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Sample records for loss rates due

  1. The electron energy loss rate due to radiative recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junjie; Kaastra, Jelle; Badnell, N. R.

    2017-02-01

    Context. For photoionized plasmas, electron energy loss rates due to radiative recombination (RR) are required for thermal equilibrium calculations, which assume a local balance between the energy gain and loss. While many calculations of total and/or partial RR rates are available from the literature, specific calculations of associated RR electron energy loss rates are lacking. Aims: Here we focus on electron energy loss rates due to radiative recombination of H-like to Ne-like ions for all the elements up to and including zinc (Z = 30), over a wide temperature range. Methods: We used the AUTOSTRUCTURE code to calculate the level-resolved photoionization cross section and modify the ADASRR code so that we can simultaneously obtain level-resolved RR rate coefficients and associated RR electron energy loss rate coefficients. We compared the total RR rates and electron energy loss rates of H i and He i with those found in the literature. Furthermore, we utilized and parameterized the weighted electron energy loss factors (dimensionless) to characterize total electron energy loss rates due to RR. Results: The RR electron energy loss data are archived according to the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) data class adf48. The RR electron energy loss data are also incorporated into the SPEX code for detailed modeling of photoionized plamsas. Full Tables 1 and 2 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A10

  2. Counting losses due to saturation effects of scintillation counters at high count rates

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, K

    1999-01-01

    The counting statistics of a scintillation counter, with a preamplifier saturated by an overloading input, are investigated. First, the formulae for the variance and the mean number of counts, accumulated within a given gating time, are derived by considering counting-loss effects originating from the saturation and a finite resolving time of the electronic circuit. Numerical examples based on the formulae indicate that the saturation makes a positive contribution to the variance-to-mean ratio and that the contribution increases with count rate. Next the ratios are measured under high count rates when the preamplifier saturation can be observed. By fitting the present formula to the measured data, the counting-loss parameters can be evaluated. Corrections based on the parameters are made for various count rates measured in a nuclear reactor. As a result of the corrections, the linearity between count rate and reactor power can be restored.

  3. Gamow-Teller strength distributions and neutrino energy loss rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Fayaz, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Gamow-Teller transitions in isotopes of chromium play a consequential role in the presupernova evolution of massive stars. $\\beta$-decay and electron capture rates on chromium isotopes significantly affect the time rate of change of lepton fraction ($\\dot{Y_{e}}$). Fine-tuning of this parameter is one of the key for simulating a successful supernova explosion. The (anti)neutrinos produced as a result of electron capture and $\\beta$-decay are transparent to stellar matter during presupernova phases. They carry away energy and this result in cooling the stellar core. In this paper we present the calculations of Gamow-Teller strength distributions and (anti)neutrino energy loss rates due to weak interactions on chromium isotopes of astrophysical importance. We compare our results with measured data and previous calculations wherever available.

  4. A scenario for impacts of water availability loss due to climate change on riverine fish extinction rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedesco, P.A.; Oberdorff, T.; Cornu, J.-F.; Beauchard, O.; Brosse, S.; Dürr, H.H.; Grenouillet, G.; Leprieur, F.; Tisseuil, C.; Zaiss, R.; Hugueny, B.

    2013-01-01

    1. Current models estimating impact of habitat loss on biodiversity in the face of global climate change usually project only percentages of species committed to extinction' on an uncertain time-scale. Here, we show that this limitation can be overcome using an empirically derived background

  5. A scenario for impacts of water availability loss due to climate change on riverine fish extinction rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tedesco, P.A.; Oberdorff, T.; Cornu, J.-F.; Beauchard, O.; Brosse, S.; Dürr, H.H.; Grenouillet, G.; Leprieur, F.; Tisseuil, C.; Zaiss, R.; Hugueny, B.

    2013-01-01

    1. Current models estimating impact of habitat loss on biodiversity in the face of global climate change usually project only percentages of species committed to extinction' on an uncertain time-scale. Here, we show that this limitation can be overcome using an empirically derived background extinct

  6. Energy-loss rate of hot electrons due to confined acoustic phonon modes in a semiconductor quantum wire under transverse electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, A.; Yeranosyan, M.; Vardanyan, L.; Asatryan, A.; Kirakosyan, A.; Vartanian, A.

    2017-08-01

    The hot-electron energy-loss rate via the acoustic-phonons in an embedded semiconductor quantum wire of circular cross section in the presence of external electric field has been investigated using deformation potential theory. Dimensional confinement effect on modifying acoustic-phonon modes are taken into account. The energy-loss rate as a function of electric field strength, electron density and electron temperature is obtained. Our calculations show that the electric field applied perpendicularly to the wire axis can be used as an important tool for the control of the energy-loss processes in nanowires.

  7. Loss rates of Europa's tenuous atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Plainaki, Christina; Cremonese, Gabriele; Milillo, Anna; Cassidy, Timothy; Jia, Xianzhe; Shematovich, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Loss processes in Europa's tenuous atmosphere are dominated by plasma-neutral interactions. Based on the updated data of the plasma conditions in the vicinity of Europa (Bagenal et al. 2015), we provide estimations of the atmosphere loss rates for the H2O, O2 and H2 populations. Due to the high variability of the plasma proprieties, we perform our investigation for three sample plasma environment cases identified by Bagenal et al. as hot/low density, cold/high density, and an intermediate case. The role of charge-exchange interactions between atmospheric neutrals and three different plasma populations, i.e. magnetospheric, pickup, and ionospheric ions, is examined in detail. Our assumptions related to the pickup and to the ionospheric populations are based on the model by Sittler et al. (2013). We find that O2-O2+ charge-exchange is the fastest loss process for the most abundant atmospheric species O2, though this loss process has been neglected in previous atmospheric models. Using both the revised O2 column density obtained from the EGEON model (Plainaki et al., 2013) and the current loss rate estimates, we find that the upper limit for the volume integrated loss rate due to O2-O2+ charge exchange is in the range (13-51)×1026 s-1, depending on the moon's orbital phase and illumination conditions. The results of the current study are relevant to the investigation of Europa's interaction with Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma.

  8. Economic evaluation of water loss saving due to the biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economic evaluation of water loss saving due to the biological control of water hyacinth at New ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... The benefit/cost ratio at the low evapotranspiration rate was less than one, implying that ...

  9. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Houshang Mehrparvar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup.

  10. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...

  11. Computing the bounds on the loss rates

    OpenAIRE

    Fourneau J.-M.; Mokdad L.; Pekergin N.

    2002-01-01

    We consider an example network where we compute the bounds on cell loss rates. The stochastic bounds for these loss rates using simple arguments lead to models easier to solve. We proved, using stochastic orders, that the loss rates of these easier models are really the bounds of our original model. For ill-balanced configurations these models give good estimates of loss rates.

  12. Unilateral sudden hearing loss due to otosyphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike J. de Goffau

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of sudden hearing loss is very extensive. However, in most patients, no underlying pathology will be found and the patient is consequently diagnosed with idiopathic sudden hearing loss. Nevertheless, it is important that one stays alert in everyday routine practice to less common but potentially treatable pathology. We report a case of a 53- year old patient with sudden unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus caused by otosyphilis. Diagnosis, therapy and the incidence of (otosyphilis are discussed. Also, as ENT-surgeons, it is important to realise that syphilis is still with us, and that its prevalence might well increase in the near future.

  13. [Sensorineural hearing loss due to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarós, P; Turcanu, D; Caballero, M; Costa, C; Clavería, M A; Clarós, A; Clarós, A

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the sensorineural hearing loss is presented as a possible sequelae of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In our program of early hipoacusia detection, 241 babies were examined from January 1996 until November 1999; 7 cases had a history of hyperbilirubinemia in the neonatal period and 2 of them were diagnosed of sensorineural hearing loss. We discuss how the bilirubin or any other associated factor might have been the cause and this could explain the selective affectation of some children.

  14. Computing the bounds on the loss rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fourneau J.-M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider an example network where we compute the bounds on cell loss rates. The stochastic bounds for these loss rates using simple arguments lead to models easier to solve. We proved, using stochastic orders, that the loss rates of these easier models are really the bounds of our original model. For ill-balanced configurations these models give good estimates of loss rates.

  15. Heat Loss Due To Thermal Bridges In Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J. B.; tarot, R. A.; Childs, K. W.; Courville, G. E.

    1984-03-01

    Building envelopes often contain numerous highly conductive heat flow paths, called thermal bridges, which are major sources of heat loss and deterioration of building materials due to moisture condensation. Some examples of thermal bridges occurring in office buildings are presented. Infrared thermography was used to identify the locations and magnitudes of thermally defective areas resulting from inadequate construction, design, or substandard workmanship in existing buildings. Due to the large thermal inertia of building components and transient conditions caused by fluctuating outdoor and indoor temperatures, long measurement periods are required. This makes thermography impractical for quantifying the heat loss. In order to estimate the heat loss rate from thermal bridges and to obtain a better understanding of the physical processes involved, a two-dimensional heat flow model has been developed for transient heat conduction within the exterior wall/intermediate floor systems. The calculated results from the mathematical model are compared with available experimental data. An in-situ measurement technique, which is currently under development at NBS for quantifying the energy loss due to thermal bridges, is described.

  16. Alzheimer's disease due to loss of function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a highly complex disease involving a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations that are currently not understood in combination. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, tau, presenilin, oxidative stress, and metal hypotheses....... The amyloid hypothesis has dominated the field with its assumption that buildup of pathogenic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide causes disease. This paradigm has been criticized, yet most data suggest that Aβ plays a key role in the disease. Here, a new loss-of-function hypothesis is synthesized that accounts...

  17. Evaluation Model of Life Loss Due to Dam Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongjing

    2016-04-01

    Dam failure poses a serious threat to human life, however there is still lack of systematic research on life loss which due to dam failure in China. From the perspective of protecting human life, an evaluation model for life loss caused by dam failure is put forward. The model building gets three progressive steps. Twenty dam failure cases in China are preferably chosen as the basic data, considering geographical location and construction time of dams, as well as various conditions of dam failure. Then twelve impact factors of life loss are selected, including severity degree of flood, population at risk, understanding of dam failure, warning time, evacuation condition, number of damaged buildings, water temperature, reservoir storage, dam height, dam type, break time and distance from flood area to dam. And through principal component analysis, it gets four principal components consisting of the first flood character principle component, the second warning system principle component, the third human character principle component and the fourth space-time impact principle component. After multivariate nonlinear regression and ten-fold validation in combination, the evaluation model for life loss is finally established. And the result of the proposed model is closer to the true value and better in fitting effect in comparison with the results of RESCDAM method and M. Peng method. The proposed model is not only applied to evaluate life loss and its rate under various kinds of dam failure conditions in China, but also provides reliable cause analysis and prediction approach to reduce the risk of life loss.

  18. Economic losses occurring due to brucellosis in Indian livestock populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B B; Dhand, N K; Gill, J P S

    2015-05-01

    Brucellosis is a serious public health issue in India. Estimation of economic losses occurring due to brucellosis is required to help formulate prevention and control strategies, but has not been done in India. We estimated economic losses due to brucellosis by sourcing prevalence data from epidemiological surveys conducted in India. Data for livestock populations were obtained from official records. Probability distributions were used for many of the input parameters to account for uncertainty and variability. The analysis revealed that brucellosis in livestock is responsible for a median loss of US $ 3.4 billion (5th-95th percentile 2.8-4.2 billion). The disease in cattle and buffalo accounted for 95.6% of the total losses occurring due to brucellosis in livestock populations. The disease is responsible for a loss of US $ 6.8 per cattle, US$18.2 per buffalo, US $ 0.7 per sheep, US $ 0.5 per goat and US $ 0.6 per pig. These losses are additional to the economic and social consequences of the disease in humans. The results suggest that the disease causes significant economic losses in the country and should be controlled on a priority basis.

  19. Limitations on plasma acceleration due to synchrotron losses

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, W A; Bonifacio, R; De Salvo, L

    1999-01-01

    In this letter we consider the effect of synchrotron radiation losses due to the betatron motion of the electron beam in its self-induced magnetic field in a plasma accelerator taking into account the charge neutralization factor. The most favorable case is where the plasma density is smaller than the beam density. The contrary regime is strongly disfavored by the synchrotron radiation loss for beams with characteristics for TeV energies. In both cases we find that upon increasing the plasma density the synchrotron losses kill the acceleration process, so that there are limitations on the maximum allowable plasma density.

  20. Energy Loss in Pulse Detonation Engine due to Fuel Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid viscosity is a significant factor resulting in the energy loss in most fluid dynamical systems. To analyze the energy loss in the pulse detonation engine (PDE due to the viscosity of the fuel, the energy loss in the Burgers model excited by periodic impulses is investigated based on the generalized multisymplectic method in this paper. Firstly, the single detonation energy is simplified as an impulse; thus the complex detonation process is simplified. And then, the symmetry of the Burgers model excited by periodic impulses is studied in the generalized multisymplectic framework and the energy loss expression is obtained. Finally, the energy loss in the Burgers model is investigated numerically. The results in this paper can be used to explain the difference between the theoretical performance and the experimental performance of the PDE partly. In addition, the analytical approach of this paper can be extended to the analysis of the energy loss in other fluid dynamic systems due to the fluid viscosity.

  1. Loss Estimations due to Earthquakes and Secondary Technological Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, N.; Larionov, V.; Bonnin, J.

    2009-04-01

    Expected loss and damage assessment due to natural and technological disasters are of primary importance for emergency management just after the disaster, as well as for development and implementation of preventive measures plans. The paper addresses the procedures and simulation models for loss estimations due to strong earthquakes and secondary technological accidents. The mathematical models for shaking intensity distribution, damage to buildings and structures, debris volume, number of fatalities and injuries due to earthquakes and technological accidents at fire and chemical hazardous facilities are considered, which are used in geographical information systems assigned for these purposes. The criteria of technological accidents occurrence are developed on the basis of engineering analysis of past events' consequences. The paper is providing the results of scenario earthquakes consequences estimation and individual seismic risk assessment taking into account the secondary technological hazards at regional and urban levels. The individual risk is understood as the probability of death (or injuries) due to possible hazardous event within one year in a given territory. It is determined through mathematical expectation of social losses taking into account the number of inhabitants in the considered settlement and probability of natural and/or technological disaster.

  2. Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

  3. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornung, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.hornung@ise.fraunhofer.de; Nitz, Peter, E-mail: thorsten.hornung@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-09-26

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  4. Economic losses due to bovine brucellosis in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato L. Santos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is an important zoonosis of worldwide distribution. Reliable epidemiologic brucellosis data covering approximately 90% of the cattle population in Brazil have been recently published. Therefore, considering the scarcity of information regarding the economic impact of bovine brucellosis in Brazil, the goal of this study was to estimate economic impact of brucellosis on the Brazilian cattle industry. Several parameters including abortion and perinatal mortality rates, temporary infertility, replacement costs, mortality, veterinary costs, milk and meat losses were considered in the model. Bovine brucellosis in Brazil results in an estimated loss of R$ 420,12 or R$ 226,47 for each individual dairy or beef infected female above 24 months of age, respectively. The total estimated losses in Brazil attributed to bovine brucellosis were estimated to be approximately R$ 892 million (equivalent to about 448 million American dollars. Every 1% increase or decrease in prevalence is expected to increase or decrease the economic burden of brucellosis in approximately 155 million Reais.

  5. Event loss rates and readout chips

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelling, M

    1998-01-01

    98-57 The LHCb experiment aims at a deadtimeless readout of B­events at a primary bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. In order to achieve this goal, information from all events must be stored in a pipeline with latency matched to the time needed for the Level 0 trigger decision. Accepted events, which constitute only a small fraction of the total sample, are stored in a fifo of a certain depth and read out with a fixed clock rate. The fifo, also referred to as multi­event or derandomizing buffer, is needed in order to even out statistical fluctuations in the trigger rate. Apart from the length of the pipeline, which determines the maximum latency of the chip, the crucial parameter characterizing a readout chip is the fraction of triggers lost due to limitations of the chip's architecture. This note describes how the different design parameters and operation conditions determine the chip's performance.

  6. Economic losses due to important diseases of bovines in central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Singh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the factors associated with morbidity and mortality rates as well as to evaluate economic losses due to important diseases of bovines, viz. mastitis, HS and surra in Purvanchal Region of Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A sample of 300 livestock owners were selected from each of five divisions of Purvanchal region of the state of Uttar Pradesh using multistage stratified sampling with simple random sampling without replacement at village level. The morbidity, mortality and case fatality rates due to different diseases were determined using standard statistical indices. Association between cattle morbidity and mortality rates and different factors was calculated by χ2 Test. The total economic loss due to diseases in bovines was worked out as sum of mortality loss, loss in milk yield and cost of treatment of affected animals. Results: The overall morbidity rates of mastitis, HS and surra in cattle and buffaloes were 15.5%, 7.1% and 5.3%, respectively. The mortality and case fatality due to HS was found higher in the young calves as compared to the adults in case of both buffaloes and cattle. Mortality and case fatality due to surra was greater in the adult animals as compared to the younger ones in case of both buffaloes and cattle. Total losses due to mastitis per lactation in ND cow, CB cow and buffalo were INR 868.34, INR 1, 314.10 and INR 1, 272.36, respectively. Total losses due to HS per animal in ND cows, CB cows and buffaloes were INR 2, 355.78, INR 3, 228.52 and INR 4, 262.57, respectively. Total losses due to surra per animal in ND cow, CB cow and buffalo were INR 3, 328.18, INR 6, 193 and INR 9, 872.33, respectively. Conclusion: The study thus revealed significant losses due to diseases in large ruminants on. There is thus ample scope for preventive measures to control the disease bovines.

  7. Hearing Loss Rates Holding Steady for U.S. Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167456.html Hearing Loss Rates Holding Steady for U.S. Teens: Study Vaccine ... via earphones than ever before, but rates of hearing loss have not increased. Still, "the overall take-home ...

  8. On the decline of biodiversity due to area loss

    OpenAIRE

    Keil Petr; Storch David; Jetz Walter

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of how different facets of biodiversity decline with habitat loss are broadly needed, yet challenging. Here we provide theory and a global empirical evaluation to address this challenge. We show that extinction estimates based on endemics–area and backward species–area relationships are complementary, and the crucial difference comprises the geometry of area loss. Across three taxa on four continents, the relative loss of species, and of phylogenetic and functional div...

  9. On the decline of biodiversity due to area loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Petr; Storch, David; Jetz, Walter

    2015-11-17

    Predictions of how different facets of biodiversity decline with habitat loss are broadly needed, yet challenging. Here we provide theory and a global empirical evaluation to address this challenge. We show that extinction estimates based on endemics-area and backward species-area relationships are complementary, and the crucial difference comprises the geometry of area loss. Across three taxa on four continents, the relative loss of species, and of phylogenetic and functional diversity, is highest when habitable area disappears inward from the edge of a region, lower when it disappears from the centre outwards, and lowest when area is lost at random. In inward destruction, species loss is almost proportional to area loss, although the decline in phylogenetic and functional diversity is less severe. These trends are explained by the geometry of species ranges and the shape of phylogenetic and functional trees, which may allow baseline predictions of biodiversity decline for underexplored taxa.

  10. Hearing Loss Due to Familial Hypercholesterolemia and Statin Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Oylumlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that high cholesterol levels might have adverse effects on hearing and interest- ingly statins may have beneficial effects on hearing loss. Herein, we share a dramatic improvement in acute hearing loss by statin administration in a young patient with familial hypercholesterolemia. To our knowledge this is the first report indicating the possible role of statins in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss in the context of familial hypercholesterolemia. Although the statin administra- tion as a therapeutic option for sudden hearing loss needs to be clarified in prospective studies, this case report might shed more light for possible association of dyslipidemia and hearing loss and role of statins in such cases.

  11. Probabilistic Forecasting of Life and Economic Losses due to Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C. C.; Tebbens, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude of natural hazard events such as hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and floods are traditionally measured by wind speed, energy release, or discharge. In this study we investigate the scaling of the magnitude of individual events of the 20th and 21stcentury in terms of economic and life losses in the United States and worldwide. Economic losses are subdivided into insured and total losses. Some data sets are inflation or population adjusted. Forecasts associated with these events are of interest to insurance, reinsurance, and emergency management agencies. Plots of cumulative size-frequency distributions of economic and life loss are well-fit by power functions and thus exhibit self-similar scaling. This self-similar scaling property permits use of frequent small events to estimate the rate of occurrence of less frequent larger events. Examining the power scaling behavior of loss data for disasters permits: forecasting the probability of occurrence of a disaster over a wide range of years (1 to 10 to 1,000 years); comparing losses associated with one type of disaster to another; comparing disasters in one region to similar disasters in another region; and, measuring the effectiveness of planning and mitigation strategies. In the United States, life losses due to flood and tornado cumulative-frequency distributions have steeper slopes, indicating that frequent smaller events contribute the majority of losses. In contrast, life losses due to hurricanes and earthquakes have shallower slopes, indicating that the few larger events contribute the majority of losses. Disaster planning and mitigation strategies should incorporate these differences.

  12. Prediction of hearing loss due to cisplatin chemoradiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, E.A.R.; Zuur, C.L.; Jóźwiak, K.; Lopez-Yurda, M.; Hauptmann, M.; Rasch, C.R.N.; van der Baan, S.; de Boer, J.P.; Dreschler, W.A.; Balm, A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Patients with head and neck cancer may experience chemoradiotherapy-induced hearing loss, but the weighing of involved variables has been subjective. Identification of patient and treatment characteristics to predict the absolute posttreatment hearing level is important for effective coun

  13. 7 CFR 610.13 - Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion... Erosion Prediction Equations § 610.13 Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion. (a) The equation for predicting soil loss due to wind in the Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ) is E = f(IKCLV). (For...

  14. Radiological quiz. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss due to multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbarzade, Cavid; Özgen, Burçe; Sennaroglu, Levent

    2014-01-01

    A case with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) owing to multiple sclerosis (MS) who had clinical and dramatic radiological improvement just after medical therapy was reported in this article. Case report and review of related literature. A 22-year-old female patient with MS related SSNHL was presented in this article. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an MS plaque localized at pons extending from right cochlear nucleus to proximal part of the right cochlear nerve. Most dramatic recovery was present in the 5th day control MRI, where the plaque located on pons disappeared completely. On the 10th day control audiogram hearing recovery was observed and pure tone audiogram levels were almost normal. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss owing to MS is seen more common than expected. It has good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is also thought to have an important role in diagnosis and treatment efficacy of SSNHL owing to MS. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o.

  15. LH transition characteristics due to bipolar losses in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Shinichiro [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    1998-10-01

    The L/H transition theory is extended based on the electrostatic bifurcation. We study the bipolar losses which have not been examined as the transition mechanisms yet and investigate the L/H transition characteristics. The comparison study with the experimental results is also done. It is found that the equation of motions has the solutions with various hysteresis types of electrostatic bifurcation phenomena when the mechanisms of bipolar losses are considered. The dependences of the particle flux and the diffusivity on the thermodynamic force in the presence of the electric field are examined. ELMs (Edge Localizes Modes) phenomena which are typical in the H-mode are studied. The model equation is newly extended to include the effect of the electric field shear in addition to the electric field shear. This model is also extended to the dynamic model which includes the temporal evolution of the density from the static model with the hysteresis characteristics. (author)

  16. Information Loss in Binomial Data Due to Data Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Hodge

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the idea of information loss through data compression, as occurs in the course of any data analysis, illustrated via detailed consideration of the Binomial distribution. We examine situations where the full sequence of binomial outcomes is retained, situations where only the total number of successes is retained, and in-between situations. We show that a familiar decomposition of the Shannon entropy H can be rewritten as a decomposition into H t o t a l , H l o s t , and H c o m p , or the total, lost and compressed (remaining components, respectively. We relate this new decomposition to Landauer’s principle, and we discuss some implications for the “information-dynamic” theory being developed in connection with our broader program to develop a measure of statistical evidence on a properly calibrated scale.

  17. Estimation of economic losses due to Peste de Petits Ruminants in small ruminants in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To develop a simple mathematical model to assess the losses due to peste des petits ruminants (PPR in small ruminants in India. Materials and Methods: The study was based on cases and deaths in goats and sheep due to PPR from the average combined data on ovine/caprine as published by Government of India for the last 5 years (2008-2012. All possible direct and indirect losses due to the disease, viz. mortality losses, losses due to direct reduction in milk/wool yield, losses due to reproduction failure, body weight losses, treatment costs and opportunity costs, were considered to provide estimate of annual economic losses due to PPR in sheep and goats in India. Based on cases and deaths as reported in sample survey studies, the annual economic loss was also estimated. Results: On the basis of data reported by Government of India, the study has shown average annual economic loss of Rs. 167.83 lacs, of which Rs. 125.67 lacs and Rs. 42.16 lacs respectively are due to the incidence of the disease in goats and sheep. Morbidity losses constituted the greater share of the total loss in both goats and sheep (56.99% and 61.34%, respectively. Among different components of morbidity loss, direct body weight loss was the most significant in both goats and sheep. Based on cases and deaths as reported in sample survey studies, the estimated annual economic loss due to PPR in goats and sheep is Rs. 8895.12 crores, of which Rs. 5477.48 and Rs. 3417.64 crores respectively are due to the disease in goats and sheep. Conclusion: The low economic losses as reported based on Government of India data points towards underreporting of cases and deaths due to the disease. The study thus revealed a significant loss due to PPR in small ruminants on a large scale.

  18. Sorting and the output loss due to search frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier; C.N. Teulings

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a general search model with on-the-job search (OJS) and sorting of heterogeneous workers into heterogeneous jobs. For given values of non-market time, the relative efciency of OJS, and the amount of search frictions, we derive a simple relationship between the unemployment rate, mismatch

  19. Geriatric vision loss due to cataracts, macular degeneration, and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    The major causes of impaired vision in the elderly population of the United States are cataracts, macular degeneration, and open-angle glaucoma. Cataracts and macular degeneration usually reduce central vision, especially reading and near activities, whereas chronic glaucoma characteristically attacks peripheral vision in a silent way, impacting balance, walking, and driving. Untreated, these visual problems lead to issues with regard to taking medications, keeping track of finances and personal information, walking, watching television, and attending the theater, and often create social isolation. Thus, visually impaired individuals enter nursing homes 3 years earlier, have twice the risk of falling, and have 4× the risk of hip fracture. Consequently, many elderly with low vision exercise greater demands on community services. With the prospect of little improvement and sustained visual loss, in the face of poor tolerance of low-vision services and not accepting magnification as the only way to read, clinical depression is common. In many instances, however, early and accurate diagnosis can result in timely treatment and can preserve quality of life. This review will look at current diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Currently, about 20.5 million people in the United States have cataracts. The number will reach 30 million by 2020. About 1.75 million Americans currently have some form of macular degeneration, and the number is estimated to increase to 2.95 million in 2020. Approximately 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma, and by 2020 that number is estimated to be close to 3.4 million people. It is projected that by 2030 there will be 72.1 million seniors. With some overlap of the above 3 groups conservatively estimated (if you add the 2030 cataract group to the macular degeneration and glaucoma groups), then about 1 in 2 senior individuals by 2030 may have some significant ocular disease, which could account for about 50% of the healthcare budget for the

  20. 7 CFR 610.12 - Equations for predicting soil loss due to water erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... erosion. 610.12 Section 610.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... ASSISTANCE Soil Erosion Prediction Equations § 610.12 Equations for predicting soil loss due to water erosion. (a) The equation for predicting soil loss due to erosion for both the USLE and the RUSLE is A = R ×...

  1. The form drag due to vegetated weir-like obstacles interpreted as expansion losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, S.; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The Objective of this study is to estimate the form drag due to vegetated weir- like obstacles. Head loss due to submerged vegetated dikes and groins has been modeled by expansion loss form drag model (Energy and momentum balance principles) and it has been compared with experimental data. An experi

  2. On Assessment and Estimation of Potential Losses due to Land Subsidence in Urban Areas of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Andreas, Heri; Gumilar, Irwan; Sidiq, Teguh P.

    2016-04-01

    Land subsidence is natural-anthropogenic hazard affecting several large urban areas in Indonesia, i.e. Jakarta, Bandung and Semarang. Geodetic based results from various techniques (e.g. Leveling, GPS and InSAR) show that land subsidence rates in all three cities generally have spatial and temporal variations, and their magnitude is in average about 5-10 cm/year. The impacts of subsidence in those cities can be seen in the field in various forms such as cracking of permanent constructions and roads, tilting of houses and buildings, 'sinking' of houses and buildings, changes in river canal and drain flow systems, wider expansion of coastal and/or inland flooding areas, and increased inland sea water intrusion. These impacts can be categorized into infrastructure, environmental, economic, and social impacts. The potential losses due to land subsidence in urban areas are actually quite significant. Related infrastructural, social and environmental costs due to direct and indirect impacts of land subsidence are economically quite significant, and can not be underestimated in sustainable urban development. The planning, development and maintenance costs of building and infrastructures in the affected areas are usually much higher than the normal situation. The collateral impact of coastal subsidence in Jakarta and Semarang, in the form of coastal flooding during high tides is also quite damaging. This repeated coastal flooding in several areas along the coast will deteriorate the structure and function of building and infrastructures, badly influences the quality of the living environment and life (e.g. health and sanitation condition), and also disrupts economic and social activities in the affected areas. As in the case of Bandung, inland subsidence also has a quite significant impact on inland flooding phenomena, since it will theoretically lead to expanded coverage and deeper water depth of flooded (inundated) areas. Since the direct and indirect impacts of

  3. Migration rates of planets due to scattering of planetesimals

    CERN Document Server

    Ormel, Chris; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2012-01-01

    Planets migrate due to the recoil they experience from scattering solid (planetesimal) bodies. To first order, the torques exerted by the interior and exterior disks cancel, analogous to the cancellation of the torques from the gravitational interaction with the gas (type I migration). Assuming the dispersion-dominated regime and power-laws characterized by indices {\\alpha} and {\\beta} for the surface density and eccentricity profiles, we calculate the net torque on the planet. We consider both distant encounters and close (orbit-crossing) encounters. We find that the close and distant encounter torques have opposite signs with respect to their {\\alpha} and {\\beta} dependences; and that the torque is especially sensitive to the eccentricity gradient ({\\beta}). Compared to type-I migration due to excitation of density waves, the planetesimal-driven migration rate is generally lower due to the lower surface density of solids in gas-rich disk, although this may be partially or fully offset when their eccentricit...

  4. The Economic Losses of University Hospitals due to the No Payment System for Forensic Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürcan Altun

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper which reference to Trakya University Hospital draws attention to economic losses of university hospitals due to lack of a system for payment of forensic reports. In this paper, forensic documents of Trakya University Hospital, covering the period January 2003- December 2004, were reviewed. We established the institutions that ask to prepare forensic reports and queries during this period. These institutions were offices of the public prosecutor and court, police, gendarme, and the other institutions (such as management of jails, notary public offices. In 2003 and 2004 Trakya University Hospital forensic reports were 471 and 653, respectively. We established annual rate of increase to the number of prepared forensic reports (39% and unit prices (50-60% between 2003 and 2004. Economic losses of no payment for preparing forensic reports in 2003 and 2004 years have been calculated as 9.647.500.000 TL and 19.420.000.000 TL, respectively. A total economic loss for two years was 29.067.500.000 TL. As a conclusion, the prices of contributing forensic expertise services by university for medicolegal cases must be measured according to price list of Council of Forensic Medicine. Managements of the universities with the help of Council of Higher Education should apply to Ministry of Finance for solving this problem. Key words: Forensic report, cost, university hospital

  5. Subexponential loss rate asymptotics for Lévy processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nørvang

    We consider a Lévy process reflected in barriers at 0 and K > 0. The loss rate is the mean time spent at the upper barrier K at time 1 when the process is started in stationarity, and is a natural continuous-time analogue of the stationary expected loss rate for a reflected random walk. We derive...... asymptotics for the loss rate when K tends to infinity, when the mean of the Lévy process is negative and the positive jumps are subexponential. In the course of this derivation, we achieve a formula, which is a generalization of the celebrated Pollaczeck-Khinchine formula.......We consider a Lévy process reflected in barriers at 0 and K > 0. The loss rate is the mean time spent at the upper barrier K at time 1 when the process is started in stationarity, and is a natural continuous-time analogue of the stationary expected loss rate for a reflected random walk. We derive...

  6. Subexponential loss rate asymptotics for Lévy processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nørvang

    2011-01-01

    We consider a Lévy process reflected in barriers at 0 and K > 0. The loss rate is the mean of the local time at K at time 1 when the process is started in stationarity, and is a natural continuous-time analogue of the stationary expected loss rate for a reflected random walk. We derive asymptotic...... for the loss rate when K tends to infinity, when the mean of the Lévy process is negative and the positive jumps are subexponential. In the course of this derivation, we achieve a formula, which is a generalization of the celebrated Pollaczeck-Khinchine formula.......We consider a Lévy process reflected in barriers at 0 and K > 0. The loss rate is the mean of the local time at K at time 1 when the process is started in stationarity, and is a natural continuous-time analogue of the stationary expected loss rate for a reflected random walk. We derive asymptotics...

  7. Is the normal heart rate "chaotic" due to respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Niels; Riedl, Maik; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular diseases increases with the growth of the human population and an aging society, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, it is challenging to develop sophisticated methods in order to improve medical diagnostics. The question whether the normal heart rate is chaotic or not is an attempt to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of cardiovascular dynamics and therefore a highly controversial topical challenge. In this contribution we demonstrate that linear and nonlinear parameters allow us to separate completely the data sets of the three groups provided for this controversial topic in nonlinear dynamics. The question whether these time series are chaotic or not cannot be answered satisfactorily without investigating the underlying mechanisms leading to them. We give an example of the dominant influence of respiration on heart beat dynamics, which shows that observed fluctuations can be mostly explained by respiratory modulations of heart rate and blood pressure (coefficient of determination: 96%). Therefore, we recommend reformulating the following initial question: "Is the normal heart rate chaotic?" We rather ask the following: "Is the normal heart rate 'chaotic' due to respiration?"

  8. Transport and chemical loss rates in Saturn's inner plasma disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, M. K. G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Vigren, E.; Cassidy, T. A.; Andrews, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The Kronian moon Enceladus is constantly feeding its surrounding with new gas and dust, from cryovolcanoes located in its south polar region. Through photoionization and impact ionization of these neutrals, a plasma disk is created, which mainly contains hydrogen ions and water group ions. This paper investigates the importance of ion loss by outward radial transport and ion loss by dissociative recombination, which is the dominant chemical loss process in the inner plasma disk. We use plasma densities derived from several years of measurements by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science electric field power spectral density and Langmuir probe to calculate the total flux tube content NL2. Our calculation shows that NL2 agrees well with earlier estimates within dipole L shell 8. We also show that loss by transport dominates chemical loss between L shells 4 and 10. Using extrapolation of available measurements, we extend the study to include L shells 2.5 to 4. The results indicate that loss by transport dominates chemical loss also between L shells 2.5 and 4. The loss rate by transport is around five times larger at L shell 5, and the difference increases as L7.7 beyond L = 5, for the net ion population. Chemical loss may still be important for the structure of the plasma disk in the region closest to Enceladus (around ±0.5 RS) at 3.95 RS (1 RS = Saturn's equatorial radius = 60,268 km), since the transport and chemical loss rates only differ by a factor of ˜2 in this region. We also derive the total plasma content of the plasma disk between L shells 4 and 10 to be 1.9 × 1033 ions and the total ion source rate for the same region to be 5.8 × 1027 s-1. The estimated equatorial ion production rate P ranges from 2.6 × 10-5 cm-3 s-1 (at L = 10) to 1.1 × 10-4 cm-3 s-1 (at L = 4.8). The net mass loading rate is derived to be 123 kg/s for L shells 4 to 10.

  9. Assessing biodiversity loss due to land use with Life Cycle Assessment: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Danielle M; Teixeira, Ricardo F M; Ostermann, Ole P

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems are under increasing pressure from human activities, with land use and land-use change at the forefront of the drivers that provoke global and regional biodiversity loss. The first step in addressing the challenge of how to reverse the negative outlook for the coming years starts with measuring environmental loss rates and assigning responsibilities. Pinpointing the global pressures on biodiversity is a task best addressed using holistic models such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). LCA is the leading method for calculating cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of products and services; it is actively promoted by many public policies, and integrated as part of environmental information systems within private companies. LCA already deals with the potential biodiversity impacts of land use, but there are significant obstacles to overcome before its models grasp the full reach of the phenomena involved. In this review, we discuss some pressing issues that need to be addressed. LCA mainly introduces biodiversity as an endpoint category modeled as a loss in species richness due to the conversion and use of land over time and space. The functional and population effects on biodiversity are mostly absent due to the emphasis on species accumulation with limited geographic and taxonomical reach. Current land-use modeling activities that use biodiversity indicators tend to oversimplify the real dynamics and complexity of the interactions of species among each other and with their habitats. To identify the main areas for improvement, we systematically reviewed LCA studies on land use that had findings related to global change and conservation ecology. We provide suggestion as to how to address some of the issues raised. Our overall objective was to encourage companies to monitor and take concrete steps to address the impacts of land use on biodiversity on a broader geographical scale and along increasingly globalized supply chains. © 2014 The Authors. Global Change

  10. Assessing biodiversity loss due to land use with Life Cycle Assessment: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Danielle M; Teixeira, Ricardo FM; Ostermann, Ole P

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystems are under increasing pressure from human activities, with land use and land-use change at the forefront of the drivers that provoke global and regional biodiversity loss. The first step in addressing the challenge of how to reverse the negative outlook for the coming years starts with measuring environmental loss rates and assigning responsibilities. Pinpointing the global pressures on biodiversity is a task best addressed using holistic models such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). LCA is the leading method for calculating cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of products and services; it is actively promoted by many public policies, and integrated as part of environmental information systems within private companies. LCA already deals with the potential biodiversity impacts of land use, but there are significant obstacles to overcome before its models grasp the full reach of the phenomena involved. In this review, we discuss some pressing issues that need to be addressed. LCA mainly introduces biodiversity as an endpoint category modeled as a loss in species richness due to the conversion and use of land over time and space. The functional and population effects on biodiversity are mostly absent due to the emphasis on species accumulation with limited geographic and taxonomical reach. Current land-use modeling activities that use biodiversity indicators tend to oversimplify the real dynamics and complexity of the interactions of species among each other and with their habitats. To identify the main areas for improvement, we systematically reviewed LCA studies on land use that had findings related to global change and conservation ecology. We provide suggestion as to how to address some of the issues raised. Our overall objective was to encourage companies to monitor and take concrete steps to address the impacts of land use on biodiversity on a broader geographical scale and along increasingly globalized supply chains. PMID:25143302

  11. A Numerical Study of Water Loss Rate Distributions in MDCT-Based Human Airway Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-01

    Both three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) computational fluid dynamics methods are applied to study regional water loss in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airway models at the minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. The overall water losses predicted by both 3D and 1D models in the entire respiratory tract agree with available experimental measurements. However, 3D and 1D models reveal different regional water loss rate distributions due to the 3D secondary flows formed at bifurcations. The secondary flows cause local skewed temperature and humidity distributions on inspiration acting to elevate the local water loss rate; and the secondary flow at the carina tends to distribute more cold air to the lower lobes. As a result, the 3D model predicts that the water loss rate first increases with increasing airway generation, and then decreases as the air approaches saturation, while the 1D model predicts a monotonic decrease of water loss rate with increasing airway generation. Moreover, the 3D (or 1D) model predicts relatively higher water loss rates in lower (or upper) lobes. The regional water loss rate can be related to the non-dimensional wall shear stress (τ (*)) by the non-dimensional mass transfer coefficient (h 0 (*) ) as [Formula: see text].

  12. Extra loss due to Fano resonances in inhibited coupling fibers based on a lattice of tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincetti, L; Setti, V

    2012-06-18

    Confinement loss of inhibited coupling fibers with a cladding composed of a lattice of tubes of various shapes is theoretically and numerically investigated. Both solid core and hollow core are taken into account. It is shown that in case of polygonal shaped tubes, confinement loss is affected by extra loss due to Fano resonances between core modes and cladding modes with high spatial dependence. This explains why hollow core Kagome fibers exhibit much higher confinement loss with respect to tube lattice fibers and why hypocycloid core cladding interfaces significantly reduce fiber loss. Moreover it is shown that tube deformations, due for example to fabrication process, affect fiber performances. A relationship between the number of polygon sides and the spectral position of the extra loss is found. This suggests general guide lines for the design and fabrication of fibers free of Fano resonance in the spectral range of interest.

  13. Stratospheric cooling and polar ozone loss due to H2 emissions of a global hydrogen economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feck, T.; Grooß, J.-U.; Riese, M.; Vogel, B.

    2009-04-01

    "Green" hydrogen is seen as a major element of the future energy supply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially. However, due to the possible interactions of hydrogen (H2) with other atmospheric constituents there is a need to analyse the implications of additional atmospheric H2 that could result from hydrogen leakage of a global hydrogen infrastructure. Emissions of molecular H2 can occur along the whole hydrogen process chain which increase the tropospheric H2 burden. Across the tropical tropopause H2 reaches the stratosphere where it is oxidised and forms water vapour (H2O). This causes increased IR-emissions into space and hence a cooling of the stratosphere. Both effects, the increase of stratospheric H2O and the cooling, enhances the potential of chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which increase polar ozone destruction. Hence a global hydrogen economy could provoke polar ozone loss and could lead to a substantial delay of the current projected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our investigations show that even if 90% of the current global fossil primary energy input could be replaced by hydrogen and approximately 9.5% of the product gas would leak to the atmosphere, the ozone loss would be increased between 15 to 26 Dobson Units (DU) if the stratospheric CFC loading would retain unchanged. A consistency check of the used approximation methods with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) shows that this additional ozone loss can probably be treated as an upper limit. Towards more realistic future H2 leakage rate assumptions (< 3%) the additional ozone loss would be rather small (? 10 DU). However, in all cases the full damage would only occur if stratospheric CFC-levels would retain unchanged. Due to the CFC-prohibition as a result of the Montreal Protocol the forecasts suggest a decline of the stratospheric CFC loading about 50% until 2050. In this case our calculations

  14. Stellar energy loss rates in the pair-annihilation process beyond the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ruíz, M. A.; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A.; González-Sánchez, A.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the stellar energy loss due to neutrino-pair production in e+e- annihilation in the context of a 331 model, a left-right symmetric model and a simplest little Higgs model in a way that can be used in supernova calculations. We also present some simple estimates which show that such process can act as an efficient energy loss mechanism in the shocked supernova core. We find that the stellar energy loss is almost independent of the parameters of the models in the allowed range for these parameters. This work complements other studies on the stellar energy loss rate in e+e- annihilation.

  15. Improved Multiple Descriptions Sinusoidal Coder Adaptive to Packet Loss Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG Yue; WANG Jing; ZHAO Sheng-hui; KUANG Jing-ming

    2008-01-01

    To make the multiple descriptions codec adaptive to the packet loss rate, which can minimize the final distortion, a novel adaptive multiple descriptions sinusoidal coder (AMDSC) is proposed, which is based on a sinusoidal model and a noise model. Firstly, the sinusoidal parameters are extracted in the sinusoidal model, and ordered in a decrease manner. Odd indexed and even indexed parameters are divided into two descriptions. Secondly, the output vector from the noise model is split vector quantized. And the two sub-vectors are placed into two descriptions too. Finally, the number of the extracted parameters and the redundancy between the two descriptions are adjusted according to the packet loss rate of the network. Analytical and experimental results show that the proposed AMDSC outperforms existing MD speech coders by taking network loss characteristics into account. Therefore, it is very suitable for unreliable channels.

  16. Mass loss rates in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, C. de; Nieuwenhuijzen, H.; Hucht, K.A. van der

    1988-02-01

    From the literature we collected values for the rate of mass loss for 271 stars, nearly all of population I, and of spectral types 0 through M. Rates of stellar mass loss determined according to six different methods were compared and appear to yield the same result per star within the limits of errors; this is true regardless of the star's position in the HR-diagram. Thus average rates of mass loss were determined, and weights were allocated to the M-determinations for each star. In addition we studied some groups of other stars: fast rotators (22 Be-type stars), and chemically evolved stars (31 Wolf-Rayet stars; 11 C- and 4 S-type stars and 15 nuclei of planetary nebulae). The chemically evolved stars have rates of mass loss which are larger than those of ''normal'' stars occupying the same positions in the Hertzprung-Russel diagram, by factors: 160 for Wolf-Rayet stars; 11 for C-type stars, and by estimated factors of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ for the nuclei of planetary nebulae.

  17. Culling Rate of Icelandic Horses due to Bone Spavin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árnason Th

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A survival analysis was used to compare the culling rate of Icelandic horses due to the presence of radiographic and clinical signs of bone spavin. A follow-up study of 508 horses from a survey five years earlier was performed. In the original survey 46% of the horses had radiographic signs of bone spavin (RS and/or lameness after flexion test of the tarsus. The horse owners were interviewed by telephone. The owners were asked if the horses were still used for riding and if not, they were regarded as culled. The owners were then asked when and why the horses were culled. During the 5 years, 98 horses had been culled, 151 had been withdrawn (sold or selected for breeding and 259 were still used for riding. Hind limb lameness (HLL was the most common reason for culling (n = 42. The rate of culling was low up to the age of 11 years, when it rose to 0.05 for horses with RS. The risk ratio for culling was twice as high for horses with RS compared with horses without RS and 5.5 times higher for culling because of HLL. The risk of culling (prognostic value was highest for the combination of RS with lameness after flexion test, next highest for RS and lowest for lameness after flexion test as the only finding. It was concluded that bone spavin affects the duration of use of Icelandic horses and is the most common cause of culling due to disease of riding horses in the age range of 7–17 years.

  18. Glucosamines Attenuate Bone Loss Due to Menopause by Regulating Osteoclast Function in Ovariectomized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Hironobu; Nakatani, Sachie; Kato, Takuya; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Mano, Hiroshi; Kobata, Kenji; Wada, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) on bone metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) mice was studied. After 12 weeks of feeding with 0.2% GlcN and 0.2% GlcNAc, the femoral bone mineral density in OVX mice was significantly increased compared with that in OVX mice fed the control diet. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia indicated that the rates of osteogenesis and bone resorption were reduced due to the GlcN diet. The erosion depth of osteoclasts on the tibia in GlcN- and GlcNAc-fed OVX mice was significantly lower than that in the control OVX mice. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts induced from bone marrow stem cells isolated from GlcN-fed OVX mice was significantly lower than that from control OVX mice. A loss of uterine weight and higher serum calcium concentration in the GlcN- and GlcNAc-fed OVX mice were observed. The results suggest that the intake of GlcN suppresses bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activity in a nonestrogenic manner.

  19. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yashiro, Seiji [Interferometrics Inc., Herndon, VA 20171 (United States); Gopalswamy, Nat, E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  20. Global Earthquake Casualties due to Secondary Effects: A Quantitative Analysis for Improving PAGER Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER’s overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability.

  1. Global earthquake casualties due to secondary effects: A quantitative analysis for improving rapid loss analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, K.D.; Wald, D.J.; Allen, T.I.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER's overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  2. WSAP: provide loss rate differentiation with active queue management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Miao; Wu Jianping; Xu Ke

    2005-01-01

    How to provide service differentiation in the Internet is a hot research topic. One proposal is to provide loss rate differentiation by assigning levels of dropprecedence to IP packets. This paper proposes a new Active Queue Management (AQM) mechanism, Weighted SAP (WSAP) to achieve this goal. WSAP is based on a new AQM algorithm called Simple Adaptive Proportional (SAP). WSAP can approximate proportional loss rate differentiation, while keeping high link utilization and short queuing delay. Compared with Weighted RED(WRED) and RED In and Out (RIO), WSAP is easier to configure and can provide better performance. Furthermore, an architecture for differentiated service is proposed. In the design of this architecture, more attention is paid to the characte of network traffic in the Internet and an attempt is made to preserve the Internet's oringinal design principles.

  3. CREDIT MANAGEMENT MODEL WITH A GIVEN LOSS RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena G. Snegova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the credit limit model with a given loss rate. Applying this model, it is possible to increase the profitability of the bank’s product in the case of fast loans issued in the form of credit cards. Author offers a method for simulating of credit limit utilization functions. It is formulated and solved the problem of finding the optimal credit limit for the borrower.

  4. Power fluctuation and power loss of wind turbines due to wind shear and tower shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Binrong; Wei, Sha; Wei, Kexiang; Yang, Wenxian; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2017-09-01

    The magnitude and stability of power output are two key indices of wind turbines. This study investigates the effects of wind shear and tower shadow on power output in terms of power fluctuation and power loss to estimate the capacity and quality of the power generated by a wind turbine. First, wind speed models, particularly the wind shear model and the tower shadow model, are described in detail. The widely accepted tower shadow model is modified in view of the cone-shaped towers of modern large-scale wind turbines. Power fluctuation and power loss due to wind shear and tower shadow are analyzed by performing theoretical calculations and case analysis within the framework of a modified version of blade element momentum theory. Results indicate that power fluctuation is mainly caused by tower shadow, whereas power loss is primarily induced by wind shear. Under steady wind conditions, power loss can be divided into wind farm loss and rotor loss. Wind farm loss is constant at 3 α(3 α-1) R 2/(8 H 2). By contrast, rotor loss is strongly influenced by the wind turbine control strategies and wind speed. That is, when the wind speed is measured in a region where a variable-speed controller works, the rotor loss stabilizes around zero, but when the wind speed is measured in a region where the blade pitch controller works, the rotor loss increases as the wind speed intensifies. The results of this study can serve as a reference for accurate power estimation and strategy development to mitigate the fluctuations in aerodynamic loads and power output due to wind shear and tower shadow.

  5. Power fluctuation and power loss of wind turbines due to wind shear and tower shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Binrong; Wei, Sha; Wei, Kexiang; Yang, Wenxian; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2017-05-01

    The magnitude and stability of power output are two key indices of wind turbines. This study investigates the effects of wind shear and tower shadow on power output in terms of power fluctuation and power loss to estimate the capacity and quality of the power generated by a wind turbine. First, wind speed models, particularly the wind shear model and the tower shadow model, are described in detail. The widely accepted tower shadow model is modified in view of the cone-shaped towers of modern large-scale wind turbines. Power fluctuation and power loss due to wind shear and tower shadow are analyzed by performing theoretical calculations and case analysis within the framework of a modified version of blade element momentum theory. Results indicate that power fluctuation is mainly caused by tower shadow, whereas power loss is primarily induced by wind shear. Under steady wind conditions, power loss can be divided into wind farm loss and rotor loss. Wind farm loss is constant at 3α(3α-1)R 2/(8H 2). By contrast, rotor loss is strongly influenced by the wind turbine control strategies and wind speed. That is, when the wind speed is measured in a region where a variable-speed controller works, the rotor loss stabilizes around zero, but when the wind speed is measured in a region where the blade pitch controller works, the rotor loss increases as the wind speed intensifies. The results of this study can serve as a reference for accurate power estimation and strategy development to mitigate the fluctuations in aerodynamic loads and power output due to wind shear and tower shadow.

  6. Quantifying Biodiversity Losses Due to Human Consumption: A Global-Scale Footprint Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Harry C; Schipper, Aafke M; Bakkenes, Michel; Meijer, Johan R; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2017-03-21

    It is increasingly recognized that human consumption leads to considerable losses of biodiversity. This study is the first to systematically quantify these losses in relation to land use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production and consumption of (inter)nationally traded goods and services by presenting consumption-based biodiversity losses, in short biodiversity footprint, for 45 countries and world regions globally. Our results showed that (i) the biodiversity loss per citizen shows large variations among countries, with higher values when per-capita income increases; (ii) the share of biodiversity losses due to GHG emissions in the biodiversity footprint increases with income; (iii) food consumption is the most important driver of biodiversity loss in most of the countries and regions, with a global average of 40%; (iv) more than 50% of the biodiversity loss associated with consumption in developed economies occurs outside their territorial boundaries; and (v) the biodiversity footprint per dollar consumed is lower for wealthier countries. The insights provided by our analysis might support policymakers in developing adequate responses to avert further losses of biodiversity when population and incomes increase. Both the mitigation of GHG emissions and land use related reduction options in production and consumption should be considered in strategies to protect global biodiversity.

  7. Exchange-rate forecasts and asymmetric loss: empirical evidence for the yen/dollar exchange rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadtmann, Georg; Pierdzioch; Rülke

    2012-01-01

    We used the yen/dollar exchange-rate forecasts of the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) poll to analyse whether exchange-rate forecasters have an asymmetric loss function. To this end, we applied an approach recently developed by Elliott et al. (2005). We found that only few forecasters seem to form...

  8. Self-Directed Weight Loss Strategies: Energy Expenditure Due to Physical Activity Is Not Increased to Achieve Intended Weight Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Elbelt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reduced physical activity and almost unlimited availability of food are major contributors to the development of obesity. With the decline of strenuous work, energy expenditure due to spontaneous physical activity has attracted increasing attention. Our aim was to assess changes in energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits in obese subjects aiming at self-directed weight loss. Methods: Energy expenditure and physical activity patterns were measured with a portable armband device. Nutritional habits were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Results: Data on weight development, energy expenditure, physical activity patterns and nutritional habits were obtained for 105 patients over a six-month period from an initial cohort of 160 outpatients aiming at weight loss. Mean weight loss was −1.5 ± 7.0 kg (p = 0.028. Patients with weight maintenance (n = 75, with substantial weight loss (>5% body weight, n = 20 and with substantial weight gain (>5% body weight, n = 10 did not differ in regard to changes of body weight adjusted energy expenditure components (total energy expenditure: −0.2 kcal/kg/day; non-exercise activity thermogenesis: −0.3 kcal/kg/day; exercise-related activity thermogenesis (EAT: −0.2 kcal/kg/day or patterns of physical activity (duration of EAT: −2 min/day; steps/day: −156; metabolic equivalent unchanged measured objectively with a portable armband device. Self-reported consumption frequency of unfavorable food decreased significantly (p = 0.019 over the six-month period. Conclusions: An increase in energy expenditure or changes of physical activity patterns (objectively assessed with a portable armband device are not employed by obese subjects to achieve self-directed weight loss. However, modified nutritional habits could be detected with the use of a food frequency questionnaire.

  9. [Labor productivity losses attributable to premature deaths due to traffic injuries between 2002 and 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubí-Mollá, Patricia; Peña-Longobardo, Luz María; Casal, Bruno; Rivera, Berta; Oliva-Moreno, Juan

    2015-09-01

    To estimate the years of potential life lost, years of potential productive life lost and the labor productivity losses attributable to premature deaths due to traffic injuries between 2002 and 2012 in Spain. Several statistical sources were combined (Spanish Registry of Deaths, Labor Force Survey and Wage Structure Survey) to develop a simulation model based on the human capital approach. This model allowed us to estimate the loss of labor productivity caused by premature deaths following traffic injuries from 2002 to 2012. In addition, mortality tables with life expectancy estimates were used to compute years of potential life lost and years of potential productive life lost. The estimated loss of labour productivity caused by fatal traffic injuries between 2002 and 2012 in Spain amounted to 9,521 million euros (baseline year 2012). The aggregate number of years of potential life lost in the period amounted to 1,433,103, whereas the years of potential productive life lost amounted to 875,729. Throughout the period analyzed, labor productivity losses and years of life lost diminished substantially. Labor productivity losses due to fatal traffic injuries decreased throughout the period analyzed. Nevertheless, the cumulative loss was alarmingly high. Estimation of the economic impact of health problems can complement conventional indicators of distinct dimensions and be used to support public policy making. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Crop production and economic loss due to wind erosion in hot arid ecosystem of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Priyabrata; Moharana, P. C.; Kumar, Mahesh; Soni, M. L.; Pandey, C. B.; Chaudhari, S. K.; Sikka, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    Wind erosion is a severe land degradation process in hot arid western India and affects the agricultural production system. It affects crop yield directly by damaging the crops through abrasion, burial, dust deposition etc. and indirectly by reducing soil fertility. In this study, an attempt was made to quantify the indirect impact of wind erosion process on crop production loss and associated economic loss in hot arid ecosystem of India. It has been observed that soil loss due to wind erosion varies from minimum 1.3 t ha-1 to maximum 83.3 t ha-1 as per the severity. Yield loss due to wind erosion was found maximum for groundnut (Arachis hypogea) (5-331 kg ha-1 yr-1), whereas minimum for moth bean (Vigna aconitifolia) (1-93 kg ha-1 yr-1). For pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), which covers a major portion of arable lands in western Rajasthan, the yield loss was found 3-195 kg ha-1 yr-1. Economic loss was found higher for groundnut and clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) than rest crops, which are about

  11. Quantitative Analysis Method of Output Loss due to Restriction for Grid-connected PV Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yuzuru; Oozeki, Takashi; Kurokawa, Kosuke; Itou, Takamitsu; Kitamura, Kiyoyuki; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Yokota, Masaharu; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    Voltage of power distribution line will be increased due to reverse power flow from grid-connected PV systems. In the case of high density grid connection, amount of voltage increasing will be higher than the stand-alone grid connection system. To prevent the over voltage of power distribution line, PV system's output will be restricted if the voltage of power distribution line is close to the upper limit of the control range. Because of this interaction, amount of output loss will be larger in high density case. This research developed a quantitative analysis method for PV systems output and losses to clarify the behavior of grid connected PV systems. All the measured data are classified into the loss factors using 1 minute average of 1 second data instead of typical 1 hour average. Operation point on the I-V curve is estimated to quantify the loss due to the output restriction using module temperature, array output voltage, array output current and solar irradiance. As a result, loss due to output restriction is successfully quantified and behavior of output restriction is clarified.

  12. Milk yield and associated economic losses in quarters with subclinical mastitis due to Staphylococcus aureus in Ethiopian crossbred dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Gebreyohannes Y; Regassa, Fekadu Gudeta; Kelay, B

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence and losses associated with subclinical mastitis (SCM) caused by Staphylococcus aureus in Ethiopian crossbred dairy cows. A split-udder trial was carried out to determine milk yield losses in udder quarter with S. aureus-caused SCM. Each quarter of the study cows was examined using the California Mastitis Test (CMT) and quarter milk production was measured over a period of 8 days. Milk yield losses for CMT positive quarters were estimated by comparing production of quarters with CMT score 0. Mean milk yield for uninfected healthy quarters was 1.66 kg per milking (95% CI, 1.66-1.55 kg per milking), and the rate of milk reduction for quarters with CMT scores of 1+, 2+, and 3+ was 25%, 33%, and 48%, respectively. Economic losses at different farm-size levels were calculated by multiplying the prevalence of CMT scores with milk yield losses associated with respective CMT scores. In Debre Ziet dairy herds, a quarter with SCM due to S. aureus lost an average of 34.5% of its potential milk production while the total milk yield loss per cow was estimated at 6.8%. Losses were highest in large-scale (13%) farms and lowest (3.7%) in small-scale. Based on the prevalence, the overall financial loss for each cow per lactation was 984.64 Eth Birr (US$78.65) and losses in large farms (1,882.40 Eth Birr or US$150.35) were over 3.5 times the loss in small-size farms. These figures possibly underestimate the potential benefits of mastitis control program as they do not include other direct and indirect costs.

  13. Buoyancy driven flow in a hot water tank due to standby heat loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    show that the CFD model predicts satisfactorily water temperatures at different levels of the tank during cooling by standby heat loss. It is elucidated how the downward buoyancy driven flow along the tank wall is established by the heat loss from the tank sides and how the natural convection flow......Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal behavior in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank due to standby heat loss of the tank are presented. The effect of standby heat loss on temperature distribution in the tank is investigated experimentally on a slim 150l tank...... parts of the tank is measured by experiments and used as input to the CFD model. Water temperatures at different levels of the tank are measured and compared to CFD calculated temperatures. The investigations focus on validation of the CFD model and on understanding of the CFD calculations.The results...

  14. Marsh Loss Due to Cumulative Impacts of Hurricane Isaac and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Louisiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Khanna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal ecosystems are greatly endangered due to anthropogenic development and climate change. Multiple disturbances may erode the ability of a system to recover from stress if there is little time between disturbance events. We evaluated the ability of the saltmarshes in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, USA, to recover from two successive disturbances, the DeepWater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and Hurricane Isaac in 2012. We measured recovery using vegetation indices and land cover change metrics. We found that after the hurricane, land loss along oiled shorelines was 17.8%, while along oil-free shorelines, it was 13.6% within the first 7 m. At a distance of 7–14 m, land loss from oiled regions was 11.6%, but only 6.3% in oil-free regions. We found no differences in vulnerability to land loss between narrow and wide shorelines; however, vegetation in narrow sites was significantly more stressed, potentially leading to future land loss. Treated oiled regions also lost more land due to the hurricane than untreated regions. These results suggest that ecosystem recovery after the two disturbances is compromised, as the observed high rates of land loss may prevent salt marsh from establishing in the same areas where it existed prior to the oil spill.

  15. Twenty-five winters of unexpected Eurasian cooling unlikely due to Arctic sea-ice loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Kelly E.; Fyfe, John C.; Sigmond, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Surface air temperature over central Eurasia decreased over the past twenty-five winters at a time of strongly increasing anthropogenic forcing and Arctic amplification. It has been suggested that this cooling was related to an increase in cold winters due to sea-ice loss in the Barents-Kara Sea. Here we use over 600 years of atmosphere-only global climate model simulations to isolate the effect of Arctic sea-ice loss, complemented with a 50-member ensemble of atmosphere-ocean global climate model simulations allowing for external forcing changes (anthropogenic and natural) and internal variability. In our atmosphere-only simulations, we find no evidence of Arctic sea-ice loss having impacted Eurasian surface temperature. In our atmosphere-ocean simulations, we find just one simulation with Eurasian cooling of the observed magnitude but Arctic sea-ice loss was not involved, either directly or indirectly. Rather, in this simulation the cooling is due to a persistent circulation pattern combining high pressure over the Barents-Kara Sea and a downstream trough. We conclude that the observed cooling over central Eurasia was probably due to a sea-ice-independent internally generated circulation pattern ensconced over, and nearby, the Barents-Kara Sea since the 1980s. These results improve our knowledge of high-latitude climate variability and change, with implications for our understanding of impacts in high-northern-latitude systems.

  16. Annual losses of weed seeds due to predation in organic cereal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, P.R.; Wes, J.S.; Kropff, M.J.; Werf, van der W.

    2003-01-01

    1. Post-dispersal seed losses in annual arable weed species are poorly quantified, but may be of significance for natural population control, especially if they can be manipulated. We hypothesized that weed seed predation on the soil surface was significant, so we measured rates in the field to esti

  17. Beam losses due to the foil scattering for CSNS/RCS

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ming-Yang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Shou-Yan

    2012-01-01

    For the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS/RCS), the stripping foil scattering generates the beam halo and gives rise to additional beam losses during the injection process. The interaction between the proton beam and the stripping foil was discussed and the foil scattering was studied. A simple model and the realistic situation of the foil scattering were considered. By using the codes ORBIT and FLUKA, the multi-turn phase space painting injection process with the stripping foil scattering for CSNS/RCS was simulated and the beam losses due to the foil scattering were obtained.

  18. Using Reanalysis Data for the Prediction of Seasonal Wind Turbine Power Losses Due to Icing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtch, D.; Mullendore, G. L.; Delene, D. J.; Storm, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Northern Plains region of the United States is home to a significant amount of potential wind energy. However, in winter months capturing this potential power is severely impacted by the meteorological conditions, in the form of icing. Predicting the expected loss in power production due to icing is a valuable parameter that can be used in wind turbine operations, determination of wind turbine site locations and long-term energy estimates which are used for financing purposes. Currently, losses due to icing must be estimated when developing predictions for turbine feasibility and financing studies, while icing maps, a tool commonly used in Europe, are lacking in the United States. This study uses the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset in conjunction with turbine production data to investigate various methods of predicting seasonal losses (October-March) due to icing at two wind turbine sites located 121 km apart in North Dakota. The prediction of icing losses is based on temperature and relative humidity thresholds and is accomplished using three methods. For each of the three methods, the required atmospheric variables are determined in one of two ways: using industry-specific software to correlate anemometer data in conjunction with the MERRA dataset and using only the MERRA dataset for all variables. For each season, a percentage of the total expected generated power lost due to icing is determined and compared to observed losses from the production data. An optimization is performed in order to determine the relative humidity threshold that minimizes the difference between the predicted and observed values. Eight seasons of data are used to determine an optimal relative humidity threshold, and a further three seasons of data are used to test this threshold. Preliminary results have shown that the optimized relative humidity threshold for the northern turbine is higher than the southern turbine for all methods

  19. Stellar energy loss rates in the pair-annihilation process beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ruiz, M.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimicas, Apartado Postal C-585, Zacatecas (Mexico); Gutierrez-Rodriguez, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Facultad de Fisica, Apartado Postal C-580, Zacatecas (Mexico); Gonzalez-Sanchez, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Facultad de Fisica, Apartado Postal C-580, Zacatecas (Mexico); PSL Research University, Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, CNRS UMR 8112, Paris (France)

    2017-01-15

    We calculate the stellar energy loss due to neutrino-pair production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation in the context of a 331 model, a left-right symmetric model and a simplest little Higgs model in a way that can be used in supernova calculations. We also present some simple estimates which show that such process can act as an efficient energy loss mechanism in the shocked supernova core. We find that the stellar energy loss is almost independent of the parameters of the models in the allowed range for these parameters. This work complements other studies on the stellar energy loss rate in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. (orig.)

  20. Mass-loss rates from mid-infrared excesses in LMC and SMC O stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.; Prinja, R. K.

    2017-09-01

    We use a combination of BVJHK and Spitzer [3.6], [5.8] and [8.0] photometry to determine infrared (IR) excesses for a sample of 58 Large Magellanic Cloud and 46 Small Magellanic Cloud O stars. This sample is ideal for determining IR excesses because the very small line-of-sight reddening minimizes uncertainties due to extinction corrections. We use the core-halo model developed by Lamers & Waters to translate the excesses into mass-loss rates and demonstrate that the results of this simple model agree with the more sophisticated CMFGEN models to within a factor of 2. Taken at face value, the derived mass-loss rates are larger than those predicted by Vink et al., and the magnitude of the disagreement increases with decreasing luminosity. However, the IR excesses need not imply large mass-loss rates. Instead, we argue that they probably indicate that the outer atmospheres of O stars contain complex structures and that their winds are launched with much smaller velocity gradients than normally assumed. If this is the case, it could affect the theoretical and observational interpretations of the 'weak wind' problem, where classical mass-loss indicators suggest that the mass-loss rates of lower luminosity O stars are far less than expected.

  1. Economic losses due to cystic echinococcosis in India: Need for urgent action to control the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balbir B; Dhand, Navneet K; Ghatak, Sandeep; Gill, Jatinder P S

    2014-01-01

    Cystic ehinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains a neglected zoonotic disease despite its considerable human and animal health concerns. This is the first systematic analysis of the livestock and human related economic losses due to cystic echinococcosis in India. Data about human cases were obtained from a tertiary hospital. Human hydatidosis cases with and without surgical interventions were extrapolated to be 5647 and 17075 per year assuming a total human population of 1210193422 in India. Data about prevalence of hydatid cysts in important food producing animals were obtained from previously published abattoir based epidemiological surveys that reported a prevalence of 5.39% in cattle, 4.36% in buffaloes, 3.09% in pigs, 2.23% in sheep and 0.41% in goats. Animal population data were sourced from the latest census conducted by the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries, India. Other input parameters were obtained from published scientific literature. Probability distributions were included for many input values to account for variability and uncertainty. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the effect of important parameters on the estimated economic losses. The analysis revealed a total annual median loss of Rs. 11.47 billion (approx. US $ 212.35 million). Cattle and buffalo industry accounted for most of the losses: 93.05% and 88.88% of the animal and total losses, respectively. Human hydatidosis related losses were estimated to be Rs. 472.72 million (approx. US $ 8.75 million) but are likely to be an under-estimate due to under-reporting of the disease in the country. The human losses more than quadrupled to Rs. 1953 million i.e. approx. US $ 36.17 million, when the prevalence of human undiagnosed cases was increased to 0.2% in the sensitivity analyses. The social loss and psychological distress were not taken into account for calculating human loss. The results highlight an urgent need for a science based policy

  2. Measurement of hearing loss due to perforated tympanic membrane using image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardesai, Neha; Sardesai, Ravindra; Chang, Chein-I.

    2014-05-01

    The tympanic membrane (ear drum) is a thin tissue film that is stretched between the outer and middle ear. Sound waves travel from outside the ear, and strike the tympanic membrane resulting in its vibration. These vibrations amplify the sound waves and transmit them to the ossicles (auditory bones). The magnitude of amplification is directly proportional to vibrating area of tympanic membrane. Hence a perforation in this membrane would result in hearing loss. Pure-tone audiometry is the traditional procedure used to detect the amount of hearing loss in a patient. However, it is lengthy and less efficient, as it largely depends on the response of the patient to sound intensity and frequency of pure-tones. We present a relatively more efficient approach to determine hearing loss due to perforated tympanic membrane using image processing techniques. We describe an algorithm that uses unsharp masking to sharpen images of the perforations as well as the tympanic membrane. Then, it converts the image into a binary image using thresholding. A median filter is applied to get rid of the noise component in the image. The ratio of the area of perforation and total area of tympanic membrane will define the percentage of hearing loss. Our approach will eliminate the error introduced due to patient dependency as in the traditional method.

  3. Process Measurement Deviation Analysis for Flow Rate due to Miscalibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Eunsuk; Kim, Byung Rae; Jeong, Seog Hwan; Choi, Ji Hye; Shin, Yong Chul; Yun, Jae Hee [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    An analysis was initiated to identify the root cause, and the exemption of high static line pressure correction to differential pressure (DP) transmitters was one of the major deviation factors. Also the miscalibrated DP transmitter range was identified as another major deviation factor. This paper presents considerations to be incorporated in the process flow measurement instrumentation calibration and the analysis results identified that the DP flow transmitter electrical output decreased by 3%. Thereafter, flow rate indication decreased by 1.9% resulting from the high static line pressure correction exemption and measurement range miscalibration. After re-calibration, the flow rate indication increased by 1.9%, which is consistent with the analysis result. This paper presents the brief calibration procedures for Rosemount DP flow transmitter, and analyzes possible three cases of measurement deviation including error and cause. Generally, the DP transmitter is required to be calibrated with precise process input range according to the calibration procedure provided for specific DP transmitter. Especially, in case of the DP transmitter installed in high static line pressure, it is important to correct the high static line pressure effect to avoid the inherent systematic error for Rosemount DP transmitter. Otherwise, failure to notice the correction may lead to indicating deviation from actual value.

  4. Calculations of Energy Losses due to Atomic Processes in Tokamaks with Applications to the ITER Divertor

    CERN Document Server

    Post, D; Clark, R E H; Putvinskaya, N

    1995-01-01

    Reduction of the peak heat loads on the plasma facing components is essential for the success of the next generation of high fusion power tokamaks such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) 1 . Many present concepts for accomplishing this involve the use of atomic processes to transfer the heat from the plasma to the main chamber and divertor chamber walls and much of the experimental and theoretical physics research in the fusion program is directed toward this issue. The results of these experiments and calculations are the result of a complex interplay of many processes. In order to identify the key features of these experiments and calculations and the relative role of the primary atomic processes, simple quasi-analytic models and the latest atomic physics rate coefficients and cross sections have been used to assess the relative roles of central radiation losses through bremsstrahlung, impurity radiation losses from the plasma edge, charge exchange and hydrogen radiation losses f...

  5. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  6. [Loss and grieving: the experiences of women who terminate a pregnancy due to lethal fetal malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consonni, Elenice Bertanha; Petean, Eucia Beatriz Lopes

    2013-09-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the grieving experiences of women who terminated pregnancies under judicial authorization, due to life-incompatible fetal malformation. Ten women attended in the Fetal Medicine Department of Botucatu Clinical Hospital participated in the study. Data collection was conducted by means of semi-structured interviews forty days after termination. The interviews were recorded and transcribed in full, with the data analyzed from the thematic content analysis perspective. The results revealed that the mothers sought explanations and meanings for the loss, with religious responses and self-blame being very frequent. The reports were marked by feelings of sadness, longing and sensations of emptiness due to the loss of the child, revealing the need of the mothers to dwell on the issue. The mothers were and continued to be linked to their children; the termination of the pregnancy, although being a choice to minimize the pain of an inevitable loss, did not spare the women from experiences of great suffering.>The study includes input for the discussion and planning of health approaches and care for women who terminate their pregnancy due to lethal fetal malformation, by means of judicial authorization.

  7. Global rates of habitat loss and implications for amphibian conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, A.L.; Klaver, R.W.; Casper, G.S.; Lannoo, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    A large number of factors are known to affect amphibian population viability, but most authors agree that the principal causes of amphibian declines are habitat loss, alteration, and fragmentation. We provide a global assessment of land use dynamics in the context of amphibian distributions. We accomplished this by compiling global maps of amphibian species richness and recent rates of change in land cover, land use, and human population growth. The amphibian map was developed using a combination of published literature and digital databases. We used an ecoregion framework to help interpret species distributions across environmental, rather than political, boundaries. We mapped rates of land cover and use change with statistics from the World Resources Institute, refined with a global digital dataset on land cover derived from satellite data. Temporal maps of human population were developed from the World Resources Institute database and other published sources. Our resultant map of amphibian species richness illustrates that amphibians are distributed in an uneven pattern around the globe, preferring terrestrial and freshwater habitats in ecoregions that are warm and moist. Spatiotemporal patterns of human population show that, prior to the 20th century, population growth and spread was slower, most extensive in the temperate ecoregions, and largely exclusive of major regions of high amphibian richness. Since the beginning of the 20th century, human population growth has been exponential and has occurred largely in the subtropical and tropical ecoregions favored by amphibians. Population growth has been accompanied by broad-scale changes in land cover and land use, typically in support of agriculture. We merged information on land cover, land use, and human population growth to generate a composite map showing the rates at which humans have been changing the world. When compared with the map of amphibian species richness, we found that many of the regions of the

  8. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. (au)

  9. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Assessment of rice yield loss due to exposure to ozone pollution in Southern Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danh, Ngo Thanh; Huy, Lai Nguyen; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim, E-mail: kimoanh@ait.ac.th

    2016-10-01

    The study domain covered the Eastern region of Southern of Vietnam that includes Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) and five other provinces. Rice production in the domain accounted for 13% of the national total with three crop cycles per year. We assessed ozone (O{sub 3}) induced rice production loss in the domain for 2010 using simulated hourly surface O{sub 3} concentrations (WRF/CAMx; 4 km resolution). Simulated O{sub 3} was higher in January–February (largely overlaps the first crop) and September–December (third crop), and lower in March–June (second crop). Spatially, O{sub 3} was higher in downwind locations of HCMC and were comparable with observed data. Relative yield loss (RYL) was assessed for each crop over the respective growing period (105 days) using three metrics: AOT40, M7 and flux-based O{sub 3} dose of POD{sub 10}. Higher RYL was estimated for the downwind of HCMC. Overall, the rice production loss due to O{sub 3} exposure in the study domain in 2010 was the highest for the first crop (up to 25,800 metric tons), the second highest for the third crop (up to 21,500 tons) and the least for the second crop (up to 6800 tons). The low RYL obtained for the second crop by POD{sub 10} may be due to the use of a high threshold value (Y = 10 nmol m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). Linear regression between non-null radiation POD{sub 0} and POD{sub 10} had similar slopes for the first and third crop when POD{sub 0} was higher and very low slope for the second crop when POD{sub 0} was low. The results of this study can be used for the rice crop planning to avoid the period of potential high RYL due to O{sub 3} exposure. - Highlights: • Simulated O{sub 3} was used to assess rice yield loss in a domain of Southern Vietnam. • Exposure metrics of AOT40, M7, POD{sub 0} and POD{sub 10} were considered. • POD{sub 10} gave the highest rice production loss. • Higher production loss was found downwind of Ho Chi Minh City.

  11. The committed long-term sink of carbon due to vegetation changes may rival carbon losses due to permafrost thawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Thomas; Jones, Chris; Burton, Chantelle; Huntingford, Chris; Arneth, Almut; Lomas, Mark; Piao, Shilong; Sitch, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    The terrestrial biosphere provides an important sink of atmospheric carbon, the size and persistence of which is one of the largest uncertainties in future climate projections. However, the response of the biosphere to changes in its environment substantially lags the rate of environmental change in many aspects. Transient assessments of changes in ecosystem properties therefore do not capture the full magnitude of the response to which ecosystems are committed. Here an ensemble of Dynamic Global Vegetation Model and Earth System Model simulations is used to assess the magnitude of committed changes in tree cover and carbon storage, to attribute the drivers of uncertainty in these values, and to assess the likely magnitude and direction of committed changes in biospheric carbon stocks post 2100. The results show consistently large committed changes post-2100 in slow components of ecosystems, notably carbon stores and vegetation cover fractions, despite relatively small changes in productivity. In boreal locations, increases in vegetation and soil carbon storage may be large enough to offset committed carbon losses from thawing permafrost. As much of this committed sink results from increased biomass as a result of changes in vegetation composition, the results indicate a pressing need for vegetation dynamics, as well as the now widely-considered anthropogenic land cover change, to be more routinely represented in the coupled Earth System Models used to make future climate projections. However, the timescales over which committed changes in vegetation cover and biomass occur are highly uncertain, and represent a key limitation in assessing whether the simulated committed sink will be realised on human-relevant timescales. A move away from evaluating DGVMs in terms of their stable vegetation state, towards addressing their ability to capture transient responses, is advocated.

  12. Neutrino energy loss rates and positron capture rates on $^{55}$Co for presupernova and supernova physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; 10.1103/PhysRevC.77.055802

    2011-01-01

    Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently being used for calculation of stellar weak interaction rates of $fp$-shell nuclide with success. Neutrino losses from proto-neutron stars play a pivotal role to decide if these stars would be crushed into black holes or explode as supernovae. The product of abundance and positron capture rates on $^{55}$Co is substantial and as such can play a role in fine tuning of input parameters of simulation codes specially in the presupernova evolution. Recently we introduced our calculation of capture rates on $^{55}$Co, in a luxurious model space of $7 \\hbar \\omega$, employing the pn-QRPA theory with a separable interaction. Simulators, however, may require these rates on a fine scale. Here we present for the first time an expanded calculation of the neutrino energy loss rates and positron capture rates on $^{55}$Co on an extensive temperature-density scale. These type of scale is appropriate for interpolation purposes and of greate...

  13. Potential Economic Losses Due to Tidal Inundation and Flood at Semarang City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifan R Suhelmi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal city of Semarang is susceptible to the impact of coastal hazard due to its flat topographic condition. Various environmental problems are faced by Semarang involve tidal inundation, land subsidence, and floods during rainy season. This study was conducted to examine the potential economic losses caused by the sea level rise phenomenon. Distribution of inundated area mapped using Digital Elevation Model and Land Subsidence data. The Scenarios of International Panel on Climate Change (2007 sea level rises used to build a model of inundated area that notes by 2030 the rise of sea level rise at 13.4 cm. The inundated map was overlayed with landuse map to calculate the potential economic losses. The results show that the inundated area that occurred in 2030 was 1,718.2 ha with the potential economic losses Rp. 6,130 trillion. With the land subsidence scenario that happen at the area, inundated area increased to 5,171.3 ha with the eonomic potential loss about Rp. 28,724 trillion.

  14. Self-amplified Amazon forest loss due to vegetation-atmosphere feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Delphine Clara; Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Hirota, Marina; Montade, Vincent; Sampaio, Gilvan; Staal, Arie; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Rammig, Anja

    2017-03-01

    Reduced rainfall increases the risk of forest dieback, while in return forest loss might intensify regional droughts. The consequences of this vegetation-atmosphere feedback for the stability of the Amazon forest are still unclear. Here we show that the risk of self-amplified Amazon forest loss increases nonlinearly with dry-season intensification. We apply a novel complex-network approach, in which Amazon forest patches are linked by observation-based atmospheric water fluxes. Our results suggest that the risk of self-amplified forest loss is reduced with increasing heterogeneity in the response of forest patches to reduced rainfall. Under dry-season Amazonian rainfall reductions, comparable to Last Glacial Maximum conditions, additional forest loss due to self-amplified effects occurs in 10-13% of the Amazon basin. Although our findings do not indicate that the projected rainfall changes for the end of the twenty-first century will lead to complete Amazon dieback, they suggest that frequent extreme drought events have the potential to destabilize large parts of the Amazon forest.

  15. Overcoming loss of contrast in atom interferometry due to gravity gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Roura, Albert; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2014-01-01

    Long-time atom interferometry is instrumental to various high-precision measurements of fundamental physical properties, including tests of the equivalence principle. Due to rotations and gravity gradients, the classical trajectories characterizing the motion of the wave packets for the two branches of the interferometer do not close in phase space, an effect which increases significantly with the interferometer time. The relative displacement between the interfering wave packets in such open interferometers leads to a fringe pattern in the density profile at each exit port and a loss of contrast in the oscillations of the integrated particle number as a function of the phase shift. Paying particular attention to gravity gradients, we present a simple mitigation strategy involving small changes in the timing of the laser pulses which is very easy to implement. A useful representation-free description of the state evolution in an atom interferometer is introduced and employed to analyze the loss of contrast an...

  16. SimPLE.ca: Simulator of Productivity Loss due to Erosion for Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer, Eric; Greer, Ken J.; Black, Malcolm; Townley-Smith, Lawrence; Malhi, S. S.; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Larney, F. J.

    2008-05-01

    Robust and practical estimates of the impact of soil erosion on crop productivity are essential for developing and implementing appropriate solutions for soil erosion on agricultural land. The objective of this study was to develop a simple model which captured the most important relationships between topsoil erosion and productivity loss for major agricultural regions of Canada. The model was developed for spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and corn (Zea mays L.). Using annual time steps, maximum crop yields were reduced by soil erosion due to losses in available water-holding capacity, N-mineralization potential and available P. Using minimal input data, the model accounted for 56% of the variation in relative yields (fraction of non-eroded controls) determined in field studies using desurfacing or comparison plot methods.

  17. Nonlinear absorption due to linear loss and magnetic permeability in metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yuanjiang; Dai, Xiaoyu; Wen, Shuangchun; Guo, Jun

    2012-06-01

    We predict theoretically that linear magnetic permeability induces nonlinear absorption (NA) of an electric field in lossy metamaterials (MMs) with Kerr-type nonlinear polarization even when the imaginary part of the nonlinear polarization is absent. The nonlinear magnetic susceptibility, if it exists and although it may be real, enhances or reduces the NA of the electric field, depending on the relative values of the electric and magnetic losses. In particular, it is shown that the NA effect can be tuned by the figure of merit (FOM) of the MM: generally, MMs with a better FOM have a weaker NA effect. Moreover, the nonlinear coefficient can also be enhanced greatly due to the combined effect of the linear losses and the nonlinear magnetization of MMs. The control of the tunable NA and nonlinear coefficients by the structural parameters of MMs is also discussed.

  18. Micromechanical modeling of master curve temperature shifts due to constraint loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odette, G. R.; He, M. Y.

    2002-12-01

    The effects of constitutive and local fracture properties on constraint loss effects in fracture toughness tests of small specimens was carried out within the framework of the MC-Δ T method. Constraint loss (CL) decreases the temperature at a specified reference toughness. This temperature shift increases with decreasing: (a) specimen size, (b) ratio of the critical cleavage stress to yield stress and (c) strain hardening. The toughness-temperature curve shift due to CL increases with higher reference toughness and reference toughness-temperature. These results can guide the development and interpretation of small specimen fracture tests, as well as the use of even smaller specimens for particular applications, like comparative studies of irradiation variable effects on embrittlement. While they are only briefly noted in this work, additional consideration of both statistical and three dimensional size effects will be carried out in the future.

  19. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  20. North-south differences in Chinese agricultural losses due to climate-change-influenced droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zhang; Lanying, Han; Jingjing, Lin; Qingyan, Cheng

    2016-12-01

    One of the effects of global climate change is increase in the frequency and severity of drought, which strongly affects the Chinese agricultural production. In order to cope these changes more effectively, it is important to document and analyze the agricultural losses caused by drought. We collected and analyzed conventional meteorological data and agricultural statistics data, in order to outline trends in drought occurrence and decline in agricultural yield. Data were assembled for the period 1960-2010. The study pays particular attention to regional differences between northern and southern China. Our results show the drought-caused agricultural loss rates (DCALR) in China have increased by approximately 0.5% per decade in the past 50 years. The study area in this paper is for the whole of the People's Republic of China, minus the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau; when we analyzed regional differences, we found that losses increased by approximately 0.6% per decade in northern China, close to twice the increase in southern China. Moreover, drought risks and agricultural losses are rising faster in northern China. Our results also indicate that the agriculture in northern China is more sensitive to changes in precipitation, whereas the agriculture in southern China is more sensitive to temperature changes.

  1. Loss of water transport capacity due to xylem cavitation in roots of two CAM succulents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, M J; Nobel, P S

    1999-11-01

    Loss of axial hydraulic conductance as a result of xylem cavitation was examined for roots of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) succulents Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica. Vulnerability to cavitation was not correlated with either root size or vessel diameter. Agave deserti had a mean cavitation pressure of -0.93 ± 0.08 MPa by both an air-injection and a centrifugal method compared to -0.70 ± 0.02 MPa by the centrifugal method for O. ficus-indica, reflecting the greater tolerance of the former species to low water potentials in its native habitat. Substantial xylem cavitation would occur at a soil water potential of -0.25 MPa, resulting in a predicted 22% loss of conductance for A. deserti and 32% for O. ficus-indica. For an extended drought of 3 mo, further cavitation could cause a 69% loss of conductance for A. deserti and 62% for O. ficus-indica. A model of axial hydraulic flow based upon the cavitation response of these species predicted that water uptake rates are far below the maximum possible, owing to the high root water potentials of these desert succulents. Despite various shoot adaptations to aridity, roots of A. deserti and O. ficus-indica are highly vulnerable to cavitation, which partially limits water uptake in a wet soil but helps reduce water loss to a drying soil.

  2. Mass loss rate determinations of southern OB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Benaglia, P; Koribalski, B S

    2001-01-01

    A sample of OB stars (eleven Of, one O and one B supergiant) has been surveyed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 4.8 and 8.64 GHz with a resolution of 2'' -- 4''. Five stars were detected; three of them have negative spectral indices, consistent with non-thermal emission, and two have positive indices. The thermal radiation from HD 150135 and HD 163181 can be explained as coming from an optically thick ionized stellar wind. The non-thermal radiation from CD-47 4551, HD 124314 and HD 150136 possibly comes from strong shocks in the wind itself and/or in the wind colliding region if the stars have a massive early-type companion. The percentage of non-thermal emitters among detected O stars has increased up to ~50%. The Of star HD 124314 clearly shows flux density variations. Mass loss rates (or upper limits) were derived for all the observed stars and the results compared with non-radio measurements and theoretical predictions.

  3. Milk losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata infection) in Algeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouarda Ayadi; Mohamed Gharbi

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied the impact of tropical theileriosis onset on milk yield decrease in 10 local bred cows in Skikda (Northern Algeria) during 2015 summer season. The milk yield decrease estimated weekly during two months was 2.76 L/day/cow corresponding to 31.92%of the total milk yield. This decrease corresponds to 110.5 Algerian Dinars (1.02 US$)/day/diseased cow. The relative variation of milk yield showed a dramatic decrease from 82.72% to 0.76% at Day 21 then became constant. Further studies are needed to improve these estimations of financial losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis in Algeria.

  4. The impact of reduced mass loss rates on the evolution of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschi, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Mass loss is a very important aspect of the life of massive stars. After briefly reviewing its importance, we discuss the impact of the recently proposed downward revision of mass loss rates due to clumping (difficulty to form Wolf-Rayet stars and production of critically rotating stars). Although a small reduction might be allowed, large reduction factors around ten are disfavoured. We then discuss the possibility of significant mass loss at very low metallicity due to stars reaching break-up velocities and especially due to the metal enrichment of the surface of the star via rotational and convective mixing. This significant mass loss may help the first very massive stars avoid the fate of pair-creation supernova, the chemical signature of which is not observed in extremely metal poor stars. The chemical composition of the very low metallicity winds is very similar to that of the most metal poor star known to date, HE1327-2326 and offer an interesting explanation for the origin of the metals in this star. W...

  5. Housing arrangement and location determine the likelihood of housing loss due to wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Keeley, Jon E.; Massada, Avi Bar; Brennan, Teresa J.; Radeloff, Volker C.

    2012-01-01

    Surging wildfires across the globe are contributing to escalating residential losses and have major social, economic, and ecological consequences. The highest losses in the U.S. occur in southern California, where nearly 1000 homes per year have been destroyed by wildfires since 2000. Wildfire risk reduction efforts focus primarily on fuel reduction and, to a lesser degree, on house characteristics and homeowner responsibility. However, the extent to which land use planning could alleviate wildfire risk has been largely missing from the debate despite large numbers of homes being placed in the most hazardous parts of the landscape. Our goal was to examine how housing location and arrangement affects the likelihood that a home will be lost when a wildfire occurs. We developed an extensive geographic dataset of structure locations, including more than 5500 structures that were destroyed or damaged by wildfire since 2001, and identified the main contributors to property loss in two extensive, fire-prone regions in southern California. The arrangement and location of structures strongly affected their susceptibility to wildfire, with property loss most likely at low to intermediate structure densities and in areas with a history of frequent fire. Rates of structure loss were higher when structures were surrounded by wildland vegetation, but were generally higher in herbaceous fuel types than in higher fuel-volume woody types. Empirically based maps developed using housing pattern and location performed better in distinguishing hazardous from non-hazardous areas than maps based on fuel distribution. The strong importance of housing arrangement and location indicate that land use planning may be a critical tool for reducing fire risk, but it will require reliable delineations of the most hazardous locations.

  6. Housing arrangement and location determine the likelihood of housing loss due to wildfire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra D Syphard

    Full Text Available Surging wildfires across the globe are contributing to escalating residential losses and have major social, economic, and ecological consequences. The highest losses in the U.S. occur in southern California, where nearly 1000 homes per year have been destroyed by wildfires since 2000. Wildfire risk reduction efforts focus primarily on fuel reduction and, to a lesser degree, on house characteristics and homeowner responsibility. However, the extent to which land use planning could alleviate wildfire risk has been largely missing from the debate despite large numbers of homes being placed in the most hazardous parts of the landscape. Our goal was to examine how housing location and arrangement affects the likelihood that a home will be lost when a wildfire occurs. We developed an extensive geographic dataset of structure locations, including more than 5500 structures that were destroyed or damaged by wildfire since 2001, and identified the main contributors to property loss in two extensive, fire-prone regions in southern California. The arrangement and location of structures strongly affected their susceptibility to wildfire, with property loss most likely at low to intermediate structure densities and in areas with a history of frequent fire. Rates of structure loss were higher when structures were surrounded by wildland vegetation, but were generally higher in herbaceous fuel types than in higher fuel-volume woody types. Empirically based maps developed using housing pattern and location performed better in distinguishing hazardous from non-hazardous areas than maps based on fuel distribution. The strong importance of housing arrangement and location indicate that land use planning may be a critical tool for reducing fire risk, but it will require reliable delineations of the most hazardous locations.

  7. Vertical and horizontal bedrock displacements near Jakobshavn Isbræ due to glacial ice mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Wahr, John; Liu, Lin;

    2011-01-01

    Jakobshavn Isbræ. All stations experienced uplift, but the uplift rate at Kangia North, only 5 km from the glacier front, was about 10 mm/yr larger than the rate at Ilulissat, located only 45 km further away. This suggests that most of the uplift is due to the unloading of the Earth’s surface as Jakobshavn...... thins and loses mass. The observed rates are consistent with a glacier thinning model based on repeat altimeter surveys from NASA’s Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), which shows that Jakobshavn lost mass at an average rate of 22 +- 2 km3/yr between 2006 and 2009. The fact that the GPS uplift rates...

  8. Food loss rate in food supply chain using material flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Munsol; Osako, Masahiro; Harashina, Sachihiko

    2017-03-01

    The food loss rate is a factor that represents food consumption efficiency. To improve food consumption efficiency, we need to fundamentally quantify food loss at national and global levels. This study examines food and food waste flow and calculates the food loss rate in the food supply chain by targeting Japan. We analyzed inedible food waste and avoidable food losses in wholesale, manufacturing, retail, food services, and households and considered different supply chain pathways, different food categories representing whole Japanese meals, and weight changes after cooking. The results are as follows: (1) Japan has an overall rate of avoidable food losses of approximately 15% for meals (excluding agricultural losses), (2) the supply sector with the highest food loss rate is food services, and (3) the food category with the highest food loss rate is vegetables. Finally, we proposed a model for calculating food loss rates that could be used for future analysis in Japan or other countries.

  9. Evaluation of Mismatch Losses due to Shunts in industrial Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaran, P.; Shilpi, M.; Gupta, R.

    2017-05-01

    In order to achieve higher efficiencies in photovoltaic module technology, it is important to characterize the shunts and other defects which degrade the performance of cells and modules as well as decrease their efficiency. These shunts also affect the reliability of cells and modules. It is important to understand how much fill factor and power loss is caused by the presence of shunts in the module. Shunts not only reduce the module power output, but also affect the I-V characteristics of the cell and hence the characteristics of the shunted cells are different from those of the shunt-free cells connected in the module leading to the mismatch effect. This is an interesting effect which has been systematically investigated in the present work. Moreover, the flow of increased shunt current will give rise to increased temperature in the region of shunt, which will affect the cell and hence module performance. In the present study, the distributed diode model has been extended to the module level and applied to evaluate the electrical mismatch losses and thermal mismatch losses due to shunts in industrial Silicon PV modules.

  10. On the loss-of-correlation due to PIV image noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnowski, Sven; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of image noise on the uncertainty of velocity fields measured with particle image velocimetry (PIV) is still an unsolved problem. Image noise reduces the correlation signal and thus affects the estimation of the particle image displacement. However, a systematic quantification of the effect of the noise level on the loss-of-correlation is missing. In this work, a new method is proposed to estimate the loss-of-correlation due to image noise F_{σ } from the autocorrelation function of PIV images. Furthermore, a new definition of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for PIV images is suggested, which results in a bijective relation between F_{σ } and SNR. Based on the newly defined SNR, it becomes possible to estimate the signal level and the noise level itself. The presented method is very general because the estimation of F_{σ } and SNR works independently of various parameters, including the particle image intensity, the particle image density, the particle image size, the image noise distributions and the laser light-sheet profile. The findings lead to an extension of the fundamental PIV equation N=NI FI FO F_{Δ } and enable PIV users to optimize their measurement setup with respect to the image noise and not only based on the loss-of-correlation due to in-plane motion, out-of-plane motion and displacement gradients. Furthermore, the new definition of SNR allows for a characterization and comparison of PIV images. The new approaches are validated by using synthetic images, and the predictions are confirmed by using experimental data.

  11. Empirical mass-loss rates for 25 O and early B stars, derived from Copernicus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathier, R.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Snow, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet line profiles are fitted with theoretical line profiles in the cases of 25 stars covering a spectral type range from O4 to B1, including all luminosity classes. Ion column densities are compared for the determination of wind ionization, and it is found that the O VI/N V ratio is dependent on the mean density of the wind and not on effective temperature value, while the Si IV/N V ratio is temperature-dependent. The column densities are used to derive a mass-loss rate parameter that is empirically correlated against the mass-loss rate by means of standard stars with well-determined rates from IR or radio data. The empirical mass-loss rates obtained are compared with those derived by others and found to vary by as much as a factor of 10, which is shown to be due to uncertainties or errors in the ionization fractions of models used for wind ionization balance prediction.

  12. [Postoperative visual loss due to conversion disorder after spine surgery: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Dailson Mamede; Bezerra, Eglantine Mamede; Silva Junior, Antonio Jorge; Amorim, Marco Aurélio Soares; Miranda, Denismar Borges de

    2016-01-21

    Patients undergoing spinal surgeries may develop postoperative visual loss. We present a case of total bilateral visual loss in a patient who, despite having clinical and surgical risk factors for organic lesion, evolved with visual disturbance due to conversion disorder. A male patient, 39 years old, 71kg, 1.72 m, ASA I, admitted to undergo fusion and discectomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. Venoclysis, cardioscopy, oximetry, NIBP; induction with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium; intubation with ETT (8.0mm) followed by capnography and urinary catheterization for diuresis. Maintenance with full target-controlled intravenous anesthesia. During fixation and laminectomy, the patient developed severe bleeding and hypovolemic shock. After 30minutes, hemostasis and hemodynamic stability was achieved with infusion of norepinephrine, volume expansion, and blood products. In the ICU, the patient developed mental confusion, weakness in the limbs, and bilateral visual loss. It was not possible to identify clinical, laboratory or image findings of organic lesion. He evolved with episodes of anxiety, emotional lability, and language impairment; the hypothesis of conversion syndrome with visual component was raised after psychiatric evaluation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after visual education and introduction of low doses of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and benzodiazepine. Other symptoms also regressed, and the patient was discharged 12 days after surgery. After 60 days, the patient had no more symptoms. Conversion disorders may have different signs and symptoms of non-organic origin, including visual component. It is noteworthy that the occurrence of this type of visual dysfunction in the postoperative period of spinal surgery is a rare event and should be remembered as a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Yield loss assessment due to Alternaria blight and its management in linseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R B; Singh, H K; Parmar, Arpita

    2014-04-01

    Field experiments were conducted during 2010-11 and 2011-12 to assess the yield losses due to Alternaria blight disease caused by Alternaria lini and A. linicola in recently released cultivars and their management with the integration of Trichoderma viride, fungicides and plant extract. Disease severity on leaves varied from 41.07% (Parvati) to 65.01% (Chambal) while bud damage per cent ranged between 23.56% (Shekhar) to 46.12% (T-397), respectively in different cultivars. Maximum yield loss of 58.44% was recorded in cultivar Neelum followed by Parvati (55.56%), Meera (55.56%) and Chambal (51.72%), respectively while minimum loss was recorded in Kiran (19.99%) and Jeevan (22.22%). Minimum mean disease severity (19.47%) with maximum disease control (69.74%) was recorded with the treatment: seed treatment (ST) with vitavax power (2 g kg(-1) seed) + 2 foliar sprays (FS) of Saaf (a mixture of carbendazim+mancozeb) 0.2% followed by ST with Trichoderma viride (4g kg(-1) seed) + 2 FS of Saaf (0.2%). Minimum bud damage (13.75%) with maximum control (60.94%) was recorded with treatment of ST with vitavax power+2 FS of propiconazole (0.2%). Maximum mean seed yield (1440 kg ha(-1)) with maximum net return (Rs. 15352/ha) and benefit cost ratio (1:11.04) was obtained with treatment ST with vitavax power + 2 FS of Neem leaf extract followed by treatment ST with vitavax power+2 FS of Saaf (1378 kg ha(-1)).

  14. Milk losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata infection in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouarda Ayadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the impact of tropical theileriosis onset on milk yield decrease in 10 local bred cows in Skikda (Northern Algeria during 2015 summer season. The milk yield decrease estimated weekly during two months was 2.76 L/day/cow corresponding to 31.92% of the total milk yield. This decrease corresponds to 110.5 Algerian Dinars (1.02 US$/day/diseased cow. The relative variation of milk yield showed a dramatic decrease from 82.72% to 0.76% at Day 21 then became constant. Further studies are needed to improve these estimations of financial losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis in Algeria.

  15. Visual loss due to paranasal sinus invasive aspergillosis in a diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, George; Gkinis, George; Dais, Panayotis; Stathopoulos, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus species are commonly found in the soil and decaying organic matter. The spores can be typically inhaled or ingested, yet disease due to tissue invasion is rarely seen in the immunocompetent host. In the immunocompromised patient, there has been an increased incidence of invasive aspergillosis in the last 20 years. Invasive aspergillosis of the maxillary sinus with orbital and cranial spread can be lethal, therefore, necessitates early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The predilection of Aspergillus for infiltration of blood vessels can result in serious ocular complications which can lead to loss of vision. We present the case of an uncontrolled diabetic patient with invasive maxillary sinus aspergillosis and extension to the orbital contents. Our purpose was to emphasize the need of early recognition and prompt initiation of combined antifungal treatment and surgical intervention with the intent to preserve the involved vital structures.

  16. Assessment of the Personal Losses Suffered by Correctional Officers due to Burnout Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanova, R G; Harizanova, S N

    2016-01-01

    Professional burnout is defined as a state of depletion and loss of motivation accompanied by different mental and physical symptoms. To assess personal losses suffered by correctional officers due to burnout. This cross-sectional study conducted between June and December 2012 included 201 correctional officers in two Bulgarian prisons. The mean age of the whole group was 41.2 (SD 8.0) years. The respondents was mostly male (56.7%), married (72.6%), had a secondary educational level (61.7%), and 76.1% of them had been in current prison work over 5 years. The demographic characteristics had no influence on the occurrence of burnout but there was a correlation between level of burnout and the number of sick-leaves, the need for medical help, and the expenses spent on medications. Officers affected by burnout took more sick-leaves and this affected adversely their remuneration as they lost 3.1% of their annual wages. Their expenses spent on user fees for medical services were 3 times higher. Their monthly expenses spent on medications were 3.14 times higher than those of people without the burnout syndrome. The high level of burnout has a negative personal economic effect on the prison employees.

  17. Estimating the loss in expectation of life due to cancer using flexible parametric survival models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese M-L; Dickman, Paul W; Eloranta, Sandra; Lambe, Mats; Lambert, Paul C

    2013-12-30

    A useful summary measure for survival data is the expectation of life, which is calculated by obtaining the area under a survival curve. The loss in expectation of life due to a certain type of cancer is the difference between the expectation of life in the general population and the expectation of life among the cancer patients. This measure is used little in practice as its estimation generally requires extrapolation of both the expected and observed survival. A parametric distribution can be used for extrapolation of the observed survival, but it is difficult to find a distribution that captures the underlying shape of the survival function after the end of follow-up. In this paper, we base our extrapolation on relative survival, because it is more stable and reliable. Relative survival is defined as the observed survival divided by the expected survival, and the mortality analogue is excess mortality. Approaches have been suggested for extrapolation of relative survival within life-table data, by assuming that the excess mortality has reached zero (statistical cure) or has stabilized to a constant. We propose the use of flexible parametric survival models for relative survival, which enables estimating the loss in expectation of life on individual level data by making these assumptions or by extrapolating the estimated linear trend at the end of follow-up. We have evaluated the extrapolation from this model using data on four types of cancer, and the results agree well with observed data.

  18. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse Presenting as Complete Monocular Vision Loss due to Optic Nerve Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam A. Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML involvement of the central nervous system is relatively rare, and detection of leptomeningeal disease typically occurs only after a patient presents with neurological symptoms. The case herein describes a 48-year-old man with relapsed/refractory AML of the mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement subtype, who presents with monocular vision loss due to leukemic eye infiltration. MRI revealed right optic nerve sheath enhancement and restricted diffusion concerning for nerve ischemia and infarct from hypercellularity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis showed a total WBC count of 81/mcl with 96% AML blasts. The onset and progression of visual loss were in concordance with rise in peripheral blood blast count. A low threshold for diagnosis of CSF involvement should be maintained in patients with hyperleukocytosis and high-risk cytogenetics so that prompt treatment with whole brain radiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can be delivered. This case suggests that the eye, as an immunoprivileged site, may serve as a sanctuary from which leukemic cells can resurge and contribute to relapsed disease in patients with high-risk cytogenetics.

  19. Implications of mass and energy loss due to coronal mass ejections on magnetically-active stars

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Jeremy J; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power law relationships between the 1-8 AA flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE=kE^-alpha. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of alpha and are very large: M_dot ~ 5x10^-10 M_sun/yr and E_dot ~ 0.1L_sun. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence >~ 10^31 erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energ...

  20. Assessment of the Personal Losses Suffered by Correctional Officers due to Burnout Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG Stoyanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional burnout is defined as a state of depletion and loss of motivation accompanied by different mental and physical symptoms. Objective: To assess personal losses suffered by correctional officers due to burnout. Methods: This cross-sectional study conducted between June and December 2012 included 201 correctional officers in two Bulgarian prisons. The mean age of the whole group was 41.2 (SD 8.0 years. The respondents was mostly male (56.7%, married (72.6%, had a secondary educational level (61.7%, and 76.1% of them had been in current prison work over 5 years. Results: The demographic characteristics had no influence on the occurrence of burnout but there was a correlation between level of burnout and the number of sick-leaves, the need for medical help, and the expenses spent on medications. Officers affected by burnout took more sick-leaves and this affected adversely their remuneration as they lost 3.1% of their annual wages. Their expenses spent on user fees for medical services were 3 times higher. Their monthly expenses spent on medications were 3.14 times higher than those of people without the burnout syndrome. Conclusion: The high level of burnout has a negative personal economic effect on the prison employees.

  1. GPS measurements of crustal uplift near Jakobshavn Isbræ due to glacial ice mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Liu, Lin; Wahr, John;

    2010-01-01

    Isbræ. All stations experienced uplift, but the uplift rate at Kangia North, only 5 km from the glacier front, was about 10 mm yr−1 larger than the rate at Ilulissat, located only ∼45 km further away. This suggests that most of the uplift is due to the unloading of the Earth’s surface as Jakobshavn...... thins and loses mass. Our estimate of Jakobshavn’s contribution to uplift rates at Kangia North and Ilulissat are 14.6 ± 1.7 mm yr−1 and 4.9 ± 1.1 mm yr−1, respectively. The observed rates are consistent with a glacier thinning model based on repeat altimeter surveys from NASA’s Airborne Topographic...... Mapper (ATM), which shows that Jakobshavn lost mass at an average rate of 22 ± 2 km3 yr−1 between 2006 and 2009. At Kangia North and Ilulissat, the predicted uplift rates computed using thinning estimates from the ATM laser altimetry are 12.1 ± 0.9 mm yr−1 and 3.2 ± 0.3 mm yr−1, respectively...

  2. The spectrum of epilepsy and electroencephalographic abnormalities due to SHANK3 loss-of-function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J Lloyd; Quach, Michael M

    2016-10-01

    The coincidence of autism with epilepsy is 27% in those individuals with intellectual disability.(1) Individuals with loss-of-function mutations in SHANK3 have intellectual disability, autism, and variably, epilepsy.(2-5) The spectrum of seizure semiologies and electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities has never been investigated in detail. With the recent report that SHANK3 mutations are present in approximately 2% of individuals with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities and 1% of individuals with autism, determining the spectrum of seizure semiologies and electrographic abnormalities will be critical for medical practitioners to appropriately counsel the families of patients with SHANK3 mutations. A retrospective chart review was performed of all individuals treated at the Blue Bird Circle Clinic for Child Neurology who have been identified as having either a chromosome 22q13 microdeletion encompassing SHANK3 or a loss-of-function mutation in SHANK3 identified through whole-exome sequencing. For each subject, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure semiology, frequency, age of onset, and efficacy of therapy were determined. Electroencephalography studies were reviewed by a board certified neurophysiologist. Neuroimaging was reviewed by both a board certified pediatric neuroradiologist and child neurologist. There is a wide spectrum of seizure semiologies, frequencies, and severity in individuals with SHANK3 mutations. There are no specific EEG abnormalities found in our cohort, and EEG abnormalities were present in individuals diagnosed with epilepsy and those without history of a clinical seizure. All individuals with a mutation in SHANK3 should be evaluated for epilepsy due to the high prevalence of seizures in this population. The most common semiology is atypical absence seizure, which can be challenging to identify due to comorbid intellectual disability in individuals with SHANK3 mutations; however, no consistent seizure semiology

  3. The time aspect of bioenergy. Climate impacts of bioenergy due to differences in carbon uptake rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zetterberg, Lars [IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Chen, Deliang [Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    This paper investigates the climate impacts from bioenergy due to how they influence carbon stocks over time and more specifically how fast combustion related carbon emissions are compensated by uptake of atmospheric carbon. A set of fuel types representing different uptake rates are investigated, namely willow, branches and tops, stumps and coal. Net emissions are defined as emissions from utilizing the fuel minus emissions from a reference case of no utilisation. In the case of forest residues, the compensating 'uptake' is avoided emissions from the reference case of leaving the residues to decompose on the ground. Climate impacts are estimated using the measures radiative forcing and global average surface temperature, which have been calculated by an energy balance climate model. We conclude that there is a climate impact from using bioenergy due to how fast the emission pulse is compensated by uptake of atmospheric carbon (or avoided emissions). Biofuels with slower uptake rates have a stronger climate impact than fuels with a faster uptake rate, assuming all other parameters equal. The time perspective over which the analysis is done is crucial for the climate impact of biofuels. If only biogenic fluxes are considered, our results show that over a 100 year perspective branches and tops are better for climate mitigation than stumps which in turn are better than coal. Over a 20 year time perspective this conclusion holds, but the differences between these fuels are relatively smaller. Establishing willow on earlier crop land may reduce atmospheric carbon, provided new land is available. However, these results are inconclusive since we haven't considered the effects, if needed, of producing the traditional agricultural crops elsewhere. The analysis is not a life cycle assessment of different fuels and does therefore not consider the use of fossil fuels for logging, transportation and refining, other greenhouse gases than carbon or energy

  4. Decline of the performance of a portable axial-flow fan due to the friction and duct bending loss of a connected flexible duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2017-03-28

    In a job site, a portable fan is often used to ventilate a confined space. When a portable fan is applied to such a space, the actual ventilation flow rate must be accurately estimated in advance because the safety level of contaminant and oxygen concentrations in the space will determine the ventilation requirements. When a portable fan is used with a flexible duct, the actual flow rate of the fan decreases due to the friction and duct bending loss of the duct. Intending to show the decline of a fan performance, the author conducted laboratory experiments and reported the quantitative effect of the friction and duct bending loss of a flexible duct to the flow rate of a portable fan. Four commercial portable fans of different specifications were procured for the experiments, and the decline of the performance of each portable fan due to the friction loss etc. of a connected flexible duct was investigated by measuring actual flow rate. The flow rate showed an obvious decrease from the rated flow rate when a flexible duct was connected. Connection of a straight polyester flexible duct and a straight aluminum flexible duct reduced the flow rates to 81.2 - 52.9% and less than 50%, respectively. The flow rate decreased with an increase of the bend angle of the flexible duct. It is recommended that flow rate check of a portable fan should be diligently carried out in every job site.

  5. Assessment of soil loss and nutrient depletion due to cassava harvesting: A case study from low input traditional agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sumithra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is a major food crop for farmers and especially small holder farmers and cultivated under low input other than the irrigation. It is cultivated as mono crop or intercrop at early stage and cultivating throughout the year. It is harvested carefully because of cyanogenic glucosides and consumed with in day. Easy and un-damageable uprooting of the tuber mainly depends on soil moisture, texture and agronomic practices. The study was focused with the objectives of the assessment of soil loss due to the harvesting of cassava roots tubers under low input agriculture, and to estimate the amount of plant nutrients loss due to crop harvest for cassava. Also the observation was made the correlation between the soil loss and physical characters of the tuber, soil texture and agronomic practices. Average plant specific soil loss due to crop harvesting was 80. 7 g root−1 and crop specific soil loss due to crop harvesting was 7. 64 kg ha−1 harvest−1 loss in Valliagmam area in Jaffna, Sri Lanka. Soil moisture content at harvesting time was a significant factor that explained the variations in the soil lost at cassava harvesting. Soil moisture has linear positive relationship with average plant specific soil loss due to crop harvesting. Soil nutrient loss during cassava harvesting by removal of adhering soil with root tuber was 1. 15 kg of N, 1. 99 kg of P and 2. 91 kg of K ha−1 harvest−1. Application of fertilizer is important since considerable amount nutrient loss was observed due to soil loss due to crop harvest.

  6. Loss of soil (macro)fauna due to the expansion of Brazilian sugarcane acreage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, André L C; Bartz, Marie L C; Cherubin, Maurício R; Baretta, Dilmar; Cerri, Carlos E P; Feigl, Brigitte J; Wall, Diana H; Davies, Christian A; Cerri, Carlos C

    2016-09-01

    Land use changes (LUC) from pasture to sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) crop are expected to add 6.4Mha of new sugarcane land by 2021 in the Brazilian Cerrado and Atlantic Forest biomes. We assessed the effects of these LUC on the abundance and community structure of animals that inhabit soils belowground through a field survey using chronosequences of land uses comprising native vegetation, pasture, and sugarcane along a 1000-km-long transect across these two major tropical biomes in Brazil. Macrofauna community composition differed among land uses. While most groups were associated with samples taken in native vegetation, high abundance of termites and earthworms appeared associated with pasture soils. Linear mixed effects analysis showed that LUC affected total abundance (X(2)(1)=6.79, p=0.03) and taxa richness (X(2)(1)=6.08, p=0.04) of soil macrofauna. Abundance increased from 411±70individualsm(-2) in native vegetation to 1111±202individualsm(-2) in pasture, but decreased sharply to 106±24individualsm(-2) in sugarcane soils. Diversity decreased 24% from native vegetation to pasture, and 39% from pasture to sugarcane. Thus, a reduction of ~90% in soil macrofauna abundance, besides a loss of ~40% in the diversity of macrofauna groups, can be expected when sugarcane crops replace pasture in Brazilian tropical soils. In general, higher abundances of major macrofauna groups (ants, coleopterans, earthworms, and termites) were associated with higher acidity and low contents of macronutrients and organic matter in soil. This study draws attention for a significant biodiversity loss belowground due to tropical LUC in sugarcane expansion areas. Given that many groups of soil macrofauna are recognized as key mediators of ecosystem processes such as soil aggregation, nutrients cycling and soil carbon storage, our results warrant further efforts to understand the impacts of altering belowground biodiversity and composition on soil functioning and agriculture performance

  7. Determination of tropical deforestation rates and related carbon losses from 1990 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achard, Frédéric; Beuchle, René; Mayaux, Philippe; Stibig, Hans-Jürgen; Bodart, Catherine; Brink, Andreas; Carboni, Silvia; Desclée, Baudouin; Donnay, François; Eva, Hugh D; Lupi, Andrea; Raši, Rastislav; Seliger, Roman; Simonetti, Dario

    2014-08-01

    We estimate changes in forest cover (deforestation and forest regrowth) in the tropics for the two last decades (1990-2000 and 2000-2010) based on a sample of 4000 units of 10 ×10 km size. Forest cover is interpreted from satellite imagery at 30 × 30 m resolution. Forest cover changes are then combined with pan-tropical biomass maps to estimate carbon losses. We show that there was a gross loss of tropical forests of 8.0 million ha yr(-1) in the 1990s and 7.6 million ha yr(-1) in the 2000s (0.49% annual rate), with no statistically significant difference. Humid forests account for 64% of the total forest cover in 2010 and 54% of the net forest loss during second study decade. Losses of forest cover and Other Wooded Land (OWL) cover result in estimates of carbon losses which are similar for 1990s and 2000s at 887 MtC yr(-1) (range: 646-1238) and 880 MtC yr(-1) (range: 602-1237) respectively, with humid regions contributing two-thirds. The estimates of forest area changes have small statistical standard errors due to large sample size. We also reduce uncertainties of previous estimates of carbon losses and removals. Our estimates of forest area change are significantly lower as compared to national survey data. We reconcile recent low estimates of carbon emissions from tropical deforestation for early 2000s and show that carbon loss rates did not change between the two last decades. Carbon losses from deforestation represent circa 10% of Carbon emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production during the last decade (2000-2010). Our estimates of annual removals of carbon from forest regrowth at 115 MtC yr(-1) (range: 61-168) and 97 MtC yr(-1) (53-141) for the 1990s and 2000s respectively are five to fifteen times lower than earlier published estimates. © The Authors Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Energy loss of a fast-electron beam due to the excitation of collective oscillation in hot plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jin-Yi; Qiu Xi-Jun; Zhu Zhi-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    Energy loss due to a fast-electron beam interacting with the hot plasma at a high density is analysed theoretically.By splitting the particle density fluctuations into the individual part due to the random thermal motion of the individual electrons and the collective part due to plasma-wave excitation, we are concerned with the collective interaction of the relativistic plasma electrons resulting from the Coulomb interactions. Consequently, we derive the frequency of the hot plasma and the "Debye length" with the modification of the relativistic effect. And finally we calculate the energy loss of a fast-electron beam due to the excitation of collective oscillation in the hot plasma.

  9. Poultry performance in different grazing densities: forage characteristics, losses due to grazing and feed intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Cristiano França

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characteristics of three forage species grazed by rustic poultry in stocking were evaluated. Coast-cross fodder, kikuyu grass, and stylosanthes were planted in 33-m2 paddocks with two densities (m2/animal: D1 = 3m2/animal and D2 = 1m2/animal. The design was a randomized complete block with a 3 x 2 factorial (three grasses and two densities and three replications. Grass canopy height, grass mass, morphological composition (leaf, stem, and dead material, losses due to grazing, poultry weight gain and consumption, and concentrate feed conversion ratio and efficiency were evaluated. At the end of the experiment, forage and leaves masses were considered low to stylosanthes in D2 (0.28 to 0.03 kg/m2 and to kikuyu grass in D1 (0.13 to 0.05 kg/m2 and in D2 (0.11 and 0.03 kg/m2, respectively. In addition, the grass canopy height was considered low for stylosanthes (6.50 cm that could jeopardize the entry of new poultry lot. The three grass species had similar weight gain and revealed better results for 3m²/ chicken (3.20 kg/animal. Coast-cross fodder, kikuyu grass, and stylosanthes, with some exceptions, can be considered suitable for grazing fattening poultry at 3m2/animal at the evaluated time of the year (autumn.

  10. Role of odanacatib in reducing bone loss due to endodontic disease: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahuguna, Rachana; Jain, Atul; Khan, Suleman Abbas; Arvind, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Through a comprehensive literature review, this article provides an overview of the potential role of odanacatib (ODN) in reducing bone loss due to endodontic disease. Materials and Methods: A literature review was performed in PubMed Central, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EBSCO databases. The articles identified included those published between 2002 and 2016. Based on the predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, out of 237 articles found, 50 were selected for this review. Results: Cathepsin K (CstK), which is indispensible to the immune system, also plays an important role in osteoclastic bone resorption. ODN, which is an orally active, selective, and effective inhibitor of CstK, decreases bone resorption by selectively inhibiting proteolysis of matrix proteins by CstK, without affecting other osteoclastic activity or osteoblast viability. Conclusion: The goal of endodontic treatment is to achieve a clinically asymptomatic state along with formation of reparative bone. This process could take 6 months or longer, hence, an earlier reversal of the resorption process could lead to faster healing and resolution of the periapical lesion. Use of ODN can be of help in achieving this goal. PMID:28217533

  11. Economic losses to buildings due to tsunami impact: the case of Rhodes city, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Ioanna; Novikova, Tatyana; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos

    2017-04-01

    The expected economic losses to buildings due to the tsunami impact is of particular importance for the tsunami risk management. However, only few efforts can be found in this direction. In this study we approached this issue selecting the city of Rhodes Isl., Greece, as a test-site. The methodological steps followed include (a) selection of worst case scenario in the study area based on the tsunami history of the area which includes several powerful events, e.g. 142 AD, 1303, 1481, 1609, 1741, (b) numerical simulation of the tsunami and determination of the inundation zone, (c) application of the DAMASCHE empirical tool, produced by the SCHEMA EU-FP6 project, for the calculation of the damage level expected at each one of the buildings as a function of the water depth in the inundation area, (d) calculation of the buildings that would need reparation after partial damage and of those that would need reconstruction after total destruction, (e) calculation of the cost implied for both reparation and reconstruction. The several data sets which are needed for the execution of these steps, are susceptible to uncertainties and, therefore, the final results are quite sensitive to changes of the data sets. Alternative costs were calculated by taking into account the several uncertainties involved. This research is a contribution to the EU-FP7 tsunami research project ASTARTE (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe), grant agreement no: 603839, 2013-10-30.

  12. Premature loss of primary anterior teeth due to trauma--potential short- and long-term sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holan, Gideon; Needleman, Howard L

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) can result in the premature loss of primary anterior teeth due to an immediate avulsion, extraction later after the injury because of poor prognosis or late complications, or early exfoliation. There are a number of potential considerations or sequelae as a result of this premature loss that have been cited in the dental literature, which include esthetics, quality of life, eating, speech development, arch integrity (space loss), development and eruption of the permanent successors, and development of oral habits. This article provides a comprehensive review of the dental literature on the possible consequences of premature loss of maxillary primary incisors following TDI.

  13. Losartan improves heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Arslan, Uğur; Türkoğlu, Sedat; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence are known to be disturbed and associated with excess mortality in heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether losartan, when added on top of beta-blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy, could improve these indices in patients with systolic heart failure. Seventy-seven patients (mean age 60.4 +/- 8.0, 80.5% male) with ischemic cardiomyopathy (mean ejection fraction 34.5 +/- 4.4%) and New York Heart Association Class II-III heart failure symptoms, already receiving a beta-blocker and an ACEI, were randomly assigned to either open-label losartan (losartan group) or no additional drug (control group) in a 2:1 ratio and the patients were followed for 12 weeks. The HRV and heart rate turbulence indices were calculated from 24-hour Holter recordings both at the beginning and at the end of follow-up. The baseline clinical characteristics, HRV, and heart rate turbulence indices were similar in the 2 groups. At 12 weeks of follow-up, all HRV parameters except pNN50 increased (SDNN: 113.2 +/- 34.2 versus 127.8 +/- 24.1, P = .001; SDANN: 101.5 +/- 31.7 versus 115.2 +/- 22.0, P = .001; triangular index: 29.9 +/- 11.1 versus 34.2 +/- 7.9, P = .008; RMSSD: 29.1 +/- 20.2 versus 34.3 +/- 23.0, P = .009; NN50: 5015.3 +/- 5554.9 versus 6446.7 +/- 6101.1, P = .024; NN50: 5.65 +/- 6.41 versus 7.24 +/- 6.99, P = .089; SDNNi: 45.1 +/- 13.3 versus 50.3 +/- 14.5, P = .004), turbulence onset decreased (-0. 61 +/- 1.70 versus -1.24 +/- 1.31, P = .003) and turbulence slope increased (4.107 +/- 3.881 versus 5.940 +/- 4.281, P = .004) significantly in the losartan group as compared with controls. A 12-week-long losartan therapy significantly improved HRV and heart rate turbulence in patients with Class II-III heart failure and ischemic cardiomyopathy already on beta-blockers and ACEI.

  14. Suppressing Energy Loss due to Triplet Exciton Formation in Organic Solar Cells: The Role of Chemical Structures and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2017-04-21

    In the most efficient solar cells based on blends of a conjugated polymer (electron donor) and a fullerene derivative (electron acceptor),ultrafast formation of charge-transfer (CT) electronic states at the donor-acceptor interfaces and efficient separation of these CT states into free charges, lead to internal quantum efficiencies near 100%. However, there occur substantial energy losses due to the non-radiative recombinations of the charges, mediated by the loweset-energy (singlet and triplet) CT states; for example, such recombinations can lead to the formation of triplet excited electronic states on the polymer chains, which do not generate free charges. This issue remains a major factor limiting the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of these devices. The recombination rates are, however, difficult to quantify experimentally. To shed light on these issues, here, an integrated multi-scale theoretical approach that combines molecular dynamics simulations with quantum chemistry calculations is employed in order to establish the relationships among chemical structures, molecular packing, and non-radiative recombination losses mediated by the lowest-energy charge-transfer states.

  15. Measurements with a Ge detector and Monte Carlo computations of dose rate yields due to cosmic muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2003-02-01

    The present work shows how portable Ge detectors can be useful for measurements of the dose rate due to ionizing cosmic radiation. The methodology proposed converts the cosmic radiation induced background in a Ge crystal (energy range above 3 MeV) to the absorbed dose rate due to muons, which are responsible for 75% of the cosmic radiation dose rate at sea level. The key point is to observe in the high energy range (above 20 MeV) the broad muon peak resulting from the most probable energy loss of muons in the Ge detector. An energy shift of the muon peak was observed, as expected, for increasing dimensions of three Ge crystals (10%, 20%, and 70% efficiency). Taking into account the dimensions of the three detectors the location of the three muon peaks was reproduced by Monte Carlo computations using the GEANT code. The absorbed dose rate due to muons has been measured in 50 indoor and outdoor locations at Thessaloniki, the second largest town of Greece, with a portable Ge detector and converted to the absorbed dose rate due to muons in an ICRU sphere representing the human body by using a factor derived from Monte Carlo computations. The outdoor and indoor mean muon dose rate was 25 nGy h(-1) and 17.8 nGy h(-1), respectively. The shielding factor for the 40 indoor measurements ranges from 0.5 to 0.9 with a most probable value between 0.7-0.8.

  16. The loss rates of web tags applied to day-old Anas and Aythya ducklings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blums, P.; Mednis, A.; Bauga, I.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers studied the loss rate of web tags on Anas and Aythya ducklings by double marking day-old ducklings of five species with web tags and plasticine-filled rings. Tag loss was examined over three-month, one-year, and three-year periods. Web tag loss was greatest for Anas and occurred mostly in the first three months following tagging.

  17. [FEDERAL CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS IN DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF HEARING LOSS DUE TO NOISE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeninskaya, E E; Bukhtiarov, I V; Bushmanov, A Iu; Dayhes, N A; Denisov, E I; Izmerov, N F; Mazitova, N N; Pankova, V B; Preobrazhenskaya, E A; Prokopenko, L V; Simonova, N I; Tavartkiladze, G A; Fedina, I N

    2016-01-01

    Noise induced hearing loss is a slowly developing hearing impairment, caused by occupational exposure to excessive noise levels, constitutes a lesion of the auditory analyzer and clinically manifested as chronic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Currently, there is not a treatment that provide a cure of sensorineural hearing loss. Regular, individually tailored treatment should be directed to the pathogenic mechanisms and specific clinical symptoms of hearing loss, as well as the prevention of complications. We recommend using non-drug therapies that can improve blood flow in labyrinth, tissue and cellular metabolism.

  18. Canine and feline pregnancy loss due to viral and non-infectious causes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstegen, J; Dhaliwal, G; Verstegen-Onclin, K

    2008-08-01

    Among the causes for pregnancy loss, viruses and non-infectious factors are among the most important. In both dogs and cats, research and clinical evidence provide proof that there is an increasing incidence of pregnancy loss associated with infectious diseases like herpesvirus, as well as the presence of toxicants or chemicals in the animal's diet and environment. Endocrine causes must be taken into consideration when dealing with pregnancy loss. This review will cover the most recent knowledge regarding viral and non-infectious of pregnancy losses in the dog and cat.

  19. Quantifying array losses due to spacing and staggering in offshore wind farms (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, C. L.; Mirzaeisefat, S.; Lee, S.; Xie, S.

    2013-12-01

    the farm constant, we design several new Lillgrund farm layouts with and without staggering, with increased spacing in each direction individually and in both directions together, and with various wind directions and atmospheric stabilities. We found that the average wind power generated per turbine is increased by ~32% (from 696 kW to 922 kW) if both staggering and doubling of the across-spacing are implemented simultaneously in a neutral stability case. Wake losses are quantified in terms of average power in the first (upwind) row of wind turbines in the control case, representative of the power that could be generated if there were no wakes, over the average power of all the wind turbines in the farm. Wake losses at Lillgrund are relatively high due to the tight packing, of the order of 35%, but smart combinations of staggering and doubling of turbine spacing can reduce them to 15%-26%. In summary, we provide estimates of the losses/gains associated with individual and combined changes in two design variables, spacing and staggering, under various atmospheric stabilities, wind directions, and wind speeds. These estimates will be useful to the wind industry to optimize a wind project because the effects of alternative layouts can be quantified quickly with respect to total power, capacity factor, and number of wind turbines, all of which can ultimately be converted to actual costs or savings.

  20. Epidemiological updates and economic losses due to Taenia hydatigena in sheep from Sardinia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, A; Pipia, A P; Dore, F; Sanna, G; Tamponi, C; Marrosu, R; Bandino, E; Carmona, C; Boufana, B; Varcasia, A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology and transmission of Taenia hydatigena in sheep and dogs from Sardinia and the economic estimation of losses due to this metacestodosis in lambs. A total of 7781 Sarda breed lambs were examined at abattoirs for the detection of Cysticercus tenuicollis or necrotic-haemorrhagic tracks of their migration. Morphological and molecular identification of parasites was carried out. Individual faecal samples from 300 dogs were examined for copromicroscopic investigations and coproELISA assay. An overall prevalence of 14.6% for T. hydatigena cysticercosis was found in the examined lambs. In total, 10,807 parasitary tracks were found, with an abundance of 1.39 and an average intensity of 9.52. The molecular analysis of the isolates showed an overall pairwise nucleotide divergence for the CO1 and ND1 was of 0-3.1 and 0-3.3%, respectively. Low intra- and interspecific variation was recorded for C. tenuicollis isolates used in this study which suggested the absence of differentiation. Microscopic examination of dog faeces showed a total prevalence of 31.3% for endoparasites in the examined samples (94/300). Taeniid eggs were found in 8.3% of the dogs. The results of the monoclonal antibody ATH4 ELISA test showed a prevalence of 11% (33/300) for T. hydatigena coproantigens. The total economic costs related to cysticercosis amounted to almost € 330,000. The prevalence of C. tenuicollis in 14.6% of 30-40-day-old lambs highlights the high parasitic pressure by T. hydatigena in the territory of Sardinia, Italy.

  1. Selection Bias Due to Loss to Follow Up in Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Chanelle J; Cole, Stephen R; Lau, Bryan; Napravnik, Sonia; Eron, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Selection bias due to loss to follow up represents a threat to the internal validity of estimates derived from cohort studies. Over the past 15 years, stratification-based techniques as well as methods such as inverse probability-of-censoring weighted estimation have been more prominently discussed and offered as a means to correct for selection bias. However, unlike correcting for confounding bias using inverse weighting, uptake of inverse probability-of-censoring weighted estimation as well as competing methods has been limited in the applied epidemiologic literature. To motivate greater use of inverse probability-of-censoring weighted estimation and competing methods, we use causal diagrams to describe the sources of selection bias in cohort studies employing a time-to-event framework when the quantity of interest is an absolute measure (e.g., absolute risk, survival function) or relative effect measure (e.g., risk difference, risk ratio). We highlight that whether a given estimate obtained from standard methods is potentially subject to selection bias depends on the causal diagram and the measure. We first broadly describe inverse probability-of-censoring weighted estimation and then give a simple example to demonstrate in detail how inverse probability-of-censoring weighted estimation mitigates selection bias and describe challenges to estimation. We then modify complex, real-world data from the University of North Carolina Center for AIDS Research HIV clinical cohort study and estimate the absolute and relative change in the occurrence of death with and without inverse probability-of-censoring weighted correction using the modified University of North Carolina data. We provide SAS code to aid with implementation of inverse probability-of-censoring weighted techniques.

  2. Scale-factor variations due to wavelength-dependent optical losses in fiber optic gyros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, James A.

    1996-11-01

    Most sources of optical loss in a fiber optic gyro (FOG) depend on wavelength. Because of the broadband sources used in interferometric FOGs, these losses result in an effective shift of mean wavelength of the light producing the interference signal. For some signal processing methods, these wavelength variations produce proportional changes in the IFOG scale factor. Using well documented approximations, losses are calculated and plotted versus wavelength. A discussion of the qualitative effects on scale factor is presented and expected mean wavelength variations are computed using a representative approximation of the spectrum of a FOG source. The types of losses considered include: fiber-fiber or fiber-wave guide misalignments; microbend losses, bending losses and mode diameter mismatches. Preliminary results indicate that scale factor variations caused by such losses will contribute significantly to the total scale factor thermal sensitivity for some FOG designs. While closed loop operation results in a scale factor with fundamentally low sensitivity to variations in optical losses, most implementations are sensitive to changes in mean wavelength, thus the effects discussed here should be considered when designing high performance IFOGs and their electronics.

  3. Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Van dam, Tonie; Hamilton, Gordon S.

    2007-01-01

    , calculated from sequential digital elevation models, contributes about 16 mm of the observed uplift, with an additional 5 mm from volume loss of Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier. The remaining uplift signal is attributed to significant melt-induced ice volume loss from the ice sheet margin along the southeast coast...

  4. Temporal changes in loss of life expectancy due to cancer in Australia: a flexible parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baade, Peter D; Youlden, Danny R; Andersson, Therese M; Youl, Philippa H; Walpole, Euan T; Kimlin, Michael G; Aitken, Joanne F; Biggar, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate changes in cancer mortality burden over time by assessing temporal trends in life expectation for Australian residents diagnosed with cancer. The study cohort consisted of all people diagnosed with cancer in the period 1990-2000 and aged 15-89 years (n = 1,275,978), with mortality follow-up to 31 December 2010. Flexible parametric survival models incorporating background age-sex-year-specific population mortality rates were applied to generate the observed survival curves for all cancers combined and selected major cancer types. Predicted values of loss of life expectancy (LOLE) in years were generated and then averaged across calendar year and age group (15-49, 50-69 and 70-89 years) or spread of disease (localized, regional, distant, unknown). The greatest LOLE burden was for lung cancer (14.3 years per diagnosis) and lowest for melanoma (2.5 years). There was a significant decrease in LOLE over time (-0.13 LOLE per year) for all cancers combined. Decreases were also observed for female breast cancer (-0.21), prostate cancer (-0.17), colorectal cancer (-0.08), melanoma (-0.07) and stomach cancer (-0.02), with slight increases for lung cancer (+0.04). When restricted to the sub-cohort from New South Wales with spread of disease information, these decreases in LOLE were primarily among cancers categorized as localized or regional spread at diagnosis. In Australia, persons diagnosed with cancer have a steadily improving outlook that exceeds that expected by general improvement in population life expectancy. The overall improvement is observed in persons with localized or regional cancers but not in those with advanced cancers, findings which encourage earlier diagnosis.

  5. Enhanced O2 Loss at Mars Due to an Ambipolar Electric Field from Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mcenulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (T sub e) in Mars dayside ionosphere above approx. 180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to approx. 500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher T(sub e) (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher T(sub e) may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced T(sub e) in Mars ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (e) of several k(sub b)T(sub e), which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  6. Acute sensorineural hearing loss and severe otalgia due to scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dong-Min

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrub typhus is an acute febrile illness caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Case presentations We encountered a patient with sensorineural hearing loss complicating scrub typhus, and three patients with scrub typhus who complained of otalgia, which was sudden onset, severe, paroxysmal, intermittent yet persistent pain lasting for several seconds, appeared within 1 week after the onset of fever and rash. The acute sensorineural hearing loss and otalgia were resolved after antibiotic administration. Conclusion When patients in endemic areas present with fever and rash and have sensorineural hearing loss or otalgia without otoscopic abnormalities, clinicians should suspect scrub typhus and consider empirical antibiotic therapy.

  7. The Importance of Considering Product Loss Rates in Life Cycle Assessment: The Example of Closure Systems for Bottled Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Jolliet

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this study is to discuss the implications of product loss rates in terms of the environmental performance of bottled wine. Wine loss refers to loss occurring when the consumer does not consume the wine contained in the bottle and disposes of it because of taste alteration, which is caused by inadequate product protection rendering the wine unpalatable to a knowledgeable consumer. The decision of whether or not to drink the wine in such cases is guided by subjective consumer taste perception and wine quality expectation (drinking the bottle or disposing of the wine down the drain and replacing it with a new bottle. This study aims to illustrate the importance of accurately defining system boundaries related to wine packaging systems. Methods: The environmental impacts resulting from wine loss rates as related to two types of wine bottle closures—natural cork stoppers and screw caps—have been estimated based on literature review data and compared to the impact of the respective closure system. The system studied relates to the functional unit “a 750 mL bottle of drinkable wine” and includes bottled wine, bottle and closure production, wine production, wine loss and wine poured down the drain. Results: The range of wine alteration rates due to corked wine is estimated to be 2–5% based on interviews with wine experts. Consumer behavior was assessed through a sensitivity study on replacement rates. When the increase in loss rate with the cork stopper is higher than 1.2% (corresponding to 3.5% corked wine multiplied by a consumer replacement rate of 35%, the influence of losses on the impact results is higher than that of the closure material itself. The different closures and associated wine losses represent less than 5% of the total life cycle impact of bottled wine.

  8. Sudden hearing loss due to oxaliplatin use in a patient with colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvenç, M Güven; Dizdar, Denizhan; Dizdar, Senem Kurt; Okutur, Sadi Kerem; Demir, Gökhan

    2016-08-01

    Oxaliplatin is used to treat advanced colorectal cancer. Platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents are known to be ototoxic. However, ototoxicity is rare with newer generation platinum-derived agents, such as oxaliplatin. This case report presents a rare case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss following intravenous (IV) infusion of oxaliplatin in a 64-year-old woman with advanced colon cancer. The hearing loss was severe and did not respond to treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fifth reported case of oxaliplatin ototoxicity. Although oxaliplatin ototoxicity is rare, physicians must be aware of this important adverse effect, and an audiometric evaluation must be performed when necessary. Patients treated with oxaliplatin should be followed closely for early signs and symptoms of hearing loss, and if hearing loss is detected, treatment should be stopped immediately.

  9. Housing Arrangement and Location Determine the Likelihood of Housing Loss Due to Wildfire

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra D Syphard; Keeley, Jon E; Avi Bar Massada; Brennan, Teresa J.; Volker C Radeloff

    2012-01-01

    Surging wildfires across the globe are contributing to escalating residential losses and have major social, economic, and ecological consequences. The highest losses in the U.S. occur in southern California, where nearly 1000 homes per year have been destroyed by wildfires since 2000. Wildfire risk reduction efforts focus primarily on fuel reduction and, to a lesser degree, on house characteristics and homeowner responsibility. However, the extent to which land use planning could alleviate wi...

  10. Valuing productivity loss due to absenteeism: firm-level evidence from a Canadian linked employer-employee survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Huiying; Woodcock, Simon; Anis, Aslam H

    2017-12-01

    In health economic evaluation studies, to value productivity loss due to absenteeism, existing methods use wages as a proxy value for marginal productivity. This study is the first to test the equality between wage and marginal productivity losses due to absenteeism separately for team workers and non-team workers. Our estimates are based on linked employer-employee data from Canada. Results indicate that team workers are more productive and earn higher wages than non-team workers. However, the productivity gap between these two groups is considerably larger than the wage gap. In small firms, employee absenteeism results in lower productivity and wages, and the marginal productivity loss due to team worker absenteeism is significantly higher than the wage loss. No similar wage-productivity gap exists for large firms. Our findings suggest that productivity loss or gain is most likely to be underestimated when valued according to wages for team workers. The findings help to value the burden of illness-related absenteeism. This is important for economic evaluations that seek to measure the productivity gain or loss of a health care technology or intervention, which in turn can impact policy makers' funding decisions.

  11. Theoretical method for estimation of power loss due to mismatch in solar cell I-V characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasamurthy, N.; Malathi, B.; Mathur, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    In order to generate power from the solar panels at a required voltage, suitable number of cells should be connected in series and parallel. There exists a mismatch in the solar cell I-V characteristics, when they are produced in a lot. When such cells are connected in a series parallel array, power loss would occur due to the mismatch. A theoretical approach is made to compute the power loss. This would suggest the designer to select proper combination of cells for minimum power loss of any configuration of the solar panel.

  12. Methodology of risk assessment of loss of water resources due to climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israfilov, Yusif; Israfilov, Rauf; Guliyev, Hatam; Afandiyev, Galib

    2016-04-01

    For sustainable development and management of rational use of water resources of Azerbaijan Republic it is actual to forecast their changes taking into account different scenarios of climate changes and assessment of possible risks of loss of sections of water resources. The major part of the Azerbaijani territory is located in the arid climate and the vast majority of water is used in the national economic production. An optimal use of conditional groundwater and surface water is of great strategic importance for economy of the country in terms of lack of common water resources. Low annual rate of sediments, high evaporation and complex natural and hydrogeological conditions prevent sustainable formation of conditioned resources of ground and surface water. In addition, reserves of fresh water resources are not equally distributed throughout the Azerbaijani territory. The lack of the common water balance creates tension in the rational use of fresh water resources in various sectors of the national economy, especially in agriculture, and as a result, in food security of the republic. However, the fresh water resources of the republic have direct proportional dependence on climatic factors. 75-85% of the resources of ground stratum-pore water of piedmont plains and fracture-vein water of mountain regions are formed by the infiltration of rainfall and condensate water. Changes of climate parameters involve changes in the hydrological cycle of the hydrosphere and as a rule, are reflected on their resources. Forecasting changes of water resources of the hydrosphere with different scenarios of climate change in regional mathematical models allowed estimating the extent of their relationship and improving the quality of decisions. At the same time, it is extremely necessary to obtain additional data for risk assessment and management to reduce water resources for a detailed analysis, forecasting the quantitative and qualitative parameters of resources, and also for

  13. Mesospheric energy loss rates by OH and O2 emissions at 23°S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Takahashi

    Full Text Available The nightglow OH(9, 4 and O2 atmospheric (0,1 band emission intensities and their rotational temperatures T(OH and T(O2, respectively, observed at Cachoeira Paulista (23°S, 45°W, Brazil, during the period from October 1989 to December 1990, have been analyzed to study the nighttime mesospheric energy loss rates through the radiations from the vibrationally excited OH* and electronically excited O2* bands. The total emission rates of the OH Meinel bands, O2 atmospheric (0,0 and O2 infrared atmospheric (1Δg bands were calculated using reported data for the relative band intensities I(ν'',ν'/I(9,4, IO2A(0,0/IO2A(0,1 and IO2(1Δg/IO2A(0,1. It was found that there is a minimum in equivalent energy loss rate by the OH* Meinel bands during December/January (equivalent energy loss rate of 0.39K/day*, where day* means averaged over the night and maximum in equivalent energy loss rate during September (equivalent energy loss rate of 0.98K/day*. Energy loss rate by the O2* radiation, on the other hand, is weaker than that by the OH* Meinel bands, showing equivalent energy loss rates of 0.12K/day* and 0.22K/day* during January and September, respectively.

  14. Death rate due to horseshoe crab poisoning:summarization on Thai reports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe crab can be poisonous and intoxication due to intake of horseshoe crab is possible. Horseshoe crab intoxication can be seen in many countries with seacoasts including Thailand. Here, the authors summarized the death rate due to horseshoe crab poisoning in Thailand.

  15. Weight loss and exercise training effect on oxygen uptake and heart rate response to locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary R; Fisher, Gordon; Bryan, David R; Zuckerman, Paul A

    2012-05-01

    Effects of resistance and aerobic training on the ease of physical activity during and after weight loss are unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine what effect weight loss combined with either aerobic or resistance training has on the ease of locomotion (net V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and heart rate). It is hypothesized that exercise training will result in an increased ease, lowers heart rate during locomotion. Seventy-three overweight premenopausal women were assigned to diet and aerobic training, diet and resistance training, or diet only. Subjects were evaluated while overweight, after diet-induced weight loss (average, 12.5 kg loss), and 1 year after weight loss (5.5 kg regain). Submaximal walking, grade walking, stair climbing, and bike oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured at all time points. Weight loss diet was 800 kcal per day. Exercisers trained 3 times per week during weight loss and 2 times per week during 1-year follow-up. Resistance training increased strength, and aerobic training increased maximum oxygen uptake. Net submaximal oxygen uptake was not affected by weight loss or exercise training. However, heart rate during walking, stair climbing, and bicycling was reduced after weight loss. No significant differences in reduction in heart rate were observed among the 3 treatment groups for locomotion after weight loss. However, during 1-year follow-up, exercise training resulted in maintenance of lower submaximal heart rate, whereas nonexercisers increased heart rate during locomotion. Results suggest that moderately intense exercise is helpful in improving the ease of movement after weight loss. Exercise training may be helpful in increasing the participation in free-living physical activity.

  16. [Hearing loss in adolescents due to leisure noise. The OHRKAN study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardella, D; Perez Alvarez, C; Steffens, T; Fromme, H; Raab, U

    2011-08-01

    Alarming reports have been published about hearing loss in adolescents, and increasing leisure time noise exposure has been blamed. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music as well as music from portable music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss. The empirical evidence for this association, however, is not sufficient. Not even an increase in the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss among adolescents can be documented. OHRKAN is a prospective cohort study aimed to produce information on the prevalence of hearing loss as well as its risk factors in adolescents. Currently, a total of 2,240 pupils in grade 9 at schools in the city of Regensburg, Germany, have been recruited. Data on noise exposure were collected using standardized questionnaires. In addition, hearing status was assessed by medical examination including tympanometry, audiometry, and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. Developments in noise exposure as well as hearing status will be assessed in follow-up data collections. Independent of this empirical assessment preventive measures are already needed now to reduce the risk of hearing loss in adolescents and young adults.

  17. A design point correlation for losses due to part-span dampers on transonic rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design-point losses caused by part-span dampers were correlated for 21 transonic axial-flow fan rotors that had tip speeds varying from 350 to 488 meters per second and design pressure ratios of 1.5 to 2.0. The additional loss attributable to the damper and the total region along the blade height influenced were correlated with selected aerodynamic and geometric parameters. The maximum damper loss correlated well with the mean inlet Mach number at the damper location, the geometric parameters of leading- and trailing-edge damper radius normalized by mean passage height and damper aerodynamic chord, respectively, and the aerodynamic loading parameter of the blade camber divided by the solidity at the damper location. The region of damper influence extended over a mean passage height of the order of 10 to 15 times the maximum damper thickness.

  18. Reconstruction of the penile skin loss due to 'radical' circumcision with a full thickness skin graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Excessive resection of penile skin is a rare but important complication of circumcision. Penis 'trapping' under the skin and consequent sexual dysfunction occur as a result. Case report. Excessive circumcision with complete resection of the penile skin is shown. Penis, trapped under the skin, was deliberated and skin defect was substituted with the full thickness skin graft. One year after the surgery penis has a good cosmetic appearance, adequate size and sexual function. Conclusion. Full thickness skin graft is a good option for augmentation of the penile skin loss in cases with intact hypodermal tissue and extensive skin loss, for the reconstruction in a single act.

  19. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  20. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  1. Practical modeling of acoustic losses in air due to heat conduction and viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, René; Juhl, Peter Møller; Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Accurate acoustics models of small devices with cavities and narrow slits and ducts should include the socalled boundary layer attenuation caused by thermal conduction and viscosity. The purpose of this paper is to present and compare different methods for including these loss mechanisms in analy......Accurate acoustics models of small devices with cavities and narrow slits and ducts should include the socalled boundary layer attenuation caused by thermal conduction and viscosity. The purpose of this paper is to present and compare different methods for including these loss mechanisms...

  2. Comment to the article "Temperature dependence of ultracold neutron loss rates" E.Korobkina et al., PRB 70,035409

    CERN Document Server

    Serebrov, A

    2009-01-01

    In work [1] ("Temperature dependence of ultracold neutron loss rates" E.Korobkina et al., PRB 70,035409) results of measurement of temperature dependence of losses of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a range from 4 K to 300 K at UCN storage in a copper trap are presented. At interpretation of experimental data it was artificially considered only the difference of losses rate 1/tau(T)= 1/tau_exp(T)- 1/tau_exp(10K), (tau - UCN storage time in the trap). It has been accepted for temperature dependence of losses which changes from 0 to 3.3*10-4 per one collision of UCN with a trap surface. However, the analysis of raw experimental data shows that in a trap at temperature 10 K there is losses 1.0*10-3 per collision. They are considerably (in 3 times) more than discussed temperature dependence and almost 10 times more than losses due to capture cross section on copper. It is the most probable that these losses are connected with leakage of UCN through a slit of trap shutter. Change of the size of a slits on 25% at chang...

  3. Scenarios for future biodiversity loss due to multiple drivers reveal conflict between mitigating climate change and preserving biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W. R.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2013-06-01

    We assess the potential for future biodiversity loss due to three interacting factors: energy withdrawal from ecosystems due to biomass harvest, habitat loss due to land-use change, and climate change. We develop four scenarios to 2050 with different combinations of high or low agricultural efficiency and high or low meat diets, and use species-energy and species-area relationships to estimate their effects on biodiversity. In our scenarios, natural ecosystems are protected except when additional land is necessary to fulfil the increasing dietary demands of the global population. Biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) is used as a means of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere (and offsetting fossil fuel emissions). BECCS is based on waste biomass, with the addition of bio-energy crops only when already managed land is no longer needed for food production. Forecast biodiversity loss from natural biomes increases by more than a factor of five in going from high to low agricultural efficiency scenarios, due to destruction of productive habitats by the expansion of pasture. Biodiversity loss from energy withdrawal on managed land varies by a factor of two across the scenarios. Biodiversity loss due to climate change varies only modestly across the scenarios. Climate change is lowest in the ‘low meat high efficiency’ scenario, in which by 2050 around 660 million hectares of pasture are converted to biomass plantation that is used for BECCS. However, the resulting withdrawal of energy from managed ecosystems has a large negative impact on biodiversity. Although the effects of energy withdrawal and climate change on biodiversity cannot be directly compared, this suggests that using bio-energy to tackle climate change in order to limit biodiversity loss could instead have the opposite effect.

  4. Prevention of adolescents' music-induced hearing loss due to discotheque attendance: a Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, I.; Brug, J.; Ploeg, van der C.P.B.; Raat, H.

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a significant social and public health problem, which is found in increasing numbers of adolescents. Young people are particularly likely to expose themselves to potentially damaging loud sounds during leisure activities. Visiting discotheques is one of the most popular

  5. Irreversible Loss of Vision in a Child due to Occipital Infarction after Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Mansour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 2½-year-old girl developed a bilateral occipital infarct following severe gastroenteritis with bilateral vision of light perception. Evaluations for sickle cell anemia, hemolytic anemia and coagulopathies were negative. Cortical blindness is an uncommon but dramatic complication of gastroenteritis, hence the need of prompt hydration and other supportive measures to avoid irreversible visual loss or mental sequela.

  6. Iron Losses in Electrical Machines Due to Non Sinusoidal Alternating Fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritchie, Ewen; Walker, J.A.; Dorrell, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper shows how the flux waveform in the core of an electrical machine can be vary non- sinusoidally which complicates the calculation of the iron loss in a machine. A set of tests are conducted on a steel sample using an Epstein square where harmonics are injected into the flux waveform which...

  7. Dust emission and soil loss due to anthropogenic activities by wind erosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katra, Itzhak; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Wind erosion is major process of soil loss and air pollution by dust emission of clays, nutrients, and microorganisms. Many soils throughout the world are currently or potentially associated with dust emissions, especially in dryland zones. The research focuses on wind erosion in semi-arid soils (Northern Negev, Israel) that are subjected to increased human activities of urban development and agriculture. A boundary-layer wind tunnel has been used to study dust emission and soil loss by simulation and quantification of high-resolution wind processes. Field experiments were conducted in various surface types of dry loess soils. The experimental plots represent soils with long-term and short term influences of land uses such as agriculture (conventional and organic practices), grazing, and natural preserves. The wind tunnel was operated under various wind velocities that are above the threshold velocity of aeolian erosion. Total soil sediment and particulate matter (PM) fluxes were calculated. Topsoil samples from the experimental plots were analysed in the laboratory for physical and chemical characteristics including aggregation, organic matter, and high-resolution particle size distribution. The results showed variations in dust emission in response to surface types and winds to provide quantitative estimates of soil loss over time. Substantial loss of particulate matter that is resources and management strategies as well as for PM loading to the atmosphere and air pollution.

  8. Polarization retention loss in PbTiO3 ferroelectric films due to leakage currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morelli, A.; Venkatesan, Sriram; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between retention loss in single crystal PbTiO3 ferroelectric thin films and leakage currents is demonstrated by piezoresponse and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements. It was found that the polarization reversal in the absence of an electric field followed a stretched ex

  9. Loss of labor time due to malfunctioning ICTs and ICT skill insufficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, van Alexander; Dijk, van Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to unexplore the area of information and communication technology (ICT) use in organizations related to the assumed productivity gains by the use of ICTs. On the one hand, the paper focus on the losses of labor time that are caused by malfunctioning hardware o

  10. MEASUREMENT OF RF LOSSES DUE TO TRAPPED FLUX IN A LARGE-GRAIN NIOBIUM CAVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Alex Gurevich

    2008-01-23

    Trapped magnetic field in superconducting niobium is a well known cause of radio-frequency (RF) residual losses. In this contribution, we present the results of RF tests on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large grain niobium before and after allowing a fraction of the Earth magnetic field to be trapped in the cavity during the cooldown below the critical temperature Tc. This experiment has been done on the cavity before and after a low temperature baking. Temperature mapping allowed us to determine the location of hot-spots with high losses and to measure their field dependence. The results show not only an increase of the low-field residual resistance, but also a larger increase of the surface resistance for intermediate RF field (higher “medium field Q-slope”), which depends on the amount of the trapped flux. These additional field-dependent losses can be described as losses of pinned vortices oscillating under the applied RF magnetic field.

  11. Early loss of primary incisors due to parafunctional tendency--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Keith; Roy, Barnali; Yoon, Richard K

    2012-11-01

    Premature loss of primary teeth associated with a parafunctional habit in a 30-month-old child is reported. Report details, clinically and radiographically, these effects in a very young child and reviews diagnostic possibilities. Early detection and scrutiny by the pediatric dentist is important to determine origin and to rule out periodontal disease as a manifestation of underlying systemic disease.

  12. Early loss of primary incisors due to parafunctional tendency. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Keith; Roy, Barnali; Yoon, Richard K

    2012-03-01

    Premature loss of primary teeth associated with a parafunctional habit in 30-month-old child is reported. Report details, clinically and radiographically, these effects in a very young child and reviews diagnostic possibilities. Early detection and scrutiny by the pediatric dentist is important to determine origin and to rule out periodontal disease as manifestation of underlying systemic disease.

  13. Apparent losses due to domestic water meter under-registration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-05

    Oct 5, 2015 ... registration. The eThekwini meter replacement database was used to estimate the effect of meter age on meter accuracy. ... According to the American Water Works ... water in terms of volume, but 69% in terms of financial loss.

  14. Self-amplified Amazon forest loss due to vegetation-atmosphere feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemp, Delphine Clara; Schleussner, Carl Friedrich; Barbosa, Henrique M.J.; Hirota, Marina; Montade, Vincent; Sampaio, Gilvan; Staal, Arie; Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; Rammig, Anja

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 The Author(s).Reduced rainfall increases the risk of forest dieback, while in return forest loss might intensify regional droughts. The consequences of this vegetation-atmosphere feedback for the stability of the Amazon forest are still unclear. Here we show that the risk of self-amplified Am

  15. Prevention of Adolescents' Music-Induced Hearing Loss due to Discotheque Attendance: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, I.; Brug, J.; Van der Ploeg, C. P. B.; Raat, H.

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a significant social and public health problem, which is found in increasing numbers of adolescents. Young people are particularly likely to expose themselves to potentially damaging loud sounds during leisure activities. Visiting discotheques is one of the most popular leisure activities of young people. Only a few…

  16. Mediation analysis to estimate direct and indirect milk losses due to clinical mastitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detilleux, J; Kastelic, J P; Barkema, H W

    2015-03-01

    Milk losses associated with mastitis can be attributed to either effects of pathogens per se (i.e., direct losses) or effects of the immune response triggered by intramammary infection (indirect losses). The distinction is important in terms of mastitis prevention and treatment. Regardless, the number of pathogens is often unknown (particularly in field studies), making it difficult to estimate direct losses, whereas indirect losses can be approximated by measuring the association between increased somatic cell count (SCC) and milk production. An alternative is to perform a mediation analysis in which changes in milk yield are allocated into their direct and indirect components. We applied this method on data for clinical mastitis, milk and SCC test-day recordings, results of bacteriological cultures (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and streptococci other than Strep. dysgalactiae and Strep. uberis), and cow characteristics. Following a diagnosis of clinical mastitis, the cow was treated and changes (increase or decrease) in milk production before and after a diagnosis were interpreted counterfactually. On a daily basis, indirect changes, mediated by SCC increase, were significantly different from zero for all bacterial species, with a milk yield decrease (ranging among species from 4 to 33g and mediated by an increase of 1000 SCC/mL/day) before and a daily milk increase (ranging among species from 2 to 12g and mediated by a decrease of 1000 SCC/mL/day) after detection. Direct changes, not mediated by SCC, were only different from zero for coagulase-negative staphylococci before diagnosis (72g per day). We concluded that mixed structural equation models were useful to estimate direct and indirect effects of the presence of clinical mastitis on milk yield.

  17. Complete Loss and Thermal Model of Power Semiconductors Including Device Rating Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon;

    2015-01-01

    loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal......Thermal loading of power devices are closely related to the reliability performance of the whole converter system. The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal...... models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally pre-defined by experience with limited design flexibility. Consequently, a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical...

  18. Loss and thermal model for power semiconductors including device rating information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon;

    2014-01-01

    The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally...... pre-defined by experience with poor design flexibility. Consequently a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal...... impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal profiles of power devices can be accurately mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal...

  19. Loss and thermal model for power semiconductors including device rating information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal profiles of power devices can be accurately mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal......The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally...... pre-defined by experience with poor design flexibility. Consequently a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal...

  20. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Seryi, Andrei; Sramek, Christopher K

    2005-01-01

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ‘banana effect'). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  1. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis due to dietary weight-loss supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Emmanuel; Bercovici, Silvia; Niranjan, Selvanayagam; Paul, Nisha; Hemavathy, Bhakthavatsalam

    2011-05-01

    Herbal and dietary supplements for weight loss and in treatment of obesity are growing in popularity and acceptance in the United States. Most of these supplements can be obtained over the counter and can have serious adverse effects associated with their consumption. We describe 2 patients who developed thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis 2-3 weeks after consuming thyroxine-containing weight-loss supplements. This is the first known case of thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis secondary to dietary supplements. It is important that patients and physicians are aware of the severe adverse reactions associated with dietary supplements. Physicians should as a routine inquire about herbal and dietary supplement consumption during all patient encounters.

  2. Changes in Intraocular Pressure due to Surgical Positioning Studying Potential Risk for Postoperative Vision Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    surgical position on IOP and perfusion to the optic nerve during spine surgery is not known. Moreover, most surgeons and anesthesiologists do not record...needed at some point during surgery, be vigilant to return to less risky positions when appropriate. 3. Consider anesthesiologists recording the...massive blood loss after lumbar spine surgery. Spine 1994;19:468–9. 18. Brown R, Schauble J, Miller N. Anemia and hypotension as contributors to

  3. Noise Attenuation Loss Due to Wearing APEL Eye Protection with Ear-Muff Style Headset Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    have active noise reduction (ANR) circuitry which attenuates low frequency sounds by electronically generating an equal but opposite pressure wave...insertion loss) provided by each combination. 4 Equipment The test procedure utilized a binaural KEMAR manikin, two QSC Audio PLX 3402 power...control circuit modules (PXle-8360, PXI-6620, PXI-4461), and a personal computer running Windows XP. The sound field was generated using REATMaster

  4. Visual loss due to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a heart transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A R; Kline, L B; Pinkard, N B

    1993-12-01

    A 59-year-old male heart transplant recipient experienced progressive visual loss following routine cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation. Cranial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging suggested and brain biopsy confirmed the cause to be progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The patient died 2 months following cataract surgery. This case illustrates that visual failure may be the initial manifestation of PML, and the ophthalmologist should be aware of this central demyelinating disorder when dealing with immunocompromised patients.

  5. Digit loss due to Demodex spp. infestation in a dog: clinical and pathological features

    OpenAIRE

    F. Grandi; Pasternak, A.; Beserra, H.E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe a rare clinical manifestation of canine pododemodicosis. A dog was presented with pedal erythema, scaling, crusting, severe edema and digit loss. The following diseases were taken into account for the differential diagnosis: pododemodicosis, lethal acrodermatitis, zinc responsive dermatosis and pemphigus foliaceus. Results from skin biopsies revealed the presence of Demodex spp. of mites in the follicular infundibula and a severe inflammatory process (pododemodicosis). Upon ...

  6. Digit loss due to Demodex spp. infestation in a dog: clinical and pathological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Grandi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a rare clinical manifestation of canine pododemodicosis. A dog was presented with pedal erythema, scaling, crusting, severe edema and digit loss. The following diseases were taken into account for the differential diagnosis: pododemodicosis, lethal acrodermatitis, zinc responsive dermatosis and pemphigus foliaceus. Results from skin biopsies revealed the presence of Demodex spp. of mites in the follicular infundibula and a severe inflammatory process (pododemodicosis. Upon the acaricidal treatment, the patient exhibited favorable signs of clinical improvement.

  7. Compound Heterozygosity for Y Box Proteins Causes Sterility Due to Loss of Translational Repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Snyder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Y-box proteins YBX2 and YBX3 bind RNA and DNA and are required for metazoan development and fertility. However, possible functional redundancy between YBX2 and YBX3 has prevented elucidation of their molecular function as RNA masking proteins and identification of their target RNAs. To investigate possible functional redundancy between YBX2 and YBX3, we attempted to construct Ybx2-/-;Ybx3-/- double mutants using a previously reported Ybx2-/- model and a newly generated global Ybx3-/- model. Loss of YBX3 resulted in reduced male fertility and defects in spermatid differentiation. However, homozygous double mutants could not be generated as haploinsufficiency of both Ybx2 and Ybx3 caused sterility characterized by extensive defects in spermatid differentiation. RNA sequence analysis of mRNP and polysome occupancy in single and compound Ybx2/3 heterozygotes revealed loss of translational repression almost exclusively in the compound Ybx2/3 heterozygotes. RNAseq analysis also demonstrated that Y-box protein dose-dependent loss of translational regulation was inversely correlated with the presence of a Y box recognition target sequence, suggesting that Y box proteins bind RNA hierarchically to modulate translation in a range of targets.

  8. Stochastic orbit loss of neutral beam ions from NSTX due to toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Crocker, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Fredrickson, E. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkova, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kubota, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Medley, S. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Podestà, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shi, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); White, R. B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-12-17

    Short toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and could also cause a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions takes place. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding centre code that incorporates the plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are like those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary and the trajectories along which modes may transport particles extend from the deposition volume to the loss boundary.

  9. Can We Predict Cognitive Performance Decrements Due to Sleep Loss and the Recuperative Effects of Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-14

    the amplitude factor MD and elimination rate kD accounted for the extant plasma caffeine concentration , which was computed using the standard one...factor and elimination rate parameters, respectively, that now depend on the caffeine concentration at time tj [26]. This repeated-dose gPD model in Eq...

  10. Emerald ash borer and the urban forest: Changes in landslide potential due to canopy loss scenarios in the City of Pittsburgh, PA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil-McCullough, Erin; Bain, Daniel J; Bergman, Jeffery; Crumrine, Danielle

    2015-12-01

    Emerald ash borer is expected to kill thousands of ash trees in the eastern U.S. This research develops tools to predict the effect of ash tree loss from the urban canopy on landslide susceptibility in Pittsburgh, PA. A spatial model was built using the SINMAP (Stability INdex MAPping) model coupled with spatially explicit scenarios of tree loss (0%, 25%, 50%, and 75% loss of ash trees from the canopy). Ash spatial distributions were estimated via Monte Carlo methods and available vegetation plot data. Ash trees are most prevalent on steeper slopes, likely due to urban development patterns. Therefore, ash loss disproportionately increases hillslope instability. A 75% loss of ash resulted in roughly 800 new potential landslide initiation locations. Sensitivity testing reveals that variations in rainfall rates, and friction angles produce minor changes to model results relative to the magnitude of parameter variation, but reveal high model sensitivity to soil density and root cohesion values. The model predictions demonstrate the importance of large canopy species to urban hillslope stability, particularly on steep slopes and in areas where soils tend to retain water. To improve instability predictions, better characterization of urban soils, particularly spatial patterns of compaction and species specific root cohesion is necessary. The modeling framework developed in this research will enhance assessment of changes in landslide risk due to tree mortality, improving our ability to design economically and ecologically sustainable urban systems.

  11. Estimating earnings losses due to mental illness: a quantile regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Dave E; Wilcox-Gök, Virginia

    2003-09-01

    The ability of workers to remain productive and sustain earnings when afflicted with mental illness depends importantly on access to appropriate treatment and on flexibility and support from employers. In the United States there is substantial variation in access to health care and sick leave and other employment flexibilities across the earnings distribution. Consequently, a worker's ability to work and how much his/her earnings are impeded likely depend upon his/her position in the earnings distribution. Because of this, focusing on average earnings losses may provide insufficient information on the impact of mental illness in the labor market. In this paper, we examine the effects of mental illness on earnings by recognizing that effects could vary across the distribution of earnings. Using data from the National Comorbidity Survey, we employ a quantile regression estimator to identify the effects at key points in the earnings distribution. We find that earnings effects vary importantly across the distribution. While average effects are often not large, mental illness more commonly imposes earnings losses at the lower tail of the distribution, especially for women. In only one case do we find an illness to have negative effects across the distribution. Mental illness can have larger negative impacts on economic outcomes than previously estimated, even if those effects are not uniform. Consequently, researchers and policy makers alike should not be placated by findings that mean earnings effects are relatively small. Such estimates miss important features of how and where mental illness is associated with real economic losses for the ill.

  12. Decadal changes and delayed avian species losses due to deforestation in the northern Neotropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Shaw

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available How avifauna respond to the long-term loss and fragmentation of tropical forests is a critical issue in biodiversity management. We use data from over 30 years to gain insights into such changes in the northernmost Neotropical rainforest in the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas of southern Veracruz, Mexico. This region has been extensively deforested over the past half-century. The Estación de Biología Tropical Los Tuxtlas, of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, protects a 640 ha tract of lowland forest. It became relatively isolated from other forested tracts between 1975 and 1985, but it retains a corridor of forest to more extensive forests at higher elevations on Volcán San Martín. Most deforestation in this area occurred during the 1970s and early 1980s. Forest birds were sampled on the station and surrounding areas using mist nets during eight non-breeding seasons from 1973 to 2004 (though in some seasons netting extended into the local breeding season for some species. Our data suggested extirpations or declines in 12 species of birds subject to capture in mist nets. Six of the eight species no longer present were captured in 1992–95, but not in 2003–2004. Presence/absence data from netting and observational data suggested that another four low-density species also disappeared since sampling began. This indicates a substantial time lag between the loss of habitat and the apparent extirpation of these species. Delayed species loss and the heterogeneous nature of the species affected will be important factors in tropical forest management and conservation.

  13. Decadal changes and delayed avian species losses due to deforestation in the northern Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David W; Escalante, Patricia; Rappole, John H; Ramos, Mario A; Oehlenschlager, Richard J; Warner, Dwain W; Winker, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    How avifauna respond to the long-term loss and fragmentation of tropical forests is a critical issue in biodiversity management. We use data from over 30 years to gain insights into such changes in the northernmost Neotropical rainforest in the Sierra de Los Tuxtlas of southern Veracruz, Mexico. This region has been extensively deforested over the past half-century. The Estación de Biología Tropical Los Tuxtlas, of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), protects a 640 ha tract of lowland forest. It became relatively isolated from other forested tracts between 1975 and 1985, but it retains a corridor of forest to more extensive forests at higher elevations on Volcán San Martín. Most deforestation in this area occurred during the 1970s and early 1980s. Forest birds were sampled on the station and surrounding areas using mist nets during eight non-breeding seasons from 1973 to 2004 (though in some seasons netting extended into the local breeding season for some species). Our data suggested extirpations or declines in 12 species of birds subject to capture in mist nets. Six of the eight species no longer present were captured in 1992-95, but not in 2003-2004. Presence/absence data from netting and observational data suggested that another four low-density species also disappeared since sampling began. This indicates a substantial time lag between the loss of habitat and the apparent extirpation of these species. Delayed species loss and the heterogeneous nature of the species affected will be important factors in tropical forest management and conservation.

  14. New contact frame design for minimizing losses due to edge recombination and grid-induced shading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, D.; Ebest, G. [Technical University of Chemnitz (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2003-02-01

    Edge recombination and grid shading are two loss mechanisms which decrease solar cell efficiency. We introduce a new way for decreasing both significantly by a novel contact frame design which runs along the edge on the surface of a solar cell. No additional processing is necessary for preparing the contact frame. For a 100 cm{sup 2} commercial c-Silicon (Si) solar cell the efficiency increased from 16.18% to 16.83% at 1 Sun (AM 1.5) as estimated by careful device simulation. (author)

  15. Nitrogen losses due to denitrification from cattle slurry injected into grassland soil with and without a nitrification inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, de C.A.M.; Logtestijn, van R.S.P.; Meer, van der H.G.; Geurink, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Injection of cattle slurry into a grassland soil decreases NH3 volatilisation and increases N utilisation by the sward, but may also increase denitrification losses. Denitrification rates were measured using a soil core incubation technique involving acetylene inhibition, following injection of catt

  16. Initial Atom Loss Rate after the Sudden Ramp of a BEC to Unitarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohaptra, Abhishek; Smith, D. Hudson

    2016-05-01

    The quantum-degenerate unitary Bose gas has been studied in an experiment at JILA in which a Bose-Einstein condensate was quickly ramped to infinite scattering length. The sudden approximation can be used to calculate the probability for creating Efimov trimers. A trimer that is created in a region of the BEC where its decay rate is faster than its reaction rate from atom-trimer scattering can contribute to the initial atom loss rate. We use universal 3-body and 4-body results to estimate the initial atom loss rate. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  17. Modelling of labour productivity loss due to climate change: HEAT-SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Daanen, Hein

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will bring higher heat levels (temperature and humidity combined) to large parts of the world. When these levels reach above thresholds well defined by human physiology, the ability to maintain physical activity levels decrease and labour productivity is reduced. This impact is of particular importance in work situations in areas with long high intensity hot seasons, but also affects cooler areas during heat waves. Our modelling of labour productivity loss includes climate model data of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Inter-comparison Project (ISI-MIP), calculations of heat stress indexes during different months, estimations of work capacity loss and its annual impacts in different parts of the world. Different climate models will be compared for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and the outcomes of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) agreements. The validation includes comparisons of modelling outputs with actual field studies using historical heat data. These modelling approaches are a first stage contribution to the European Commission funded HEAT-SHIELD project.

  18. Consequences of biodiversity loss diverge from expectation due to post-extinction compensatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Matthias S.; Garcia, Clement; Bolam, Stefan G.; Parker, Ruth; Godbold, Jasmin A.; Solan, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Consensus has been reached that global biodiversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning and the sustainability of services beneficial to humanity. However, the ecosystem consequences of extinction in natural communities are moderated by compensatory species dynamics, yet these processes are rarely accounted for in impact assessments and seldom considered in conservation programmes. Here, we use marine invertebrate communities to parameterise numerical models of sediment bioturbation – a key mediator of biogeochemical cycling – to determine whether post-extinction compensatory mechanisms alter biodiversity-ecosystem function relations following non-random extinctions. We find that compensatory dynamics lead to trajectories of sediment mixing that diverge from those without compensation, and that the form, magnitude and variance of each probabilistic distribution is highly influenced by the type of compensation and the functional composition of surviving species. Our findings indicate that the generalized biodiversity-function relation curve, as derived from multiple empirical investigations of random species loss, is unlikely to yield representative predictions for ecosystem properties in natural systems because the influence of post-extinction community dynamics are under-represented. Recognition of this problem is fundamental to management and conservation efforts, and will be necessary to ensure future plans and adaptation strategies minimize the adverse impacts of the biodiversity crisis.

  19. Consequences of biodiversity loss diverge from expectation due to post-extinction compensatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Matthias S.; Garcia, Clement; Bolam, Stefan G.; Parker, Ruth; Godbold, Jasmin A.; Solan, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Consensus has been reached that global biodiversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning and the sustainability of services beneficial to humanity. However, the ecosystem consequences of extinction in natural communities are moderated by compensatory species dynamics, yet these processes are rarely accounted for in impact assessments and seldom considered in conservation programmes. Here, we use marine invertebrate communities to parameterise numerical models of sediment bioturbation – a key mediator of biogeochemical cycling – to determine whether post-extinction compensatory mechanisms alter biodiversity-ecosystem function relations following non-random extinctions. We find that compensatory dynamics lead to trajectories of sediment mixing that diverge from those without compensation, and that the form, magnitude and variance of each probabilistic distribution is highly influenced by the type of compensation and the functional composition of surviving species. Our findings indicate that the generalized biodiversity-function relation curve, as derived from multiple empirical investigations of random species loss, is unlikely to yield representative predictions for ecosystem properties in natural systems because the influence of post-extinction community dynamics are under-represented. Recognition of this problem is fundamental to management and conservation efforts, and will be necessary to ensure future plans and adaptation strategies minimize the adverse impacts of the biodiversity crisis. PMID:28255165

  20. Marsh loss due to cumulative impacts of Hurricane Isaac and the DWH oil spill in Louisiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, Shruti; Ferreira Dos Santos, M.J.; Shapiro, Kristen; Lay, Mui; Ustin, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are greatly endangered due to anthropogenic development and climate change. Multiple disturbances may erode the ability of a system to recover from stress if there is little time between disturbance events. We evaluated the ability of the saltmarshes in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, U

  1. Marsh loss due to cumulative impacts of Hurricane Isaac and the DWH oil spill in Louisiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, Shruti; Ferreira Dos Santos, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371571979; Shapiro, Kristen; Lay, Mui; Ustin, Susan L.

    Coastal ecosystems are greatly endangered due to anthropogenic development and climate change. Multiple disturbances may erode the ability of a system to recover from stress if there is little time between disturbance events. We evaluated the ability of the saltmarshes in Barataria Bay, Louisiana,

  2. High-energy irradiation and mass loss rates of hot Jupiters in the solar neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2015-01-01

    Giant gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience strong irradiation. In extreme cases photoevaporation causes a transonic, planetary wind and the persistent mass loss can possibly affect the planetary evolution. We have identified nine hot Jupiter systems in the vicinity of the Sun, in which expanded planetary atmospheres should be detectable through Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy according to predictions. We use X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of seven of these targets to derive the high-energy irradiation level of the planetary atmospheres and the resulting mass loss rates. We further derive improved Lyman alpha luminosity estimates for the host stars including interstellar absorption. According to our estimates WASP-80 b, WASP-77 b, and WASP-43 b experience the strongest mass loss rates, exceeding the mass loss rate of HD 209458 b, where an expanded atmosphere has been confirmed. Furthermore, seven out of nine targets might be amenable to Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy...

  3. The Rate of Water Loss in Relation to Internodes Position and Wood Maturity in Vine Chords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin SALA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of study was to assess the rate of water loss from the strings of vines in relation to internodes position on vine chords and degree of wood maturity. The biological material was represented by Burgund vine cultivar, to which were analyzed individually all internodes distributed on the chord length (internodes number IN2-19. The rate of water loss and associated parameters (maximum rate of water loss - RWLMax, total drying time - T, time to achieve RWLMax - tRWLMax were determined from the Burgund vine cultivar, in controlled condition. Parameters studied were associated with dry matter content (refractometric method, degree of maturity of the wood, and internodes positions on chord. RWL Max had higher values in the basal internodes (IN2; RWL Max = 0.252±0.005 g/min and lower in the apical internodes (IN17-19; RWLMax = 0.202±0.011 g/min. RWLMax distributions values, according to the position of internodes on chord was described by a third degree polynomial function, statistical safety (R2 = 0.949, p<0.01. Dry substance content in internodes (sugar was correlated with the total time of water loss (T; R2 = 0.945, the time to reach the maximum rate of water loss (tRWLMax; R2 = 0.855, and maximum rate of water loss (RWLMax; R2 = 0.984.

  4. Structure of a scheme of emergency control to avoid blackout due to interconnection lines loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, L.T. da; Werberich, L.C.; Herve, H.M. [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (CEEE), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This work presents the structure of Gravatai Emergency Control Scheme (ECS) with short about its development and operation. This ECS was made to avoid two kinds of problems for the systems of Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica (CEEE). The first one is the voltage collapse that happens after the opening of one of the 525 kv LTs of the interconnection with the Brazilian Interconnected System (BIS). The second one is the CEEE isolating after the 525 kV network loss. We show the ECS existence reason and we describe its functional structure, the substations, the circuits and the amount of load shedding involved by the system. Finally, we present the project of a control structure based on microcomputer which is being developed for this ECS. (author) 3 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Mass Loss Due to Sputtering and Thermal Processes in Meteoroid Ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, L A; Hawkes, R L

    2005-01-01

    Conventional meteoroid theory assumes that the dominant mode of ablation is by evaporation following intense heating during atmospheric flight. In this paper we consider the question of whether sputtering may provide an alternative disintegration process of some importance.For meteoroids in the mass range from 10^-3 to 10^-13 kg and covering a meteor velocity range from 11 to 71 km/s, we numerically modeled both thermal ablation and sputtering ablation during atmospheric flight. We considered three meteoroid models believed to be representative of asteroidal (3300 kg m^-3 mass density), cometary (1000 kg m^-3) and porous cometary (300 kg m^-3) meteoroid structures. Atmospheric profiles which considered the molecular compositions at different heights were used in the sputtering calculations. We find that while in many cases (particularly at low velocities and for relatively large meteoroid masses) sputtering contributes only a small amount of mass loss during atmospheric flight, in some cases sputtering is ver...

  6. High turnover rates of copepod fecal pellets due to Noctiluca scintillans grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Copepod fecal pellet production and vertical flux, as well as vertical distributions of copepods, fecal pellets and the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans were monitored in an upwelling plume off the coast of Brazil during 5 d in austral spring. Less than half (20 to 45......%) of the pellets produced in the overlying water column reached sediment traps positioned at 30 to 60 m depth, and specific sinking losses computed from steady-state considerations varied inversely with trap depth between 0.3 and 2.9 d-1. Total specific losses varied between 0.6 and 16 d-1, and the major part...... as the latter aged, up to 5 x 105 cells m-2, and fecal pellets occurred commonly in the food vacuoles of N. scintillans. Specific fecal pellet remineralization rates were linearly related to the abundance of N. scintillans. This relation can be quantitatively accounted for if N. scintillans clears the water...

  7. Factors related to building loss due to wildfires in the conterminous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Patricia M; Stewart, Susan I; Keuler, Nicholas S; Clayton, Murray K; Mockrin, Miranda H; Bar-Massada, Avi; Syphard, Alexandra D; Radeloff, Volker C

    2016-10-01

    Wildfire is globally an important ecological disturbance affecting biochemical cycles and vegetation composition, but also puts people and their homes at risk. Suppressing wildfires has detrimental ecological effects and can promote larger and more intense wildfires when fuels accumulate, which increases the threat to buildings in the wildland-urban interface (WUI). Yet, when wildfires occur, typically only a small proportion of the buildings within the fire perimeter are lost, and the question is what determines which buildings burn. Our goal was to examine which factors are related to building loss when a wildfire occurs throughout the United States. We were particularly interested in the relative roles of vegetation, topography, and the spatial arrangement of buildings, and how their respective roles vary among ecoregions. We analyzed all fires that occurred within the conterminous United States from 2000 to 2010 and digitized which buildings were lost and which survived according to Google Earth historical imagery. We modeled the occurrence as well as the percentage of buildings lost within clusters using logistic and linear regression. Overall, variables related to topography and the spatial arrangement of buildings were more frequently present in the best 20 regression models than vegetation-related variables. In other words, specific locations in the landscape have a higher fire risk, and certain development patterns can exacerbate that risk. Fire policies and prevention efforts focused on vegetation management are important, but insufficient to solve current wildfire problems. Furthermore, the factors associated with building loss varied considerably among ecoregions suggesting that fire policy applied uniformly across the United States will not work equally well in all regions and that efforts to adapt communities to wildfires must be regionally tailored.

  8. Wetland loss due to land use change in the Lower Paraná River Delta, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Y V; Quintana, R D; Radeloff, V C; Gavier-Pizarro, G I

    2016-10-15

    Wetland loss is a global concern because wetlands are highly diverse ecosystems that provide important goods and services, thus threatening both biodiversity and human well-being. The Paraná River Delta is one of the largest and most important wetland ecosystems of South America, undergoing expanding cattle and forestry activities with widespread water control practices. To understand the patterns and drivers of land cover change in the Lower Paraná River Delta, we quantified land cover changes and modeled associated factors. We developed land cover maps using Landsat images from 1999 and 2013 and identified main land cover changes. We quantified the influence of different socioeconomic (distance to roads, population centers and human activity centers), land management (area within polders, cattle density and years since last fire), biophysical variables (landscape unit, elevation, soil productivity, distance to rivers) and variables related to extreme system dynamics (flooding and fires) on freshwater marsh conversion with Boosted Regression Trees. We found that one third of the freshwater marshes of the Lower Delta (163,000ha) were replaced by pastures (70%) and forestry (18%) in only 14years. Ranching practices (represented by cattle density, area within polders and distance to roads) were the most important factors responsible for freshwater marsh conversion to pasture. These rapid and widespread losses of freshwater marshes have potentially large negative consequences for biodiversity and ecosystem services. A strategy for sustainable wetland management will benefit from careful analysis of dominant land uses and related management practices, to develop an urgently needed land use policy for the Lower Delta.

  9. Gut microbiota composition correlates with changes in body fat content due to weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remely, M; Tesar, I; Hippe, B; Gnauer, S; Rust, P; Haslberger, A G

    2015-01-01

    Genetics, lifestyle, and dietary habits contribute to metabolic syndrome, but also an altered gut microbiota has been identified. Based on this knowledge it is suggested that host bacterial composition tends to change in response to dietary factors and weight loss. The aim of this study was to identify bacteria affecting host metabolism in obesity during weight loss and to correlate them with changes of the body composition obtained from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). We recruited obese individuals receiving a dietary intervention according DACH (German, Austrian, and Swiss Society of Nutrition) reference values and guidelines for 'prevention and therapy of obesity' of DAG e.V., DDG, DGE e.V., and DGEM e.V. over three months. Faecal microbiota and BIA measurements were conducted at three time points, before, during, and after the intervention. Gut microbiota was analysed on the basis of 16S rDNA with quantitative real time PCR. Additionally, a food frequency questionnaire with questions to nutritional behaviour, lifestyle, and physical activity was administered before intervention. After weight reduction, obese individuals showed a significant increase of total bacterial abundance. The ratio of Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes significantly decreased during intervention. Lactobacilli significantly increased between the first and the second time point. These differences also correlated with differences in weight percentage. During the intervention period Clostridium cluster IV increased significantly between the second and the third time point. In contrast Clostridium cluster XIVa showed a decreased abundance. The dominant butyrate producer, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, significantly increased as did the abundance of the butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase gene. Archaea and Akkermansia were significantly more prevalent after weight reduction. Our results show a clear difference in the gut bacterial composition before and after dietary intervention with a rapid

  10. Short term Heart Rate Variability to predict blood pressure drops due to standing: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, G; Melillo, P; Stranges, S; De Pietro, G; Pecchia, L

    2015-01-01

    Standing from a bed or chair may cause a significant lowering of blood pressure (ΔBP), which may have severe consequences such as, for example, falls in older subjects. The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict the ΔBP due to standing in healthy subjects, based on their Heart Rate Variability, recorded in the 5 minutes before standing. Heart Rate Variability was extracted from an electrocardiogram, recorded from 10 healthy subjects during the 5 minutes before standing. The blood pressure value was measured before and after rising. A mathematical model aiming to predict ΔBP based on Heart Rate Variability measurements was developed using a robust multi-linear regression and was validated with the leave-one-subject-out cross-validation technique. The model predicted correctly the ΔBP in 80% of experiments, with an error below the measurement error of sphygmomanometer digital devices (± 4.5 mmHg), a false negative rate of 7.5% and a false positive rate of 10%. The magnitude of the ΔBP was associated with a depressed and less chaotic Heart Rate Variability pattern. The present study showes that blood pressure lowering due to standing can be predicted by monitoring the Heart Rate Variability in the 5 minutes before standing.

  11. Due To Surplus in Aluminum Capacity, a Number of Enterprises Experienced Loss to Varying Degrees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Beginning from 2002,in China’s aluminum industry,aluminum output began to show surplus due to dwindling demand from downstream industry;in 2008 China’s aluminum surplus was expected to reach 500,000 tonnes.In recent years,capacity surplus in the aluminum industry has become widely known,in the final analysis,the reason is related to the accelerating speed of capacity

  12. Soil nutrient loss due to tuber crop harvesting and its environmental impact in the North China Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Han-qing; LI Yong; ZHOU Na; Adrian Chappell; LI Xiao-yu; Jean Poesen

    2016-01-01

    Soil loss due to crop harvesting (SLCH) is a soil erosion process that signiifcantly contributes to soil degradation in crop-lands. However, little is known about soil nutrient losses caused by SLCH and its environmental impacts. In the North China Plain area, we measured the losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen as wel as phosphorus due to SLCH and assessed their relationship with soil particle size composition, agronomic practices and soil moisture content. Our results show that the losses by harvesting potato of SOC, total nitrogen (TN), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and total phosphorus (TP) were 1.7, 1.8, 1.8, 15.9 and 14.1 times compared by harvesting sweet potato, respectively. The variation of SOC, N and P loss by SLCH are mainly explained by the variation of plant density (PD) (17–50%), net mass of an individual tuber (Mcrop/p) (16–74%), soil clay content (34–70%) and water content (19–46%). Taking into account the current sewage treatment system and the ratio of the nutrients adhering to the tubers during transportation from the ifeld (NTRP/SP), the loss of TN and TP by harvesting of potato and sweet potato in the North China Plain area amounts to 3% N and 20% P loads in the water bodies of this region. The fate of the exported N and P in the sewage treatment system ultimately controls the contribution of N and P to the polution of lakes and rivers. Our results suggest that a large amount of SLCH-induced soil nutrient export during transportation from the ifeld is a potential polutant source for agricultural water for vast planting areas of tuber crops in China, and should not be overlooked.

  13. Evaluating Land Subsidence Rates and Their Implications for Land Loss in the Lower Mississippi River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High subsidence rates, along with eustatic sea-level change, sediment accumulation and shoreline erosion have led to widespread land loss and the deterioration of ecosystem health around the Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB. A proper evaluation of the spatial pattern of subsidence rates in the LMRB is the key to understanding the mechanisms of the submergence, estimating its potential impacts on land loss and the long-term sustainability of the region. Based on the subsidence rate data derived from benchmark surveys from 1922 to 1995, this paper constructed a subsidence rate surface for the region through the empirical Bayesian kriging (EBK interpolation method. The results show that the subsidence rates in the region ranged from 1.7 to 29 mm/year, with an average rate of 9.4 mm/year. Subsidence rates increased from north to south as the outcome of both regional geophysical conditions and anthropogenic activities. Four areas of high subsidence rates were found, and they are located in Orleans, Jefferson, Terrebonne and Plaquemines parishes. A projection of future landscape loss using the interpolated subsidence rates reveals that areas below zero elevation in the LMRB will increase from 3.86% in 2004 to 19.79% in 2030 and 30.88% in 2050. This translates to a growing increase of areas that are vulnerable to land loss from 44.3 km2/year to 240.7 km2/year from 2011 to 2050. Under the same scenario, Lafourche, Plaquemines and Terrebonne parishes will experience serious loss of wetlands, whereas Orleans and Jefferson parishes will lose significant developed land, and Lafourche parish will endure severe loss of agriculture land.

  14. Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainty propagation in a stratospheric model. 2: Uncertainties due to reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Butler, D. M.; Rundel, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A concise stratospheric model was used in a Monte-Carlo analysis of the propagation of reaction rate uncertainties through the calculation of an ozone perturbation due to the addition of chlorine. Two thousand Monte-Carlo cases were run with 55 reaction rates being varied. Excellent convergence was obtained in the output distributions because the model is sensitive to the uncertainties in only about 10 reactions. For a 1 ppby chlorine perturbation added to a 1.5 ppby chlorine background, the resultant 1 sigma uncertainty on the ozone perturbation is a factor of 1.69 on the high side and 1.80 on the low side. The corresponding 2 sigma factors are 2.86 and 3.23. Results are also given for the uncertainties, due to reaction rates, in the ambient concentrations of stratospheric species.

  15. Particle Rate and Host Accelerator Beam Loss on the MICE Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Adam James [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    A study is presented of particle rates in the MICE Muon Beamline and their relationship to beam loss produced in ISIS. A brief overview of neutrino physics is presented, together with a discussion on the Neutrino Factory as a motivation for MICE. An overview of MICE itself is then presented, highlighting the need for a systematic understanding of the relationship between the MICE target parameters, ISIS beam loss, and MICE particle rate. The variation of beam loss with target depth is examined and observed to be non-linear. The variation of beam loss with respect to the target dip time in the ISIS cycle is examined and observed to be approximately linear for dip times between 11.1 ms and 12.6 ms after ISIS injection, before tailing at earlier dip times. The variation of beam loss with particle rate is also observed to follow an approximately linear relationship from 0.05 V.ms to 4.7 V.ms beam loss, with a further strong indication that this continues up to 7.1 V.ms. Particle identification using time-of-flight data is used to give an insight into the relative abundances of each particle species present in the MICE beam. Estimates of muon rate are then produced as a function of beam loss. At a level of 2 V.ms beam loss ~10.9 muons per spill for a 3.2 ms spill with negative π → μ optics, and ~31.1 muons per 1 ms spill with positive π → μ optics are observed. Simulations using the ORBIT particle tracking code of the beam loss distributions around the ISIS ring, caused by the MICE target, are also presented and the implications for MICE running discussed.

  16. Radiation in the C0 assembly hall due to muons from accidental beam loss in the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbincius, P.H.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    A set of calculations performed with the MARS15 code indicates a maximum radiation dose due to muons in the C0 Assembly Building (C0 AB) for a person standing on a ladder in the orbit plane of the Tevatron of 10 mrem and a maximum dose for a person standing on a C0 AB floor < 1 mrem per loss of 2.5 x 10{sup 13} protons of 1 TeV energy in the Tevatron.

  17. Comparison of distance and near visual acuity in patients with vision loss due to cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Carmel L; Doroslovački, Pavle; Wang, Jiangxia; Siddiqui, Aazim A; Kolker, Andrew F; Kolker, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether there is a disparity in distance and near best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in cataract eyes. 102 patients with cataract (N = 121 eyes) were seen in clinic between January and November 2013 at the Wilmer Eye Institute Comprehensive Eye Service. An age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) group (N = 27 eyes) was also identified for comparison. Distance and near BCVA were measured as part of the standard ophthalmic evaluation. Snellen measurements were converted to their LogMAR equivalents for statistical analysis. Near was better than distance BCVA with mean difference of 1.38 lines (P distance BCVA disparity is a statistically significant finding seen with cataracts. This may have further implications in patients with both cataract and ARMD as the presence of disparity may suggest a cataract etiology playing a greater role in vision loss. This comparison may be useful for surgical prognostication and as a quick triage tool in conjunction with, or in place of, a potential acuity meter and dilated near-pinhole test.

  18. Characterizing GPS radio occultation loss of lock due to ionospheric weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Pedatella, Nicholas M.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Transient loss of lock is one of the key space weather effects on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations during 2007-2011, we have analyzed the signal cycle slip (CS) occurrence comprehensively and its correlation to the ionospheric weather phenomena such as sporadic E (Es), equatorial F region irregularity (EFI), and the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The high vertical resolution of RO observations enables us to distinguish the CS resulting from different ionospheric layers clearly on a global scale. In the E layer, the CS is dominated by the Es occurrence, while in the F layer, the CS is mainly related to the EIA and EFI at low and equatorial latitudes. In the polar region, the CS is primarily related to polar cap electron density gradients. The overall average CS (>6 cycles) occurrence is ~23% per occultation, with the E (50-150 km) and F (150-600 km) layers contributing ~8.3% and ~14.7%, respectively. Awareness of the effect of the ionospheric weather on the CS of the low Earth orbit (LEO)-based GNSS signal could be beneficial to a variety of applications, including the LEO-based GNSS data processing and the corresponding hardware/firmware design.

  19. Thermal structures of accreting neutron stars with neutrino losses due to strong pion condensations

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuo, Yasuhide; Hayashida, Koutarou; Liu, Helei; Noda, Tsuneo; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y

    2016-01-01

    Quiescent X-ray luminosities are presented in low mass X-ray binaries with use of evolutionary calculations. The calculated luminosities are compared with observed ones in terms of timeaveraged mass accretion rate. It is shown that neutrino emission by strong pion condensation can explain quiescent X-ray luminosity of SAX J1808.4-3658 and we do not need direct Urca processes concerning nucleons and/or hyperons.

  20. The loss of the entanglement between Hawking pairs due to a black hole singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Oshita, Naritaka

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the entanglement of Hawking pairs disappears due to redshift of the infalling mode in the vicinity of a black hole singularity. More concretely, the infalling mode is redshifted as it falls away from the horizon and decoheres, which makes the state of the Hawking pair separable, namely the entanglement is broken. This implies we no longer need to introduce the firewalls to avoid the firewall paradox. In other words, we do not need to abandon any of the fundamental principle, i.e., Einstein's equivalence principle, unitarity, and quantum field theory.

  1. Binder extraction from green multilayer ceramics using a weight loss rate-controlled thermogravimetric analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Jason; Speyer, Robert F.; Murali, Lakshman

    1997-06-01

    A weight loss rate-controlled organic extraction furnace was built and demonstrated using a multilayer green ceramic. Multirate weight loss schedules as well as automated atmosphere control and detection were demonstrated. The low thermal mass furnace showed good tracking with 300 °C heating and cooling rates. This furnace, coupled with appropriate PID control constants, facilitated feedback control which could extract organics rapidly without self-ignition to uncontrolled combustion. Controlled organic burnout was demonstrated at weight loss rates up to 0.5%/min in air. Damage-free multilayers were observed using a burnout rate requiring 150 min for extraction, rather than the days commonly associated with this task when using conventional furnaces.

  2. Fetal loss rate after chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis: an 11-year national registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabor, A; Vestergaard, C H F; Lidegaard, Ø

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the fetal loss rate following amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS). METHODS: This was a national registry-based cohort study, including all singleton pregnant women who had an amniocentesis (n = 32 852) or CVS (n = 31 355) in Denmark between 1996 and 2006. Personal...... registration numbers of women having had an amniocentesis or a CVS were retrieved from the Danish Central Cytogenetic Registry, and cross-linked with the National Registry of Patients to determine the outcome of each pregnancy. Postprocedural fetal loss rate was defined as miscarriage or intrauterine demise...... before 24 weeks of gestation. RESULTS: The miscarriage rates were 1.4% (95% CI, 1.3-1.5) after amniocentesis and 1.9% (95% CI, 1.7-2.0) after CVS. The postprocedural loss rate for both procedures did not change during the 11-year study period, and was not correlated with maternal age. The number...

  3. Biodiversity loss in seagrass meadows due to local invertebrate fisheries and harbour activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, Lina Mtwana; Gullström, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Seagrass meadows provide a wide variety of ecosystem services, but their distribution and health are adversely affected by man. In the present study, we examined the influence of coastal exploitation in terms of invertebrate harvesting and harbour activity on invertebrate community composition in subtropical seagrass meadows at Inhaca Island, Mozambique, in the Western Indian Ocean. There was a fivefold higher invertebrate density and biomass, and clearly higher invertebrate species richness, in the protected (control) site compared to the two exploited sites. The causes for the clear differences between protected and exploited sites were probably a result of (1) the directional outtake of large edible or saleable invertebrates (mostly molluscs) and the absence of boat traffic in the harvested site, and (2) harbour activities. Invertebrate community composition in the two exploited sites also differed (although less clear), which was likely due to inherent distinction in type of disturbance. Our findings revealed that protection of seagrass habitat is necessary and that disturbances of different origin might require different forms of management and conservation. Designing protected areas is however a complex process due to competition for use and space with activities such as invertebrate harvesting and harbours.

  4. Dies1/VISTA expression loss is a recurrent event in gastric cancer due to epigenetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Carvalho, Joana; Rocha, Sara; Azevedo, Mafalda; Reis, Inês; Camilo, Vânia; Sousa, Bárbara; Valente, Sofia; Paredes, Joana; Almeida, Raquel; Huntsman, David; Oliveira, Carla

    2016-10-10

    Dies1/VISTA induces embryonic stem-cell differentiation, via BMP-pathway, but also acts as inflammation regulator and immune-response modulator. Dies1 inhibition in a melanoma-mouse model led to increased tumour-infiltrating T-cells and decreased tumour growth, emphasizing Dies1 relevance in tumour-microenvironment. Dies1 is involved in cell de/differentiation, inflammation and cancer processes, which mimic those associated with Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal-Transition (EMT). Despite this axis linking Dies1 with EMT and cancer, its expression, modulation and relevance in these contexts is unknown. To address this, we analysed Dies1 expression, its regulation by promoter-methylation and miR-125a-5p overexpression, and its association with BMP-pathway downstream-effectors, in a TGFβ1-induced EMT-model, cancer cell-lines and primary samples. We detected promoter-methylation as a mechanism controlling Dies1 expression in our EMT-model and in several cancer cell-lines. We showed that the relationship between Dies1 expression and BMP-pathway effectors observed in the EMT-model, was not present in all cell-lines, suggesting that Dies1 has other cell-specific effectors, beyond the BMP-pathway. We further demonstrated that: Dies1 expression loss is a recurrent event in GC, caused by promoter methylation and/or miR-125a-5p overexpression and; GC-microenvironment myofibroblasts overexpress Dies1. Our findings highlight Dies1 as a novel player in GC, with distinct roles within tumour cells and in the tumour-microenvironment.

  5. Measurement of 2 characteristics of metastable helium important for laser cooling: loss rates due to collisions in presence of quasi-resonant laser radiation and transition rates for 2 forbidden transitions: 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} and 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0}; Mesure de deux caracteristiques de l'helium metastable importantes pour le refroidissement radiatif: taux de pertes par collisions en presence de lumiere quasi-resonante et taux de transition des raies interdites 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} et 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} {yields} 1{sup 1}S{sub 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poupard, J

    2000-11-15

    This thesis presents the study of 2 characteristics of metastable helium that are important for laser cooling. First, we measure two-body losses in a magneto-optical trap. The losses, enhanced by nearly resonant laser radiation, are mainly due to ionizing collisions. We measure the loss rate by observing the decay of the number of trapped atoms using either atomic fluorescence or ion production. We study the loss rate as a function of the trapping laser parameters. The second part of the thesis concerns experiments to measure the transition rates of the intercombination lines: 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} to 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} and 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} to 1{sup 1}S{sub 0}. The first of these rates is measured by exciting a small fraction of the atoms in a magneto-optical trap to the 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} state and observing the decrease in the trap lifetime. We then measure the ratio of the transition rates for 2{sup 3}P{sub 1} and 2{sup 3}P{sub 2} towards the 1{sup 1}S{sub 0} ground state by monitoring the flux of UV photons associated with the transition. (author)

  6. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  7. Assessment, management rehabilitation of surface water losses due to longwall coal mining subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawkins, A.P. [Coffey Geosciences Pty. Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1999-07-01

    Subsidence due to longwall coal mining has generated notable effects on surface water and groundwater above numerous longwall coal mines in Queensland and NSW. This paper deals with the methods which can be used to assess, predict and rehabilitate the effects of longwall surface subsidence on surface water bodies. Aspects discussed cover the subsidence model, hydrological and hydrogeological assessment, hydrogeochemical changes and subsidence rehabilitation issues. The paper concludes that longwall surface subsidence can significantly affect the mine's local environment. However, with sufficient baseline data and a thorough assessment of site specific issues, longwalls can be planned to account for subsidence effects on surface water, and possible deleterious effects can be mitigated. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Kinetics of 3-chlorotyrosine formation and loss due to hypochlorous acid and chloramines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Matthew P; Hicks, Andrew J; Neidigh, Jonathan W

    2011-03-21

    The persistent activation of innate immune cells in chronic inflammation is gaining recognition as a contributing factor in a number of human diseases. A distinguishing feature of activated leukocytes at sites of inflammation is their production of reactive species such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Investigating the role of reactive molecules such as HOCl in inflammation and human disease requires appropriate biomarkers. The preferred biomarker for HOCl, and by extension its synthesizing enzyme myeloperoxidase, is 3-chlorotyrosine. 3-Chlorotyrosine is a chemically stable product formed when HOCl, or an HOCl-generated chloramine, reacts with the tyrosine side chain and is readily measured by sensitive mass spectrometry methods. However, Whiteman and Spencer ((2008) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 371, 50 - 53.) noted that 3-chlorotyrosine is degraded by HOCl, calling into question its use as a biomarker. The kinetic rate constants for the reaction of 3-chlorotyrosine with HOCl, histidine chloramine, or lysine chloramine to form 3,5-dichlorotyrosine are reported. The kinetics of tyrosine chlorination in the context of a peptide with a nearby lysine residue was also determined and further supports the role of chloramines in the chlorination of protein-bound tyrosine residues. The likelihood of free and protein-bound 3,5-dichlorotyrosine occurring in vivo, given the reported rate constants, is discussed.

  9. Comparing the rates of absorption and weight loss during a desorption test using near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qassem, M; Kyriacou, P A

    2013-05-01

    The importance of determining skin hydration has over the years prompt the development of many instruments and methods, specifically designed to assess this parameter or water contents especially in the stratum corneum, and have greatly matured to suit different anatomical sites and measure multiple attributes. Of those, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) has gained wide interest as a precise, safe, fast and noninvasive technique for determining skin hydration due to its high sensitivity to hydrogen bonding and ability to measure the amount of water in skin directly using the intensities of overtone and combination bands of OH and HOH water bonds occurring in the NIR region, that are good indicators of the state of skin hydration. This paper reports near infrared spectrophotometric measurements using a highly sophisticated spectrophotometer in the region of 1000-2500 nm to study the water uptake and dehydration properties of skin in vitro using samples of porcine skin. Initial results of pure liquid water and skin samples have clearly displayed the prominent bands associated with water content, and desorption tests have been able to verify changes in these bands associated with water content, although a clear correlation between the rates of weight loss and absorbance loss at various hydration periods has not yet been established. These preliminary results are expected to further explain the relationship between water and skin, and its role within, in hope to aid the future development of a portable instrument based on near infrared spectroscopy that would be capable of directly measuring skin hydration and/or water content in a fast and noninvasive manner.

  10. A Grid of MHD Models for Stellar Mass Loss and Spin-down Rates of Solar Analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Stellar winds are believed to be the dominant factor in spin down of stars over time. However, stellar winds of solar analogs are poorly constrained due to the challenges in observing them. A great improvement has been made in the last decade in our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of the solar wind and in the development of numerical models for solar and stellar winds. In this paper, we present a grid of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models to study and quantify the values of stellar mass-loss and angular momentum loss rates as a function of the stellar rotation period, magnetic dipole component, and coronal base density. We derive simple scaling laws for the loss rates as a function of these parameters, and constrain the possible mass-loss rate of stars with thermally-driven winds. Despite the success of our scaling law in matching the results of the model, we find a deviation between the "solar dipole" case and a real case based on solar observations that overestimates the actua...

  11. Managing for No Net Loss of Ecological Services: An Approach for Quantifying Loss of Coastal Wetlands due to Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassakian, Jennifer; Jones, Ann; Martinich, Jeremy; Hudgens, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Sea level rise has the potential to substantially alter the extent and nature of coastal wetlands and the critical ecological services they provide. In making choices about how to respond to rising sea level, planners are challenged with weighing easily quantified risks (e.g., loss of property value due to inundation) against those that are more difficult to quantify (e.g., loss of primary production or carbon sequestration services provided by wetlands due to inundation). Our goal was to develop a cost-effective, appropriately-scaled, model-based approach that allows planners to predict, under various sea level rise and response scenarios, the economic cost of wetland loss—with the estimates proxied by the costs of future restoration required to maintain the existing level of wetland habitat services. Our approach applies the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model to predict changes in wetland habitats over the next century, and then applies Habitat Equivalency Analysis to predict the cost of restoration projects required to maintain ecological services at their present, pre-sea level rise level. We demonstrate the application of this approach in the Delaware Bay estuary and in the Indian River Lagoon (Florida), and discuss how this approach can support future coastal decision-making.

  12. [Sudden motor and sensorial loss due to retroperitoneal hematoma during postoperative periods: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Pelin; Gültekin, Havva Gül; Caymaz, İsmail; Özel, Ömer; Türköz, Ayda

    A 68 year-old male patient was hospitalized for radical prostatectomy. He had no abnormal medical history including neurological deficit before the operation. Prior to general anesthesia, an epidural catheter was inserted in the L3-4 interspace for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. After surgery for nine hours, he developed confusion and flaccid paralysis of bilateral lower extremities occurred. No pathology was detected from cranial computed tomography and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging no pathology was detected. His thoracic/lumbar magnetic resonance imaging. Intraabdominal pressure was shown to be 25mmHg, and abdominal ultrasonography revealed progression in the inflammation/edema/hematoma in the perirenal region. The Bromage score was back to 1 in the right foot on the 24th hour and in the left foot on the 26th hour. Paraplegia developed in patients after epidural infusion might be caused by potentiated local anesthetic effect due to retroperitoneal hematoma and/or elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term effects of early parental loss due to divorce on the HPA axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Miki; Peleg, Ido; Koren, Danny; Aner, Hamotal; Klein, Ehud

    2007-04-01

    We investigated the long-term effects of divorce and early separation from one parent on HPA axis reactivity, in young adults without psychopathology. Participants were 44 young subjects, 22 whose parents divorced before they reached age 10, and 22 controls. Psychiatric symptomatology was measured with the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), family perceived stress by the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), and bonding by the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). Assessment of HPA axis function included baseline morning cortisol and ACTH and cortisol response to a CRH stimulation test. No baseline or stimulated group differences were observed for ACTH. Cortisol levels were consistently but insignificantly lower in the divorce group throughout the CRH stimulation reaching statistical significance only at 5 min (peffect reached a trend level (peffect for both family stress and child-parent bonding to stimulated ACTH levels. These preliminary findings suggest that even in the absence of adult psychopathology, a history of childhood separation from one parent due to divorce may lead to detectable, albeit mild, long-term alterations in HPA axis activity. Furthermore, they suggest that level of stress at home and parental bonding are important determinants of this effect. It is likely that divorce has significant and sustained effects on children's HPA axis only in the context of a traumatic separation.

  14. On the Upper Ocean Turbulent Dissipation Rate due to Very Short Breaking Wind-Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Banner, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Sutherland and Melville (2015a) investigated the relative contributions to the total dissipation rate in the ocean surface wave boundary layer of different breaking wave scales, from large-scale whitecaps to micro-breakers. Based on their measurements of geometric/kinematic properties of breaking waves for a wide range of wave ages, they inferred the dissipation rates from breaking as a function of scale. These results were compared with their complementary measurements of the total dissipation rate in the underlying wave boundary layer. They reported that the total depth-integrated dissipation rate in the water column agreed well with dissipation rate from breaking waves for young to very old wind seas. They also reported high observed levels of dissipation rate very near the sea surface. They concluded that this showed a large fraction of the total dissipation rate was due to non-air entraining micro-breakers and very small whitecaps. Because of its fundamental importance, both physically and for accurate a...

  15. Cross‐Layer optimization of the packet loss rate in mobile videoconferencing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rivera‐Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Videoconferencing transmission over wireless channels presents relevant challenges in mobile scenarios at vehicular speeds.Previous contributions are focused on the optimization of the transmission of multimedia and delay‐sensitive applications overthe forward link. In this paper, a new Quality of Service (QoS parameter adaptation scheme is proposed. This scheme appliesthe Cross‐Layer Design technique on the reverse link of an 1xEV‐DO Revision 0 channel. As the wireless channel parameters andthe vehicle speed have significant influence in the network layer packet loss rate, it is proposed that the data rate generated bythe application adapts itself to the throughput offered by the lower layers as a function of such packet loss rate. Simulations ofthe proposed model show a significant reduction in losses caused by wireless channel impairments and vehicle mobility,resulting in an improvement in the performance of the mobile videoconferencing session.

  16. Pre-Spud Mud Loss Flow Rate in Steeply Folded Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhiyuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method that predicts the pre-spud mud loss flow rate in formations with tectonic fractures of steeply folded structures is proposed. The new method is based on finite element analysis of the palaeo-tectonic and current tectonic stress field and fracture distribution. The steps of the method are as follows. First, palaeo-tectonic stress distribution is simulated through finite element analysis. The tectonic fracture distribution of the region is obtained by combining rock failure criteria with palaeo-tectonic stress distribution. Afterward, the tectonic fracture density, aperture, porosity and permeability are calculated by studying the rebuilding process of current stress to the fracture parameters. Finally, the mud loss flow rate is calculated according to fracture parameters and the basic data of a given well. The new method enables the prediction of the mud loss flow rate before drilling steeply folded structures.

  17. Expanded calculation of weak-interaction mediated neutrino cooling rates due to $^{56}$Ni in stellar matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimate of the neutrino cooling rates is required in order to study the various stages of stellar evolution of massive stars. Neutrino losses from proto-neutron stars play a crucial role in deciding whether these stars would be crushed into black holes or explode as supernovae. Both pure leptonic and weak-interaction processes contribute to the neutrino energy losses in stellar matter. At low temperatures and densities, characteristic of the early phase of presupernova evolution, cooling through neutrinos produced via the weak-interaction is important. Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently being used for calculation of stellar weak-interaction rates of $fp$-shell nuclide with success. The lepton-to-baryon ratio ($Y_{e}$) during early phases of stellar evolution of massive stars changes substantially alone due to electron captures on $^{56}$Ni. The stellar matter is transparent to the neutrinos produced during the presupernova evolution of massive star...

  18. Loss of Shallow Geothermal Resources in Urban Environment Due to the Absence of Thermal Management Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, A.; Vázquez-Suñé, E.; Sánchez-Navarro, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow geothermal energy resources are of interest worldwide for the development of strategies against climate change. The current regulative framework for the sustainable implementation of the technologies exploiting this resources is facing several barriers. In the case of groundwater heat pumps, the thermal interference between exploitations may be endangering their feasibility in urban environments. Uncertainty in prediction of the sustainability of shallow geothermal energy development in urban groundwater bodies stems from the absence of a scientific-based legal regulatory framework which protects stakeholders from thermal interferences between existent exploitations systems. The present work consists of a numerical study aimed at understanding and predicting the thermal interference between groundwater heat pumps where several induced heat plumes in an urban ground water body coalesce, thus generating a heat island effect. A transient groundwater flow and heat transport model was developed to reproduce complex high-resolution data obtained from local monitoring specifically designed to control the aquifer respond to geothermal exploitation. The model aims to reproduce the groundwater flow and heat transport processes in a shallow alluvial aquifer exploited by 27 groundwater heat pumps and influenced by a river-aquifer relationship dominated by flood events mainly occurring in winter when the surface temperature is between 3 and 10 ºC. The results from the simulations have quantified the time-space thermal interference between exploitation systems and the consequences of river-aquifer thermal exchange. The results obtained showed the complexity of thermal management of the aquifer due to the transient activity of exploitations over space and time. With the actual exploitation regime of shallow geothermal resources in the investigated area the model predicts a temperature rising tendency in the production wells until 2019 which can compromise the coefficient

  19. REDUCING THE REJECTION RATE OF ENGINES MANUFACTURING DUE TO INJECTION TIMING VARIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. P.SIVASHANKARI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The white paper is on HINO 6 cylinder engine and the aim is to reduce the rejection rate of engines during testing due to the problems occur in valve timing and injection timing. The concept of Six Sigma is mainly practiced as a design to eliminate the production defects by improving the process of manufacturing. In the observation, the injection timing mark (spill mark is not perfectly done and also the imperfection in flywheel marking machine locator pin increases engine rejection. The aim is to eliminate the engines getting rejected during engine test due to problems arising in the injection timing and valve timing. As there are a lot of problems arising in the test bed where the engine is tested, few of which are related to injection timing and valve timing. These problems mainly arise due to changes in the valve and injection timing variation.

  20. Error resilient H.264/AVC Video over Satellite for low Packet Loss Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghito, Shankar Manuel; Forchhammer, Søren; Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    2007-01-01

    The performance of video over satellite is simulated. The error resilience tools of intra macroblock refresh and slicing are optimized for live broadcast video over satellite. The improved performance using feedback, using a cross- layer approach, over the satellite link is also simulated. The ne...... Inmarsat BGAN system at 256 kbit/s is used as test case. This systems operates at low loss rates guaranteeing a packet loss rate of not more than 10~3. For high-end applications as 'reporter-in-the-field' live broadcast, it is crucial to obtain high quality without increasing delay....

  1. Low-loss waveguides fabricated in BK7 glass by high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Shane M; Ng, Mi Li; Bonse, Jörn; Mermillod-Blondin, Alexandre; Zhang, Haibin; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Herman, Peter R

    2008-04-20

    For the first time femtosecond-laser writing has inscribed low-loss optical waveguides in Schott BK7 glass, a commercially important type of borosilicate widely used in optical applications. The use of a variable repetition rate laser enabled the identification of a narrow processing window at 1 MHz repetition rate with optimal waveguides exhibiting propagation losses of 0.3 dB/cm and efficient mode matching to standard optical fibers at a 1550 nm wavelength. The waveguides were characterized by complementary phase contrast and optical transmission microscopy, identifying a micrometer-sized guiding region within a larger complex structure of both positive and negative refractive index variations.

  2. LEGAL PROTECTION FOR CUSTOMER SEGREGATED ACCOUNT OWNER FROM LOSS DUE TO THE BANKCRUPTY OF FUTURES BROKERAGE FIRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yessy Meryantika Sari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Commodity futures trading is a business activity that is complex and involves many parties including Client Segregated Account and Brokerage Company. This business promises huge benefits but ba-lanced with a high risk of loss. Therefore, a potential event of bankruptcy. Customer as the owner of the funds which mandated funds to the brokerage company to be managed for purposes of the transaction, should get legal protection from potential losses due to bankruptcy of futures brokerage firm. The spirit of the law in protection for customers is reflected in the preamble of le-gal norms futures trading as further elaborated in the general legal provisions stipulated in the Fu-tures Trading Act.

  3. Gross margin losses due to Salmonella Dublin infection in Danish dairy cattle herds estimated by simulation modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Dahl; Kudahl, Anne Braad; Østergaard, S.

    2013-01-01

    and dynamic simulation model. The model incorporated six age groups (neonatal, pre-weaned calves, weaned calves, growing heifers, breeding heifers and cows) and five infection stages (susceptible, acutely infected, carrier, super shedder and resistant). The effects of introducing one S. Dublin infectious...... losses. This was more influential in the poorer management scenarios due to increased number of infected cows. The results can be used to inform dairy farmers of the benefits of preventing introduction and controlling spread of S. Dublin. Furthermore, they can be used in cost-benefit analyses of control...

  4. End-to-end rate-based congestion control with random loss: convergence and stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The convergence and stability analysis for two end-to-end rate-based congestion control algorithms with unavoidable random loss in packets are presented, which can be caused by, for example, errors on wireless links. The convergence rates of these two algorithms are analyzed by linearizing them around their equilibrium points, since they are globally stable and can converge to their unique equilibrium points. Some sufficient conditions for local stability in the presence of round-trip delay are obtained based on the general Nyquist criterion of stability. The stability conditions can be considered to be more general. If random loss in the first congestion control algorithm is not considered, they reduce to the local stability conditions which have been obtained in some literatures. Furthermore, sufficient conditions for local stability of a new congestion control algorithm have also been obtained if random loss is not considered in the second congestion control algorithm.

  5. Complete Loss and Thermal Model of Power Semiconductors Including Device Rating Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    profiles of the power devices can accurately be mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal loading of the power converter. The proposed model can be further improved by experimental tests, and it is well agreed by both circuit and Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation......Thermal loading of power devices are closely related to the reliability performance of the whole converter system. The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal...... models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally pre-defined by experience with limited design flexibility. Consequently, a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical...

  6. Phyto-oestrogen excretion and rate of bone loss in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Morton, M.S.; Brüggemann-Rotgans, I.E.M.; Beresteijn, E.C.H. van

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The hypothesis was tested that the rate of postmenopausal bone loss is inversely associated with long-term urinary excretion of phyto-oestrogens, as a marker of habitual dietary intake. Design: Secondary analysis of a 10-year follow-up study (1979-1989) among postmenopausal women in the N

  7. Energy expenditure in relation to flight speed: whay is the power of mass loss rate estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvist, A.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Lindström, A.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between mass loss rate and chemical power in Eying birds is analysed with regard to water and heat balance. Two models are presented: the first model is applicable to situations where heat loads are moderate, i.e. when heat balance can be achieved by regulating non-evaporative heat

  8. Effect of rotational mixing and metallicity on the hot star wind mass-loss rates

    CERN Document Server

    Krticka, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Hot star wind mass-loss rates depend on the abundance of individual elements. This dependence is usually accounted for assuming scaled solar chemical composition. However, this approach may not be justified in evolved rotating stars. The rotational mixing brings CNO-processed material to the stellar surface, increasing the abundance of nitrogen at the expense of carbon and oxygen, which potentially influences the mass-loss rates. We study the influence of the modified chemical composition resulting from the rotational mixing on the wind parameters, particularly the wind mass-loss rates. We use our NLTE wind code to predict the wind structure and compare the calculated wind mass-loss rate for the case of scaled solar chemical composition and the composition affected by the CNO cycle. We show that for a higher mass-fraction of heavier elements $Z/Z_\\odot\\gtrsim0.1$ the change of chemical composition from the scaled solar to the CNO-processed scaled solar composition does not significantly affect the wind mass-l...

  9. Estimated crop loss due to coconut mite and financial analysis of controlling the pest using the acaricide abamectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Daniela; Melo, José W S; Oliveira, José E M; Gondim, Manoel G C

    2016-07-01

    Reducing the losses caused by Aceria guerreronis Keifer has been an arduous task for farmers. However, there are no detailed studies on losses that simultaneously analyse correlated parameters, and very few studies that address the economic viability of chemical control, the main strategy for managing this pest. In this study the objectives were (1) to estimate the crop loss due to coconut mite and (2) to perform a financial analysis of acaricide application to control the pest. For this, the following parameters were evaluated: number and weight of fruits, liquid albumen volume, and market destination of plants with and without monthly abamectin spraying (three harvests). The costs involved in the chemical control of A. guerreronis were also quantified. Higher A. guerreronis incidence on plants resulted in a 60 % decrease in the mean number of fruits harvested per bunch and a 28 % decrease in liquid albumen volume. Mean fruit weight remained unaffected. The market destination of the harvested fruit was also affected by higher A. guerreronis incidence. Untreated plants, with higher A. guerreronis infestation intensity, produced a lower proportion of fruit intended for fresh market and higher proportions of non-marketable fruit and fruit intended for industrial processing. Despite the costs involved in controlling A. guerreronis, the difference between the profit from the treated site and the untreated site was 18,123.50 Brazilian Real; this value represents 69.1 % higher profit at the treated site.

  10. XML Survey of the productivity loss due to heat stress in different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Monazzam Esmaielpou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heat is one of the hazardous physical agents in the workplace. Exposure to heat and consequent thermal stress influence workers productivity in addition to adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to determine the heat stress induced productivity loss related to different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city, during summer. Material and Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in summer, 2014, among farmers in Darreh Shahr city. After determining the sample size, farmers’ activities were determined using hierarchical task analysis (HTA, and WBGT measurements were done according to the ISO7243. Metabolism was estimated by the ISO8996. Following, the type of activities were identified according their required metabolism. Knowing WBGT and workload and using the work capacity model, the productivity loss in different tasks and ultimately total productivity loss were calculated. Result: The mean WBGT activities for plowing, terracing, planting seeds, watering, fertilizing, weeding, spraying, and harvesting were 29.98 °C, 31.28 °C,30.66 °C,31.39 °C,31.99 °C,31.75 °C,31.08 °C, and 30.3 °C, respectively. WBGT values were higher than the permissible level provided by ISO7243 in all farming activities. Maximum value of WBGT was belonged to fertilizing activity (31.99 °C and the lowest value was for plowing (29.98 °C. ANOVA test results did not show a significant difference in WBGT at head, waist, and ankle height. The highest and lowest amount of productivity loss was estimated respectively for weeding and plowing activities. The total productivity loss for farming was calculated 69.3 percent in an hour which is due to high physical activity, working outdoor, with exposure to direct solar radiation, and consequent heat stress imposed to workers. Conclusion: Productivity is a factor which is affected by the workplace heat stress. According to results of the present research, the amount of productivity is reduced

  11. Survey of the productivity loss due to heat stress in different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Monazzam Esmaielpour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heat is one of the hazardous physical agents in the workplace. Exposure to heat and consequent thermal stress influence workers productivity in addition to adverse health effects. The aim of this study was to determine the heat stress induced productivity loss related to different tasks of farmers in Darreh Shahr city, during summer. . Material and Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in summer, 2014, among farmers in Darreh Shahr city. After determining the sample size, farmers’ activities were determined using hierarchical task analysis (HTA, and WBGT measurements were done according to the ISO7243. Metabolism was estimated by the ISO8996. Following, the type of activities were identified according their required metabolism. Knowing WBGT and workload and using the work capacity model, the productivity loss in different tasks and ultimately total productivity loss were calculated. .Result: The mean WBGT activities for plowing, terracing, planting seeds, watering, fertilizing, weeding, spraying, and harvesting were 29.98 °C, 31.28 °C,30.66 °C,31.39 °C,31.99 °C,31.75 °C,31.08 °C, and 30.3 °C, respectively. WBGT values were higher than the permissible level provided by ISO7243 in all farming activities. Maximum value of WBGT was belonged to fertilizing activity (31.99 °C and the lowest value was for plowing (29.98 °C. ANOVA test results did not show a significant difference in WBGT at head, waist, and ankle height. The highest and lowest amount of productivity loss was estimated respectively for weeding and plowing activities. The total productivity loss for farming was calculated 69.3 percent in an hour which is due to high physical activity, working outdoor, with exposure to direct solar radiation, and consequent heat stress imposed to workers. .Conclusion: Productivity is a factor which is affected by the workplace heat stress. According to results of the present research, the amount of productivity is

  12. Testing the Rate of False Planetary Transits due to Binary Star Blending

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G K G

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the rate of false planetary transit detection due to blending with eclipsing binaries. Our approach is purely empirical and is based on the analysis of the artificially blended light curves of the eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud from the archive of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE). Employing parameters that characterize the significance of the transit and the amplitude of the variation out of the transit, we can substantially limit the number of potential false positives. Further constraint comes from the expected length of the transit by a possible planetary companion. By the application of these criteria we are left only with 18 candidates from the full sample of 2495 stars. Visual inspection of these remaining variables eliminates all of them for obvious reasons (e.g., for visible fingerprints of orbital eccentricity). We draw the attention to the short-period stars, where the false alarm rate is especially low.

  13. A unified numerical model of collisional depolarization and broadening rates due to hydrogen atom collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Derouich, M; Barklem, P S

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of solar polarization spectra accounting for partial or complete frequency redistribution requires data on various collisional processes. Data for depolarization and polarization transfer are needed but often missing, while data for collisional broadening are usually more readily available. Recent work by Sahal-Br\\'echot and Bommier concluded that despite underlying similarities in the physics of collisional broadening and depolarization processes, relationships between them are not possible to derive purely analytically. We aim to derive accurate numerical relationships between the collisional broadening rates and the collisional depolarization and polarization transfer rates due to hydrogen atom collisions. Such relationships would enable accurate and efficient estimation of collisional data for solar applications. Using earlier results for broadening and depolarization processes based on general (i.e. not specific to a given atom), semi-classical calculations employing interaction potentials...

  14. Heating rate and spin flip lifetime due to near field noise in layered superconducting atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Fermani, Rachele; Zhang, Bo; Lim, Michael J; Dumke, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the heating rate and spin flip lifetimes due to near field noise for atoms trapped close to layered superconducting structures. In particular, we compare the case of a gold layer deposited above a superconductor with the case of a bare superconductor. We study a niobium-based and a YBCO-based chip. For both niobium and YBCO chips at a temperature of 4.2 K, we find that the deposition of the gold layer can have a significant impact on the heating rate and spin flip lifetime, as a result of the increase of the near field noise. At a chip temperature of 77 K, this effect is less pronounced for the YBCO chip.

  15. Thermokarst Rates Intensify Due to Climate Change and Forest Fragmentation in an Alaskan Boreal Forest Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M. J.; Genet, H.; McGuire, A. D.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, D. N.; Jorgenson, T.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Breen, A. L.; Bolton, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse scar-bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5o C of thawing. Increases in the collapse of lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998 and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30x30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, respectively. Gradient boosting and regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950-2009 landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² of birch forest area to wetlands on the Tanana Flats, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights the vulnerability of lowland

  16. Measured Mass Loss Rates of Solar-like Stars as a Function of Age and Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, B E; Zank, G P; Linsky, J L; Wood, Brian E.; Mueller, Hans-Reinhard; Zank, Gary P.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Collisions between the winds of solar-like stars and the local ISM result in a population of hot hydrogen gas surrounding these stars. Absorption from this hot H I can be detected in high resolution Lyman-alpha spectra of these stars from the Hubble Space Telescope. The amount of absorption can be used as a diagnostic for the stellar mass loss rate. We present new mass loss rate measurements derived in this fashion for four stars (Epsilon Eri, 61 Cyg A, 36 Oph AB, and 40 Eri A). Combining these measurements with others, we study how mass loss varies with stellar activity. We find that for the solar-like GK dwarfs, the mass loss per unit surface area is correlated with X-ray surface flux. Fitting a power law to this relation yields Mdot ~ Fx^(1.15+/-0.20). The active M dwarf Proxima Cen and the very active RS CVn system Lambda And appear to be inconsistent with this relation. Since activity is known to decrease with age, the above power law relation for solar-like stars suggests that mass loss decreases with t...

  17. β-carotene losses due to handling and cooking in Kenyan leafy vegetables connote no comparative nutritional superiority over kales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiye, Shadrack O; Oniang'o, Ruth K; Shiundu, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    African leafy vegetables (ALVs) are known to be high in β-carotene content and are preferred over kales due to this nutritional superiority. Ten different vegetables were collected from farm and market locations and analyzed for β-carotene content. Cooked vegetables (in single or in combination) as well as solar dried samples were prepared by the community members in the study area in the usual way and without any instruction or conditions given. β-carotene content was analyzed using a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The results provided new representative β-carotene content of the fresh, marketed, cooked and dried vegetables without controlling or simulating the household handling or processing methods in a laboratory. While edible portions of kales are relatively inferior as a β-carotene source as compare to ALVs when in raw form, this is not the case at market place where kales exhibit comparable level of the β-carotene. As much as 280 μRE/100 g (a dietarily significant amount) can be lost through β-carotene oxidation before farm-fresh ALVs are sold in the market place with the losses severe in some ALVs and only subtle and relatively lower in kales. Post-cooking, kales had statistically comparable β-carotene content to ALVs save for when compared with purple amaranths and blacknight shade. Due to losses experienced in ALVs, kales are not comparatively inferior vegetables in terms of β-carotene content. Measures to prevent β-carotene losses in ALVs between the farm and market, during cooking and drying should be instituted in order to benefit from their high β-carotene content.

  18. A New Prescription for the Mass-loss Rates of WC and WO Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramper, F.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new empirical prescription for the mass-loss rates of carbon- and oxygen-sequence Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of their luminosity, surface chemical composition, and initial metallicity. The new prescription is based on results of detailed spectral analyses of WC and WO stars and improves the often applied Nugis and Lamers relation. We find that the mass-loss rates of WC and WO stars (with X = 0 and Y ≲ 0.98) can be expressed as {log} \\dot{M}=-9.20+0.85{log}(L/L ⊙) + 0.44 log Y + 0.25 log (Z Fe/Z Fe,⊙). This relation is based on mass-loss determinations that assume a volume-filling factor of 0.1, but the prescription can easily be scaled to account for other volume-filling factors. The residual of the fit is σ = 0.06 dex. We investigated whether the relation can also describe the mass loss of hydrogen-free WN stars and showed that it can when an adjustment of the metallicity dependence ({log} \\dot{M}\\propto 1.3{log}({Z}{Fe}/{Z}{Fe,⊙ })) is applied. Compared to that of Nugis and Lamers, \\dot{M} is less sensitive to the luminosity and the surface abundance, implying a stronger mass loss of massive stars in their late stages of evolution. The modest metallicity dependence implies that if WC or WO stars are formed in metal-deficient environments, their mass-loss rates are higher than currently anticipated. These effects may result in the formation of a larger number of SNe Ic and fewer black holes and may favor the production of superluminous SNe Ic through interaction with C- and O-rich circumstellar material or dense stellar wind.

  19. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on pregnancy rates and early pregnancy loss after intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajishafiha M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Masomeh Hajishafiha1, Mohammad Ghasemi-rad1, Aishe Memari1, Siamak Naji1, Nikol Mladkova2, Vida Saeedi1 1Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran; 2Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, London, UK Background: There is a need to elucidate what affects the implantation and early pregnancy course in pregnancies conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART so that pregnancy rates and outcomes can be improved. Our aim was to determine the role of maternal Helicobacter pylori infection. Material and methods: We did a prospective study of 187 infertile couples undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI and segregated those according to underlying infertility etiology. We assessed the status of H. pylori IgG antibodies and anti-CagA IgG antibodies by ELISA assay. All pregnancies were followed for early pregnancy loss (EPL, first 12 weeks. Results: The likelihood of H. pylori infection increased with age (1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.13; P = 0.040 but there was no association with EPL. Women infected with CagA-positive strains were more likely to have EPL (19.39, 95% CI: 1.8–208.4; P = 0.014. Women with tubal factor or ovulatory disorder infertility were more likely to abort early (12.95, 95% CI: 1.28–131.11; P = 0.030, 10.84, 95% CI: 1.47–80.03; P = 0.020, respectively. There was no association between EPL and age, number of embryos formed or transferred, or number of oocytes retrieved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that infection with CagA-positive H. pylori strains is linked to an increase in women's potential to abort early (possibly through increased release of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, tubal factor and ovulatory disorder infertility are linked to EPL after ICSI due to unknown mechanisms. Proposals to eradicate H. pylori infection prior to ICSI could lead to a decrease in EPL after ART.Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, early pregnancy loss, early abortion, infertility, intracytoplasmic sperm

  20. Radio emission and mass loss rate limits of four young solar-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtinger, Bibiana; Güdel, Manuel; Mutel, Robert L.; Hallinan, Gregg; Gaidos, Eric; Skinner, Stephen L.; Lynch, Christene; Gayley, Kenneth G.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Observations of free-free continuum radio emission of four young main-sequence solar-type stars (EK Dra, π1 UMa, χ1 Ori, and κ1 Cet) are studied to detect stellar winds or at least to place upper limits on their thermal radio emission, which is dominated by the ionized wind. The stars in our sample are members of The Sun in Time programme and cover ages of 0.1-0.65 Gyr on the main-sequence. They are similar in magnetic activity to the Sun and thus are excellent proxies for representing the young Sun. Upper limits on mass loss rates for this sample of stars are calculated using their observational radio emission. Our aim is to re-examine the faint young Sun paradox by assuming that the young Sun was more massive in its past, and hence to find a possible solution for this famous problem. Methods: The observations of our sample are performed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) with excellent sensitivity, using the C-band receiver from 4-8 GHz and the Ku-band from 12-18 GHz. Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillitmeter Array (ALMA) observations are performed at 100 GHz. The Common Astronomy Software Application (CASA) package is used for the data preparation, reduction, calibration, and imaging. For the estimation of the mass loss limits, spherically symmetric winds and stationary, anisotropic, ionized winds are assumed. We compare our results to 1) mass loss rate estimates of theoretical rotational evolution models; and 2) to results of the indirect technique of determining mass loss rates: Lyman-α absorption. Results: We are able to derive the most stringent direct upper limits on mass loss so far from radio observations. Two objects, EK Dra and χ1 Ori, are detected at 6 and 14 GHz down to an excellent noise level. These stars are very active and additional radio emission identified as non-thermal emission was detected, but limits for the mass loss rates of these objects are still derived. The emission of χ1 Ori does not come from the main target

  1. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on pregnancy rates and early pregnancy loss after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishafiha, Masomeh; Ghasemi-Rad, Mohammad; Memari, Aishe; Naji, Siamak; Mladkova, Nikol; Saeedi, Vida

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to elucidate what affects the implantation and early pregnancy course in pregnancies conceived with assisted reproductive technology (ART) so that pregnancy rates and outcomes can be improved. Our aim was to determine the role of maternal Helicobacter pylori infection. We did a prospective study of 187 infertile couples undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and segregated those according to underlying infertility etiology. We assessed the status of H. pylori IgG antibodies and anti-CagA IgG antibodies by ELISA assay. All pregnancies were followed for early pregnancy loss (EPL, first 12 weeks). The likelihood of H. pylori infection increased with age (1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0-1.13; P = 0.040) but there was no association with EPL. Women infected with CagA-positive strains were more likely to have EPL (19.39, 95% CI: 1.8-208.4; P = 0.014). Women with tubal factor or ovulatory disorder infertility were more likely to abort early (12.95, 95% CI: 1.28-131.11; P = 0.030, 10.84, 95% CI: 1.47-80.03; P = 0.020, respectively). There was no association between EPL and age, number of embryos formed or transferred, or number of oocytes retrieved. Our findings suggest that infection with CagA-positive H. pylori strains is linked to an increase in women's potential to abort early (possibly through increased release of inflammatory cytokines). In addition, tubal factor and ovulatory disorder infertility are linked to EPL after ICSI due to unknown mechanisms. Proposals to eradicate H. pylori infection prior to ICSI could lead to a decrease in EPL after ART.

  2. Studies on pressure losses and flow rate optimization in vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ao; Bao, Jie; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Premature voltage cut-off in the operation of the vanadium redox flow battery is largely associated with the rise in concentration overpotential at high state-of-charge (SOC) or state-of-discharge (SOD). The use of high constant volumetric flow rate will reduce concentration overpotential, although potentially at the cost of consuming excessive pumping energy which in turn lowers system efficiency. On the other hand, any improper reduction in flow rate will also limit the operating SOC and lead to deterioration in battery efficiency. Pressure drop losses are further exacerbated by the need to reduce shunt currents in flow battery stacks that requires the use of long, narrow channels and manifolds. In this paper, the concentration overpotential is modelled as a function of flow rate in an effort to determine an appropriate variable flow rate that can yield high system efficiency, along with the analysis of pressure losses and total pumping energy. Simulation results for a 40-cell stack under pre-set voltage cut-off limits have shown that variable flow rates are superior to constant flow rates for the given system design and the use of a flow factor of 7.5 with respect to the theoretical flow rate can reach overall high system efficiencies for different charge-discharge operations.

  3. The competition of neutrino energy loss due to the pair,photo-,plasma process at the late stages of stellar evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing-Jing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Weinberg-Salam theory,the competition of the Neutrino Energy Loss (NEL) rates due to the pair,photo- and plasma process are canvassed.The ratio factor C1,C2 and C3 which correspond the different contributions of the pair,photo- and plasma neutrino process to those of the total NEL rates are accurately taken into account.The ratio factors are very sensitive to the temperature and density.The ratio factor C2 always is lower than the ratio factor C1 and C3.The pair NEL process is the dominant contribution before the crossed point O(C1=C3=0.45) and the plasma NEL process will be the main dominant contribution after the crossed point O.With increasing temperature,the crossed point O will move to the direction of higher density.

  4. Upon Accounting for the Impact of Isoenzyme Loss, Gene Deletion Costs Anticorrelate with Their Evolutionary Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yu; Segrè, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    System-level metabolic network models enable the computation of growth and metabolic phenotypes from an organism’s genome. In particular, flux balance approaches have been used to estimate the contribution of individual metabolic genes to organismal fitness, offering the opportunity to test whether such contributions carry information about the evolutionary pressure on the corresponding genes. Previous failure to identify the expected negative correlation between such computed gene-loss cost and sequence-derived evolutionary rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been ascribed to a real biological gap between a gene’s fitness contribution to an organism “here and now” and the same gene’s historical importance as evidenced by its accumulated mutations over millions of years of evolution. Here we show that this negative correlation does exist, and can be exposed by revisiting a broadly employed assumption of flux balance models. In particular, we introduce a new metric that we call “function-loss cost”, which estimates the cost of a gene loss event as the total potential functional impairment caused by that loss. This new metric displays significant negative correlation with evolutionary rate, across several thousand minimal environments. We demonstrate that the improvement gained using function-loss cost over gene-loss cost is explained by replacing the base assumption that isoenzymes provide unlimited capacity for backup with the assumption that isoenzymes are completely non-redundant. We further show that this change of the assumption regarding isoenzymes increases the recall of epistatic interactions predicted by the flux balance model at the cost of a reduction in the precision of the predictions. In addition to suggesting that the gene-to-reaction mapping in genome-scale flux balance models should be used with caution, our analysis provides new evidence that evolutionary gene importance captures much more than strict essentiality. PMID:28107392

  5. Upon Accounting for the Impact of Isoenzyme Loss, Gene Deletion Costs Anticorrelate with Their Evolutionary Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christopher; Lambourne, Luke; Xia, Yu; Segrè, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    System-level metabolic network models enable the computation of growth and metabolic phenotypes from an organism's genome. In particular, flux balance approaches have been used to estimate the contribution of individual metabolic genes to organismal fitness, offering the opportunity to test whether such contributions carry information about the evolutionary pressure on the corresponding genes. Previous failure to identify the expected negative correlation between such computed gene-loss cost and sequence-derived evolutionary rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been ascribed to a real biological gap between a gene's fitness contribution to an organism "here and now" and the same gene's historical importance as evidenced by its accumulated mutations over millions of years of evolution. Here we show that this negative correlation does exist, and can be exposed by revisiting a broadly employed assumption of flux balance models. In particular, we introduce a new metric that we call "function-loss cost", which estimates the cost of a gene loss event as the total potential functional impairment caused by that loss. This new metric displays significant negative correlation with evolutionary rate, across several thousand minimal environments. We demonstrate that the improvement gained using function-loss cost over gene-loss cost is explained by replacing the base assumption that isoenzymes provide unlimited capacity for backup with the assumption that isoenzymes are completely non-redundant. We further show that this change of the assumption regarding isoenzymes increases the recall of epistatic interactions predicted by the flux balance model at the cost of a reduction in the precision of the predictions. In addition to suggesting that the gene-to-reaction mapping in genome-scale flux balance models should be used with caution, our analysis provides new evidence that evolutionary gene importance captures much more than strict essentiality.

  6. Cyst Viability, Organ Distribution and Financial Losses due to Hydatidosis in Cattle Slaughtered At Dessie Municipal Abattoir, North-eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Melaku

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A cross sectional study was conducted from October 2010 to March 2011 to assess the prevalence, cyst viability, organ distribution and financial losses of bovine hydatidosis in cattle slaughtered at Dessie municipal abattoir. Postmortem inspection, cyst characterization and financial loss estimations were conducted. Out of 610 inspected cattle, 83 (13.61% were harbouring a single or multiple hydatid cysts. Significantly (P<0.05 higher infection rate was observed in poor (22.89% than medium (12.99% and good (10.40% body condition scorings but significant variation (P>0.05 was not observed in different age groups. Anatomically, the cysts were distributed 68.67% in the lung, 14.46% in the liver, 6.02% in the kidneys, 1.2% in the heart and 9.64% were found both in the lung and liver. Of the total examined cysts (195 for fertility and viability, 27 (13.85% were fertile, 44 (22.56% were calcified, 124 (63.59% were sterile. The rate of cyst calcification was higher in the liver (78.14% than other organs whilst the fertility percentage was higher in the lung (14.65%. Of the total 27 fertile cysts subjected to viability test, 13 (6.67% were viable. Size assessment made on 195 cysts indicated that 153 (78.46% were small, 41 (21.03% were medium and one (0.51% were large sized cysts. In the present study, the total annual economic loss from organ condemnation and carcass weight loss due to hydatidosis was estimated as 681,333.87 Ethiopian birr which is about 39157.12 United States dollar per annum based on the local market prices in the study period. The result of this study revealed that hydatidosis is an economically important disease of cattle which necessitates designing of appropriate strategies for its control. [Vet. World 2012; 5(4.000: 213-218

  7. Rapid Enhancement in General Relativistic Precession Rates due to Kozai Mechanism in Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Aswin; Asher, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Werner, Stephanie; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Li, Gongjie

    2017-06-01

    Two well known phenomena in orbital dynamics associated with low perihelion distance bodies are general relativistic (GR) precession and Lidov-Kozai (LK) oscillations.In this work, we are interested to identify bodies evolving in the near future (i.e. thousands of years in this case) into rapid sungrazing and sun colliding phases and undergoing inclination flips, due to LK like oscillations and being GR active at the same time. We find that LK mechanism leads to secular lowering of perihelion distance which in turn leads to a huge increase in GR precession of the argument of pericentre depending on the initial orbital elements. This in turn gives feedback to the LK mechanism as the eccentricity, inclination and argument of pericentre in Kozai cycles are closely correlated. In this work, we find real examples of solar system bodies which show rapid enhancement in GR precession rates due to LK like oscillations and there are cases where GR precession rate peaks to about 60 times that of the GR precession of Mercury thus showing the strength and complementary nature between these two dynamical phenomena.An analytical treatment is done on few bodies to understand the difference in their orbital evolution in the context of LK mechanism with and without GR precession term by incorporating suitable Hamiltonian dynamics. This result is subsequently matched using numerical integrations to find direct correlations. Real solar system bodies showing both GR precession and LK like oscillations are identified using compiled observational records from IAU-Minor Planet Center, Cometary Catalogue, IAU-Meteor Data Center and performing analytical plus numerical tests on them. This intermediate state (where GR and LK effects are comparable and co-exist) brings up the interesting possibility of drastic changes in GR precession rates during orbital evolution due to sungrazing and sun colliding phases induced by the LK like mechanism, thus combining both these important effects in a

  8. Using radiative energy losses to constrain the magnetization and magnetic reconnection rate at the base of black hole jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, William J.

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the severe radiative energy losses which occur at the base of black hole jets using a relativistic fluid jet model, including in situ acceleration of non-thermal leptons by magnetic reconnection. Our results demonstrate that including a self-consistent treatment of radiative energy losses is necessary to perform accurate magnetohydrodynamic simulations of powerful jets and that jet spectra calculated via post-processing are liable to vastly overestimate the amount of non-thermal emission. If no more than 95 per cent of the initial total jet power is radiated away by the plasma travels as it travels along the length of the jet, we can place a lower bound on the magnetization of the jet plasma at the base of the jet. For typical powerful jets, we find that the plasma at the jet base is required to be highly magnetized, with at least 10 000 times more energy contained in magnetic fields than in non-thermal leptons. Using a simple power-law model of magnetic reconnection, motivated by simulations of collisionless reconnection, we determine the allowed range of the large-scale average reconnection rate along the jet, by restricting the total radiative energy losses incurred and the distance at which the jet first comes into equipartition. We calculate analytic expressions for the cumulative radiative energy losses due to synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission along jets, and derive analytic formulae for the constraint on the initial magnetization.

  9. A physics investigation of deadtime losses in neutron counting at low rates with Cf252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [CANBERRA INDUSTRIES, INC.

    2009-01-01

    {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission sources are used for the characterization of neutron counters and the determination of calibration parameters; including both neutron coincidence counting (NCC) and neutron multiplicity deadtime (DT) parameters. Even at low event rates, temporally-correlated neutron counting using {sup 252}Cf suffers a deadtime effect. Meaning that in contrast to counting a random neutron source (e.g. AmLi to a close approximation), DT losses do not vanish in the low rate limit. This is because neutrons are emitted from spontaneous fission events in time-correlated 'bursts', and are detected over a short period commensurate with their lifetime in the detector (characterized by the system die-away time, {tau}). Thus, even when detected neutron events from different spontaneous fissions are unlikely to overlap in time, neutron events within the detected 'burst' are subject to intrinsic DT losses. Intrinsic DT losses for dilute Pu will be lower since the multiplicity distribution is softer, but real items also experience self-multiplication which can increase the 'size' of the bursts. Traditional NCC DT correction methods do not include the intrinsic (within burst) losses. We have proposed new forms of the traditional NCC Singles and Doubles DT correction factors. In this work, we apply Monte Carlo neutron pulse train analysis to investigate the functional form of the deadtime correction factors for an updating deadtime. Modeling is based on a high efficiency {sup 3}He neutron counter with short die-away time, representing an ideal {sup 3}He based detection system. The physics of dead time losses at low rates is explored and presented. It is observed that new forms are applicable and offer more accurate correction than the traditional forms.

  10. A new prescription for the mass-loss rates of WC and WO stars

    CERN Document Server

    Tramper, F; de Koter, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a new empirical prescription for the mass-loss rates of carbon and oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of their luminosity, surface chemical composition, and initial metallicity. The new prescription is based on results of detailed spectral analyses of WC and WO stars, and improves the often applied Nugis & Lamers (2000) relation. We find that the mass-loss rates of WC and WO stars (with $X=0$ and $Y < 0.98$) can be expressed as $\\log{\\dot{M}} = -9.20 + 0.85\\log{(L/L_{\\odot})} + 0.44\\log{Y} + 0.25\\log{(Z_{\\mathrm{Fe}}/Z_{\\mathrm{Fe}, \\odot})}$. This relation is based on mass-loss determinations that assume a volume-filling factor of 0.1, but the prescription can easily be scaled to account for other volume-filling factors. The residual of the fit is $\\sigma = 0.06$ dex. We investigated whether the relation can also describe the mass loss of hydrogen-free WN stars and showed that it can when an adjustement of the metallicty dependence ($\\log{\\dot{M}} \\propto 1.3\\log{(Z_{\\mathrm{Fe}...

  11. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Mark J; Genet, Hélène; McGuire, Anthony D; Euskirchen, Eugénie S; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R N; Jorgenson, Mark T; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Breen, Amy; Bolton, William R

    2016-02-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  12. Thermokarst rates intensify due to climate change and forest fragmentation in an Alaskan boreal forest lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Genet, Helene; McGuire, Anthony; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Zhang, Yujin; Brown, Dana R. N.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Romanovsky, V.; Breen, Amy L.; Bolton, W.R.

    2016-01-01

    Lowland boreal forest ecosystems in Alaska are dominated by wetlands comprised of a complex mosaic of fens, collapse-scar bogs, low shrub/scrub, and forests growing on elevated ice-rich permafrost soils. Thermokarst has affected the lowlands of the Tanana Flats in central Alaska for centuries, as thawing permafrost collapses forests that transition to wetlands. Located within the discontinuous permafrost zone, this region has significantly warmed over the past half-century, and much of these carbon-rich permafrost soils are now within ~0.5 °C of thawing. Increased permafrost thaw in lowland boreal forests in response to warming may have consequences for the climate system. This study evaluates the trajectories and potential drivers of 60 years of forest change in a landscape subjected to permafrost thaw in unburned dominant forest types (paper birch and black spruce) associated with location on elevated permafrost plateau and across multiple time periods (1949, 1978, 1986, 1998, and 2009) using historical and contemporary aerial and satellite images for change detection. We developed (i) a deterministic statistical model to evaluate the potential climatic controls on forest change using gradient boosting and regression tree analysis, and (ii) a 30 × 30 m land cover map of the Tanana Flats to estimate the potential landscape-level losses of forest area due to thermokarst from 1949 to 2009. Over the 60-year period, we observed a nonlinear loss of birch forests and a relatively continuous gain of spruce forest associated with thermokarst and forest succession, while gradient boosting/regression tree models identify precipitation and forest fragmentation as the primary factors controlling birch and spruce forest change, respectively. Between 1950 and 2009, landscape-level analysis estimates a transition of ~15 km² or ~7% of birch forests to wetlands, where the greatest change followed warm periods. This work highlights that the vulnerability and resilience of

  13. The loss of ecosystem services due to land degradation. Integration of mechanistic and probabilistic models in an Ethiopian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretelli, Stefania; Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro; Peressotti, Alessandro; Black, Helaina

    2017-04-01

    Land and soil degradation are widespread especially in dry and developing countries such as Ethiopia. Land degradation leads to ecosystems services (ESS) degradation, because it causes the depletion and loss of several soil functions. Ethiopia's farmland faces intense degradation due to deforestation, agricultural land expansion, land overexploitation and overgrazing. In this study we modelled the impact of physical factors on ESS degradation, in particular soil erodibility, carbon storage and nutrient retention, in the Ethiopian Great Rift Valley, northwestern of Hawassa. We used models of the Sediment retention/loss, the Nutrient Retention/loss (from the software suite InVEST) and Carbon Storage. To run the models we coupled soil local data (such as soil organic carbon, soil texture) with remote sensing data as input in the parametrization phase, e.g. to derive a land use map, to calculate the aboveground and belowground carbon, the evapotraspiration coefficient and the capacity of vegetation to retain nutrient. We then used spatialised Bayesian Belief Networks (sBBNs) predicting ecosystem services degradation on the basis of the results of the three mechanistic models. The results show i) the importance of mapping of ESS degradation taking into consideration the spatial heterogeneity and the cross-correlations between impacts ii) the fundamental role of remote sensing data in monitoring and modelling in remote, data-poor areas and iii) the important role of spatial BBNs in providing spatially explicit measures of risk and uncertainty. This approach could help decision makers to identify priority areas for intervention in order to reduce land and ecosystem services degradation.

  14. Loss of ecosystem services due to chronic pollution of forests and surface waters in the Adirondack region (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Colin M; Caputo, Jesse; Lawrence, Gregory B; Sullivan, Timothy J

    2017-04-15

    Sustaining recent progress in mitigating acid pollution could require lower emissions caps that will give rise to real or perceived tradeoffs between healthy ecosystems and inexpensive energy. Because most impacts of acid rain affect ecosystem functions that are poorly understood by policy-makers and the public, an ecosystem services (ES) framework can help to measure how pollution affects human well-being. Focused on the Adirondack region (USA), a global 'hot-spot' of acid pollution, we measured how the chronic acidification of the region's forests, lakes, and streams has affected the potential economic and cultural benefits they provide to society. We estimated that acid-impaired hardwood forests provide roughly half of the potential benefits of forests on moderate to well-buffered soils - an estimated loss of ∼ $10,000 ha(-1) in net present value of wood products, maple syrup, carbon sequestration, and visual quality. Acidic deposition has had only nominal impact - relative to the effects of surficial geology and till depth - on the capacity of Adirondack lakes and streams to provide water suitable for drinking. However, as pH declines in lakes, the estimated value of recreational fishing decreases significantly due to loss of desirable fish such as trout. Hatchery stocking programs have partially offset the pollution-mediated losses of fishery value, most effectively in the pH range 4.8-5.5, but are costly and limited in scope. Although any estimates of the monetary 'damages' of acid rain have significant uncertainties, our findings highlight some of the more tangible economic and cultural benefits of pollution mitigation efforts, which continue to face litigation and political opposition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Global crop yield reductions due to surface ozone exposure: 1. Year 2000 crop production losses and economic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avnery, Shiri; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Liu, Junfeng; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2011-04-01

    Exposure to elevated concentrations of surface ozone (O 3) causes substantial reductions in the agricultural yields of many crops. As emissions of O 3 precursors rise in many parts of the world over the next few decades, yield reductions from O 3 exposure appear likely to increase the challenges of feeding a global population projected to grow from 6 to 9 billion between 2000 and 2050. This study estimates year 2000 global yield reductions of three key staple crops (soybean, maize, and wheat) due to surface ozone exposure using hourly O 3 concentrations simulated by the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 2.4 (MOZART-2). We calculate crop losses according to two metrics of ozone exposure - seasonal daytime (08:00-19:59) mean O 3 (M12) and accumulated O 3 above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40) - and predict crop yield losses using crop-specific O 3 concentration:response functions established by field studies. Our results indicate that year 2000 O 3-induced global yield reductions ranged, depending on the metric used, from 8.5-14% for soybean, 3.9-15% for wheat, and 2.2-5.5% for maize. Global crop production losses totaled 79-121 million metric tons, worth $11-18 billion annually (USD 2000). Our calculated yield reductions agree well with previous estimates, providing further evidence that yields of major crops across the globe are already being substantially reduced by exposure to surface ozone - a risk that will grow unless O 3-precursor emissions are curbed in the future or crop cultivars are developed and utilized that are resistant to O 3.

  16. Prediction of Spring Rate and Initial Failure Load due to Material Properties of Composite Leaf Spring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sung Ha [Maxoft Inc., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bok Lok [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This paper presented analysis methods for adapting E-glass fiber/epoxy composite (GFRP) materials to an automotive leaf spring. It focused on the static behaviors of the leaf spring due to the material composition and its fiber orientation. The material properties of the GFRP composite were directly measured based on the ASTM standard test. A reverse implementation was performed to obtain the complete set of in-situ fiber and matrix properties from the ply test results. Next, the spring rates of the composite leaf spring were examined according to the variation of material parameters such as the fiber angles and resin contents of the composite material. Finally, progressive failure analysis was conducted to identify the initial failure load by means of an elastic stress analysis and specific damage criteria. As a result, it was found that damage first occurred along the edge of the leaf spring owing to the shear stresses.

  17. Study of bantam miRNA expression in brain tumour resulted due to loss of polarity modules in Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANIMESH BANERJEE; JAGAT K. ROY

    2017-06-01

    Disturbance of delicate concordance between stem cell proliferation, specification and differentiation during brain development leads to several neural disorders including tumours. Accumulating evidences have demonstratedinvolvement of short noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) in governing several biological as well as pathological processes, including tumourigenesis across various species. Drosophila bantam miRNA, known to regulate critical physiological functions is reported to have elevated expression in ovarian tumour. Here, we provide an update on the expression of bantam miRNA in Drosophila brain tumour background resulting due to loss of well characterized polarity proteins, Brat, Lgl and Scrib. Since, both miRNA TaqMan assay and bantam sensor assay showed elevated expression of bantam in brain tumour background, it clearly reflects presence of an antagonistic relationship between polarity proteins and bantam miRNA indicating of its involvement in tumour progression.

  18. A Study on Distribution Measurement and Mechanism of Deformation due to Water Loss of Overburden Layer in Vertical Shaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunde Piao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on FBG fiber Bragg grating technology and BOTDA distributed optical fiber sensing technology, this study uses fine sand to simulate overburden layer in vertical shaft model equipment. It studies the placing technique and test method for optical fiber sensors in the overburden layer, combined with MODFLOW software to simulate the change of the water head value when the overburden layer is losing water, and obtains the deformation features of overburden layer. The results show, at the beginning of water loss, the vertical deformation increases due to larger hydraulic pressure drop, while the deformation decreases gradually and tends to be stable with the hydraulic pressure drop reducing. The circumferential deformation is closely related to such factors as the distance between each drainage outlet, the variations of water head value, and the method of drainage. The monitoring result based on optical fiber sensing technology is consistent with the characteristics of water loss in overburden layer simulated by MODFLOW software, which shows that the optical fiber sensing technology applied to monitor shaft overburden layer is feasible.

  19. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Pascal H., E-mail: pascal-h.fries@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SCIB, RICC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SCIB, RICC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Belorizky, Elie [Université Grenoble Alpes, LIPHY, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, Leti-Clinatec, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  20. Flood loss reduction of private households due to building precautionary measures -- lessons learned from the Elbe flood in August 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Building houses in inundation areas is always a risk, since absolute flood protection is impossible. Where settlements already exist, flood damage must be kept as small as possible. Suitable means are precautionary measures such as elevated building configuration or flood adapted use. However, data about the effects of such measures are rare, and consequently, the efficiency of different precautionary measures is unclear. To improve the knowledge about efficient precautionary measures, approximately 1200 private households, which were affected by the 2002 flood at the river Elbe and its tributaries, were interviewed about the flood damage of their buildings and contents as well as about their precautionary measures. The affected households had little flood experience, i.e. only 15% had experienced a flood before. 59% of the households stated that they did not know, that they live in a flood prone area. Thus, people were not well prepared, e.g. just 11% had used and furnished their house in a flood adapted way and only 6% had a flood adapted building structure. Building precautionary measures are mainly effective in areas with frequent small floods. But also during the extreme flood event in 2002 building measures reduced the flood loss. From the six different building precautionary measures under study, flood adapted use and adapted interior fitting were the most effective ones. They reduced the damage ratio for buildings by 46% and 53%, respectively. The damage ratio for contents was reduced by 48% due to flood adapted use and by 53% due to flood adapted interior fitting. The 2002 flood motivated a relatively large number of people to implement private precautionary measures, but still much more could be done. Hence, to further reduce flood losses, people's motivation to invest in precaution should be improved. More information campaigns and financial incentives should be issued to encourage precautionary measures.

  1. On the rate of convergence for multi-category classification based on convex losses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The multi-category classification algorithms play an important role in both theory and practice of machine learning.In this paper,we consider an approach to the multi-category classification based on minimizing a convex surrogate of the nonstandard misclassification loss.We bound the excess misclassification error by the excess convex risk.We construct an adaptive procedure to search the classifier and furthermore obtain its convergence rate to the Bayes rule.

  2. Rainfall timing and poultry litter application rate effects on phosphorus loss in surface runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, P D; Radcliffe, D E; Cabrera, M L

    2004-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in runoff from pastures amended with poultry litter may be a significant contributor to eutrophication of lakes and streams in Georgia and other areas in the southeastern United States. The objectives of this research were to determine the effects of litter application rate and initial runoff timing on the long-term loss of P in runoff from surface-applied poultry litter and to develop equations that predict P loss in runoff under these conditions. Litter application rates of 2, 7, and 13 Mg ha(-1), and three rainfall scenarios applied to 1- x 2-m plots in a 3 x 3 randomized complete block design with three replications. The rainfall scenarios included (i) sufficient rainfall to produce runoff immediately after litter application; (ii) no rainfall for 30 d after litter application; and (iii) small rainfall events every 7 d (5 min at 75 mm h(-1)) for 30 d. Phosphorus loss was greatest from the high litter rate and immediate runoff treatments. Nonlinear regression equations based on the small plot study produced fairly accurate (r(2) = 0.52-0.62) prediction of P concentrations in runoff water from larger (0.75 ha) fields over a 2-yr period. Predicted P concentrations were closest to observed values for events that occurred shortly after litter application, and the relative error in predictions increased with time after litter application. In addition, previously developed equations relating soil test P levels to runoff P concentrations were ineffective in the presence of surface-applied litter.

  3. Effect of steam corrosion on core post strength loss: I. Low, chronic steam ingress rates. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichner, R.P.

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of chronic, low levels of steam ingress into the primary system of the HTGR on the corrosion, and consequent strength loss of the core support posts. The assessment proceeded through the following three steps: (1) The impurity composition in the primary system was estimated as a function of a range of steady ingress rates of from 0.001 to 1.0 g/sec, both by means of an analysis of the Dragon steam ingress experiment and a computer code, TIMOX, which treats the primary system as a well-mixed pot. (2) The core post burnoffs which result from 40-year exposures to these determined impurity atmospheres were then estimated using a corrosion rate expression derived from published ATJ-graphite corrosion rate data. Burnoffs were determined for both the core posts at the nominal and the maximum sustained temperature, estimated to be 90/sup 0/C above nominal. (3) The final step involved assessment of the degree of strength loss resulting from the estimated burnoffs. An empirical equation was developed for this purpose which compares reasonably well with strength loss data for a number of different graphites and specimen geometries.

  4. Period -- mass-loss rate relation of Miras with and without technetium

    CERN Document Server

    Uttenthaler, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We report the discovery that Mira variables with and without absorption lines of the element technetium (Tc) occupy two different regions in a diagram of near- to mid-infrared colour versus pulsation period. Tc is an indicator of a recent or ongoing mixing event called the third dredge-up (3DUP), and the near- to mid-IR colour, such as the (K-[22]) colour where [22] is the the 22 micron band of the WISE space observatory, is an indicator of the dust mass-loss rate of a star. Methods: We collected data from the literature about the Tc content, pulsation period, and near- and mid-infrared magnitudes of more than 190 variable stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to which Miras belong. The sample is naturally biased towards optical AGB stars, which have low to intermediate (dust) mass-loss rates. Results: We show that a clear relation between dust mass-loss rate and pulsation period exists if a distinction is made between Tc-poor and Tc-rich Miras. Surprisingly, at a given period, Tc-poor Miras are re...

  5. Modest weight loss in moderately overweight postmenopausal women improves heart rate variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Astrup, Arne;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of weight loss on heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters in overweight postmenopausal women. Design and Methods: Forty-nine overweight postmenopausal women with an average body mass index of 28.8 1.9 kg/m2 underwent a 12-week dietary weight......-slice MRI at L3. Results: The weight loss of 3.9 2.0 kg was accompanied by an improvement of HRV. SDNN increased by 9.2% (p ¼ 0.003) and SDNNindex increased by 11.4% (p ¼ 0.0003). MeanNN increased by 2.4%, reflecting a decrease in mean heart rate from 74.1 to 72.3 beats/min (p ¼ 0.033). Systolic blood....... IAAT and the IAAT/SCAT-ratio were found to be negatively associated with HRV parameters but changes in body composition were not associated with changes in HRV. Conclusions: The observed improvement of HRV seems to be facilitated by weight loss. IAAT and the IAAT/SCAT ratio were found to be associated...

  6. Evolutionary loss of the rdar morphotype in Salmonella as a result of high mutation rates during laboratory passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Carla J; White, Aaron P; Surette, Michael G

    2008-03-01

    Rapid evolution of microbes under laboratory conditions can lead to domestication of environmental or clinical strains. In this work, we show that domestication due to laboratory passage in rich medium is extremely rapid. Passaging of wild-type Salmonella in rich medium led to diversification of genotypes contributing to the loss of a spatial phenotype, called the rdar morphotype, within days. Gene expression analysis of the rdar regulatory network demonstrated that mutations were primarily within rpoS, indicating that the selection pressure for scavenging during stationary phase had the secondary effect of impairing this highly conserved phenotype. If stationary phase was omitted from the experiment, radiation of genotypes and loss of the rdar morphotype was also demonstrated, but due to mutations within the cellulose biosynthesis pathway and also in an unknown upstream regulator. Thus regardless of the selection pressure, rapid regulatory changes can be observed on laboratory timescales. The speed of accumulation of rpoS mutations during daily passaging could not be explained by measured fitness and mutation rates. A model of mutation accumulation suggests that to generate the observed accumulation of sigma 38 mutations, this locus must experience a mutation rate of approximately 10(-4) mutations/gene/generation. Sequencing and gene expression of population isolates indicated that there were a wide variety of sigma 38 phenotypes within each population. This suggests that the rpoS locus is highly mutable by an unknown pathway, and that these mutations accumulate rapidly under common laboratory conditions.

  7. Rate of vision loss in neovascular age-related macular degeneration explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Juan P; Granero, Gladys E; De Santis, Mariana O; Juarez, Claudio P; Palma, Santiago D; Kelly, Simon P; Luna, José D

    2015-11-01

    To explore decline in visual acuity in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD) awaiting intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab treatment following initial diagnosis and after disease reactivation. Retrospective analysis of 74 treatment-naïve patients (84 eyes) in two centers in Córdoba, Argentina. The time between treatment indication and intravitreal injection, and the changes in BCVA produced during this delay were studied in both periods. A linear regression model to search the impact of time on progression visual impairment was conducted. In both periods, a significant reduction in vision occurred awaiting intravitreal injection. The longer the delay, the greater the vision loss (R2 = 0.55 p < 0.01) and the less improvement following treatment (Pearson coefficient -0.26). The result of the model shows that the change in vision as a function of initial delay were best described by a polynomic model with a mean loss of 5 letters in the first 3 weeks, a slowdown in the rate of change of VA, and a dependence of visual acuity at the moment of diagnosis . The loss of visual acuity after reactivation shows the same behavior as at the onset of the disease but independent of visual acuity prior to reactivation. Visual loss awaiting injection intravitreal anti-VEGF is clinically significant and with an asymptotic pattern, with early rapid loss of vision in both the onset of the disease and the reactivation. Initiation of anti-VEGF treatment must be undertaken urgently, as should retreatment of disease activation to reduce visual loss.

  8. Genetic counseling for men with recurrent pregnancy loss or recurrent implantation failure due to abnormal sperm chromosomal aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Taylor P; Kohn, Jaden R; Darilek, Sandra; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Lipshultz, Larry

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to review recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) due to sperm chromosomal abnormalities and discuss the genetic counseling that is required for men with sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The literature was reviewed, and a genetic counselor lends her expertise as to how couples with RPL and sperm chromosomal abnormalities ought to be counseled. The review of the literature was performed using MEDLINE. Sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be used to determine if disomy or unbalanced chromosomal translocations are present. In men with aneuploidy in sperm or who carry a chromosomal translocation, pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS) combined with in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) can increase chances of live birth. In men with abnormal sperm FISH results, the degree of increased risk of abnormal pregnancy remains unclear. Genetic counselors can provide information to couples about the risk for potential trisomies and sex chromosome aneuploidies and discuss their reproductive and testing options such as PGS, use of donor sperm, and adoption. The provision of genetic counseling also allows a couple to be educated about recommended prenatal testing since pregnancies conceived with a partner who has had abnormal sperm FISH are considered to be at increased risk for aneuploidy. We review the literature and discuss genetic counseling for couples with RPL or recurrent implantation failure due to increased sperm aneuploidy.

  9. Evaluation of the Survival Rate and Bone Loss of Implants with Various Lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR. Rokn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The replacement of missing teeth with implant-associated restorations has become a widely used treatment modality in recent years. The length of dental implants may be a critical factor in achieving and maintaining osseointegration.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival rate and bone loss of dental implants with different lengthsMaterials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed on 60 ITI-system implants, evenly distributed into three groups including 8, 10 and 12 mm high implants in the posterior segments of both jaws. Demographic information, oral hygiene,cigarette smoking, implant length, duration of implant placement (at least 24 months,bleeding on probing index and pocket probing depth were recorded for all participants.Bone loss was calculated using pre- and post-operative panoramic radiographs.Results: The mean rate of bone loss was different among the three groups and were found to be 0.21 (0.45, 0.3 (0.41 and 0.43 (0.55 mm in the 8, 10, and 12 mm high implants, respectively. Neither mean bone loss nor bleeding on probing index showed significant differences with implant length. A significant correlation was found between implant length and pocket probing depth (P<0.0001.Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that both short (8 mm high and long (10 or 12 mm high implants may be used with nearly equal success rates in the posterior segments of the jaws.

  10. Validation of Loss and Continuation Rate Models to Support Navy Community Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    are a function of the optimization embedded in the software . The proposed models are ‘relatively’ standard; differences in results due to estimation... software used are unlikely, but possible. 8. Following CNA, continuation rates, (CR) for paygrades, (PG), E1-E3 were combined into one category. 9...2011), Forecasting Navy Continuation Rates: An Exploratory Analysis, Center for Naval Analysis, CRM D0023555.A2 Schmitz, E., Kraus, A., Sutton, W

  11. The rate of Aflatoxin contamination of bread losses in Lorestan provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nader Azadbakht

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Azadbakht N1, Khosravinegad K2, Tarrahi MJ3 1. MSc in plant pathology, Khorramabad, Iran 2. BSc in livestock sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 3. Instrustor, Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences , Khorramabad, Iran Abstract Background: Aflatoxins belong to a group of toxins called mycotoxins that infection with them can cause complications in humans such as immunity weakness, lung syndrome, liver cancer, esophagus cancer and hemagglutination, and are inhibitor of RNA and protein, as well as cause numorous complications in genital, respiratory and the digestive systems and because of their poisoning and carcinogenic and tumorigenic properties, cause numorous complications in livestock. This research was carried out to determine the rate of Aflatoxine contamination of bread losses in Lorestan province and its comparison with standard levels reported by WHO and FAO. Materials and methods: This study was done by field and laboratory method on 180 samples of losses dried bread in 2009 with randomized distribution in Lorestan provine and detection of samples contamination to aflatoxin was done by HPLC floresence apparatus. Data was analyzed by SPSS software (α=5%. Results: The median rate of types of aflatoxin: B1,B2,G1 and G2 total types of aflatoxin in bread losses (infected, semi-infected and safe in Lorestan were 22.5304,2.4369,0.1923,0.1022 and 25.2636 (µg/kg. Average of minimum and maximum infection to aflatoxin with all types of aflatoxin belonged to Khorramabad (42.9403 and 47.7153 µg/kg and Borujerd (1.8611 and 1.9833 respectively. Average rate of aflatoxin type B1 in infected, semi-infected and safe bread are 64.0536, 1.9167, 0.5629 (µg/kg and average rate of all types of aflatoxin in infected, and safe breads were: 72.0257,1.9990 and 05753 (µg/kg. Also rate of aflatoxin B1 in 29 out of 180 samples are more than standard level and total rate of different types of aflatoxin in 18 samples were

  12. Continuous taurocholic acid exposure promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma progression due to reduced cell loss resulting from enhanced vascular development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. METHODS: A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. RESULTS: Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. CONCLUSION: Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells.

  13. A Note on Forecasting the Rate of Change of the Price of Oil: Asymmetric Loss and Forecast Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pierdzioch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study whether forecasts of the rate of change of the price of oil are rational. To this end, we consider a model that allows the shape of forecasters’ loss function to be studied. The shape of forecasters’ loss function may be consistent with a symmetric or an asymmetric loss function. We find that an asymmetric loss function often (but not always makes forecasts look rational, and we also report that forecast rationality may have changed over time.

  14. Upper bound on the modal material loss rate in plasmonic and metamaterial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Aaswath; Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-05-01

    A better understanding of optical loss in plasmonic and metamaterial systems is of increasing importance for both basic and applied research in a broad range of topics including sensors, antennas, optical interconnects, and photovoltaics. In this Letter, we use a photonic band formalism for plasmonics to exactly derive a fundamental upper bound on the nonradiative material loss rate of modes in plasmonic, polaritonic, and metamaterial systems. This bound is purely defined by material properties and cannot be overcome by device design. Moreover it is frequency dependent in the presence of multiple Lorentz poles. We numerically verify this bound through direct calculations for a range of plasmonic systems, including optical antennas where the bound places fundamental performance constraints.

  15. Enhancement of fusion rates due to quantum effects in the particles momentum distribution in nonideal media

    CERN Document Server

    Fisch, N J; Petrushevich, Yu V; Quarati, Piero; Starostin, A N

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns a situation when measurements of the nonresonant cross-section of nuclear reactions appear highly dependent on the environment in which the particles interact. An appealing example discussed in the paper is the interaction of a deuteron beam with a target of deuterated metal Ta. In these experiments, the reaction cross section for d(d,p)t was shown to be orders of magnitude greater than what the conventional model predicts for the low-energy particles. In this paper we take into account the influence of quantum effects due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for particles in a non-ideal medium elastically interacting with the medium particles. In order to calculate the nuclear reaction rate in the non-ideal environment we apply both the Monte Carlo technique and approximate analytical calculation of the Feynman diagram using nonrelativistic kinetic Green's functions in the medium which correspond to the generalized energy and momentum distribution functions of interacting particles. We...

  16. Comoving frame models of hot star winds. II. Reduction of O star wind mass-loss rates in global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, J.

    2017-10-01

    We calculate global (unified) wind models of main-sequence, giant, and supergiant O stars from our Galaxy. The models are calculated by solving hydrodynamic, kinetic equilibrium (also known as NLTE) and comoving frame (CMF) radiative transfer equations from the (nearly) hydrostatic photosphere to the supersonic wind. For given stellar parameters, our models predict the photosphere and wind structure and in particular the wind mass-loss rates without any free parameters. Our predicted mass-loss rates are by a factor of 2-5 lower than the commonly used predictions. A possible cause of the difference is abandoning of the Sobolev approximation for the calculation of the radiative force, because our models agree with predictions of CMF NLTE radiative transfer codes. Our predicted mass-loss rates agree nicely with the mass-loss rates derived from observed near-infrared and X-ray line profiles and are slightly lower than mass-loss rates derived from combined UV and Hα diagnostics. The empirical mass-loss rate estimates corrected for clumping may therefore be reconciled with theoretical predictions in such a way that the average ratio between individual mass-loss rate estimates is not higher than about 1.6. On the other hand, our predictions are by factor of 4.7 lower than pure Hα mass-loss rate estimates and can be reconciled with these values only assuming a microclumping factor of at least eight.

  17. Evaluation of fluid intake, weight loss and sweat rate in young triathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Sellés López de Castro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Triathlon is an endurance sport comprising three disciplines: swimming, cycling and running. It is necessary to purpose guidelines in order to avoid dehydration during training or competition and keep good hydration before, during and after physical activity. The aim of this study is to evaluation of fluid intake, weight loss and sweat rate in young triathletes, during different trainings.Material and Methods: A descriptive-observational study in 14 triathletes (7 boys and 7 girls during a session of swimming, other session of cycling, another session of running. Fluid intake, weight loss, % of total body water, % dehydration and sweat rate, were assessed. Triathletes drank water in their drums of 750 ml and urine measurement was performed in containers.Results: The results of our study following the next order: swimming, cycling and running. Water intake 2.66±1.94ml/min, 7.91±7.69ml/min y 7.08±4.13ml/min in boys and 3.43±1.53ml/min, 6.39±5.36ml/min y 8.33±2.74ml/min in girls; weight loss 0.83±0.5kg, 0.47±0.3kg y 0.98±0.4kg in boys and 0.79±0.3kg, 0.47±0.58kg y 0.28±0.21kg in girls; and sweating rate 4.44±4.9ml/ min, 11.81±6.46ml/min y 5.29±3.13ml/min in boys and 3.89±2.4ml/min, 4.69±4.20ml/min and 7.96±5.06ml/min in girls.Conclusions: The percentage of body water and dehydration, loss of weight and sweat rate were compared with other studies and it´s shown that our results are lower than others studies, being below the recommendations of liquid intake in athletes.

  18. Comparison of mass loss rate in reaction of silica with carbon from different investigation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Węgrzyn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the process of carbothermic reaction of SiO2 + mC, key reactions appear on the surfaces of both SiO2 and C grains. However, the values of these surfaces are not known. Assuming the simplest case, quartzite and carbon grains are spheres, total surfaces of reaction were calculated for grains of carbon and quartzite respectively. This enabled to determine the rate of weight loss referred to the unit area of C and SiO2.

  19. Sudden Hearing Loss Basically Due to Low Frequencies Hearing Loss: a Report of 30 Cases%以低频听力下降为主的突发性耳聋30例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王承华; 甘忠; 何金水; 董玉礼

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the prevalence situation and therapeutic efficacy of sudden hearing loss basically due to low frequencies hearing loss. Methods The attack situations, examination results and therapeutic effects of 30 cases of sudden hearing loss basically due to the low frequencies hearing loss were analyzed retrospectively. The curative effect was evaluated with recovered, marked effect,effective and no effect. The pure tone tests were carried out before and after treatment. Results In this study, female was more than male ,2/3 of them were aged from 30 to 50 years old; the morbidity of the left ears were more than the right ones; 10 cases were with the history of catching a cold or overwork;24 cases were with tinnitus. 29 cases received the treatment and the effective rate 86.2% , in which the total effective rate of female patients was 94.73% , and male patients was 70%. The early diagnosis leaded to a good therapeutic effect. The tinnitus symptoms disappeared in 22 cases. Conclusion Women are with a higher incidence of sudden hearing loss due to the low frequencies hearing loss. The timely diagnosis and treatment will a-chieve a satisfying result,especially in female patients.%目的 探讨以低频听力下降为主的突发性耳聋发病情况及治疗效果.方法 回顾性分析近两年收治的30例以低频听力下降为主的突发性耳聋患者发病情况、检查结果及治疗效果,将疗效分为痊愈、显效、有效和无效.治疗前后进行纯音听力检测.结果 30例以低频听力下降为主的突发性耳聋患者,女性发病比男性多,年龄以30~50岁占2/3,左耳较右耳发病多,10例发病前有感冒、劳累史;24倒伴发有耳鸣症状.经过治疗的29例患者总的治疗有效率86.2%,其中女性患者的治疗总有效率94.73%,男性患者的治疗总有效率70%.就诊及时的治疗效果较好,有22例耳鸣症状消失.结论 以低频听力下降为主的突发性耳聋以女性发病较多,

  20. Warming, soil moisture, and loss of snow increase Bromus tectorum’s population growth rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Compagnoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Climate change threatens to exacerbate the impacts of invasive species. In temperate ecosystems, direct effects of warming may be compounded by dramatic reductions in winter snow cover. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum is arguably the most destructive biological invader in basins of the North American Intermountain West, and warming could increase its performance through direct effects on demographic rates or through indirect effects mediated by loss of snow. We conducted a two-year experimental manipulation of temperature and snow pack to test whether 1 warming increases cheatgrass population growth rate and 2 reduced snow cover contributes to cheatgrass’ positive response to warming. We used infrared heaters operating continuously to create the warming treatment, but turned heaters on only during snowfalls for the snowmelt treatment. We monitored cheatgrass population growth rate and the vital rates that determine it: emergence, survival and fecundity. Growth rate increased in both warming and snowmelt treatments. The largest increases occurred in warming plots during the wettest year, indicating that the magnitude of response to warming depends on moisture availability. Warming increased both fecundity and survival, especially in the wet year, while snowmelt contributed to the positive effects of warming by increasing survival. Our results indicate that increasing temperature will exacerbate cheatgrass impacts, especially where warming causes large reductions in the depth and duration of snow cover.

  1. Temporal constraints on future accumulation-area loss of a major Arctic ice cap due to climate change (Vestfonna, Svalbard).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Marco; Schneider, Christoph

    2015-01-28

    Arctic glaciers and ice caps are major contributors to past, present and future sea-level fluctuations. Continued global warming may eventually lead to the equilibrium line altitudes of these ice masses rising above their highest points, triggering unstoppable downwasting. This may feed future sea-level rise considerably. We here present projections for the timing of equilibrium-line loss at the major Arctic ice cap Vestfonna, Svalbard. The projections are based on spatially distributed climatic mass balance modelling driven by the outputs of multiple climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) forced by the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6, 4.5, 6.0 and 8.5. Results indicate strongly decreasing climatic mass balances over the 21(st) century for all RCPs considered. Glacier-wide mass-balance rates will drop down to -4 m a(-1) w.e. (water equivalent) at a maximum. The date at which the equilibrium line rises above the summit of Vestfonna (630 m above sea level) is calculated to range between 2040 and 2150, depending on scenario.

  2. Net loss of CaCO3 from coral reef communities due to human induced seawater acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, A.J.; Kuffner, I.B.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Jokiel, P.L.; Rodgers, K.S.; Tan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (n=3) incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NEC=CaCO3 production – dissolution) was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at −0.04 mmol CaCO3 m−2h−1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates), and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  3. Due-Window Assignment and Scheduling with Multiple Rate-Modifying Activities under the Effects of Deterioration and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanguo Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses due-window assignment and scheduling with multiple rate-modifying activities. Multiple types of rate-modifying activities are allowed to perform on a single machine. The learning effect and job deterioration are also integrated concurrently into the problem which makes the problem more realistic. The objective is to find jointly the optimal location to perform multiple rate-modifying activities, the optimal job sequence, and the optimal location and size of the due window to minimize the total earliness, tardiness, and due-window-related costs. We propose polynomial time algorithms for all the cases of the problem under study.

  4. Energy Loss of Solar $p$ Modes due to the excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gascoyne, Andrew; Hindman, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We consider damping and absorption of solar $p$ modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of $p$ modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by $p$ modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux-tube. The deficit of $p$-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, $\\Gamma$ and absorption coefficient, $\\alpha$. The variation of $\\Gamma$ and $\\alpha$ as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modelled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere (Bogdan et al. (1996), Hindman & Jain 2008, Gascoyne et al. (2011)). Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the $p$ modes is very sensitiv...

  5. Second order effect of binary sources on characteristics of queue and loss rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Hong-Dah; Li, San-Qi

    1994-02-01

    A wideband source in high speed networks is typically represented by a binary random process. In this paper we characterize the second-order properties of each binary source by a multi-state MMPP. A comprehensive numerical study is carried out to identify the individual effect of the source second-order dynamics on the queue length and loss rate. The results can be used to verify the validity of the two-state Markov chain binary source assumption which is commonly made within the framework of input rate control and bandwidth allocation in high speed networks. The concept of input power spectrum is then developed as a unified source characterization for multimedia traffic queueing analyses.

  6. Effect of weight loss on the rate of muscle protein synthesis during fasted and fed conditions in obese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villareal, Dennis T; Smith, Gordon I; Shah, Krupa; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2012-09-01

    Although weight loss ameliorates many of the metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity, there has been reluctance to prescribe weight loss in obese, older individuals because of the fear that it will cause debilitating loss of muscle mass and impair physical function. To gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for the weight loss-induced changes in muscle mass, we measured the rate of muscle protein synthesis (by using stable isotope labeled tracer methodology) during basal, postabsorptive conditions and during mixed meal ingestion in eight obese, older adults: (i) before weight loss therapy, (ii) ~3 months after starting the weight loss intervention (i.e., during the active weight loss phase), when subjects had lost ~7% of their initial body weight, and (iii) after they had lost ~10% of their body weight and maintained this new body weight for ~6 months (~12 months after starting the weight loss intervention). The basal muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was not affected by weight loss. Mixed meal ingestion stimulated the rate of muscle protein synthesis, and the anabolic response (i.e., increase in the protein synthesis rate above basal values) was greater (P weight loss at 3 months (0.033 ± 0.012%·per hour, mean ± s.e.m.) than during weight maintenance before and at 12 months of weight loss therapy (0.003 ± 0.003 and 0.008 ± 0.012%·per hour, respectively). We conclude that during dietary calorie restriction and weight loss in older adults, the rate of muscle protein synthesis is not impaired. Thus, the loss of muscle mass must be mediated predominately by adverse effects of dietary calorie restriction on muscle proteolysis.

  7. Numerical simulation of energy losses in a wind turbine due to icing; Simulation numerique des pertes energetiques d'une eolienne dues au givrage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrova, M.; Ibrahim, H. [TechnoCentre eolien Gaspesie-les Iles, Gaspe, PQ (Canada); Fortin, G.; Perron, J. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada); Ilinca, A. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This poster reported on a study that reproduced frost conditions measured on wind turbines in Murdochville, Quebec. Frost accumulation was measured on the NACA 63 415 blade profile of a Vesta V80, 1.8 MW wind turbine. The loss of mass was measured and the form of frost deposited was examined along with lift and drag. Several tests were conducted with various frost precipitation. Meteorological data such as wind velocity, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure and solar radiation were recorded along with icing events and their duration. The model was used to determine at which point the drag would cause the turbine to stop turning. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. The rate of loss of eyelid reflex following thiopental administration in hypo- and hypergonadism in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Bogdan; Pakulski, Cezary; Drobnik, Leon; Starczewski, Andrzej; Badowicz, Beata

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this research was to explain whether different hormonal conditions caused by disturbed concentrations of estrogens and progesterone might lead to alteration of CNS reaction following administration of the hypnotic agent thiopental. The investigated factor was the rate of loss of the eyelid reflex after intravenous thiopental administration, since this corresponds with loss of consciousness. The investigation was performed in 24 sexually mature female Chinchilla rabbits divided into 4 groups of 6 rabbits each. The animals were oophorectomized (hypoprogesterone/hypoestrogen), hyperestrogen (sham surgery plus estradiol injections), hyperprogesterone (sham surgery plus 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone injections), or normal (sham surgery). Twelve weeks later, thiopental (40 mg/ml) was infused through the intravenous cannula at a constant rate (90 ml/hour) until loss of the eyelid reflex, at which time blood was sampled for determination of thiopental, b-estradiol, progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations. The ANOVA and Tukey tests were applied in statistical analysis (p=0.05). Hyperprogesterone rabbits lost consciousness faster (138 +/- 34.6 sec), at a lower plasma thiopental concentration (46.3 +/- 6.6 microg/ml), and required less thiopental (24.63 +/- 6.44 mg/kg) than controls; hypoprogesterone rabbits lost consciousness slower (207.5 +/- 30.9 sec), at a higher plasma thiopental concentration (129.2 +/- 24.9 microg/ml), and required more thiopental (38.51 +/- 2.33 mg/kg) than controls. The time of sleep induction in the control group was 190 +/- 25.7 sec.; the serum thiopental concentration was 77.8 +/- 13.9 microg/ml, and the total thiopental consumption was 35.8 +/- 3.51 mg/kg. Estrogen status has no effect. Various hormonal states are accompanied by different CNS reactions to thiopental. Among the studied groups of sex steroids, only progestins significantly modify the CNS response to barbiturate infusion.

  9. Effectiveness of two contrasting mulching rates to reduce post-fire soil and organic matter losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Flavio; Prats, Sergio; Vieira, Diana; Puga, João; Lopes, Rita; Gonzaléz-Pelayo, Oscar; Caetano, Ana; Campos, Isabel; Keizer, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Wildfire-affected soils can reveal strong responses in runoff generation and associated soil (fertility) losses, thereby constituting a major threat to the typically shallow and poor forest soils of the Portuguese mountain areas. Mulching with logging residues from these forests has proven to provide a protective soil cover that is highly effective in reducing post-fire runoff and especially erosion (Prats et al., 2012, 2014, 2016a, 2016b). However, these past experiments have all applied comparatively large amounts of forest residues, in the order of 10 Mg ha-1, so that the relationship between application rate and effectiveness is still poorly known. Such relationship would nonetheless be of crucial importance for the employment of forest residue mulching in practice, as one of the possible emergency stabilization measures to be contemplated in post-fire land management of a recently-burned area. Further research gaps that exist in relation to post-fire forest residue mulching include its effectiveness in reducing soil fertility losses (C, N, P; Ferreira et al., 2016a, 2016b) and in minimizing export of contaminants (especially PAHs and metals; Campos et al., 2016), and its (secondary) impacts on soil biological activity and diversity (Puga et al., 2016) and on forest productivity (including through the addition of organic matter to the soil surface, partially replacing the burned litter layer; Prats et al. 2016b). In the framework of the EU-project RECARE, the effectiveness of two contrasting mulching rates with forest logging residues has been tested following a wildfire that on August 9th - 10th 2015 consumed some 715 ha of eucalypt plantations in the Semide municipality, central Portugal. Commercially-available logging residues (chopped bark and twigs) from eucalypt plantations were purchased, transported to the study site and applied to six out of nine 16 m2 erosion bounded plots that had been installed in a burned eucalypt plantation using a randomized

  10. Change in General Relativistic precession rates due to Lidov-Kozai oscillations in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Aswin; Asher, David J.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Li, Gongjie

    2017-04-01

    permissible in nature. A real solar system body in this intermediate state is identified using compiled observational records from IAU-Minor Planet Center, Cometary Catalogue, IAU-Meteor Data Center and performing analytical plus numerical tests on them. This intermediate state brings up the interesting possibility of drastic changes in GR precession rates (at some points peaking to about 60 times that of Mercury's GR precession) during orbital evolution due to sungrazing and sun colliding phases induced by the LK mechanism, thus combining both these important effects in a unique and dynamically interesting way. Comet 96P/Machholz 1 stands out as the only real body identified (from our simulations) to be exhibiting these interesting traits, as well as inclination flips, in the near future. Both these phenomena complimenting and co-existing at the same time has interesting implications in the long term impact studies of small bodies in general.

  11. Sweat Rates, Sweat Sodium Concentrations, and Sodium Losses in 3 Groups of Professional Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godek, Sandra Fowkes; Peduzzi, Chris; Burkholder, Richard; Condon, Steve; Dorshimer, Gary; Bartolozzi, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Sweat sodium losses have never been reported in a large cohort of American football players. Objective: To compare sweat rates (SwtRs), sweat sodium concentrations (SwtNa+), and sodium losses in 3 groups of players (backs and receivers [BK], linebackers and quarterbacks [LB/QB], and linemen [LM]) to determine if positional differences and, therefore, size differences exist. Design: Observational study. Setting: Data were collected during practices in the second week of 2 consecutive training camps. The wet bulb globe temperature was 78.5°F ± 3.5°F (25.9°C ± 1.9°C). Patients or Other Participants: Eighteen BK, 12 LB/QB, and 14 LM volunteered. Intervention(s): Sterile sweat patches were applied to the right forearm after the skin was appropriately cleaned. The patches were removed during practice, placed in sterile tubes, centrifuged, frozen, and later analyzed by flame photometry. Main Outcome Measure(s): Sweat rate, SwtNa+, and sodium loss. We calculated SwtR by change in mass adjusted for urine produced and fluids consumed divided by practice time in hours. Results: Other than age, physical characteristics were different among groups (P < .001). The SwtR was different among groups (F2,41  =  7.3, P  =  .002). It was lower in BK (1.42 ± 0.45 L/h) than in LB/QB (1.98 ± 0.49 L/h) (P < .05) and LM (2.16 ± 0.75 L/h) (P < .01), but we found no differences between SwtRs for LB/QB and LM. The SwtNa+ was not different among groups (BK  =  50 ± 16 mEq/L, LB/QB  =  48.2 ± 23 mEq/L, and LM  =  52.8 ± 25 mEq/L) and ranged from 15 to 99 mEq/L. Sweat sodium losses ranged from 642 mg/h to 6.7 g/h, and findings for group comparisons approached significance (P  =  .06). On days when players practiced 4.5 hours, calculated sodium losses ranged from 2.3 to 30 g/d. Conclusions: The BK sweated at lower rates than did the midsized LB/QB and large LM, but LB/QB sweated similarly to LM. Sweat sodium concentration and daily

  12. Accelerated evolution of functional plastid rRNA and elongation factor genes due to reduced protein synthetic load after the loss of photosynthesis in the chlorophyte alga Polytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, D; Gutell, R R; Cannone, J J; Rumpf, R W; Birky, C W

    2001-09-01

    Polytoma obtusum and Polytoma uvella are members of a clade of nonphotosynthetic chlorophyte algae closely related to Chlamydomonas humicola and other photosynthetic members of the Chlamydomonadaceae. Descended from a nonphotosynthetic mutant, these obligate heterotrophs retain a plastid (leucoplast) with a functional protein synthetic system, and a plastid genome (lpDNA) with functional genes encoding proteins required for transcription and translation. Comparative studies of the evolution of genes in chloroplasts and leucoplasts can identify modes of selection acting on the plastid genome. Two plastid genes--rrn16, encoding the plastid small-subunit rRNA, and tufA, encoding elongation factor Tu--retain their functions in protein synthesis after the loss of photosynthesis in two nonphotosynthetic Polytoma clades but show a substantially accelerated rate of base substitution in the P. uvella clade. The accelerated evolution of tufA is due, at least partly, to relaxed codon bias favoring codons that can be read without wobble, mainly in three amino acids. Selection for these codons may be relaxed because leucoplasts are required to synthesize fewer protein molecules per unit time than are chloroplasts (reduced protein synthetic load) and thus require a lower rate of synthesis of elongation factor Tu. Relaxed selection due to a lower protein synthetic load is also a plausible explanation for the accelerated rate of evolution of rrn16, but the available data are insufficient to test the hypothesis for this gene. The tufA and rrn16 genes in Polytoma oviforme, the sole member of a second nonphotosynthetic clade, are also functional but show no sign of relaxed selection.

  13. Energy Loss of Solar p Modes due to the Excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoyne, A.; Jain, R.; Hindman, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = -z 0).

  14. Energy loss of solar p modes due to the excitation of magnetic sausage tube waves: Importance of coupling the upper atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, A.; Jain, R. [Applied Mathematics Department, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hindman, B. W., E-mail: a.d.gascoyne@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: r.jain@sheffield.ac.uk [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = –z{sub 0}).

  15. Is the Cortical Deficit in Amblyopia Due to Reduced Cortical Magnification, Loss of Neural Resolution, or Neural Disorganization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavagnier, Simon; Dumoulin, S.O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314406514; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of amblyopia is a matter of debate. The following possibilities have been suggested: loss of foveal cells, reduced cortical magnification, loss of spatial resolution of foveal cells, and topographical disarray in the cellular map. To resolve this we undertook a population receptive

  16. Loss of productivity due to neck/shoulder symptoms and hand/arm symptoms: Results from the PROMO-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S.G. van den; IJmker, S.; Blatter, B.M.; Korte, E.M. de

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of the present study is to describe the extent of productivity loss among computer workers with neck/shoulder symptoms and hand/arm symptoms, and to examine associations between pain intensity, various physical and psychosocial factors and productivity loss in computer

  17. Is the Cortical Deficit in Amblyopia Due to Reduced Cortical Magnification, Loss of Neural Resolution, or Neural Disorganization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavagnier, Simon; Dumoulin, S.O.; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of amblyopia is a matter of debate. The following possibilities have been suggested: loss of foveal cells, reduced cortical magnification, loss of spatial resolution of foveal cells, and topographical disarray in the cellular map. To resolve this we undertook a population receptive

  18. Changes to infiltration and soil loss rates during the growing season under conventional and conservation tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Gergely; Madarász, Balázs; Szabó, Judit; Tóth, Adrienn; Zacháry, Dóra; Szalai, Zoltán; Dyson, Jeremy

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall simulation studies were conducted to determine how infiltration and soil erosion rates vary in field plots under conventional and conservation tillage practices during the growing season: i.) in April while the soil was under green cover; ii.) in May when the soil was a bare seed bed; iii.) in October when the soil was covered in stubble after harvest. At each time, five different rainfall intensities were applied to the plots and the infiltration rate calculated as function of rainfall intensity. The highest infiltration rates were observed on the plot under conservation tillage when it was under the cover crop. Comparing these infiltration rates with those at other times, important differences can be seen. When the soil was prepared as a seedbed, higher infiltration rates occurred when rainfall intensities were less than 80 mm/h. However, when the rainfall intensities were more than 80 mm/h, water infiltration rates were higher when the soil was covered in stubble. This means that natural pore forming processes can be more effective at improving soil drainage potential than temporary improvements created by soil tillage operations. Different methods were used to assess the soil erosion potential. Independently of the method used to calculate soil erodibility, it is obvious that the soil is most vulnerable when prepared as a seedbed. In addition, the highest resistance against soil erosion was observed when the soil was covered with crops. A method of calculating the sediment transporting capacity of runoff found no significant difference between conservation and conventional tillage systems. This contrasts with the Universal Soil Loss Equation method, which indicated differences between the two tillage systems substantial at each time of observation. The lowest difference (less than two times) was when the soil was covered in stubble, which matches with literature data. Overall, conservation tillage resulted in much lower soil erodibility values for the

  19. Prehistorical and historical declines in Caribbean coral reef accretion rates driven by loss of parrotfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Katie L.; O'Dea, Aaron; Clark, Tara R.; Zhao, Jian-Xin; Norris, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Caribbean coral reefs have transformed into algal-dominated habitats over recent decades, but the mechanisms of change are unresolved due to a lack of quantitative ecological data before large-scale human impacts. To understand the role of reduced herbivory in recent coral declines, we produce a high-resolution 3,000 year record of reef accretion rate and herbivore (parrotfish and urchin) abundance from the analysis of sediments and fish, coral and urchin subfossils within cores from Caribbean Panama. At each site, declines in accretion rates and parrotfish abundance were initiated in the prehistorical or historical period. Statistical tests of direct cause and effect relationships using convergent cross mapping reveal that accretion rates are driven by parrotfish abundance (but not vice versa) but are not affected by total urchin abundance. These results confirm the critical role of parrotfish in maintaining coral-dominated reef habitat and the urgent need for restoration of parrotfish populations to enable reef persistence.

  20. Differential Dropout Rates of Minority and Majority Job Candidates Due to "Time Lags" between Selection Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvey, Richard D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This research investigated whether or not "time lags" are related to the dropout rates of job applicants. The effect of duration of these time lags, periods between initial job application and psychological testing, on differential dropout rates of minority and majority candidates was also examined. (Author/RK)

  1. Modeling of the capacity loss of a 12 V automotive lead-acid battery due to ageing and comparison with measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ui Seong; Shin, Chee Burm; Chung, Seung Myun; Kim, Sung Tae; Cho, Byung Won

    One-dimensional modeling was carried-out to predict the capacity loss of a 12 V automotive lead-acid battery due to ageing. The model not only accounted for electrochemical kinetics and ionic mass transfer in a battery cell, but also considered the anodic corrosion of lead in sulfuric acid. In order to validate the modeling, modeling results were compared with the measurement data of the cycling behaviors of the lead-acid batteries having nominal capacity of 68 Ah that are mounted on the automobiles manufactured by Hyundai Motor Company. The cycling was performed under the protocol of the constant-current discharge and the constant-voltage charge. The discharge rate of C/3 was used. The range of state of charge was between 1 and 0.85. The voltage was kept constant at the gassing voltage until the charge current tapered to 10 mA. The retention capacity of the battery was measured with C/3 discharge rate before the beginning of cycling and after every 40 cycles of cycling. The modeling results were in good agreement with the measurement data.

  2. Surface loss rate of H and N radicals in H2/N2 plasma etching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chang Sung; Takeda, Keigo; Hayashi, Toshio; Takashima, Seigo; Sekine, Makoto; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Shiratani, Masaharu; Hori, Masaru

    2008-10-01

    As ULSI devices are down to nano-scale size, there have been many efforts to develop low dielectric constant (low-k) materials and establish the plasma etching technology. Especially, the interaction between the plasma and the surface has an enormous influence on characterizing the etching process. However, the reactions in contact with solid surface such as substrate and wall are very complicated and moreover, at present, there are many interactions unknown and they are not fully understood yet. In this study, surface loss probabilities of H, N radicals on stainless steel and organic low-k film surfaces are investigated by vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) technique. The changes of H, N radical densities are quantitatively measured in H2/N2 plasma afterglow and the loss rates on each surface are evaluated. It is expected that the development of plasma etching process can be advanced by understanding the reaction of radicals with the surface during organic low-k etching process.

  3. From wind to superwind - The evolution of mass-loss rates for Mira models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.; Willson, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical atmosphere models were calculated for a large grid of variables with Mira-like properties satisfying the Iben radius-luminosity-mass relationship for evolving AGB stars. Their masses ranged from 0.7 to 2.4 solar masses, and their periods from 150 to 800 days. All were fundamental-mode pulsators, had solar metallicity, and included effects of dust. The mass-loss rate increases as an approximately exponential function of time, reaching 0.00001-0.0001 solar masses/yr. Further evolution is dominated by the powerful wind, which strips the star's envelope from the core. This 'superwind', a remarkably robust effect, occurs for all initial stellar masses and all modeling parameters that have been tested. Models with very low metallicity also show the effect, but at higher luminosities, which has intriguing implications for the number of supernovae in early low-metallicity populations and for the chemical evolution of galaxies.

  4. On the sensitivity of extrasolar mass-loss rate ranges: HD 209458b a case study

    CERN Document Server

    D'Angelo, C S Villarreal; Costa, A; Velázquez, P; Raga, A; Esquivel, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a 3D hydrodynamic study of the effects that different stellar wind conditions and planetary wind structures have on the calculated Ly-$\\alpha$ absorptions produced during the transit of HD 209458b. Considering a range of stellar wind speeds $\\sim$[350-800] km s$^{-1}$, coronal temperature $\\sim$[3-7] $\\times10^{6}$ K and two values of the polytropic index $\\Gamma$ $\\sim$[1.01-1.13], while keeping fixed the stellar mass loss rate, we found a that a $\\dot M_p$ range between $\\sim$[3-5] $\\times 10^{10}$g s$^{-1}$ give account for the observational absorption in Ly-$\\alpha$ measured for the planetary system. Also, several models with anisotropic evaporation profiles for the planetary escaping atmosphere were carried out, showing that both, the escape through polar regions and through the night side yields larger absorptions than an isotropic planetary wind.

  5. From wind to superwind - The evolution of mass-loss rates for Mira models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.; Willson, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical atmosphere models were calculated for a large grid of variables with Mira-like properties satisfying the Iben radius-luminosity-mass relationship for evolving AGB stars. Their masses ranged from 0.7 to 2.4 solar masses, and their periods from 150 to 800 days. All were fundamental-mode pulsators, had solar metallicity, and included effects of dust. The mass-loss rate increases as an approximately exponential function of time, reaching 0.00001-0.0001 solar masses/yr. Further evolution is dominated by the powerful wind, which strips the star's envelope from the core. This 'superwind', a remarkably robust effect, occurs for all initial stellar masses and all modeling parameters that have been tested. Models with very low metallicity also show the effect, but at higher luminosities, which has intriguing implications for the number of supernovae in early low-metallicity populations and for the chemical evolution of galaxies.

  6. The empirical metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rate of O- and early B-type stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokiem, M.R.; de Koter, A.; Vink, J.S.; Puls, J.; Evans, C.J.; Smartt, S.J.; Crowther, P.A.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.J.; Najarro, F.; Villamariz, M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Abridged] We present a comprehensive study of the metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rates in stationary stellar winds of hot massive stars. Assuming a power-law dependence of mass loss on metallicity, Mdot \\propto Z^{m}, and adopting a theoretical relation between the terminal velocity and met

  7. Direct costs and benefits of multiple mating: Are high female mating rates due to ejaculate replenishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Amy M; Kelly, Clint D

    2016-03-01

    Females often mate more than is necessary to ensure reproductive success even when they incur significant costs from doing so. Direct benefits are hypothesized to be the driving force of high female mating rates, yet species in which females only receive an ejaculate from their mate still realize increased fitness from multiple mating. Using the Texas field cricket, Gryllus texensis, we experimentally test the hypothesis that multiple mating via monandry or polyandry increases female fitness by replenishing ejaculates, thereby allowing females to produce more offspring for a longer period of time. We found that higher rates of female mating significantly increased lifetime fecundity and oviposition independent of whether females mated with one or two males. Further, although interactions with males significantly increased rates of injury or death, females that replenished ejaculates experienced an increased rate and duration of oviposition, demonstrating that the immediate benefits of multiple mating may greatly outweigh the long-term costs that mating poses to female condition and survival. We suggest that ejaculate replenishment is a driving factor of high mating rates in females that do not receive external direct benefits from mating and that a comparative study across taxa will provide additional insight into the role that ejaculate size plays in the evolution of female mating rates.

  8. Modification of atomic physics rates due to nonlocal electron parallel heat transport in divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allais, F. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Matte, J.P. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)]. E-mail: matte@inrs-emt.uquebec.ca; Alouani-Bibi, F. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Kim, C.G. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stotler, D.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Rognlien, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The effect of steep temperature gradients on the rate of ionization of atomic hydrogen is studied numerically with the electron kinetic code 'FPI' [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 (1994) 1208]. A set of cross sections ['Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction data for fusion'. Supplement to the journal Nucl. Fusion 4 (1993)] has been used which gives the same rates of radiation, ionization and recombination as in the well known edge modeling codes 'UEDGE' and 'DEGAS' for Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions. For this purpose, 30 energy levels are included in the computation, as stepwise ionization is dominant. The enhancement of the ionization rate by non-Maxwellian effects in the colder part of the plasma is significant.

  9. New model of propagation rates of long crack due to structure fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-tao LIU; Ping-an DU; Ming-jing HUANG; Qing ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    By comparison of the characteristics of existing models for long fatigue crack propagation rates,a new model,called the generalized passivation-lancet model for long fatigue crack propagation rates (GPLFCPR),and a general formula for characterizing the process of crack growth rates are proposed based on the passivation-lancet theory.The GPLFCPR model overcomes disadvantages of the existing models and can describe the rules of the entire fatiguc crack growth process from the cracking threshold to the critical fracturing point effectively with explicit physical meaning. It also reflects the influence of material characteristics,such as strength parameters,fracture parameters and heat treatment. Experimental results obtained by testing LZ50 steel,AlZnMgCu0.5,0.5Cr0.5Mo0.25V steel,etc.,show good consistency with the new model. The GPLFCPR model is valuable in theoretical research and practical applications.

  10. Intervention analysis of introduction of rotavirus vaccine on hospital admissions rates due to acute diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Teixeira Masukawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine on hospitalization rates for acute diarrhea in children younger than 5 years old after the introduction of the vaccine in 2006. A descriptive analytical observational study was carried out of the hospitalization rates occurred between 2000 and 2011 in 22 Regional Health Centers of Paraná State, Brazil. The effect of the vaccine was assessed by applying the SARIMA/Box-Jenkins time series methodology of intervention analysis, which allows verifying the slopes of the series are different after the introduction of the vaccine and estimating the magnitude of these effects for children younger than five years of age, by age group, for each region center. It was verified a statistically significant reduction by center/month on hospitalization rates for children 1 year old and younger, with averages of 47% and 58%, respectively, in December 2011.

  11. Technique for reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils due to thermal expansion properties of various FRP bobbins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, N.; Tada, S.; Higuchi, T.; Furumura, Y.; Takao, T.; Yamanaka, A.

    2005-10-01

    We reported about reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils. The method is the use of FRP bobbins fabricated with special fibers. Since their FRPs have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, the FRP bobbins expand to the circumferential direction during cooling down. In case of the superconducting coils with such FRP bobbins, the winding tensions do not decrease during cooling down. Therefore, the mechanical losses are reduced by the suppression of wire's vibration. Their special FRPs are a Dyneema® fiber reinforced plastic (DFRP), a Dyneema and glass fiber reinforced plastic (DGFRP), and a Zylon® fiber reinforced plastic (ZFRP). These materials have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, however, the amplitudes of thermal expansion are various by the quantity or quality of the fiber. In this paper, the values of thermal expansion were actually measured, and it was discussed about the influence on the mechanical losses. At the experimental results, the mechanical loss was small, so that the thermal strain to the circumferential direction on the coil was large. Moreover, in case of the coils with sufficiently strong winding tensions at coil-operating temperature, the mechanical losses vanished.

  12. Technique for reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils due to thermal expansion properties of various FRP bobbins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, N. [Tsukamoto Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: n-sekine@tsukalab.dnj.ynu.ac.jp; Tada, S. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Higuchi, T. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Furumura, Y. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Takao, T. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Yamanaka, A. [Research Center, Toyobo, Co., Ltd, 2-1-1, Katata, Otsu, Shiga 520-0292 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    We reported about reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils. The method is the use of FRP bobbins fabricated with special fibers. Since their FRPs have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, the FRP bobbins expand to the circumferential direction during cooling down. In case of the superconducting coils with such FRP bobbins, the winding tensions do not decrease during cooling down. Therefore, the mechanical losses are reduced by the suppression of wire's vibration. Their special FRPs are a Dyneema[reg] fiber reinforced plastic (DFRP), a Dyneema and glass fiber reinforced plastic (DGFRP), and a Zylon[reg] fiber reinforced plastic (ZFRP). These materials have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, however, the amplitudes of thermal expansion are various by the quantity or quality of the fiber. In this paper, the values of thermal expansion were actually measured, and it was discussed about the influence on the mechanical losses. At the experimental results, the mechanical loss was small, so that the thermal strain to the circumferential direction on the coil was large. Moreover, in case of the coils with sufficiently strong winding tensions at coil-operating temperature, the mechanical losses vanished.

  13. Do gallstones found before sleeve gastrectomy behave the same as those formed after surgery due to weight loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Alexandria; Tarboush, Moayad; Manatsathit, Wuttiporn; Meguid, Ahmed; Szpunar, Suzanna; Hawasli, Abdelkader

    2016-11-01

    Gallstone formation is prevalent in the bariatric population and after weight loss. We believe that gallstones found preoperatively behave differently and may not cause significant complications as those developing after weight loss. Thus, prophylactic cholecystectomy before or during sleeve gastrectomy (SG) may not be necessary. Patients undergoing SG from January 2011 to May 2012 were evaluated for the presence of gallstones and development of symptoms or need for cholecystectomy postoperatively. Group 1 (n = 18) had gallstones preoperatively. Group 2 (n = 29) developed gallstones after weight loss. Both groups' demographics were similar. Symptomatic gallstones occurred in 1 patient (5.6%) in group 1 and in 9 patients (31.0%) in group 2 (P = .19). Percent excess body mass index loss (%EBL) was 58 ± 24% vs 70 ± 22% (P = .11) with a mean follow-up of 8.9 ± 6.2 and 14.7 ± 3.9 months for group 1 and group 2, respectively (P = .005). Asymptomatic gallstones found before SG tend to have less risk of becoming symptomatic than those formed after weight loss. There was no statistical significant difference because of small sample. Prophylactic cholecystectomy, however, may not be warranted in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Soil Water Availability Modulation Over Estimated Relative Yield Losses in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Due to Ozone Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel De la Torre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach developed by Fuhrer in 1995 to estimate wheat yield losses induced by ozone and modulated by the soil water content (SWC was applied to the data on Catalonian wheat yields. The aim of our work was to apply this approach and adjust it to Mediterranean environmental conditions by means of the necessary corrections. The main objective pursued was to prove the importance of soil water availability in the estimation of relative wheat yield losses as a factor that modifies the effects of tropospheric ozone on wheat, and to develop the algorithms required for the estimation of relative yield losses, adapted to the Mediterranean environmental conditions. The results show that this is an easy way to estimate relative yield losses just using meteorological data, without using ozone fluxes, which are much more difficult to calculate. Soil water availability is very important as a modulating factor of the effects of ozone on wheat; when soil water availability decreases, almost twice the amount of accumulated exposure to ozone is required to induce the same percentage of yield loss as in years when soil water availability is high.

  15. Determination of Rate of Degradation of Iron Plates Due To Rust Using Image Processing -A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Choudhary

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: most of industries and bridges around us make use of iron for manufacturing their products. On the other hand corrosion is a natural process that deteriorates the integrity of iron surface. Therefore, rusting of iron takes place. To avoid unwanted accidents in industries and bridges, it is necessary to detect rusting in earlier stage, so that it can be prevented. Digital image processing for the detection of the rusting provides fast, accurate and objectives results. In this research paper, we have done a systematic review of algorithms that help us to detect the rust area from a metal (iron.it has been found that most of researches are bring their images, processing series in usage for this purpose due to its simplicity in implementing and due to fact the images help capturing the visual inspection process easily and due to the ground teeth. The image processing techniques explored by other peoples based on in-depth analysis, we have also proposed a novel technique to overcome the limitation.

  16. Determination of Rate of Degradation of Iron Plates due to Rust using Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Choudhary

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of industries and bridges around us make use of iron for manufacturing their products. On the other hand corrosion is a natural process that deteriorates the integrity of iron surface. Therefore, rusting of iron takes place. To avoid unwanted accidents in industries and bridges, it is necessary to detect rusting in earlier stage, so that it can be prevented. Digital image processing for the detection of the rusting provides fast, accurate and objectives results. In this research paper, we have done a systematic review of algorithms that help us to detect the rust area from a metal (iron.it has been found that most of researches are bring their images, processing series in usage for this purpose due to its simplicity in implementing and due to fact the images help capturing the visual inspection process easily and due to the ground teeth. The image processing techniques explored by other peoples based on in-depth analysis, we have also proposed a novel technique to overcome the limitation.

  17. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracheboud, J.; Otto, S.J.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Broeders, M.J.M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Koning, H.J. de

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The Netherlands Can

  18. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fracheboud (Jacques); S.J. Otto (Suzie); J.A.A.M. van Dijck; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The Net

  19. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fracheboud (Jacques); S.J. Otto (Suzie); J.A.A.M. van Dijck; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The

  20. Recent pause in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Trevor F.; Prentice, I. Colin; Canadell, Josep G.; Williams, Christopher A.; Wang, Han; Raupach, Michael; Collatz, G. James

    2016-11-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon cycle and offset a large fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The terrestrial carbon sink is increasing, yet the mechanisms responsible for its enhancement, and implications for the growth rate of atmospheric CO2, remain unclear. Here using global carbon budget estimates, ground, atmospheric and satellite observations, and multiple global vegetation models, we report a recent pause in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2, and a decline in the fraction of anthropogenic emissions that remain in the atmosphere, despite increasing anthropogenic emissions. We attribute the observed decline to increases in the terrestrial sink during the past decade, associated with the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 on vegetation and the slowdown in the rate of warming on global respiration. The pause in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate provides further evidence of the roles of CO2 fertilization and warming-induced respiration, and highlights the need to protect both existing carbon stocks and regions, where the sink is growing rapidly.

  1. TDP-43 Loss-of-Function Causes Neuronal Loss Due to Defective Steroid Receptor-Mediated Gene Program Switching in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Vanden Broeck

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TDP-43 proteinopathy is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and related neurodegenerative disorders. Whether TDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a novel toxic gain-of-function mechanism of the aggregates or by a loss of its normal function is unknown. We increased and decreased expression of TDP-43 (dTDP-43 in Drosophila. Although upregulation of dTDP-43 induced neuronal ubiquitin and dTDP-43-positive inclusions, both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 resulted in selective apoptosis of bursicon neurons and highly similar transcriptome alterations at the pupal-adult transition. Gene network analysis and genetic validation showed that both up- and downregulated dTDP-43 directly and dramatically increased the expression of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Map205, resulting in cytoplasmic accumulations of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR and a failure to switch EcR-dependent gene programs from a pupal to adult pattern. We propose that dTDP-43 neurotoxicity is caused by a loss of its normal function.

  2. Stabilized nitrogen fertilizers and application rate influence nitrogen losses under rainfed spring wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) losses associated with fertilizer application have negative economic and environmental consequences, but urease and nitrification inhibitors have potential to reduce N losses. The effectiveness of these inhibitors has been studied extensively in irrigated but not rainfed systems. Theref...

  3. Connecting the dots: a correlation between ionizing radiation and cloud mass-loss rate traced by optical integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, A. F.; Gritschneder, M.; Dale, J. E.; Ginsburg, A.; Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Preibisch, T.; Ramsay, S.; Reiter, M.; Testi, L.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of feedback from O- and B-type stars with data from the integral field spectrograph Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) mounted on the Very Large Telescope of pillar-like structures in the Carina Nebular Complex, one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Galaxy. For the observed pillars, we compute gas electron densities and temperatures maps, produce integrated line and velocity maps of the ionized gas, study the ionization fronts at the pillar tips, analyse the properties of the single regions, and detect two ionized jets originating from two distinct pillar tips. For each pillar tip, we determine the incident ionizing photon flux Q0, pil originating from the nearby massive O- and B-type stars and compute the mass-loss rate dot{M} of the pillar tips due to photoevaporation caused by the incident ionizing radiation. We combine the results of the Carina data set with archival MUSE data of a pillar in NGC 3603 and with previously published MUSE data of the Pillars of Creation in M16, and with a total of 10 analysed pillars, find tight correlations between the ionizing photon flux and the electron density, the electron density and the distance from the ionizing sources, and the ionizing photon flux and the mass-loss rate. The combined MUSE data sets of pillars in regions with different physical conditions and stellar content therefore yield an empirical quantification of the feedback effects of ionizing radiation. In agreement with models, we find that dot{M}∝ Q_0,pil^{1/2}.

  4. Rovibrational Collisional Rates of SiO due to Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Benhui H.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Wang, Xiaohong; Bowman, J.; Zhang, Peng; Naduvalath, Balakrishnan; Forrey, Robert C.

    2016-06-01

    SiO has been detected in a variety of astronomical sources and is a potential diagnostic of dust formation and destruction in star-forming regions and evolved stars. Its rovibrational level populations are perturbed by collisions with He, H and H2 requiring a non-LTE analysis. However, the necessary collisional rate coefficients, and their temperature dependence, are largely unknown. Scattering calculations are the primary source of such rate coefficients. In this work a full-dimensional (6D) potential energy surface (PES) for the SiO-H2 complex was computed using the high-level CCSD(T)-F12B method and fitted using an invariant polynomial approach in 6D. The first full dimensional quantum close-coupling scattering calculations of SiO in collision with H2 on the 6D PES have been performed for the pure state-to-state rotational excitations from SiO(v=0, j=0-10). For rovibrational transitions, state-to-state and total quenching rate coefficients from several low-lying rotational levels of SiO(v=1) are studied for both para-H2 and ortho-H2 collisions.Work at UGA and Emory are supported by NASA grant No. NNX12AF42G, at UNLV by NSF Grant No. PHY-1505557, and at Penn State by NSF Grant No. PHY-1503615.

  5. Reduced basal autophagy and impaired mitochondrial dynamics due to loss of Parkinson's disease-associated protein DJ-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Krebiehl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial dysfunction and degradation takes a central role in current paradigms of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD. Loss of DJ-1 function is a rare cause of familial PD. Although a critical role of DJ-1 in oxidative stress response and mitochondrial function has been recognized, the effects on mitochondrial dynamics and downstream consequences remain to be determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using DJ-1 loss of function cellular models from knockout (KO mice and human carriers of the E64D mutation in the DJ-1 gene we define a novel role of DJ-1 in the integrity of both cellular organelles, mitochondria and lysosomes. We show that loss of DJ-1 caused impaired mitochondrial respiration, increased intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and characteristic alterations of mitochondrial shape as shown by quantitative morphology. Importantly, ultrastructural imaging and subsequent detailed lysosomal activity analyses revealed reduced basal autophagic degradation and the accumulation of defective mitochondria in DJ-1 KO cells, that was linked with decreased levels of phospho-activated ERK2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that loss of DJ-1 leads to impaired autophagy and accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that under physiological conditions would be compensated via lysosomal clearance. Our study provides evidence for a critical role of DJ-1 in mitochondrial homeostasis by connecting basal autophagy and mitochondrial integrity in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Rates of thoracic trauma and mortality due to accidents in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cury Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report on the causes of trauma, indexes of trauma, and mortality related to thoracic trauma in one region of Brazil. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed at the Regional Trauma Center in Sγo Josι do Rio Preto over a 1-year period, from 1 st July 2004 to 30 th June 2005. We included all patients attending the center′s emergency room with thoracic trauma and an anatomic injury scale (AIS ≥ 2. We collected data using a protocol completed on arrival in hospital utilizing the AIS. We studied the types of accidents as well as the mortality and the AIS scores. Prevalence rates were calculated and the paired t-test and logistic regression were employed for the statistical analysis. Results:There were a total of 373 casualties with AIS ≥ 2 and there were 45 (12% deaths. The causes of thoracic trauma among the 373 casualties were as follows: 91 (24.4% car crashes, 75 (20.1% falls, 46 (12.3% motorbike accidents, 40 (10.7% stabbings, 22 (5.9% accidents involving pedestrians, 21 (5.6% bicycle accidents, 17 (4.6% shootings, and 54 (14.5% other types of accident. The severity of the injuries was classified according to the AIS: 224 (60% were grade 2, 101 (27% were grade 3, 27 (7.2% were grade 4, 18 (4.9% were grade 5, and 3 were (0.8% grade 6. With respect to thoracic trauma, pedestrians involved in accidents and victims of shootings had mortality rates that were significantly higher than that of those involved in other types of accidents. Conclusion: Road accidents are the main cause of thoracic injury, with accidents involving pedestrians and shootings being associated with a greater death rate.

  7. Rates of thoracic trauma and mortality due to accidents in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Francisco; Baitello, André Luciano; Echeverria, Rodrigo Florêncio; Espada, Paulo César; Pereira de Godoy, José Maria

    2009-01-01

    To report on the causes of trauma, indexes of trauma, and mortality related to thoracic trauma in one region of Brazil. This prospective study was performed at the Regional Trauma Center in São José do Rio Preto over a 1-year period, from 1(st) July 2004 to 30(th) June 2005. We included all patients attending the center's emergency room with thoracic trauma and an anatomic injury scale (AIS) ≥ 2. We collected data using a protocol completed on arrival in hospital utilizing the AIS. We studied the types of accidents as well as the mortality and the AIS scores. Prevalence rates were calculated and the paired t-test and logistic regression were employed for the statistical analysis. There were a total of 373 casualties with AIS ≥ 2 and there were 45 (12%) deaths. The causes of thoracic trauma among the 373 casualties were as follows: 91 (24.4%) car crashes, 75 (20.1%) falls, 46 (12.3%) motorbike accidents, 40 (10.7%) stabbings, 22 (5.9%) accidents involving pedestrians, 21 (5.6%) bicycle accidents, 17 (4.6%) shootings, and 54 (14.5%) other types of accident. The severity of the injuries was classified according to the AIS: 224 (60%) were grade 2, 101 (27%) were grade 3, 27 (7.2%) were grade 4, 18 (4.9%) were grade 5, and 3 were (0.8%) grade 6. With respect to thoracic trauma, pedestrians involved in accidents and victims of shootings had mortality rates that were significantly higher than that of those involved in other types of accidents. Road accidents are the main cause of thoracic injury, with accidents involving pedestrians and shootings being associated with a greater death rate.

  8. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08.

  9. Study of back quench in the superconducting coils of the barrel toroid of ATLAS due to losses during a "slow" discharge of the magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Sorbi, M

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the losses in the Al matrix of the conductor and in the casings where the superconducting coils are located, due to a "slow discharge" (heaters of the coils off) of the Barrel Toroid of ATLAS has been carried out. The values of the losses have been calculated and cross checked by means of different analytical and FE approaches, and simple relations have been carried out in order to correlate them with the main electrical parameters of the magnet. With a thermal analysis, the increase of temperature in the superconducting coils due to these extra losses has been calculated. The temperature margin (i.e. difference between current sharing temperature and operating temperature) has been calculated and compared with the temperature margin during the normal run of the magnet. (6 refs).

  10. No association between hearing loss due to bilateral otitis media with effusion and Denver-II test results in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbetcioglu, Bulent; Ugurtay, Ozgur; Kirkim, Gunay; Mutlu, Basak

    2008-02-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of acquired hearing loss in childhood and has been associated with delayed language development and behavioral problems. In this study, children with an evidently recurrent otitis media were investigated. The present study examines the association between hearing loss versus developmental screening test parameters of preschool children. Sixteen children with bilateral otitis media were compared with age-matched same number of children with normal hearing (controls). Language and verbal cognitive abilities were not affected significantly as a result of the presence of hearing loss because of OME. Using internationally standardized Denver-II test to evaluate the language development and other developmental screening parameters, no significant difference was found between the patient and control groups. This study failed to find any association between the hearing loss due to otitis media with effusion and speech and language parameters in preschool children.

  11. Estimated economic losses due to neospora caninum infection in dairy herds with and without a history of neospora caninum associated abortion epidemics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, C.J.M.; Hogeveen, H.; Schaik, van G.; Wouda, W.; Dijkstra, Th.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, direct economic losses due to Neospora caninum infection, based on actual data from N. caninum seropositive reference herds and from herds that experienced an N. caninum- associated abortion epidemic, were calculated using a stochastic model with random elements. The results demonstra

  12. THE ANALYSIS OF FACTORS DETERMINING THE DIFFERENCES OF PERINATAL LOSSES DUE TO CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS IN THE REGIONS OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION (ACCORDING TO THE STATE AND DEPARTMENTAL STATISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Baibarina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of comparative analysis of the structure of medico-biological factors affecting characteristics of perinatal losses due to congenital malformations in the regions of the Russian Federation in 2010. The authors represent the objective comparative analysis of the management of obstetric, gynecological and neonatal medical healthcare quality at different levels and stages.

  13. Plant diversity does not buffer drought effects on early-stage litter mass loss rates and microbial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Anja; Eisenhauer, Nico; Weigelt, Alexandra; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Human activities are decreasing biodiversity and changing the climate worldwide. Both global change drivers have been shown to affect ecosystem functioning, but they may also act in concert in a non-additive way. We studied early-stage litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties (basal respiration and microbial biomass) during the summer season in response to plant species richness and summer drought in a large grassland biodiversity experiment, the Jena Experiment, Germany. In line with our expectations, decreasing plant diversity and summer drought decreased litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties. In contrast to our hypotheses, however, this was only true for mass loss of standard litter (wheat straw) used in all plots, and not for plant community-specific litter mass loss. We found no interactive effects between global change drivers, that is, drought reduced litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties irrespective of plant diversity. High mass loss rates of plant community-specific litter and low responsiveness to drought relative to the standard litter indicate that soil microbial communities were adapted to decomposing community-specific plant litter material including lower susceptibility to dry conditions during summer months. Moreover, higher microbial enzymatic diversity at high plant diversity may have caused elevated mass loss of standard litter. Our results indicate that plant diversity loss and summer drought independently impede soil processes. However, soil decomposer communities may be highly adapted to decomposing plant community-specific litter material, even in situations of environmental stress. Results of standard litter mass loss moreover suggest that decomposer communities under diverse plant communities are able to cope with a greater variety of plant inputs possibly making them less responsive to biotic changes.

  14. Cup Anemometers’ Loss of Performance Due to Ageing Processes, and Its Effect on Annual Energy Production (AEP Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Sanz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The deviation of calibration coefficients from five cup anemometer models over time was analyzed. The analysis was based on a series of laboratory calibrations between January 2001 and August 2010. The analysis was performed on two different groups of anemometers: (1 anemometers not used for any industrial purpose (that is, just stored; and (2 anemometers used in different industrial applications (mainly in the field—or outside—applications like wind farms. Results indicate a loss of performance of the studied anemometers over time. In the case of the unused anemometers the degradation shows a clear pattern. In the case of the anemometers used in the field, the data analyzed also suggest a loss of performance, yet the degradation does not show a clear trend. A recalibration schedule is proposed based on the observed performances variations.

  15. Bipedicled transverse abdominal flap for coverage of exposed iliac crest due to post traumatic tissue loss in left inguinal region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra G. Naik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is a surgical challenge for any plastic surgeon to choose the type of flap in the case of large inguinal canal tissue loss with exposed crest of ilium. Most repair methods provide inadequate closure of the defect for the large tissue loss over the inguinal region with exposure of the iliac crest. There are very few cases reported in the literature about transverse bipedicled abdominal flap for tissue defect over the inguinal region with exposure of the iliac crest bone and upper part of the thigh. In this case, by taking advantage of the large, loose, and lax nature of the abdominal skin, systematic primary closure of the donor as well as recipient site has been successfully achieved. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 963-965

  16. Insect occurrence and losses due to phytophagous species in the amaranth Amaranthus hypocondriacus L. crop in Puebla, Mexico,

    OpenAIRE

    A. Aragón-García; Pérez Torres, B. C.; Damián-Huato, M. A.; Huerta-Lara, M.; Sáenz de Cabezón, F. J.; Pérez-Moreno, I.; Marco Mancebón, Vicente; Lopez Olguín, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    A field survey for insects associated with amaranth Amaranthus hypocondriacus L. (Amaranthaceae) was conducted in the semiarid Region Mixteca of Puebla State in Mexico. Also, the losses to the crop caused by the phytophagous species were assessed. Samples were collected every fifteen days during one year in five plots to obtain a representation of the phytophagous and beneficial insects, and of the percentages of plants infested with the principal phytophagous insects. The species that were o...

  17. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

    1995-03-01

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

  18. Bit Error Rate Due to Misalignment of Earth Station Antenna Pointing to Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Pamungkas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available One problem causing reduction of energy in satellite communications system is the misalignment of earth station antenna pointing to satellite. Error in pointing would affect the quality of information signal to energy bit in earth station. In this research, error in pointing angle occurred only at receiver (Rx antenna, while the transmitter (Tx antennas precisely point to satellite. The research was conducted towards two satellites, namely TELKOM-1 and TELKOM-2. At first, measurement was made by directing Tx antenna precisely to satellite, resulting in an antenna pattern shown by spectrum analyzer. The output from spectrum analyzers is drawn with the right scale to describe swift of azimuth and elevation pointing angle towards satellite. Due to drifting from the precise pointing, it influenced the received link budget indicated by pattern antenna. This antenna pattern shows reduction of power level received as a result of pointing misalignment. As a conclusion, the increasing misalignment of pointing to satellite would affect in the reduction of received signal parameters link budget of down-link traffic.

  19. Fundamental rate-loss trade-off for the quantum internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Mizutani, Akihiro; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2016-11-01

    The quantum internet holds promise for achieving quantum communication--such as quantum teleportation and quantum key distribution (QKD)--freely between any clients all over the globe, as well as for the simulation of the evolution of quantum many-body systems. The most primitive function of the quantum internet is to provide quantum entanglement or a secret key to two points efficiently, by using intermediate nodes connected by optical channels with each other. Here we derive a fundamental rate-loss trade-off for a quantum internet protocol, by generalizing the Takeoka-Guha-Wilde bound to be applicable to any network topology. This trade-off has essentially no scaling gap with the quantum communication efficiencies of protocols known to be indispensable to long-distance quantum communication, such as intercity QKD and quantum repeaters. Our result--putting a practical but general limitation on the quantum internet--enables us to grasp the potential of the future quantum internet.

  20. Fundamental rate-loss trade-off for the quantum internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Mizutani, Akihiro; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2016-11-25

    The quantum internet holds promise for achieving quantum communication-such as quantum teleportation and quantum key distribution (QKD)-freely between any clients all over the globe, as well as for the simulation of the evolution of quantum many-body systems. The most primitive function of the quantum internet is to provide quantum entanglement or a secret key to two points efficiently, by using intermediate nodes connected by optical channels with each other. Here we derive a fundamental rate-loss trade-off for a quantum internet protocol, by generalizing the Takeoka-Guha-Wilde bound to be applicable to any network topology. This trade-off has essentially no scaling gap with the quantum communication efficiencies of protocols known to be indispensable to long-distance quantum communication, such as intercity QKD and quantum repeaters. Our result-putting a practical but general limitation on the quantum internet-enables us to grasp the potential of the future quantum internet.

  1. Photon backgrounds at the CLIC interaction point due to losses in the post-collision extraction line

    CERN Document Server

    Salt, M D; Elsener, K; Ferrari, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC beam delivery system focuses 1.5~TeV electron and positron beams to a nanometre-sized cross section when colliding them at the interaction point (IP). The intense focusing leads to large beam-beam effects, causing the production of beamstrahlung photons, coherent and incoherent $e^+e^-$ pairs, as well as a significant disruption of the main beam. The transport of the post-collision beams requires a minimal loss extraction line, with high acceptance for energy deviation and divergence. The current design includes vertical bends close to the IP in order to separate the charged particles with a sign opposite to the main beam into a diagnostic-equipped intermediate dump, whilst transporting the photons and the main beam to the final dump. Photon and charged particle losses on magnet masks and dumps result in a complex radiation field and IP background particle fluxes. In this paper, the electromagnetic backgrounds at the IP arising from the losses occurring closest to the collision point are calculated.

  2. Synthesis of Pt nanoparticles and their burrowing into Si due to synergistic effects of ion beam energy losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles and their burrowing into silicon upon irradiation of a Pt–Si thin film with medium-energy neon ions at constant fluence (1.0 × 1017 ions/cm2. Several values of medium-energy neon ions were chosen in order to vary the ratio of the electronic energy loss to the nuclear energy loss (Se/Sn from 1 to 10. The irradiated films were characterized using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. A TEM image of a cross section of the film irradiated with Se/Sn = 1 shows ≈5 nm Pt NPs were buried up to ≈240 nm into the silicon. No silicide phase was detected in the XRD pattern of the film irradiated at the highest value of Se/Sn. The synergistic effect of the energy losses of the ion beam (molten zones are produced by Se, and sputtering and local defects are produced by Sn leading to the synthesis and burrowing of Pt NPs is evidenced. The Pt NP synthesis mechanism and their burrowing into the silicon is discussed in detail.

  3. The Study of Wound Infection Rate Due to Midsternatomy after Heart Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Safiarian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Sternal wound infection and dehiscence are feared complications observed in 0.4-5% of cardiac operations. Even nowadays the mortality remains as high as 20-40%. The aim of the current study was to determine the rate of sternal wound infection. Material and Methods: The outcomes of 388 patients undergoing cardiac surgery during a 7 month follow up were analyzed and their risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, cigarette smoking, blood transfusion, renal failure, hypertension, COPD, preoperative ejection fraction, aortic clamping time, and time of cardio pulmonary bypass were evaluated. The data was analyzed by t-test & 2 statistical tests. Results: The present study revealed that 3 patients developed wound infection and dehiscence and its incidence was 0.74% (P=0.042. There was not any significant relationship between wound infection and the other risk factors (P>0.05. Conclusions: Our results indicate that ejection fraction preoperatively is very important in sternal wound infection. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;17(4:39-42

  4. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, o...

  5. Rate-dependent activation failure in isolated cardiac cells and tissue due to Na+ channel block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Anthony; Spindler, Anthony J; Paterson, David; Noble, Denis

    2015-11-15

    While it is well established that class-I antiarrhythmics block cardiac sodium channels, the mechanism of action of therapeutic levels of these drugs is not well understood. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, we studied the failure of activation of action potentials in single ventricular cells and in tissue caused by Na(+) channel block. Our computations of block and unblock of sodium channels by a theoretical class-Ib antiarrhythmic agent predict differences in the concentrations required to cause activation failure in single cells as opposed to multicellular preparations. We tested and confirmed these in silico predictions with in vitro experiments on isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells and papillary muscles stimulated at various rates (2-6.67 Hz) and exposed to various concentrations (5 × 10(-6) to 500 × 10(-6) mol/l) of lidocaine. The most salient result was that whereas large doses (5 × 10(-4) mol/l or higher) of lidocaine were required to inhibit action potentials temporarily in single cells, much lower doses (5 × 10(-6) mol/l), i.e., therapeutic levels, were sufficient to have the same effect in papillary muscles: a hundredfold difference. Our experimental results and mathematical analysis indicate that the syncytial nature of cardiac tissue explains the effects of clinically relevant doses of Na(+) channel blockers.

  6. Maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells culture due to the cells with reduced attachment rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuvalova N. S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The classic detachment techniques lead to changes in cells properties. We offer a simple method of cultivating the population of cells that avoided an influence on the surface structures. Methods. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC from human umbilical cord matrix were obtained and cultivated in standard conditions. While substituting the culture media by a fresh portion, the conditioned culture medium, where the cells were maintained for three days, was transferred to other culture flacks with addition of serum and growth factors. Results. In the flacks, one day after medium transfer, we observed attached cells with typical MSC morphology. The cultures originated from these cells had the same rate of surface markers expression and clonogenic potential as those replated by standard methods. Conclusions. MSC culture, derived by preserving the cells with reduced attachment ability, actually has the properties of «parent» passage. Using this method with accepted techniques of cells reseeding would allow maintaining the cells that avoided an impact on the cell surface proteins.

  7. Heart rate modulates the slow enhancement of contraction due to sudden left ventricular dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, P J; Murad, N; Rossi, C L; Nogueira, R J; Santana, O

    2001-05-01

    In isovolumic blood-perfused dog hearts, left ventricular developed pressure (DP) was recorded while a sudden ventricular dilation was promoted at three heart rate (HR) levels: low (L: 52 +/- 1.7 beats/min), intermediate (M: 82 +/- 2.2 beats/min), and high (H: 117 +/- 3.5 beats/min). DP increased instantaneously with chamber expansion (Delta(1)DP), and another continuous increase occurred for several minutes (Delta(2)DP). HR elevation did not alter Delta(1)DP (32.8 +/- 1.6, 33.6 +/- 1.5, and 34.3 +/- 1.2 mmHg for L, M, and H, respectively), even though it intensified Delta(2)DP (17.3 +/- 0.9, 20.7 +/- 1.0, and 26.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg for L, M, and H, respectively), meaning that the treppe phenomenon enhances the length dependence of the contraction component related to changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Frequency increments reduced the half time of the slow response (82 +/- 3.6, 67 +/- 2.6, and 53 +/- 2.0 s for L, M, and H, respectively), while the number of beats included in half time increased (72 +/- 2.9, 95 +/- 2.9, and 111 +/- 3.2 beats for L, M, and H, respectively). HR modulation of the slow response suggests that L-type Ca(2+) channel currents and/or the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger plays a relevant role in the stretch-triggered Ca(2+) gain when HR increases in the canine heart.

  8. Gamma ray heating rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar core during late stages of high mass stars (>10M⊙

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Jameel-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray heating rates are thought to play a crucial role during the pre-supernova stage of high mass stars. Gamma ray heating rates, due to β±-decay and electron (positron capture on chromium isotopes, are calculated using proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The electron capture significantly affects the lepton fraction (Ye and accelerates the core contraction. The gamma rays emitted as a result of weak processes heat the core and tend to hinder the cooling and contraction due to electron capture and neutrino emission. The emitted gamma rays tend to produce enormous entropy and set the convection to play its role at this stage. The gamma heating rates, on 50-60Cr, are calculated for the density range 10 < ρ (g.cm-3 < 1011 and temperature range 107 < T (K < 3.0×1010.

  9. Is the Cortical Deficit in Amblyopia Due to Reduced Cortical Magnification, Loss of Neural Resolution, or Neural Disorganization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavagnier, Simon; Dumoulin, Serge O; Hess, Robert F

    2015-11-04

    The neural basis of amblyopia is a matter of debate. The following possibilities have been suggested: loss of foveal cells, reduced cortical magnification, loss of spatial resolution of foveal cells, and topographical disarray in the cellular map. To resolve this we undertook a population receptive field (pRF) functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis in the central field in humans with moderate-to-severe amblyopia. We measured the relationship between averaged pRF size and retinal eccentricity in retinotopic visual areas. Results showed that cortical magnification is normal in the foveal field of strabismic amblyopes. However, the pRF sizes are enlarged for the amblyopic eye. We speculate that the pRF enlargement reflects loss of cellular resolution or an increased cellular positional disarray within the representation of the amblyopic eye. The neural basis of amblyopia, a visual deficit affecting 3% of the human population, remains a matter of debate. We undertook the first population receptive field functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis in participants with amblyopia and compared the projections from the amblyopic and fellow normal eye in the visual cortex. The projection from the amblyopic eye was found to have a normal cortical magnification factor, enlarged population receptive field sizes, and topographic disorganization in all early visual areas. This is consistent with an explanation of amblyopia as an immature system with a normal complement of cells whose spatial resolution is reduced and whose topographical map is disordered. This bears upon a number of competing theories for the psychophysical defect and affects future treatment therapies. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514740-16$15.00/0.

  10. Correlation of Conformational Changes and Protein Degradation with Loss of Lysozyme Activity Due to Chlorine Dioxide Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Beng Guat; Branning, Sharon Alyssa

    2016-12-13

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a potent oxidizing agent used for the treatment of drinking water and decontamination of facilities and equipment. The purpose of this research is to elucidate the manner in which ClO2 destroys proteins by studying the effects of ClO2 on lysozyme. The degree of enzyme activity lost can be correlated to the treatment time and levels of the ClO2 used. Lysozyme activity was drastically reduced to 45.3% of original enzyme activity when exposed to 4.3 mM ClO2 in the sample after 3 h. Almost all activities were lost in 3 h after exposure to higher ClO2 concentrations of up to 16.8 and 21.9 mM. Changes in protein conformation and amount as a result of ClO2 treatment were determined using the Raman spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Raman shifts and the alteration of spectral features observed in the ClO2-treated lysozyme samples are associated with loss of the α-helix secondary structure, tertiary structure, and disulfide bond. Progressive degradation of the denatured lysozyme by increasing levels of chlorine dioxide was also observed in gel electrophoresis. Hence, ClO2 can effectively cause protein denaturation and degradation resulting in loss of enzyme activity.

  11. Ciliopathy-associated protein CEP290 modifies the severity of retinal degeneration due to loss of RPGR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kollu N; Zhang, Wei; Li, Linjing; Ronquillo, Cecinio; Baehr, Wolfgang; Khanna, Hemant

    2016-05-15

    Mutations in RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) are the most common cause of X-linked RP, a severe blindness disorder. RPGR mutations result in clinically variable disease with early- to late-onset phenotypic presentation. Molecular mechanisms underlying such heterogeneity are unclear. Here we show that phenotypic expression of Rpgr-loss in mice is influenced genetically by the loss of Cep290, a human ciliopathy gene. We found that Rpgr(ko/Y) mice with a heterozygous hypomorphic allele of Cep290 (Cep290(rd16/+)) but not of a heterozygous null allele of Cep290 (Cep290(null/+)) or of other ciliopathy genes, Rpgrip1, Nphp1, Nphp4 and Nphp5, exhibit relatively early onset (by 3 months of age) retinal degeneration and dysfunction when compared with the onset at ∼7 months of age in the Rpgr(ko/Y) mice. We also observed disorganized photoreceptor outer-segment morphology and defective trafficking of opsins in the Rpgr(ko/Y)::Cep290(rd16/+) mice. Together with a physical interaction between RPGR and the C-terminal domain of CEP290, our data suggest that RPGR and CEP290 genetically interact and highlight the involvement of hypomorphic alleles of genes as potential modifiers of heterogeneous retinal ciliopathies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Factors affecting conception rate after artificial insemination and pregnancy loss in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebel, Ricardo C; Santos, José E P; Reynolds, James P; Cerri, Ronaldo L A; Juchem, Sérgio O; Overton, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Objectives were to determine factors associated with conception rate (CR) and pregnancy loss (PL) in high producing lactating Holstein cows. In Study 1, CR was evaluated in 7633 artificial inseminations (AI) of 3161 dairy cows in two dairy farms. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed by palpation per rectum 39+/-3 days after AI. Environmental temperature was recorded at different intervals prior to and after AI. In Study 2, 1465 pregnancies from 1393 cows diagnosed at 31+/-3 days after AI by ultrasonography on three dairy farms were re-examined 14 days later to determine PL. Temperature > or =29 degrees C was considered to be heat stress (HS). Exposure to HS was defined as following: NH, no heat stress; HS1, exposure to at least 1 day of maximum temperature > or =29 degrees C and average daily maximum temperature (ADMT) or =29 degrees C. In Study 1, exposure of cows to HS1 and HS2 from 50 to 20 prior to AI was associated with reduced CR compared to cows not exposed to HS (28.8, 23.0, and 31.3%, respectively). Post-AI HS was not associated with CR. Cows inseminated following estrus detection or timed AI had similar CR. As the number of AI increased, CR decreased. Multiparous cows had lower CR than primiparous cows, and occurrence of milk fever and retained placenta was associated with decreased CR. In Study 2, PL was not associated with exposure to HS either prior to or after AI. Cows diagnosed with clinical mastitis experienced increased PL, but parity, number of AI, AI protocol, milk production, and days postpartum at AI were not associated with PL. In conclusion, CR was affected by HS prior to AI, parity, number of AI, and postparturient diseases, whereas PL was affected by clinical mastitis.

  13. Connecting the dots: a correlation between ionising radiation and cloud mass-loss rate traced by optical integral field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, A F; Dale, J E; Ginsburg, A; Klaassen, P D; Mottram, J C; Preibisch, T; Ramsay, S; Reiter, M; Testi, L

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of feedback from O- and B-type stars with data from the integral field spectrograph MUSE mounted on the Very Large Telescope of pillar-like structures in the Carina Nebular Complex, one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Galaxy. For the observed pillars, we compute gas electron densities and temperatures maps, produce integrated line and velocity maps of the ionised gas, study the ionisation fronts at the pillar tips, analyse the properties of the single regions, and detect two ionised jets originating from two distinct pillar tips. For each pillar tip we determine the incident ionising photon flux $Q_\\mathrm{0,pil}$ originating from the nearby massive O- and B-type stars and compute the mass-loss rate $\\dot{M}$ of the pillar tips due to photo-evaporation caused by the incident ionising radiation. We combine the results of the Carina data set with archival MUSE data of a pillar in NGC 3603 and with previously published MUSE data of the Pillars of Creation in M...

  14. Towards a CFD Model for Prediction of Wind Turbine Power Losses due to Icing in Cold Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Cecilie; Sørensen, Henrik

    Icing induced power losses is an important issue when operating wind turbines in cold climate. This paper presents a concept of modelling ice accretion on wind turbines using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The modelling concept works towards unifying the processes of modelling ice accretion...... and the aerodynamic analysis of the iced object into one CFD-based icing model. Modelling of icing and obtaining ice shapes in combination with mesh update by surface boundary displacement was demonstrated in the paper. It has been done by expressing in-cloud icing in CFD by an Eulerian multiphase model, implementing...... an icing module into the CFD solution and finally by surface boundary displacement also included in the CFD solution. The model has been developed using ANSYS-FLUENT and user-defined functions. The naca profile, NACA64618, has been used to illustrate the functionality of the model. Running ice accretion...

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction due to Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy as a cause of visual loss during assessment for epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehusmann, Pitt; Surges, Rainer; von Wrede, Randi D; Elger, Christian E; Wellmer, Jörg; Reimann, Jens; Urbach, Horst; Vielhaber, Stefan; Bien, Christian G; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2011-01-01

    Assessment for epilepsy surgery may require invasive measures such as implantation of intracranial electrodes or the Wada test. These investigations are commonly well tolerated. However, complications, including visual disturbances of various etiologies, have been reported. Here we describe two patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who displayed loss of vision in the context of presurgical assessment and in whom mutations associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) were detected. Genetic analysis revealed in one patient the frequent mitochondrial G11778A LHON mutation in ND4. In the second patient, the mitochondrial C4640A mutation in ND2 was detected. This rare LHON mutation enhanced the sensitivity of the patient's muscle and brain tissue to amobarbital, a known blocker of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in epilepsy. Thus, the presence of LHON mutations can be a rare cause of visual disturbances in patients with epilepsy and may have predisposed to development of epilepsy.

  16. Secondary oxalosis due to excess vitamin C intake: A cause of graft loss in a renal transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Yaich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal oxalate deposition can be seen with primary hyperoxaluria, malabsorptive states, ethylene glycol toxicity and, rarely, with excessive vitamin C ingestion. We report a case of secondary hyperoxaluria in which the diagnosis was not considered initially because there was no past history of urinary calculi and no evidence of nephrocalcinosis on plain X-ray of the abdomen and ultrasonography. The disease was detected and diagnosed only after kidney transplantation. Secondary oxalosis can cause graft loss or delayed graft function. Biopsy of the allograft should be carefully examined for oxalate deposits even in the absence of a family history. When oxalosis is diagnosed, intensifying hemodialysis (HD to eliminate calcium oxalate can help in the recovery of renal function in some cases. Systematic vitamin C supplementation in HD patients should be avoided as it can be a cause of secondary oxalosis.

  17. The main moisture sources over Barents/Kara Sea and sea ice loss due to the moisture transport in winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lijuan; Zhong, Linhao; Luo, Dehai

    2017-04-01

    This work examines the main sources of moisture and the poleward transport water vapor over Barents/Kara Sea (BKS) during boreal winter of 1979 2015 in the ERA-Interim reanalysis product through a revised dynamic recycling model during boreal winter. The methodology computes the water vapor contributions from sources along 15-day time-reverse trajectories. The large-scale circulation patterns associated with the moisture transport process. The results suggested that water vapor from Northern Atlantic play crucial role in regulating the sea ice loss in Barents Sea and Kara Sea. It seems that positive NAO events tend to transport the Atlantic moisture to the Eastern Europe, and then Ural blocking flow further transports the moisture northward to BKS. The Atlantic moisture approximately takes 3-6 days to BKS through the moisture pathway regulated by NAO and Ural blocking.

  18. Disturbed mitochondrial and peroxisomal dynamics due to loss of MFF causes Leigh-like encephalopathy, optic atrophy and peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Johannes; Feichtinger, René G; Freisinger, Peter; Pies, Mechthild; Schrödl, Falk; Iuso, Arcangela; Sperl, Wolfgang; Mayr, Johannes A; Prokisch, Holger; Haack, Tobias B

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles which undergo continuous fission and fusion to maintain their diverse cellular functions. Components of the fission machinery are partly shared between mitochondria and peroxisomes, and inherited defects in two such components (dynamin-related protein (DRP1) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 (GDAP1)) have been associated with human disease. Deficiency of a third component (mitochondrial fission factor, MFF) was recently reported in one index patient, rendering MFF another candidate disease gene within the expanding field of mitochondrial and peroxisomal dynamics. Here we investigated three new patients from two families with pathogenic mutations in MFF. The patients underwent clinical examination, brain MRI, and biochemical, cytological and molecular analyses, including exome sequencing. The patients became symptomatic within the first year of life, exhibiting seizures, developmental delay and acquired microcephaly. Dysphagia, spasticity and optic and peripheral neuropathy developed subsequently. Brain MRI showed Leigh-like patterns with bilateral changes of the basal ganglia and subthalamic nucleus, suggestive of impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism. However, activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes were found to be normal in skeletal muscle. Exome sequencing revealed three different biallelic loss-of-function variants in MFF in both index cases. Western blot studies of patient-derived fibroblasts indicated normal content of mitochondria and peroxisomes, whereas immunofluorescence staining revealed elongated mitochondria and peroxisomes. Furthermore, increased mitochondrial branching and an abnormal distribution of fission-mediating DRP1 were observed. Our findings establish MFF loss of function as a cause of disturbed mitochondrial and peroxisomal dynamics associated with early-onset Leigh-like basal ganglia disease. We suggest that, even if laboratory findings are not indicative of

  19. Complication rate of posterior capsule rupture with vitreous loss during phacoemulsification at a Hawaiian cataract surgical center: a clinical audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ming Chen,1 Kara C LaMattina,2 Thomas Patrianakos,2 Surendar Dwarakanathan2 1Department of Surgery, Division of Ophthalmology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA; 2Division of Ophthalmology, John H Stroger, Jr Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL, USA Purpose: To compare the complication rate of posterior capsule rupture (PCR with vitreous loss during phacoemulsification at an ambulatory surgical center with published results as a clinical audit for quality control. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 3,339 consecutive patients who underwent routine phacoemulsification by four experienced private practice surgeons from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012 at The Surgical Suites, Honolulu, HI, USA. All cases with PCR and vitreous loss were identified and selected for the study. Risk factors of this complication were further examined. Data were sent to John H Stroger Jr Hospital of Cook County, Division of Ophthalmology, for literature review, analysis, and write-up. Results: Twenty-three of the 3,339 cases incurred PCR and vitreous loss during phacoemulsification, for an incidence rate of 0.68%. Miosis, shallow chamber, restlessness, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, floppy iris syndrome, and zonulopathy were the main causes. In addition, surgeon volume (number of cases was inversely correlated with PCR. Conclusion: The rate of PCR with vitreous loss during phacoemulsification in this study may be lower than other published results done at academic centers. However, there was no compatible study available for comparison, as existing studies performed at academic centers included resident cases. This study identified risk factors for PCR/vitreous loss both preoperatively and postoperatively that may assist in application of preventive measures to decrease rates of PCR/vitreous loss. Keywords: phacoemulsification complications, posterior capsule rupture, vitreous loss, vitrectomy, miosis, pseudoexfoliation, floppy iris syndrome, zonulopathy

  20. Effects of rippled fields due to ferritic inserts and ELM mitigation coils on energetic ion losses in a 15 MA inductive scenario in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.; Oikawa, T.; Putvinski, S.; Schaffer, M.; Loarte, A.

    2012-09-01

    The energetic ion loss has been assessed using the F3D-OFMC code for a 15 MA inductive scenario with Q = 10 and the latest information on the first wall geometry, the implementation of ferritic inserts (FI) and the ELM mitigation/control coils. Alpha particles and NB ions generated by the neutral beam injectors with the injection energy of 1 MeV are well confined and the heat load on the first wall is negligibly small and allowable for the magnetic background by the toroidal field coils and FI. However, an increase in the loss of these energetic ions is observed when the magnetic field by the ELM coils is applied. The increase in the loss fraction is larger for NB ions than for alpha particles under the ELM coil field. The origin of the expelled NB ions is dominantly trapped ions generated in the peripheral region due to a high-density plasma of the 15 MA scenario.

  1. Scattering rates due to electron-phonon interaction in CdS1-xSex quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Augusto M.; Weber, Gerald

    2000-11-01

    We calculate electron-LO-confined and surface phonon scattering rates in CdS1-xSex spherical quantum dots. The phonon modes are described in the frame of the two-mode dielectric continuum model, and the standard k.p formalism is used for treating the electronic band structure. We include the effects of inhomogeneous broadening due to statistical dot size distribution, which can create a wide channel of efficient relaxation. We demonstrate that changes in the concentration can generate variations of more than one order of magnitude in the relaxation rates.

  2. Effect of extreme data loss on heart rate signals quantified by entropy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Jun; Li, Jin; Liu, Dazhao

    2015-02-01

    The phenomenon of data loss always occurs in the analysis of large databases. Maintaining the stability of analysis results in the event of data loss is very important. In this paper, we used a segmentation approach to generate a synthetic signal that is randomly wiped from data according to the Gaussian distribution and the exponential distribution of the original signal. Then, the logistic map is used as verification. Finally, two methods of measuring entropy-base-scale entropy and approximate entropy-are comparatively analyzed. Our results show the following: (1) Two key parameters-the percentage and the average length of removed data segments-can change the sequence complexity according to logistic map testing. (2) The calculation results have preferable stability for base-scale entropy analysis, which is not sensitive to data loss. (3) The loss percentage of HRV signals should be controlled below the range (p = 30 %), which can provide useful information in clinical applications.

  3. The Effect of Impermeable Clothing on Weight Loss, Heart Rate, and Core Temperature in Wrestlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Harold B.; Humphrey, L. Dennis

    1976-01-01

    Results refute the hypotheses that weight losses in lightly clothed wrestlers might equal or exceed those of wrestlers wearing vapor barrier suits under conditions of equal thermal and exercise stress. (JD)

  4. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  5. Rotordynamic analysis of asymmetric turbofan rotor due to fan blade-loss event with contact-impact rub loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sunil K.

    2013-04-01

    Loss of a blade from a running turbofan rotor introduces not only huge imbalance into the dynamical system rather it makes the entire rotor asymmetric as well. In a nonsymmetric rotor, the various terms of mass, gyroscopic and stiffness matrices also become time-dependent. In this paper, all the dynamical equations include the effect of the rotary inertia and gyroscopic moments as a result of both shaft bending as well as staggered blades flexing in-and-out of the plane of the disk. The governing equations also account for internal material damping in the shaft and the external damping in the support bearing system. In addition to the unbalance load at the disk location, the shaft may also be subjected to a torque and axial forces. Here, the fan blades are modeled as pre-twisted thin shallow shells. They have coupled flexural-torsional motion in the lateral out-of-plane direction as well as extensional degrees-of-freedom in the longitudinal spanwise direction of the blade airfoil. The effect of blade tip rub forces being transmitted to the shaft are analyzed in terms of the dynamic stability of the rotor, especially during windmilling.

  6. Trisomy 15 with loss of the paternal 15 as a cause of Prader-Willi syndrome due to maternal disomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, S.B.; Lai, Li-Wen; Erickson, R.P. (Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ (United States)); Magnuson, L.; Thomas, E.; Herrmann, J. (Great Lakes Genetics, Milwaukee, AZ (United States)); Gendron, R. (Great Lakes Genetics, Kingsport, TN (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Uniparental disomy has recently been recognized to cause human disorders, including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). The authors describe a particularly instructive case which raises important issues concerning the mechanisms producing uniparental disomy and whose evaluation provides evidence that trisomy may precede uniparental disomy in a fetus. Chorionic villus sampling performed for advanced maternal age revealed trisomy 15 in all direct and cultured cells, though the fetus appeared normal. Chromosome analysis of amniocytes obtained at 15 wk was normal in over 100 cells studied. The child was hypotonic at birth, and high-resolution banding failed to reveal the deletion of 15q11-13, a deletion which is found in 50%-70% of patients with PWS. Over time, typical features of PWS developed. Molecular genetic analysis using probes for chromosome 15 revealed maternal disomy. Maternal nondisjunction with fertilization of a disomic egg by a normal sperm, followed by loss of the paternal 15, is a likely cause of confined placental mosaicism and uniparental disomy in this case of PWS, and advanced maternal age may be a predisposing factor. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Adverse events in a newborn on valproate therapy due to loss-of-function mutations in CYP2C9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased risk of valproate-induced toxicity has been reported in children, particularly in those younger than 2 years of age. Significant variations in valproate pharmacokinetics and shifts in the metabolic pathways towards CYP2C9-dependent metabolism seem to play some role in the age-related differences in the incidence of adverse events. We present the case of a premature patient with moderate hemorrhage in the subependymal region (grade II — intraventricular hemorrhage without ventricular dilatation, several myoclonic episodes in her right upper arm (series of jerks lasting milliseconds, and epileptiform abnormalities on the EEG (localized spike-and-wave in the left frontal region with preserved background activity who was treated with valproate. Serious side effects, consisting of bone marrow depression, hyperammonemia, and serum alkaline phosphatase elevation, were observed seventeen days after the beginning of valproate therapy. The toxic symptoms were likely the consequence of a reduced ability to metabolize valproate. The patient was demonstrated to carry two loss-of-function mutations in CYP2C9 (CYP2C9*3/*3 resulting in exaggerated blood concentrations of valproate. The present case highlights the importance of assaying inborn errors in CYP2C9 gene in pediatric patients to avoid valproate-evoked serious side effects.

  8. Periodic mass loss episodes due to an oscillation mode with variable amplitude in the hot supergiant HD50064

    CERN Document Server

    Aerts, C; Baglin, A; Degroote, P; Oreiro, R; Vuckovic, M; Smolders, K; Acke, B; Verhoelst, T; Desmet, M; Godart, M; Noels, A; Dupret, M -A; Auvergne, M; Baudin, F; Catala, C; Michel, E; Samadi, R

    2010-01-01

    We aim to interpret the photometric and spectroscopic variability of the luminous blue variable supergiant HD\\,50064 ($V=8.21$).CoRoT space photometry and follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy, with a time base of 137\\,d and 169\\,d, respectively, was gathered, analysed and interpreted using standard time series analysis and light curve modelling methods as well as spectral line diagnostics.The space photometry reveals one period of 37\\,d, which undergoes a sudden amplitude change with a factor 1.6. The pulsation period is confirmed in the spectroscopy, which additionally reveals metal line radial velocity values differing by $\\sim 30\\,$km\\,s$^{-1}$ depending on the spectral line and on the epoch. We estimate \\teff$\\sim$13\\,500\\,K, \\logg$\\sim$1.5 from the equivalent width of Si lines. The Balmer lines reveal that the star undergoes episodes of changing mass loss on a time scale similar to the changes in the photometric and spectroscopic variability, with an average value of $\\log\\dot{\\rm M}\\simeq-5$ (in M$_\\o...

  9. Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammadhasan786@gmail.com [ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore-560017 (India); Ghatak, Ananya, E-mail: gananya04@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India); Mandal, Bhabani Prasad, E-mail: bhabani.mandal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2014-05-15

    We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. -- Highlights: •Energy ranges for CC and CPA are obtained explicitly for complex WS potential. •Analytical conditions for CC and CPA for PT symmetric WS potential are obtained. •Conditions for left and right CC are shown to be different. •Conditions for CC and CPA are shown to be that of SS for the time reversed system. •Our model shows the great flexibility of frequencies for CC and CPA.

  10. Net loss of CaCO3 from coral reef communities due to human induced seawater acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Rodgers

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns for its adverse effects on corals, coral reefs and carbonate communities in general. Here we demonstrate a transition from net accumulation towards net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 material owing to decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (n=3 incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to present and future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NEC = CaCO3 production – dissolution was positive at 4.5 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at −0.1 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century.

  11. Losses Assessment of Crops due to Typhoon Disaster in China Coastal Areas —— A Case Study of Zhanjiang City, Guangdong Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, W.; Fang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Vulnerability which quantifies the loss ratio under different hazard intensity is an important feature of the natural disaster system and has important significance to natural disaster risk assessment. Agriculture is an outdoor industry with high risk of meteorological disasters. The strong winds, heavy rain and storm surge are main typhoon hazard factors to crops. To provide a quantitative research method for the loss evaluation of crops due to typhoon disaster we first revised two vulnerability curves for crops under comprehensive intensity of typhoon based on the simulated hazard data and loss data related to historical typhoon events landing on China from 1949 to 2014;and then established a storm surge vulnerability matrix of crops regarding Zhanjiang City of Guangdong Province as the study area ; finally, we put forward three storm surge fragility curves for crops representing different states of loss. The results can effectively describe the typhoon vulnerability for crops in China coastal areas so as to provide the input to post-disaster loss assessments and catastrophe modeling applications.

  12. The effect of rate of weight loss on long-term weight regain in adults with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Roel G; Roumans, Nadia J T; Arkenbosch, Laura A J; Mariman, Edwin C M; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of rate of weight loss, with similar total weight loss, on weight regain in individuals with overweight and obesity. Fifty-seven participants (BMI: 28-35 kg/m(2) ) underwent a dietary intervention (DI). They were randomized to a low-calorie diet (LCD; 1250 kcal/day) for 12 weeks (slow weight loss) or a very-low-calorie diet (VLCD; 500 kcal/day) for 5 weeks (rapid weight loss) (weight loss (WL) period) followed by a 4-week weight-stable (WS) period and 9 months follow-up. Body weight and body composition (BodPod) were determined at study start and after each period. Weight change was similar in both groups after WL (LCD: -8.2 kg and VLCD: -9.0 kg, P = 0.24). Weight regain after follow-up was not significantly different between groups (LCD: 4.2 kg and VLCD: 4.5 kg, P = 0.73). Percentage fat-free mass loss (%FFML) was higher in the VLCD-group compared to the LCD-group after DI (8.8% and 1.3%, respectively, P = 0.034) and was associated with weight regain during follow-up in the whole group (r = 0.325, P = 0.018). The present study showed that, with similar total weight loss, rate of weight loss did not affect weight regain. However, %FFML after DI was associated with weight regain. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  13. Analysis of the Processes in Spent Fuel Pools in Case of Loss of Heat Removal due to Water Leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Kaliatka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The safe storage of spent fuel assemblies in the spent fuel pools is very important. These facilities are not covered by leaktight containment; thus, the consequences of overheating and melting of fuel in the spent fuel pools can be very severe. On the other hand, due to low decay heat of fuel assemblies, the processes in pools are slow in comparison with processes in reactor core during LOCA accident. Thus, the accident management measures play a very important role in case of some accidents in spent fuel pools. This paper presents the analysis of possible consequences of fuel overheating due to leakage of water from spent fuel pool. Also, the accident mitigation measure, the late injection of water was evaluated. The analysis was performed for the Ignalina NPP Unit 2 spent fuel pool, using system thermal hydraulic code for severe accident analysis ATHLET-CD. The phenomena, taking place during such accident, are discussed. Also, benchmarking of results of the same accident calculation using ASTEC and RELAP/SCDAPSIM codes is presented here.

  14. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  15. Conflicting HLA assignment by three different typing methods due to the apparent loss of heterozygosity in the MHC region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linjama, T; Impola, U; Niittyvuopio, R; Kuittinen, O; Kaare, A; Rimpiläinen, J; Volin, L; Peräsaari, J; Jaatinen, T; Lauronen, J; Saarinen, T; Juvonen, E; Partanen, J; Koskela, S

    2016-05-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) has been reported to cause false human leukocyte antigen (HLA) homozygous typing results in pre-transplant patients suffering from haematological malignancies, who in fact are HLA heterozygous. This poses a challenge for histocompatibility testing, as a stem cell graft from a genuinely HLA homozygous donor to a mistyped patient may lead to acute life-threatening graft-vs-host disease. LOH in the HLA region on chromosome 6 is known to be quite common in solid tumours, helping malignant cells to escape T-cell surveillance, but the incidence in haematological malignancies is less well known and the estimates vary. Here we report LOH in the HLA region of five patients with haematological malignancy. We found considerable differences in sensitivity between the three different HLA typing methods used in our laboratory: SSP was clearly the most sensitive method for detecting the lost haplotype, followed by rSSO, while SBT was the least sensitive technique. A subsequent, retrospective genotyping of 65 HLA homozygous haematological patients by SSP method showed no mistyped LOH cases in our laboratory in the past 10 years. The frequency of HLA homozygosity was found to be similar between haematological patients and control groups. It is important for an HLA laboratory to be aware of the differences in various HLA typing techniques' sensitivity for detecting an under-represented haplotype between HLA typing techniques when genotyping patients with haematological diseases. It is advisable for HLA laboratories to have at least two different methods with different sensitivities in their repertoire to be able to retype samples when a false homozygous result is suspected.

  16. Adipose tissue gene expression is differentially regulated with different rates of weight loss in overweight and obese humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, R G; Roumans, N J; Fazelzadeh, P; Tareen, S H K; Boekschoten, M V; van Baak, M A; Mariman, E C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Moderate weight loss (WL) can ameliorate adverse health effects associated with obesity, reflected by an improved adipose tissue (AT) gene expression profile. However, the effect of rate of WL on the AT transcriptome is unknown. We investigated the global AT gene expression pr

  17. Measurement by SPR of very low dissociation rates: oxidation-mediated loss of biotin-streptavidin affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhan, Mario A E; Brunschweiger, Andreas; Hall, Jonathan

    2013-11-04

    Long-term relationship: biotin labels on RNAs, and possibly other biomacromolecules, are easily oxidized causing a dramatic loss of affinity for streptavidin and adversely affecting the measurement of high-affinity interactions. A new SPR method has been developed for measuring the very low rate-dissociation constants of biotin- and biotin oxide-conjugated RNAs with streptavidin.

  18. Mass-loss rate by the Mira in the symbiotic binary V1016 Cygni from Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Sekeráš, Matej

    2015-01-01

    The mass-loss rate from Mira variables represents a key parameter in our understanding of their evolutionary tracks. We introduce a method for determining the mass-loss rate from the Mira component in D-type symbiotic binaries via the Raman scattering of atomic hydrogen in the wind from the giant. Using our method, we investigated Raman HeII 1025\\AA\\ --> 6545\\AA\\ conversion in the spectrum of the symbiotic Mira V1016 Cyg. We determined its efficiency to be 0.102 and 0.148, and the corresponding mass-loss rate 2.0 (+0.1/-0.2) x 1E-6 and 2.7 (+0.2/-0.1) x 1E-6 M(Sun)/year, using our spectra from 2006 April and 2007 July,respectively. Our values of the mass-loss rate that we derived from Raman scattering are comparable with those obtained independently by other methods. Applying the method to other Mira-white dwarf binary systems can provide a necessary constraint in the calculation of asymptotic giant branch evolution.

  19. Effects of carbohydrate quantity and glycemic index on resting metabolic rate and body composition during weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To examine the effects of diets varying in carbohydrate and glycemic index (GI) on changes in body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and metabolic adaptation during and after weight loss. Methods: Adults with obesity (n = 91) were randomized to one of four provided-food diets f...

  20. Adipose tissue gene expression is differentially regulated with different rates of weight loss in overweight and obese humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, R.G.; Roumans, N.J.; Fazelzadeh, P.; Tareen, S.H.K.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Baak, Van M.A.; Mariman, E.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives:Moderate weight loss (WL) can ameliorate adverse health effects associated with obesity, reflected by an improved adipose tissue (AT) gene expression profile. However, the effect of rate of WL on the AT transcriptome is unknown. We investigated the global AT gene expression pro

  1. Aspects regarding the Calculation of the Dielectric Loss Angle Tangent between the Windings of a Rated 40 MVA Transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristinel Popescu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to identify how to determine the dielectric loss angle tangent of the electric transformers from the transformer stations. Autors of the paper managed a case study on the dielectric established between high respectively medium voltage windings of an electrical rated 40 MVA transformer.

  2. [Effects of irrigation mode and N application rate on cotton field fertilizer N use efficiency and N losses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Wei, Chang-Zhou; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Peng; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Qi-Chao; Wang, Jin-Xin

    2012-10-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different irrigation modes (drip irrigation and furrow irrigation) and different N application rates (0, 240, 360 and 480 kg N x hm(-2)) on the fertilizer N use efficiency and N losses in a cotton field in Xinjiang, Northwest China. The main N cycling pathways, such as the N uptake by cotton plant, NO3(-)-N residual in soil, NH3 volatilization, NO3(-)-N leaching, and nitrification-denitrification, were quantitatively monitored. Compared with furrow irrigation, drip irrigation increased the seed cotton yield, plant N uptake, and fertilizer N use efficiency significantly. The NO3(-)-N residual in soil was significantly greater under furrow irrigation than under drip irrigation. With the application of fertilizer N, the N loss from NH3 volatilization under drip irrigation occupied 0.06% -0.14% of applied N, and was significantly greater than that under furrow irrigation. The N loss from NO3(-)-N leaching under drip irrigation and furrow irrigation was 4.4% and 8.8% of the applied N, respectively. Compared with furrow irrigation, drip irrigation could significantly decrease the NO3(-)-N leakage rate in leakage water. The nitrification-dinetrification loss under drip irrigation and furrow irrigation was 17.9% and 16.8% of the applied N, respectively. It was suggested that NO3(-)-N leaching and nitrification-denitrification were the main N losses in the cotton fields of Xinjiang.

  3. Does physical fitness affect injury occurrence and time loss due to injury in elite vocational ballet students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twitchett, Emily; Brodrick, Anna; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Angioi, Manuela; Wyon, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Most ballet dancers will suffer at least one injury a year. There are numerous causes of injury in dance, and while many investigators have documented risk factors such as anatomical characteristics, past medical history, menstrual history, dance experience, length of dance training, fatigue, and stress, risk factors related to body characteristics and nutrient intake, levels of conditioning, or physical fitness parameters have only recently received the same amount of attention. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate correlations between ballet injury and body fat percentage, active and passive flexibility, lower limb power, upper body and core endurance, and aerobic capacity. Low levels of aerobic fitness were significantly associated with many of the injuries sustained over a 15-week period (r=.590, p=0.034), and body fat percentage was significantly associated with the length of time a dancer was forced to modify activity due to injury (r=-.614, p=0.026). This information may be of benefit to dancers, teachers, physical therapists and physicians in dance schools and companies when formulating strategies to prevent injury.

  4. Tidal radii and destruction rates of globular clusters in the Milky Way due to bulge-bar and disk shocking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Edmundo; Pichardo, Bárbara [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, 04510 México, D. F. (Mexico); Velázquez, Héctor [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 877, 22800 Ensenada (Mexico)

    2014-10-01

    We calculate orbits, tidal radii, and bulge-bar and disk shocking destruction rates for 63 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Orbits are integrated in both an axisymmetric and a nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential that includes a bar and a three-dimensional model for the spiral arms. With the use of a Monte Carlo scheme, we consider in our simulations observational uncertainties in the kinematical data of the clusters. In the analysis of destruction rates due to the bulge-bar, we consider the rigorous treatment of using the real Galactic cluster orbit instead of the usual linear trajectory employed in previous studies. We compare results in both treatments. We find that the theoretical tidal radius computed in the nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential compares better with the observed tidal radius than that obtained in the axisymmetric potential. In both Galactic potentials, bulge-shocking destruction rates computed with a linear trajectory of a cluster at its perigalacticons give a good approximation of the result obtained with the real trajectory of the cluster. Bulge-shocking destruction rates for clusters with perigalacticons in the inner Galactic region are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential than those in the axisymmetric potential. For the majority of clusters with high orbital eccentricities (e > 0.5), their total bulge+disk destruction rates are smaller in the nonaxisymmetric potential.

  5. A Review on Level of Specific Absorption Rate Due to High Power Transmission Lines: Analysis toward Human Position Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazali Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this project is the development of a homogeneous model of a man to presents the specific absorption rate (SAR due to high power transmission line. As a low frequency application under high power transmission line of 50 Hz in electrical engineering, to studies the influence of human’s posture on specific absorption rate. This project designs two types of human body which one design uses most cylinder block and another design use brick block where both blocks have a different value of mesh cells. For each design has four types of posture are standing, sitting, arms up and arms out by using Computer Simulation Technology (CST Studio Software. This analysis does toward for four types of the human position postures because each posture has different value of specific absorption rate (SAR based on the size of the mesh cells of the design. Based on two designs of the human body, the lowest of the mesh cells value will reduce time to simulate SAR. For each posture has different value of SAR for each part of the human body because the whole human body has different types of tissues. Therefore, the CST studio software uses extremely to simulate the SAR value toward human position posture due to high power transmission line.

  6. e-MERLIN 21cm constraints on the mass-loss rates of OB stars in Cyg OB2

    CERN Document Server

    Morford, Jack; Prinja, Raman; Blomme, Ronnie; Yates, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    We present e-MERLIN 21 cm (L-band) observations of single luminous OB stars in the Cygnus OB2 association, from the COBRaS Legacy programme. The radio observations potentially offer the most straightforward, least model-dependent, determinations of mass-loss rates, and can be used to help resolve current discrepancies in mass-loss rates via clumped and structured hot star winds. We report here that the 21 cm flux densities of O3 to O6 supergiant and giant stars are less than ~ 70 microJy. These fluxes may be translated to `smooth' wind mass-loss upper limits of ~ 4.4 - 4.8 x 10^(-6) M_sol/yr for O3 supergiants and < 2.9 x 10^(-6) M_sol/yr for B0 to B1 supergiants. The first ever resolved 21 cm detections of the hypergiant (and LBV candidate) Cyg OB2 #12 are discussed; for multiple observations separated by 14 days, we detect a ~ 69% increase in its flux density. Our constraints on the upper limits for the mass-loss rates of evolved OB stars in Cyg OB2 support the model that the inner wind region close to t...

  7. e-MERLIN 21 cm constraints on the mass-loss rates of OB stars in Cyg OB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, J. C.; Fenech, D. M.; Prinja, R. K.; Blomme, R.; Yates, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present e-MERLIN 21 cm (L-band) observations of single luminous OB stars in the Cygnus OB2 association, from the Cyg OB2 Radio Survey Legacy programme. The radio observations potentially offer the most straightforward, least model-dependent, determinations of mass-loss rates, and can be used to help resolve current discrepancies in mass-loss rates via clumped and structured hot star winds. We report here that the 21 cm flux densities of O3 to O6 supergiant and giant stars are less than ˜70 μJy. These fluxes may be translated to `smooth' wind mass-loss upper limits of ˜4.4-4.8 × 10-6 M⊙ yr -1 for O3 supergiants and ≲2.9 × 10-6 M⊙ yr -1 for B0 to B1 supergiants. The first ever resolved 21 cm detections of the hypergiant (and luminous blue variable candidate) Cyg OB2 #12 are discussed; for multiple observations separated by 14 d, we detect an ˜69 per cent increase in its flux density. Our constraints on the upper limits for the mass-loss rates of evolved OB stars in Cyg OB2 support the model that the inner wind region close to the stellar surface (where Hα forms) is more clumped than the very extended geometric region sampled by our radio observations.

  8. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  9. The Mass-Loss Return From Evolved Stars to The Large Magellanic Cloud VI: Luminosities and Mass-Loss Rates on Population Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Riebel, D; Sargent, B; Meixner, M

    2012-01-01

    We present results from the first application of the Grid of Red Supergiant and Asymptotic Giant Branch ModelS (GRAMS) model grid to the entire evolved stellar population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). GRAMS is a pre-computed grid of 80,843 radiative transfer (RT) models of evolved stars and circumstellar dust shells composed of either silicate or carbonaceous dust. We fit GRAMS models to ~30,000 Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) and Red Supergiant (RSG) stars in the LMC, using 12 bands of photometry from the optical to the mid-infrared. Our published dataset consists of thousands of evolved stars with individually determined evolutionary parameters such as luminosity and mass-loss rate. The GRAMS grid has a greater than 80% accuracy rate discriminating between Oxygen- and Carbon-rich chemistry. The global dust injection rate to the interstellar medium (ISM) of the LMC from RSGs and AGB stars is on the order of 1.5x10^(-5) solar masses/yr, equivalent to a total mass injection rate (including the gas) into t...

  10. Reduced spin-down rate of PSR J0738-4042 explained as due to an asteroid disruption event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong-Bo; Huang, Yong-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Long term observations by Brook et al. reveal that the derivative of rotational frequency of PSR J0738-4042 changed abruptly in 2005. Originally, the spin-down rate was relatively stable, with the rotational frequency derivative being -1.14×10-14 s-2. After September 2005, the derivative began to rise. About 1000 days later, it arrived at another relatively stable value of about -0.98 × 10-14 s-2, indicating that the pulsar is spinning-down relatively slowly. To explain the observed change in spin-down rate, we resort to an asteroid disrupted by PSR J0738-4042. In our model, the orbital angular momentum of the asteroid is assumed to be parallel to that of the rotating pulsar, so that the pronounced reduction in the spin-down rate can be naturally explained as due to the transfer of angular momentum from the disrupted material to the central pulsar. The derived magnetospheric radius is about 7.0 × 109 cm, which is smaller than the tidal disruption radius (8.7 × 1010 cm). Our model is self-consistent. It is shown that the variability in the spin-down rate of PSR J0738-4042 can be quantitatively accounted for by accretion from the asteroid disrupted by the central pulsar.

  11. Estimating gene gain and loss rates in the presence of error in genome assembly and annotation using CAFE 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mira V; Thomas, Gregg W C; Lugo-Martinez, Jose; Hahn, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Current sequencing methods produce large amounts of data, but genome assemblies constructed from these data are often fragmented and incomplete. Incomplete and error-filled assemblies result in many annotation errors, especially in the number of genes present in a genome. This means that methods attempting to estimate rates of gene duplication and loss often will be misled by such errors and that rates of gene family evolution will be consistently overestimated. Here, we present a method that takes these errors into account, allowing one to accurately infer rates of gene gain and loss among genomes even with low assembly and annotation quality. The method is implemented in the newest version of the software package CAFE, along with several other novel features. We demonstrate the accuracy of the method with extensive simulations and reanalyze several previously published data sets. Our results show that errors in genome annotation do lead to higher inferred rates of gene gain and loss but that CAFE 3 sufficiently accounts for these errors to provide accurate estimates of important evolutionary parameters.

  12. Three-month exercise and weight loss program improves heart rate recovery in obese persons along with cardiopulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Junzo; Musha, Haruki; Takada, Hideomi; Takagi, Kumiko; Mita, Toshiharu; Mochida, Takashi; Yoshihisa, Takeshi; Imagawa, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Ishige, Narumi; Fujimaki, Rikiya; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Masahiro

    2010-07-01

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality, and it is well known to be modifiable by weight loss. We investigated whether HRR was mainly improved by better cardiopulmonary function or by alteration of the metabolic profile. The weight loss program included 2h of group exercise per week and individual dietary instruction by a qualified dietician every week. Clinical assessment (including HRR) was done before and after the 3-month program. The subjects were 125 obese persons without a past history of stroke, cardiovascular events, or use of medications who participated in and completed our exercise plus weight loss program. HRR (35.61+/-12.83 to 45.34+/-13.6 beats/min, pchange in HRR was significantly correlated (pchanges in body weight, body mass index, percent body fat, waist circumference, hip circumference, resting heart rate, peak exercise heart rate, exercise time, maximal work load, physical working capacity divided by body weight (PWC75%HRmax/weight), subcutaneous fat area, visceral fat area, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and leptin. Multivariate analysis showed that the change in HRR was significantly correlated (pchanges in resting heart rate, peak exercise heart rate, and PWC75%HRmax/weight. Our data demonstrated that HRR can be improved in obese subjects by a 3-month exercise and weight loss program. Improvement in cardiopulmonary function by exercise seems to be the main contributor to the increment of HRR. Copyright 2010 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of the heating rate dependency associated with the loss of crystalline structure in sucrose, glucose, and fructose using a thermal analysis approach (part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Won; Thomas, Leonard C; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2011-01-26

    Thermodynamic melting occurs at a single, time-independent temperature with a constant enthalpy value. However, substantial variation in the melting parameters (T(m onset), T(m peak), and ΔH) for sucrose, glucose, and fructose has been reported in the literature. Although a number of explanations have been put forth, they do not completely account for the observed variation. Thus, this research was performed to elucidate the fundamental mechanism underlying the loss of crystalline structure in the sugars using both thermal (Part I) and chemical (Part II) analysis approaches. A strong heating rate dependency observed in the melting parameters for the sugars implies the occurrence of a kinetic process during the loss of crystalline structure. The difference in heat capacity and modulated heat flow amplitude in the stepwise quasi-isothermal modulated differential scanning calorimetry experiments for the sugars compared to indium and mannitol (thermodynamic melting comparison materials) strongly suggests thermal decomposition as the kinetic process responsible for the loss of crystalline structure, which is the critical difference between our conclusion and others. We propose the term "apparent melting" to distinguish the loss of crystalline structure due to a kinetic process, such as thermal decomposition, from thermodynamic melting.

  14. Effects of low calorie diet-induced weight loss on post-exercise heart rate recovery in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Maeng Kyu

    2014-06-01

    Heart Rate Recovery (HRR) after maximum exercise is a reactivation function of vagus nerve and an independent risk factor that predicts cardiovascular disease and mortality. Weight loss obtained through dietary programs has been employed as a therapy to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and obesity. Eighteen subjects of middle aged obese men (age 44.8 ± 1.6 yrs, BMI 29.7 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)) were selected for this study. As a weight loss direction, the nutritional direction of low-calorie diet mainly consisted of carbohydrate, protein, and fat has been conducted for 3 months. Blood pressure was measured after overnight fasting, and blood samples were collected from the antecubital vein before and after weight loss program. All the pre- and post-exercise 'HRR decay constant's were assessed by using values of HRR (heart recovery rate; 2 minutes) and HR measured after reached to the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) exploited the bicycle ergometer. After the completion of weight loss program, body weight and BMI were significantly decreased, but the Heart Rate (HR) after maximum exercise and in steady state were not changed significantly (p > 0.05). The post-exercise HRR after the weight loss did not show significant changes in perspectives of 30 seconds (-16.6 ± 2.3 to -20.2 ± 2.1 beats/min, p > 0.05) and 60 seconds (-33.5 ± 3.4 to -34.6 ± 2.8 beats/min, p > 0.05) respectively but in perspectives of 90 seconds (-40.9 ± 2.6 to -48.1 ± 3.1 beats/min, p exercise, and this improvement in cardiovascular autonomic nerve system was estimated to be involved with improvements in blood glucose and maximal oxygen consumption.

  15. Effects of carbohydrate quantity and glycemic index on resting metabolic rate and body composition during weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J Philip; Roberts, Susan B; Schaefer, Ernst J; Gleason, Joi A; Fuss, Paul; Rasmussen, Helen; Saltzman, Edward; Das, Sai Krupa

    2015-11-01

    To examine the effects of diets varying in carbohydrate and glycemic index (GI) on changes in body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and metabolic adaptation during and after weight loss. Adults with obesity (n = 91) were randomized to one of four provided-food diets for 17 weeks. Diets differed in percentage energy from carbohydrate (55% or 70%) and GI (low or high) but were matched for protein, fiber, and energy. Body weight, body composition, RMR, and metabolic adaptation (measured RMR-predicted RMR) were measured during weight loss and subsequent weight stability. No effect of dietary carbohydrate content or GI on body weight loss or percentage of weight lost as fat mass (FM) was observed. Measured RMR was significantly lower (-226 kJ/day [95% CI: -314 to -138 kJ/day], P weight loss, but this difference was attenuated after 5 weeks of weight stability. Metabolic adaptation did not differ by dietary carbohydrate content or GI and was not associated with weight regain 12 months later. Moderate-carbohydrate and low-GI diets did not preferentially reduce FM, preserve lean mass, or attenuate metabolic adaptation during weight loss compared to high-carbohydrate and high-GI diets. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  16. Estimation of soil redistribution rates due to snow cover related processes in a mountainous area (Valle d'Aosta, NW Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ceaglio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mountain areas are widely affected by soil erosion, which is commonly linked to runoff processes. Also winter processes, like snow gliding and full-depth avalanches, may be important factors that can enhance soil erosion, however the role and importance of snow movements as agents of soil redistribution are not well understood yet. The aim of this study is to provide information on the relative importance of snow related soil erosion processes in comparison to runoff processes. In the study area, which is an avalanche path characterized by intense snow movements and soil erosion, soil redistribution rates were quantified with two methods: (i by field measurements of sediment yield in an avalanche deposition area during 2009 and 2010 winter seasons; (ii by Caesium-137 method, which supplies the cumulative net soil loss/gain since 1986, including winter and summer soil erosion processes. The soil erosion rates estimated from the sediment yield at the avalanche deposit area (3.2 and 20.8 Mg ha−1 event−1 is comparable to the yearly erosion rates (averaged since 1986 estimated with the Cs-137 method (8.8–13.4 Mg ha−1 yr−1. The soil accumulation rate estimated with data from the avalanche deposition area (28.2 and 160.7 Mg ha−1 event−1 is even more intense than the yearly deposition rates estimated with Cs-137 (8.9–12.6 Mg ha−1 yr−1. This might be due to the high relevance of the two investigated avalanche events and/or to the discrepancy between the long-term (since 1986 signal of the Cs-137 method compared to rates of 2009 and 2010. Even though the comparability is limited by the different time scale of the applied methods, both methods yielded similar magnitudes of soil redistribution rates indicating that soil erosion due to snow movements is the main driving force of soil redistribution in the area. Therefore winter processes have to be

  17. A quantification of damage and assessment of economic loss due to crop raiding by Asian Elephant Elephas maximus (Mammalia: Proboscidea: Elephantidae: a case study of Manas National Park, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba K. Nath

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out in Manas National Park, Assam in northeastern India between 2007 and 2009 to understand the magnitude of human-elephant conflict through a quantification of damage and assessment of economic loss. A cluster of six villages adjacent to the Park was selected for this study. Five major agricultural crops were grown during the study period of which three were raided by elephants: winter paddy, autumn paddy and pulses. Paddy was the principle crop central to the farmers’ subsistence. Winter paddy was the most cultivated crop and autumn paddy was the least cultivated. The incidence rate of crop raiding was highest for autumn paddy and lowest for pulses. Overall economic loss due to crop raiding was negligible, however at the individual farmer level, it was quite high. The study revealed that human-elephant conflict is not so severe, indicating ample opportunity for human-elephant coexistence in the region. Crop fields adjacent to the Park were particularly vulnerable to crop raiding which necessitates creation of a buffer zone. The frequency of raiding and the extent of damage was found to be significantly less in crop fields which were guarded by farmers. This was due to traditional crop guarding practices being followed in the region, the strengthening of which could effectively reduce annual crop loss and thus human-elephant conflict could be minimized to a large extent.

  18. A quantification of damage and assessment of economic loss due to crop raiding by Asian Elephant Elephas maximus (Mammalia: Proboscidea: Elephantidae: a case study of Manas National Park, Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba K. Nath

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out in Manas National Park, Assam in northeastern India between 2007 and 2009 to understand the magnitude of human-elephant conflict through a quantification of damage and assessment of economic loss. A cluster of six villages adjacent to the Park was selected for this study. Five major agricultural crops were grown during the study period of which three were raided by elephants: winter paddy, autumn paddy and pulses. Paddy was the principle crop central to the farmers’ subsistence. Winter paddy was the most cultivated crop and autumn paddy was the least cultivated. The incidence rate of crop raiding was highest for autumn paddy and lowest for pulses. Overall economic loss due to crop raiding was negligible, however at the individual farmer level, it was quite high. The study revealed that human-elephant conflict is not so severe, indicating ample opportunity for human-elephant coexistence in the region. Crop fields adjacent to the Park were particularly vulnerable to crop raiding which necessitates creation of a buffer zone. The frequency of raiding and the extent of damage was found to be significantly less in crop fields which were guarded by farmers. This was due to traditional crop guarding practices being followed in the region, the strengthening of which could effectively reduce annual crop loss and thus human-elephant conflict could be minimized to a large extent.

  19. Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability features for real-life stress detection. Case study: students under stress due to university examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Paolo; Bracale, Marcello; Pecchia, Leandro

    2011-11-07

    This study investigates the variations of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) due to a real-life stressor and proposes a classifier based on nonlinear features of HRV for automatic stress detection. 42 students volunteered to participate to the study about HRV and stress. For each student, two recordings were performed: one during an on-going university examination, assumed as a real-life stressor, and one after holidays. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed by using Poincaré Plot, Approximate Entropy, Correlation dimension, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Recurrence Plot. For statistical comparison, we adopted the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and for development of a classifier we adopted the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the stress session. LDA generated a simple classifier based on the two Poincaré Plot parameters and Approximate Entropy, which enables stress detection with a total classification accuracy, a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 90%, 86%, and 95% respectively. The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear HRV analysis using short term ECG recording could be effective in automatically detecting real-life stress condition, such as a university examination.

  20. Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability features for real-life stress detection. Case study: students under stress due to university examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melillo Paolo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigates the variations of Heart Rate Variability (HRV due to a real-life stressor and proposes a classifier based on nonlinear features of HRV for automatic stress detection. Methods 42 students volunteered to participate to the study about HRV and stress. For each student, two recordings were performed: one during an on-going university examination, assumed as a real-life stressor, and one after holidays. Nonlinear analysis of HRV was performed by using Poincaré Plot, Approximate Entropy, Correlation dimension, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis, Recurrence Plot. For statistical comparison, we adopted the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and for development of a classifier we adopted the Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA. Results Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the stress session. LDA generated a simple classifier based on the two Poincaré Plot parameters and Approximate Entropy, which enables stress detection with a total classification accuracy, a sensitivity and a specificity rate of 90%, 86%, and 95% respectively. Conclusions The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear HRV analysis using short term ECG recording could be effective in automatically detecting real-life stress condition, such as a university examination.

  1. Enhancement of fusion rates due to quantum effects in the particles momentum distribution in nonideal plasma media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.; Gladush, M. G.; Petrushevich, Y. V.; Quarati, P.; Starostin, A. N.

    2012-06-01

    This study concerns a situation when measurements of the nonresonant cross-section of nuclear reactions appear highly dependent on the environment in which the particles interact. An appealing example discussed in the paper is the interaction of a deuteron beam with a target of deuterated metal Ta. In these experiments, the reaction cross section for d(d, p)t was shown to be orders of magnitude greater than what the conventional model predicts for the low-energy particles. In this paper we take into account the influence of quantum effects due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for particles in a non-ideal plasma medium elastically interacting with the medium particles. In order to calculate the nuclear reaction rate in the non-ideal environment we apply both the Monte Carlo technique and approximate analytical calculation of the Feynman diagram using nonrelativistic kinetic Green's functions in the medium which correspond to the generalized energy and momentum distribution functions of interacting particles. We show a possibility to reduce the 12-fold integral corresponding to this diagram to a fivefold integral. This can significantly speed up the computation and control accuracy. Our calculations show that quantum effects significantly influence reaction rates such as p +7Be, 3He +4He, p +7Li, and 12C +12C. The new reaction rates may be much higher than the classical ones for the interior of the Sun and supernova stars. The possibility to observe the theoretical predictions under laboratory conditions is discussed.

  2. Tidal radii and destruction rates of globular clusters in the Milky Way due to bulge-bar and disk shocking

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, Edmundo; Velazquez, Hector

    2014-01-01

    We calculate orbits, tidal radii, and bulge-bar and disk shocking destruction rates for 63 globular clusters in our Galaxy. Orbits are integrated in both an axisymmetric and a non-axisymmetric Galactic potential that includes a bar and a 3D model for the spiral arms. With the use of a Monte Carlo scheme, we consider in our simulations observational uncertainties in the kinematical data of the clusters. In the analysis of destruction rates due to the bulge-bar, we consider the rigorous treatment of using the real Galactic cluster orbit, instead of the usual linear trajectory employed in previous studies. We compare results in both treatments. We ?nd that the theoretical tidal radius computed in the nonaxisymmetric Galactic potential compares better with the observed tidal radius than that obtained in the axisymmetric potential. In both Galactic potentials, bulge-shocking destruction rates computed with a linear trajectory of a cluster at its perigalacticons give a good approximation to the result obtained with...

  3. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtas, H

    2004-07-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate.

  4. Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Else, Brent G. T.; Galley, R. J.; Lansard, B.; Barber, D. G.; Brown, K.; Miller, L. A.; Mucci, A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Rysgaard, S.

    2013-03-01

    data collected in 2009, we evaluated the potential for the southeastern Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290-320 µatm), considering that surface water temperatures were low and the influence of ice melt was strong. A simple model simulating melt of the remaining ice and exposure of the surface water for 100 days revealed a weak capacity for atmospheric CO2 uptake (mean flux: -2.4 mmol m-2 d-1), due largely to warming of the shallow mixed layer. Our results confirm a previous finding that the Canada Basin is not a significant sink of atmospheric CO2 under summertime ice-free conditions and that increased ventilation of the surface mixed layer due to sea ice loss is weakening the sink even further.

  5. Measurement of loss rates of organic compounds in snow using in situ experiments and isotopically labelled compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika von Schneidemesser

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular marker compounds are widely used to identify emissions from anthropogenic and biogenic air pollution sources in atmospheric samples and in deposition. Specific organic compounds have been detected in polar regions, but their fate after deposition to snow is poorly characterized. Within this context, a series of exposure experiments were carried out to observe the post-depositional processing of organic compounds under real-world conditions in snow on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet, at the Summit research station. Snow was prepared from water spiked with isotopically labelled organic compounds, representative of typical molecular marker compounds emitted from anthropogenic activities. Reaction rate constants and reaction order were determined based on a decrease in concentration to a stable, non-zero, threshold concentration. Fluoranthene-d10, docosane-d46, hexadecanoic acid-d31, docosanoic acid-d43 and azelaic acid-d14 were estimated to have first order loss rates within surface snow with reaction rate constants of 0.068, 0.040, 0.070, 0.067 and 0.047 h−1, respectively. No loss of heptadecane-d36 was observed. Overall, these results suggest that organic contaminants are archived in polar snow, although significant post-depositional losses of specific organic compounds occur. This has implications for the environmental fate of organic contaminants, as well as for ice-core studies that seek to use organic molecular markers to infer past atmospheric loadings, and source emissions.

  6. Metabolic rate, evaporative water loss and thermoregulatory state in four species of bats in the Negev desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Larraín, Paloma; Ben-Hamo, Miriam; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo; Williams, Joseph B; Pinshow, Berry; Korine, Carmi

    2016-01-01

    Life in deserts is challenging for bats because of their relatively high energy and water requirements; nevertheless bats thrive in desert environments. We postulated that bats from desert environments have lower metabolic rates (MR) and total evaporative water loss (TEWL) than their mesic counterparts. To test this idea, we measured MR and TEWL of four species of bats, which inhabit the Negev desert in Israel, one species mainly restricted to hyper-arid deserts (Otonycteris hemprichii), two species from semi-desert areas (Eptesicus bottae and Plecotus christii), and one widespread species (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We also measured separately, in the same individuals, the two components of TEWL, respiratory water loss (RWL) and cutaneous evaporative water loss (CEWL), using a mask. In all the species, MR and TEWL were significantly reduced during torpor, the latter being a consequence of reductions in both RWL and CEWL. Then, we evaluated whether MR and TEWL in bats differ according to their geographic distributions, and whether those rates change with Ta and the use of torpor. We did not find significant differences in MR among species, but we found that TEWL was lowest in the species restricted to desert habitats, intermediate in the semi-desert dwelling species, and highest in the widespread species, perhaps a consequence of adaptation to life in deserts. Our results were supported by a subsequent analysis of data collected from the literature on rates of TEWL for 35 bat species from desert and mesic habitats.

  7. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  8. Measurement of the energy loss of an electron bunch passing in a chicane-type bunch compressor due to the coherent synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Okuda, S; Yokoyama, K

    2000-01-01

    The energy loss of an electron beam due to the coherent synchrotron radiation in the components for beam transportation possibly degrades the quality of the beam. In this work the energy loss of an intense single-bunch electron beam passing through a chicane-type bunch compressor has been investigated. The single-bunch beams are being used for self-amplified spontaneous emission experiments in Osaka University. At a beam energy of 27 MeV and the charge of electrons in a bunch of 22 nC the peak shift on the energy spectrum of the beam by 1% and the energy loss of about 0.5% have been observed. In order to evaluate the energy of the coherent synchrotron radiation emitted in the bunch compressor a form factor of the electron bunch has been assumed, according to the results for the measurements of the time profile of the electron bunch with a streak camera and the spectrum of the coherent transition radiation.

  9. Measurement of HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate due to radon decay in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce ({center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2} {center_dot}) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate was found to be (4.31{plus_minus}0.07) {times} 10{sup 5} HO{sub x}{center_dot} per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G{sub (HO{sub x}{center_dot})}-value, 7.86{plus_minus}0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HO{sub x}{center_dot}] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HO{sub x}{center_dot} produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for {center_dot}OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial {center_dot}OH produced from the photolysis of O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O.

  10. Simultaneous event-specific estimates of transport, loss, and source rates for relativistic outer radiation belt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Q.; Tu, W.; Ali, A. F.; Li, X.; Godinez, H. C.; Turner, D. L.; Morley, S. K.; Henderson, M. G.

    2017-03-01

    The most significant unknown regarding relativistic electrons in Earth's outer Van Allen radiation belt is the relative contribution of loss, transport, and acceleration processes within the inner magnetosphere. Detangling each individual process is critical to improve the understanding of radiation belt dynamics, but determining a single component is challenging due to sparse measurements in diverse spatial and temporal regimes. However, there are currently an unprecedented number of spacecraft taking measurements that sample different regions of the inner magnetosphere. With the increasing number of varied observational platforms, system dynamics can begin to be unraveled. In this work, we employ in situ measurements during the 13-14 January 2013 enhancement event to isolate transport, loss, and source dynamics in a one-dimensional radial diffusion model. We then validate the results by comparing them to Van Allen Probes and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations, indicating that the three terms have been accurately and individually quantified for the event. Finally, a direct comparison is performed between the model containing event-specific terms and various models containing terms parameterized by geomagnetic index. Models using a simple 3/Kp loss time scale show deviation from the event-specific model of nearly 2 orders of magnitude within 72 h of the enhancement event. However, models using alternative loss time scales closely resemble the event-specific model.

  11. Low levels of human HIP14 are sufficient to rescue neuropathological, behavioural, and enzymatic defects due to loss of murine HIP14 in Hip14-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona B Young

    Full Text Available Huntingtin Interacting Protein 14 (HIP14 is a palmitoyl acyl transferase (PAT that was first identified due to altered interaction with mutant huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington Disease (HD. HIP14 palmitoylates a specific set of neuronal substrates critical at the synapse, and downregulation of HIP14 by siRNA in vitro results in increased cell death in neurons. We previously reported that mice lacking murine Hip14 (Hip14-/- share features of HD. In the current study, we have generated human HIP14 BAC transgenic mice and crossed them to the Hip14-/- model in order to confirm that the defects seen in Hip14-/- mice are in fact due to loss of Hip14. In addition, we sought to determine whether human HIP14 can provide functional compensation for loss of murine Hip14. We demonstrate that despite a relative low level of expression, as assessed via Western blot, BAC-derived human HIP14 compensates for deficits in neuropathology, behavior, and PAT enzyme function seen in the Hip14-/- model. Our findings yield important insights into HIP14 function in vivo.

  12. Power Scaling of the Size Distribution of Economic Loss and Fatalities due to Hurricanes, Earthquakes, Tornadoes, and Floods in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbens, S. F.; Barton, C. C.; Scott, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    Traditionally, the size of natural disaster events such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, and floods is measured in terms of wind speed (m/sec), energy released (ergs), or discharge (m3/sec) rather than by economic loss or fatalities. Economic loss and fatalities from natural disasters result from the intersection of the human infrastructure and population with the size of the natural event. This study investigates the size versus cumulative number distribution of individual natural disaster events for several disaster types in the United States. Economic losses are adjusted for inflation to 2014 USD. The cumulative number divided by the time over which the data ranges for each disaster type is the basis for making probabilistic forecasts in terms of the number of events greater than a given size per year and, its inverse, return time. Such forecasts are of interest to insurers/re-insurers, meteorologists, seismologists, government planners, and response agencies. Plots of size versus cumulative number distributions per year for economic loss and fatalities are well fit by power scaling functions of the form p(x) = Cx-β; where, p(x) is the cumulative number of events with size equal to and greater than size x, C is a constant, the activity level, x is the event size, and β is the scaling exponent. Economic loss and fatalities due to hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, and floods are well fit by power functions over one to five orders of magnitude in size. Economic losses for hurricanes and tornadoes have greater scaling exponents, β = 1.1 and 0.9 respectively, whereas earthquakes and floods have smaller scaling exponents, β = 0.4 and 0.6 respectively. Fatalities for tornadoes and floods have greater scaling exponents, β = 1.5 and 1.7 respectively, whereas hurricanes and earthquakes have smaller scaling exponents, β = 0.4 and 0.7 respectively. The scaling exponents can be used to make probabilistic forecasts for time windows ranging from 1 to 1000 years

  13. Does Amniocentesis Increase the Rates of Fetal Loss and Poor Pregnancy Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Ercan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the risk of fetal loss and poor pregnancy outcomes associated with amniocentesis procedures on patients in our clinic in the last 5 years. Material and Method: This retrospective study was conducted by examining the hospital records and genetic centre records of 387 patients who underwent amniocentesis at the Gynaecology and Obstetrics Clinic of Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Medical Faculty between January 2011 and July 2015. A control group was formed of 250 low-risk patients who attended the clinic and did not have amniocentesis applied. Results:Throughout the study period there were 688 patients with an indication for amniocentesis. Of these, amniocentesis was applied to 387 patients and 43.8% refused the amniocentesis. The most common amniocentesis indication was the scanning test for Downs syndrome (57.6% followed by older maternal age (22.5%. Of the patients who underwent amniocentesis, chromosomal abnormality was determined in 24 (6.2%, the most common of which was Downs syndrome (54%. Fetal loss following amniocentesis was seen in 2 patients (0.5%. When the total poor pregnancy outcomes were examined, a poor outcome was determined in 8 of the amniocentesis group and in 5 of the control group and the difference beween the 2 groups was not statistically significant (p=0.263. Discussion: Amniocentesis is an invasive prenatal test in frequent current use. No increase in pregnancy complications was observed associated with the procedure. Before the application of amniocentesis, the patient must be given detailed information about the procedure and the outcomes.

  14. Folding rates and low-entropy-loss routes of two-state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Thomas R; Dill, Ken A

    2003-06-01

    We develop a simple model for computing the rates and routes of folding of two-state proteins from the contact maps of their native structures. The model is based on the graph-theoretical concept of effective contact order (ECO). The model predicts that proteins fold by "zipping up" in a sequence of small-loop-closure events, depending on the native chain fold. Using a simple equation, with a few physical rate parameters, we obtain a good correlation with the folding rates of 24 two-state folding proteins. The model rationalizes data from Phi-value analysis that have been interpreted in terms of delocalized or polarized transition states. This model indicates how much of protein folding may take place in parallel, not along a single reaction coordinate or with a single transition state.

  15. Accounting for disagreements on average cone loss rates in retinitis pigmentosa with a new kinetic model: Its relevance for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, W A; Baumgartner, A M

    2016-04-01

    Since 1985, at least nine studies of the average rate of cone loss in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) populations have yielded conflicting average rate constant values (-k), differing by 90-160%. This is surprising, since, except for the first two investigations, the Harvard or Johns Hopkins' protocols used in these studies were identical with respect to: use of the same exponential decline model, calculation of average -k from individual patient k values, monitoring patients over similarly large time frames, and excluding data exhibiting floor and ceiling effects. A detailed analysis of Harvard's and Hopkins' protocols and data revealed two subtle differences: (i) Hopkins' use of half-life t0.5 (or t(1/e)) for expressing patient cone-loss rates rather than k as used by Harvard; (ii) Harvard obtaining substantially more +k from improving fields due to dormant-cone recovery effects and "small -k" values than Hopkins' ("small -k" is defined as less than -0.040 year(-1)), e.g., 16% +k, 31% small -k, vs. Hopkins' 3% and 6% respectively. Since t0.5=0.693/k, it follows that when k=0, or is very small, t0.5 (or t(1/e)) is respectively infinity or a very large number. This unfortunate mathematical property (which also prevents t0.5 (t(1/e)) histogram construction corresponding to -k to +k) caused Hopkins' to delete all "small -k" and all +k due to "strong leverage". Naturally this contributed to Hopkins' larger average -k. Difference (ii) led us to re-evaluate the Harvard/Hopkins' exponential unchanging -k model. In its place we propose a model of increasing biochemical stresses from dying rods on cones during RP progression: increasing oxidative stresses and trophic factor deficiencies (e.g., RdCVF), and RPE malfunction. Our kinetic analysis showed rod loss to follow exponential kinetics with unchanging -k due to constant genetic stresses, thereby providing a theoretical basis for Clarke et al.'s empirical observation of such kinetics with eleven animal models of RP. In

  16. Summary of information on low-speed lateral-directional derivatives due to rate of change of sideslip beta prime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Graham, A. B.; Chambers, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results presented show that the magnitudes of the aerodynamic stability derivatives due to rate of change of sideslip become quite large at high angles of attack for swept- and delta-wing configurations, and that such derivatives have large effects on the calculated dynamic stability of these configurations at high angles of attack. The wind-tunnel test techniques used to measure the beta prime derivatives and various approaches used to predict them are discussed. Both the conventional oscillating-airfoil theory and the lag-of-the-sidewash theory are shown to be inadequate for predicting the vertical-tail contribution to the acceleration-in-sideslip derivative; a flow-field-lag theory, which is discussed, appears to give qualitative agreement with experimental data for a current twin-jet fighter configuration.

  17. Runoff and soil loss from steep sloping vineyards in the Douro Valley, Portugal: rates and factors

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Tomás; Poesen, Jean; Ferreira, Alfredo Gonçalves; Gonçalves, Dionísio

    2013-01-01

    The Douro Region,, NE Portugal, where the grapes for Port Wine are produced, faces a high potential erosion risk due to its natural setting, for long tackled with heavy labour inputs. These allowed the stabilization of steep vineyard covered hill-slopes by means of traditional terracing, manually built and following models that changed through time. Alternative vineyard installation and cultivation techniques were tested and progressively adopted, namely row plantation perpendicular to the co...

  18. Superior bit error rate and jitter due to improved switching field distribution in exchange spring magnetic recording media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, D; Fuger, M; Abert, C; Bruckner, F; Vogler, C

    2016-06-01

    We report two effects that lead to a significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. The first effect relies on a subtle mechanism of the interplay between exchange coupling between soft and hard layers and anisotropy that allows significant reduction of the switching field distribution in exchange spring media. This effect reduces the switching field distribution by about 30% compared to single-phase media. A second effect is that due to the improved thermal stability of exchange spring media over single-phase media, the jitter due to thermal fluctuation is significantly smaller for exchange spring media than for single-phase media. The influence of this overall improved switching field distribution on the transition jitter in granular recording and the bit error rate in bit-patterned magnetic recording is discussed. The transition jitter in granular recording for a distribution of Khard values of 3% in the hard layer, taking into account thermal fluctuations during recording, is estimated to be a = 0.78 nm, which is similar to the best reported calculated jitter in optimized heat-assisted recording media.

  19. A Control Allocation System for Automatic Detection and Compensation of Phase Shift Due to Actuator Rate Limiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Yidiray; Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Acosta, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a control allocation system that can detect and compensate the phase shift between the desired and the actual total control effort due to rate limiting of the actuators. Phase shifting is an important problem in control system applications since it effectively introduces a time delay which may destabilize the closed loop dynamics. A relevant example comes from flight control where aggressive pilot commands, high gain of the flight control system or some anomaly in the system may cause actuator rate limiting and effective time delay introduction. This time delay can instigate Pilot Induced Oscillations (PIO), which is an abnormal coupling between the pilot and the aircraft resulting in unintentional and undesired oscillations. The proposed control allocation system reduces the effective time delay by first detecting the phase shift and then minimizing it using constrained optimization techniques. Flight control simulation results for an unstable aircraft with inertial cross coupling are reported, which demonstrate phase shift minimization and recovery from a PIO event.

  20. Global Crop Yield Reductions due to Surface Ozone Exposure: Crop Production Losses and Economic Damage in 2000 and 2030 under Two Future Scenarios of O3 Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avnery, S.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Liu, J.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Field studies demonstrate that exposure to elevated concentrations of surface ozone (O3) may cause substantial reductions in the agricultural yields of many crops. As emissions of O3 precursors rise in many parts of the world over the next few decades, yield reductions from O3 exposure may increase the challenges of feeding a global population projected to grow from approximately 6 to 8 billion people between 2000 and 2030. This study estimates global yield reductions of three key staple crops (soybean, maize, and wheat) due to surface ozone exposure in 2000 and 2030 according to two trajectories of O3 pollution: the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (IPCC SRES) A2 and B1 storylines, which represent upper- and lower-boundary projections, respectively, of most O3 precursor emissions in 2030. Our results indicate that year 2000 O3-induced global yield reductions ranged, depending on the O3 exposure metric used, from 3.9-15% for wheat, 8.5-14% for soybean, and 2.2-5.5% for maize. Global crop production losses totaled 79-121 million metric tons, worth 11-18 billion annually (USD2000). In the 2030-A2 scenario we find global O3-induced yield loss of wheat to be 5.4-26% (a further reduction in yield of +1.5-10% from year 2000 values), 15-19% for soybean (reduction of +0.9-11%), and 4.4-8.7% for maize (reduction of +2.1-3.2%) depending on the metric used, with total global agricultural losses worth 17-35 billion USD2000 annually (an increase of +6-17 billion in losses from 2000). Under the 2030-B1 scenario, we project less severe but still substantial reductions in yields: 4.0-17% for wheat (a further decrease in yield of +0.1-1.8% from 2000), 9.5-15% for soybean (decrease of +0.7-1.0%), and 2.5-6.0% for maize (decrease of+ 0.3-0.5%), with total losses worth 12-21 billion annually (an increase of +$1-3 billion in losses from 2000). Because our analysis uses crop data from the year 2000, which likely underestimates agricultural

  1. Measurement of elasticity and transepidermal water loss rate of burn scars with the Dermalab(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonissen, Mieke; Daly, Daniel; Fieuws, Steffen; Massagé, Patrick; Van Brussel, Michel; Vranckx, Jan; Van den Kerckhove, Eric

    2013-05-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the reproducibility of repeated elasticity and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements with the DermaLab(®) on 32 active burn scars and healthy skin. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was examined by means of intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and standard error of measurements (SEM). Results showed good ICC values and rather high SEM values for inter- and intra-observer reproducibility of elasticity measurements. For TEWL measurements, ICC values were good and SEM values were high for inter- and intra-observer reproducibility. There was a significant difference between the estimated mean elasticity values of normal skin and grafted scars and between normal skin and spontaneously healed scars (p≤0.003). For the estimated mean TEWL values, there was a significant difference between normal skin and spontaneously healed scars (p=0.036). A significant negative relation was reported between mean TEWL and time after burn (p=0.008). In clinical trials it is necessary to interpret patient-specific changes in elasticity and TEWL with caution, since the SEMs of both modes are rather high. We therefore recommend the use of a mean of repeated measurements of elasticity and TEWL to decrease the SEM.

  2. Foraging Activity Pattern Is Shaped by Water Loss Rates in a Diurnal Desert Rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Ofir; Dayan, Tamar; Porter, Warren P; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2016-08-01

    Although animals fine-tune their activity to avoid excess heat, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of such behaviors. As the global climate changes, such understanding is particularly important for projecting shifts in the activity patterns of populations and communities. We studied how foraging decisions vary with biotic and abiotic pressures. By tracking the foraging behavior of diurnal desert spiny mice in their natural habitat and estimating the energy and water costs and benefits of foraging, we asked how risk management and thermoregulatory requirements affect foraging decisions. We found that water requirements had the strongest effect on the observed foraging decisions. In their arid environment, mice often lose water while foraging for seeds and cease foraging even at high energetic returns when water loss is high. Mice also foraged more often when energy expenditure was high and for longer times under high seed densities and low predation risks. Gaining insight into both energy and water balance will be crucial to understanding the forces exerted by changing climatic conditions on animal energetics, behavior, and ecology.

  3. Rates of progressive retinal nerve fiber layer loss in glaucoma measured by scanning laser polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Felipe A; Zangwill, Linda M; Alencar, Luciana M; Sample, Pamela A; Weinreb, Robert N

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate rates of change measured with scanning laser polarimetry with enhanced corneal compensation (GDx ECC) and compare them to those measured using the variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC) method in a cohort of glaucoma patients and individuals suspected of having the disease followed over time. Observational cohort study. The study included 213 eyes of 213 patients with an average follow-up time of 4.5 years. Images were obtained annually with the GDx ECC and VCC, along with optic disc stereophotographs and standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual fields. Progression was determined by the Guided Progression Analysis software for SAP and by masked assessment of stereophotographs by expert graders. Joint linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate rates of change in GDx measurements and their relationship with disease progression. Thirty-three patients (15%) showed progression over time on visual fields and/or stereophotographs. Mean rates of average retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness change measured by the GDx ECC were significantly different in progressors versus nonprogressors (-1.24 microm/year vs -0.34 microm/year; P polarimetry. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radial Distribution of Production Rates, Loss Rates and Densities Corresponding to Ion Masses <=40 amu in the Inner Coma of Comet Halley: Composition and Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, S A; Bhardwaj, Anil

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we have studied the chemistry of C, H, N, O, and S compounds corresponding to ions of masses <=40 amu in the inner coma of the comet 1P/Halley. The production rates, loss rates, and ion mass densities are calculated using the Analytical Yield Spectrum approach and solving coupled continuity equation controlled by the steady state photochemical equilibrium condition. The primary ionization sources in the model are solar EUV photons, photoelectrons, and auroral electrons of the solar wind origin. The chemical model couples ion-neutral, electron-neutral, photon-neutral and electron-ion reactions among ions, neutrals, electrons, and photons through over 600 chemical reactions. Of the 46 ions considered in the model the chemistry of 24 important ions are discussed in this paper. The calculated ion mass densities are compared with the Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) data at radial distances 1500, 3500, and 6000 km.

  5. Potential bias due to outcome-related loss to follow-up in cohort studies on incidence of drug injection: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Luis; Bravo, Maria J; Barrio, Gregorio; Indave, B Iciar; Degenhardt, Louisa; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to synthesize results from cohort studies on initiation into drug injection among vulnerable populations, to quantify heterogeneity in the estimated incidence rates of drug injection and to identify potential sources of heterogeneity and bias. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and LILACS were searched for relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. Investigators independently reviewed studies for inclusion, retrieved information on baseline population characteristics and follow-up features and assessed study quality. Study-specific incidence rates of drug injection were calculated as the number of new injectors divided by the person-years at risk. The I(2) statistic was used to quantify heterogeneity in incidence rates across studies, and random-effects meta-regression models were used to identify determinants of heterogeneity and bias. Nine cohorts totalling 1843 participants met the inclusion criteria, with individual sample sizes of 70-415 participants and follow-up lengths of 6 months-3.4 years. The incidence of drug injection varied widely, from 2.1 to 24.2 cases per 100 person-years. The strong between-study heterogeneity (I(2)  = 90%, Pcohort studies on drug injection initiation. Low retention rates and potential for downward selection bias in cohort studies on drug injection initiation are caused primarily by greater loss to follow-up among individuals at higher risk of starting injection, compared with other participants. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Rate of loss of insecticides during soil solarization and soil biosolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, José; Ruiz, Encarnación; Hellín, Pilar; Martínez, Carmen M; Flores, Pilar

    2011-01-30

    This paper reports the use of solarization and biosolarization to decontaminate a soil polluted with six insecticides (buprofezin, pirimicarb, pirimiphos methyl, pyridaben, pyriproxyfen and tebufenpyrad). In the experiment, 17-L pots filled with clay-loam soil were placed in a greenhouse during the summer season and then contaminated with the insecticides of interest. Treatments consisted of different solarization and biosolarization treatments, including a control without disinfection. For both solarization and biosolarization treatments, low-density polyethylene film was used as cover; the biosolarization treatment involving application of a mixture of sheep and chicken manures at a rate of 400 g pot(-1). Five pots per treatment were sampled periodically up to 90 d after the beginning of each treatment. The results showed that both solarization and biosolarization enhanced the degradation rates of most of the insecticides tested compared with the control, probably as a result of the increased soil temperature. Pirimicarb, pirimiphos methyl, tebufenpyrad, pyriproxyfen and pyridaben were degraded to a greater extent in the biosolarization than in the solarization treatment. The results confirm that both solarization and biosolarization can be considered as a remediation tool for soils polluted by these insecticides. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Vertical Rate Error on Recovery from Loss of Well Clear Between UAS and Non-Cooperative Intruders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Andrew; Thipphavong, David; Lee, Seung Man; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    When an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) encounters an intruder and is unable to maintain required temporal and spatial separation between the two vehicles, it is referred to as a loss of well-clear. In this state, the UAS must make its best attempt to regain separation while maximizing the minimum separation between itself and the intruder. When encountering a non-cooperative intruder (an aircraft operating under visual flight rules without ADS-B or an active transponder) the UAS must rely on the radar system to provide the intruders location, velocity, and heading information. As many UAS have limited climb and descent performance, vertical position andor vertical rate errors make it difficult to determine whether an intruder will pass above or below them. To account for that, there is a proposal by RTCA Special Committee 228 to prohibit guidance systems from providing vertical guidance to regain well-clear to UAS in an encounter with a non-cooperative intruder unless their radar system has vertical position error below 175 feet (95) and vertical velocity errors below 200 fpm (95). Two sets of fast-time parametric studies was conducted, each with 54000 pairwise encounters between a UAS and non-cooperative intruder to determine the suitability of offering vertical guidance to regain well clear to a UAS in the presence of radar sensor noise. The UAS was not allowed to maneuver until it received well-clear recovery guidance. The maximum severity of the loss of well-clear was logged and used as the primary indicator of the separation achieved by the UAS. One set of 54000 encounters allowed the UAS to maneuver either vertically or horizontally, while the second permitted horizontal maneuvers, only. Comparing the two data sets allowed researchers to see the effect of allowing vertical guidance to a UAS for a particular encounter and vertical rate error. Study results show there is a small reduction in the average severity of a loss of well-clear when vertical maneuvers

  8. LOSS Revisited - II: The relative rates of different types of supernovae vary between low- and high-mass galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Modjaz, Maryam; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V; Li, Weidong; Smith, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope supernova (SE SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses $\\lesssim 10^{10}~{\\rm M}_\\odot$. Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. (in prep.) We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ~3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host ~9 times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia are ~30% more common in low-mass galax...

  9. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  10. Hepatitis C virus RNA kinetics: Drug efficacy and the rate of HCV-infected cells loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harel Dahari; Alan S Perelson

    2007-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR We read the study by Medeiros-Filho et al[1] with much interest. The study shed light on early HCV RNA kinetics in conjunction with liver cirrhosis, different genotypes (gen-1 vs gen-3) of HCV and sustained viral response (SVR) rates. In particular, Medeiros-Filho et al[1]showed that the HCV RNA first phase decline, under interferon-α (IFN) and ribavirin therapy, which represents the effectiveness (ε) of IFN to block viral production[2,3],was significantly larger in gen-3 cirrhotic patients (mean ε = 0.99) than gen-1 cirrhotic patients (mean ε = 0.8). In addition, in these cirrhotic patients, they found that the HCV RNA second phase decay slope in gen-3 patients was significantly faster than in gen-1 patients, and suggested that the immune response against infected HCV cells in gen-1 patients may be less potent than in gen-3 patients.

  11. Combination of poroelasticity theory and constant strain rate test in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tien Hung; Rühaak, Wolfram; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Extensive groundwater extraction leads to a drawdown of the ground water table. Consequently, soil effective stress increases and can cause land subsidence. Analysis of land subsidence generally requires a numerical model based on poroelasticity theory, which was first proposed by Biot (1941). In the review of regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction, Galloway and Burbey (2011) stated that more research and application is needed in coupling of stress-dependent land subsidence process. In geotechnical field, the constant rate of strain tests (CRS) was first introduced in 1969 (Smith and Wahls 1969) and was standardized in 1982 through the designation D4186-82 by American Society for Testing and Materials. From the reading values of CRS tests, the stress-dependent parameters of poroelasticity model can be calculated. So far, there is no research to link poroelasticity theory with CRS tests in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction. One dimensional CRS tests using conventional compression cell and three dimension CRS tests using Rowe cell were performed. The tests were also modelled by using finite element method with mixed elements. Back analysis technique is used to find the suitable values of hydraulic conductivity and bulk modulus that depend on the stress or void ratio. Finally, the obtained results are used in land subsidence models. Biot, M. A. (1941). "General theory of three-dimensional consolidation." Journal of applied physics 12(2): 155-164. Galloway, D. L. and T. J. Burbey (2011). "Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction." Hydrogeology Journal 19(8): 1459-1486. Smith, R. E. and H. E. Wahls (1969). "Consolidation under constant rates of strain." Journal of Soil Mechanics & Foundations Div.

  12. Loss of lag-response curvilinearity of indices of heart rate variability in congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Michael L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart rate variability (HRV is known to be impaired in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF. Time-domain analysis of ECG signals traditionally relies heavily on linear indices of an essentially non-linear phenomenon. Poincaré plots are commonly used to study non-linear behavior of physiologic signals. Lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information and analysis of Poincaré plots for various lags can provide interesting insights into the autonomic control of the heart. Methods Using Poincaré plot analysis, we assessed whether the relation of the lag between heart beats and HRV is altered in CHF. We studied the influence of lag on estimates of Poincaré plot indices for various lengths of beat sequence in a public domain data set (PhysioNet of 29 subjects with CHF and 54 subjects with normal sinus rhythm. Results A curvilinear association was observed between lag and Poincaré plot indices (SD1, SD2, SDLD and SD1/SD2 ratio in normal subjects even for a small sequence of 50 beats (p value for quadratic term 3 × 10-5, 0.002, 3.5 × 10-5 and 0.0003, respectively. This curvilinearity was lost in patients with CHF even after exploring sequences up to 50,000 beats (p values for quadratic term > 0.5. Conclusion Since lagged Poincaré plots incorporate autocovariance information, these analyses provide insights into the autonomic control of heart rate that is influenced by the non-linearity of the signal. The differences in lag-response in CHF patients and normal subjects exist even in the face of the treatment received by the CHF patients.

  13. Theoretical predictions of source rates for exospheric CO 2 on icy satellites of the outer planets due to sublimation of deep subsurface CO 2 ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stephen E.

    2016-10-01

    The abundances of CO2 observed in the exospheres of Callisto and, more recently, Rhea and Dione are difficult to explain. The previously proposed sources for the CO2 either have production rates well below the expected rates of escape/destruction or should produce other species (e.g. CO) that are not observed.We consider a potential source that has not been previously investigated - CO2 vapor originating from crustal CO2 ice and driven upward by the endogenic heat flux - and have developed a model to make quantitative estimates of the corresponding global subsurface vapor flux.Our model is based on previous theoretical work by Clifford (1993) and Mellon et al. (1997) for equatorial ground ice on Mars, who showed that in times or places where subsurface pore ice is undergoing long-term sublimation and diffusive loss, the ice table (the shallowest depth where any pore ice exists) will not continue to recede indefinitely. Beyond a certain, predictable depth, the linear diffusive profile of vapor density between the ice table and the surface will become supersaturated with respect to the local temperature and recondense as pore ice. This is true for any planetary body with a non-negligible interior heat source (e.g. radiogenic, tidal, etc) and is due to the fact that, while the ice temperature increases ~linearly with depth, the corresponding equilibrium vapor density increases exponentially.Once this occurs, a steady-state profile of ice volume fraction, f_ice(z), develops, with net mass loss only occurring from the retreating pore-filling ice layer. The rate of vapor flux to the surface is then determined only by the vapor density and temperature gradient at the ice table depth. We use a 1-D thermal model coupled with an analytic physical model for regolith thermal conductivity (including its depth- and T-dependence), to calculate the zonally-integrated global CO2 vapor flux corresponding to the range of expected heat flow values. Our preliminary results show

  14. Low post-glacial rebound rates in the Weddell Sea due to Late Holocene ice-sheet readvance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sarah L.; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.; Whitehouse, Pippa; Bentley, Michael J.; King, Matt

    2014-05-01

    The Holocene deglaciation of West Antarctica resulted in widespread ice surface lowering. While many ice-sheet reconstructions generally assume a monotone Holocene retreat for the West Antarctica Ice sheet (WAIS) [Ivins et al., 2013; Peltier, 2004; Whitehouse et al., 2012], an increasing number of glaciological observations infer it is readvancing, following retreat behind the present-day margin[Siegert et al., 2013]. We will show that a readvance in the Weddell Sea region can reconcile two outstanding problems: (i) the present-day widespread occurrence of seemingly stable ice-streams grounded on beds that deepen inland in apparent contradiction to theory [Schoof, 2007]; and (ii) the inability of models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) to match present-day uplift rates [Whitehouse et al., 2012]. Combining a suite of ice loading histories that include a readvance with a model of GIA provides significant improvements to predictions of present-day uplift rates, and we are able to reproduce previously unexplained observations of subsidence in the southern sector of the Weddell Sea. We hypothesize that retreat behind present grounding lines occurred when the bed was lower, and isostatic recovery led to shallowing, ice sheet re-grounding and readvance. We will conclude that some sections of the current WAIS grounding line that are theoretically unstable, may be advancing and that the volume change of the WAIS may have been more complex in the Late Holocene than previously posited. This revised Holocene ice-loading history would have important implications for the GIA correction applied to Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data, likely resulting in a reduction in the GIA correction and a smaller estimate of present-day ice mass loss within the Weddell Sea region of the WAIS. Ivins, E. R., T. S. James, J. Wahr, E. J. O. Schrama, F. W. Landerer, and K. M. Simon (2013), Antarctic contribution to sea level rise observed by GRACE with improved GIA correction

  15. Rate of shunt revision as a function of age in patients with shunted hydrocephalus due to myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupepe, Esther B; Hopson, Betsy; Johnston, James M; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Jerry Oakes, W; Blount, Jeffrey P; Rocque, Brandon G

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE It is generally accepted that cerebrospinal fluid shunts fail most frequently in the first years of life. The purpose of this study was to describe the risk of shunt failure for a given patient age in a well-defined cohort with shunted hydrocephalus due to myelomeningocele (MMC). METHODS The authors analyzed data from their institutional spina bifida research database including all patients with MMC and shunted hydrocephalus. For the entire population, the number of shunt revisions in each year of life was determined. Then the number of patients at risk for shunt revision during each year of life was calculated, thus enabling them to calculate the rate of shunt revision per patient in each year of life. In this way, the timing of all shunt revision operations for the entire clinic population and the likelihood of having a shunt revision during each year of life were calculated. RESULTS A total of 655 patients were enrolled in the spina bifida research database, 519 of whom had a diagnosis of MMC and whose mean age was 17.48 ± 11.7 years (median 16 years, range 0-63 years). Four hundred seventeen patients had had a CSF shunt for the treatment of hydrocephalus and thus are included in this analysis. There were 94 shunt revisions in the 1st year of life, which represents a rate of 0.23 revisions per patient in that year. The rate of shunt revision per patient-year initially decreased as age increased, except for an increase in revision frequency in the early teen years. Shunt revisions continued to occur as late as 43 years of age. CONCLUSIONS These data substantiate the idea that shunt revision surgeries in patients with MMC are most common in the 1st year of life and decrease thereafter, except for an increase in the early teen years. A persistent risk of shunt failure was observed well into adult life. These findings underscore the importance of routine follow-up of all MMC patients with shunted hydrocephalus and will aid in counseling patients and

  16. Impact of Orlistat-Induced Weight Loss on Diastolic Function and Heart Rate Variability in Severely Obese Subjects with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Determine the impact of Orlistat-induced weight loss on metabolic profile and cardiovascular function in severely obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. Twenty-nine patients were randomized either to a nonplacebo control group or to a treatment group with Orlistat thrice a day. Metabolic profile, anthropometric parameters, heart rate variability indices, and echocardiographic variables were measured before and after a 12-week treatment period. Results. Treatment with Orlistat induced a modest but significant weight loss compared to controls (3.7 ± 3.0 versus 0.5 ± 2.2 kg, resp.; P=.003. There was significant decrease in fasting glycemia (7.9 ± 3.0 versus 6.7 ± 2.2 mmol/L; P=.03 and significant improvements in left ventricular diastolic function (P=.03 and in the sympathovagal balance (LF/HF ratio (P=.04 in the Orlistat group. Conclusion. These results suggest that a modest weight loss improves fasting glycemia, left ventricular diastolic function, and sympathovagal balance in severely obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Loss of animal seed dispersal increases extinction risk in a tropical tree species due to pervasive negative density dependence across life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughlin, T Trevor; Ferguson, Jake M; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Zuidema, Pieter A; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Levey, Douglas J

    2015-01-07

    Overhunting in tropical forests reduces populations of vertebrate seed dispersers. If reduced seed dispersal has a negative impact on tree population viability, overhunting could lead to altered forest structure and dynamics, including decreased biodiversity. However, empirical data showing decreased animal-dispersed tree abundance in overhunted forests contradict demographic models which predict minimal sensitivity of tree population growth rate to early life stages. One resolution to this discrepancy is that seed dispersal determines spatial aggregation, which could have demographic consequences for all life stages. We tested the impact of dispersal loss on population viability of a tropical tree species, Miliusa horsfieldii, currently dispersed by an intact community of large mammals in a Thai forest. We evaluated the effect of spatial aggregation for all tree life stages, from seeds to adult trees, and constructed simulation models to compare population viability with and without animal-mediated seed dispersal. In simulated populations, disperser loss increased spatial aggregation by fourfold, leading to increased negative density dependence across the life cycle and a 10-fold increase in the probability of extinction. Given that the majority of tree species in tropical forests are animal-dispersed, overhunting will potentially result in forests that are fundamentally different from those existing now.

  18. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Efforts over the last Two Decades to Reduce Human Losses due to Natural Hazards, and A Proposal for Future Efforts (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, B. E.; Chakos, A.

    2009-12-01

    While there is evidence that efforts over the last 20 years to reduce human and fiscal losses due to natural hazards have been effective, there is also evidence that, despite these efforts, we can expect large and, perhaps, even increasing losses in the future. If this conclusion is correct—and unacceptable—then what should be done differently to reduce these losses? One piece of the answer can be found through analyzing why the efforts to date have not been more effective. Another piece can be found through examining the characteristics of successful social movements. For a social movement is what we are talking about when we advocate changing human behavior in order to reduce risk from natural hazards. We cannot attribute the disappointingly modest success of past risk reduction efforts to inadequate science or engineering: the reduction of natural disaster losses in both the U.S. and Japan over the last century indicates that humans possess the required scientific and engineering expertise to reduce the risk of natural hazards, and reduce it significantly. If the problem is that this expertise is not being applied outside of Japan and the U.S., where the risk is concentrated, then we need to understand why. There are numerous examples, after all, of widespread, rapid adoption of modern technologies (such as the internet), once these technologies were perceived to be beneficial. Yet not only have earthquake engineering advances failed to be adopted where they are needed, even existing building codes are often not followed. To understand this behavioral paradox better, we turn to human psychology. In the last several years, Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times has invoked the work of psychologists, in order to explore how our brains may not have yet evolved to respond properly to certain types of modern risks. Kristof refers, for example, to Professor Daniel Gilbert, who argues that threats that will catch our attention will either be personalized, imminent

  19. The wind speeds, dust content, and mass-loss rates of evolved AGB and RSG stars at varying metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Steven R.; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Green, James A.; Wood, Peter R.; Nanni, Ambra; Imai, Hiroshi; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Gómez, José F.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of our survey of 1612-MHz circumstellar OH maser emission from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have discovered four new circumstellar maser sources in the LMC, and increased the number of reliable wind speeds from infrared (IR) stars in the LMC from 5 to 13. Using our new wind speeds, as well as those from Galactic sources, we have derived an updated relation for dust-driven winds: vexp ∝ ZL0.4. We compare the subsolar metallicity LMC OH/IR stars with carefully selected samples of more metal-rich OH/IR stars, also at known distances, in the Galactic Centre and Galactic bulge. We derive pulsation periods for eight of the bulge stars for the first time by using near-IR photometry from the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea survey. We have modelled our LMC OH/IR stars and developed an empirical method of deriving gas-to-dust ratios and mass-loss rates by scaling the models to the results from maser profiles. We have done this also for samples in the Galactic Centre and bulge and derived a new mass-loss prescription which includes luminosity, pulsation period, and gas-to-dust ratio dot{M} = 1.06^{+3.5}_{-0.8} × }10^{-5 (L/10^4 L_{⊙})^{0.9± 0.1}(P/500 {d})^{0.75± 0.3} (r_gd/200)^{-0.03± 0.07} M⊙ yr-1. The tightest correlation is found between mass-loss rate and luminosity. We find that the gas-to-dust ratio has little effect on the mass-loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs within the Galaxy and the LMC. This suggests that the mass-loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs is (nearly) independent of metallicity between a half and twice solar.

  20. Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Else, B.G.T.; Galley, R.J.; Lansard, B.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Using data collected in 2009, we evaluated the potential for the southeastern Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) to act as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290–320matm......), considering that surface water temperatures were low and the influence of ice melt was strong. A simple model simulating melt of the remaining ice and exposure of the surface water for 100 days revealed a weak capacity for atmospheric CO2 uptake (mean flux: 2.4 mmol m2 d1), due largely to warming of the shallow....... Galley, B. Lansard, D. G. Barber, K. Brown, L. A. Miller, A. Mucci, T. N. Papakyriakou, J.-É. Tremblay, and S. Rysgaard (2013), Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 1132–1137, doi:10.1002/grl...

  1. LOSS Revisited. II. The Relative Rates of Different Types of Supernovae Vary between Low- and High-mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graur, Or; Bianco, Federica B.; Modjaz, Maryam; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Smith, Nathan

    2017-03-01

    In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope (SE) supernova (SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses ≲ {10}10 {M}ȯ . Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ∼3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host about nine times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia seem to be ∼30% more common in low-mass galaxies, making these galaxies better sources for homogeneous SN Ia cosmology samples. The relative rates of SNe IIb are consistent in both low- and high-mass galaxies. The same is true for broad-line SNe Ic, although our sample includes only two such objects. The results presented here are in tension with a similar analysis from the Palomar Transient Factory, especially as regards SNe IIb.

  2. Estimation of soil redistribution rates due to snow cover related processes in a mountainous area (Valle d'Aosta, NW Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ceaglio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mountain areas are widely affected by soil erosion, which is generally linked to runoff processes occurring in the growing season and snowmelt period. Also processes like snow gliding and full-depth snow avalanches may be important factors that can enhance soil erosion, however the role and importance of snow movements as agents of soil redistribution are not well understood yet. The aim of this study was to provide information on the relative importance of snow related processes in comparison to runoff processes. In the study area, which is an avalanche path characterized by intense snow movements, soil redistribution rates were quantified with two methods: (i by field measurements of sediment yield in an avalanche deposition area during 2009 and 2010 winter seasons; (ii by caesium-137 method, which supplies the cumulative net soil loss/gain since 1986, including all the soil erosion processes. The snow related soil accumulation estimated with data from the deposit area (27.5 Mg ha−1 event−1 and 161.0 Mg ha−1 event−1 was not only higher than the yearly sediment amounts, reported in literature, due to runoff processes, but it was even more intense than the yearly total deposition rate assessed with 137Cs (12.6 Mg ha−1 yr−1. The snow related soil erosion rates estimated from the sediment yield at the avalanche deposit area (3.7 Mg ha−1 and 20.8 Mg ha−1 were greater than the erosion rates reported in literature and related to runoff processes; they were comparable to the yearly total erosion rates assessed with the 137Cs method (13.4 Mg ha−1 yr−1 and 8.8 Mg ha−1 yr−1. The 137Cs method also showed that, where the ground avalanche does not release, the erosion and deposition of soil particles from the upper part of the basin was considerable and likely related to

  3. CSNS/RCS粒子散射束流损失研究%Study of Beam Loss due to Particle Scattering in CSNS/RCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄明阳; 王娜; 邱静; 王生; 黄楠

    2012-01-01

    在中国散裂中子源快循环同步加速器(CSNS/RCS)中,质子束流在加速过程中会与一些器件(如剥离膜、准直器、散射引出膜等)相互作用,产生粒子散射并导致束流损失.本工作首先利用ORBIT模拟RCS束流注入过程,并用FLUKA模拟注入束流穿过剥离膜的粒子散射过程,计算剥离膜散射所造成的束流损失.其次,模拟质子束流与准直器相互作用的粒子散射,计算质子束流与不同尺寸的次级准直器相互作用的吸收效率,作为对次级准直器优化的依据.最后,研究CSNS/RCS膜散射引出方案,利用FLUKA对不同引出方案进行模拟并比较,得到最佳的可行性方案.%In the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS/ RCS) , the proton beam will interact with some devices, such as the stripping foil, beam collimator, and foil for scattering extraction. These interactions result in some particle scattering and beam losses. In this paper, firstly, the beam transportation in the injection procedure was simulated by ORBIT and the particle scattering due to the interaction between the beam and stripping foil was simulated by FLUKA, then the beam loss due to the foil scattering was calculated. Secondly, the particle scattering due to the proton beam interacting with the secondary collimator was simulated, and based on which, the secondary collimator was optimized by calculating the absorb efficiency. The optimization was done for the foil scattering extraction scheme by simulating and comparing different schemes with FLUKA.

  4. Effect of temperature on incubation period, embryonic mortality, hatch rate, egg water loss and partridge chick weight (Rhynchotus rufescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakage ES

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incubation temperature (34.5; 35.5; 36.5; 37.5 and 38.5ºC, on incubation period, embryonic mortality, hatching rate, water loss and chick weight at hatch, using daily incubation of partridge (Rhynchotus rufescens eggs. The highest hatching percentage was obtained between 35.5 and 36.5ºC. Incubation length and temperature were inversely proportional. Water loss was lower in eggs incubated at low temperatures as compared to high temperatures. There was no difference among incubation temperatures in absolute and relative hatchling weights. Early embryonic mortality increased at low temperatures (36.5ºC. Our results show that, under conditions of daily incubation of eggs in the same incubator, higher hatching rate can be obtained using temperatures between 35.5ºC and 36.5ºC; incubation temperature is inversely proportional to incubation length, and absolute and relative weights of partridge chicks are not affected by incubation temperature.

  5. Ülkemizde Transfer Fiyatlandırmasının Yol Açtığı Tahmini Kurumlar Vergisi Kaybı(The Estimated Corporate Tax Loss Due To Transfer Pricing In Our Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar PEHLİVAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available States, though in order to grasp taxable income have created legal infrastructure; with the reason of lack of efficient tax audit, they have been exposed to important tax losses due to transfer pricing.The amount of tax losses due to over invoiced imports and under invoiced exports that are determined as estimation; has shown that tax audit had not been efficient in transfer pricing. In order to minimize corporate tax losses that occured due to transfer pricing, it is required to take precautionary measures oriented in increasing efficiency in tax audit

  6. Evaluation of heart rate variability and night-time blood pressure measurements in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirelli, S; Degirmenci, H; Fırtına, S; Salcan, I; Ermis, E; Duman, H; Ipek, E; Hamur, H; Ceyhun, G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the autonomic nervous system in the etiology of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) by measuring heart rate variability (HRV) and night-time blood pressure levels. A total of 58 patients, 31 ISSHL patients (group 1) and 27 healthy volunteers (control group; group 2), were included in this study. Clinical and ambulatory blood pressure measurements and Holter electrocardiography were performed in both groups. After these evaluations, HRV parameters and night-time blood pressure values were determined. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) measured at night-time were higher in group 1 compared to group 2 (p Heart rate variability parameters were lower in group 1 than in group 2. In patients with ISSHL, elevated blood pressure at night-time and reduced heart rate variability suggest that autonomic nervous system dysfunction might play a role in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. The measurements of ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate variability can reveal more enlightening data in the determination of the etiology of ISSHL and guiding the treatment.

  7. Mice with increased angiogenesis and osteogenesis due to conditional activation of HIF pathway in osteoblasts are protected from ovariectomy induced bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Guochun; Qi, Jin; Deng, Lianfu

    2012-03-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is characterized by a reduction in the numbers of sinusoidal and arterial capillaries in the bone marrow and reduced bone perfusion suggesting a role of vascular component in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Previous studies have shown that bone formation and angiogenesis are positively coupled through activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF1α) signaling pathway. Therefore, we hypothesized that mice with increased angiogenesis and osteogenesis due to activation of the HIF signaling pathway in osteoblasts, via osteoblast specific disruption of HIF degrading protein von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) (ΔVhl), are protected from ovariectomy induced bone loss. ΔVhl mice and control littermates were ovariectomized or sham operated and four weeks later bone quality was evaluated along with blood vessel formation. Trabecular and cortical bone volume was strikingly increased in ΔVhl mice along with blood vessel formation as compared to control littermates. In control mice, ovariectomy significantly decreased bone mineral density, deteriorated bone microarchitecture, and decreased mechanical strength compared to the sham operated control mice. This was accompanied with a significant decrease in blood vessel volume and expressions of HIF1α, HIF2α, and VEGF proteins at the distal femur in ovariectomized control mice. In contrast, ovariectomy in ΔVhl mice had absolutely no effect on either the blood vessel formation or the bone structural and mechanical quality parameters. These data indicate that activation of HIF signaling pathway in osteoblasts may prevent estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss and decrease in blood vessels in bone marrow. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Margin selection to compensate for loss of target dose coverage due to target motion during external-beam radiation therapy of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, W Kyle; Osei, Ernest; Barnett, Rob

    2015-01-08

    The aim of this study is to provide guidelines for the selection of external-beam radiation therapy target margins to compensate for target motion in the lung during treatment planning. A convolution model was employed to predict the effect of target motion on the delivered dose distribution. The accuracy of the model was confirmed with radiochromic film measurements in both static and dynamic phantom modes. 502 unique patient breathing traces were recorded and used to simulate the effect of target motion on a dose distribution. A 1D probability density function (PDF) representing the position of the target throughout the breathing cycle was generated from each breathing trace obtained during 4D CT. Changes in the target D95 (the minimum dose received by 95% of the treatment target) due to target motion were analyzed and shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. Furthermore, the amount of target D95 recovered per millimeter of increased field width was also shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. The sensitivity of changes in dose coverage with respect to target size was also determined. Margin selection recommendations that can be used to compensate for loss of target D95 were generated based on the simulation results. These results are discussed in the context of clinical plans. We conclude that, for PDF standard deviations less than 0.4 cm with target sizes greater than 5 cm, little or no additional margins are required. Targets which are smaller than 5 cm with PDF standard deviations larger than 0.4 cm are most susceptible to loss of coverage. The largest additional required margin in this study was determined to be 8 mm.

  9. Caprylic triglyceride as a novel therapeutic approach to effectively improve the performance and attenuate the symptoms due to the motor neuron loss in ALS disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and finally death. ALS patients suffer from asthenia and their progressive weakness negatively impacts quality of life, limiting their daily activities. They have impaired energy balance linked to lower activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzymes in ALS spinal cord, suggesting that improving mitochondrial function may present a therapeutic approach for ALS. When fed a ketogenic diet, the G93A ALS mouse shows a significant increase in serum ketones as well as a significantly slower progression of weakness and lower mortality rate. In this study, we treated SOD1-G93A mice with caprylic triglyceride, a medium chain triglyceride that is metabolized into ketone bodies and can serve as an alternate energy substrate for neuronal metabolism. Treatment with caprylic triglyceride attenuated progression of weakness and protected spinal cord motor neuron loss in SOD1-G93A transgenic animals, significantly improving their performance even though there was no significant benefit regarding the survival of the ALS transgenic animals. We found that caprylic triglyceride significantly promoted the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate in vivo. Our results demonstrated that caprylic triglyceride alleviates ALS-type motor impairment through restoration of energy metabolism in SOD1-G93A ALS mice, especially during the overt stage of the disease. These data indicate the feasibility of using caprylic acid as an easily administered treatment with a high impact on the quality of life of ALS patients.

  10. Caprylic Triglyceride as a Novel Therapeutic Approach to Effectively Improve the Performance and Attenuate the Symptoms Due to the Motor Neuron Loss in ALS Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Varghese, Merina; Vempati, Prashant; Dzhun, Anastasiya; Cheng, Alice; Wang, Jun; Lange, Dale; Bilski, Amanda; Faravelli, Irene; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons causing progressive muscle weakness, paralysis, and finally death. ALS patients suffer from asthenia and their progressive weakness negatively impacts quality of life, limiting their daily activities. They have impaired energy balance linked to lower activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzymes in ALS spinal cord, suggesting that improving mitochondrial function may present a therapeutic approach for ALS. When fed a ketogenic diet, the G93A ALS mouse shows a significant increase in serum ketones as well as a significantly slower progression of weakness and lower mortality rate. In this study, we treated SOD1-G93A mice with caprylic triglyceride, a medium chain triglyceride that is metabolized into ketone bodies and can serve as an alternate energy substrate for neuronal metabolism. Treatment with caprylic triglyceride attenuated progression of weakness and protected spinal cord motor neuron loss in SOD1-G93A transgenic animals, significantly improving their performance even though there was no significant benefit regarding the survival of the ALS transgenic animals. We found that caprylic triglyceride significantly promoted the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate in vivo. Our results demonstrated that caprylic triglyceride alleviates ALS-type motor impairment through restoration of energy metabolism in SOD1-G93A ALS mice, especially during the overt stage of the disease. These data indicate the feasibility of using caprylic acid as an easily administered treatment with a high impact on the quality of life of ALS patients. PMID:23145119

  11. A new method for estimation of TEC from GNSS receivers during multiple cycle slips and data loss due to ionospheric irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashora, Nirvikar

    2012-07-01

    Estimation of total electron content (TEC) is a must to utilize the GNSS signal for ionospheric research. The estimation of absolute ionospheric TEC from raw GNSS data itself is a lengthy and complex task and requires knowledge of sophisticated computer programming skills, satellite orbital geometry and many other aspects like GNSS signal structure, satellite and receiver specific information etc. Not many software are available that automatize the complex task of cycle slip detection and correction. The estimation of satellite and receiver biases is one more step left before getting true TEC. In equatorial and low latitudes, where the nighttime ionospheric irregularities are oft-occurring phenomena, estimation of TEC becomes a challenge. This is because, during TEC depletions and scintillations, the loss of lock in the receiver results either in data loss or sharp gradients in the recorded delays; more often for phase than code. Raw data in form of accumulated phase in radians and total code-range in meters show random occurrences of multiple cycle slips and data loss of several minutes in the data file. Thus, such phase and code data has to be corrected first before processing it to obtain TEC. Almost all available software/algorithms suggest flagging such data for no further use. Hence, TEC cannot be estimated during multiple cycle slip events within few minutes from raw GPS data. But, for ionospheric research the time of occurrence, evolution and drift of depletions are very useful. This paper details a complete new software for pre-processing the raw RINEX (receiver independent exchange format) data and retrieval of TEC using code and carrier-phase measurements from an stand alone dual frequency GPS receiver. We use modified and new sets of algorithms a GNSS receiver. It is significant to note that we are able to retrieves almost all the the corrupted TEC data points due to random multiple cycle slip events which are oft-occurring phenomena during ESF in

  12. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, contract to updata FEMA data due 2009, Published in unknown, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset as of unknown. It is described as 'contract to updata FEMA data due 2009'. Data by...

  13. Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE, contract to updata FEMA data due 2009, Published in 2009, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Flood Insurance Rate Maps and Base Flood Elevations, FIRM, DFIRM, BFE dataset as of 2009. It is described as 'contract to updata FEMA data due 2009'. Data by...

  14. An actinomycete isolate from solitary wasp mud nest having strong antibacterial activity and kills the Candida cells due the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay eKumar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An actinomycetes strain designated as MN 2(6 was isolated from the solitary wasp mud nest. The isolate was identified using polyphasic taxonomy. It produced the extensive branched brown substrate and white aerial hyphae that changed into grayish black. The aerial mycelia produced the spiral spore chains with rugose spore surface. The growth was observed between temperature range of 27-37°C, pH 8-10 and below salt concentration of 6% (w/v. The comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic relationship showed that strain MN 2(6 lies in clade with Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T, Streptomyces sporocinereus NBRC 100766T and Streptomyces demainii NRRL B-1478T with which it shares a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.3%. The strain MN 2(6 can be differentiated from type strains based on phenotypic characteristics. The strain MN 2(6 showed most promising activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, acid-fast bacilli and Candida species suggesting broad-spectrum characteristics of the active metabolite. Evaluation of anti-candidal activity of the metabolite of strain MN 2(6 by scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed changed external morphology of yeast. It kills the Candida cells due to the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss. However, further studies are required to elucidate the structure of the active metabolite produced by the isolate MN 2(6

  15. The superconducting proposal for the CS magnet system of FAST: a preliminary analysis of the heat load due to AC losses

    CERN Document Server

    Pompeo, N

    2011-01-01

    FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus), the Italian proposal of a Satellite Facility to ITER, is a compact tokamak (R$_0$ = 1.82 m, a = 0.64 m, triangularity $\\delta$ = 0.4) able to investigate non-linear dynamics effects of $\\alpha$-particle behavior in burning plasmas and to test technical solutions for the first wall/divertor directly relevant for ITER and DEMO. Currently, ENEA is investigating the feasibility of a superconducting solution for the magnet system. This paper focuses on the analysis of the CS (Central Solenoid) magnet thermal behavior. In particular, considering a superconducting solution for the CS which uses the room available in the resistive design and referring to one of the most severe scenario envisaged for FAST, the heat load of the CS winding pack due to AC losses is preliminarily evaluated. The results provide a tentative baseline for the definition of the strand requirements and conductor design, that can be accepted in order to fulfil the design requirements.

  16. Analyses of the Temporal Development and Yield Losses due to Sheath Blight of Rice (Rhizoctonia solani AG1.1a)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sheath blight of rice, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG1.1a, has become the most important disease and caused serious yield losses in some major rice-growing regions in China in recent years. In the present study, field plot experiment was conducted to examine the relationships between disease intensity and inoculum density (ID), the seasonal disease epidemic dynamics, and yield reductions due to disease damages. Results from the experiment demonstrated that the areas under progress curves of disease severity and those of percent rice tillers diseased were positively and closely related to the relative initial ID of the pathogen. The inoculum density-disease (IDD) relationships were simulated and the impractical linear models were obtained. Both logistic and Gompertz functions could be used to simulate the disease progress dynamics in time, but the progress curves of the disease severity were modeled better by the Gompertz than by logistic function. However, the Richards function was found to be the best in simulating the disease progress curves when a most appropriate value was chosen for the shape parameter m by using the computer software Epitimulator(R).Sheath blight infection decreased rice yield very significantly and a yield reduction of 40% was recorded in rice crop with the highest inoculum density. Rice yield was linearly and negatively correlated with the disease severity and the percent tillers affected. The simulated models for all these relationships were computed through executing Epitimulator(R) software and were presented in this paper.

  17. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1998-01-01

    It is unlikely that the presence of chondrules, and thus their formation, within the protoplanetary nebula would be predicted if it were not for their ubiquitous presence in most chondritic meteorites. The study of these enigmatic, igneous objects has a direct influence on how meteoritic and solar system researchers model the processes operating and the materials present within our protoplanetary nebula. Key to understanding chondrule formation is a determination of constraints on their thermal histories. The three important variables in this history are their peak melting temperatures, the duration of their melting at peak temperatures, and the rate at which these object cool. Although these three variables are interdependent, it is cooling rate that provides the most powerful constraint. Cooling rate has a direct affect on the development of both crystal morphology and the elemental distributions within these grains. To date, experiments have indicated that chondrule cooling rates are in the range of 10's to 100's of degrees per hour for porphyritic chondrules (the most abundant type). The cooling rate for radial and barred chondrules is thought to be more rapid. To generate these cooling rates (rapid relative to the cooling of the nebula as a whole, but slow compared to simple black body radiation) the environment of chondrule formation must have been localized, and the abundance of solid materials must have been greatly enhanced above a gas of solar composition. Thus accurate determinations of chondrule cooling rates is critical in understanding both their formation and the nebular environment in which they formed. In a quest to more accurately determine the lower limit on cooling rates and to determine in more detail the effects of Fe loss from a molten sample to Pt wire loops, Weinbruch et al. have explored this issue experimentally and reevaluated the findings of Radomsky and Hewins in light of their new results. The basic conclusions of their paper are an

  18. Influence of body mass loss on changes in heart rate during exercise in the heat: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, William M; Ferraro, Elizabeth M; Huggins, Robert A; Casa, Douglas J

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to compare the changes in heart rate (HR) for every 1% change in body mass loss (ΔBML) in individuals while exercising in the heat. PubMed, SPORTDiscus, ERIC, CINAHL, and Scopus were searched from the earliest entry to February 2013 using the search terms dehydration, heart rate, and exercise in various combinations. Original research articles that met the following criteria were included: (a) valid measure of HR, (b) exercise in the heat (>26.5° C [79.7 °F]), (c) the level of dehydration reached at least 2%, (d) a between-group comparison (a euhydrated group or a graded dehydration protocol) was evident, and (e) for rehydration protocols, only oral rehydration was considered for inclusion. Twenty articles were included in the final analysis. Mean values and SDs for HR and percentage of body mass loss immediately after exercise were used for this review. The mean change in HR for every 1% ΔBML was 3 b·min-1. In trials where subjects arrived euhydrated and hypohydrated, the mean change in HR for every 1% ΔBML was 3 and 3 b·min-1, respectively. Fixed intensity and variable intensity trials exhibited a mean HR change of 4 and 1 b·min-1, respectively. Exercising in the heat while hypohydrated (≥2%) resulted in an increased HR after exercise. This increase in HR for every 1% ΔBML exacerbates cardiovascular strain in exercising individuals, thus causing decrements in performance. It should be encouraged that individuals should maintain an adequate level of hydration to maximize performance, especially in the heat.

  19. Estimation of Mass-Loss Rates from Emission Line Profiles in the UV Spectra of Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, K. G.; Robinson, R. D.; Harper, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    The photon-scattering winds of cool, low-gravity stars (K-M giants and supergiants) produce absorption features in the strong chromospheric emission lines. This provides us with an opportunity to assess important parameters of the wind, including flow and turbulent velocities, the optical depth of the wind above the region of photon creation, and the star's mass-loss rate. We have used the Lamers et al. Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) radiative transfer code along with simple models of the outer atmospheric structure to compute synthetic line profiles for comparison with the observed line profiles. The SEI code has the advantage of being computationally fast and allows a great number of possible wind models to be examined. We therefore use it here to obtain initial first-order estimates of the wind parameters. More sophisticated, but more time-consuming and resource intensive calculations will be performed at a later date, using the SEI-deduced wind parameters as a starting point. A comparison of the profiles over a range of wind velocity laws, turbulence values, and line opacities allows us to constrain the wind parameters, and to estimate the mass-loss rates. We have applied this analysis technique (using lines of Mg II, 0 I, and Fe II) so far to four stars: the normal K5-giant alpha Tau, the hybrid K-giant gamma Dra, the K5 supergiant lambda Vel, and the M-giant gamma Cru. We present in this paper a description of the technique, including the assumptions which go into its use, an assessment of its robustness, and the results of our analysis.

  20. Comparative evolution history of SINEs in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea: evidence for a high rate of SINE loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, A; Pélissier, T; Bousquet-Antonelli, C; Deragon, J M

    2005-01-01

    allele and the pre-integrative allele (i.e. the "empty" allele), we observed in the different ecotypes, alleles with truncated portions of the SINE (up to the complete loss of the element) and of the immediate genomic flanking sequences. The absence of SINEs in orthologous positions between B. oleracea and A. thaliana and the presence in recently diverged A. thaliana ecotypes of alleles containing severely truncated SINEs suggest a very high rate of SINE loss in these species.

  1. Evaluation of the Safety Issue Concerning the Potential for Loss of Decay Heat Removal Function due to Crude Oil Spill in the Ultimate Heat Sink of Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Roh, Kyung Wan; Yune, Young Gill; Kang, Dong Gu; Kim, Hho Jhung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    A barge crashed into a moored oil tanker at about 7:15 a.m., Dec. 12, 2007, dumping around 10,500 tons of crude oil into the sea in Korea. The incident took place about 15 kilometers northwest of Manripo beach in South Chungcheong where is Korea's west coast in the Yellow Sea. In a few days, the oil slicks spread to the northern and southern tips of the Taean Peninsula by strong winds and tides. As time went the spilled oil floating on the surface of sea water was volatilized to become tar-balls and lumps and drifted far away in the southern direction. 13 days after the incident, some of oil slicks and tar lumps were observed to flow in the service water intake at the Younggwang nuclear power plants (NPPs) operating 6 reactors, which are over 150 km away from the incident spot in the southeastern direction. According to the report by the Younggwang NPPs, a total weight 83 kg of tar lumps was removed for about 3 days. Oil spills in the sea can happen in any country or anytime due to human errors or mistakes, wars, terrors, intentional dumping of waste oils, and natural disasters like typhoon and tsunami. In fact, there have been 7 major oil spills over 10,000 tons that have occurred around the world since 1983. As such serious oil spill incidents may happen near the operating power plants using the sea water as ultimate heat sink. To ensure the safe operation of nuclear reactors it is required to evaluate the potential for loss of decay heat removal function of nuclear reactors due to the spilled oils flowing in the service water intake, from which the service water is pumped. Thus, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety identified this problem as one of the important safety. When an incident of crude oil spill from an oil carrier occurs in the sea near the nuclear power plants, the spilled oil can be transported to the intake pit, where all service water pumps locate, by sea current and wind drift (induced) current. The essential service water pumps take the

  2. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: Mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, A.J.; Kuffner, I.B.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Jokiel, P.L.; Rodgers, K.S.; Tan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO 2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (N=3) incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NECC=CaCO3 production - dissolution) was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at -0.04 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates), and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  3. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Rodgers

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (n=3 incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NEC=CaCO3 production – dissolution was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at −0.04 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates, and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  4. Real-time Assessment of Heart Rate Variability and Loss of Control Eating in Adolescent Girls: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Engel, Scott G.; Crosby, Ross D.; Haigney, Mark; Anderson, Micheline; McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Studying physiologic underpinnings of loss-of-control (LOC) eating may inform its etiology and contribute to intervention efforts. We therefore examined temporal relationships between autonomic indices (heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV)) and LOC-eating in the natural environment. Method For two days, adolescents (n=17, 14.77±1.55 years, BMI-Z 2.17±0.48) with LOC-eating reported on LOC using an electronic device while HR and HRV were assessed continuously using Holter monitoring. Results Higher HR and lower HRV in the 30-minutes before eating were significantly associated with LOC-eating overall (p’s 0.44). Examined categorically, HR was significantly higher, and HRV significantly lower, prior to high-LOC compared to low-LOC episodes (p’s < 0.001). Discussion This pilot study suggests that LOC-eating may involve physiologic underpinnings. Additional research with larger samples is needed to further investigate this phenomenon. PMID:26401652

  5. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melissa M.; Wang, David C.; D'Souza, Donna M.; Krause, Matthew P.; Layne, Andrew S.; Criswell, David S.; O'Neill, Hayley M.; Connor, Michael K.; Anderson, Judy E.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Hawke, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolism. While muscle-specific AMPK β1β2 double-knockout (β1β2M-KO) mice display alterations in metabolic and mitochondrial capacity, their severe exercise intolerance suggested a secondary contributor to the observed phenotype. We find that tibialis anterior (TA), but not soleus, muscles of sedentary β1β2M-KO mice display a significant myopathy (decreased myofiber areas, increased split and necrotic myofibers, and increased centrally nucleated myofibers. A mitochondrial- and fiber-type-specific etiology to the myopathy was ruled out. However, β1β2M-KO TA muscles displayed significant (Pmuscle resulted from impaired AMPK-nNOSμ signaling, causing increased platelet aggregation, impaired vasodilation, and, ultimately, ischemic injury. Consistent with this hypothesis, AMPK-specific phosphorylation (Ser1446) of nNOSμ was decreased in β1β2M-KO compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The AMPK-nNOSμ relationship was further demonstrated by administration of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) to β1β2-MKO muscles and C2C12 myotubes. AICAR significantly increased nNOSμ phosphorylation and nitric oxide production (Pmuscles and C2C12 myotubes but not in β1β2M-KO muscles. These findings highlight the importance of the AMPK-nNOSμ pathway in resting skeletal muscle.—Thomas, M. M., Wang, D. C., D'Souza, D. M., Krause, M. P., Layne, A. S., Criswell, D. S., O'Neill, H. M., Connor, M. K., Anderson, J. E., Kemp, B. E., Steinberg, G. R., and Hawke, T. J. Muscle-specific AMPK β1β2-null mice display a myopathy due to loss of capillary density in nonpostural muscles. PMID:24522207

  6. Increased Cortical Inhibition in Autism-Linked Neuroligin-3R451C Mice Is Due in Part to Loss of Endocannabinoid Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley E Speed

    Full Text Available A single, maternally inherited, X-linked point mutation leading to an arginine to cysteine substitution at amino acid 451 (R451C of Neuroligin 3 (NLGN3R451C is a likely cause of autism in two brothers. Knockin mice expressing the Nlgn3R451C mutation in place of wild-type Nlgn3 demonstrate increased inhibitory synaptic strength in somatosensory cortex, resulting in an excitatory/inhibitory (E/I imbalance that is potentially relevant for autism-associated behavioral deficits characteristic of these mice. We have replicated the increase in evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs onto layer II/III cortical pyramidal neurons. We also find that increased frequency of spontaneous mIPSCs in Nlgn3R451C mice occurs in the absence of action potential-driven transmission. This suggests the E/I imbalance is due to changes at the synapse level, as opposed to the network level. Next, we use paired whole-cell recordings in an attempt to identify specific interneuron subtypes affected by the Nlgn3R451C mutation. Curiously, we observe no change in the amplitude of cell-to-cell, unitary IPSCs (uIPSCs from parvalbumin-positive (PV or somatostatin-positive (SOM interneurons onto pyramidal neurons. We also observe no change in the number or density of PV and SOM interneurons in LII/III of somatosensory cortex. This effectively rules out a role for these particular interneurons in the increased inhibitory synaptic transmission, pointing to perhaps alternative interneuron subtypes. Lastly, impaired endocannabinoid signaling has been implicated in hippocampal synaptic dysfunction in Nlgn3R451C mice, but has not been investigated at cortical synapses. We find that bath application of the CB1 antagonist, AM 251 in WT mice eliminates the Nlgn3R451C increase in eIPSC amplitude and mIPSC frequency, indicating that increased inhibitory transmission in mutant mice is due, at least in part, to a loss of endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 receptors likely acting at

  7. Increased Cortical Inhibition in Autism-Linked Neuroligin-3R451C Mice Is Due in Part to Loss of Endocannabinoid Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Haley E.; Masiulis, Irene; Gibson, Jay R.; Powell, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    A single, maternally inherited, X-linked point mutation leading to an arginine to cysteine substitution at amino acid 451 (R451C) of Neuroligin 3 (NLGN3R451C) is a likely cause of autism in two brothers. Knockin mice expressing the Nlgn3R451C mutation in place of wild-type Nlgn3 demonstrate increased inhibitory synaptic strength in somatosensory cortex, resulting in an excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) imbalance that is potentially relevant for autism-associated behavioral deficits characteristic of these mice. We have replicated the increase in evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) onto layer II/III cortical pyramidal neurons. We also find that increased frequency of spontaneous mIPSCs in Nlgn3R451C mice occurs in the absence of action potential-driven transmission. This suggests the E/I imbalance is due to changes at the synapse level, as opposed to the network level. Next, we use paired whole-cell recordings in an attempt to identify specific interneuron subtypes affected by the Nlgn3R451C mutation. Curiously, we observe no change in the amplitude of cell-to-cell, unitary IPSCs (uIPSCs) from parvalbumin-positive (PV) or somatostatin-positive (SOM) interneurons onto pyramidal neurons. We also observe no change in the number or density of PV and SOM interneurons in LII/III of somatosensory cortex. This effectively rules out a role for these particular interneurons in the increased inhibitory synaptic transmission, pointing to perhaps alternative interneuron subtypes. Lastly, impaired endocannabinoid signaling has been implicated in hippocampal synaptic dysfunction in Nlgn3R451C mice, but has not been investigated at cortical synapses. We find that bath application of the CB1 antagonist, AM 251 in WT mice eliminates the Nlgn3R451C increase in eIPSC amplitude and mIPSC frequency, indicating that increased inhibitory transmission in mutant mice is due, at least in part, to a loss of endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 receptors likely acting at interneurons

  8. Increases in soil water content after the mortality of non-native trees in oceanic island forest ecosystems are due to reduced water loss during dry periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kenji; Kawakami, Kazuto; Kachi, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    The control of dominant, non-native trees can alter the water balance of soils in forest ecosystems via hydrological processes, which results in changes in soil water environments. To test this idea, we evaluated the effects of the mortality of an invasive tree, Casuarina equisetifolia Forst., on the water content of surface soils on the Ogasawara Islands, subtropical islands in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, using a manipulative herbicide experiment. Temporal changes in volumetric water content of surface soils at 6 cm depth at sites where all trees of C. equisetifolia were killed by herbicide were compared with those of adjacent control sites before and after their mortality with consideration of the amount of precipitation. In addition, the rate of decrease in the soil water content during dry periods and the rate of increase in the soil water content during rainfall periods were compared between herbicide and control sites. Soil water content at sites treated with herbicide was significantly higher after treatment than soil water content at control sites during the same period. Differences between initial and minimum values of soil water content at the herbicide sites during the drying events were significantly lower than the corresponding differences in the control quadrats. During rainfall periods, both initial and maximum values of soil water contents in the herbicided quadrats were higher, and differences between the maximum and initial values did not differ between the herbicided and control quadrats. Our results indicated that the mortality of non-native trees from forest ecosystems increased water content of surface soils, due primarily to a slower rate of decrease in soil water content during dry periods.

  9. Estimated Numbers of Community Cases of Illness Due to Salmonella, Campylobacter and Verotoxigenic Escherichia Coli: Pathogen-Specific Community Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kate Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the annual number of cases of illness due to verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC, Salmonella and Campylobacter in the Canadian population, using data from the National Notifiable Disease registry (NND, estimates of under-reporting derived from several National Studies on Acute Gastrointestinal Illness, and the literature.

  10. Numerical simulation of fatigue crack growth rate and crack retardation due to an overload using a cohesive zone model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silitonga, S.; Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Snijder, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a numerical method is pursued based on a cohesive zone model (CZM). The method is aimed at simulating fatigue crack growth as well as crack growth retardation due to an overload. In this cohesive zone model, the degradation of the material strength is represented by a variation of the

  11. Effect of liquid swine manure rate, incorporation, and timing of rainfall on phosphorus loss with surface runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Brett L; Mallarino, Antonio P

    2008-01-01

    Excessive manure phosphorus (P) application increases risk of P loss from fields. This study assessed total runoff P (TPR), bioavailable P (BAP), and dissolved reactive P (DRP) concentrations and loads in surface runoff after liquid swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) manure application with or without incorporation into soil and different timing of rainfall. Four replicated manure P treatments were applied in 2002 and in 2003 to two Iowa soils testing low in P managed with corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotations. Total P applied each time was 0 to 80 kg P ha(-1) at one site and 0 to 108 kg P ha(-1) at the other. Simulated rainfall was applied within 24 h of P application or after 10 to 16 d and 5 to 6 mo. Nonincorporated manure P increased DRP, BAP, and TPR concentrations and loads linearly or exponentially for 24-h and 10- to 16-d runoff events. On average for the 24-h events, DRP, BAP, and TPR concentrations were 5.4, 4.7, and 2.2 times higher, respectively, for nonincorporated manure than for incorporated manure; P loads were 3.8, 7.7, and 3.6 times higher; and DRP and BAP concentrations were 54% of TPR for nonincorporated manure and 22 to 25% for incorporated manure. A 10- to 16-d rainfall delay resulted in DRP, BAP, and TPR concentrations that were 3.1, 2.7, and 1.1 times lower, respectively, than for 24-h events across all nonincorporated P rates, sites, and years, whereas runoff P loads were 3.8, 3.6, and 1.6 times lower, respectively. A 5- to 6-mo simulated rainfall delay reduced runoff P to levels similar to control plots. Incorporating swine manure when the probability of immediate rainfall is high reduces the risk of P loss in surface runoff; however, this benefit sharply decreases with time.

  12. NLP modeling for the optimization of LiBr-H2O absorption refrigeration systems with exergy loss rate, heat transfer area, and cost as single objective functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussati, Sergio F.; Gernaey, Krist; Morosuk, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    exergy loss rate, the total heat transfer area, and the total annual cost of the system. It was found that the optimal solution obtained by minimization of the total exergy loss rate provides “theoretical” upper bounds not only for the total heat transfer area of the system but also for each process unit...... and all stream temperatures, while the optimal solution obtained by minimization of the total heat transfer area provides the lower bounds for these model variables, to solve a cost optimization problem. The minimization of the total exergy loss rate by varying parametrically the available total heat...... and quantitatively with increasing available total heat transfer area. These optimization results allowed to find a “practical” value of the total heat transfer area, i.e. no benefits can be obtained by increasing the available total heat transfer area above this value since the minimal total exergy loss value...

  13. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Runoff Losses from Orchard Soils in South China as Affected by Fertilization Depths and Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Fertilizers are heavily applied in orchards of the hilly and mountainous topography of South China and may increase nutrient loadings to receiving waters.A simple runoff collecting system was used to measure the effects of different fertilization treatments on total N and P concentrations of surface runoff in a Chinese chestnut(Castanea mollissima Blume)orchard in Dongyuan County,Guangdong Province,China.In such orchards,fertilizer was typically applied in two short furrows or pits on either side of each tree.Treatments included three application depths(surface,10 era and 20 cm),and three application rates(low,median and high).Results showed that 90.5% of the runoff water samples had a total N concentration higher than 0.35 mg L-1 and 54.2% had a total P concentration higher than 0.1 mg L-1.Fertilizer application at all depths and at all but the lowest rate significantly increased total N and P concentrations in runoff water.Fertilization with chemical compound fertilizer at a soil depth of 20 cm prodiuced significantly lower(P<0.05)total N concentration in runoff than both surface and 10-cm depth fertilization,and significantly lower(P<0.05)total P concentration in runoff than surface fertilization.Total N and P concentrations in runoff significantly increased with the application rate of organic fertilizers.With the exception of total P concentrations,which were not significantly different between the control and fertilization at a rate of 119 kg P ha-1 in organic form,all the other fertilization treatments produced significantly higher total N and total P concentrations in runoff than the control.A fertilization depth ≥ 20 cm and an application rate ≤ 72 kg N ha-1 or 119 kg P ha-1 for compound organic fertilizer was suggested to substantially reduce N and P runoff losses from hillslope orchards and to protect receiving waters in South China.

  14. Slowing the rate of loss of mineral wetlands on human dominated landscapes - Diversification of farmers markets to include carbon (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, I. F.; Badiou, P.; Lobb, D.

    2013-12-01

    Canada is the fourth-largest exporter of agriculture and agri-food products in the world (exports valued at 28B), but instability of agriculture markets can make it difficult for farmers to cope with variability, and new mechanisms are needed for farmers to achieve economic stability. Capitalizing on carbon markets will help farmers achieve environmentally sustainable economic performance. In order to have a viable carbon market, governments and industries need to know what the carbon capital is and what potential there is for growth, and farmers need financial incentives that will not only allow them to conserve existing wetlands but that will also enable them to restore wetlands while making a living. In southern Ontario, farmers' needs to maximize the return on investment on marginal lands have resulted in loss of 70-90% of wetlands, making this region one of the most threatened region in terms of wetland degradation and loss in Canada. Our project establishes the role that mineral wetlands have in the net carbon balance by contributing insight into the potential benefits to carbon management provided by wetland restoration efforts in these highly degraded landscapes. The goal was to establish the magnitude of carbon offsets that could be achieved through wetland conservation (securing existing carbon stocks) and restoration (creating new carbon stocks). The experimental design was to focus on (1) small (0.2-2.0 ha) and (2) isolated (no inflow or outflow) mineral wetlands with the greatest restoration potential that included (3) a range of restoration ages (drained (0 yr), 3 yr, 6 yr, 12 yr, 20 yr, 35 yr, intact marshes) to capture potential changes in rates of carbon sequestration with restoration age of wetland. From each wetland, wetland soil carbon pools samples were collected at four positions: centre of wetland (open-water); emergent vegetation zone; wet meadow zone where flooding often occurs (i.e., high water mark); and upland where flooding rarely

  15. Novel Method for Measuring the Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters Based on Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The determinations of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, the direct determination requires complex detection devices and a series of standard experiments, which also wastes too much time and manpower. To address this problem, we propose machine learning models including artificial neural networks (ANNs and support vector machines (SVM to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient without a direct determination. Parameters that can be easily obtained by “portable test instruments” were set as independent variables, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, final temperature and angle between tubes and ground, while the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient determined by the detection device were set as dependent variables respectively. Nine hundred fifteen samples from in-service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters were used for training and testing the models. Results show that the multilayer feed-forward neural network (MLFN with 3 nodes is the best model for the prediction of heat collection rate and the general regression neural network (GRNN is the best model for the prediction of heat loss coefficient due to their low root mean square (RMS errors, short training times, and high prediction accuracies (under the tolerances of 30%, 20%, and 10%, respectively.

  16. HST Studies of the Chromospheres, Wind, and Mass-Loss Rates of Cool Giant and Supergiant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2000-01-01

    UV spectra of K-M giant and supergiant stars and of carbon stars have been acquired with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These spectra have been used to measure chromospheric flow and turbulent velocities, study the acceleration of their stellar winds, acquire constraints on their outer atmospheric structure, and enable estimates of their mass-loss rates. Results from our observations of the giant stars Gamma Dra (K5 III hybrid), Alpha Tau (K5 III), Gamma Cru (M3.4 III), Mu Gem (M3 IIIab), and 30 Her (MG III), the supergiants Alpha Ori (M2 Iab) and Lambda Vel (K5 Ib), and the carbon stars TX Psc (NO; C6,2) and TW Hor (NO; C7,2) will be summarized and compared. The high resolution and wavelength accuracy of these data have allowed the direct measurement of the acceleration of the stellar winds in the chromospheres of several of these stars (from initial velocities of 3-9 km/s to upper velocities of 15-25 km/s) and of the chromospheric macroturbulence (-25-35 km/s). The high signal-to-noise and large dynamic range of these spectra have allowed the detection and identification of numerous new emission features, including weak C IV emission indicative of hot transition-region plasma in the non-coronal giant Alpha Tau, many new fluorescent lines of Fe II, and the first detection of fluorescent molecular hydrogen emission and of Ca II recombination lines in the UV spectrum of a giant star. The UV spectrum of two carbon stars have been studied with unprecedented resolution and reveal extraordinarily complicated Mg II lines nearly smothered by circumstellar absorptions. Finally, comparison of synthetic UV emission line profiles computed with the Lamers et al. (1987) Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) code with observations of chromospheric emission lines overlain with wind absorption features provides estimates of the mass-loss rates for four of these stars.

  17. Analytical investigation of the decrease in the size of the habitable zone due to limited CO$_2$ outgassing rate

    CERN Document Server

    Abbot, Dorian S

    2016-01-01

    The habitable zone concept is important because it focuses the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and aids the planning of future telescopes. Recent work has shown that planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone might not actually be able to stay warm and habitable if CO$_2$ outgassing rates are not large enough to maintain high CO$_2$ partial pressures against removal by silicate weathering. In this paper I use simple equations for the climate and CO$_2$ budget of a planet in the habitable zone that can capture the qualitative behavior of the system. With these equations I derive an analytical formula for an effective outer edge of the habitable zone, including limitations imposed by the CO$_2$ outgassing rate. I then show that climate cycles between a Snowball state and a warm climate are only possible beyond this limit if the weathering rate in the Snowball climate is smaller than the CO$_2$ outgassing rate (otherwise stable Snowball states result). I derive an analytical solution for the c...

  18. Impurity microsegregation due to periodic changes in the temperature and pulling rate of crystal grown by the Stepanov method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, A.V.; Nikolaeva, L.P.; Red`kin, B.S. [Institute of Solid-State Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to describe the behavior of a doping impurity concentration in a crystal grown by the Stepanov method from a melt and subjected to periodic changes in its pulling rate and temperature of the thermal node. Various modes of these effects are discussed. The results obtained are given by graphs that characterize their influence on concentration distribution.

  19. Analytical Investigation of the Decrease in the Size of the Habitable Zone Due to a Limited CO2 Outgassing Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    The habitable zone concept is important because it focuses the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and aids the planning of future telescopes. Recent work has shown that planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone might not actually be able to stay warm and habitable if CO2 outgassing rates are not large enough to maintain high CO2 partial pressures against removal by silicate weathering. In this paper, I use simple equations for the climate and CO2 budget of a planet in the habitable zone that can capture the qualitative behavior of the system. With these equations I derive an analytical formula for an effective outer edge of the habitable zone, including limitations imposed by the CO2 outgassing rate. I then show that climate cycles between a snowball state and a warm climate are only possible beyond this limit if the weathering rate in the snowball climate is smaller than the CO2 outgassing rate (otherwise stable snowball states result). I derive an analytical solution for the climate cycles including a formula for their period in this limit. This work allows us to explore the qualitative effects of weathering processes on the effective outer edge of the habitable zone, which is important because weathering parameterizations are uncertain.

  20. Progresso do crestamento gomoso e perdas na cultura da melancia Disease progress and crop losses due to watermelon gummy stem blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil R. dos Santos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O progresso do crestamento gomoso e as perdas na cultura da melancia foram estudados em ensaios de campo com inoculação artificial de Didymella bryoniae. Para o estudo do progresso da doença foram utilizadas duas áreas indenes, cada uma com 24 x 32 m, e nenhuma medida de controle foi adotada. Para obtenção das curvas de progresso, quantificou-se a percentagem média de área foliar afetada em uma área de 768 m², aos 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 74, 80 e 87 dias após o plantio (DAP. Ficou demonstrado que a doença progride segundo o modelo exponencial, mesmo sob condições não muito favoráveis, na ausência de chuvas e com baixo nível de inóculo inicial. Os valores máximos de severidade foram observados aos 87 DAP (12,5-13,6% da área foliar doente. No ensaio de perdas, utilizou-se o delineamento experimental de blocos casualizados com cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições. Cinco níveis de doença foram obtidos pela aplicação de doses decrescentes da mistura clorotalonil e tiofanato metílico (g/100 L de água: (a 0,0 g i.a. (testemunha; (b clorotalonil 25 g + tiofanato metílico 10 g; (c clorotalonil 75 g + tiofanato metílico; 30 g; (d clorotalonil 125 g + tiofanato metílico 50 g; (e clorotalonil 250 g + tiofanato metílico 100 g. A doença foi avaliada uma única vez, aos 78 DAP por meio de uma escala de notas de 0 a 9, baseada na porcentagem de área foliar doente. A severidade máxima foi observada aos 78 DAP na testemunha (26,5% de área foliar doente. Houve alta (r=-0,96 correlação negativa entre os níveis da doença nas folhas e a produção de frutos, com redução de até 19,2% na produtividade da melancia devido ao crestamento gomoso do caule. O controle químico foi eficiente a partir da dosagem de clorotalonil 125 g + tiofanato metílico 50 g.Progress and losses due to gummy st