0.06 μmol/l, 0.32 ± 0.05 μmol/l, and 0.52 ± 0.14 μmol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 ± 0.09 μmol/l, 0.61 ± 0.1 μmol/l, and 0.96 ± 0.23 μmol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 μmol/l (t > 0.05 μmol/l) was 1.6 ± 0.3 h, 1.9 ± 0.2 h, and 3.0 ± 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 μmol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization

  16. Comparative study of SOI/Si hybrid substrates fabricated using high-dose and low-dose oxygen implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yemin; Chen Meng; Chen Jing; Wang Xiang; Wang Xi

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid substrates comprising both silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and bulk Si regions have been fabricated using the technique of patterned separation by implantation of oxygen (SIMOX) with high-dose (1.5 x 10 18 cm -2 ) and low-dose ((1.5-3.5) x 10 17 cm -2 ) oxygen ions, respectively. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) was employed to examine the microstructures of the resulting materials. Experimental results indicate that the SOI/Si hybrid substrate fabricated using high-dose SIMOX is of inferior quality with very large surface height step and heavily damaged transitions between the SOI and bulk regions. However, the quality of the SOI/Si hybrid substrate is enhanced dramatically by reducing the implant dose. The defect density in transitions is reduced considerably. Moreover, the expected surface height difference does not exist and the surface is exceptionally flat. The possible mechanisms responsible for the improvements in quality are discussed

  17. Screenings of lung cancer with low dose spiral CT: results of a three year pilot study and design of the randomised controlled trial Italung-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picozzi, Giulia; Paci, Enrico; Lopes Pegna, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a three-year observational pilot study of lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography (CT) and to present the study design of a randomised clinical trial named as Italung CT. Materials and methods: Sixty (47 males and 13 females, mean age 64±4.5 years) heavy smokers (at least 20 packs-year) underwent three low-dose spiral CT screening tests one year apart on a single slice or multislice CT scanner. Indeterminate nodules were managed according to the recommendations of the Early Lung Cancer Action Project. Results: Indeterminate nodules were observed in 33 (55%) of the subjects (60% at the baseline screening test, 24% at the first annual test and 16% at the second annual test). The size of the largest indeterminate nodule was [it

  18. Study on serum metabonomics of rats exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-rong WANG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the combined effects of low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise on serum metabolites and the mechanism of injury induced by these complex environmental factors in rats. Methods  Sixteen adult SD rats were randomly divided into control group and exposed group (8 each. The exposed group received the combined effect every day for 7 days. At the end of experiment, sera were collected from the abdominal aorta of rats. The metabolic fingerprint of serum was obtained by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy and determined with pattern recognition techniques of principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares (OSC-PLS. The similarities and differences in metabolic profiles between two groups were visualized by SIMCA-P software. Results The rat serum 1H NMR spectra revealed different metabolic spectra between the control group and exposed group. The OSC-PLS plots of the serum samples presented respectively marked clustering between the two groups. Compared with the control group, the contents of lipid, high density lipoprotein, glycine/glucose, N-acetyl glycoprotein 1, N-acetyl glycoprotein 2, phosphatidyl choline and unsaturated fatty acid increased, while those of lactic acid, threonine/lipid, alanine, creatine, glycerylphosphorylcholine/ trimethylamine oxide, low density lipoprotein/high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein/ low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein and saturated fatty acid decreased. Conclusions Combination of low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise could induce changes of serum metabolites in rats, involving in immune function, renal function and energy metabolism. The NMR-based-metabonomics method has potential of application in research on combined biological effects of the complex environmental factors. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.09

  19. A cross section study on low-dose lonization radiation and health effects in different sex subgroups of occupational population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiayuan; Yang Fei; Huang Zhonghang; Lu Xiaoqing; Liu Hui; Jiang Di; Yang Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between long-time exposure to low-dose ionization radiation and health effects. Methods: 1052 occupational subjects exposed to ionization radiation in Chengdu city were recruited in monitoring cohort in 2007, including 785 men (74.62%) and 267 women (25.38%). Individual exposure dose were monitored by Thermoluminescent Measurement. Health effects include blood routine examination, Chromosomal aberration, eye lens test, etc. Variance Analysis (ANOVA), χ 2 Test and Univariate Procedure of General Liner Model (Covariance Analysis) were implemented to test the difference among subgroups with SPSS 13.0 software. Results: Annual average of exposure dose of male and female were (0.76 ± 0.65) mSv and (0.75 ± 0.64) mSv. There is no statistical significant between sex subgroups (F= (0.136, P = 0.712). In females subgroup, the frequencies and ratios with low WBC, Low platelet, high RBC and high HGB were 30 (11.2%), 45(16.9%), 4(1.5%) and 3(1.1%) respectively. And in male subgroup, frequencies and ratios of above index were 32 (4.1%), 147 (18.7%), 64 (8.2%) and 115 (14.6%) respectively. Except low platelet, the distribution differences of the rest three blood indexes between sex subgroups were statistically significant (χ 2 test, P<0.01). Either in male or in female subgroups, no statistically significant difference of all health indexes(RBC, WBC, Platelet, HGB, and Chromosomal aberration) was observed in different radiation dose teams. Conclusion: In this monitoring cohort, the health effects were related to hormesis and adaptive response as well as radiation damage accumulation effect of low-dose ionization radiation. Females were the sensitive group to suffer adverse effects, while blood indexes were the sensitive indexes for monitoring radiation exposure. (authors)

  20. Inter- and intrascanner variability of pulmonary nodule volumetry on low-dose 64-row CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X; Willemink, M J; Zhao, Y; de Jong, P A; van Ooijen, P M A; Oudkerk, M; Greuter, M J W

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess inter- and intrascanner variability in volumetry of solid pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom using low-dose CT. Methods: Five spherical solid artificial nodules [diameters 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT density +100 Hounsfield units (HU)] were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom in different combinations. The phantom was examined on two 64-row multidetector CT (64-MDCT) systems (CT-A and CT-B) from different vendors with a low-dose protocol. Each CT examination was performed three times. The CT examinations were evaluated twice by independent blinded observers. Nodule volume was semi-automatically measured by dedicated software. Interscanner variability was evaluated by Bland–Altman analysis and expressed as 95% confidence interval (CI) of relative differences. Intrascanner variability was expressed as 95% CI of relative variation from the mean. Results: No significant difference in CT-derived volume was found between CT-A and CT-B, except for the 3-mm nodules (pvolumetry of artificial pulmonary nodules between 5 mm and 12 mm in diameter. Inter- and intrascanner variability decreases at a larger nodule size to a maximum of 4.9% for ≥8 mm nodules. Advances in knowledge: The commonly accepted cut-off of 25% to determine nodule growth has the potential to be reduced for ≥8 mm nodules. This offers the possibility of reducing the interval for repeated CT scans in lung cancer screenings. PMID:23884758

  1. The effectiveness of low-dose and high-dose tranexamic acid in posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Tack; Kim, Cheung-Kue; Kim, Yong-Chan; Juh, Hyung-Suk; Kim, Hyo-Jong; Kim, Hyeon-Soo; Hong, Se Jung; Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis

    2017-11-01

    Tranexamic acid is a proven drug used for reduction of intraoperative blood loss in spinal surgery. However, optimal dosing considering risk/benefits is not well established owing to the heterogeneity in patient selection and surgical procedures of previous studies. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of various tranexamic acid regimens in reducing perioperative blood loss in single-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Patients were randomly grouped into three different interventions: low-dose tranexamic acid (LD), high-dose tranexamic acid (HD), and placebo-controlled (PC) groups. The HD and LD groups received 10 and 5 mg/kg of bolus loading dose and 2 and 1 mg/kg of continuous infusion until 5 h after surgery, respectively. Data on patient demographics and preoperative and 24-h postoperative laboratory values were collected. Outcome parameters include intraoperative blood loss, 24-h postoperative blood loss, and blood loss during removal of the last drain. Seventy-two patients (mean age 63.3 ± 7.6 years) showed similar baseline characteristics. Intraoperatively, blood loss was reduced by the administration of tranexamic acid (P = 0.04), contributed predominantly by a difference between the LD and HD groups (123 mL; P tranexamic acid use were noted. Tranexamic acid administration for single-level PLIF was effective and safe in reducing perioperative blood loss in a dose-dependent manner. An HD regimen comprising 10 mg/kg of bolus loading dose and 2 mg/kg/h of continuous infusion is recommended. Level 1 study according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine 2011 Levels of Evidence.

  2. Low-Dose (10-Gy) Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An Open Clinical Study and Pooled Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamstrup, Maria R., E-mail: mkam0004@bbh.regionh.dk [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gniadecki, Robert [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Iversen, Lars [Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Skov, Lone [Department of Dermatology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Peter Meidahl [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. Methods and Materials: In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over <2.5 weeks, receiving a total dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. Results: The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (<1% skin involvement with patches or plaques) documented in 57% of the patients. Median duration of overall cutaneous response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. Conclusions: Low-dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT.

  3. Metabolic interactions between low doses of benzo[a]pyrene and tributyltin in arctic charr (salvelinus alpinus): a long-term in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padros, Jaime; Pelletier, Emilien; Ribeiro, Ciro Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    We have previously reported that short-term, single exposure to a high dose of tributyltin (TBT), a widely used antifouling biocide, inhibited both the in vivo metabolism and metabolic activation of the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in fish; (BaP), in turn, stimulated TBT metabolism. Here, we provide further mechanistic evidence of mutual metabolic interactions between BaP and TBT in response to long-term, repeated exposures to low doses. Juvenile Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) received 10 separate ip injections (a single injection every 6 days) of BaP (3 mg/kg), TBT (0.3 mg/kg), or both in combination; control fish received corn oil vehicle only. Two days after the 2nd (Day 8), 6 th (Day 32), and 10th dose (Day 56), blood, bile, and liver samples were collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers. HPLC/fluorescence analysis indicated that TBT cotreatment inhibited the formation of (+)-anti-BaP diol-epoxide adducts with plasma albumin (53%, Day 8), hepatic DNA (27%, Day 32), or both albumin and globin (50 and 58%, Day 56) compared to BaP alone. This antagonistic interaction was associated with a time-dependent modulation (inhibition at Day 8, enhancement at Day 32) of both cytochrome P450 (P450)1A-mediated ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity and biliary BaP metabolite formation. TBT cotreatment also inhibited (39%) the BaP-mediated induction of hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity observed at Day 8. Treatment with TBT alone increased EROD activity (60%) at Day 32, but decreased both GST activity (70 and 37%) and glutathione content (24% and 16%) at Days 32 and 56, respectively. GC/MS analysis revealed that, at Day 56, BaP cotreatment increased (200%) the levels of biliary butyltin compounds, including mono- and dibutyltin metabolites. This potentiative interaction was associated with a protective effect of BaP cotreatment against the TBT-mediated decreases in GST activity and glutathione content. The

  4. Low-dose (10-Gy) total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: an open clinical study and pooled data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars; Skov, Lone; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Loft, Annika; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ACCEPTABILITY OF ULTRA LOW-DOSE ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES CONTAINING 20 µg ETHINYL ESTRADIOL AND 75 µg GESTODENE IN YOUNG FEMALES IN A MULTICENTER CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Pinter

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The acceptability of ultra low-dose oral contraception (OC among young females after three and six cycles of treatment was assessed.Methods. In the clinical prospective study, carried out in 10 outpatient clinics in Slovenia, 240 healthy women aged 16– 30 years choosing ultra low-dose OC (20 µg ethinyl estradiol and 75 µg gestodene were included.Results. The average age was 20.6 (± 3.5 years. After three cycles (N = 228 there were no changes in body weight or blood pressure; one tenth (9.6% of women reported irregular bleeding and 3.9% weight gain while other side effects occurred rarely. After three cycles 88.3% of the women initially included continued OC use (5% discontinued the use due to side effects. After six cycles (N = 195 there were no changes in blood pressure; body weight statistically significantly increased for 0.5 kg providing the weight changes during the time were not considered. Fewer women reported side effects (3.6% irregular bleeding, 2.6% weight gain and rarely other side effects. After six cycles 75.0% of the women initially included continued the OC use (7.5% discontinued the use due to the side effects.Conclusions. The study has shown good clinical acceptability of ultra low-dose OC by young females.

  6. Association between low-dose pulsed intravenous cyclophosphamide therapy and amenorrhea in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The risk for amenorrhea following treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY) has not been fully explored. Our objective was to ascertain the incidence of amenorrhea following treatment with low-dose IVCY and the association between amenorrhea and the clinical parameters of SLE. Methods A case-control retrospective study of premenopausal women ≤ 45 years old who had been treated for SLE with low-dose IVCY (500 mg/body/pulse) plus high-dose glucocorticoids (0.8-1.0 mg/kg/day of prednisolone; IVCY group) or glucocorticoids alone (0.8-1.0 mg/kg/day of prednisolone; steroid group) in our hospital from 2000 through 2009 was conducted using a questionnaire survey and medical record review. Results Twenty-nine subjects in the IVCY group and 33 subjects in the steroid group returned the questionnaire. A multivariate analysis revealed that age at initiation of treatment ≥ 40 years old was significantly associated with amenorrhea [p = 0.009; odds ratio (OR) 10.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-58.7]. IVCY treatment may display a trend for association with amenorrhea (p = 0.07; OR 2.9; 95% CI 0.9-9.4). Sustained amenorrhea developed in 4 subjects in the IVCY group and 1 subject in the steroid group; all of these patients were ≥ 40 years old. Menses resumed in all subjects amenorrhea, our data suggest that patients amenorrhea with low-dose IVCY treatment. A higher risk for sustained amenorrhea following treatment with IVCY is a consideration for patients ≥ 40 years old. PMID:21663683

  7. Continuous low-dose oral chemotherapy in recurrent and persistent carcinoma of cervix following chemoradiation: A comparative study between prolonged oral cyclophosphamide and oral etoposide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Baruah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the efficacy and toxicities of low-dose oral cyclophosphamide and oral etoposide in patients with persistent and recurrent cervical cancer with gross pelvic disease following full course of chemoradiation therapy. Materials and Methods: 30 patients with recurrent and persistent cervical cancer with gross pelvic disease were enrolled in this trial. The patients were randomly divided into two groups of 15 patients each with one group receiving low dose oral cyclophosphamide (100 mg/day and the other group receiving low-dose oral etoposide (50 mg/day. Results were statistically analysed by IBM SPSS Statistics 19. Results: Oral etoposide was not well tolerated with grade 2 neutropenia occurring in 33.3% and grade 3 neutropenia in 6.6% and thrombocytopenia occurring in 13.3%. Oral cyclophosphamide group on the other hand was better tolerated with none of the patients having thrombocytopenia and 6.6% patients having grade 2 neutropenia. There were two complete response (15.38% and one partial response at the end of study (7.6% in the cyclophosphamide group whereas there was no complete response and two partial response (16.6% in the oral etoposide group. Conclusion: Long-term, low-dose oral etoposide was found to be less tolerated without any significant effect with patients with persistent and recurrent cervical cancer with gross pelvic disease following full course of chemoradiation therapy in contrast to oral cyclophosphamide which was found to be effective and well-tolerated by the patients.

  8. A comparison of low-dose risperidone to paroxetine in the treatment of panic attacks: a randomized, single-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galynker Igor I

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because a large proportion of patients with panic attacks receiving approved pharmacotherapy do not respond or respond poorly to medication, it is important to identify additional therapeutic strategies for the management of panic symptoms. This article describes a randomized, rater-blind study comparing low-dose risperidone to standard-of-care paroxetine for the treatment of panic attacks. Methods Fifty six subjects with a history of panic attacks were randomized to receive either risperidone or paroxetine. The subjects were then followed for eight weeks. Outcome measures included the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (Ham-A, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (Ham-D, the Sheehan Panic Anxiety Scale-Patient (SPAS-P, and the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI. Results All subjects demonstrated a reduction in both the frequency and severity of panic attacks regardless of treatment received. Statistically significant improvements in rating scale scores for both groups were identified for the PDSS, the Ham-A, the Ham-D, and the CGI. There was no difference between treatment groups in the improvement in scores on the measures PDSS, Ham-A, Ham-D, and CGI. Post hoc tests suggest that subjects receiving risperidone may have a quicker clinical response than subjects receiving paroxetine. Conclusion We can identify no difference in the efficacy of paroxetine and low-dose risperidone in the treatment of panic attacks. Low-dose risperidone appears to be tolerated equally well as paroxetine. Low-dose risperidone may be an effective treatment for anxiety disorders in which panic attacks are a significant component. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT100457106

  9. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment at a low dose but for a long duration in patients with coronary heart disease. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Koji; Nagashima, Kenshi; Arai, Masazumi

    2006-01-01

    In animal models, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves post-infarct cardiac function. However, in pilot studies involving patients with angina and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), G-CSF at a high dose frequently induced coronary occlusion or restenosis, but those at a low dose showed no significant beneficial effect. We hypothesized that a low dose but long duration of G-CSF will have a beneficial effect without serious complications to patients with coronary heart disease. Forty-six patients with angina or AMI were randomly assigned into G-CSF and non-G-CSF control groups, respectively. Recombinant G-CSF was subcutaneously injected once a day for 10 days. The leukocyte counts in the peripheral blood were controlled at approximately 30,000/μl. One month later, a Thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography revealed the increased percentage uptake and the reduced extent and severity scores in the G-CSF angina group. In the G-CSF AMI group, the curve between the ejection fraction and peak creatine kinase shifted significantly upward, compared with that of the non-G-CSF AMI group. Serious complications were not observed during the 6 months of observation. A low dose but long duration of G-CSF treatment may have a beneficial effect without any serious complications in patients with coronary heart disease. (author)

  10. Low-dose CT screening in an Asian population with diverse risk for lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Chin A.; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shin, Myung-Hee; Cho, Yun Yung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Kwon, O. Jung; Shin, Kyung Eun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer (LCA) detection in an Asian population with diverse risks for LCA. LCA screening was performed in 12,427 symptomless Asian subjects using either LDCT (5,771) or chest radiography (CXR) (6,656) in a non-trial setting. Subjects were divided into high-risk and non-high-risk groups. Data were collected on the number of patients with screening-detected LCAs and their survival in order to compare outcomes between LDCT and CXR screening with the stratification of risks considering age, sex and smoking status. In the non-high-risk group, a significant difference was observed for the detection of lung cancer (adjusted OR, 5.07; 95 % CI, 2.72-9.45) and survival (adjusted HR of LCA survival between LDCT vs. CXR group, 0.08; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.62). No difference in detection or survival of LCA was noticed in the high-risk group. LCAs in the non-high-risk group were predominantly adenocarcinomas (96 %), and more likely to be part-solid or non-solid compared with those in the high-risk group (p = 0.023). In the non-high-risk group, LDCT helps detect more LCAs and offers better survival than CXR screening, due to better detection of part solid or non-solid lung adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  11. Low-dose CT screening in an Asian population with diverse risk for lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Chin A. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Myung-Hee; Cho, Yun Yung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Center for Health Promotion, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, O. Jung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Eun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer (LCA) detection in an Asian population with diverse risks for LCA. LCA screening was performed in 12,427 symptomless Asian subjects using either LDCT (5,771) or chest radiography (CXR) (6,656) in a non-trial setting. Subjects were divided into high-risk and non-high-risk groups. Data were collected on the number of patients with screening-detected LCAs and their survival in order to compare outcomes between LDCT and CXR screening with the stratification of risks considering age, sex and smoking status. In the non-high-risk group, a significant difference was observed for the detection of lung cancer (adjusted OR, 5.07; 95 % CI, 2.72-9.45) and survival (adjusted HR of LCA survival between LDCT vs. CXR group, 0.08; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.62). No difference in detection or survival of LCA was noticed in the high-risk group. LCAs in the non-high-risk group were predominantly adenocarcinomas (96 %), and more likely to be part-solid or non-solid compared with those in the high-risk group (p = 0.023). In the non-high-risk group, LDCT helps detect more LCAs and offers better survival than CXR screening, due to better detection of part solid or non-solid lung adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  12. Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the knowledge about the effects of ionizing radiations on mankind. Some of them have been well documented (skin cancer and leukaemia for the pioneer scientists who worked on radiations, some other types of cancer for workers who handled luminescent paints, rock miners, nuclear explosion survivors, patients submitted to radiological treatments). He also evokes the issue of hereditary cancers, and discusses the issue of low dose irradiation where some surveys can now be performed on workers. He discusses the biological effects of these low doses. He outlines that many questions remain about these effects, notably the influence of dose level and of dose rate level on the biological reaction

  13. Reduced oxygen enhancement ratio at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    The oxygen depletion rate in cell suspensions was measured using a Clark electrode. It was found that under experimental conditions used in this laboratory for hypoxic irradiations, the oxygen levels before the start of irradiation are always below 0.1μm, the levels which could give any significant enhancement to radiation inactivation by x-rays. The measured O/sub 2/ depletion rates were comparable to those reported in the literature. Chinese hamster cells (CHO) were made hypoxic by gas exchange, combined with metabolic consumption of oxygen by cells at 37 0 C. Full survival curves were determined in the dose range 0 to 3Gy using the low dose survival assay. The results confirmed the authors' earlier finding that the OER decreases at low doses. The authors therefore believe that the dose-dependent OER is a true radiobiological phenomenon and not an artifact of the experimental method used in the low dose survival assay

  14. Consequences of long-term effects of low doses of radioactive exposure on females with adnexitis: Hematologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazhyna, M.

    1997-01-01

    Time cause in changes of haematological indices and Cs radioactivity in females with chronic adnexitis was studied. The significant changes in cellular structure of blood were demonstrated in patients with positive analysis on radioactivity (above 1000 Bq/1). Decelerated blood sedimentation rate, increased erythrocytes' anisocytosis (13-15%), decreased level of lymphocytes (18-25%) were revealed in this group of patients. (author)

  15. Low dose epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Hubert, P.

    1992-01-01

    Actually, epidemiological studies have to establish if the assessment of cancer risk can be verified at low chronic radiation doses. The population surveillance must be very long, the side effects and cancers of such radiation appearing much later. In France, this epidemiological study on nuclear workers have been decided recently. Before describing the experiment and french projects in epidemiology of nuclear workers, the authors present the main english and american studies

  16. Real-time Molecular Study of Bystander Effects of Low dose Low LET radiation Using Living Cell Imaging and Nanoparticale Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Mohan [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio; Xu, Nancy R [Old Dominion University; Mohan, Sumathy [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

    2013-06-03

    In this study two novel approaches are proposed to investigate precisely the low dose low LET radiation damage and its effect on bystander cells in real time. First, a flow shear model system, which would provide us a near in vivo situation where endothelial cells in the presence of extra cellular matrix experiencing continuous flow shear stress, will be used. Endothelial cells on matri-gel (simulated extra cellular matrix) will be subjected to physiological flow shear (that occurs in normal blood vessels). Second, a unique tool (Single nano particle/single live cell/single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy; Figure A) will be used to track the molecular trafficking by single live cell imaging. Single molecule chemical microscopy allows one to single out and study rare events that otherwise might be lost in assembled average measurement, and monitor many target single molecules simultaneously in real-time. Multi color single novel metal nanoparticle probes allow one to prepare multicolor probes (Figure B) to monitor many single components (events) simultaneously and perform multi-complex analysis in real-time. These nano-particles resist to photo bleaching and hence serve as probes for unlimited timeframe of analysis. Single live cell microscopy allows one to image many single cells simultaneously in real-time. With the combination of these unique tools, we will be able to study under near-physiological conditions the cellular and sub-cellular responses (even subtle changes at one molecule level) to low and very low doses of low LET radiation in real time (milli-second or nano-second) at sub-10 nanometer spatial resolution. This would allow us to precisely identify, at least in part, the molecular mediators that are responsible of radiation damage in the irradiated cells and the mediators that are responsible for initiating the signaling in the neighboring cells. Endothelial cells subjected to flow shear (2 dynes/cm2 or 16 dynes/cm2) and exposed to 0.1, 1 and 10

  17. Progress in structure recovery from low dose exposures: Mixed molecular adsorption, exploitation of symmetry and reconstruction from the minimum signal level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, C., E-mail: Christian.Kramberger-Kaplan@univie.ac.at; Meyer, J.C., E-mail: Jannik.Meyer@univie.ac.at

    2016-11-15

    We investigate the recovery of structures from large-area, low dose exposures that distribute the dose over many identical copies of an object. The reconstruction is done via a maximum likelihood approach that does neither require to identify nor align the individual particles. We also simulate small molecular adsorbates on graphene and demonstrate the retrieval of images with atomic resolution from large area and extremely low dose raw data. Doses as low as 5 e{sup −}/Å{sup 2} are sufficient if all symmetries (translations, rotations and mirrors) of the supporting membrane are exploited to retrieve the structure of individual adsorbed molecules. We compare different optimization schemes, consider mixed molecules and adsorption sites, and requirements on the amount of data. We further demonstrate that the maximum likelihood approach is only count limited by requiring at least three independent counts per entity. Finally, we demonstrate that the approach works with real experimental data and in the presence of aberrations.

  18. Gender-Specific Differences in Low-Dose Haloperidol Response for Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Register-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettner, Florian; Janitza, Silke; Prüll, Kathrin; Weninger, Ernst; Mansmann, Ulrich; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Jovanovic, Alexander; Pollwein, Bernhard; Chappell, Daniel; Zwissler, Bernhard; von Dossow, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of the most common and distressing complications after general anesthesia and surgery, with young non-smoking females receiving postoperative opioids being high-risk patients. This register-based study aims to evaluate the effect of low-dose haloperidol (0.5 mg intravenously) directly after induction of general anesthesia to reduce the incidence of PONV in the postoperative anesthesiological care unit (PACU). Multivariable regression models were used to investigate the association between low-dose haloperidol and the occurrence of PONV using a patient registry containing 2,617 surgical procedures carried out at an university hospital. Haloperidol 0.5 mg is associated with a reduced risk of PONV in the total collective (adjusted odds ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: [0.56, 0.99], p = 0.05). The results indicate that there is a reduced risk in male patients (adjusted odds ratio = 0.45, 95% confidence interval: [0.28, 0.73], p = 0.001) if a dose of 0.5 mg haloperidol was administered while there seems to be no effect in females (adjusted odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval: [0.71, 1.46], p = 0.93). Currently known risk factors for PONV such as female gender, duration of anesthesia and the use of opioids were confirmed in our analysis. This study suggests that low-dose haloperidol has an antiemetic effect in male patients but has no effect in female patients. A confirmation of the gender-specific effects we have observed in this register-based cohort study might have major implications on clinical daily routine.

  19. Regular and low-dose aspirin, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and prospective risk of HER2-defined breast cancer: the California Teachers Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christina A; Canchola, Alison J; Moy, Lisa M; Neuhausen, Susan L; Chung, Nadia T; Lacey, James V; Bernstein, Leslie

    2017-05-01

    Regular users of aspirin may have reduced risk of breast cancer. Few studies have addressed whether risk reduction pertains to specific breast cancer subtypes defined jointly by hormone receptor (estrogen and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression. This study assessed the prospective risk of breast cancer (overall and by subtype) according to use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) in a cohort of female public school professionals in California. In 1995 - 1996, participants in the California Teachers Study completed a baseline questionnaire on family history of cancer and other conditions, use of NSAIDs, menstrual and reproductive history, self-reported weight and height, living environment, diet, alcohol use, and physical activity. In 2005-2006, 57,164 participants provided some updated information, including use of NSAIDs and 1457 of these participants developed invasive breast cancer before January 2013. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models provided hazard rate ratios (HRR) for the association between NSAID use and risk of invasive breast cancer as well as hormone receptor- and HER2-defined subtypes. Developing breast cancer was associated inversely with taking three or more tablets of low-dose aspirin per week (23% of participants). Among women reporting this exposure, the HRR was 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72-0.98) compared to those not taking NSAIDs and this was particularly evident in women with the hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative subtype (HRR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.96). Use of three or more tablets of "other" NSAIDs was marginally associated with lower risk of breast cancer (HRR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.62-1.00). Other associations with NSAIDs were generally null. Our observation of reduced risk of breast cancer, among participants who took three or more tablets of low-dose aspirin weekly, is consistent with other reports looking at

  20. Low Dose I-131 MIBG therapy as an adjunct for bone pain palliation in pediatric patients with end-stage neuroblastoma: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, Thomas; Herbert, Anthony; Howman-Giles, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objective: This study describes the initial experience in the use of low-dose 1-131 MIBG in patients with metastaticl refractory Neuroblastoma given at 18.5 Mbql Kg (0.5 mCi/Kg )to (1) achieve disease palliation (i.e., pain I symptom control) and improvement in the quality of life, through subjective response from patient/carers and (2) allow day-admission to minimize hospital stay providing more quality time between the patients and carers. Methods: Patients with refractory and metastatic Neuroblastoma whose primary treatment goal at that particular stage is pain palliation were given low-dose 1-131 M IBG at a dose of 18.5 Mbql Kg ( 0.5 mCil Kg)l. Assessment of subjective pain relief following 1-131 MIBG was done through interviews from hospital visits of the patient and home visits by the team. Results: Four patients underwent Low-Dose 1-131 MIBG Therapy for pain palliation between May 2007- March 2008. Median age was 5.75 years old and median total dose given was 539 Mbql patient (14.5 mCil patient). All patients at a cenain time had relief from disease pain allowing them to communicate with family and participate in physical activities not priyiledged before. Observations gathered from carersl parents revealed that the overall quality-of-life improved after the 1-131 MIBG therapy with concurrent pain medication protocol. Conclusion: This initial I pilot study described achievement of disease palliation (i.e., pain and symptom control) and improvement in the quality of life of Stage IV Neuroblastoma patients and allows day-admissions providing more quality time between the patient and the family and reduces patient anxiety.

  1. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations

  2. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M [Univ Florida, Jacksonville Beach, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations.

  3. Weekly Low-Dose Docetaxel-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal or Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Retrospective, Single-Institution Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeda, Atsuya; Ohashi, Toshio; Tomita, Toshiki; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Fujii, Masato; Kubo, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the efficacy, toxicity, and prognostic factors of weekly low-dose docetaxel-based chemoradiotherapy for Stage III/IV oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2005, 72 consecutive patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCR; radiation at 60 Gy plus weekly docetaxel [10 mg/m 2 ]). Thirty of these patients also received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC; docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil) before concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Survival was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months, with overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates at 3 years of 59%, 45%, and 52%, respectively. Thirty-six patients (50%) experienced more than one Grade 3 to 4 acute toxicity. Grade 3 mucositis occurred in 32 patients (44%), Grade 4 laryngeal edema in 1 (1%). Grade ≥3 severe hematologic toxicity was observed in only 2 patients (3%). Grade 3 dysphagia occurred as a late complication in 2 patients (3%). Multivariate analyses identified age, T stage, hemoglobin level, and completion of weekly docetaxel, but not NAC, as significant factors determining disease-free survival. Conclusions: Docetaxel is an active agent used in both concurrent and sequential chemoradiotherapy regimens. Mucositis was the major acute toxicity, but this was well tolerated in most subjects. Anemia was the most significant prognostic factor determining survival. Further studies are warranted to investigate the optimal protocol for integrating docetaxel into first-line chemoradiotherapy regimens, as well as the potential additive impact of NAC.

  4. Occupational exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cataract development: a systematic literature review and perspectives on future studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Gael P. [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany); Registre Morphologique des Tumeurs, Laboratoire National de Sante, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Scheidemann-Wesp, Ulrike; Wicke, Henryk; Blettner, Maria [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany); Samkange-Zeeb, Florence [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS GmbH, Department of Prevention and Evaluation, Bremen (Germany); Neriishi, Kazuo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well-known but little understood risk factor for lens opacities. Until recently, cataract development was considered to be a deterministic effect occurring at lens doses exceeding a threshold of 5-8 Gy. Substantial uncertainty about the level and the existence of a threshold subsists. The International Commission on Radiation Protection recently revised it to 0.5 Gy. Based on a systematic literature review of epidemiological studies on exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation and the occurrence of lens opacities, a list of criteria for new epidemiological studies was compiled, and a list of potential study populations was reviewed. Among 24 publications finally identified, six report analyses of acute exposures in atomic bomb survivors and Chernobyl liquidators, and the others report analyses of protracted exposures in occupationally, medically or accidentally exposed populations. Three studies investigated a dose threshold: in atomic bomb survivors, the best estimates were 1 Sv (95 % CI <0-0.8 Sv) regarding lensectomies; in survivors exposed as children, 0.6 Sv (90 % CI <0.0-1.2 Sv) for cortical cataract prevalence and 0.7 Sv (90 % CI 0.0-2.8 Sv) for posterior subcapsular cataract; and in Chernobyl liquidators, 0.34 Sv (95 % CI 0.19-0.68 Sv) for stage 1 cataract. Current studies are heterogeneous and inconclusive regarding the dose-response relationship. Protracted exposures and high lens doses occur in several occupational groups, for instance, in physicians performing fluoroscopy-guided interventional procedures, and in accidentally exposed populations. New studies with a good retrospective exposure assessment are feasible and should be initiated. (orig.)

  5. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  6. A comparative study on the changes of serum fibrosis indicators after TACE with use of low-dose versus conventional-dose of anticancer drugs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Li Yanhao; He Xiaofeng; Chen Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum fibrosis indicators after transcatheter arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with the use of low-dose vs conventional-dose of anticancer drugs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: Forty patients with HCC were divided into two groups to receive superselective TACE. Patients in group A(n=20) received low-dose anticancer drug(s): 2-4 mg mitomycin C (MMC) with the tumor mass less than 5 cm in size; while MMC 4-6 mg and epirubicin (EPI) 10 mg were given with tumor size of 5-8 cm in diameter, and MMC 6-8 mg, EPI 10 mg, CBP 100 mg with tumors larger than 8 cm. Patients in group B (n=20) were given conventional-dose of anticancer drugs (MMC 10 mg, EPI 40 mg and CBP 300 mg). Lipiodol-anticancer drugs emulsion was injected into the feeding arteries of tumors and followed by gelatin sponge or PVA particles embolization participation. Four serum fibrosis indicators, including hyaluronate acid (HA), human procollagen type-III (hPC-III), laminin (LN), collagen type-IV (IV-C) were assessed before and 7 days after TACE. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups concerning the four indicators before TACE, but the concentrations of the four serum indicators were increased significantly in group B (P 0.05). Conclusions: The formation of liver fibrosis after TACE in HCC is related to the dosage of anticancer drugs employed for chemoembolization. Therefore, low-dose anticancer drugs should be advocated. (authors)

  7. [Study of genome instability using DNA fingerprinting of the offspring of male mice subjected to chronic low dose gamma irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezlepkin, V G; Vasil'eva, G V; Lomaeva, M G; Sirota, N P; Gaziev, A I

    2000-01-01

    By a polymerase chain reaction with an arbitrary primer (AP-PCR), the possibility of transmission of genome instability to somatic cells of the offspring (F1 generation) from male parents of mice exposed to chronic low-level gamma-radiation was studied. Male BALB/c mice 15 days after exposure to 10-50 cGy were mated with unirradiated females. Biopsies were taken from tale tips of two month-old offspring mice and DNA was isolated. The primer in the AP-PCR was a 20-mer oligonucleotide flanking the microsatellite locus Atp1b2 on chromosome 11 of the mouse. A comparative analysis of individual fingerprints of AP-PCR products on DNA-templates from the offspring of irradiated and unirradiated male mice revealed an increased variability of microsatellite-associated sequences in the genome of the offspring of the males exposed to 25 and 50 cGy. The DNA-fingerprints of the offspring of male mice exposed to chronic irradiation with the doses 10 and 25 cGy 15 days before fertilization (at the post-meiotic stage of spermatogenesis) showed an increased frequency of "non-parent bands". The results of the study point to the possibility of transmission to the offspring somatic cells of changes increasing genome instability from male parents exposed to chronic low-level radiation prior to fertilization.

  8. A role for very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII in refractory bleeding after cardiac surgery: Lessons from an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Till; Assmann, Alexander; Dierksen, Angelika; Roussel, Elisabeth; Ullrich, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Artur; Albert, Alexander; Sixt, Stephan

    2018-04-18

    Although off-label use of recombinant activated factor VII against refractory bleeding is incorporated in current guideline recommendations, safety concerns persist predominantly with respect to thromboembolic complications. We analyzed the safety and efficacy of recombinant activated factor VII at a very low dose in cardiosurgical patients with refractory bleeding. This prospective study includes 1180 cardiosurgical patients at risk of bleeding. Goal-directed substitution was based on real-time laboratory testing and clinical scoring of the bleeding intensity. All patients who fulfilled the criteria for enhanced risk of bleeding (n = 281) were consequently included in the present analysis. Patients in whom refractory bleeding developed despite substitution with specific hemostatic compounds (n = 167) received a single shot of very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII (≤20 μg/kg). Mortality and risk of thromboembolic complications, and freedom from stroke and acute myocardial infarction in particular, were analyzed (vs patients without recombinant activated factor VII) by multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses, as well as Kaplan-Meier estimates. There was no increase in rates of mortality (30-day mortality 4.2% vs 7.0% with P = .418; follow-up survival 85.6% at 13.0 [interquartile range, 8.4-15.7] months vs 80.7% at 10.2 [interquartile range, 7.2-16.1] months with P = .151), thromboembolic complications (6.6% vs 9.6% with P = .637), renal insufficiency, need for percutaneous coronary intervention, duration of ventilation, duration of hospital stay, or rehospitalization in patients receiving very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII compared with patients not receiving recombinant activated factor VII. Complete hemostasis without any need for further hemostatic treatment was achieved after very low-dose recombinant activated factor VII administration in the majority of patients (up to 88.6% vs 0% with P factor VII treatment of

  9. Effect of omega 3 fatty acids plus low-dose aspirin on both clinical and biochemical profiles of patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes: a randomized double blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakeel, N M; Hazaa, H H

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was, first, to investigate the effect of omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids plus low-dose aspirin with closed debridement in the treatment of patients with periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and second, to estimate the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-3 (MCP-3) in response to the supposed modulatory therapy. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 DM were equally divided into groups 1 (patients received ω3 plus low-dose aspirin for 6 mo) and 2 (patients received placebo during the same period). Evaluation was done clinically (pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, gingival index and plaque index) and biochemically by estimating levels of interleukin 1β and MCP-3 in gingival crevicular fluid, plus investigating the effect of treatment on glycemic control by levels of glycated hemoglobin A1c in serum. All data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 mo after treatment. Subjects of group 1 showed a highly significant reduction in pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, gingival index (p ≤ 0.01) after 3 and 6 mo compared to group 2. Glycated hemoglobin A1c levels showed a reduction in both groups at the end of the study period, with a non-significant difference (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the treatment protocol showed a significant reduction in levels of MCP-3 and interleukin 1β at 3 and 6 mo compared to the placebo group. Within the limits of the present study, ω3 plus low-dose aspirin proved effective as an adjunct to closed periodontal therapy in the management of patients with periodontitis and type 2 DM. Moreover, MCP-3 was proven to be effective both in the pathogenesis of the disease and as a biomarker in evaluating the response to periodontal treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Low dose ionizing radiation exposure and cardiovascular disease mortality: cohort study based on Canadian national dose registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, J. M.; Band, P. R.; Ashmore, P. J.; Jiang, H.; Shilnikova, N. S.; Tait, V. K.; Krewski, D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in a Canadian cohort of 337 397 individuals (169 256 men and 168 141 women) occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. Material and Methods: Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, such as those received during radiotherapy, leads to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The emerging evidence of excess risk of CVDs after exposure to doses well below those previously considered as safe warrants epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the cohort consisted of employees at nuclear power stations (nuclear workers) as well as medical, dental and industrial workers. The mean whole body radiation dose was 8.6 mSv for men and 1.2 mSv for women. Results: During the study period (1951 - 1995), as many as 3 533 deaths from cardiovascular diseases have been identified (3 018 among men and 515 among women). In the cohort, CVD mortality was significantly lower than in the general population of Canada. The cohort showed a significant dose response both among men and women. Risk estimates of CVD mortality in the NDR cohort, when expressed as excess relative risk per unit dose, were higher than those in most other occupational cohorts and higher than in the studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Conclusions: The study has demonstrated a strong positive association between radiation dose and the risk of CVD mortality. Caution needs to be exercised when interpreting these results, due to the potential bias introduced by dosimetry uncertainties, the possible record linkage errors, and especially by the lack of adjustment for non-radiation risk factors. (authors)

  11. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (2); In vitro study with regards to neuronal migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Koji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1993-03-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of neuronal migration on developing rat cerebral cortex, we need a tissue culture system in which neuronal migration can be observed. We prepared a tissue culture system of embryonic rat cerebral cortex starting on embryonic day 16 and cultivating it for 48 hours. The autoradiographic study in this system revealed not only the migration of [sup 3]H-thymidine labeled neurons but also neuronal migration delays from low doses of ionizing radiation of more than 10 cGy. In addition, on immunohistochemical study, cell-cell adhesion molecule N-CAM staining was remarkably decreased in the matrix cell layer. In the tissue culture system where monoclonal anti-N-CAM antibodies were added, neuronal migration delay comparable to that of 20 cGy radiation was found. In conclusion, it was speculated that neuronal migration delay might be caused by disturbed N-CAM synthesis in matrix cells after low dose ionizing radiation. (author).

  12. Ultra low-dose chest CT using filtered back projection: Comparison of 80-, 100- and 120 kVp protocols in a prospective randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali, E-mail: rkhawaja@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Singh, Sarabjeet [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Madan, Rachna [Division of Thoracic Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Sharma, Amita; Padole, Atul; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Digumarthy, Subba; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Kalra, Mannudeep K. [Division of Thoracic Radiology, MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Filtered back projection technique enables acceptable image quality for chest CT examinations at 0.9 mGy (estimated effective dose of 0.5 mSv) for selected sizes of patients. • Lesion detection (such as solid non-calcified lung nodules) in lung parenchyma is optimal at 0.9 mGy, with limited visualization of thyroid nodules in FBP images. • Further dose reduction down to 0.4 mGy is possible for most patients undergoing follow-up chest CT for evaluation of larger lung nodules and GGOs. • Our results may help set the reference ALARA dose for chest CT examinations reconstructed with filtered back projection technique using the minimum possible radiation dose with acceptable image quality and lesion detection. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and diagnostic image quality of filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction technique in ultra low-dose chest CT examinations. Methods and materials: In this IRB-approved ongoing prospective clinical study, 116 CT-image-series at four different radiation-doses were performed for 29 patients (age, 57–87 years; F:M – 15:12; BMI 16–32 kg/m{sup 2}). All patients provided written-informed-consent for the acquisitions of additional ultra low-dose (ULD) series on a 256-slice MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). In-addition to their clinical standard-dose chest CT (SD, 120 kV mean CTDI{sub vol}, 6 ± 1 mGy), ULD-CT was subsequently performed at three-dose-levels (0.9 mGy [120 kV]; 0.5 mGy [100 kV] and 0.2 mGy [80 kV]). Images were reconstructed with FBP (2.5 mm * 1.25 mm) resulting into four-stacks: SD-FBP (reference-standard), FBP{sub 0.9}, FBP{sub 0.5}, and FBP{sub 0.2}. Four thoracic-radiologists from two-teaching-hospitals independently-evaluated data for lesion-detection and visibility-of-small-structures. Friedman's-non-parametric-test with post hoc Dunn's-test was used for data-analysis. Results: Interobserver-agreement was substantial between radiologists (k = 0.6–0.8). With

  13. The influence of low dose irradiation on intracellular pH level, synthesizing activity and ATP level in cultured chinese fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomenko, I.M.; Perishvili, G.V.; Turovetskij, V.B.; Kudryashov, Yu.B.; Rubin, A.B.; Brovko, L.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    X-irradiation of Chinese fibroblasts with doses of 0.05-0.15 Gy was shown to cause intracellular pH (pH i ) changes: its diminishing during the first 40-60 min by 0.16-0.18 pH units, then the return to the control level 120 min after irradiation and, finally, the increase by 0.18-0.20 pH units. Simultaneously, the synthesizing activity of the cells changed in the same way. The ATP level changed in the opposite way: increased when pH fell and decreased when pH grew. It was shown that pH i changes were connected with the changes in Na + /H + -exchange system, and they seemed to be primary in the chain of the alterations observed

  14. Experimental study on active specific immunotherapy utilizing the immunotherapy utilizing the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Imanaka, Kazufumi; Gose, Kyuhei; Imajo, Yoshinari; Kimura, Shuji

    1982-01-01

    We have already demonstrated the remarkable effect of the active specific immunotherapy utilizing tumor cells and infiltrating lymphocytes prepared from a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue after cytoreductive radiotherapy. In the present study, the active specific immunotherapy using the tumor cells and infiltrating lymphocytes which were cryopreserved at -196 0 C in liquid nitrogen was investigated in female C3H/He mice inoculated MM46 tumor. Irradiation with the dose of 3,000 rads was performed on the sixth day. The tumor cells and lymphocytes which were separated from 2,000 rads-irradiated tumor tissue were frozen by the program freezer to be preserved at -196 0 C for two months and were thawed to inject into the tumor-bearing mice on the thirteenth day. Anti-tumor effect was evaluated by the regression of the tumor and survival curves. The remarkable regression of the tumor (p < 0.01) and significant elongation of the survival period (p < 0.1) were observed in the group which received the active specific immunotherapy using the cryopreserved tumor cells and lymphocytes as well as the group using the fresh tumor cells and lymphocytes prepared from a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue. (author)

  15. Light, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical study of the effect of low-dose aspirin during the proestrus phase on rat endometrium in the preimplantation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateş, Utku; Baka, Meral; Turgut, Mehmet; Uyanikgil, Yiğit; Ulker, Sibel; Yilmaz, Ozlem; Tavmergen, Erol; Yurtseven, Mine

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate structural alterations in rat endometrium at preimplantation following treatment with aspirin beginning from proestrus by light microscopy, electron microscopy and immunohistochemical techniques. Twenty rats were divided into control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 10) groups. Experimental rats were treated with low-dose aspirin daily (2 mg/kg/day) during estrus, beginning from the proestrus phase, mated at end of cycle and treated with aspirin. Untreated pregnant rats were the control group. Rats in both groups were sacrificed at the 84th pregnancy hour; the uterus was rapidly removed and dissected free of surrounding adipose tissue. Uteri specimens from nonpregnant rats were transferred into fixative solution and processed for light, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical study. Light and electron microscopy of endometrium from control rats conformed to mid-diestrus phase; endometrial histology of the aspirin-treated group conformed to late diestrus phase. The endometrial layer was significantly thicker in the aspirin-treated group compared to the untreated control group (p <0.001). No significant difference was found in vessel number between groups. Staining with alphaV integrin was more dense in the aspirin-treated group. Based on histologic findings, we suggest low-dose aspirin has positive effects on preparing endometrium before implantation.

  16. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xueqian; Zhao, Yingru; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Snijder, Roland A.; Greuter, Marcel J.W. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100 HU) were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. The phantom was examined on 16- and 64-row multidetector CT with a low-dose protocol. Two independent blinded observers screened for pulmonary nodules. Nodule diameter was measured manually, and volume calculated. For solid nodules (+100 HU), diameter and volume were also evaluated by semi-automated software. Differences in observed volumes between the manual and semi-automated method were evaluated by a t-test. Sensitivity was 100 % for all nodules of >5 mm and larger, 60-80 % for solid and 0-20 % for non-solid 3-mm nodules. No false-positive nodules but high inter-observer reliability and inter-technique correlation were found. Volume was underestimated manually by 24.1 {+-} 14.0 % for nodules of any density, and 26.4 {+-} 15.5 % for solid nodules, compared with 7.6 {+-} 8.5 % (P < 0.01) semi-automatically. In an anthropomorphic phantom study, the sensitivity of detection is 100 % for nodules of >5 mm in diameter. Semi-automated volumetry yielded more accurate nodule volumes than manual measurements. (orig.)

  17. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) upregulates catalase levels in response to low dose H2O2 treatment through enhancement of mRNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Prosenjit; Chakraborty, Prabir Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2005-08-15

    V79 fibroblasts were repetitively stressed through multiple exposures to a low dose (30 microM) H2O2 in culture for 4 weeks. Catalase activity, protein levels and mRNA levels increased markedly (5-6-fold) during this time and these augmentations were inhibited by the simultaneous presence of SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK). p38MAPK became dually phosphorylated and ATF-2, a p38MAPK substrate also became increasingly phosphorylated over the repetitive stress period. Short interfering RNA that induced effective silencing of p38MAPK, was used to silence p38MAPK in V79 fibroblasts. Silencing of p38MAPK drastically hindered the elevation in catalase (protein and mRNA) levels observed after a single low dose (50 microM) of H2O. The rise in catalase mRNA levels induced by low concentration (single and multiple dose) H2O2 treatment was established to be unconnected with transcriptional upregulation but was brought forth primarily by an enhancement in catalase mRNA stability through the action of p38MAPK. Therefore, our data strongly indicate that activation of p38MAPK is a key controlling step in the upregulation of catalase levels by low dose H2O2 treatment.

  18. Updated results of a pilot study of low dose craniospinal irradiation plus chemotherapy for children under five with cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (medulloblastoma)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldwein, Joel W.; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Johnson, James; Moshang, Thomas; Packer, Roger J.; Sutton, Leslie N.; Rorke, Lucy B.; D'Angio, Giulio J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Children under 5 years old with medulloblastoma (MB) have a poor prognosis. They are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of craniospinal irradiation (CSART) and have a higher relapse rate when treated with low-dose CSART alone. We, thus, embarked on a prospective trial testing the usefulness of very low dose CSART and adjuvant chemotherapy. This is an update of a previous report on these patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and March 1990, 10 patients with medulloblastoma were treated using 18 Gy radiation therapy (RT) to the craniospinal axis, a posterior fossa (PF) boost to 50.4-55.8 Gy and chemotherapy consisting of vincristine (VCR) weekly during RT. This was followed by VCR, cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP), and lomustine (CCNU) for eight, 6-week cycles. Patients between 18 and 60 months of age without evidence of tumor dissemination were eligible for study. Follow-up was available until September 1994 with a median follow-up for living patients of 6.3 years from diagnosis. Results: Actuarial survival at over 6 years is 70 ± 20%. Three of the 10 patients relapsed and died. In one patient, the relapse developed in the spine and brain outside the posterior fossa, in the second, concurrently in the posterior fossa, brain and spine, and the third, only in the spine. One surviving child developed a brain stem infarct 4.8 years after diagnosis and has since almost fully recovered. A mean intelligence quotient (IQ) score of 103 in six patients surviving at least 1 year is unchanged from the baseline group score of 107. Five children tested at baseline and 2 years following treatment had IQ scores of 101 and 102, respectively. Six children tested at baseline and at 3 years had IQ scores of 106 and 96, respectively. Excluding the child tested shortly after his brain stem infarct, baseline and 3 year IQ scores were 103 and 97, respectively. Five of the seven long-term survivors grew at rates significantly below their expected

  19. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  20. A Study on Epidural Tramadol Compared with Epidural Fentanyl Combined with Low Dose Bupivacaine for the Control of Metastatic Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resham Bahadur Rana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite advances in the knowledge of pathophysiology of pain and its management, patients continue to suffer from pain in many terminal stage cancer. Tramadol hydrochloride is a weak opioid with analgesic properties, and can be tried for cancer pain management. Objectives: This study was performed to find out the efficacy of the analgesic property of Tramadol through epidural route in cancer patients as an combination with low dose(.125% Bupivacaine and to compare with Fentanyl, a μ opioid agonist. Methods: 50 Cancer patients with or without previous pain management were randomly allocated to one of the two study regime- Group-A (tramadol 50 mg and Group-B (Fentanyl 50 mgm in combination with .125% Bupivacaine. Drugs were administered epidurally 6 hourly, 8 hourly and 12 hourly respectively for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd day. Low dose bupivacaine was added to both groups to enhance quality. Pain scores, blood pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, side effects and patients' satisfaction score was recorded 6 hourly for 72 hrs. The data yielded from this study were compiled and analyzed by unpaired and paired ‘t' test with 95% confidence limit. A value of P< 0.05 was considered to be significant. ÷ square test was done for some of the data. Results: Pain scores were significantly decreased in both the groups but were not significantly different. The incidence of side effects including nausea and vomiting was found in both the groups and was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: The use of epidural Tramadol in selected cancer pain patients (especially pain in lower abdomen and lower back may be very useful and is comparable to opioid in certain situations. Key words: Metastatic cancer pain; Epidural tramadol. DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i2.4760 BSMMU J 2009; 2(2: 66-72

  1. Life-span studies in 226Ra-injected animals: Effect of low doses, effect of a decorporative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoeters, G.E.R.; Vanderborght, O.L.J.

    1986-01-01

    A life-span radiation effects study was performed in mice injected with several doses of 226 Ra. The study included 788 male C57Bl mice. For the removal of the 226 Ra, half the mice were treated daily with a diet 5% of which was sodium-alginate. The experiment revealed that mice that received the lowest dose of 226 Ra lived significantly longer than controls, and, despite appreciable skeletal removal of 226 Ra as a result of decorporative treatment, no biological benefit was observed in treated animals. 19 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. The study of genotype, cold pretreatment, low-dose gamma irradiation and 2,4-D concentration effect on wheat doubled haploid production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naserian, B.; Vedadi, C.; Karbalaii, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this study, response of a cultivar (Atrak) and two lines (F3 2005 and F3 2104) of wheat , and effect of cold pretreatment, low dose gamma irradiation and 2,4-D (2,4 mg l -1 ) were investigated to anther culture response. Donar plants were grown under field conditions in early spring. Anthers were plated on modified CHB medium containing 2, 4-D (2, 4 mg l -1 ), 0.5 mg l -1 Kinetin and 90 g l -1 Sucrose. Percent of Callus formation in 100 anther and percent of plantlet in 100 calli were measured. Results indicated that genotype, cold pretreatment and 2,4-D concentrations had significant effect on anther culture response. F3 2005 showed highest callus induction and plantlet production and F3 2104 had lowest response. This experiment indicated that androgenic traits are controlled by genotype and environmental factors. Further more these traits are controlled independently. (author)

  3. Phase II study of palliative low-dose local radiotherapy in disseminated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jóhannsson, Jakob; Specht, Lena; Mejer, Johannes

    2002-01-01

    of the palliative effect of this regimen in patients with disseminated INHL or CLL. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-two patients (11 men, 11 women, median age 62 years, range 30-89) with disseminated INHL (n = 15) or CLL (n = 7) were treated with local low-dose RT, 2 Gy x 2 within 3 days, with the aim of achieving......PURPOSE: Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (INHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are highly sensitive to radiotherapy (RT). Previous retrospective studies have shown high response rates after local palliative RT of 4 Gy in 2 fractions, which prompted this prospective Phase II trial...... palliation from localized lymphoma masses. The patients were treated to a total of 31 different sites. Seventeen patients had previously been treated with chemotherapy. The median observation time after the start of RT was 8 months (range 3-26). RESULTS: All patients and all irradiated sites were assessable...

  4. GLOMERULAR INFLAMMATION IN PREGNANT RATS AFTER INFUSION OF LOW-DOSE ENDOTOXIN - AN IMMUNOHISTOLOGICAL STUDY IN EXPERIMENTAL PREECLAMPSIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FAAS, MM; SCHUILING, GA; BALLER, JFW; BAKKER, WW

    1995-01-01

    Increased endotoxin sensitivity during pregnancy occurs in many animals, including rats. The mechanism of this phenomenon is not understood. In the present study it was investigated whether this increased sensitivity is reflected by an altered inflammatory pattern. Inflammatory cell influx, the

  5. Ultra Low-Dose Naloxone and Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients Undergoing Joint Replacement Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngozi N Imasogie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A pilot study was conducted to assess whether both the rationale and feasibility exist for future randomized clinical trials to evaluate the combined use of naloxone infusion and tramadol/acetaminophen as opioid-sparing drugs in elderly patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery.

  6. Preventing ICU Subsyndromal Delirium Conversion to Delirium with Low Dose IV Haloperidol: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadheeb, Nada S.; Skrobik, Yoanna; Schumaker, Greg; Pacheco, Manuel; Roberts, Russel; Ruthazer, Robin; Devlin, John W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of scheduled low-dose, haloperidol vs. placebo for the prevention of delirium [Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist (ICDSC) ≥ 4)] administered to critically ill adults with subsyndromal delirium (ICDSC = 1-3). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Setting Three 10-bed ICUs (2 medical; 1 surgical) at an academic medical center in the U.S. Patients Sixty-eight mechanically ventilated patients with subsyndromal delirium without complicating neurologic conditions, cardiac surgery or requiring deep sedation. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous haloperidol 1 mg or placebo every six hours until either delirium (ICDSC ≥ 4 with psychiatric confirmation), therapy ≥ 10 days or ICU discharge occurred. Measurements and Main Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the haloperidol (n=34) and placebo (n=34) groups. A similar number of patients given haloperidol [12/34 (35%)] and placebo [8/34 (23%)] patients developed delirium (p=0.29). Haloperidol use reduced the hours per study day spent agitated (SAS ≥ 5) (p=0.008), but did not influence the proportion of 12-hour ICU shifts patients’ spent alive without coma (SAS ≤ 2) or delirium (p=0.36), the time to first delirium occurrence (p=0.22) nor delirium duration (p=0.26). Days of mechanical ventilation (p=0.80), ICU mortality (p=0.55) and ICU patient disposition (p=0.22) were similar in the two groups. The proportion of patients who developed QTc-interval prolongation (p=0.16), extrapyramidal symptoms (p=0.31), excessive sedation (p=0.31) or new-onset hypotension (p=1.0) that resulted in study drug discontinuation was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions Low-dose scheduled haloperidol, initiated early in the ICU stay, does not prevent delirium and has little therapeutic advantage in mechanically ventilated, critically ill adults with subsyndromal delirium. PMID:26540397

  7. Preventing ICU Subsyndromal Delirium Conversion to Delirium With Low-Dose IV Haloperidol: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadheeb, Nada S; Skrobik, Yoanna; Schumaker, Greg; Pacheco, Manuel N; Roberts, Russel J; Ruthazer, Robin R; Devlin, John W

    2016-03-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of scheduled low-dose haloperidol versus placebo for the prevention of delirium (Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist ≥ 4) administered to critically ill adults with subsyndromal delirium (Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist = 1-3). Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Three 10-bed ICUs (two medical and one surgical) at an academic medical center in the United States. Sixty-eight mechanically ventilated patients with subsyndromal delirium without complicating neurologic conditions, cardiac surgery, or requiring deep sedation. Patients were randomly assigned to receive IV haloperidol 1 mg or placebo every 6 hours until delirium occurred (Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist ≥ 4 with psychiatric confirmation), 10 days of therapy had elapsed, or ICU discharge. Baseline characteristics were similar between the haloperidol (n = 34) and placebo (n = 34) groups. A similar number of patients given haloperidol (12/34 [35%]) and placebo (8/34 [23%]) developed delirium (p = 0.29). Haloperidol use reduced the hours per study day spent agitated (Sedation Agitation Scale ≥ 5) (p = 0.008), but it did not influence the proportion of 12-hour ICU shifts patients spent alive without coma (Sedation Agitation Scale ≤ 2) or delirium (p = 0.36), the time to first delirium occurrence (p = 0.22), nor delirium duration (p = 0.26). Days of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.80), ICU mortality (p = 0.55), and ICU patient disposition (p = 0.22) were similar in the two groups. The proportion of patients who developed corrected QT-interval prolongation (p = 0.16), extrapyramidal symptoms (p = 0.31), excessive sedation (p = 0.31), or new-onset hypotension (p = 1.0) that resulted in study drug discontinuation was comparable between the two groups. Low-dose scheduled haloperidol, initiated early in the ICU stay, does not prevent delirium and has little therapeutic advantage in mechanically ventilated, critically ill adults

  8. Topical treatment of actinic keratoses with low-dose 5-fluorouracil in combination with salicylic acid--pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaak, Max; Simon, Jan C

    2010-03-01

    Actinic keratoses (AK) are carcinomas in situ and can progress to invasive squamous cell carcinomas. Treatment of actinic keratoses can be achieved by physical ablation, chemotherapeutic agents, immunomodulators or photodynamic therapy. We conducted a proof of concept study with 15 patients. Overall 66 actinic keratoses were treated with 5-FU (0.5%) and salicylic acid (10%) for 4 weeks (3 times per week). After 12 weeks complete response of 47 AK (77%), partial response of 13 AK (21%) and non-response of 1 AK (2%) were achieved. Treatment was well tolerated and efficient.

  9. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental study on active specific immunotherapy utilizing the immune reaction of low-dose irradiated tumor tissue, 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Tomoho; Yoshida, Shoji; Yamamoto, Yoichi; Morita, Masaru

    1983-01-01

    We have already reported the remarkable effect of the active specific immunotherapy utilizing cryopreserved tumor cells and infiltrating mononuclear cells prepared from a lowdose irradiated tumor tissue after cytoreductive radiotherapy. In the present study, the effect of a biological response modifier, PSK combined with this active specific immunotherapy was investigated. Twelve-week-aged female C3H/He mice transplanted with MM46 tumor cells were received local radiotherapy with the dose of 3,000 rads by high energy electron beam on the fifth day after tumor inoculation. This active specific immunotherapy was performed on the twelveth day, and daily dose of 200 mg/kg of PSK was injected intraperitoneally from the sixth day to the tenth day. The more inhibition of the tumor growth was observed in the group which received this active specific immunotherapy combined with a biological response modifier, PSK compared with that received this active specific immunotherapy alone. (author)

  11. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubert, C; Mata, J; Bench, G; Dashwood, R; Pereira, C; Tracewell, W; Turteltaub, K; Williams, D; Bailey, G

    2009-04-20

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98, 14601-14606 (2001)), where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB{sub 1}. However, neither AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted a small unblinded crossover study to establish AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters in human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla co-treatment on those parameters. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an IRB-approved dose of 14C-AFB{sub 1} (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 ml water, followed by normal eating and drinking after hr 2. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hr, and {sup 14}C-AFB{sub 1} equivalents were determined by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla, or CHL, respectively. All protocols were repeated 3 times for each of three volunteers. The study revealed rapid human AFB{sub 1} uptake (plasma ka 5.05 {+-} 1.10 hr-1, Tmax 1.0 hr) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hr) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB{sub 1} absorption and reduced Cmax and AUC's (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  12. The effect of low dose rocuronium on globe position, muscle relaxation and ventilation in dogs: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Ulrike; Mosing, Martina; Moens, Yves P S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate globe position, muscle relaxation and changes in ventilatory parameters after intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg rocuronium. Prospective clinical study. Sixteen dogs of different breeds, with a body weight of 22.1 +/- 13 kg and age of 5.6 +/- 2.8 years (mean +/- SD), were anesthetized for a short ophthalmic examination requiring central position of the globe. All dogs were premedicated with 0.005 mg/kg medetomidine and 0.1 mg/kg methadone IV. Anesthesia was induced with propofol to effect and maintained with 10 mg/kg/h propofol by continuous rate infusion. Following endotracheal intubation all dogs breathed 100% oxygen via an anesthetic circle system. Neuromuscular function was assessed with an acceleromyograph (TOF-Guard, Organon Teknika NV, Turnhout, Belgium) and by stimulation of the nervus peroneus superficialis. The ventilation parameters were measured using spirometry and capnography. After baseline measurements 0.1 mg/kg rocuronium was administered IV. Minute volume (MV), tidal volume (Vt), respiratory rate (RR), end expiratory carbon dioxide concentration (PE'CO(2)) and maximal depression of the response of the first twitch (T1) of train-of-four (TOF) stimulation and train-of-four ratio (TOFR) was measured. The change in the position of the globe was recorded. T1 decreased to 61 +/- 18% and the TOF ratio to 45 +/- 21% of baseline values. Both parameters returned to baseline after 9 min. There was no significant reduction in MV, TV and RR and no increase in PE'CO(2). The globe rotated to a central position of 45 +/- 7.7 s after administration of rocuronium and remained there for 23 +/- 10.8 min in all dogs. Rocuronium administered intravenously at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg to dogs causes a central position of the globe but minimal impairment of ventilation parameters.

  13. Multimodal lung cancer screening using the ITALUNG biomarker panel and low dose computed tomography. Results of the ITALUNG biomarker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozzi, Francesca Maria; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carrozzi, Laura; Falaschi, Fabio; Lopes Pegna, Andrea; Mascalchi, Mario; Picozzi, Giulia; Peluso, Marco; Sani, Cristina; Greco, Luana; Ocello, Cristina; Paci, Eugenio

    2017-07-01

    Asymptomatic high-risk subjects, randomized in the intervention arm of the ITALUNG trial (1,406 screened for lung cancer), were enrolled for the ITALUNG biomarker study (n = 1,356), in which samples of blood and sputum were analyzed for plasma DNA quantification (cut off 5 ng/ml), loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability. The ITALUNG biomarker panel (IBP) was considered positive if at least one of the two biomarkers included in the panel was positive. Subjects with and without lung cancer diagnosis at the end of the screening cycle with LDCT (n = 517) were evaluated. Out of 18 baseline screen detected lung cancer cases, 17 were IBP positive (94%). Repeat screen-detected lung cancer cases were 18 and 12 of them positive at baseline IBP test (66%). Interval cancer cases (2-years) and biomarker tests after a suspect Non Calcific Nodule follow-up were investigated. The single test versus multimodal screening measures of accuracy were compared in a simulation within the screened ITALUNG intervention arm, considering screen-detected and interval cancer cases. Sensitivity was 90% at baseline screening. Specificity was 71 and 61% for LDCT and IBP as baseline single test, and improved at 89% with multimodal, combined screening. The positive predictive value was 4.3% for LDCT at baseline and 10.6% for multimodal screening. Multimodal screening could improve the screening efficiency at baseline and strategies for future implementation are discussed. If IBP was used as primary screening test, the LDCT burden might decrease of about 60%. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Low-dose in vivo pharmacokinetic and deuterium isotope effect studies of N-nitrosodimethylamine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mico, B.A.; Swagzdis, J.E.; Hu, H.S.; Keefer, L.K.; Oldfield, N.F.; Garland, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    The rates of elimination of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and its fully deuterated analogue (N-nitrosodi[ 2 H6]methylamine, [ 2 H6]NDMA) were studied in vivo to explore the origins of the difference in their carcinogenicity. Male Fischer 344 rats, 7.5 weeks of age, were given nitrosamine bolus doses of 1.35 mumol/kg by tail vein injection and 2.02 or 4.05 mumol/kg by p.o. gavage. Animals were sacrificed at various time points from 2.5 to 180 min after i.v. administration or 5 to 120 min after p.o. dosage, and their blood was analyzed for NDMA by gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. After i.v. injection, blood nitrosamine concentrations declined in an apparently biexponential manner with a terminal half-life of 10 min for NDMA and 12 min for [ 2 H6]NDMA. The apparent total systemic blood clearances for NDMA and [ 2 H6]NDMA were 39 and 26 ml/min/kg, respectively. The apparent steady-state volumes of distribution were nearly identical (297 and 309 ml/kg, respectively). The areas under the curve after 2.02- and 4.05-mumol/kg p.o. doses were proportional to dose. The apparent bioavailability of NDMA was 8%, while that of [ 2 H6]NDMA was 21%. Isotope effects calculated as the ratios of first-pass metabolism, total systemic clearances, bioavailabilities, and intrinsic hepatic clearances were 1.2, 1.5, 2.6, and 3.2, respectively. The isotope effect determined from blood concentrations measured after simultaneous administration of NDMA and [ 2 H6]NDMA by steady-state infusion (each at 1.5 mumol/kg/h) was 2.6 +/- 0.9 (SD)

  15. TU-CD-207-02: Quantification of Breast Lesion Compositions Using Low-Dose Spectral Mammography: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H; Ding, H; Sennung, D; Kumar, N; Molloi, S [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of measuring breast lesion composition with spectral mammography using physical phantoms and bovine tissue. Methods: Phantom images were acquired with a spectral mammography system with a silicon-strip based photon-counting detector. Plastic water and adipose-equivalent phantoms were used to calibrate the system for dual-energy material decomposition. The calibration phantom was constructed in range of 2–8 cm thickness and water densities in the range of 0% to 100%. A non-linear rational fitting function was used to calibrate the imaging system. The phantom studies were performed with uniform background phantom and non-uniform background phantom. The breast lesion phantoms (2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm in thickness) were made with water densities ranging from 0 to 100%. The lesion phantoms were placed in different positions and depths on the phantoms to investigate the accuracy of the measurement under various conditions. The plastic water content of the lesion was measured by subtracting the total decomposed plastic water signal from a surrounding 2.5 mm thick border outside the lesion. In addition, bovine tissue samples composed of 80 % lean were imaged as background for the simulated lesion phantoms. Results: The thickness of measured and known water contents was compared. The rootmean-square (RMS) errors in water thickness measurements were 0.01 cm for the uniform background phantom, 0.04 cm for non-uniform background phantom, and 0.03 cm for 80% lean bovine tissue background. Conclusion: The results indicate that the proposed technique using spectral mammography can be used to accurately characterize breast lesion compositions.

  16. Study of the anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiation. The contribution of biphasic regulation of the antioxidative system in endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Large, Martin; Hehlgans, Stephanie; Reichert, Sebastian; Roedel, Claus; Roedel, Franz [Goethe University Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gaipl, Udo S. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Fournier, Claudia [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany); Weiss, Christian [Goethe University Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Klinikum Darmstadt, Institute for Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We examined (a) the expression of the antioxidative factor glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) following low-dose X-irradiation in endothelial cells (ECs) and (b) the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nrf2 on functional properties of ECs to gain further knowledge about the anti-inflammatory mode of action of low doses of ionizing radiation. EA.hy926 ECs and primary human dermal microvascular ECs (HMVEC) were stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 20 ng/ml) 4 h before irradiation with single doses ranging from 0.3 to 3 Gy. The expression and activity of GPx and Nrf2 were analyzed by flow cytometry, colorimetric assays, and real-time PCR. The impact of ROS and Nrf2 on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) adhesion was assayed in the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and Nrf2 activator AI-1. Following a low-dose exposure, we observed in EA.hy926 EC and HMVECs a discontinuous expression and enzymatic activity of GPx concomitant with a lowered expression and DNA binding activity of Nrf2 that was most pronounced at a dose of 0.5 Gy. Scavenging of ROS by NAC and activation of Nrf2 by AI-1 significantly diminished a lowered adhesion of PBMC to EC at a dose of 0.5 Gy. Low-dose irradiation resulted in a nonlinear expression and activity of major compounds of the antioxidative system that might contribute to anti-inflammatory effects in stimulated ECs. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war die Untersuchung der Expression des antioxidativen Enzyms Glutathionperoxidase (GPx) und des Transkriptionsfaktors ''nuclear factor E2-related factor 2'' (Nrf2) in Endothelzellen nach niedrigdosierter Roentgenbestrahlung. Des Weiteren wurde der Einfluss von reaktiven Sauerstoffmetaboliten (ROS) und von Nrf2 auf funktionelle Eigenschaften von Endothelzellen analysiert, um weitere Erkenntnisse ueber die antientzuendliche Wirkung von niedrigdosierten Roentgenstrahlen

  17. A prospective randomized study of the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuwan, Pawana; Tuntawiroon, Malulee; Sritongkul, Nopamol; Chaudakshetrin, Pachee; Nopmaneejumruslers, Cherdchai; Komoltri, Chulalak; Thepamongkhol, Kullathorn; Khiewvan, Benjapa; Tuchinda, Pongpija; Sriussadaporn, Sutin

    2011-03-01

    To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of high and low dose regimens of I-131 treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. One hundred fifty patients with proven hyperthyroidism were randomly allocated into the high (74 patients) and low (76 patients) dose regimen of I-131 treatment. Four patients of the high dose group and one patient of the low dose group were excluded because of lost follow-up. A gland-specific dosage was calculated on the estimated weight of thyroid gland and 24-hour I-131 uptake. The high and low I-131 dose regimens were 150 microCi/gm and 100 microCi/gm, respectively. The first mean radioiodine activity administered to the high and low dose group was 10.2 and 8 mCi, respectively. Repeated treatment was given to 25 patients of the high dose group and 40 patients of the low dose group. Clinical outcome and calculated costs for outpatient attendances, and laboratory tests together with initial and subsequent treatments were evaluated for one year after I-131 treatment. Elimination of hyperthyroidism that resulted in either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism was classified as therapeutic success. The cost effectiveness was also compared. At 6 months after treatment, 45 (64.3%) patients receiving high dose and 59 (78.7%) patients receiving low dose were hyperthyroidism. Clinical outcome at one year showed persistence of hyperthyroidism in 21 (30%) patients of the high dose regimen and 36 (48%) patients of the low dose regimen. At one year post treatment, it was demonstrated that the high dose regimen could eliminate hyperthyroidism in a significantly shorter time than the low dose regimen, i.e., 259.6 days and 305.5 days, respectively, p = 0.008). For the persistent hyperthyroid patients, the average total cost of treatment in the low dose group was significantly higher than that of the high dose group, i.e., 13,422.78 baht and 10,942.79 baht, respectively; p = 0.050). A high dose regimen of radioactive iodine treatment is more effective than

  18. Study on Effectiveness of Low Dose Theophylline as Add-on to Inhaled Corticosteroid for Patients with Sulfur Mustard Induced Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Panahi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Theophylline may reverse steroid resistance and decrease inflammation in patients with chronic pulmonary disease and sulfur mustard (SM induced bronchiolitis. This study was designed to assess the effects of low-dose theophylline on improvement of pulmonary function tests (PFTs of SM exposed patients.Methods: In this comparative observational study, a group of SM-exposed victims during the Iraq-Iran war who were treated with oral slow releasing (SR theophylline, salmetrol, fluxitide, omeprazole and NAC (study group were compared to a group of age and gender matched SM-exposed patients who received same medications except oral SR theophylline (historical control group. PFTs were measured at the beginning of the study and after 8 weeks of the treatment.Results: In total, 33 subjects in the study group and 27 subjects in the control group were studied. Mean (SD age of all subjects was 51 (14.1 years. In the study group, on the 8th week post-treatment, PFTs decreased, though the differences of tests between before and after treatment were not significant. In the control group, all the tests decreased in the same period and these reductions were not also significant. However, the changes in PFTs were significantly different between the two groups. The results of most PFTs in the controls decreased in greater extents compared to theophylline treated patients. This shows that despite theophylline was unable to improve the patients; it was partially able to decelerate the reductions in PFTs.Conclusion: Theophylline may not improve PFTs of SM exposed patients but it may decelerate the progress of the underlying respiratory disease. Further studies in this setting with higher doses of theophylline and longer term of evaluation are needed to better understand the pathophysiological mechanism of SM induced bronchiolitis and the effectiveness of the treatment with theophylline.   How to cite this article: Panahi Y, Poursaleh Z, Amini-Harandi A

  19. Mammography-oncogenecity at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyes, G J; Mill, A J; Charles, M W

    2009-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the biological effectiveness of low energy x-rays used for mammography breast screening. Recent radiobiology studies have provided compelling evidence that these low energy x-rays may be 4.42 ± 2.02 times more effective in causing mutational damage than higher energy x-rays. These data include a study involving in vitro irradiation of a human cell line using a mammography x-ray source and a high energy source which matches the spectrum of radiation observed in survivors from the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Current radiation risk estimates rely heavily on data from the atomic bomb survivors, and a direct comparison between the diagnostic energies used in the UK breast screening programme and those used for risk estimates can now be made. Evidence highlighting the increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mammography x-rays to a range of x-ray energies implies that the risks of radiation-induced breast cancers for mammography x-rays are potentially underestimated by a factor of four. A pooled analysis of three measurements gives a maximal RBE (for malignant transformation of human cells in vitro) of 4.02 ± 0.72 for 29 kVp (peak accelerating voltage) x-rays compared to high energy electrons and higher energy x-rays. For the majority of women in the UK NHS breast screening programme, it is shown that the benefit safely exceeds the risk of possible cancer induction even when this higher biological effectiveness factor is applied. The risk/benefit analysis, however, implies the need for caution for women screened under the age of 50, and particularly for those with a family history (and therefore a likely genetic susceptibility) of breast cancer. In vitro radiobiological data are generally acquired at high doses, and there are different extrapolation mechanisms to the low doses seen clinically. Recent low dose in vitro data have indicated a potential suppressive effect at very low dose rates and doses. Whilst mammography is a low

  20. New risk estimates at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The age of molecular radiation epidemiology may be at hand. The techniques are available to establish with the degree of precision required to determine whether agent-specific mutations can be identified consistently. A concerted effort to examine radiation-induced changes in as many relevant genes as possible appears to be justified. Cancers in those exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation should be chosen for the investigation. Parallel studies of radiation-induced cancers in experimental animals would not only complement the human studies, but perhaps reveal approaches to extrapolation of risk estimates across species. A caveat should be added to this optimistic view of what molecular studies might contribute to the knotty problem of risk estimates at low doses. The suggestions are made by one with no expertise in the field of molecular biology

  1. Feasibility of a CdTe-based SPECT for high-resolution low-dose small animal imaging: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S-J; Yu, A R; Lee, Y-J; Kim, Y-S; Kim, H-J

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems based on pixelated semiconductors such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) are in development to study small animal models of human disease. In an effort to develop a high-resolution, low-dose system for small animal imaging, we compared a CdTe-based SPECT system and a conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In addition, we investigated the radiation absorbed dose and calculated a figure of merit (FOM) for both SPECT systems. Using the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system, we achieved a spatial resolution of 1.66 mm at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance, and a resolution of 2.4-mm hot-rods. Using the newly-developed CdTe-based SPECT system, we achieved a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm FWHM at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance, and a resolution of 1.7-mm hot-rods. The sensitivities at a 30 mm source-to-collimator distance were 115.73 counts/sec/MBq and 83.38 counts/sec/MBq for the CdTe-based SPECT and conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT systems, respectively. To compare quantitative measurements in the mouse brain, we calculated the CNR for images from both systems. The CNR from the CdTe-based SPECT system was 4.41, while that from the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system was 3.11 when the injected striatal dose was 160 Bq/voxel. The CNR increased as a function of injected dose in both systems. The FOM of the CdTe-based SPECT system was superior to that of the conventional NaI(Tl)-based SPECT system, and the highest FOM was achieved with the CdTe-based SPECT at a dose of 40 Bq/voxel injected into the striatum. Thus, a CdTe-based SPECT system showed significant improvement in performance compared with a conventional system in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity, and CNR, while reducing the radiation dose to the small animal subject. Herein, we discuss the feasibility of a CdTe-based SPECT system for high

  2. The effect of low doses on the metabolism of thymidine in bone marrow cells of NMRI mice; an in vivo - in vitro study using labeled nucleic acid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, C.

    1984-12-01

    Low-dose whole-body exposure of mice to less than 0.01 Gy causes a temporary inhibition of incorporation of thymidine into DNA of bone-marrow cells in vitro. This inhibition has its maximum at 4 hours after irradiation. The low-dose effect is due to the temporary inhibition of cellular thymidine kinase. This decrease in thymidine kinase activity involves only 35% of the entire cellular enzyme activity and, analogous to the depression of thymidine incorporation into the cells, is only seen in the presence of a physiological concentration of NaHCO 3 . The inhibition of TdR-kinase at very low doses should not be viewed as an expression of cell damage but might be part of a cellular protection mechanism different from known repair systems. (orig.) [de

  3. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, Caio H.

    2017-01-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  4. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C., E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: villavic@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia

    2017-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  5. Incidence of colorectal cancer in new users and non-users of low-dose aspirin without existing cardiovascular disease: A cohort study using The Health Improvement Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2017-12-01

    Evidence regarding the chemo-protective effects of aspirin has influenced expert opinion in favour of low-dose aspirin use in certain patient populations without cardiovascular disease (CVD). The effects of aspirin in reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) may be a large contributor to this favourable risk-benefit profile of low-dose aspirin in primary CVD prevention. Using The Health Improvement Network, we estimated the incidence of CRC in individuals free of CVD and either prescribed or not prescribed prophylactic low-dose aspirin. Two cohorts - new-users of low-dose aspirin (N=109,426) and a comparator cohort of non-users (N=154,056) at start of follow-up - were followed (maximum 13years) to identify incident CRC cases. Individuals with a record of CVD, cancer or low-dose aspirin prescription before start of follow-up were excluded. 2330 incident cases of CRC occurred; 885 in the aspirin cohort and 1445 in the comparator cohort, after mean follow-ups of 5.43years and 5.17years, respectively. Incidence rates of CRC per 10,000 person-years (95% confidence interval) were 14.90 (13.95-15.92) in the aspirin cohort and 18.15 (17.24-19.12) in the comparator cohort; incidence rate ratio 0.82 (0.76-0.89) adjusted for age, sex and primary care practitioner (PCP) visits in the previous year. Lower incidence rates were seen in the aspirin cohort for all strata evaluated (gender, age group and number of PCP visits in the previous year) except those aged ≥80years. Among most individuals without established CVD, initiation of low-dose aspirin is associated with a reduced incidence of CRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Retrospective Study Evaluating the Effect of Low Doses of Perineural Dexamethasone on Ropivacaine Brachial Plexus Peripheral Nerve Block Analgesic Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepper, Gregory D; Kightlinger, Benjamin I; Jiang, Yunyun; Wolf, Bethany J; Bolin, Eric D; Wilson, Sylvia H

    2017-09-23

    Examination of the effectiveness of perineural dexamethasone administered in very low and low doses on ropivacaine brachial plexus block duration. Retrospective evaluation of brachial plexus block duration in a large cohort of patients receiving peripheral nerve blocks with and without perineural dexamethasone in a prospectively collected quality assurance database. A single academic medical center. A total of 1,942 brachial plexus blocks placed over a 16-month period were reviewed. Demographics, nerve block location, and perineural dexamethasone utilization and dose were examined in relation to block duration. Perineural dexamethasone was examined as none (0 mg), very low dose (2 mg or less), and low dose (greater than 2 mg to 4 mg). Continuous catheter techniques, local anesthetics other than ropivacaine, and block locations with fewer than 15 subjects were excluded. Associations between block duration and predictors of interest were examined using multivariable regression models. A subgroup analysis of the impact of receiving dexamethasone on block duration within each block type was also conducted using a univariate linear regression approach. A total of 1,027 subjects were evaluated. More than 90% of brachial plexus blocks contained perineural dexamethasone (≤4 mg), with a median dose of 2 mg. Increased block duration was associated with receiving any dose of perineural dexamethasone (P block duration did not differ with very low- or low-dose perineural dexamethasone after controlling for other factors (P = 0.420). Perineural dexamethasone prolonged block duration compared with ropivacaine alone; however, duration was not greater with low-dose compared with very low-dose perineural dexamethasone. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Comparison of chest radiography, chest digital tomosynthesis and low dose MDCT to detect small ground-glass opacity nodules: an anthropomorphic chest phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Yong, Hwan Seok; Ham, Soo-Youn; Lee, Ki Yeol; Choo, Ji Yung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of chest radiography (CXR), chest digital tomosynthesis (DT) and low dose multidetector computed tomography (LDCT) for the detection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Artificial pulmonary nodules were placed in a phantom and a total of 40 samples of different nodule settings underwent CXR, DT and LDCT. The images were randomly read by three experienced chest radiologists. Free-response receiver-operating characteristics (FROC) were used. The figures of merit for the FROC curves averaged for the three observers were 0.41, 0.37 and 0.76 for CXR, DT and LDCT, respectively. FROC analyses revealed significantly better performance of LDCT over CXR or DT for the detection of GGO nodules (P < 0.05). The difference in detectability between CXR and DT was not statistically significant (P = 0.73). The diagnostic performance of DT for the detection of pulmonary small GGO nodules was not significantly different from that of CXR, but LDCT performed significantly better than both CXR and DT. DT is not a suitable alternative to CT for small GGO nodule detection, and LDCT remains the method of choice for this purpose. (orig.)

  8. Biostatistical approaches for modeling U-shaped dose-response curves and study design considerations in assessing the biological effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, T.

    1992-01-01

    The demonstration of hormetic effects is rendered difficult for a number of reasons: The spontaneous rate must be large enough for a difference to be detectable. In contrast with detrimental effects, there is a limited range of doses over which beneficial effects are likely to be found. Publication bias hampers publication of low-dose beneficial effects and discourages research in the area. Some scientists actually believe that hormetic effects are contary to reason. All these factors contribute to lessen the chances of detecting hormetic effects through synthesis of the scientific literature. The extra statistical power obtained from mathematical modeling is not available for hormetic studies when appropriate models are not available. Even a simple statistical device such as a test for linear trend does not work well for U-shaped data. The first part of this two-part chapter deals with the probabilities of determining qualitatively what kinds of health effects may result from exposures to substances, and the second part with characterizing quantitative relationships between such health effects and exposures. The health effects may be beneficial in some situations, and detrimental in others

  9. Comparison of chest radiography, chest digital tomosynthesis and low dose MDCT to detect small ground-glass opacity nodules: an anthropomorphic chest phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Yong, Hwan Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Soo-Youn [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Yeol; Choo, Ji Yung [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of chest radiography (CXR), chest digital tomosynthesis (DT) and low dose multidetector computed tomography (LDCT) for the detection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Artificial pulmonary nodules were placed in a phantom and a total of 40 samples of different nodule settings underwent CXR, DT and LDCT. The images were randomly read by three experienced chest radiologists. Free-response receiver-operating characteristics (FROC) were used. The figures of merit for the FROC curves averaged for the three observers were 0.41, 0.37 and 0.76 for CXR, DT and LDCT, respectively. FROC analyses revealed significantly better performance of LDCT over CXR or DT for the detection of GGO nodules (P < 0.05). The difference in detectability between CXR and DT was not statistically significant (P = 0.73). The diagnostic performance of DT for the detection of pulmonary small GGO nodules was not significantly different from that of CXR, but LDCT performed significantly better than both CXR and DT. DT is not a suitable alternative to CT for small GGO nodule detection, and LDCT remains the method of choice for this purpose. (orig.)

  10. Effectiveness of low-dose doxycycline (LDD on clinical symptoms of Sjögren's Syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuotila Tuija

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are proteolytic enzymes that may contribute to tissue destruction in Sjögren's syndrome (SS. Low-dose doxycycline (LDD inhibits MMPs. We evaluated the efficacy of LDD for the subjective symptoms in primary SS patients. This was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled cross-over study. 22 patients were randomly assigned to receive either 20 mg LDD or matching placebo twice a day for 10 weeks. The first medication period was followed by 10-week washout period, after which the patient received either LDD or placebo, depending on the first drug received, followed by the second washout period. Stimulated saliva flow rates and pH were measured before and after one and ten weeks of each medication and after washout periods. VAS scale was used to assess the effect of LDD and placebo on following six subjective symptoms: xerostomia; xerophtalmia; difficulty of swallowing; myalgia; arthralgia; and fatigue. The effect was evaluated for each medication and washout period separately. Results Overall, the effects of medications on subjective symptoms were minor. Wilcoxon test demonstrated increased fatigue with LDD during medication (p Conclusion LDD may not be useful in reducing the primary SS symptoms.

  11. Efficacy of Albis for the Prevention of Gastric Mucosal Injury Concomitant with the Use of Low-Dose Aspirin: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Gyun Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims Long-term use of aspirin can be a risk factor of peptic ulcer diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Albis (Daewoong Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. for the prevention of gastric mucosal injury caused by aspirin. Methods Aspirin users were enrolled and randomized into the Albis or placebo group. Screening and follow-up endoscopy were performed for modified Lanza scores (MLSs. Primary outcome was measured by the incidence rate of peptic ulcer, and secondary outcomes were measured by the incidence rate of gastritis, improvement in MLS and subjective symptoms. Results In total, 81 aspirin users were randomized, 43 in the Albis group and 38 in the placebo group. There was no incidence of peptic ulcer in both groups. The incidence of gastritis was significantly higher in the placebo group (44.4% vs. 10.0%, p=0.003; however, the scores of mucosal edema, hyperemia and hemorrhage were not statistically different between the two groups (p>0.05. The frequency of subjective symptoms were more improved in the Albis group than in the placebo group (p=0.023. Conclusions The incidence of gastritis was lower in the group that received low-dose aspirin and Albis. The development of peptic ulcer due to long-term use of aspirin might be prevented with concomitant use of Albis.

  12. Analysis of renal impairment in MM-003, a phase III study of pomalidomide + low - dose dexamethasone versus high - dose dexamethasone in refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Katja C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Moreau, Philippe; Lacy, Martha Q.; Song, Kevin W.; Delforge, Michel; Karlin, Lionel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Banos, Anne; Oriol, Albert; Alegre, Adrian; Chen, Christine; Cavo, Michele; Garderet, Laurent; Ivanova, Valentina; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Knop, Stefan; Yu, Xin; Hong, Kevin; Sternas, Lars; Jacques, Christian; Zaki, Mohamed H.; Miguel, Jesus San

    2016-01-01

    Pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone is effective and well tolerated for refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma after bortezomib and lenalidomide failure. The phase III trial MM-003 compared pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone with high-dose dexamethasone. This subanalysis grouped patients by baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (n=93, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=56, high-dose dexamethasone) or ≥ 60 mL/min (n=205, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=93, high-dose dexamethasone). Median progression-free survival was similar for both subgroups and favored pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone: 4.0 versus 1.9 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (P<0.001) and 4.0 versus 2.0 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 60 mL/min (P<0.001). Median overall survival for pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone was 10.4 versus 4.9 months (P=0.030) and 15.5 versus 9.2 months (P=0.133), respectively. Improved renal function, defined as an increase in creatinine clearance from < 60 to ≥ 60 mL/min, was similar in pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone and high-dose dexamethasone patients (42% and 47%, respectively). Improvement in progression-free and overall survival in these patients was comparable with that in patients without renal impairment. There was no increase in discontinuations of therapy, dose modifications, and adverse events in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pomalidomide at a starting dose of 4 mg + low-dose dexamethasone is well tolerated in patients with refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma, and of comparable efficacy if moderate renal impairment is present. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier 01311687 and EudraCT identifier 2010-019820-30. PMID:27081177

  13. Global DNA methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.R.; Ormsby, R.J.; Blyth, B.J.; Sykes, P.J.; Bezak, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: High radiation doses cause breaks in the DNA which are considered the critical lesions in initiation of radiation-induced cancer. However, at very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of such breaks will be rare, and other changes to the DNA such as DNA methylation which affects gene expression may playa role in radiation responses. We are studying global DNA methylation after low dose radiation exposure to determine if low dose radiation has short- and/or long-term effects on chromatin structure. We developed a sensitive high resolution melt assay to measure the levels of DNA methylation across the mouse genome by analysing a stretch of DNA sequence within Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements-I (LINE I) that comprise a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Our initial results suggest no significant short-term or longterm) changes in global NA methylation after low dose whole-body X-radiation of 10 J1Gyor 10 mGy, with a significant transient increase in NA methylation observed I day after a high dose of I Gy. If the low radiation doses tested are inducing changes in bal DNA methylation, these would appear to be smaller than the variation observed between the sexes and following the general stress of the sham-irradiation procedure itself. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Biological and Environmental Research, US DOE, Grant DE-FG02-05ER64104 and MN is the recipient of the FMCF/BHP Dose Radiation Research Scholarship.

  14. The effects of high and low doses of folic acid on oxidation of protein levels during pregnancy: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiralizadeh, Javad; Barmaki, Haleh; Haiaty, Sanya; Faridvand, Yousef; Mostafazadeh, Mostafa; Mokarizadeh, Narmin; Kamrani, Amir; Isazadeh, Alireza; Maroufi, Nazila Fathi

    2017-09-04

    Objective Oxidants include important active molecules which are created in the body and attack biological molecules especially lipids, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and proteins, and cause oxidation and various diseases in the body. Antioxidants existing in the body help to avoid the incidence of these injuries. Pregnant women are among those where oxidation of biological molecules may do irreparable damage to them and their embryos. So, the purpose of this study was to review the effect of folic acid with both high (5 mg/day) and low (0.5 mg/day) doses on the changes of oxidative protein in reducing plasma homocystein concentration during pregnancy. Materials and methods Forty-five pregnant women participated in this study. They were divided into two groups: group 1 included 23 women who received 5 mg/day folic acid and group 2 included 23 women who took 0.5 mg/day folic acid before pregnancy till the 36th week pregnancy. We measured the biochemical variables in the serum of pregnant women at the beginning and at the end of the study. Results Folic acid reduced plasma homocytein in both low and high dose groups (p = 0.035, p = 0.012, respectively). Also, the results showed that folic acid prescription led to reduce plasma level of carbonyl groups in both low and high dose groups (p = 0.01, p = 0.03, respectively). Furthermore, the results showed that there is no significant difference between two groups and folic acid affects both groups equally. Conclusion It is possible that folic acid administration can reduce plasma homocysteine and carbonyl levels during pregnancy in dose independent manner.

  15. Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI). Strategic research agenda for low dose radiation risk research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, BfS, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Auvinen, A. [University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Cardis, E. [ISGlobal, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona (Spain); Durante, M. [Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, TIFPA, Trento (Italy); Harms-Ringdahl, M. [Stockholm University, Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Jourdain, J.R. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Madas, B.G. [MTA Centre for Energy Research, Environmental Physics Department, Budapest (Hungary); Ottolenghi, A. [University of Pavia, Physics Department, Pavia (Italy); Pazzaglia, S. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Prise, K.M. [Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Quintens, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sabatier, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, Paris (France); Bouffler, S. [Public Health England, PHE, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) is a European radiation protection research platform with focus on research on health risks after exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. It was founded in 2010 and currently includes 44 members from 18 countries. A major activity of MELODI is the continuous development of a long-term European Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on low-dose risk for radiation protection. The SRA is intended to identify priorities for national and European radiation protection research programs as a basis for the preparation of competitive calls at the European level. Among those key priorities is the improvement of health risk estimates for exposures close to the dose limits for workers and to reference levels for the population in emergency situations. Another activity of MELODI is to ensure the availability of European key infrastructures for research activities, and the long-term maintenance of competences in radiation research via an integrated European approach for training and education. The MELODI SRA identifies three key research topics in low dose or low dose-rate radiation risk research: (1) dose and dose rate dependence of cancer risk, (2) radiation-induced non-cancer effects and (3) individual radiation sensitivity. The research required to improve the evidence base for each of the three key topics relates to three research lines: (1) research to improve understanding of the mechanisms contributing to radiogenic diseases, (2) epidemiological research to improve health risk evaluation of radiation exposure and (3) research to address the effects and risks associated with internal exposures, differing radiation qualities and inhomogeneous exposures. The full SRA and associated documents can be downloaded from the MELODI website (http://www.melodi-online.eu/sra.html). (orig.)

  16. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin 10 mg and atorvastatin 20 mg in high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia – Prospective study to evaluate the Use of Low doses of the Statins Atorvastatin and Rosuvastatin (PULSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Hugo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease do not achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C goals. This study compared the efficacy and safety of low doses of rosuvastatin (10 mg and atorvastatin (20 mg in high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods A total of 996 patients with hypercholesterolemia (LDL-C ≥ 3.4 and Results Rosuvastatin 10 mg reduced LDL-C levels significantly more than atorvastatin 20 mg at week 6 (44.6% vs. 42.7%, p Conclusion In high-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia, rosuvastatin 10 mg was more efficacious than atorvastatin 20 mg at reducing LDL-C, enabling LDL-C goal achievement and improving other lipid parameters. Both treatments were well tolerated.

  17. Clomifene citrate or low-dose FSH for the first-line treatment of infertile women with anovulation associated with polycystic ovary syndrome: a prospective randomized multinational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homburg, R.R.; Hendriks, M.L.; König, T.E.; Anderson, R.A.; Balen, A.H.; Brincat, M.; Child, T.; Davies, M.; D'Hooghe, T.; Martinez, A; Rajkhowa, M.; Rueda-Saenz, R.; Hompes, P.G.A.; Lambalk, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clomifene citrate (CC) is accepted as the first-line method for ovulation induction (OI) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) associated with infertility owing to anovulation. Low-dose FSH has been reserved for women failing to conceive with CC. In this RCT, we tested the

  18. Randomized study on hydroxyurea alone versus hydroxyurea combined with low-dose interferon-alpha 2b for chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, JC; Delannoy, A; Louwagie, A; Le Cessie, S; Hermans, J; van der Burgh, JF; Hagemeijer, AM; Van den Berghe, H

    1998-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is considered the standard therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients not suitable for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. From 1987 through 1992, 195 patients in the Benelux with recent untreated CML were randomized between low-dose IFN-alpha 2b (3 MIU, 5

  19. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT : an anthropomorphic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, X.; Zhao, Yingru; Snijder, R.A.; van Ooijen, P.M.; de Jong, P.A.; Oudkerk, M.; de Bock, G.H.; Vliegenthart, R.; Greuter, M.J.

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100

  20. A short-term risk-benefit analysis of occasional and regular use of low-dose aspirin in primary prevention of vascular diseases: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, I-Chen; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-09

    To calculate the short-term risk-benefit effect of occasional and regular use of low-dose aspirin (≤100 mg/day) in primary prevention. Two retrospective cohort studies. Taiwan. 63 788 and 24 910 patients of two nationwide population-based studies were examined. Two databases of 1 000 000 patients were randomly sampled from data of Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) for years 1997-2000 (NHI 2000) and 2005 (NHI 2005). In NHI 2000, 63 788 patients 30-95 years of age were found not to have previously been prescribed aspirin before 1 January 2000, but to have first been prescribed low-dose aspirin after that date. They were also found to be at risk of first hospitalisation for any major vascular diseases including haemorrhage (major gastrointestinal haemorrhage or cerebral haemorrhage) and ischaemia (acute myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke) after their first prescription. We also applied it to NHI 2005, and the number of eligible patients was 24 910. Patients prescribed low-dose aspirin for risk. Vascular diseases. In NHI 2000, the overall unadjusted rates of haemorrhage and ischaemia were 0.09% and 0.21%, respectively, for occasional users and 0.32% and 2.30%, respectively, for regular users. Adjusted net clinical risk of low-dose aspirin use between the two groups was 2.24% (95% CI 2.03% to 2.48%; ppreventing major vascular diseases in primary prevention. Prescribing regular low-dose aspirin for primary prevention should be done with caution. Future studies should explore the risk-benefit effect of long-term low-dose aspirin use in primary prevention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Immunophenotyping and efficacy of low dose ATG in non-sensitized kidney recipients undergoing early steroid withdrawal: a randomized pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Grafals

    Full Text Available Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG is commonly used as an induction therapy in renal transplant recipients, but the ideal dosage in tacrolimus-based early steroid withdrawal protocols has not been established. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the immunophenotyping and efficacy of lower dose ATG in low immunological-risk kidney transplant recipients. In this prospective study, 45 patients were randomized (1∶1 to our standard dose ATG (total dose 3.75 mg/kg(sATG vs. lower dose 2.25 mg/kg (lowATG. All patients underwent early steroid withdrawal within 7 days. The primary end point was biopsy-proven acute rejection at 12 months. Prospective immunophenotyping of freshly isolated PBMCs was performed at baseline, 3, 6, 12 months post-transplant. The rate of acute rejection was 17% and 10% in the sATG and lowATG, respectively. Effector memory T cells, Tregs and recent thymic emigrants T cells had similar kinetics post-transplant in both groups. No statistically significant differences were found in graft survival, patient survival or infections between the two groups, though there was a non-significant increase in leukopenia (43%v s. 30%, CMV (8% vs. 0 and BK (4% vs. 0 infections in sATG group vs. lowATG. In sum, in low immunological risk kidney recipients undergoing steroid withdrawal, low dose ATG seems to be efficacious in preventing acute rejection and depleting T cells with potentially lower infectious complications. A larger study is warranted to confirm these findings.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00548405.

  2. Low dose oral desmopressin for nocturnal polyuria in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chung-Jing; Lin, Yu-Nan; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of low dose oral desmopressin in elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia with more than nocturnal voids and nocturnal polyuria more than 30% of total daily urine volume. Eligible patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia older than 65 years with nocturia, nocturnal polyuria and International Prostate Symptom Score 14 or greater were included in the study. All patients received placebo or 0.1 mg desmopressin orally at bedtime. Patients were required to visit the outpatient clinic from the first visit, and after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. Patients maintained flow volume charts and used diaries to record voiding data throughout the study. During followup urinalysis, urine sodium, urine osmolality, serum electrolytes, prostate specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life, transrectal ultrasonography of prostate, uroflowmetry and post-void residual urine volume were performed at each visit. A total of 115 patients were enrolled in the study and randomized as 58 in the placebo group and 57 in the desmopressin group. Desmopressin significantly decreased nocturnal urine output and the number of nocturia episodes, and prolonged the first sleep period (p polyuria in the lower urinary tract symptoms of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Long-term desmopressin therapy gradually decreases serum sodium and it might induce hyponatremia even in patients without initial hyponatremia. For long-term desmopressin administration serum sodium should be assessed carefully, at least at 1 week after treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An open pilot study of zonisamide augmentation in major depressive patients not responding to a low dose trial with duloxetine: preliminary results on tolerability and clinical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenuti Marzia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite multiple antidepressant options, major depressive disorder (MDD still faces high non-response rates, eventually requiring anticonvulsant augmentation strategies too. The aim of this study was to explore such a potential role for zonisamide. Methods A total of 40 MDD outpatients diagnosed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria entered a 24 week open trial receiving duloxetine 60 mg/day for the first 12 weeks and subsequently (weeks 12 to 24 augmentation with zonisamide 75 mg/day if they did not respond to the initial monotherapy. Efficacy and tolerability were assessed using the Hamilton Scales for Anxiety and Depression (a 12 week score ≥50% vs baseline defined 'non-response', the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, the Patient Rated Inventory of Side Effects and the Young Mania Rating Scale. Results At week 12, 15 patients out of 39 (38.5% were responders, and 1 had dropped out; remarkably, 14 patients out of 24 (58.3% had achieved response by week 24. Poor concentration and general malaise were associated with non-response both at week 12 and 24 (P = 0.001, while loss of libido and reduced energy were prominent among final timepoint non-responders. Patients receiving zonisamide also experienced weight reduction (2.09 ± 12.14 kg; P = 0.001 independently of the outcome. Conclusions Although only a preliminary study due to strong methodological limitations, and thus requiring confirmation by further controlled investigations, the current results indicate zonisamide may be a potential augmentation option for some depressed patients receiving low doses of duloxetine.

  4. Multi-institutional phase I study of low-dose ultra-fractionated radiotherapy as a chemosensitizer for gemcitabine and erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or limited metastatic pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; Meyer, Joshua E.; Joiner, Michael; Hall, Michael J.; Philip, Philip; Shields, Anthony; McSpadden, Erin; Choi, Minsig; Adaire, Beth; Duncan, Gail; Meropol, Neal J.; Cescon, Terrence P.; Cohen, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Gemcitabine (G) has been shown to sensitize pancreatic cancer to radiotherapy but requires lower doses of G and thus delays aggressive systemic treatment, potentially leading to distant failure. We initiated a phase I trial combining ultra-fractionated low-dose radiotherapy with full dose G and erlotinib in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: Patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer confined to the abdomen and an ECOG performance status (PS) of 0–1 who had received 0–1 prior regimens (without G or E) and no prior radiotherapy were eligible. Patients were treated in 21 day cycles with G IV days 1 and 8, E once PO QD, and twice daily RT fractions separated by at least 4 h on days 1, 2, 8, and 9. Whole abdominal RT fields were used. Primary endpoint was to define dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: 27 patients (median age 64 years and 15 male) were enrolled between 11/24/08 and 4/12/12. 1 patient withdrew consent prior to receiving any protocol therapy. 17 patients had a PS of 1. The majority of patients were stage IV. One DLT was noted out of 7 patients at dose level (DL) 1. Subsequently no DLTs were noted in 3 patients each enrolled at DL2-4 or 11 patients in the expansion cohort. The majority of grade 3 toxicities were hematologic with 1 grade 5 bowel perforation in dose level 1 in cycle 4. Best response in 24 evaluable patients: PR (8), stable (15), PD 1. Median survival for the entire group was 9.1 months. Conclusion: This phase I study combining low-dose ultra-fractionated RT as a sensitizer to full dose G plus E was well tolerated with encouraging efficacy. This represents a novel strategy worthy of further investigation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients

  5. Plants as warning signal for exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli Ibrahim; Norhafiz Talib

    2012-01-01

    The stamen-hair system of Tradescantia for flower colour has proven to be one of the most suitable materials to study the frequency of mutations induced by low doses of various ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens. The system has also been used successfully for detecting mutagenic synergisms among chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations as well as for studying the variations of spontaneous mutation frequency. In this study of radiobiology, the main objective is to observe somatic mutation (occurrence of pink cells from blue cells) induced on stamen hairs of five Tradescantia sp. available in Malaysia after exposure to low doses of chronic gamma irradiation using Gamma Green House. Pink cells appeared only on Tradescantia Pallida Purpurea stamen hairs after 13 days of exposure to irradiation with different doses of gamma rays. The highest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded from flowers irradiated with the highest dose of 6.37 Gy with 0.07 Gy/ h of dose rate. The lowest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded with an average of 0.57, irradiated with the lowest dose of 0.91 Gy with 0.01 Gy/ h of dose rate. There were no pink cells observed on Tradescantia Spathaceae Discolor after exposure to different doses of gamma rays. Similar negative results were observed for the control experiments. The principal cells in this assay are the mitotic stamen hair cells developing in the young flower buds. After exposure to radiation, the heterozygous dominant blue character of the stamen hair cell is prevented, resulting in the appearance of the recessive pink color. Furthermore, no pink cell appears on all species of Tradescantia spathaceae after irradiated with different doses of gamma rays. The sensitivity of the Tradescantia has been used widely and has demonstrated the relation between radiation dose and frequency of mutation observed at low doses which can contribute to the effects of low doses and their consequences for human health. This system

  6. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  7. Effects of Low Dose Metformin in Adolescents with Type I Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Double-Blinded Placebo-Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Kristen; Chow, Kelsey; Alam, Lyla; Lindquist, Kara; Cambell, Sarah; McFann, Kim; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Walravens, Phillipe

    2014-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance increases during adolescence in those with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), complicating glycemic control and potentially increasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Metformin, typically used in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), is a possible adjunct therapy in T1DM to help improve glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. Objective We hypothesized that metformin would improve metabolic parameters in adolescents with T1DM. Design, Setting, and Participants This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial included 74 pubertal adolescents (ages 13–20 years) with T1DM. Participants were randomized to receive either metformin or placebo for six months. HbA1c, insulin dose, waist circumference, BMI, and blood pressure were measured at baseline, 3 and 6 months, with fasting lipids measured at baseline and 6 months. Results Total daily insulin dose, BMI Z-score and waist circumference significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months compared to baseline within the metformin group, even among normal-weight participants. In placebo group, total insulin dose and systolic blood pressure increased significantly at 3 months and total insulin dose increased significantly at 6 months. No significant change was observed in HbA1c at any time point between metformin and placebo groups or within either group. Conclusions Low-dose metformin likely improves BMI as well as insulin sensitivity in T1DM adolescents, as indicated by a decrease in total daily insulin dose. The decrease in waist circumference indicates that fat distribution is also likely impacted by metformin in T1DM. Further studies with higher metformin doses and more detailed measurements are needed to confirm these results, their underlying mechanisms, and potential impact on CVD in T1DM youth. PMID:24698216

  8. A pilot study using low-dose Spectral CT and ASIR (Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction) algorithm to diagnose solitary pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Huijuan; Liu, Yihe; Tan, Hongna; Liang, Pan; Wang, Bo; Su, Lei; Wang, Suya; Gao, Jianbo

    2015-11-17

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer which has the highest mortality rate. With the development of computed tomography (CT) techniques, the case detection rates of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) has constantly increased and the diagnosis accuracy of SPN has remained a hot topic in clinical and imaging diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combination of low-dose spectral CT and ASIR (Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction) algorithm in the diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN). 62 patients with SPN (42 cases of benign SPN and 20 cases of malignant SPN, pathology confirmed) were scanned by spectral CT with a dual-phase contrast-enhanced method. The iodine and water concentration (IC and WC) of the lesion and the artery in the image that had the same density were measured by the GSI (Gemstone Spectral Imaging) software. The normalized iodine and water concentration (NIC and NWC) of the lesion and the normalized iodine and water concentration difference (ICD and WCD) between the arterial and venous phases (AP and VP) were also calculated. The spectral HU (Hounsfield Unit ) curve was divided into 3 sections based on the energy (40-70, 70-100 and 100-140 keV) and the slopes (λHU) in both phases were calculated. The ICAP, ICVP, WCAP and WCVP, NIC and NWC, and the λHU in benign and malignant SPN were compared by independent sample t-test. The iodine related parameters (ICAP, ICVP, NICAP, NICVP, and the ICD) of malignant SPN were significantly higher than that of benign SPN (t = 3.310, 1.330, 2.388, 1.669 and 3.251, respectively, P 0.05). The iodine related parameters and the slope of spectral curve are useful markers to distinguish the benign from the malignant lung diseases, and its application is extremely feasible in clinical applications.

  9. Pulsed EPR study of low-dose irradiation effects in L-alanine crystals irradiated with γ-rays, Ne and Si ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakvin, B.; Maltar-Strmecki, N.; Nakagawa, K.

    2007-01-01

    Low-dose irradiation effects in L-alanine single crystals irradiated with γ-rays, Ne and Si ion beams have been investigated by means of a two-pulse electron spin echo (ESE) technique. An effective phase memory time, T M , was measured from the first stable L-alanine radical, SAR1, and its complex relaxation mechanism is discussed. Both spectral and instantaneous diffusion contributions to the total effective relaxation rate have been extrapolated through the detection of the two-pulse ESE signal as a function of turning angle. The local microscopic concentration of paramagnetic centers C(ions)/C(γ-ray) for low-dose heavy-ion irradiation has been deduced from the corresponding spin-spin interaction

  10. Optimal low-dose radiosurgery combined with and without intervention for unruptured arteriovenous malformations. A long-term follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hiroshi K.; Naitou, Isao

    2006-01-01

    Treatment indication for unruptured arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the brain was investigated based on long-term results of low-dose Gamma Knife (GK) surgery. Thirty-nine patients with unruptured AVMs treated with GK surgery were followed more than 7 years. These AVMs were found due to seizure and steal symptoms in 22 and 4 patients, respectively, and incidentally in 13. Embolization was performed in 6 patients before GK surgery. Total obliteration was obtained in 83.3% after initial treatment and 95.8% after additional treatment. Bleeding before total obliteration occurred in 2 patients and adverse effect on the internal capsule in 1. It is concluded that low-dose GK surgery is safe and effective for the treatment of unruptured AVMs, especially symptomatic AVMs in functional areas. (author)

  11. Efficacy and safety of low-dose anticholinergics to treat men with lower urinary tract symptoms with overactive bladder: a retrospective study based on real life practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Kgi Park

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: Our results suggest that treatment of LUTS/OAB patients with an α-blocker plus tolterodine 2 mg is as effective as α-blocker plus tolterodine 4 mg, and the incidence of voiding difficulty was in the low-dose anticholinergic is lower. These results indicate that dose strength should be decided on a case-by-case basis to balance the efficacy and safety.

  12. Diagnostic Performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Detecting Asbestos-Related Pleuropulmonary Diseases: Prospective Study in a Screening Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Schaal, Marysa; Severac, Fran?ois; Labani, Aissam; Jeung, Mi-Young; Roy, Catherine; Ohana, Micka?l

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Chest CT (ULD CT) for the detection of any asbestos-related lesions (primary endpoint) and specific asbestos-related abnormalities, i.e. non-calcified and calcified pleural plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, asbestosis and significant lung nodules (secondary endpoints). Material and Methods 55 male patients (55.7?8.1 years old) with occupational asbestos exposure for at least 15 years and where CT screening was indicated wer...

  13. Is low-dose amitriptyline effective in the management of chronic low back pain? Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Donna M; Wluka, Anita E; Sim, Malcolm R; van Tulder, Maurits; Forbes, Andrew; Gibson, Stephen J; Arnold, Carolyn; Fong, Chris; Anthony, Shane N; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2016-10-22

    Low back pain is a major clinical and public health problem, with limited evidence-based treatments. Low-dose antidepressants are commonly used to treat pain in chronic low back pain. However, their efficacy is unproven. The aim of this pragmatic, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial is to determine whether low-dose amitriptyline (an antidepressant) is more effective than placebo in reducing pain in individuals with chronic low back pain. One hundred and fifty individuals with chronic low back pain will be recruited through hospital and private medical and allied health clinics, advertising in local media and posting of flyers in community locations. They will be randomly allocated to receive either low-dose amitriptyline (25 mg) or an active placebo (benztropine mesylate, 1 mg) for 6 months. The primary outcome measure of pain intensity will be assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months using validated questionnaires. Secondary measures of self-reported low back disability, work absence and hindrance in the performance of paid/unpaid work will also be examined. Intention-to-treat analyses will be performed. This pragmatic, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial will provide evidence regarding the effectiveness of low-dose antidepressants compared with placebo in reducing pain, disability, work absenteeism and hindrance in work performance in individuals with chronic low back pain. This trial has major public health and clinical importance as it has the potential to provide an effective approach to the management of chronic low back pain. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12612000131853 ; registered on 30 January 2012.

  14. Study of the anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiation. The contribution of biphasic regulation of the antioxidative system in endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large, Martin; Hehlgans, Stephanie; Reichert, Sebastian; Roedel, Claus; Roedel, Franz; Gaipl, Udo S.; Fournier, Claudia; Weiss, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We examined (a) the expression of the antioxidative factor glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) following low-dose X-irradiation in endothelial cells (ECs) and (b) the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nrf2 on functional properties of ECs to gain further knowledge about the anti-inflammatory mode of action of low doses of ionizing radiation. EA.hy926 ECs and primary human dermal microvascular ECs (HMVEC) were stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 20 ng/ml) 4 h before irradiation with single doses ranging from 0.3 to 3 Gy. The expression and activity of GPx and Nrf2 were analyzed by flow cytometry, colorimetric assays, and real-time PCR. The impact of ROS and Nrf2 on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) adhesion was assayed in the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and Nrf2 activator AI-1. Following a low-dose exposure, we observed in EA.hy926 EC and HMVECs a discontinuous expression and enzymatic activity of GPx concomitant with a lowered expression and DNA binding activity of Nrf2 that was most pronounced at a dose of 0.5 Gy. Scavenging of ROS by NAC and activation of Nrf2 by AI-1 significantly diminished a lowered adhesion of PBMC to EC at a dose of 0.5 Gy. Low-dose irradiation resulted in a nonlinear expression and activity of major compounds of the antioxidative system that might contribute to anti-inflammatory effects in stimulated ECs. (orig.) [de

  15. Bioavailability of diclofenac potassium at low doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Burkhard; Chevts, Julia; Renner, Bertold; Wuttke, Henrike; Rau, Thomas; Schmidt, Andreas; Szelenyi, Istvan; Brune, Kay; Werner, Ulrike

    2005-01-01

    Aim Diclofenac-K has been recently launched at low oral doses in different countries for over-the-counter use. However, given the considerable first-pass metabolism of diclofenac, the degree of absorption of diclofenac-K at low doses remained to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability of low-dose diclofenac-K. Methods A randomized, three-way, cross-over study was performed in 10 subjects. Each received diclofenac-K, 22.5 mg via short-term i.v. infusion and orally at single doses of 12.5 mg and 25 mg. Results Mean (± SD) times to maximal plasma concentration (tmax) of diclofenac were 0.48 ± 0.28 h (12.5 mg) and 0.93 ± 0.96 h (25 mg). The absolute bioavailability of diclofenac-K after oral administration did not differ significantly in the 12.5-mg and 25-mg dose group (63.1 ± 12.6% vs. 65.1 ± 19.4%, respectively). The 90% confidence intervals for the AUC∞ and AUCt ratios for the two oral regimes were 82.6, 103.4% (point estimate 92.4%) and 86.2, 112.9% (point estimate 98.6%), respectively. These values were within the acceptance criteria for bioequivalence (80–125%). Conclusions Our data indicate that diclofenac-K is rapidly and well absorbed at low dose, and are consistent with a rapid onset of action of the drug. Abbreviations AUC, area under plasma concentraton-time curve; Cmax, peak plasma concentration; CI, confidence interval; COX, cyclooxygenase; D, dose; F, absolute bioavailability; tmax, time to reach Cmax. PMID:15606444

  16. Non-randomized study on the effects of preoperative radiotherapy and daily administration of low-dose cisplatin against those of radiotherapy alone for oral cancer. Effects on local control, control of metastases, and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hiroshi; Ohtsuka, Akiko; Kobayashi, Hiroichi; Kurashina, Kenji; Shikama, Naoto; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2000-01-01

    Cisplatin is a known radiation modifier. Our previous study suggested that daily administration of low-dose cisplatin enhanced the efficacy of radiotherapy against primary oral squamous carcinoma. In this paper, we follow the patients who participated in the previous study and survey the benefit of combination low-dose cisplatin in improving local control, prevention of metastases, and overall survival. This study included patients with surgically resectable advanced oral tumors. Ten patients underwent preoperative radiotherapy of 30-40 Gy/15-20 days with concomitant daily administration of low-dose cisplatin (5 mg/body or 5 mg/m 2 ). Ten other patients received external radiotherapy alone. All patients then underwent a planned radical tumor resection. No significant difference was see in loco-regional control rates (primary: 86 vs. 88%, neck: 83 vs. 78% at 48 months) or incidence of metastasis (70 vs. 64%) between the two groups. Nor was there a significant difference in the overall survival rate (60 vs. 66%). The results of this study suggest that the concomitant use of daily administration of low-dose cisplatin with preoperative radiation brings no statistically significant benefit in improving local control and survival rate in patients with advanced resectable oral cancer. (author)

  17. A randomized, double-blind, multicentre study comparing daily 2 and 5 mg of tropisetron for the control of nausea and vomiting induced by low-dose cisplatin- or non-cisplatin-containing chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, ANM; vanderGraaf, WTA; Wils, JA; vanHeukelom, LS; vanderLinden, GHM; DullemondWestland, AC; Nooy, M; vanderHeul, C; deBruijn, KM; deVries, EGE

    Background: This study compares efficacy safety and tolerability of 2 and 5 mg tropisetron in prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by low-dose cisplatin- or non-cisplatin-containing chemotherapy. Patients and methods: 152 chemotherapy-naive cancer patients were randomized in a double-blind

  18. A comparison study on of tumor cell-killing effects between low-dose-rate β-irradiation of 32P and γ-irradiation of 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Huiru; Tian Jiahe; Ding Weimin; Zhang Jinming; Chen Yingmao

    2004-01-01

    The paper is to elucidate radiobiological characteristics and radiobiological mechanism in killing tumor cells with low dose rate β-rays and high dose rate γ-rays. HeLa cells were exposed to low-rate β-irradiation of 32 P or high-dose-rate γ-irradiation of 60 Co. Cell response-patterns were compared between two the types of radiations in terms of their inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle blockage, evaluated by trypanblue excluded method and flow cytometry, respectively. Results show that there is a different way in growth inhibition effect on HeLa cells between low-dose-rate irradiation of 32 P and high-dose-rate irradiation of 60 Co γ. In exposure to 32 P, the inhibition of cell proliferation in HeLa cell was a prolong course, whereas and the effect was in a more serious and quick way in 60 Co irradiation. Cell cycle arrest in G 2 phase induced by 32 P was lower and more prolong than that induced by 60 Co. The inhibition effect on tumor cells between the two types of radiations is different. Impaired DNA repair system by continuous low-dose-rate radiation might contribute to the final radiation effect of 32 P

  19. The influence of 60Co gamma rays to cell reproduction (An experiment using low dose levels on vero and primary monkey kidney cells)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danusupadmo, C.J. Sugiarto

    1985-01-01

    Vero and primary monkey kidney cells in culture were gamma irradiated with doses of 0, 0.4 and 0.8 Gy at a dose-rate of 1.30-1.45x10 3 Gy/hour. At harvest time 3 days post irradiation, 0.4 Gy proved to be able to lower the number of vero cells in such a degree that it became significantly different from the control, whereas 0.8 Gy could not suppress the number of primary cells to a level that differed significantly from its control. At harvest time of 7 days post irradiation, 0.4 Gy was found effective in lowering both vero and primary cells so that the number of the harvested cells were significantly different from the controls. At harvest time of 3 days post irradiation, 0.8 Gy caused both cell types reached levels that were not significantly different from 0.4 Gy, but at 7 days post irradiation the number of vero cells was very significantly different from that of 0.4 Gy, while the number of primary cells remained equal to that of 0.4 Gy. This phenomenon showed that irradiation could cause greater injurious effect at more advanced post irradiation times, while the more proliferative vero cells proved to be more susceptible to irradiation than primary cells, but at the same time more potential in performing repair. (author)

  20. Late change of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate or low dose rate interstitial brachytherapy. A retrospective comparative study on oral and oropharyngeal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare late changes of normal tissue treated either by high dose rate (HDR) or low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy. For HDR group, 22 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by HDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Osaka (Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases and Osaka University Hospital) during June 1994 through April 2000 and came to the follow-up clinics during July 2000 through December 2000 were studied. For LDR group, 26 oropharynx cancer patients who were treated by LDR Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy with/without external beam radiotherapy in Nancy (Centre Alexis Vautrin) during February 1989 through July 1998 and came to the follow-up clinics during April 1999 through July 1999 were studied. The standard HDR schedules were 54 Gy/9 fr/5-6 days for monotherapy and 18-24 Gy/3-4 fr/2-3 days following 45 Gy external beam radiotherapy. The standard LDR schedules were 65 Gy/5-6 days for monotherapy and 15-25 Gy/2-3 days following 50 Gy external beam radiotherapy. For evaluation of the late changes, we scored the mucosal and muscular changes inside the treated volume using the modified Dische score system and the RTOG/EORTC late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. For 6 items of the modified Dische score system, no significant difference was found between HDR and LDR groups. For the remaining 2 items (pallor, mobility impairment of faucial pillars), LDR group showed higher scores (p=0.010, 0.002). LDR group showed a trend toward higher scores for the RTOG/EORTC scheme (p=0.059). Some predict late effects by HDR interstitial brachytherapy to be severer than by LDR because no dose-rate effects can be expected. Our study, however, showed at least equivalent or even milder late changes by HDR. Appropriate fractionation schedule and extra geometrical sparing effects by optimized dose distribution of HDR group might result in milder late changes. With our

  1. Biological responses to low dose rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    Linear non-threshold (LNT) theory is a basic theory for radioprotection. While LNT dose not consider irradiation time or dose-rate, biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose. Moreover, experimental and epidemiological studies that can evaluate LNT at low dose/low dose-rate are not sufficiently accumulated. Here we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, dose-rate and irradiation time using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells as indicators of biological responses. We also acquired quantitative data at low doses that can evaluate adaptability of LNT with statistically sufficient accuracy. Our results demonstrate that biological responses at low dose-rate are remarkably affected by exposure time, and they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in long-term irradiation. We also found that change of biological responses at low dose was not linearly correlated to dose. These results suggest that it is necessary for us to create a new model which sufficiently includes dose-rate effect and correctly fits of actual experimental and epidemiological results to evaluate risk of radiation at low dose/low dose-rate. (author)

  2. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  3. Dose rate effect on low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity with cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) is the phenomenon that mammalian cells exhibit higher sensitivity to radiation at low doses (< 0.5 Gy) than expected by the linear-quadratic model. At doses above 0.5Gy, the cellular response is recovered to the level expected by the linear-quadratic model. This transition is called the increased radio-resistance (IRR). HRS was first verified using Chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro by Marples and has been confirmed in studies with other cell lines including human normal and tumor cells. HRS is known to be induced by inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), which plays a key role in repairing DNA damages. Considering the connection between ATM and HRS, one can infer that dose rate may affect cellular response regarding HRS at low doses. In this study, we quantitated the effect of dose rate on HRS by clonogenic assay with normal and tumor cells. The HRS of cells at low dose exposures is a phenomenon already known. In this study, we observed HRS of rat normal diencephalon cells and rat gliosarcoma cells at doses below 1 Gy. In addition, we found that dose rate mattered. HRS occurred at low doses, but only when total dose was delivered at a rate below certain level.

  4. Low-dose non-enhanced CT versus full-dose contrast-enhanced CT in integrated PET/CT studies for the diagnosis of uterine cancer recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of PET Diagnosis, Kobe (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Suzuki, Kayo [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of PET Diagnosis, Kobe (Japan); Nakamoto, Yuji [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko; Sakamoto, Setsu; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan); Senda, Michio [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Department of Molecular Imaging, Kobe (Japan); Kita, Masato [Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kobe (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate low-dose non-enhanced CT (ldCT) and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in integrated {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT studies for restaging of uterine cancer. A group of 100 women who had undergone treatment for uterine cervical (n=55) or endometrial cancer (n=45) underwent a conventional PET/CT scans with ldCT, and then a ceCT scan. Two observers retrospectively reviewed and interpreted the PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT images in consensus using a three-point grading scale (negative, equivocal, or positive) per patient and per lesion. Final diagnoses were obtained by histopathological examination, or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months. Patient-based analysis showed that the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/ceCT were 90% (27/30), 97% (68/70) and 95% (95/100), respectively, whereas those of PET/ldCT were 83% (25/30), 94% (66/70) and 91% (91/100), respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy did not significantly differ between two methods (McNemar test, p=0.48, p=0.48, and p=0.13, respectively). There were 52 sites of lesion recurrence: 12 pelvic lymph node (LN), 11 local recurrence, 8 peritoneum, 7 abdominal LN, 5 lung, 3 supraclavicular LN, 3 liver, 2 mediastinal LN, and 1 muscle and bone. The grading results for the 52 sites of recurrence were: negative 5, equivocal 0 and positive 47 for PET/ceCT, and negative 5, equivocal 4 and positive 43 for PET/ldCT, respectively. Four equivocal regions by PET/ldCT (local recurrence, pelvic LN metastasis, liver metastasis and muscle metastasis) were correctly interpreted as positive by PET/ceCT. PET/ceCT is an accurate imaging modality for the assessment of uterine cancer recurrence. Its use reduces the frequency of equivocal interpretations. (orig.)

  5. Low and very low doses, new recommendations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, N.

    1999-01-01

    The topic of the seminar organized by the world council of nuclear workers (WONUC) was the effects of low or very low doses on human health. Discussions centred round the linearity of the relation between dose and effect in the evaluation and management of the health hazard. The recommendations proposed by ICPR (international commission for radiological protection) are based on this linearity as a precaution. On the one hand it is remembered that low dose irradiation might be beneficial. It has been proved that the irradiation of the whole body is efficient in case of Hodgkin lymphoma. On the other hand it is remembered that doses as low as 10 mSv in utero have led to an excess of cancer in children. Studies based on experimentally radio-induced cancers have been carried out in Japan, China, Canada and France.Their results seem to be not consistent with the hypothesis of linearity. During the last decade a lot of work has been made but a conclusion is far to be reached, it is said that the American department of energy (DOE) has invited bids in 1999 to launch research programs in order to clarify the situation. (A.C.)

  6. Use of low-dose oral theophylline as an adjunct to inhaled corticosteroids in preventing exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Graham; Cotton, Seonaidh; Barnes, Peter; Briggs, Andrew; Burns, Graham; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Chrystyn, Henry; Davies, Lisa; De Soyza, Anthony; Fielding, Shona; Gompertz, Simon; Haughney, John; Lee, Amanda J; McCormack, Kirsty; McPherson, Gladys; Morice, Alyn; Norrie, John; Sullivan, Anita; Wilson, Andrew; Price, David

    2015-06-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. An incomplete response to the anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled corticosteroids is present in COPD. Preclinical work indicates that 'low dose' theophylline improves steroid responsiveness. The Theophylline With Inhaled Corticosteroids (TWICS) trial investigates whether the addition of 'low dose' theophylline to inhaled corticosteroids has clinical and cost-effective benefits in COPD. TWICS is a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted in primary and secondary care sites in the UK. The inclusion criteria are the following: an established predominant respiratory diagnosis of COPD (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity [FEV1/FVC] of less than 0.7), age of at least 40 years, smoking history of at least 10 pack-years, current inhaled corticosteroid use, and history of at least two exacerbations requiring treatment with antibiotics or oral corticosteroids in the previous year. A computerised randomisation system will stratify 1424 participants by region and recruitment setting (primary and secondary) and then randomly assign with equal probability to intervention or control arms. Participants will receive either 'low dose' theophylline (Uniphyllin MR 200 mg tablets) or placebo for 52 weeks. Dosing is based on pharmacokinetic modelling to achieve a steady-state serum theophylline of 1-5 mg/l. A dose of theophylline MR 200 mg once daily (or placebo once daily) will be taken by participants who do not smoke or participants who smoke but have an ideal body weight (IBW) of not more than 60 kg. A dose of theophylline MR 200 mg twice daily (or placebo twice daily) will be taken by participants who smoke and have an IBW of more than 60 kg. Participants will be reviewed at recruitment and after 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome is the total number of participant-reported COPD exacerbations requiring

  7. Research on low radiation doses - A better understanding of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Radiation doses below 100 mSv are called low doses. Epidemiological research on the health hazards of low doses are difficult to do because numerous pathologies, particularly cancer, appear lifelong for genetical or environmental causes without any link with irradiation and it is very difficult to identify the real cause of a cancer. Another concern is that the impact on human health is weak and are observed only after a long period after irradiation. These features make epidemiological studies cumbersome to implement since they require vast cohorts and a very long-term follow-up. The extrapolation of the effects of higher doses to the domain of low doses does not meet reality and it is why the European Union takes part into the financing of such research. In order to gain efficiency, scientists work together through various European networks among them: HLEG (High Level Expert Group On European Low Dose Risk Research) or MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative). Several programs are underway or have been recently launched: -) the impact of Cesium contamination on children's health (Epice program), -) the study of the impact of medical imaging on children, -) the study of the health of children living near nuclear facilities, -) the relationship between radon and lung cancer, -) the effect of occupational low radiation doses, -) the effect of uranium dissolved in water on living organisms (Envirhom program). (A.C.)

  8. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xueqian; Zhao, Yingru; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Snijder, Roland A.; Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Jong, Pim A. de; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Bock, Geertruida H. de

    2013-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100 HU) were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. The phantom was examined on 16- and 64-row multidetector CT with a low-dose protocol. Two independent blinded observers screened for pulmonary nodules. Nodule diameter was measured manually, and volume calculated. For solid nodules (+100 HU), diameter and volume were also evaluated by semi-automated software. Differences in observed volumes between the manual and semi-automated method were evaluated by a t-test. Sensitivity was 100 % for all nodules of >5 mm and larger, 60-80 % for solid and 0-20 % for non-solid 3-mm nodules. No false-positive nodules but high inter-observer reliability and inter-technique correlation were found. Volume was underestimated manually by 24.1 ± 14.0 % for nodules of any density, and 26.4 ± 15.5 % for solid nodules, compared with 7.6 ± 8.5 % (P 5 mm in diameter. Semi-automated volumetry yielded more accurate nodule volumes than manual measurements. (orig.)

  9. Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

    2010-01-01

    Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses <100 mSv in a single exposure appear to be too small to allow epidermiological detection of statistically significant excess cancers in the presence of naturally occurring cancers; that low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

  10. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  11. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek

    2007-07-01

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources

  12. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  13. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a 'Th2 polarized' immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in

  14. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  15. Radiation protection and environment day the low doses in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of low doses exposures are difficult to explore and the studies give often place to controversies. According to the are, differences exist in the methodological approaches. It results from it a confusion on the acceptable levels of exposure, even on the definition of low dose. This day organised by the sections 'non ionizing and research and health of the French society of radiation protection (S.F.R.P.), will be a meeting between professionals of different disciplines, to compare the approaches used for the ionizing and non ionizing radiations as well as the chemical and microbiological agents. It will allow to share the knowledge and the abilities and to progress on methodologies adapted to the evaluation and the management of risks in relation with low doses. (N.C.)

  16. The effect of Low-dose Gamma Radiation on the Bio-chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-dose gamma radiation has been applied to intravenous fluids to enhance the sterility assurance levels. This study was undertaken to determine the stability of gamma irradiated 2.5 % dextrose, 2.5 % dextrose in saline, Ringers lactate and Gastrointestinal replacement fluid at doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 20 kGy.

  17. The study of hemopoietic cells. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose rate radiation on the hemopoiesis in the spleen of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Dept. of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assays, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of hemopoietic cells (CFU-S colonies and CFU-GM colonies) decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  18. Helical CT for lung-cancer screening. 3. Fundamental study for ultra-low-dose CT by application of small tube current and filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shigeki; Koyama, Shuji; Tusaka, Masatoshi; Maekoshi, Hisashi; Satake, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Takeo.

    1996-01-01

    In order to develop ultra-low-dose helical CT for lung cancer screening, the effect of reduction of the tube current to 20 mA and application of a 10 mm thick aluminium filter upon radiation dose and image quality was evaluated with a phantom. Exposure dose at the center of a gantry and absorbed dose at the center of an acrylic phantom at 20 mA with the filter were 15% and 29% of the dose at 50 mA without the filter, respectively. For reduction of absorbed dose, reduction of the tube current was more useful than application of the filter. Image noise at 20 mA with the filter was double that at 50 mA without the filter. Neither reduction of the tube current nor application of the filter changed full width at half maximum on section sensitivity of the Z-axis. Although reduction of the tube current did not affect the difference in CT values between an acrylic sphere and styroform, application of the filter caused a reduction of 4.5% in the difference in CT values. Neither reduction of the tube current nor application of the filter affected the contrast resolution of the high-contrast phantom; however, that of the low-contrast phantom deteriorated. Although improvement of the filter and evaluation of clinical images are necessary, reduction of the tube current to 20 mA and application of the aluminium filter appear to be a promising method for ultra-low-dose helical CT of the lung. (author)

  19. Does the cell radioresistance acquired by low dose-rate gamma irradiation depend on genetic factors or physiological changes. Study carried out on inactive cells of the unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa CHICK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettwiller, Pascale.

    1982-09-01

    Inactive cells of the unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa CHICK were used to test the following hypothesis: the radioresistance acquired by these cells after irradiation at low dose rate (0.06 Gy/mn) is due to the selection or induction of radioresistant clones. Clone cultures were grown mainly from colonies exhibiting defects (high cell loss, slowed growth, pigment deficiency). Of thirty clones studied, three only of second and third separations possessed the radioresistance of their original population. On the basis of these results, backed up by a first experiment which shows the loss of cell radioresistance when continuous irradiation is stopped, the initial hypothesis may be dismissed and research directed towards changes relative to cell restoration processes by irradiation at low dose rates [fr

  20. Mutation induction in cultured human cells after low-dose and low-dose-rate γ-ray irradiation. Detection by LOH analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umebayashi, Yukihiro; Iwaki, Masaya; Yatagai, Fumio; Honma, Masamitsu; Suzuki, Masao; Suzuki, Hiromi; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2007-01-01

    To study the genetic effects of low-doses and low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (IR), human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were exposed to 30 mGy of γ-rays at a dose-rate of 1.2 mGy/hr. The frequency of early mutations (EMs) in the thymidine kinase (TK) gene locus was determined to be 1.7 x 10 -6 , or 1.9-fold higher than the level seen in unirradiated controls. These mutations were analyzed with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) detection system, a methodology which has been shown to be sensitive to the effects of radiation. Among the 15 EMs observed after IR exposure, 8 were small interstitial-deletion events restricted to the TK gene locus. However, this specific type of event was not found in unirradiated controls. Although these results were observed under the limited conditions, they strongly suggest that the LOH detection system can be used for estimating the genetic effects of a low-dose IR exposure delivered at a low-dose-rate. (author)

  1. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  2. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  3. Persistent antidepressant effect of low-dose ketamine and activation in the supplementary motor area and anterior cingulate cortex in treatment-resistant depression: A randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Hong, Chen-Jee; Tu, Pei-Chi; Bai, Ya-Mei; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Su, Tung-Ping

    2018-01-01

    A single low-dose ketamine infusion exhibited a rapid antidepressant effect within 1h. Despite its short biological half-life (approximately 3h), the antidepressant effect of ketamine has been demonstrated to persist for several days. However, changes in brain function responsible for the persistent antidepressant effect of a single low-dose ketamine infusion remain unclear METHODS: Twenty-four patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) were randomized into three groups according to the treatment received: 0.5mg/kg ketamine, 0.2mg/kg ketamine, and normal saline infusion. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) of glucose metabolism measured through 18 F-FDG positron-emission-tomography before infusion and 1day after a 40-min ketamine or normal saline infusion were used for subsequent whole-brain voxel-wise analysis and were correlated with depressive symptoms, as defined using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS-17) score RESULTS: The voxel-wise analysis revealed that patients with TRD receiving the 0.5mg/kg ketamine infusion had significantly higher SUVs (corrected for family-wise errors, P = 0.014) in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) than did those receiving the 0.2mg/kg ketamine infusion. The increase in the SUV in the dACC was negatively correlated with depressive symptoms at 1day after ketamine infusion DISCUSSION: The persistent antidepressant effect of a 0.5mg/kg ketamine infusion may be mediated by increased activation in the SMA and dACC. The higher increase in dACC activation was related to the reduction in depressive symptoms after ketamine infusion. A 0.5mg/kg ketamine infusion facilitated the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the SMA and dACC, which may be responsible for the persistent antidepressant effect of ketamine much beyond its half-life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy as a Debulking Agent for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An open-label prospective phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Lindahl, Lise Maria; Gniadecki, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a powerful treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Based on the occurrence of relapses with low radiation doses, doses of 30-36 Gy are commonly used but most patients still eventually relapse and repeat treatment courses are limited...... due to the cumulative toxicity. Complete response rates are about 60-90% for T2-4 stages with a 5-year relapse-free survival of 10-25% for stages IB-III. Objectives: To evaluate prospectively the efficacy of low-dose TSEBT (10 Gy) in terms of complete cutaneous response rate, overall response rate...... and response duration in CTCL. Methods: Ten patients with stage IB-IV mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated in an open-label manner with 4 fractions of 1 Gy/week TSEB to a total skin dose of 10 Gy. Treatment responses were assessed at 1 and 3 months after treatment and subsequently at least every 6 months...

  6. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bellomi, Massimo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Palli, Domenico; Veronesi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.31–0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high “vitamins and fiber” pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95 % CI = 0.36–0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the “vitamin and fiber” nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  7. Therapy with low-dose azacitidine for MDS in children and young adults: a retrospective analysis of the EWOG-MDS study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Annamaria M; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Yoshimi, Ayami; Catala, Albert; Frühwald, Michael C; Hasle, Henrik; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Mary M; Lauten, Melchior; De Moerloose, Barbara; Smith, Owen P; Bernig, Toralf; Gruhn, Bernd; Kulozik, Andreas E; Metzler, Markus; Olcay, Lale; Suttorp, Meinolf; Furlan, Ingrid; Strahm, Brigitte; Flotho, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Low-dose azacitidine is efficient and safe in the therapy of malignant myeloid disorders in adults but data in children are lacking. We present a retrospective analysis of 24 children and young adults with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who received azacitidine at the time of first diagnosis or relapse after allotransplant (2 children were treated with azacitidine both initially and for relapse). Diagnoses were refractory cytopenia of childhood (N = 4), advanced primary MDS (N = 9) and secondary MDS (N = 11). The median duration of treatment was four cycles. Azacitidine was well tolerated, but cytopenias led to dose reduction in five cases. Treatment was discontinued in one child because of impaired renal function. Sixteen MDS patients were treated with azacitidine at first diagnosis. One complete clinical remission was observed and one child showed complete marrow remission; six children experienced stable disease with haematological improvement. Ten children received azacitidine for relapsed MDS after transplant: of these, seven experienced stable disease for 2-30 cycles (median 3), including one patient with haematological improvement for seven cycles. In summary, azacitidine is effective in some children with MDS and appears to be a non-toxic option in palliative situations to prolong survival. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  9. Lung nodule detection performance in five observers on computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three-dimensional processing (AIDR 3D) in a Japanese multicenter study: Comparison between ultra-low-dose CT and low-dose CT by receiver-operating characteristic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yukihisa; Moriya, Hiroshi; Noma, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-07-01

    To compare lung nodule detection performance (LNDP) in computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three dimensional processing (AIDR3D) between ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) and low dose CT (LDCT). This was part of the Area-detector Computed Tomography for the Investigation of Thoracic Diseases (ACTIve) Study, a multicenter research project being conducted in Japan. Institutional Review Board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-three subjects (body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.2) underwent chest CT at 6 institutions using identical scanners and protocols. In a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120 and 20 mA (3.52, 1.74 and 0.29 mSv, respectively). Axial CT images with 2-mm thickness/increment were reconstructed using AIDR3D. Standard of reference (SOR) was determined based on CT images at 240 mA by consensus reading of 2 board-certificated radiologists as to the presence of lung nodules with the longest diameter (LD) of more than 3mm. Another 5 radiologists independently assessed and recorded presence/absence of lung nodules and their locations by continuously-distributed rating in CT images at 20 mA (ULDCT) and 120 mA (LDCT). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate LNDP of both methods in total and also in subgroups classified by LD (>4, 6 and 8 mm) and nodular characteristics (solid and ground glass nodules). For SOR, 161 solid and 60 ground glass nodules were identified. No significant difference in LNDP for entire solid nodules was demonstrated between both methods, as area under ROC curve (AUC) was 0.844 ± 0.017 in ULDCT and 0.876 ± 0.026 in LDCT (p=0.057). For ground glass nodules with LD 8mm or more, LNDP was similar between both methods, as AUC 0.899 ± 0.038 in ULDCT and 0.941 ± 0.030 in LDCT. (p=0.144). ULDCT using AIDR3D with an equivalent radiation dose to chest x-ray could have comparable LNDP to LDCT with AIDR3D except for smaller ground

  10. Synergistic Effects of Ad-Libitum Low-Dose Fructose Drinking and Low-Dose Streptozotocin Treatment in Wistar Rats: A Mild Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asie Sadeghi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To develop a convenient animal model of T2D by pretreatment with low-dose 10% w/v fructose (FRC solution followed by the injection of low doses of streptozotocin (STZ in Wistar rats. For this 8-week experimental study; rats were first fed a standard chow ad-libitum diet and either tap water (n=40 or 10% w/v FRC solution (n=40 for 4 weeks. Next, rats in each category were randomly allocated to 4 subgroups (n=10 each of low-dose STZ (25,35, and 45 mg/kg. The final mean fasting blood sugar (FBG of FRC+STZ45 (197±55.87 mg/dl were significantly higher than that of the STZ45 (P=0.015 and FRC (P=0.019 groups. FRC+STZ45 showed the highest insulin resistance demonstrated by insulin tolerance test [area under the curve (AUC of insulin tolerance test; P<0.05]. AUC was not significantly different between the STZ45 and non-STZ groups and between FRC and non-FRC fed groups. Furthermore, FBG levels did not differ between FRC and non-FRC groups. Body weight measurement showed that the FRC+STZ45 group had the lowest body weight compared to all other groups. Our data provide the evidence that FRC and STZ45 synergistically could induce hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in Wistar rats. Here we presented a feasible model for initial forms of T2D by employing pretreatment with low-dose FRC solution and treatment with low-dose STZ.

  11. Low-dose dental CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustemeyer, P.; Eich, H.T.; John-Mikolajewski, V.; Mueller, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The intention of this study was to reduce patient dose during dental CT in the planning for osseointegrated implants. Methods and Materials: Dental CTs were performed with a spiral CT (Somatom Plus 4, Siemens) and a dental software package. Use of the usual dental CT technique (120 kVp; 165 mA, 1 s rotation time, 165 mAs; pitch factor 1) was compared with a new protocol (120 kVp; 50 mA; 0.7 s rotation time; 35 mAs; pitch factor 2) which delivered the best image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose, as tested in a preceding study. Image quality was analysed using a human anatomic head preparation. Four radiologists analysed the images independently. A Wilcoxon rank pair-test was used for statistic evaluation. The doses to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the salivary glands, and the eye lens were determined in a tissue-equivalent phantom (Alderson-Rando Phantom) with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters at the appropriate locations. Results: By mAs reduction from 165 to 35 and using a pitch factor of 2, the radiation dose could be reduced by a factor of nine (max.) (e.g., the bone marrow dose could be reduced from 23.6 mSv to 2.9 mSv, eye lens from 0.5 mSv to 0.3 mSv, thyroid gland from 2.5 mSv to 0.5 mSv, parotid glands from 2.3 mSv to 0.4 mSv). The dose reduction did not lead to an actual loss of image quality or diagnostic information. Conclusion: A considerable dose reduction without loss of diagnostic information is achievable in dental CT. Dosereducing examination protocols like the one presented may further expand the use of preoperative dental CT. (orig.) [de

  12. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  13. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in μSv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  14. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in {mu}Sv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  15. Study of the intervention effect of Laminaria japonica polysaccharides on testis tissue in male rats exposed by repeated low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jun; Luo Qiong; Cui Xiaoyan; Yang Mingliang; Yan Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of the Laminaria japonica polysaccharides (LJP) intervention on the male rats' testicular tissue oxidative damage which was caused by repeated low-dose local ionizing radiation. Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, model group and LJP intervention group. The rats in the LJP intervention group was given with LJP. The rats in each group were exposed to 60 Co γ-ray local irradiation 7 d after adaptability breeding, once per day for 20 times in 4 weeks. Each rat was irradiated with the total dose of 2.3 Gy. The rats were killed at 1, 7 and 14 d post-irradiation, respectively. The testis and the epididymis were taken out. The contents of MDA and GSH, and the activities of SOD, LDH and GSH-Px were measured using spectrophotometer. The amorphous of testicular tissue was observed and the sperm count and viability were analyzed. Results: As compared with those in the model group, the content of MDA decreased in testicular tissue in the LJP group (t=3.66-5.03, P<0.01), while the GSH content increased. The activities of SOD, LDH and GSH-Px (t=2.77-25.52, P<0.05) and the sperm count and viability increased (t=3.11-23.08, P<0.01). Each index was more close to that in the control group 14 d post-irradiation. Conclusions: LJP can promote the recovery of testicular tissue oxidative damage caused by chronic local ionizing radiation. It has a role in promoting the spermatogenic function of male rate. (authors)

  16. Diagnostic Performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Detecting Asbestos-Related Pleuropulmonary Diseases: Prospective Study in a Screening Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Marysa; Severac, François; Labani, Aissam; Jeung, Mi-Young; Roy, Catherine; Ohana, Mickaël

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Chest CT (ULD CT) for the detection of any asbestos-related lesions (primary endpoint) and specific asbestos-related abnormalities, i.e. non-calcified and calcified pleural plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, asbestosis and significant lung nodules (secondary endpoints). 55 male patients (55.7±8.1 years old) with occupational asbestos exposure for at least 15 years and where CT screening was indicated were prospectively included. They all underwent a standard unenhanced chest CT (120kV, automated tube current modulation), considered as the reference, and an ULD CT (135kV, 10mA), both with iterative reconstruction. Two chest radiologists independently and blindly read the examinations, following a detailed protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and error rate of ULD CT were calculated using the exact method of Pearson with a confidence interval of 95%. Radiation dose was 17.9±1.2mGy.cm (0.25mSv) for the ULD-CT versus 288.8 ±151mGy.cm (4mSv); p value = 100%, negative predictive value = 97.8%), high for lung nodules, diffuse pleural thickening and calcified pleural plaques (sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV = 100%) and fair for asbestosis (sensitivity = 75%, specificity = 100%, PPV = 00%, NPV = 98.1%). Intra-reader accuracy between the ULD CT and the reference CT for the primary endpoint was 98% for the senior and 100% for the junior radiologist. Inter-reader agreement for the primary endpoint was almost perfect (Cohen's Kappa of 0.81). ULD CT in the screening of asbestos exposure related diseases has 90.9% sensitivity and 100% specificity, and could therefore be proposed as a first line examination.

  17. Effects of Low-Dose Microwave on Healing of Fractures with Titanium Alloy Internal Fixation: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Fu, Tengfei; Jiang, Lan; Bai, Yuehong

    2013-01-01

    Background Microwave is a method for improving fracture repair. However, one of the contraindications for microwave treatment listed in the literature is surgically implanted metal plates in the treatment field. The reason is that the reflection of electromagnetic waves and the eddy current stimulated by microwave would increase the temperature of magnetic implants and cause heat damage in tissues. Comparing with traditional medical stainless steel, titanium alloy is a kind of medical implants with low magnetic permeability and electric conductivity. But the effects of microwave treatment on fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation in vivo were not reported. The aim of this article was to evaluate the security and effects of microwave on healing of a fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation. Methods Titanium alloy internal fixation systems were implanted in New Zealand rabbits with a 3.0 mm bone defect in the middle of femur. We applied a 30-day microwave treatment (2,450MHz, 25W, 10 min per day) to the fracture 3 days after operation. Temperature changes of muscle tissues around implants were measured during the irradiation. Normalized radiographic density of the fracture gap was measured on the 10th day and 30th day of the microwave treatment. All of the animals were killed after 10 and 30 days microwave treatment with histologic and histomorphometric examinations performed on the harvested tissues. Findings The temperatures did not increase significantly in animals with titanium alloy implants. The security of microwave treatment was also supported by histology of muscles, nerve and bone around the implants. Radiographic assessment, histologic and histomorphometric examinations revealed significant improvement in the healing bone. Conclusion Our results suggest that, in the healing of fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation, a low dose of microwave treatment may be a promising method. PMID:24086626

  18. Predicting radiation effects on the development of leukemic stem cells based on studies of leukemias induced by high- and low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirouchi, Tokuhisa

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important causes of radiation-induced cancers, particularly leukemia, is gene mutations resulting from single and double strand breaks in the DNA. Tanaka et al. (2003) reported life shortening in specific pathogen free male and female B6C3F1 mice continuously exposed to γ rays at a low dose rate of 20 mGy/22 h/d for 400 days from 8 weeks of age. Early death due to cancer, mostly malignant lymphomas, was observed in both sexes. A significant increase in the incidence of myeloid leukemia, resulting in early death, was also reported in males. It is expected however, that at 20 mGy/22 h/d, which is equivalent to a dose of 15 μGy/min, DNA strand breaks induced in these cells are repaired soon after they occur. Murine leukemias induced by high-dose-rate radiation were also found in males, and 80% of the mice with leukemia had hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 around the PU.1 gene and they appeared to be derived from DNA strand breaks. Majority of these leukemia showing hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 revealed point mutations in the remaining alleles resulting in PU.1 inactivation, which was reported to be related to leukemogenesis. These point mutations are assumed to be independent of DNA strand breaks that occur immediately after irradiation, as they appear at later time after irradiation. This review discusses the effect of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and also mutagenesis induced independently of DNA strand breaks in hematopoietic cells contributing to the development of the first leukemic stem cell. (author)

  19. Low Dose Vaporized Cannabis Significantly Improves Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling either medium dose (3.53%), low dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being VAS pain intensity. Psychoactive side-effects, and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the two active dose groups’ results (p>0.7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo vs. low dose, 2.9 for placebo vs. medium dose, and 25 for medium vs. low dose. As these NNT are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being, for all intents and purposes, as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1–2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. PMID:23237736

  20. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  1. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar, E-mail: s.ganapathy@neu.edu [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Li, Ping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Fagman, Johan [The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Zhang, Guojun [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Chen, Changyan [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  2. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-01-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  3. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Akira; Kawai, Yuichi; Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  4. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Akira, E-mail: onodera@pharm.kobegakuin.ac.jp [Department of Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobegakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Kawai, Yuichi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobegakuin University, 1-1-3 Minatojima, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio [Department of Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  5. Age-related macular degeneration in a randomized controlled trial of low-dose aspirin: Rationale and study design of the ASPREE-AMD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubov Robman

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The study findings will be of significant clinical and public interest due to a potential to identify a possible low cost therapy for preventing AMD worldwide and to determine risk/benefit balance of the aspirin usage by the AMD-affected elderly. The ASPREE-AMD study provides a unique opportunity to determine the effect of aspirin on AMD incidence and progression, by adding retinal imaging to an ongoing, large-scale primary prevention randomized clinical trial.

  6. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  7. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  8. An In Vivo Study of Low-Dose Intra-Articular Tranexamic Acid Application with Prolonged Clamping Drain Method in Total Knee Replacement: Clinical Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-ngasoongsong, Paphon; Chanplakorn, Pongsthorn; Wongsak, Siwadol; Uthadorn, Krisorn; Panpikoon, Tanapong; Jittorntam, Paisan; Aryurachai, Katcharin; Angchaisukisiri, Pantap; Kawinwonggowit, Viroj

    2015-01-01

    Recently, combined intra-articular tranexamic acid (IA-TXA) injection with clamping drain method showed efficacy for blood loss and transfusion reduction in total knee replacement (TKR). However, until now, none of previous studies revealed the effect of this technique on pharmacokinetics, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. An experimental study was conducted, during 2011-2012, in 30 patients undergoing unilateral TKR. Patients received IA-TXA application and then were allocated into six groups regarding clamping drain duration (2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, and 12-hours). Blood and drainage fluid were collected to measure tranexamic acid (TXA) level and related coagulation and fibrinolytic markers. Postoperative complication was followed for one year. There was no significant difference of serum TXA level at 2 hour and 24 hour among groups (p application in TKR with prolonged clamping drain method is a safe and effective blood conservative technique with only minimal systemic absorption and without significant increase in systemic absorption over time.

  9. Randomized multicenter trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar Fasciitis (painful heel spur) using very low doses – a study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Seegenschmiedt, M Heinrich; Micke, Oliver; Gräber, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    A lot of retrospective data concerning the effect of radiotherapy on the painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis) is available in the literature. Nevertheless, a randomized proof of this effect is still missing. Thus, the GCGBD (German cooperative group on radiotherapy for benign diseases) of the DEGRO (German Society for Radiation Oncology) decided to start a randomized multicenter trial in order to find out if the effect of a conventional total dose is superior compared to that of a very low dose. In a prospective, controlled and randomized phase III trial two radiotherapy schedules are to be compared: standard arm: total dose 6.0 Gy in single fractions of 1.0 Gy applied twice a week experimental arm: total dose 0.6 Gy in single fractions of 0.1 Gy applied twice a week (acting as a placebo) Patients aged over 40 years who have been diagnosed clinically and radiologically to be suffering from a painful heel spur for at least six months can be included. Former trauma, surgery or radiotherapy to the heel are not allowed nor are patients with a severe psychiatric disease or women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. According to the statistical power calculation 100 patients have to be enrolled into each arm. After having obtaining a written informed consent a patient is randomized by the statistician to one of the arms mentioned above. After radiotherapy, the patients are seen first every six weeks, then regularly up to 48 months after therapy, they additionally receive a questionnaire every six weeks after the follow-up examinations. The effect is measured using several target variables (scores): Calcaneodynia-score according to Rowe et al., SF-12 score, and visual analogue scale of pain. The most important endpoint is the pain relief three months after therapy. Patients with an inadequate result are offered a second radiotherapy series applying the standard dose (equally in both arms). This trial protocol has been approved by the expert panel of the DEGRO as well as

  10. Diagnostic Performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Detecting Asbestos-Related Pleuropulmonary Diseases: Prospective Study in a Screening Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marysa Schaal

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic performance of Ultra-Low-Dose Chest CT (ULD CT for the detection of any asbestos-related lesions (primary endpoint and specific asbestos-related abnormalities, i.e. non-calcified and calcified pleural plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, asbestosis and significant lung nodules (secondary endpoints.55 male patients (55.7±8.1 years old with occupational asbestos exposure for at least 15 years and where CT screening was indicated were prospectively included. They all underwent a standard unenhanced chest CT (120kV, automated tube current modulation, considered as the reference, and an ULD CT (135kV, 10mA, both with iterative reconstruction. Two chest radiologists independently and blindly read the examinations, following a detailed protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and error rate of ULD CT were calculated using the exact method of Pearson with a confidence interval of 95%.Radiation dose was 17.9±1.2mGy.cm (0.25mSv for the ULD-CT versus 288.8 ±151mGy.cm (4mSv; p <2.2e-16. Prevalence of abnormalities was 20%. The ULD CT's diagnostic performance in joint reading was high for the primary endpoint (sensitivity = 90.9%, specificity = 100%, positive predictive value = 100%, negative predictive value = 97.8%, high for lung nodules, diffuse pleural thickening and calcified pleural plaques (sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV = 100% and fair for asbestosis (sensitivity = 75%, specificity = 100%, PPV = 00%, NPV = 98.1%. Intra-reader accuracy between the ULD CT and the reference CT for the primary endpoint was 98% for the senior and 100% for the junior radiologist. Inter-reader agreement for the primary endpoint was almost perfect (Cohen's Kappa of 0.81.ULD CT in the screening of asbestos exposure related diseases has 90.9% sensitivity and 100% specificity, and could therefore be proposed as a first line examination.

  11. Randomized multicenter trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar Fasciitis (painful heel spur using very low doses – a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micke Oliver

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lot of retrospective data concerning the effect of radiotherapy on the painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis is available in the literature. Nevertheless, a randomized proof of this effect is still missing. Thus, the GCGBD (German cooperative group on radiotherapy for benign diseases of the DEGRO (German Society for Radiation Oncology decided to start a randomized multicenter trial in order to find out if the effect of a conventional total dose is superior compared to that of a very low dose. Methods/Design In a prospective, controlled and randomized phase III trial two radiotherapy schedules are to be compared: standard arm: total dose 6.0 Gy in single fractions of 1.0 Gy applied twice a week experimental arm: total dose 0.6 Gy in single fractions of 0.1 Gy applied twice a week (acting as a placebo Patients aged over 40 years who have been diagnosed clinically and radiologically to be suffering from a painful heel spur for at least six months can be included. Former trauma, surgery or radiotherapy to the heel are not allowed nor are patients with a severe psychiatric disease or women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. According to the statistical power calculation 100 patients have to be enrolled into each arm. After having obtaining a written informed consent a patient is randomized by the statistician to one of the arms mentioned above. After radiotherapy, the patients are seen first every six weeks, then regularly up to 48 months after therapy, they additionally receive a questionnaire every six weeks after the follow-up examinations. The effect is measured using several target variables (scores: Calcaneodynia-score according to Rowe et al., SF-12 score, and visual analogue scale of pain. The most important endpoint is the pain relief three months after therapy. Patients with an inadequate result are offered a second radiotherapy series applying the standard dose (equally in both arms. This trial protocol has been

  12. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at % 235 U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.) [es

  13. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was use...

  14. Low-dose vaporized cannabis significantly improves neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling medium-dose (3.53%), low-dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being visual analog scale pain intensity. Psychoactive side effects and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed-effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the 2 active dose groups' results (P > .7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo versus low-dose, 2.9 for placebo versus medium-dose, and 25 for medium- versus low-dose. As these NNTs are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1 to 2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. The analgesia obtained from a low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (1.29%) in patients, most of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite conventional treatments, is a clinically significant outcome. In general, the effect sizes on cognitive testing were consistent with this minimal dose. As a result, one might not anticipate a significant impact on daily functioning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Comparative study of two doses of intrathecal dexmedetomidine as adjuvant with low dose hyperbaric bupivacaine in ambulatory perianal surgeries: A prospective randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dexmedetomidine (DMT, as intrathecal adjuvant has been shown to successfully prolong duration of analgesia but delay the motor recovery. Hence, this study was designed to find out the dose of DMT which can provide satisfactory analgesia without prolonging motor block. Methods: A total of 50 patients scheduled for elective perianal surgeries were randomly allocated to Groups C or D (n = 25. Group D received hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% 4 mg + DMT 5 μg and Group C received hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% 4 mg + DMT 3 μg intrathecally. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade, duration of analgesia, time for ambulation and first urination were recorded. Adverse effects if any were noted. Results: Demographic characters, duration of surgery were comparable. The onset of sensory block to S1 was 9.61 ± 5.53 min in Group C compared to 7.69 ± 4.80 min in Group D (P = 0.35. Duration of sensory (145.28 ± 83.17 min – C, 167.85 ± 93.75 min – D, P = 0.5 and motor block (170.53 ± 73.44 min – C, 196.14 ± 84.28 min, P = 0.39 were comparable. Duration of analgesia (337.86 ± 105.11 min – C, 340.78 ± 101.81 min – D, P = 0.9 and time for ambulation (252.46 ± 93.72 min – C, 253.64 ± 88.04 min – D, P = 0.97 were also comparable. One patient in each group had urinary retention requiring catheterization. No other side effects were observed. Conclusion: Intrathecal DMT 3 μg dose does not produce faster ambulation compared to intrathecal DMT 5 μg though it produces comparable duration of analgesia for perianal surgeries.

  16. Study of feasibility of detecting effects of low-dose radiation in shipyard workers. Final report, May 15-August 15, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1982-12-01

    There is very little information available on the chronic health effects from repeated low-level doses of radiation. This study examines the adequacy of determining radiation exposure doses in shipyard workers, the procedures used in the radiation control programs, and the feasibility of establishing an appropriate population of nuclear and non-nuclear shipyard workers for long-term studies of low-level radiation. The availability of records and the methods of population identification and of measurement of radiation dose were determined during initial visits to the yards. Personnel, industrial hygiene, radiation and medical records were examined for suitability, completeness and accuracy. It was necessary to assure that no possible errors or omissions in personnel and radiation records existed in order that the final data will have validity. Preliminary investigations on the methods of follow-up in the Portsmouth population and the time required for each procedure were also undertaken in order to have a better estimate of the total cost for a long term study

  17. Lung nodule detection performance in five observers on computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three-dimensional processing (AIDR 3D) in a Japanese multicenter study: Comparison between ultra-low-dose CT and low-dose CT by receiver-operating characteristic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro, E-mail: yatsushi@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu 520-2192, Shiga (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673, Aichi (Japan); Yamashiro, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Miyara, Tetsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan); Department of Radiology, Okinawa Prefectural Yaeyama Hospital, Ishigaki 907-0022, Okinawa (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki 569-8686, Osaka (Japan); Sato, Yukihisa [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center of Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Moriya, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Ohara General Hospital, Fukushima 960-8611 (Japan); Noma, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Tenri Hospital, Tenri 632-8552, Nara (Japan); Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Osaka (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017, Hyogo (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara 903-0215, Okinawa (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Using AIDR 3D, ULDCT showed comparable LND of solid nodules to LDCT. • Using AIDR 3D, LND of smaller GGN in ULDCT was inferior to that in LDCT. • Effective dose in ULDCT was about only twice of that in chest X-ray. • BMI values in study population were mostly in the normal range body habitus. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare lung nodule detection performance (LNDP) in computed tomography (CT) with adaptive iterative dose reduction using three dimensional processing (AIDR3D) between ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) and low dose CT (LDCT). Materials and methods: This was part of the Area-detector Computed Tomography for the Investigation of Thoracic Diseases (ACTIve) Study, a multicenter research project being conducted in Japan. Institutional Review Board approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-three subjects (body mass index, 23.3 ± 3.2) underwent chest CT at 6 institutions using identical scanners and protocols. In a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120 and 20 mA (3.52, 1.74 and 0.29 mSv, respectively). Axial CT images with 2-mm thickness/increment were reconstructed using AIDR3D. Standard of reference (SOR) was determined based on CT images at 240 mA by consensus reading of 2 board-certificated radiologists as to the presence of lung nodules with the longest diameter (LD) of more than 3 mm. Another 5 radiologists independently assessed and recorded presence/absence of lung nodules and their locations by continuously-distributed rating in CT images at 20 mA (ULDCT) and 120 mA (LDCT). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate LNDP of both methods in total and also in subgroups classified by LD (>4, 6 and 8 mm) and nodular characteristics (solid and ground glass nodules). Results: For SOR, 161 solid and 60 ground glass nodules were identified. No significant difference in LNDP for entire solid nodules was demonstrated between both methods, as area under ROC

  18. Hormesis of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Immune System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, M.H.; Abbas, M.O.; El-Asady, R.S.; Amer, H.A.; El-Khouly, W.A.; Shabon, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the immune system has been a controversial subject. To evaluate the effect of low-doses γ-irradiation exposure on immune system. An animal model, using Rattus Rattus rats was used. The rats were divided into groups exposed to either continuous or fractionated 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mSv of radiation and compared to control rats that did not receive radiation. All groups were exposed to a total white blood count (Wcs), lymphocyte count and serum IgG level measurement, as indicators of the function of the cell-mediated (T lymphocytes) and the humoral (B lymphocytes) immune system. The results of the current study revealed that the counts of total leukocytes (WBCs) and lymphocytes, as well as the serum level of IgG were increased significantly in rats receiving low dose radiation, indicating enhancement of immune system. The data suggests that low-dose gamma-radiation improved hematological parameters and significantly enhances immune response indices of the exposed rats. These findings are similar to the radiation adaptive responses in which a small dose of pre irradiation would induce certain radiation resistance and enhances the cell response after exposure to further irradiation doses The applied low doses used in the present study may appear effective inducing the radio adaptive response. Farooqi and Kesavan (1993) and Bravard et al. (1999) reported that the adaptive response to ionizing radiation refers to the phenomenon by which cells irradiated with low (cGy) or sublethal doses (conditioning doses) become less susceptible to genotoxic effects of a subsequent high dose (challenge dose, several Gy).

  19. Toxicity bioassay in mice exposed to low dose-rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joog Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwang Mo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportion to the dose amount and rate. The association between accumulated radiation dose and adverse effects, which is derived according to continuous low dose-rate radiation exposure, is not clearly elucidated. Our previous study showed that low dose-rate radiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in BALB/c mice at dose levels of ≤2 Gy, but the testis weight decreased at a dose of 2 Gy. In this study, we studied the effects of irradiation at the low dose rate (3.49 mGy/h) in the testes of C57BL/6 mice. Mice exposed to a total dose of 0.02, 0.2, and 2 Gy were found to be healthy and did not show any significant changes in body weight and peripheral blood components. However, mice irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy had significantly decreased testis weight. Further, histological studies and sperm evaluation also demonstrated changes consistent with the findings of decreased testis weight. In fertile patients found to have arrest of sperm maturation, the seminiferous tubules lack the DNMT1 and HDAC1 protein. The decrease of DNMT1 and HDAC1 in irradiated testis may be the part of the mechanism via which low dose-rate irradiation results in teticular injury. In conclusion, despite a low dose-rate radiation, our study found that when mice testis were irradiated with 2 Gy at 3.49 mGy/h dose rate, there was significant testicular and sperm damage with decreased DNMT1 and HDAC1 expression.

  20. Bioassay in BALB/c mice exposed to low dose rate radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Km, Sung Dae; Gong, Eun Ji; Bae, Min Ji; Yang, Kwang Mo; Kim, Joong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of low-dose-rate irradiation in BALB/c mice. Twenty mice of each sex were randomly assigned to four groups of five mice each and were exposed to 0 (sham), 0.02, 0.2, or 2 Gy, equivalents to low-dose-rate irradiation to 3.49 mGy{center_dot}h{sup -1}. Urine, blood, and blood biochemistry were analyzed, and organ weight was measured. The low-dose-rate irradiation did not induce any toxicologically significant changes in mortality, clinical signs, body weight, food and water consumption, urinalysis, and serum biochemistry. However, the weights of reproductive organs including the testis, ovary, and uterus decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiation at 2 Gy significantly decreased the testis, ovary, and uterus weights, but did not change the weights of other organs. There were no adverse effects on hematology in any irradiated group and only the number of neutrophils increased dose dependently. The low-dose-rate irradiation exposure did not cause adverse effects in mice at dose levels of 2 Gy or less, but the reproductive systems of male and female mice showed toxic effects.

  1. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  2. Biological influence from low dose and low-dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Although living organisms have defense mechanisms for radioadaptive response, the influence is considered to vary qualitatively and quantitatively for low dose and high dose, as well as for low-dose rate and high-dose rate. This article describes the bioresponse to low dose and low-dose rate. Among various biomolecules, DNA is the most sensitive to radiation, and accurate replication of DNA is an essential requirement for the survival of living organisms. Also, the influence of active enzymes resulted from the effect of radiation on enzymes in the body is larger than the direct influence of radiation on the body. After this, the article describes the carcinogenic risk by low-dose radiation, and then so-called Hormesis effect to create cancer inhibition effect by stimulating active physiology. (S.K.)

  3. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms and remission of vital oxidative injury by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Nomura, T.; Kojima, S.

    2000-01-01

    Excessive active oxygen produced in vivo by various causes is toxic. Accumulation of oxidation injuries due to excessive active causes cell and tissue injuries, inducing various pathologic conditions such as aging and carcinogenesis. On the other hand, there are chemical defense mechanisms in the body that eliminate active oxygen or repair damaged molecules, defending against resultant injury. It is interesting reports that appropriate oxidation stress activate the chemical biological defense mechanisms. In this study, to elucidate these phenomena and its mechanism by low dose radiation, we studied on the below subjects. Activation of chemical biological defense mechanisms by low dose radiation: (1) The effects radiation on lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in the organs, membrane fluidity and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were examined in rats and rabbits. Rats were irradiated with low dose X-ray over their entire bodies, and rabbits inhaled vaporized radon spring water, which primarily emitted α-ray. The following results were obtained. Unlike high dose X-ray, low dose X-ray and radon inhalation both reduced LPO levels and made the state of the SH-group on membrane-bound proteins closer to that of juvenile animals, although the sensitivity to radioactivity varied depending on the age of the animals and among different organs and tissues. The SOD activity was elevated, suggesting that low dose X-ray and radon both activate the host defensive function. Those changes were particularly marked in the organs related to immune functions of the animals which received low dose X-ray, while they were particularly marked in the brain after radon inhalation. It was also found that those changes continued for longer periods after low dose X-irradiation. (2) Since SOD is an enzyme that mediates the dismutation of O 2 - to H 2 O 2 , the question as to whether the resultant H 2 O 2 is further detoxicated into H 2 O and O 2 or not must still be evaluated. Hence, we studied

  4. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  5. Stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Helen

    1976-05-01

    The first section of the bibliography lists materials on the stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation, with particular reference to stimulation of germination and yield. The second section contains a small number of selected references on seed irradiation facilities. (author)

  6. Use of combined paracetamol and low dose ketamine in pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of Paracetamol and low dose Ketamine in controlling burn pain during dressings. Setting: The burns ward of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, a 750 bed capacity tertiary centre in Western Kenya. Subjects: Consenting patients were recruited to the study on admission. Babies and ...

  7. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  8. Protective Effect of Low Dose Gamma Irradiation against Oxidative Damage in Rats Administrated with Ferric- Nitrilotriacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansonr, S.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial adaptive response of low dose gamma-irradiation. Low dose gamma-irradiation (LDR) might be effective for the prevention of various reactive oxygen species-related diseases. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a strong oxidant, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radical and causes injuries of various organs including the kidney and liver. This study was designed to investigate the ability of low dose gamma-irradiation to restrain Fe-NT A induced oxidative stress. Sprague Dawley male albino rats were subjected to low dose gamma-irradiation (50 cGy). Animals were challenged with Fe-NT A (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). Results showed that Fe-NTA enhances lipid peroxidation (LPx) accompanied with reduction in glutathione (GSH) content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and phase-U metabolizing enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Fe-NTA also enhances the concentration of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine as well as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Exposure to low dose gamma- irradiation (3 h after Fe-NTA administration) resulted in a significant decrease in LPx, BUN, serum creatinine contents as well as ALT, AST and GGT enzyme activities. GSH content; GST and antioxidant enzymes were also recovered to significant level. Thus, our data suggest that exposure to LDR might be a useful antioxidant mediator to suppress the Fe-NTA induced-oxidative damage in rats

  9. Low Dose Mesalazine Plus Bismuth Regimen and Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Patients with Bloating: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavinejad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The current study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of mesalazine plus bismuth on patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and chief complaint of bloating. Methods The current quasi-experimental study, included patients with IBS and chief complaint of bloating and incomplete defecation. They were treated with masalazine and bismuth subcitrate and followed regularly based on monthly visits. The rate of symptoms relief, patients' satisfaction and any side effects were recorded during the surveillance. Results Overall, 42 patients (33 females and 9 males were included. The mean age of the patients was 35.9 years (ranged 22 - 67 years; 32%, 44% and 24% had high, medium and low socioeconomic levels, respectively; 96% of the patients were nonsmokers and just two patients had a history of alcohol consumption. Two patients had glucose intolerance, four had hypothyroidism and four had past history of valvular heart disease. In 20% of the patients, the family history for intestinal bowl disease (IBD was positive. Ten patients had a history of bloody diarrhea and no one had a history of any significant liver diseases. The most common symptoms of patients included incomplete defecation and tenesmus (41 patients, 97.6%, bloating (39 patients, 92.8%, abdominal fullness (35 patients, 83.3% and mucus discharge (30 patients, 71.4%. After an average six months of treatment (3 - 11 months, 69.1% of patients reported improvement of symptoms more than 50% (38.1%, ranged 75% - 100%, and 31% (ranged 50% - 75% indicated overall symptoms relief. The most significant improvement was reported for bloating (85%. There were no major side effects except minor degrees of diarrhea among 26% of the subjects. Conclusions The results of the study were indicative of improvement and symptom relief in the majority of patients and it seems that treatment prolongation up to six months could be a key factor to achieve better clinical responses. It is recommended that further

  10. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  11. Feasibility study of automatic tube current modulation in low-dose thoracic imaging for young children with 64-slice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yun; Li Jianyin; Zhang Qifeng; Liu Yue; Wang Bei; Zheng Jinjin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of using an automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) method to obtain consistent image quality with reduced radiation dose for young children undergoing chest scans with a set of 64-slice spiral CT. Methods: Fifty young children underwent chest scans on a GE 64-slice VCT with automatic tube current modulation. The noise index (NI) for this study group was set to 8 or 9 based on the proposed reference for pediatric chest imaging in our hospital. We compared image quality and radiation dose for the study group with the age-matched control group of 50 young children acquired with standard protocol of fixed-mAs (120 and 150 mAs for under 1 and above 1 year old, respectively). The volume CT dose index(CTDIvol) values were recorded for both groups. Two experienced pediatric radiologists assessed image quality on a 5-point scale with 5 being the best. Scores greater than or equal to 3 were considered clinically acceptable. The degree of interobserver concordance was determined by Kappa statistics. Results: The average objective image noise and CTDIvol for control group was (4.78±0.58) and (6.68±0.62) mGy, respectively. For the study group the mean value of objective mAs was (41.6±11.6) (20-79 mAs) with mean CTDIvol of (2.34±0.71) mGy, and the use of ATCM produced mean noise of (7.84±0.66). The average CTDIvol with the use of NI of 8-9 was about 65% lower than that with the fixed mAs setting. The mean image quality score for the study group and control group was (3.46±0.40) and (4.65±0.46) respectively. All studies had acceptable image quality, and there was good inter-observer agreement in diagnostic acceptability (Kappa=0.474 and 0.536). Conclusion: The automatic tube current modulation method could be used to obtain consistent image quality for young children undergoing 64-slice MSCT chest scans. With proper noise level setting (NI=8 or 9), one may obtain clinically acceptable images with much reduced radiation dose. (authors)

  12. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelward, Bevin P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  13. Effect of reconstruction algorithm on image quality and identification of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT: Experimental study using chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Kono, Atsushi A.; Kusaka, Akiko; Konishi, Minoru; Yoshii, Masaru; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of reconstruction algorithm on identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and partly solid nodules on low-dose thin-section CT. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated GGOs and partly solid nodules was scanned with five different tube currents and reconstructed by using standard (A) and newly developed (B) high-resolution reconstruction algorithms, followed by visually assessment of identification and image quality of GGOs and partly solid nodules by two chest radiologists. Inter-observer agreement, ROC analysis and ANOVA were performed to compare identification and image quality of each data set with those of the standard reference. The standard reference used 120 mA s in conjunction with reconstruction algorithm A. Results: Kappa values (κ) of overall identification and image qualities were substantial or almost perfect (0.60 < κ). Assessment of identification showed that area under the curve of 25 mA reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A was significantly lower than that of standard reference (p < 0.05), while assessment of image quality indicated that 50 mA s reconstructed with reconstruction algorithm A and 25 mA s reconstructed with both reconstruction algorithms were significantly lower than standard reference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Reconstruction algorithm may be an important factor for identification and image quality of ground-glass opacities and partly solid nodules on low-dose CT examination.

  14. Safety and efficacy of low-dose paclitaxel utilizing the cobra-P drug-eluting stent system with a novel biodegradable coating in de novo coronary lesions: the PLUS-ONE first-in-man study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderas, Carlos; Condado, Jose Francisco; Condado, Jose Antonio; Flores, Alejandra; Mueller, Amy; Thomas, Jack; Nakatani, Daisaku; Honda, Yasuhiro; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Fitzgerald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Cobra-P drug-eluting stent (DES) system consists of cobalt chromium alloy with bio-absorbable siloxane sol-gel matrix coating that elutes low dose paclitaxel within 6 months. The aim of this first-in-man trial was to evaluate the safety and performance of 2 doses of the Cobra-P DES. A total of 60 lesions (54 patients) were sequentially assigned to 2 different paclitaxel doses: group A (3.7 μg/18mm, n=30) or group B (8 μg/18mm, n=30). The primary endpoint was MACE at 4 months defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target lesion revascularization. Patient and lesion characteristics were matched between the 2 groups except for male sex. MACE at 4 months was 3.3% and 0% respectively (P=1.000) and at 1-year follow-up remained unchanged. In-stent late loss at 4 months was similar in both groups (0.36 ± 0.30mm and 0.34 ± 0.20mm P=.773). In this FIM study, implantation of the Cobra-P low dose paclitaxel-eluting stent with a bioabsorbable sol-gel coating was proven to be feasible and safe. Moderate neointimal proliferation was observed as well as an acceptable MACE rate up to 1 year. © 2014.

  15. Safety and efficacy of low-dose paclitaxel utilizing the cobra-P drug-eluting stent system with a novel biodegradable coating in de novo coronary lesions: The PLUS-ONE first-in-man study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderas, Carlos [Instituto de Clinicas Urologia Tamanaco, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Condado, Jose Francisco; Condado, Jose Antonio [Hospital Centro Medico de Caracas y Hospital Miguel Perez Carreno, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Flores, Alejandra [Instituto de Clinicas Urologia Tamanaco, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Mueller, Amy; Thomas, Jack [Medlogics Device Corporation, Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Nakatani, Daisaku; Honda, Yasuhiro; Waseda, Katsuhisa [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Fitzgerald, Peter, E-mail: crci-cvmed@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Background: The Cobra-P drug-eluting stent (DES) system consists of cobalt chromium alloy with bio-absorbable siloxane sol–gel matrix coating that elutes low dose paclitaxel within 6 months. The aim of this first-in-man trial was to evaluate the safety and performance of 2 doses of the Cobra-P DES. Methods: A total of 60 lesions (54 patients) were sequentially assigned to 2 different paclitaxel doses: group A (3.7 μg/18 mm, n = 30) or group B (8 μg/18 mm, n = 30). The primary endpoint was MACE at 4 months defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target lesion revascularization. Results: Patient and lesion characteristics were matched between the 2 groups except for male sex. MACE at 4 months was 3.3% and 0% respectively (P = 1.000) and at 1-year follow-up remained unchanged. In-stent late loss at 4 months was similar in both groups (0.36 ± 0.30 mm and 0.34 ± 0.20 mm P = .773). Conclusions: In this FIM study, implantation of the Cobra-P low dose paclitaxel-eluting stent with a bioabsorbable sol–gel coating was proven to be feasible and safe. Moderate neointimal proliferation was observed as well as an acceptable MACE rate up to 1 year.

  16. Safety and efficacy of low-dose paclitaxel utilizing the cobra-P drug-eluting stent system with a novel biodegradable coating in de novo coronary lesions: The PLUS-ONE first-in-man study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderas, Carlos; Condado, Jose Francisco; Condado, Jose Antonio; Flores, Alejandra; Mueller, Amy; Thomas, Jack; Nakatani, Daisaku; Honda, Yasuhiro; Waseda, Katsuhisa; Fitzgerald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Cobra-P drug-eluting stent (DES) system consists of cobalt chromium alloy with bio-absorbable siloxane sol–gel matrix coating that elutes low dose paclitaxel within 6 months. The aim of this first-in-man trial was to evaluate the safety and performance of 2 doses of the Cobra-P DES. Methods: A total of 60 lesions (54 patients) were sequentially assigned to 2 different paclitaxel doses: group A (3.7 μg/18 mm, n = 30) or group B (8 μg/18 mm, n = 30). The primary endpoint was MACE at 4 months defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and target lesion revascularization. Results: Patient and lesion characteristics were matched between the 2 groups except for male sex. MACE at 4 months was 3.3% and 0% respectively (P = 1.000) and at 1-year follow-up remained unchanged. In-stent late loss at 4 months was similar in both groups (0.36 ± 0.30 mm and 0.34 ± 0.20 mm P = .773). Conclusions: In this FIM study, implantation of the Cobra-P low dose paclitaxel-eluting stent with a bioabsorbable sol–gel coating was proven to be feasible and safe. Moderate neointimal proliferation was observed as well as an acceptable MACE rate up to 1 year

  17. Characteristics of repair following very low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Metting, N.F.; Nelson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on living systems being with the physical processes of energy deposition and develop through many stages of chemical reaction and biological response. The modeling effort attempts to organize the available data and theories of all of these stages into self-consistent models that can be compared and tested. In some cases, important differences among models result in only small differences in cell survival within the ranges of dose and dose rate that are normally investigated. To overcome this limitation, new ways of irradiating cells at extremes of dose rate, or ways of evaluating the effects of very small doses, are developed. Mathematical modeling and cellular studies complement each other. It has recently been found that some mechanisms are not adequate to account for the interaction of dose and repair time as they affect the reproductive survival of plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Repair of radiation-induced cellular damage plays a central role in the survival of cells exposed to doses of 1 Gy or more. This repair is responsible for the dose rate, split-dose and delayed plating effect and can be evaluated. Because split-dose and dose-rate experiments involve repair during irradiation and delayed plating experiments involve repair after irradiation is completed, it was originally thought that different repair processes were involved. It is now clear that this is not necessarily the case. Appropriately designed models can account for observed effects at conventional doses (1 Gy or more) whether they assume all damage is lethal unless repaired or some damage is innocuous unless it interacts with additional damage. The fact that the survival following a plating delay is always less than the survival following immediate plating at low doses indicates that the damage produced is probably not potentially lethal

  18. Comparison of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetics on low dose aspirin and not on low dose aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetes patients who are taking low dose aspirin with those patients who are not taking low dose aspirin. Study design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: This study was carried out at Military Hospital Rawalpindi for a period of two years (June 2006-May 2008). Patients and Methods: Sixty diabetic patients were selected who were taking low dose aspirin comparing group A and sixty diabetic patients who were not taking aspirin were placed in group B. These patients were selected from the OPD through non probability convenience sampling. All these patients were being followed up in medical outpatient quite regularly on fort-nightly basis. Data had been collected through a carefully designed questionnaire. Results: In group A, 90% of the patients had uric acid less than 445 micro mol/l and 10% of the patients had uric acid more than 445micro mol/l. Whereas in group B 100% of the patients had uric acid less than 445umol/l, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Aspirin in low doses cause hyperuricemia and regular monitoring of uric acid is mandatory to prevent its adverse effects. (author)

  19. Low-dose-rate total lymphoid irradiation: a new method of rapid immunosuppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.E.; de Silva, S.M.; Rachman, D.B.; Order, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI) has been successful in inducing immunosuppression in experimental and clinical applications. However, both the experimental and clinical utility of TLI are hampered by the prolonged treatment courses required (23 days in rats and 30-60 days in humans). Low-dose-rate TLI has the potential of reducing overall treatment time while achieving comparable immunosuppression. This study examines the immunosuppressive activity and treatment toxicity of conventional-dose-rate (23 days) vs low-dose-rate (2-7 days) TLI. Seven groups of Lewis rats were given TLI with 60Co. One group was treated at conventional-dose-rates (80-110 cGy/min) and received 3400 cGy in 17 fractions over 23 days. Six groups were treated at low-dose-rate (7 cGy/min) and received total doses of 800, 1200, 1800, 2400, 3000, and 3400 cGy over 2-7 days. Rats treated at conventional-dose-rates over 23 days and at low-dose-rate over 2-7 days tolerated radiation with minimal toxicity. The level of immunosuppression was tested using allogeneic (Brown-Norway) skin graft survival. Control animals retained allogeneic skin grafts for a mean of 14 days (range 8-21 days). Conventional-dose-rate treated animals (3400 cGy in 23 days) kept their grafts 60 days (range 50-66 days) (p less than .001). Low-dose-rate treated rats (800 to 3400 cGy total dose over 2-7 days) also had prolongation of allogeneic graft survival times following TLI with a dose-response curve established. The graft survival time for the 3400 cGy low-dose-rate group (66 days, range 52-78 days) was not significantly different from the 3400 cGy conventional-dose-rate group (p less than 0.10). When the total dose given was equivalent, low-dose-rate TLI demonstrated an advantage of reduced overall treatment time compared to conventional-dose-rate TLI (7 days vs. 23 days) with no increase in toxicity

  20. AT cells are not radiosensitive for simple chromosomal exchanges at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Megumi; Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Kawata, Tetsuya; Pluth, Janice M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Cells deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome) show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high doses (>0.5 Gy) of ionizing radiation (X-rays or γ-rays), however less is known on how these cells respond at low dose. Previously we had shown that the increased chromosome aberrations in ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex exchanges. The linear dose-response term for simple exchanges was significantly higher in NBS cells compared to wild type cells, but not for AT cells. However, AT cells have a high background level of exchanges compared to wild type or NBS cells that confounds the understanding of low dose responses. To understand the sensitivity differences for high to low doses, chromosomal aberration analysis was first performed at low dose-rates (0.5 Gy/d), and results provided further evidence for the lack of sensitivity for exchanges in AT cells below doses of 1 Gy. Normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, showed increased numbers of exchanges at a dose of 1 Gy and higher, but were similar to wild type cells at 0.5 Gy or below. These results were confirmed using siRNA knockdown of ATM. The present study provides evidence that the increased radiation sensitivity of AT cells for chromosomal exchanges found at high dose does not occur at low dose.

  1. Low-dose caffeine physical dependence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R R; Evans, S M; Heishman, S J; Preston, K L; Sannerud, C A; Wolf, B; Woodson, P P

    1990-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of terminating low dose levels of caffeine (100 mg/day) in 7 normal humans. Substitution of placebo capsules for caffeine capsules occurred under double-blind conditions while subjects rated various dimensions of their mood and behavior. In the first phase of the study, substitution of placebo for 12 consecutive days resulted in an orderly withdrawal syndrome in 4 subjects which peaked on days 1 or 2 and progressively decreased toward prewithdrawal levels over about 1 week. Data from the remaining three subjects provided no evidence of withdrawal. In the second phase of the study, the generality of the withdrawal effect was examined by repeatedly substituting placebo for 100 mg/day of caffeine for 1-day periods separated by an average of 9 days. Despite differences within and across subjects with respect to the presence, nature and magnitude of symptoms, each of the seven subjects demonstrated a statistically significant withdrawal effect. Although the phenomenon of caffeine withdrawal has been described previously, the present report documents that the incidence of caffeine withdrawal is higher (100% of subjects), the daily dose level at which withdrawal occurs is lower (roughly equivalent to the amount of caffeine in a single cup of strong brewed coffee or 3 cans of caffeinated soft drink) and the range of symptoms experienced is broader (including headache, fatigue and other dysphoric mood changes, muscle pain/stiffness, flu-like feelings, nausea/vomiting and craving for caffeine) than heretofore recognized.

  2. Low-dose memantine attenuated morphine addictive behavior through its anti-inflammation and neurotrophic effects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wu, Hsiang-En; Tseng, Leon F; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2012-06-01

    Opioid abuse and dependency are international problems. Studies have shown that neuronal inflammation and degeneration might be related to the development of opioid addiction. Thus, using neuroprotective agents might be beneficial for treating opioid addiction. Memantine, an Alzheimer's disease medication, has neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated whether a low dose of memantine prevents opioid-induced drug-seeking behavior in rats and analyzed its mechanism. A conditioned-place-preference test was used to investigate the morphine-induced drug-seeking behaviors in rats. We found that a low-dose (0.2-1 mg/kg) of subcutaneous memantine significantly attenuated the chronic morphine-induced place-preference in rats. To clarify the effects of chronic morphine and low-dose memantine, serum and brain levels of cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured. After 6 days of morphine treatment, cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6) levels had significantly increased in serum; IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels had significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, both addiction-related brain areas; and BDNF levels had significantly decreased, both in serum and in addiction-related brain areas. Pretreatment with low-dose memantine significantly attenuated chronic morphine-induced increases in serum and brain cytokines. Low-dose memantine also significantly potentiated serum and brain BDNF levels. We hypothesize that neuronal inflammation and BDNF downregulation are related to the progression of opioid addiction. We hypothesize that the mechanism low-dose memantine uses to attenuate morphine-induced addiction behavior is its anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects.

  3. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To correlate the levels of epigenetic changes with genetic rearrangement levels and gene expression patterns. In sum, we determined the precise global and locus-specific DNA methylation patterns in the LDR-exposed cells and tissues of mice, and to correlated DNA methylation changes with the gene expression patterns and manifestations of genome instability. We also determined the alterations of global histone modification pattern in the LDR exposed tissues. Additionally, we established the nature of microRNAome changes in the LDR exposed tissue. In this study we for the first time found that LDR exposure caused profound tissue-specific epigenetic changes in the exposed tissues. We established that LDR exposure affect methylation of repetitive elements in the murine genome, causes changes in histone methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. Importantly, we found that LDR causes profound and persistent effects on small RNA profiles and gene expression, and that miRNAs are excellent biomarkers of LDR exposure. Furthermore, we extended our analysis and studied LDR effects in rat tissues and human tissues and cell lines. There we also analyzed LDR-induced gene expression, DNA methylation and miRNA changes. Our datasets laid foundation for several new research projects aimed to understand molecular underpinnings of low dose radiation responses, and biological repercussions of low dose radiation effects and radiation carcinogenesis.

  4. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  5. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  6. In HFREF patients, sacubitril/valsartan, given at relatively low doses, does not lead to increased mortality or hospitalization : A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, R; Ariano, C; Di Biase, G; Noutsias, M

    2018-03-08

    In heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFREF) patients, the dosage of sacubitril/valsartan is modulated according to a gradual increase regimen. Nevertheless, if patients exhibit tolerability problems, a provisional reduction of the dose of sacubitril/valsartan or even its interruption are recommended. This study provides estimates of respective proportions of patients receiving minimum or intermediate doses of sacubitril/valsartan. In addition, a comparison was made to detect possible differences regarding all-cause mortality and heart failure hospitalization in patients treated with the recommended optimum dose compared to those receiving submaximum maintenance doses of sacubitril/valsartan. Patients treated with sacubitril/valsartan in addition to beta-blocker and mineralocorticoid receptor blocker were 68. Among them, 20 patients (29.4%), were identified as having clinical features that were contraindications to the administration of sacubitril/valsartan at full dose. The subsequent decision was to maintain an intermediate dose in 11 patients and to reduce the dose to the minimum level allowed, i.e., 24 mg/26 mg twice daily in nine patients. After a median follow-up of 5.25 months, no differences were found concerning the risk of all-cause death by comparing patients treated with reduced versus those subjected to target doses of sacubitril/valsartan (odds ratio [OR] = 1.666; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.256-10.823; p = 0.6266). Patients taking reduced doses had a similar risk of heart failure hospitalizations when compared to patients treated with the target dose (OR = 0.789; 95% CI: 0.077-8.0808; p = 1.00). During a median follow-up of 5.25 months, in the group of patients who had proven to be intolerant to the maximum dose of sacubitril/valsartan, use of reduced doses of the drug did not result in increased all-cause mortality or heart failure hospitalization compared to patients treated with

  7. [Risk of deterministic effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation: retrospective study among health workers in view of a new publication of International Commission on Radiological Protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrone, Mario; Di Lascio, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    The new recommended equivalent (publication n. 118 of International Commission on Radiological Protection) dose limit for occupational exposure of the lens of the eye is based on prevention of radiogenic cataracts, with the underlying assumption of a nominal threshold which has been adjusted from 2,5 Gy to 0.5 Gy for acute or protracted exposure. The study aim was to determine the prevalence of ocular lens opacity among healthcare workers (radiologic technologists, physicians, physician assistants) with respect to occupational exposures to ionizing radiations. Therefore, we conducted another retrospective study to explore the relationship between occupational exposure to radiation and opacity lens increase. Healthcare data (current occupational dosimetry, occupational history) are used to investigate risk of increase of opacity lens of eye. The sample of this study consisted of 148 health-workers (64 M and 84 W) aged from 28 to 66 years coming from different hospitals of the ASL of Potenza (clinic, hospital and institute with scientific feature). On the basis of the evaluation of the dosimetric history of the workers (global and effective dose) we agreed to ascribe the group of exposed subjects in cat A (equivalent dose > 2 mSV) and the group of non exposed subjects in cat B (workers with annual absorbed level of dose near 0 mSv). The analisys was conducted using SPSS 15.0 (Statistical Package for Social Science). A trend of increased ocular lens opacity was found with increasing number for workers in highest category of exposure (cat. A, Yates' chi-squared test = 13,7 p = 0,0002); variable significantly related to opacity lens results job: nurse (Χ(2)Y = 14,3 p = 0,0002) physician (Χ(2)Y = 2.2 p = 0,1360) and radiologic technologists (Χ(2)Y = 0,1 p = 0,6691). In conclusion our provides evidence that exposure to relatively low doses of ionizing radiation may be harmful to the lens of the eye and may increase a long-term risk of cataract formation; similary

  8. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  9. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  10. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  11. Deep learning for low-dose CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Given the potential risk of X-ray radiation to the patient, low-dose CT has attracted a considerable interest in the medical imaging field. Currently, the main stream low-dose CT methods include vendor-specific sinogram domain filtration and iterative reconstruction algorithms, but they need to access raw data whose formats are not transparent to most users. Due to the difficulty of modeling the statistical characteristics in the image domain, the existing methods for directly processing reconstructed images cannot eliminate image noise very well while keeping structural details. Inspired by the idea of deep learning, here we combine the autoencoder, deconvolution network, and shortcut connections into the residual encoder-decoder convolutional neural network (RED-CNN) for low-dose CT imaging. After patch-based training, the proposed RED-CNN achieves a competitive performance relative to the-state-of-art methods. Especially, our method has been favorably evaluated in terms of noise suppression and structural preservation.

  12. Modification of damage following low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Nelson, J.M.; Metting, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    At very low doses the damage-interaction mechanism is responsible for very little lethal or potentially lethal damage, and repair of the latter should essentially disappear. An alternative model suggests that potentially lethal damage is either repaired with a constant half time or misrepaired at a rate which is proportional to the square of the damage concentration. In this case, as the dose decreases, the probability of misrepair decreases faster than the probability of repair, and repair becomes a more pronounced feature of the cell response. Since the consequence of unrepaired damage is an important question in determining the effects of low doses of radiation delivered at low dose rates, we have attempted to determine which of these two types of models is consistent with the response of plateau-phase CHO cells. In the earlier experiments, there was no indication of repair after a 50-rad exposure with a 24-hour split dose or plating delay; in fact, immediate plating resulted in survival slightly above control and delayed plating in survival slightly below the control value

  13. Exercise and Sport Performance with Low Doses of Caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Spriet, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5–13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (

  14. The Potential Neurotoxic Effects of Low-Dose Sarin Exposure in a Guinea Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    1 THE POTENTIAL NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF LOW-DOSE SARIN EXPOSURE IN A GUINEA PIG MODEL Melinda R. Roberson, PhD, Michelle B. Schmidt...Proving Ground, MD 21010 USA ABSTRACT This study is assessing the effects in guinea pigs of repeated low-dose exposure to the nerve...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Potential Neurotoxic Effects Of Low-Dose Sarin Exposure In A Guinea Pig Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  15. Serum protein concentration in low-dose total body irradiation of normal and malnourished rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viana, W.C.M.; Lambertz, D.; Borges, E.S.; Neto, A.M.O.; Lambertz, K.M.F.T.; Amaral, A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the radiotherapeutics' modalities, total body irradiation (TBI) is used as treatment for certain hematological, oncological and immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose TBI on plasma concentration of total protein and albumin using prematurely and undernourished rats as animal model. For this, four groups with 9 animals each were formed: Normal nourished (N); Malnourished (M); Irradiated Normal nourished (IN); Irradiated Malnourished (IM). At the age of 28 days, rats of the IN and IM groups underwent total body gamma irradiation with a source of cobalt-60. Total protein and Albumin in the blood serum was quantified by colorimetry. This research indicates that procedures involving low-dose total body irradiation in children have repercussions in the reduction in body-mass as well as in the plasma levels of total protein and albumin. Our findings reinforce the periodic monitoring of total serum protein and albumin levels as an important tool in long-term follow-up of pediatric patients in treatments associated to total body irradiation. - Highlights: • Low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) in children have repercussions in their body-mass. • Long-term total protein and albumin levels are affected by TBI. • The monitoring of total protein and albumin levels are useful in the follow-up of TBI pediatric patients.

  16. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  17. Systemic effects of low-dose dopamine during administration of cytarabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, James; Benani, Dina J; Newman, Matthew; Burton, Bradley; Crow, Jessica; Levis, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Low-dose dopamine has been utilized to improve renal blood flow, urine output, and reduce drug-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in renal function, cardiovascular adverse events, and neurologic toxicity in patients receiving cytarabine with or without low-dose dopamine. Methods A retrospective, single-center, cohort study of patients receiving cytarabine at 667 mg/m 2 /dose or greater, with or without dopamine at ≤5 mcg/kg/min. Cohorts were based upon initiation or absence of low-dose dopamine; cytarabine only, cytarabine + pre- and day of low-dose dopamine, and cytarabine + post-low-dose dopamine. Renal outcomes (urine output, serum creatinine, and creatinine clearance) were compared with baseline and between cohorts. Safety endpoints (arrhythmias, tachycardia, and neurotoxicity) were compared between cohorts based on low-dose dopamine exposure. Results There was no difference in urine output from baseline in all cohorts. Comparing cytarabine only and pre- and day of low-dose dopamine cohorts, there was no difference in urine output. In those receiving low-dose dopamine, there was no difference in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance from baseline. No arrhythmias were documented during the study period, and there was no difference in the incidence of tachycardia between groups (P = 0.66). Neurotoxicity was reported in three patients who were on low-dose dopamine. Conclusion Though variation existed in individual patients administered low-dose dopamine, the use of low-dose dopamine did not significantly impact renal function in this small sample at a single institution. In addition, low-dose dopamine did not negatively impact cardiovascular function.

  18. Histochemical study on effects of low dose γ-irradiation on acid phosphatase in liver of the pigeons Columbus livia intermedia Strickland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadhia, P.K.; Shah, V.C.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of total body γ-irradiation with sub-lethal dose (400 rads) on acid phosphatase have been studied in the liver of pigeon. The histochemical study showed increased activity of acid phosphatase in liver after 48 hr and 72 hr of irradiation. (author)

  19. [Influence of low doses of ionizing radiation on tenascin expression in hybridoma cell systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunga, I N

    2003-01-01

    One of the achievements of the modern radiation ecology is the preparation and application of stable eukariotic cell lines to solve various problems occurring under exposure to ionizing radiation, especially to low doses. The detection of onco-fetal protein--tenascin in different embryonic and tumor cells of humans and animals supposes the probability of appropriate gene expression in lymphoid cells, including hybridomal cells. Using the immunochemical method, the study of tenascin expression in two mouse hybridomal lines was carried out. Tenascin was revealed in hybridomal lines MLC-1 and K-48. Further hybridomal cell lines were exposed to X-ray radiation (120 KV) with doses 2.10,15 cGy. The obtained results demonstrated the sensitivity of tenascin expression to low doses of ionizing radiation, that may be used as a convenient model of studying of genotoxic effects of various damaging ionizing agents on a cell level.

  20. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, pbonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  1. Influence of low dose ionizing radiation on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Hou Dianjun; Qiao Jianwei; Shang Ximei; Li Jieqing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of low dose ionization on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells. Methods: TIL cells isolated from Lewis lung cancer tissues and LAK cells from spleen of tumor-bearing mouse were irradiated with different low doses of X-rays and were cultured after irradiation. Results: Low dose ionizing radiation improved the amplification volume of LAK/TIL cells, decreased the cell death ratio in amplification process, and increased the toxicity of LAK/TIL cells, Conclusions: Low dose ionizing radiation can result in amplification of biologically activated lymphocytes, and decreases the death ratio of the cells in amplification process

  2. A prospective study of whether radiation pneumonitis is influenced by low-dose irradiated lung volume in primary lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Masuda, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Hirokuni

    2007-01-01

    The current study prospectively investigated the optimal dose-volume condition in cases of lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease compared to those without chronic pulmonary disease. Cases of primary lung cancer treated with intended curative radiation therapy were registered in the current study. Their fraction size was limited to 2-3 Gy, so-called standard fractionation. They were prescribed a total dose of 60 Gy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; n=17) and a total dose of 54 Gy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC; n=4). Of the 21 patients enrolled in this study, 4 had chronic pulmonary disease (study arm), and the others had no chronic pulmonary disease (control arm). Seven received chemotherapy. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in 5. Of the four patients in the study arm, two (50%) experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis; only 3 of the 17 patients in the control arm (17.6%) experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. Furthermore, the median V 20 of patients who experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the study arm was 14%, which was higher than that of patients with no symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the study arm, 5.8%. On the other hand, in the control arm, the median V 20 of patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis was 14.2%, about the same as that of patients with no symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the control arm, 15.1%. The current study suggested that, as much as 15% of V 20 , might play an important role in cases of lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease. (author)

  3. A Paradigm Shift in Low Dose Radiation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Alatas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available When ionizing radiation traverses biological material, some energy depositions occur and ionize directly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA molecules, the critical target. A classical paradigm in radiobiology is that the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA are responsible for the detrimental biological effects of radiation. It is presumed that no radiation effect would be expected in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure through nucleus. The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation. However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose radiation than they do to high dose radiation. Moreover, recent experimental evidences from many laboratories reveal the fact that radiation effects also occur in cells that were not exposed to radiation and in the progeny of irradiated cells at delayed times after radiation exposure where cells do not encounter direct DNA damage. Recently, the classical paradigm in radiobiology has been shifted from the nucleus, specifically the DNA, as the principal target for the biological effects of radiation to cells. The universality of target theory has been challenged by phenomena of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response. The new radiation biology paradigm would cover both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. The mechanisms underlying these responses involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. These results brought in understanding that the biological response to low dose radiation at tissue or organism level is a complex process of integrated response of cellular targets as well as extra-cellular factors. Biological understanding of

  4. Effect of low dose radiation on somatic intrachromosomal recombination in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, A.M.; Cormack, J.; Morley, A.A.; Sykes, P.J.; Bhat, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: High doses of ionising radiation are mutagenic in a wide range of mutation assays. The majority of radiation exposure studies in in vivo mouse mutation assays have been performed at high doses, eg greater than 1 Gy. However, these doses are not relevant to the low doses of ionising radiation that the majority of the population might likely come into contact with. Radiation protection levels tend to be based on a simple linear no-threshold model which suggests that any radiation above zero is potentially harmful. The pKZ1 recombination mutagenesis mouse model has proven to be a sensitive assay for the detection of mutations caused by low doses of chemical agents. In pKZ1 mice, somatic intrachromosomal recombination (SICR) inversion events can be detected in cells using histochemistry for the E. coli LacZ transgene. We exposed pKZ1 mice to a single radiation dose ranging from 0.001 to 2 Gy. A significant increase in SICR was observed in spleen at the two highest doses of 0.1 and 2 Gy and a significant reduction in SICR below the endogenous frequency was observed at the two lowest doses of 0.01 and 0.001 Gy. After exposing a pKZ1 cell line to the same dose range, a similar J curve response was observed with significant increases in SICR observed at the 3 highest doses and a significant decrease below the endogenous frequency at the lowest dose (0.001 Gy). The next experiments will be to determine the dose where the SICR frequency returns to the endogenous level. The important question posed by these results is 'Is a reduction below the endogenous SICR level caused by low doses of ionising radiation anti-mutagenic?' Studies now need to be performed to investigate the effect of low doses of radiation on other mutation end-points, and the mechanism for the reduction in SICR

  5. Diverse effects of a low dose supplement of lipidated curcumin in healthy middle aged people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiSilvestro Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin extracts of turmeric are proposed to produce health benefits. To date, human intervention studies have focused mainly on people with existing health problems given high doses of poorly absorbed curcumin. The purpose of the current study was to check whether in healthy people, a low dose of a lipidated curcumin extract could alter wellness-related measures. Methods The present study was conducted in healthy middle aged people (40–60 years old with a low dose of curcumin (80 mg/day in a lipidated form expected to have good absorption. Subjects were given either curcumin (N = 19 or placebo (N = 19 for 4 wk. Blood and saliva samples were taken before and after the 4 weeks and analyzed for a variety of blood and saliva measures relevant to health promotion. Results Curcumin, but not placebo, produced the following statistically significant changes: lowering of plasma triglyceride values, lowering of salivary amylase levels, raising of salivary radical scavenging capacities, raising of plasma catalase activities, lowering of plasma beta amyloid protein concentrations, lowering of plasma sICAM readings, increased plasma myeloperoxidase without increased c-reactive protein levels, increased plasma nitric oxide, and decreased plasma alanine amino transferase activities. Conclusion Collectively, these results demonstrate that a low dose of a curcumin-lipid preparation can produce a variety of potentially health promoting effects in healthy middle aged people.

  6. A randomised, controlled study of peri-operative low dose s(+)-ketamine in combination with postoperative patient-controlled s(+)-ketamine and morphine after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.; Cornelisse, H.B.; Schmid, R.L.; Katz, J.

    2004-01-01

    In a randomised, double-blind prospective study we compared the effects on postoperative pain and analgesic consumption of intra-operative s(+)-ketamine (100 microg.kg-1 bolus and a continuous infusion of 2 microg.kg-1.min-1) followed by postoperative patient-controlled analgesia with morphine (1 mg

  7. Phase II study of palliative low-dose local radiotherapy in disseminated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jóhannsson, Jakob; Specht, Lena; Mejer, Johannes

    2002-01-01

    Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (INHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are highly sensitive to radiotherapy (RT). Previous retrospective studies have shown high response rates after local palliative RT of 4 Gy in 2 fractions, which prompted this prospective Phase II trial of the palliative...

  8. Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayle Woloschak

    2009-12-16

    As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

  9. Low doses of Paclitaxel repress breast cancer invasion through DJ-1/KLF17 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ismail Ahmed; El-Sokkary, Gamal H; Saber, Saber H

    2018-04-27

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is an important agent against many tumours, including breast cancer. Ample data documents that paclitaxel inhibits breast cancer metastasis while others prove that paclitaxel enhances breast cancer metastasis. The mechanisms by which paclitaxel exerts its action are not well established. This study focuses on the effect of paclitaxel, particularly the low doses on breast cancer metastasis and the mechanisms that regulate it. Current results show that, paclitaxel exerts significant cytotoxicity even at low doses in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Interestingly, paclitaxel significantly inhibits cell invasion and migration, decreases Snail and increases E-cadherin mRNA expression levels at the indicated low doses. Furthermore, paclitaxel-inhibiting breast cancer metastasis is associated with down-regulation of DJ-1 and ID-1 mRNA expression level with a concurrent increase in KLF17 expression. Under the same experimental conditions, paclitaxel induces KLF17 and concurrently represses ID-1 protein levels. Our results show for the first time that paclitaxel inhibits breast cancer metastasis through regulating DJ-1/KLF17/ID-1 signalling pathway; repressed DJ-1 and ID-1 and enhanced KLF17 expression. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. γ-H2AX foci are increased in lymphocytes in vivo in young children 1 h after very low-dose X-irradiation: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halm, Brunhild M.; Franke, Adrian A.; Lai, Jennifer F. [University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Turner, Helen C.; Brenner, David J.; Zohrabian, Vatche M. [Columbia University Medical Center, Center for Radiological Research, New York, NY (United States); DiMauro, Robert [Kapi' olani Medical Center for Women and Children, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality involving ionizing radiation. The presence of γ-H2AX foci after low to moderate ionizing radiation exposure has been demonstrated; however it is unknown whether very low ionizing radiation exposure doses from CT exams can induce γ-H2AX formation in vivo in young children. To test whether very low ionizing radiation doses from CT exams can induce lymphocytic γ-H2AX foci (phosphorylated histones used as a marker of DNA damage) formation in vivo in young children. Parents of participating children signed a consent form. Blood samples from three children (ages 3-21 months) undergoing CT exams involving very low blood ionizing radiation exposure doses (blood doses of 0.22-1.22 mGy) were collected immediately before and 1 h post CT exams. Isolated lymphocytes were quantified for γ-H2AX foci by a technician blinded to the radiation status and dose of the patients. Paired t-tests and regression analyses were performed with significance levels set at P < 0.05. We observed a dose-dependent increase in γ-H2AX foci post-CT exams (P = 0.046) among the three children. Ionizing radiation exposure doses led to a linear increase of foci per cell in post-CT samples (102% between lowest and highest dose). We found a significant induction of γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes from post-CT samples of three very young children. When possible, CT exams should be limited or avoided by possibly applying non-ionizing radiation exposure techniques such as US or MRI. (orig.)

  11. γ-H2AX foci are increased in lymphocytes in vivo in young children 1 h after very low-dose X-irradiation: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halm, Brunhild M.; Franke, Adrian A.; Lai, Jennifer F.; Turner, Helen C.; Brenner, David J.; Zohrabian, Vatche M.; DiMauro, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an imaging modality involving ionizing radiation. The presence of γ-H2AX foci after low to moderate ionizing radiation exposure has been demonstrated; however it is unknown whether very low ionizing radiation exposure doses from CT exams can induce γ-H2AX formation in vivo in young children. To test whether very low ionizing radiation doses from CT exams can induce lymphocytic γ-H2AX foci (phosphorylated histones used as a marker of DNA damage) formation in vivo in young children. Parents of participating children signed a consent form. Blood samples from three children (ages 3-21 months) undergoing CT exams involving very low blood ionizing radiation exposure doses (blood doses of 0.22-1.22 mGy) were collected immediately before and 1 h post CT exams. Isolated lymphocytes were quantified for γ-H2AX foci by a technician blinded to the radiation status and dose of the patients. Paired t-tests and regression analyses were performed with significance levels set at P < 0.05. We observed a dose-dependent increase in γ-H2AX foci post-CT exams (P = 0.046) among the three children. Ionizing radiation exposure doses led to a linear increase of foci per cell in post-CT samples (102% between lowest and highest dose). We found a significant induction of γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes from post-CT samples of three very young children. When possible, CT exams should be limited or avoided by possibly applying non-ionizing radiation exposure techniques such as US or MRI. (orig.)

  12. Low-dose single acquisition rest {sup 99m}Tc/stress {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT protocol: phantom studies and clinical validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Imaging and Computer Vision, Aachen (Germany); Backus, Barbra E.; Romijn, R.Leo [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Wieczorek, Herfried [Philips Research, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Verzijlbergen, J.F. [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    We developed and tested a single acquisition rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi/stress {sup 201}Tl dual isotope protocol (SDI) with the intention of improving the clinical workflow and patient comfort of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The technical feasibility of SDI was evaluated by a series of anthropomorphic phantom studies on a standard SPECT camera. The attenuation map was created by a moving transmission line source. Iterative reconstruction including attenuation correction, resolution recovery and Monte Carlo simulation of scatter was used for simultaneous reconstruction of dual tracer distribution. For clinical evaluation, patient studies were compared to stress {sup 99m}Tc and rest {sup 99m}Tc reference images acquired in a 2-day protocol. Clinical follow-up examinations like coronary angiography (CAG) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) were included in the assessment if available. Phantom studies demonstrated the technical feasibility of SDI. Artificial lesions inserted in the phantom mimicking ischaemia could be clearly identified. In 51/53 patients, the image quality was adequate for clinical evaluation. For the remaining two obese patients with body mass index > 32 the injected {sup 201}Tl dose of 74 MBq was insufficient for clinical assessment. In answer to this the {sup 201}Tl dose was adapted for obese patients in the rest of the study. In 31 patients, SDI and {sup 99m}Tc reference images resulted in equivalent clinical assessment. Significant differences were found in 20 patients. In 18 of these 20 patients additional examinations were available. In 15 patients the diagnosis based on the SDI images was confirmed by the results of CAG or FFR. In these patients the SDI images were more accurate than the {sup 99m}Tc reference study. In three patients minor ischaemic lesions were detected by SDI but were not confirmed by CAG. In one of these cases this was probably caused by pronounced apical thinning. For two patients

  13. Low-dose single acquisition rest 99mTc/stress 201Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT protocol: phantom studies and clinical validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Thomas; Backus, Barbra E.; Romijn, R.Leo; Wieczorek, Herfried; Verzijlbergen, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    We developed and tested a single acquisition rest 99m Tc-sestamibi/stress 201 Tl dual isotope protocol (SDI) with the intention of improving the clinical workflow and patient comfort of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The technical feasibility of SDI was evaluated by a series of anthropomorphic phantom studies on a standard SPECT camera. The attenuation map was created by a moving transmission line source. Iterative reconstruction including attenuation correction, resolution recovery and Monte Carlo simulation of scatter was used for simultaneous reconstruction of dual tracer distribution. For clinical evaluation, patient studies were compared to stress 99m Tc and rest 99m Tc reference images acquired in a 2-day protocol. Clinical follow-up examinations like coronary angiography (CAG) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) were included in the assessment if available. Phantom studies demonstrated the technical feasibility of SDI. Artificial lesions inserted in the phantom mimicking ischaemia could be clearly identified. In 51/53 patients, the image quality was adequate for clinical evaluation. For the remaining two obese patients with body mass index > 32 the injected 201 Tl dose of 74 MBq was insufficient for clinical assessment. In answer to this the 201 Tl dose was adapted for obese patients in the rest of the study. In 31 patients, SDI and 99m Tc reference images resulted in equivalent clinical assessment. Significant differences were found in 20 patients. In 18 of these 20 patients additional examinations were available. In 15 patients the diagnosis based on the SDI images was confirmed by the results of CAG or FFR. In these patients the SDI images were more accurate than the 99m Tc reference study. In three patients minor ischaemic lesions were detected by SDI but were not confirmed by CAG. In one of these cases this was probably caused by pronounced apical thinning. For two patients no relevant clinical follow

  14. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  15. Effect of low dose radiation in lymphocytes from children exposed to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident. Cytogenetic, chromosome painting, GPA and adaptive response studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, L.; Appolloni, M.; Anzidei, P.; Spano, M.; Stronati, L.; Testa, A.; Mauro, F.

    1997-01-01

    The present study concerns the monitoring of some children coming from Byelorussian, Ukrainian and Russian republics, exposed to the fall-out, or to the initial acute dose of radiation with the aim of assessing the effects of ionizing radiation on human health and of verifying the persisting of chromosomal damage several years after the accident. Both structural chromosomes damage (conventional cytogenetic and chromosome painting) and molecular mutation (GPA) have been investigated, moreover the possible induction of an adaptive response has been tested. (author)

  16. An equivalence study comparing nitrous oxide and oxygen with low-dose sevoflurane and oxygen as inhalation sedation agents in dentistry for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M; Thompson, S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether sevoflurane in oxygen was equivalent to near equipotent concentrations of nitrous oxide in oxygen when used as an inhalation sedation agent in terms of patient and user acceptability. Forty anxious dental patients referred to the sedation suite at Cardiff University School of Dentistry received either nitrous oxide to a maximum concentration of 40% or sevoflurane to a maximum concentration of 0.3% for a routine maxillary plastic restoration with articaine infiltration local analgesia. The inhalation sedation agent to be administered was chosen by a random number allocator. Measurements of blood pressure, oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate and bispectral index were recorded every 5 minutes. At the end of the treatment episode the patient, the operator and an observer who was unaware of the agent used, recorded their impressions about the episode by completing questionnaires. In the doses used in this study, sevoflurane was found to be as effective as an inhalation sedation agent as the standard dose of nitrous oxide used in normal inhalation sedation in the treatment of adult anxious dental patients. Sevoflurane in low concentrations is equivalent in effect to near equipotent concentrations of nitrous oxide. This would suggest that further research, perhaps with slightly higher concentrations of sevoflurane, is needed. If sevoflurane was shown to be acceptable at slightly higher concentrations, there is scope to explore the development of equipment specifically designed to deliver sevoflurane as an inhalation sedation agent in future.

  17. The Effect of Low Dose of Lead Acetate on the Fallopian Tubes and the Role of Garlic Extract—A Histomorphic Study on Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naureen Waseem

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of lead acetate on the fallopian tube of adult mice and the possible effect of garlic extract in a Laboratory Based Randomized Control Trial. In this study, 30 female BALBc mice were selected and randomly divided into three groups. Ten animals were placed in each group. Group A being the control received only the laboratory diet. Group B was given lead acetate at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day. Group C was given lead acetate at 30 mg/kg/day and garlic extract at 500 mg/kg/day. All treatments were given through oral gavage tube for 60 days. The mice were sacrificed and dissected at the end of 60 days. The fallopian tubes were carefully dissected out and fixed in 10% formalin for routine histological examination. The histological findings in experimental group B showed increase in epithelial height, whereas no such findings were observed in group A and there was slight increase in height in group C. The lead acetate affected the epithelial height in lead acetate treated group which improved when cotreated with garlic extract.

  18. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  19. Drinking-water exposure to a mixture of nitrate and low-dose atrazine metabolites and small-for-gestational age (SGA) babies: a historic cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migeot, V; Albouy-Llaty, M; Carles, C; Limousi, F; Strezlec, S; Dupuis, A; Rabouan, S

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater, surface water and drinking water are contaminated by nitrates and atrazine, an herbicide. They are present as a mixture in drinking water and with their endocrine-disrupting activity, they may alter fetal growth. To study an association between drinking-water atrazine metabolites/nitrate mixture exposure and small-for-gestational-age(SGA). A historic cohort study based on birth records and drinking-water nitrate and pesticide measurements in Deux-Sèvres (France) between 2005 and 2009 was carried out. Exposure to drinking-water atrazine metabolites/nitrate mixture was divided into 6 classes according to the presence or absence of atrazine metabolites and to terciles of nitrate concentrations in each trimester of pregnancy. Regression analysis of SGA by mixture exposure at second trimester was subsequently conducted. We included 11,446 woman-neonate couples of whom 37.0% were exposed to pesticides, while 99.9% of the women were exposed to nitrates. Average nitrate concentration was from 0 to 63.30 mg/L. In the second trimester of pregnancy, the risk of SGA was different with mixture exposure when drinking-water atrazine metabolites, mainly 2 hydroxyatrazine and desethylatrazine, were present and nitrate dose exposure increased: compared to single first tercile of nitrate concentration exposure, single second tercile exposure OR was 1.74 CI 95% [1.10; 2.75] and atrazine metabolites presence in the third tercile of nitrate concentration exposure OR was 0.87 CI 95% [0.45;1.67]. It is possible that the association found at the second trimester of exposure with regard to birth weight may likewise be observed before birth, with regard to the estimated fetal weight, and that it might change in the event that the atrazine metabolites dose were higher or the nitrate dose lower. It would appear necessary to further explore the variability of effects. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of low-dose cyclophosphamide, ACTH, and IVIG combination immunotherapy on neuroinflammation in pediatric-onset OMS: A retrospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Allison, Tyler J; Tate, Elizabeth D

    2018-03-05

    Flow cytometric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocyte subset analysis has improved the diagnosis of neuroinflammation and identified multiple markers of inflammation in opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS). The aim of this exploratory, retrospective study was to analyze the effect of immunotherapy on these markers to determine which agents are disease modifying. Cross-sectional immunological observations were made in an IRB-approved case-control study, and patients were treated empirically. Ten different CSF lymphocyte subpopulations from 18 children with persistent OMS had been measured by flow cytometry before and after clinical treatment with cyclophosphamide/ACTH/IVIG combination (n = 7) or ACTH/IVIG alone (n = 11). Clinical severity of OMS was scored from videotapes by a blinded observer using the OMS Evaluation Scale. Only cyclophosphamide combination therapy (mean dose 26 ± 3 mg/kg or 922 ± 176 mg/m 2 x 6 cycles) significantly decreased the percentage of CSF B cells. The mean reduction was 65%, with CSF B cell frequency normalized at 7-8 months in 70%. Other abnormalities of the CSF immunophenotype, such as the low CD4/CD8 T cell ratio, persisted, and there were no therapeutic changes in T cell activation/maturation markers. Effects on relative and absolute size of PBMC subsets were similar. Clinical improvement was 70% and 55% in respective treatment groups. The relapse rates of the two groups did not significantly differ. The main effect of cyclophosphamide combination therapy on neuroinflammation in OMS was moderate reduction in CSF B cell expansion. Though exploratory, it may provide a steroid sparer option in partially-responsive OMS. Copyright © 2018 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of low-dose irradiation on microbiological quality of white carrots and string beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Amanda C.R.; Santillo, Amanda G.; Rodrigues, Flávio T.; Duarte, Renato C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The minimally processed food provided the consumer with a product quality, safety and practicality. However, minimal processing of food does not reduce pathogenic population of microorganisms to safe levels. Ionizing radiation used in low doses is effective to maintain the quality of food, reducing the microbiological load but rather compromising the nutritional values and sensory property. The association of minimal processing with irradiation could improve the quality and safety of product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-doses of ionizing radiation on the reduction of microorganisms in minimally processed foods. The results show that the ionizing radiation of minimally processed vegetables could decontaminate them without several changes in its properties.

  2. Evaluation of low-dose irradiation on microbiological quality of white carrots and string beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Amanda C. R.; Santillo, Amanda G.; Rodrigues, Flávio T.; Duarte, Renato C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C. H.

    2012-08-01

    The minimally processed food provided the consumer with a product quality, safety and practicality. However, minimal processing of food does not reduce pathogenic population of microorganisms to safe levels. Ionizing radiation used in low doses is effective to maintain the quality of food, reducing the microbiological load but rather compromising the nutritional values and sensory property. The association of minimal processing with irradiation could improve the quality and safety of product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-doses of ionizing radiation on the reduction of microorganisms in minimally processed foods. The results show that the ionizing radiation of minimally processed vegetables could decontaminate them without several changes in its properties.

  3. Effect of Hashimoto thyroiditis on low-dose radioactive-iodine remnant ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyungju; Choi, June Young; Moon, Jae Hoon; Park, Hyo Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Kyu Eun

    2016-04-01

    Radioactive-iodine remnant ablation is an integral part of the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) treatment. Although a minimum dose is usually recommended, there is controversy as to whether the low-dose (1100 MBq) radioactive-iodine remnant ablation is adequate for selected patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 691 patients. Patients with no remnant thyroid on the follow-up whole body scan and low stimulated thyroglobulin (sTg) level (Hashimoto thyroiditis based on histopathology diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.23; p Hashimoto thyroiditis and elevated sTg are negative predictive factors for successful low-dose radioactive-iodine remnant ablation treatment. An appropriate risk-adjusted approach may improve the efficacy of radioactive-iodine remnant ablation treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E730-E735, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. High-order noise analysis for low dose iterative image reconstruction methods: ASIR, IRIS, and MBAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Synho; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Karl, W. Clem; Brady, Thomas J.; Pien, Homer

    2011-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) has been shown to suppress noise significantly in low dose CT imaging. However, medical doctors hesitate to accept this new technology because visual impression of IRT images are different from full-dose filtered back-projection (FBP) images. Most common noise measurements such as the mean and standard deviation of homogeneous region in the image that do not provide sufficient characterization of noise statistics when probability density function becomes non-Gaussian. In this study, we measure L-moments of intensity values of images acquired at 10% of normal dose and reconstructed by IRT methods of two state-of-art clinical scanners (i.e., GE HDCT and Siemens DSCT flash) by keeping dosage level identical to each other. The high- and low-dose scans (i.e., 10% of high dose) were acquired from each scanner and L-moments of noise patches were calculated for the comparison.

  5. Ultra-low-dose estriol and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)) for vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitors: pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy phase I clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Gilbert; Neven, Patrick; Moegele, Maximilian; Lintermans, Anneleen; Bellen, Gert; Prasauskas, Valdas; Grob, Philipp; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) study assessed circulating estrogens in breast cancer (BC) patients on a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI) with vaginal atrophy using vaginal ultra-low-dose 0.03 mg estriol (E3) and Lactobacillus combination vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)). 16 women on NSAI with severe vaginal atrophy applied a daily vaginal tablet of Gynoflor(®) for 28 days followed by a maintenance therapy of 3 tablets weekly for 8 weeks. Primary outcomes were serum concentrations and PK of E3, estradiol (E2), and estrone (E1) using highly sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Secondary outcomes were clinical measures for efficacy and side effects; microscopic changes in vaginal epithelium and microflora; and changes in serum FSH, LH, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Compared with baseline, serum E1 and E2 did not increase in any of the women at any time following vaginal application. Serum E3 transiently increased after the first application in 15 of 16 women, with a maximum of 168 pg/ml 2-3 h post-insertion. After 4 weeks, serum E3 was slightly increased in 8 women with a maximum of 44 pg/ml. The vaginal atrophy resolved or improved in all women. The product was well tolerated, and discontinuation of therapy was not observed. The low-dose 0.03 mg E3 and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets application in postmenopausal BC patients during AI treatment suffering from vaginal atrophy lead to small and transient increases in serum E3, but not E1 or E2, and therefore can be considered as safe and efficacious for treatment of atrophic vaginitis in BC patients taking NSAIs.

  6. Low dose caffeine as a salivary tracer for the determination of gastric water emptying in fed and fasted state: A MRI validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Maximilian; Jedamzik, Philipp; Merdivan, Simon; Grimm, Michael; Schneider, Felix; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Hasan, Mahmoud; Oswald, Stefan; Kühn, Jens; Koziolek, Mirko; Weitschies, Werner

    2018-06-01

    Improving our knowledge about human gastrointestinal physiology and its impact on oral drug delivery is crucial for the development of new therapies and effective drug delivery systems. The aim of this study was to develop an in vivo tool to determine gastric emptying of water by administration of a caffeine as a tracer substance followed by subsequent saliva caffeine analysis. For this purpose, 35 mg of caffeine were given to six healthy volunteers after a 10 h overnight together with 240 mL of tap water either on a fasted stomach or 30 min after the high-caloric, high-fat breakfast recommended for bioavailability/bioequivalence (BA/BE) studies. Caffeine was administered in form of an ice capsule in order to omit the contamination of the oral cavity with caffeine. Parallel to saliva sampling, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied in order to validate this novel approach. After administration of the ice capsule, MRI measurements were performed every 2 min for the first 20 min followed by further measurements after 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 and 60 min. Saliva samples were collected always 1 min after the MRI measurement in supine position in the MRI scanner and continued for further 240 min. The caffeine concentration in saliva was quantified after liquid-liquid extraction by a validated HPLC/MS-MS method. The obtained MRI data revealed a fast emptying of the co-administered water within 10 to 50 min in the fasted state and likewise in the fed state. Salivary caffeine kinetics showed a C max from 150 to 400 ng/mL with a t max from 20 to 90 min. MRI data were normalized by setting the maximum emptied volume to 100% and the salivary caffeine kinetics were normalized by setting C max to 100%. In order to compare the results obtained by the MRI and the saliva method, the normalized data for each volunteer was correlated based on a linear regression. In the fasted state the mean slope for six comparisons was 0.9114 ± 0.1500 and the mean

  7. Ultra-low dose abdominal MDCT: Using a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction technique for substantial dose reduction in a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Blake, Michael; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Choy, Gary; Karosmangulu, Ali; Padole, Atul; Do, Synho; Brown, Kevin; Thompson, Richard; Morton, Thomas; Raihani, Nilgoun; Koehler, Thomas; Kalra, Mannudeep K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Limited abdominal CT indications can be performed at a size specific dose estimate of (SSDE) 1.5 mGy (∼0.9 mSv) in smaller patients (BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 ) using a knowledge based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) technique. • Evaluation of liver tumors and pathologies is unacceptable at this reduced dose with IMR technique especially in patients with a BMI greater than 25 kg/m 2 . • IMR body soft tissue and routine settings perform substantially better than IMR sharp plus setting in reduced dose CT images. • At SSDE of 1.5 mGy, objective image noise in reduced dose IMR images is 8–56% less than compared to standard dose FBP images, with lowest image noise in IMR body-soft tissue images. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and image quality parameters of a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) in reduced dose (RD) abdominal CT examinations. Materials and methods: This IRB-approved prospective study included 82 abdominal CT examinations performed for 41 consecutive patients (mean age, 62 ± 12 years; F:M 28:13) who underwent a RD CT (SSDE, 1.5 mGy ± 0.4 [∼0.9 mSv] at 120 kV with 17–20 mAs/slice) immediately after their standard dose (SD) CT exam (10 mGy ± 3 [∼6 mSv] at 120 kV with automatic exposure control) on 256 MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). SD data were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP). RD data were reconstructed with FBP and IMR. Four radiologists used a five-point scale (1 = image quality better than SD CT to 5 = image quality unacceptable) to assess both subjective image quality and artifacts. Lesions were first detected on RD FBP images. RD IMR and RD FBP images were then compared side-by-side to SD-FBP images in an independent, randomized and blinded fashion. Friedman's test and intraclass correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Objective measurements included image noise and attenuation as well as noise spectral density (NSD) curves to

  8. Ultra-low dose abdominal MDCT: Using a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction technique for substantial dose reduction in a prospective clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali, E-mail: rkhawaja@mgh.harvard.edu [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Singh, Sarabjeet; Blake, Michael; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Choy, Gary; Karosmangulu, Ali; Padole, Atul; Do, Synho [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brown, Kevin; Thompson, Richard; Morton, Thomas; Raihani, Nilgoun [CT Research and Advanced Development, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH (United States); Koehler, Thomas [Philips Technologie GmbH, Innovative Technologies, Hamburg (Germany); Kalra, Mannudeep K. [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Limited abdominal CT indications can be performed at a size specific dose estimate of (SSDE) 1.5 mGy (∼0.9 mSv) in smaller patients (BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m{sup 2}) using a knowledge based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) technique. • Evaluation of liver tumors and pathologies is unacceptable at this reduced dose with IMR technique especially in patients with a BMI greater than 25 kg/m{sup 2}. • IMR body soft tissue and routine settings perform substantially better than IMR sharp plus setting in reduced dose CT images. • At SSDE of 1.5 mGy, objective image noise in reduced dose IMR images is 8–56% less than compared to standard dose FBP images, with lowest image noise in IMR body-soft tissue images. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and image quality parameters of a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) in reduced dose (RD) abdominal CT examinations. Materials and methods: This IRB-approved prospective study included 82 abdominal CT examinations performed for 41 consecutive patients (mean age, 62 ± 12 years; F:M 28:13) who underwent a RD CT (SSDE, 1.5 mGy ± 0.4 [∼0.9 mSv] at 120 kV with 17–20 mAs/slice) immediately after their standard dose (SD) CT exam (10 mGy ± 3 [∼6 mSv] at 120 kV with automatic exposure control) on 256 MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). SD data were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP). RD data were reconstructed with FBP and IMR. Four radiologists used a five-point scale (1 = image quality better than SD CT to 5 = image quality unacceptable) to assess both subjective image quality and artifacts. Lesions were first detected on RD FBP images. RD IMR and RD FBP images were then compared side-by-side to SD-FBP images in an independent, randomized and blinded fashion. Friedman's test and intraclass correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Objective measurements included image noise and attenuation as well as noise spectral density (NSD) curves

  9. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  10. Low dose radiation and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongguang; Gong Shouliang; Cai Lu

    2006-01-01

    Induction of hormesis and adaptive response by low-dose radiatio (LDR) has been extensively indicated. It's mechanism may be related with the protective protein and antioxidants that LDR induced, which take effects on the diabetes mellitus (DM) and other diseases. This review will summarize available dat with emphasis on three points: the preventive effect of LDR on the development of diabetes, the therapeutic effect of LDR on diabetic complications and possible mechanisms by which LDR prevents the development of diabetes and diabetic complications. Finally, the perspectives of LDR clinical, diabetes-related implication are discussed. (authors)

  11. RISC-RAD. A European integrated approach to the problem of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, A.; Sabatier, L.; Atkinson, M.; Paretzke, H.; Bouffler, S.; Mullenders, L.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Funded by the European Commission in the framework of a dedicated programme supporting research in the Nuclear sector (FP6 Euratom), the project RISC-RAD undertakes experimental and modelling studies ultimately to improve low dose radiation cancer risk assessment by exploring and providing evidence for the most appropriate radiation cancer risk projection and interpolation models. It started on 1st January 2004 and is running until 31 st October 2008. It mobilizes a consortium of 31 partners and is coordinated by Dr. Laure Sabatier from the French atomic energy commission. Indeed the project represents an unprecedented attempt to integrate horizontally the research on the effects of low doses of IR at the European level. A multipartner project supporting objective-driven research, RISC-RAD aims at contributing to bridge the remaining gap of scientific knowledge about effects of lows doses of ionizing radiation. It spans a large part of the research spectrum, including many topics addressed during the LOWRAD2007 conference. This presentation intends to give an account of the integrative aspects of the project, insights on the innovative solutions found to approach a complex and controversial scientific topic like the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, and links with some areas of social studies on science.The concept of 'integration' implies the development of a new kind of activity in the research field, which crosses its traditional boundaries : controversies of several kinds must temporarily be overcome within the project management board in order to define and follow a common strategy. Among them, how to reconcile the creative part of fundamental research with the compliance to strict project planning rules has come up as a debate which questions the best way a significant collective and coordinated action can address the issue of the low dose cancer risk assessment on the long term. The knowledge and

  12. MELODI: The 'Multidisciplinary European Low-Dose Initiative'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, M.; Salomaa, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of research to reduce uncertainties in risk assessment of low and protracted exposures is now recognised globally. In Europe a new initiative, called 'Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative' (MELODI), has been proposed by a 'European High Level and Expert Group on low-dose risk research' (www.hleg.de), aimed at integrating national and EC (Euratom) efforts. Five national organisations: BfS (DE), CEA (FR), IRSN (FR), ISS (IT) and STUK (FI), with the support of the EC, have initiated the creation of MELODI by signing a letter of intent. In the forthcoming years, MELODI will integrate in a step-by-step approach EU institutions with significant programmes in the field and will be open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders. A key role of MELODI is to develop and maintain over time a strategic research agenda (SRA) and a road map of scientific priorities within a multidisciplinary approach, and to transfer the results for the radiation protection system. Under the coordination of STUK a network has been proposed in the 2009 Euratom Programme, called DoReMi (Low-Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration), which can help the integration process within the MELODI platform. DoReMi and the First MELODI Open Workshop, organised by BfS in September 2009, are now important inputs for the European SRA. (authors)

  13. Exercise and sport performance with low doses of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5-13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis.

  14. Low-dose CT of the paranasal sinuses. Minimizing X-ray exposure with spectral shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, Wolfgang [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany); May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Radiological Institute, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192 x 0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 x 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDI{sub vol} 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. (orig.)

  15. Low-dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantak, S.S.; Onoda, J.M.; Diglio, C.A.; Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI

    1993-01-01

    The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema. (author)

  16. Biological effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmak, M.

    1998-01-01

    A study was performed with the aim to examine whether the progeny of cells that had been repeatedly irradiated with low doses of gamma rays will change their sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Four mammalian cell lines were used in the experiment. It was found that the progeny of cells irradiated in this way do not change their sensitivity to gamma rays but would change their sensitivity to various cytostatics drugs. (A.K.)

  17. Low dose monitoring by double implant technique in IC fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.B.; Weidemann, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilisation of low dose implant monitoring (using Boron) in a manufacturing line has been discussed. The utilisation of phosphorus ions as the second implant dose were also studied as comparison. The technique relies on the fact that the sheet resistant of doped layer will increase significantly when damaged by relatively low implant dose. The technique is very sensitive and applicable for adjusting the channel dose so that an accurate threshold voltage in MOS device could be achieved

  18. Learning from agriculture: understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi eYou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health challenge worldwide, with agricultural use of antimicrobials being one major contributor to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. Globally, most antimicrobials are used in industrial food animal production, a major context for microbiomes encountering low-doses or subtherapeutic-levels of antimicrobial agents from all mechanistic classes. This modern practice exerts broad eco-evolutionary effects on the gut microbiome of food animals, which is subsequently transferred to animal waste. This waste contains complex constituents that are challenging to treat, including antimicrobial resistance determinants and low-dose antimicrobials. Unconfined storage or land deposition of a large volume of animal waste causes its wide contact with the environment and drives the expansion of the environmental resistome through mobilome facilitated horizontal genet transfer. The expanded environmental resistome, which encompasses both natural constituents and anthropogenic inputs, can persist under multiple stressors from agriculture and may re-enter humans, thus posing a public health risk to humans. For these reasons, this review focuses on agricultural antimicrobial use as a laboratory for understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion, briefly summarizes current knowledge on this topic, highlights the importance of research specifically on environmental microbial ecosystems considering antimicrobial resistance as environmental pollution, and calls attention to the needs for longitudinal studies at the systems level.

  19. Learning from agriculture: understanding low-dose antimicrobials as drivers of resistome expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yaqi; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health challenge worldwide, with agricultural use of antimicrobials being one major contributor to the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Globally, most antimicrobials are used in industrial food animal production, a major context for microbiomes encountering l