WorldWideScience

Sample records for local near-surface hydro-dfn

  1. Hydrogeological pre-modelling exercises. Assessment of impact of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Sensitivities of palaeo-hydrogeology. Development of a local near-surface Hydro-DFN for KLX09B-F. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Lee; Jackson, Peter; Joyce, Steve; Roberts, David; Shevelan, John; Swift, Ben (Serco Assurance, Harwell (GB)); Gylling, Bjoern; Marsic, Niko (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (SE)); Hermanson, Jan; Oehman, Johan (Golders Associates (SE))

    2007-12-15

    Numerical modelling has been used to investigate the potential impact of the Aespoe HRL on regional groundwater flow and hydro-geochemistry in the Laxemar study area. The numerical models have been adapted for this application from the ones use in the site-descriptive modelling (SDM) and SR-Can assessment modelling based on Laxemar version 1.2. In order to test the robustness of the simulation results, sensitivities were studied with respect to different flow boundary conditions and the hydraulic properties of the Quaternary deposits, particularly those beneath the sea around the Aespoe island. The simulations show that the Aespoe HRL has a local effect on the groundwater situation. Typically, in the simulations, the rock under the Aespoe island, the bays around it and the Aevroe area (mainly western part of the islands of Aevroe, Mjaelen and Haaloe) are influenced. In the sensitivity study, visualisations of the drawdown caused by the HRL tunnel system show small differences in the results for head versus flux top boundary conditions, little sensitivity to a change in the surface infiltration rate, but most sensitivity to the contact between the sea and the bedrock beneath the seabed sediments. For all simulation cases considered, results suggest that the Aespoe HRL has not been in operation sufficiently long to have affected the chemistry of samples collected at Laxemar and Simpevarp, though there is some possibility that Aevroe samples have been altered, at least for boreholes in the western part of Aevroe, Mjaelen and Haaloe. The distribution of flow and discharge areas around the bay at Aespoe is clearly affected by the HRL for all cases. Using the drawdown in percussion drilled boreholes around Aespoe as an interference test suggests that there is a partial reduction in the hydraulic contact between the sea and the groundwater system in the bedrock beneath. It is recommended that the conclusions about appropriate hydraulic properties for Quaternary sediments

  2. Persistent Near-Surface Flow Structures from Local Helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, R; Baker, D; Harra, L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Bogart, R S

    2015-01-01

    Near-surface flows measured by the ring-diagram technique of local helioseismology show structures that persist over multiple rotations. We examine these phenomena using data from the {\\em Global Oscillation Network Group} (GONG) and the {\\em Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager} (HMI) and show that a correlation analysis of the structures can be used to estimate the rotation rate as a function of latitude, giving a result consistent with the near-surface rate from global helioseismology and slightly slower than that obtained from a similar analysis of the surface magnetic field strength. At latitudes of 60$^{\\circ}$ and above the HMI flow data reveal a strong signature of a two-sided zonal flow structure. This signature may be related to recent reports of "giant cells" in solar convection.

  3. Locally driven interannual variability of near-surface pH and ΩA in the Strait of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Maley, Ben L.; Allen, Susan E.; Ianson, Debby

    2016-03-01

    Declines in mean ocean pH and aragonite saturation state (ΩA) driven by anthropogenic CO2 emissions have raised concerns regarding the trends of pH and ΩA in estuaries. Low pH and ΩA can be harmful to a variety of marine organisms, especially those with calcium carbonate shells, and so may threaten the productive ecosystems and commercial fisheries found in many estuarine environments. The Strait of Georgia is a large, temperate, productive estuarine system with numerous wild and aquaculture shellfish and finfish populations. We determine the seasonality and variability of near-surface pH and ΩA in the Strait using a one-dimensional, biophysical, mixing layer model. We further evaluate the sensitivity of these quantities to local wind, freshwater, and cloud forcing by running the model over a wide range of scenarios using 12 years of observations. Near-surface pH and ΩA demonstrate strong seasonal cycles characterized by low pH, aragonite-undersaturated waters in winter and high pH, aragonite-supersaturated waters in summer. The aragonite saturation horizon generally lies at ˜20 m depth except in winter and during strong Fraser River freshets when it shoals to the surface. Periods of strong interannual variability in pH and aragonite saturation horizon depth arise in spring and summer. We determine that at different times of year, each of wind speed, freshwater flux, and cloud fraction are the dominant drivers of this variability. These results establish the mechanisms behind the emerging observations of highly variable near-surface carbonate chemistry in the Strait.

  4. Crystallographic analysis of the implanted TiNi monocrystal containing misoriented localized shear mesobands in its near-surface layer [001]{sub B2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, L. L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tverdokhlebova, A. V., E-mail: a@vtverd.ru; Poletika, T. M., E-mail: poletm@ispms.tsc.ru; Girsova, S. L., E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The study was carried on for the implanted single TiNi crystal containing misoriented localized shear mesobands in its near-surface layer [001] B2. Due to the response of material to the Si ion implantation treatment of the single TiNi crystal, deformation mesobands would form in its near-surface layer. Specially designed software tools were employed for the treatment of experimental data obtained from X-ray and electron diffraction patterns. The 3D crystallographic orientations were calculated for the localized shear regions, which were displaced relative to one another and with respect to the original monocrystal orientation.

  5. Flow of groundwater from great depths into the near surface deposits - modelling of a local domain in northeast Uppland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, Johan G.; Forsman, Jonas [Golder Associates, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-01-15

    Purpose: To study the flow of groundwater from rock masses at great depths and into the surface near deposits by use of mathematical models; and to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater from great depths in the surface near deposits (quaternary deposits). The study is about the hydraulic interaction between the geosphere and the biosphere. Methodology: The system studied is represented by time dependent three dimensional mathematical models. The models include groundwater flows in the rock mass and in the quaternary deposits as well as surface water flows. The established groundwater models have such a resolution (degree of detail) that both rock masses at great depth and near surface deposits are included in the flow system studied. The modelling includes simulations under both steady state conditions and transient conditions The transient simulations represents the varying state of the groundwater system studied, caused by the variation in hydro-meteorological conditions during a normal year, a wet-year and a dry-year. The boundary condition along the topography of the model is a non-linear boundary condition, representing the ground surface above the sea and the varying actual groundwater recharge. Area studied: The area studied is located in Sweden, in the Northeast of the Uppland province, close to the Forsmark nuclear power plant. Water balance modelling: To obtain three significantly different groundwater recharge periods for the transient groundwater flow simulations a water balance modelling was carried out based on a statistical analysis of available hydro-meteorological data. To obtain a temporal distribution of the runoff (i.e. potential groundwater recharge), we have conducted a numerical time dependent water balance modelling. General conclusions of groundwater modelling: The discharge areas for the flow paths from great depth are given by the topography and located along valleys and lakes; the spatial and temporal extension of

  6. Near-surface applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Everett, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Just a few meters below the Earth's surface lie features of great importance, from geological faults which can produce devastating earthquakes, to lost archaeological treasures! This refreshing, up-to-date book explores the foundations of interpretation theory and the latest developments in near-surface techniques, used to complement traditional geophysical methods for deep-exploration targets. Clear but rigorous, the book explains theory and practice in simple physical terms, supported by intermediate-level mathematics. Techniques covered include magnetics, resistivity, seismic reflection and refraction, surface waves, induced polarization, self-potential, electromagnetic induction, ground-penetrating radar, magnetic resonance, interferometry, seismoelectric and more. Sections on data analysis and inverse theory are provided and chapters are illustrated by case studies, giving students and professionals the tools to plan, conduct and analyze a near-surface geophysical survey. This is an important textbook fo...

  7. Coastal and Near Surface Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Coastal and Near Surface Mixing Rolf Lueck Centre for Earth and Ocean Research University of Victoria Victoria, B.C., V8W 2Y2 phone: (250) 721...Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response...ADDRESS(ES) Centre for Earth and Ocean Research,,University of Victoria,,Victoria, B.C., V8W 2Y2, , 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  8. Near-surface heater experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, L.D.; Cuderman, J.F.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Lappin, A.

    1978-12-31

    Full-scale near-surface heater experiments are presently being conducted by Sandia Laboratories in the Conasauga Formation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and in the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of these experiments are: (1) to determine if argillaceous media can withstand thermal loads characteristic of high level waste; (2) to provide data for improvement of themomechanical modeling of argillaceous rocks; (3) to identify instrumentation development needed for further in situ testing; and (4) to identify unexpected general types of behavior, if any. The basic instrumentation of these tests consists of a heater in a central hole, surrounded by arrays of holes containing various instrumentation. Temperatures, thermal profiles, vertical displacements, volatile pressurization, and changes in in situ stresses are measured in each experiment as a function of time, and compared with pretest modeling results. Results to date, though in general agreement with modeling results assuming conductive heat transfer within the rock, indicate that the presence of even small amounts of water can drastically affect heat transfer within the heater hole itself, and that small amounts of upward convection of water may be occurring in the higher temperature areas of the Conasauga experiments.

  9. Semiautomatic approaches to account for 3-D distortion of the electric field from local, near-surface structures in 3-D resistivity inversions of 3-D regional magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2017-03-31

    This report summarizes the results of three-dimensional (3-D) resistivity inversion simulations that were performed to account for local 3-D distortion of the electric field in the presence of 3-D regional structure, without any a priori information on the actual 3-D distribution of the known subsurface geology. The methodology used a 3-D geologic model to create a 3-D resistivity forward (“known”) model that depicted the subsurface resistivity structure expected for the input geologic configuration. The calculated magnetotelluric response of the modeled resistivity structure was assumed to represent observed magnetotelluric data and was subsequently used as input into a 3-D resistivity inverse model that used an iterative 3-D algorithm to estimate 3-D distortions without any a priori geologic information. A publicly available inversion code, WSINV3DMT, was used for all of the simulated inversions, initially using the default parameters, and subsequently using adjusted inversion parameters. A semiautomatic approach of accounting for the static shift using various selections of the highest frequencies and initial models was also tested. The resulting 3-D resistivity inversion simulation was compared to the “known” model and the results evaluated. The inversion approach that produced the lowest misfit to the various local 3-D distortions was an inversion that employed an initial model volume resistivity that was nearest to the maximum resistivities in the near-surface layer.

  10. Tracking near-surface atmospheric conditions using an infrasound network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcillo, O; Johnson, J B

    2010-07-01

    Continuous volcanic infrasound signal was recorded on a three-microphone network at Kilauea in July 2008 and inverted for near-surface horizontal winds. Inter-station phase delays, determined by signal cross-correlation, vary by up to 4% and are attributable to variable atmospheric conditions. The results suggest two predominant weather regimes during the study period: (1) 6-9 m/s easterly trade winds and (2) lower-intensity 2-5 m/s mountain breezes from Mauna Loa. The results demonstrate the potential of using infrasound for tracking local averaged meteorological conditions, which has implications for modeling plume dispersal and quantifying gas flux.

  11. Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Beller, John Michael; Geesey, Gill Gregroy; Glenn, David Frankie; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Martian, Pete; Matthern, Gretchen Elise; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Porro, Indrek; Southworth, Finis Hio; Steffler, Eric Darwin; Stormberg, Angelica Isabel; Stormberg, Gregory John; Versteeg, Roelof Jan; White, Gregory J

    2002-08-01

    The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R&D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo- transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

  12. Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    2002-05-15

    The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined.

  13. Reduced near-surface thermal inversions in 2005-06 in the southeastern Arabian Sea (Lakshadweep Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nisha, K.; Rao, S.A.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Rao, R.R.; GirishKumar, M.S.; Pankajakshan, T.; Ravichandran, M.; Rajesh, S.; Girish, K.; Johnson, Z.; Anuradha, M.; Gavaskar, S.S.M.; Suneel, V.; Krishna, S.M.

    relatively cooler near-surface thermal regime persisted owing to prolonged upwelling until November 2005. In addition, the observed local surface wind field was relatively stronger, and the net surface heat gain to the ocean was weaker over the Lakshadweep...

  14. Autowaves in near-surface layer of magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, V.V. [Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin st., Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: fmf@stavsu.ru; Iljuch, P.M. [Stavropol Branch of Moskow Apparatus Bilding and Informatics Academy, 25 Kulakova st., Stavropol 355000 (Russian Federation); Kandaurova, N.V. [Stavropol Branch of Moskow Apparatus Bilding and Informatics Academy, 25 Kulakova st., Stavropol 355000 (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, E.A. [Stavropol State University, 1 Pushkin st., Stavropol 355009 (Russian Federation)

    2005-03-15

    Autowaves processes in a magnetic fluids in an electric and magnetic fields has been investigated. Different type of autowaves in near-surface region of electrochemical cell has been found. Equation of autowave process has been described.

  15. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  16. Near-surface alloys for hydrogen fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2006-01-01

    Near-surface alloys (NSAs) possess a variety of unusual catalytic properties that could make them useful candidates for improved catalysts in a variety of chemical processes. It is known from previous work, for example, that some NSAs bind hydrogen very weakly while, at the same time, permitting ...

  17. Near-surface attenuation estimation using wave-propagation modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Yadari, N.; Ernst, F.; Mulder, W.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the near surface on seismic land data can be so severe that static corrections are insufficient. Full-waveform inversion followed by redatuming may be an alternative, but inversion will work only if the starting model is sufficiently close to the true model. As a first step toward dete

  18. Test case for a near-surface repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M.; Jones, C. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, L.B. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Co, Stockholm (Sweden); Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    A test case is presented for assessment of a near-surface disposal facility for radioactive waste. The case includes waste characterization and repository design, requirements and constraints in an assessment context, scenario development, model description and test calculations 6 refs, 12 tabs, 16 figs

  19. FEATURES OF GEODEFORMATION CHANGES OF NEAR SURFACE SEDIMENTARY ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Larionov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the deformation process in the near surface sedimentary rocks, which has been carried out in a seismically active region of Kamchatka peninsular since 2007,are presented. The peculiarity of the experiments on the registration of geodeformations is the application of a laser deformograph-interferometer constructed according to the Michelson interferometer scheme.

  20. Near surface stress analysis strategies for axisymmetric fretting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Ramesh; Satish V Kailas; K R Y Simha

    2008-06-01

    Fretting is essentially a surface phenomenon, but bulk stresses and material properties contribute to subsequent failure. This feature of fretting demands a thorough understanding of near surface stresses under the joint action of normal, shear and thermal loading. Axisymmetric fretting is of great concern in piping and coupling design. In this paper, we develop design tools for Near Surface Analysis (NSA) for understanding axisymmetric fretting. Axisymmetric Fretting Analysis (AFA) becomes formidable owing to localised tractions that call for Fourier transform techniques. We develop two different NSA strategies based on two-dimensional plane strain models: 2D strip model (2DS) and half-plane Flamant model (2DF). We compare the results of 2DS and 2DF with the exact results for AFA obtained using Love’s stress function in conjunction with Fourier transform. There is a good correspondence between stress components obtained from 2D-models.

  1. The near-surface wind field over the Antarctic continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Turner, J.; Colwell, S. R.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    A 14 year integration with a regional atmospheric model has been used to determine the near-surface climatological wind field over the Antarctic ice sheet at a horizontal grid spacing of 55 km. Previous maps of the near-surface wind field were generally based on models ignoring the large-scale pressure-gradient forcing term in the momentum equation. Presently, state-of-the-art atmospheric models include all pressure-gradient forcing terms. Evaluation of our model output against in situ data shows that the model is able to represent realistically the observed increase in wind speed going from the interior to the coast, as well as the observed wind direction at South Pole and Dumont d'Urville and the bimodal wind distribution at Halley.

  2. Chemistry in the near-surface atmosphere at Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2013-09-01

    Theoretical predictions of the composition and chemical evolution of near-surface atmospheres of the icy satellites in the Jovian and Kronian systems are of great importance for assessing the biological potential of these satellites. Depending on the satellite mass the formation of the rarefied exosphere with the relatively dense near-surface layer is possible as, for example, in the case of the relatively heavy Galilean satellites Europa and Ganymede in the Jovian system [1-3]. Ganymede is of special interest, because observations indicate that Ganymede has a significant O2 near - surface atmosphere, probably subsurface ocean, and is the only satellite with its own magnetosphere. Processes of formation of the rarefied gaseous envelope of Ganymede and chemical exchange between atmosphere and icy surface will be considered. The water vapour is usually the domin ant parent species in such gaseous envelope because of the ejection from the satellite icy surface due to the thermal outgassing, non-thermal photolysis and radiolysis and other active processes at work on the surface. The photochemis try of water vapour in the near - surface atmospheric layer [4] and the radiolysis of icy regolith [5] result in the supplement of the atmosphere by an admixture of H2, O2, OH and O. Returning molecules have species-dependent behaviour on contact with icy surface of the satellite and non-thermal energy distributions for the chemical radicals. The H2 and O2 molecules stick with very low efficiency and are immediately desorbed thermally, but returning H2O, OH, H and O stick to the grains in the icy regolith with unit efficiency. The suprathermal radicals OH, H, and O entering the regolith can drive the surface chemistry. The numerical kinetic model to investigate on the molecular level the chemistry of the atmosphere - surface interface of the rarefied Н2О-dominant gaseous envelope at Ganymede was developed. Such numerical model simulates the gas-phase and diffusive surface

  3. Full Elastic Waveform Search Engine for Near Surface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    For processing land seismic data, the near-surface problem is often very complex and may severely affect our capability to image the subsurface. The current state-of-the-art technology for near surface imaging is the early arrival waveform inversion that solves an acoustic wave-equation problem. However, fitting land seismic data with acoustic wavefield is sometimes invalid. On the other hand, performing elastic waveform inversion is very time-consuming. Similar to a web search engine, we develop a full elastic waveform search engine that includes a large database with synthetic elastic waveforms accounting for a wide range of interval velocity models in the CMP domain. With each CMP gather of real data as an entry, the search engine applies Multiple-Randomized K-Dimensional (MRKD) tree method to find approximate best matches to the entry in about a second. Interpolation of the velocity models at CMP positions creates 2D or 3D Vp, Vs, and density models for the near surface area. The method does not just return one solution; it gives a series of best matches in a solution space. Therefore, the results can help us to examine the resolution and nonuniqueness of the final solution. Further, this full waveform search method can avoid the issues of initial model and cycle skipping that the method of full waveform inversion is difficult to deal with.

  4. Correlating simulated surface marks with near-surface tornado structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.

    Tornadoes often leave behind patterns of debris deposition, or "surface marks", which provide a direct signature of their near surface winds. The intent of this thesis is to investigate what can be learned about near-surface tornado structure and intensity through the properties of surface marks generated by simulated, debris-laden tornadoes. Earlier work showed through numerical simulations that the tornado's structure and intensity is highly sensitive to properties of the near-surface flow and can change rapidly in time for some conditions. The strongest winds often occur within tens of meters of the surface where the threat to human life and property is highest, and factors such as massive debris loadings and asymmetry of the main vortex have proven to be critical complications in some regimes. However, studying this portion of the flow in the field is problematic; while Doppler radar provides the best tornado wind field measurements, it cannot probe below about 20 m, and interpretation of Doppler data requires assumptions about tornado symmetry, steadiness in time, and correlation between scatterer and air velocities that are more uncertain near the surface. As early as 1967, Fujita proposed estimating tornado wind speeds from analysis of aerial photography and ground documentation of surface marks. A handful of studies followed but were limited by difficulties in interpreting physical origins of the marks, and little scientific attention has been paid to them since. Here, Fujita's original idea is revisited in the context of three-dimensional, large-eddy simulations of tornadoes with fully-coupled debris. In this thesis, the origins of the most prominent simulated marks are determined and compared with historical interpretations of real marks. The earlier hypothesis that cycloidal surface marks were directly correlated with the paths of individual vortices (either the main vortex or its secondary vortices, when present) is unsupported by the simulation results

  5. Mechanisms of interfacial reactivity in near surface and extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Balaska, Eric [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weare, John [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Fulton, John [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bogatko, Stuart [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Balasubramanian, Mahalingam [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cauet, Emilie [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kerisit, Sebastien [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schenter, Gregory [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weare, Jonathan [U of Chicago

    2017-01-09

    +, Co2+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Cr3+. Calculations on these systems are demanding because of their open electronic shells, and high ionic charge. Principal Investigator: Professor John Weare (University of California, San Diego) The prediction of the interactions of geochemical fluids with minerals, nanoparticles, and colloids under extreme near surface conditions of temperature (T) and pressure (P) is a grand challenge research need in geosciences (U.S. DOE 2007, Basic Research Needs for Geosciences: Facilitating the 21st Energy Systems.). To evaluate the impact of these processes on energy production and management strategies it is necessary to have a high level of understanding of the interaction between complex natural fluids and mineral formations. This program emphasizes 1st principle parameter free simulations of complex chemical processes in solutions, in the mineral phase, and in the interfaces between these phases The development of new computational tools (with emphasis on oxide materials and reaction dynamics) tailored to treat wide range of conditions and time scales experienced in such geochemical applications is has been developed. Because of the sensitivity of the interaction in these systems to electronic structure and local bonding environments, and of the need to describe bond breaking/formation, our simulations are based on interactions calculated at the electronic structure level (ab-initio molecular dynamics, AIMD). The progress in the computational aspects of program may be summarized in terms of the following themes (objectives); Development of efficient parameter free dynamical simulation technology based on 1st principles force and energy calculations especially adapted for geochemical applications (e.g., mineral, interfaces and aqueous solutions) (continuing program); Calculation of the dynamics of water structure of in the surface-water interface of transition metal oxides and oxihydroxides; and

  6. Unwrapped phase inversion for near surface seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-11-04

    The Phase-wrapping is one of the main obstacles of waveform inversion. We use an inversion algorithm based on the instantaneous-traveltime that overcomes the phase-wrapping problem. With a high damping factor, the frequency-dependent instantaneous-traveltime inversion provides the stability of refraction tomography, with higher resolution results, and no arrival picking involved. We apply the instantaneous-traveltime inversion to the synthetic data generated by the elastic time-domain modeling. The synthetic data is a representative of the near surface seismic data. Although the inversion algorithm is based on the acoustic wave equation, the numerical examples show that the instantaneous-traveltime inversion generates a convergent velocity model, very similar to what we see from traveltime tomography.

  7. Effect of film slicks on near-surface wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnotskii, Mikhail; Ermakov, Stanislav; Ostrovsky, Lev; Shomina, Olga

    2016-09-01

    The transient effects of horizontal variation of sea-surface wave roughness due to surfactant films on near-surface turbulent wind are studied theoretically and experimentally. Here we suggest two practical schemes for calculating variations of wind velocity profiles near the water surface, the average short-wave roughness of which is varying in space and time when a film slick is present. The schemes are based on a generalized two-layer model of turbulent air flow over a rough surface and on the solution of the continuous model involving the equation for turbulent kinetic energy of the air flow. Wave tank studies of wind flow over wind waves in the presence of film slicks are described and compared with theory.

  8. A Havelock Source Panel Method for Near-surface Submarines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tim Gourlay; Edward Dawson

    2015-01-01

    A panel method is described for calculating potential flow around near-surface submarines. The method uses Havelock sources which automatically satisfy the linearized free-surface boundary condition. Outputs from the method include pressure field, pressure drag, wave resistance, vertical force, trim moment and wave pattern. Comparisons are made with model tests for wave resistance of Series 58 and DARPA SUBOFF hulls, as well as with wave resistance, lift force and trim moment of three length-to-diameter variants of the DSTO Joubert submarine hull. It is found that the Havelock source panel method is capable of determining with reasonable accuracy wave resistance, vertical force and trim moment for submarine hulls. Further experimental data are required in order to assess the accuracy of the method for pressure field and wave pattern prediction. The method is implemented in the computer code“HullWave”and offers potential advantages over RANS-CFD codes in terms of speed, simplicity and robustness.

  9. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  10. Effects of global irrigation on the near-surface climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, William J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, Madison, WI (United States); Cook, Benjamin I. [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Ocean and Climate Physics, Palisades, NY (United States); NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Buenning, Nikolaus [University of Colorado-Boulder, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Levis, Samuel [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Climate and Global Dynamics Division, Boulder, CO (United States); Helkowski, Joseph H. [Earth Tech, Miami, FL (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Irrigation delivers about 2,600 km{sup 3} of water to the land surface each year, or about 2% of annual precipitation over land. We investigated how this redistribution of water affects the global climate, focusing on its effects on near-surface temperatures. Using the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) coupled to the Community Land Model (CLM), we compared global simulations with and without irrigation. To approximate actual irrigation amounts and locations as closely as possible, we used national-level census data of agricultural water withdrawals, disaggregated with maps of croplands, areas equipped for irrigation, and climatic water deficits. We further investigated the sensitivity of our results to the timing and spatial extent of irrigation. We found that irrigation alters climate significantly in some regions, but has a negligible effect on global-average near-surface temperatures. Irrigation cooled the northern mid-latitudes; the central and southeast United States, portions of southeast China and portions of southern and southeast Asia cooled by {proportional_to}0.5 K averaged over the year. Much of northern Canada, on the other hand, warmed by {proportional_to}1 K. The cooling effect of irrigation seemed to be dominated by indirect effects like an increase in cloud cover, rather than by direct evaporative cooling. The regional effects of irrigation were as large as those seen in previous studies of land cover change, showing that changes in land management can be as important as changes in land cover in terms of their climatic effects. Our results were sensitive to the area of irrigation, but were insensitive to the details of irrigation timing and delivery. (orig.)

  11. Hypotheses for Near-Surface Exchange of Methane on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renyu; Bloom, A. Anthony; Gao, Peter; Miller, Charles E.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-07-01

    The Curiosity rover recently detected a background of 0.7 ppb and spikes of 7 ppb of methane on Mars. This in situ measurement reorients our understanding of the martian environment and its potential for life, as the current theories do not entail any geological source or sink of methane that varies sub-annually. In particular, the 10-fold elevation during the southern winter indicates episodic sources of methane that are yet to be discovered. Here we suggest a near-surface reservoir could explain this variability. Using the temperature and humidity measurements from the rover, we find that perchlorate salts in the regolith deliquesce to form liquid solutions, and deliquescence progresses to deeper subsurface in the season of the methane spikes. We therefore formulate the following three testable hypotheses. The first scenario is that the regolith in Gale Crater adsorbs methane when dry and releases this methane to the atmosphere upon deliquescence. The adsorption energy needs to be 36 kJ mol-1 to explain the magnitude of the methane spikes, higher than existing laboratory measurements. The second scenario is that microorganisms convert organic matter in the soil to methane when they are in liquid solutions. This scenario does not require regolith adsorption but entails extant life on Mars. The third scenario is that deep subsurface aquifers produce the bursts of methane. Continued in situ measurements of methane and water, as well as laboratory studies of adsorption and deliquescence, will test these hypotheses and inform the existence of the near-surface reservoir and its exchange with the atmosphere.

  12. Preservation of organic molecules at Mars' near-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, Caroline

    2016-07-01

    One of the biggest concerns for the in situ detection of organics on extraterrestrial environment is the preservation potential of the molecules at the surface and subsurface given the harsh radiation conditions and oxidants they are exposed to. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) search for hydrocarbons is designed to understand taphonomic windows of organic preservation in the Mars' near-surface. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the MSL Curiosity rover discovered chlorohydrocarbon indigenous to a mudstone drilled sample, Cumberland (CB). The discovery of chlorohydrocarbons in the martian surface means that reduced material with covalent bonds has survived despite the severe degrading conditions. However, the precursors of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by pyrolysis at CB remain unknown. Organic compounds in this ancient sedimentary rock on Mars could include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and refractory organic material, either formed on Mars from igneous, hydrothermal, atmospheric, or biological processes or, alternatively, delivered directly to Mars via meteorites, comets, or interplanetary dust particles. It has been postulated that organic compounds in near-surface rocks may undergo successive oxidation reactions that eventually form metastable benzenecarboxylates, including phthalic and mellitic acids. These benzenecarboxylates are good candidates as the precursors of the chlorohydrocarbons detected in SAM pyrolysis at CB. Indeed, recently, SAM performed a derivatization experiments on a CB sample, using the residual vapor of N-methyl-N-tertbutylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) leaking into the system. The preliminary interpretations are compatible with the presence of benzocarboxylates, coincidently with long chain carboxylic acids and alcohols. The analysis of this interesting data set to identify these derivatization products, as well as future SAM measurements on Mt Sharp, should shed additional light on the chemical nature and the

  13. Mesoscale Near-Surface Wind Speed Variability Mapping with Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, George; Sikora, Todd; Winstead, Nathaniel

    2008-11-05

    Operationally-significant wind speed variability is often observed within synthetic aperture radar-derived wind speed (SDWS) images of the sea surface. This paper is meant as a first step towards automated distinguishing of meteorological phenomena responsible for such variability. In doing so, the research presented in this paper tests feature extraction and pixel aggregation techniques focused on mesoscale variability of SDWS. A sample of twenty eight SDWS images possessing varying degrees of near-surface wind speed variability were selected to serve as case studies. Gaussian high- and low-pass, local entropy, and local standard deviation filters performed well for the feature extraction portion of the research while principle component analysis of the filtered data performed well for the pixel aggregation. The findings suggest recommendations for future research.

  14. Near surface geophysical techniques on subsoil contamination: laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzoli, Luigi; Giampaolo, Valeria; Rizzo, Enzo

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbons contamination of soil and groundwater has become a serious environmental problem, because of the increasing number of accidental spills caused by human activities. The starting point of any studies is the reconstruction of the conceptual site model. To make valid predictions about the flow pathways following by hydrocarbons compound is necessary to make a correct reconstruction of their characteristics and the environment in which they move. Near-surface geophysical methods, based on the study of electrical and electromagnetic properties, are proved to be very useful in mapping spatial distribution of the organic contaminants in the subsurface. It is well known, in fact, that electrical properties of the porous media are significantly influenced by hydrocarbons because, when contaminants enter the rock matrix, surface reaction occur between the contaminant and the soil grain surface. The main aim of this work is to investigate the capability of near-surface geophysical methods in mapping and monitoring spatial distribution of contaminants in a controlled setting. A laboratory experiment has been performed at the Hydrogeosite Laboratory of CNR-IMAA (Marsico Nuovo, PZ) where a box-sand has been contaminated by diesel. The used contaminant is a LNAPL, added to the sand through a drilled pipe. Contaminant behaviour and its migration paths have been monitored for one year by Electrical Resistivity measurements. In details, a Cross Borehole Electrical Resistivity Tomography techniques were used to characterize the contamination dynamics after a controlled hydrocarbon spillage occurring in the vadose zone. The approach with cross-borehole resistivity imaging provide a great advantage compared to more conventional surface electrical resistivity tomography, due to the high resolution at high depth (obviously depending on the depth of the well instrumented for the acquisition). This method has been shown to provide good information on the distribution of

  15. Eleana near-surface heater experiment final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappin, A R; Thomas, R K; McVey, D F

    1981-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a near-surface heater experiment operated at a depth of 23 m in argillite within the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test geometrically simulated emplacement of a single canister of High-Level Waste (HLW) and was operated at a power level of 2.5 kW for 21 days, followed by 3.8 kW to 250 days, when the power was turned off. Below 85 to 100{sup 0}C, there was good agreement between modeled and measured thermal results in the rock and in the emplacement hole, except for transient transport of water in the heater hole. Above 100{sup 0}C, modeled and measured thermal results increasingly diverged, indicating that the in-situ rock-mass thermal conductivity decreased as a result of dehydration more than expected on the basis of matrix properties. Correlation of thermomechanical modeling and field results suggests that this decrease was caused by strong coupling of thermal and mechanical behavior of the argillite at elevated temperatures. No hole-wall decrepitation was observed in the experiment; this fact and the codrrelation of modeled and measured results at lower temperatures indicate that there is no a priori reason to eliminate argillaceous rocks from further consideration as a host rock for nuclear wastes.

  16. Hypotheses for near-surface exchange of methane on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Renyu; Gao, Peter; Miller, Charles E; Yung, Yuk L

    2016-01-01

    The Curiosity rover recently detected a background of 0.7 ppb and spikes of 7 ppb of methane on Mars. This in situ measurement reorients our understanding of the Martian environment and its potential for life, as the current theories do not entail any geological source or sink of methane that varies sub-annually. In particular, the 10-fold elevation during the southern winter indicates episodic sources of methane that are yet to be discovered. Here we suggest a near-surface reservoir could explain this variability. Using the temperature and humidity measurements from the rover, we find that perchlorate salts in the regolith deliquesce to form liquid solutions, and deliquescence progresses to deeper subsurface in the season of the methane spikes. We therefore formulate the following three testable hypotheses. The first scenario is that the regolith in Gale Crater adsorbs methane when dry and releases this methane to the atmosphere upon deliquescence. The adsorption energy needs to be 36 kJ/mol to explain the m...

  17. Near Surface CO2 Triple Oxygen Isotope Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasadhar Mahata

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is a powerful tool for constraining its sources and sinks. In particular, the 17O oxygen anomaly [Δ17O = 1000 × ln(1 + δ17O/1000 - 0.516 × 1000 × ln(1 + δ18O/1000], with a value > 0.5‰ produced in the middle atmosphere, provides an ideal tool for probing the exchange of carbon dioxide between the biosphere/hydrosphere and atmosphere. The biosphere/hydrosphere and anthropogenic emissions give values ≤ 0.3‰. Therefore, any anomaly in near surface CO2 would reflect the balance between stratospheric input and exchange with the aforementioned surface sources. We have analyzed Δ17O values of CO2 separated from air samples collected in Taipei, Taiwan, located in the western Pacific region. The obtained mean anomaly is 0.42 ± 0.14‰ (1-σ standard deviation, in good agreement with model prediction and a published decadal record. Apart from typically used δ13C and δ18O values, the Δ17O value could provide an additional tracer for constraining the carbon cycle.

  18. Preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, Frederick D.; Rollins, John B.; Noyes, Harold J.; Bush, James G.

    2017-05-30

    In one embodiment, the invention provides a system including at least one computing device for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an underground, near-surface crude oil extraction environment by performing a method comprising sampling and identifying microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi) that reside in the underground, near-surface crude oil extraction environment; collecting rock and fluid property data from the underground, near-surface crude oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the underground, near-surface crude oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the underground, near-surface crude oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the underground, near-surface crude oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the underground, near-surface crude oil extraction environment.

  19. Topographic Influence on Near-Surface Seismic Velocity in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Moon, S.; Meng, L.; Davis, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Near-surface seismic velocity is commonly used to determine subsurface rock structure, properties, and ground-motion amplification. The spatial distribution of Vs30 (shear-wave seismic velocity in the top 30 m of Earth's crust) has been inferred based on the correlations of measured Vs30 with rock types and topographic slopes. Inference of Vs30 based on topographic slopes relies on the assumption that mechanically strong rocks tend to have steep slopes. The topographic slopes can thus be used to infer bedrock strength and seismic velocity. However, due to limited accessibility and logistical difficulties, there are few Vs30 measurements in sites of crystalline rocks that have measurable topographic variations. Thus, the variability of Vs30 with topographic slope for crystalline rocks has not been addressed systematically. In order to examine the local variabilities in near-surface seismic velocity in southern California, we measured the spatial distributions of near-surface seismic velocity at two sites: one in the San Gabriel Mountains (SGM) and one in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). Both sites are composed of predominantly crystalline rocks with topographic slopes that range from 0.2 to 0.5. We conducted seismic refraction surveys using sledgehammer-induced impacts on a steel plate along seismic lines that were oriented roughly N-S, 240 m in length with a spacing of 5 m, and with topographic variation including both a local hilltop and valley. Using first P-wave arrivals, we constructed a P-wave seismic tomography down to 50 m. Our results show that P-wave seismic velocity in the SGM site varies significantly within hillslopes and does not linearly correlate with slope, while P-wave seismic velocity in the SBM site shows little variation in the hillslope. In the SGM site, the Vs30 beneath the valley is 25% faster than the Vs30 beneath the hillslope. These results suggest that the local variability of seismic velocity depends on differences in sediment

  20. The global distribution of near-surface hydrogen on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.); Maurice, S. (Sylvestre); Bish, D. L. (David L.); Vaniman, D. T. (David T.); Squyres, Steven W.; Boynton, W. V. (William V.); Elphic, R. C. (Richard C.); Funsten, H. O. (Herbert O.); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Tokar, R. L. (Robert L.); Moore, K. R. (Kurt R.)

    2004-01-01

    Prime objectives of the neutron spectrometer (NS) component of the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments aboard Mars Odyssey are to identify the major reservoirs of hydrogen on Mars, determine their relative contributions to its total water inventory, and estimate the portion of the current inventory that is near the surface. Although more information is required than is currently available, epithermal neutron currents alone can provide a significant lower bound of hydrogen abundances on Mars. Observations from Viking 1, Viking 2, and Mars Pathfinder positively identified two of these reservoirs. By far the largest near-surface reservoir is comprised of the two residual polar caps, which together are sufficient to cover Mars with a global ocean about 30 m deep. The second is contained in the atmosphere, which if deposited on the surface, would cover Mars with a thin film of water about 10{sup -5} m deep. Although negligible in comparison, the fact that an atmospheric reservoir exists shows that it can provide a conduit that couples transient reservoirs of near-surface water ice. It has long been speculated that Mars has had, and may still retain, a far larger reservoir of water. Topographic features such as rampart craters, collapsed chaotic terrain, massive outflow channels, and valley networks provide strong support for the past existence of large bodies of surface water. Measurements of the areal size and depth of all paleo-water and volcanic features led to an estimate of a total water inventory equivalent to a global ocean that was between 100 and 500 m thick. Measurements of the D/H ratio have allowed predictions that between 5 and 50 m of this inventory was lost to space. Altogether, these estimates lead to between 20 and 465 m of water from the juvenile Martian inventory that is not accounted for. First analyses of Mars Odyssey neutron and gamma-ray data showed that reservoirs of hydrogen do indeed exist poleward of about {+-}50{sup o} latitude. Mars

  1. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  2. Retrieval of near-surface sulfur dioxide (SO2 concentrations at a global scale using IASI satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bauduin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SO2 from volcanic eruptions is now operationally monitored from space in both ultraviolet (UV and thermal infrared (TIR spectral range, but anthropogenic SO2 has almost solely been measured from UV sounders. Indeed, TIR instruments are well-known to have a poor sensitivity to the boundary layer (PBL, due to generally low thermal contrast (TC between the ground and the air above it. Recent studies have demonstrated the capability of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI to measure near-surface SO2 locally, for specific atmospheric conditions. In this work, we develop a retrieval method allowing the inference of SO2 near-surface concentrations from IASI measurements at a global scale. This method consists of two steps. Both are based on the computation of radiance indexes representing the strength of the SO2 ν3 band in IASI spectra. The first step allows retrieving the peak altitude of SO2 and selecting near-surface SO2. In the second step, 0–4 km columns of SO2 are inferred using a look-up table (LUT approach. Using this new retrieval method, we obtain the first global distribution of near-surface SO2 from IASI-A, and identify the dominant anthropogenic hotspot sources and volcanic degassing. The 7-year daily time evolution of SO2 columns above two industrial source areas (Beijing in China and Sar Cheshmeh in Iran is investigated and correlated to the seasonal variations of the parameters that drive the IASI sensitivity to the PBL composition. Apart from TC, we show that humidity is the most important parameter which determines IR sensitivity to near-surface SO2. As IASI provides twice daily global measurements, the differences between the retrieved columns for the morning and evening orbits are investigated. This paper finally presents a first intercomparison of the measured 0–4 km columns with an independent iterative retrieval method and with observations of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI.

  3. Dynamics of near-surface electric discharges and mechanisms of their interaction with the airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonov, Sergey B.; Adamovich, Igor V.; Soloviev, Victor R.

    2016-12-01

    The main focus of the review is on dynamics and kinetics of near-surface discharge plasmas, such as surface dielectric barrier discharges sustained by AC and repetitively pulsed waveforms, pulsed DC discharges, and quasi-DC discharges, generated in quiescent air and in the airflow. A number of technical issues related to plasma flow control applications are discussed in detail, including discharge development via surface ionization waves, charge transport and accumulation on dielectric surface, discharge contraction, different types of flow perturbations generated by surface discharges, and effect of high-speed flow on discharge dynamics. In the first part of the manuscript, plasma morphology and results of electrical and optical emission spectroscopy measurements are discussed. Particular attention is paid to dynamics of surface charge accumulation and dissipation, both in diffuse discharges and during development of ionization instabilities resulting in discharge contraction. Contraction leads to significant increase of both the surface area of charge accumulation and the energy coupled to the plasma. The use of alternating polarity pulse waveforms accelerates contraction of surface dielectric barrier discharges and formation of filamentary plasmas. The second part discusses the interaction of discharge plasmas with quiescent air and the external airflow. Four major types of flow perturbations have been identified: (1) low-speed near-surface jets generated by electrohydrodynamic interaction (ion wind); (2) spanwise and streamwise vortices formed by both electrohydrodynamic and thermal effects; (3) weak shock waves produced by rapid heating in pulsed discharges on sub-microsecond time scale; and (4) near-surface localized stochastic perturbations, on sub-millisecond time, detected only recently. The mechanism of plasma-flow interaction remains not fully understood, especially in filamentary surface dielectric barrier discharges. Localized quasi-DC surface

  4. Spectroscopy and control of near-surface defects in conductive thin film ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Leah L.; Racke, David A.; Schulz, Philip; Li, Hong; Winget, Paul; Kim, Hyungchul; Ndione, Paul; Sigdel, Ajaya K.; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Berry, Joseph J.; Graham, Samuel; Monti, Oliver L. A.

    2016-03-01

    The electronic structure of inorganic semiconductor interfaces functionalized with extended π-conjugated organic molecules can be strongly influenced by localized gap states or point defects, often present at low concentrations and hard to identify spectroscopically. At the same time, in transparent conductive oxides such as ZnO, the presence of these gap states conveys the desirable high conductivity necessary for function as electron-selective interlayer or electron collection electrode in organic optoelectronic devices. Here, we report on the direct spectroscopic detection of a donor state within the band gap of highly conductive zinc oxide by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. We show that adsorption of the prototypical organic acceptor C60 quenches this state by ground-state charge transfer, with immediate consequences on the interfacial energy level alignment. Comparison with computational results suggests the identity of the gap state as a near-surface-confined oxygen vacancy.

  5. Spectroscopy and control of near-surface defects in conductive thin film ZnO

    KAUST Repository

    Kelly, Leah L

    2016-02-12

    The electronic structure of inorganic semiconductor interfaces functionalized with extended π-conjugated organic molecules can be strongly influenced by localized gap states or point defects, often present at low concentrations and hard to identify spectroscopically. At the same time, in transparent conductive oxides such as ZnO, the presence of these gap states conveys the desirable high conductivity necessary for function as electron-selective interlayer or electron collection electrode in organic optoelectronic devices. Here, we report on the direct spectroscopic detection of a donor state within the band gap of highly conductive zinc oxide by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. We show that adsorption of the prototypical organic acceptor C60 quenches this state by ground-state charge transfer, with immediate consequences on the interfacial energy level alignment. Comparison with computational results suggests the identity of the gap state as a near-surface-confined oxygen vacancy.

  6. A Mechanism for Near-Surface Water Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, B. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent findings (e.g., Byrne et al, 2009) indicate that water ice lies very close to the surface at mid-latitudes on Mars. Re-interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray data is consistent with water ice buried less than a meter or two below the surface. Hydrothermal convection of brines provides a mechanism for delivering water to the near-surface. Previous numerical and experimental studies with pure water have indicated that hydrothermal circulation of pore water should be possible, given reasonable estimates of geothermal heat flux and regolith permeability. For pure water convection, the upper limit of the liquid zone would lie at some depth, but in the case of salt solutions, the boundary between liquid and frozen pore water could reach virtually to the surface. The principal drivers for hydrothermal circulation are regolith permeability, geothermal heat flux, surface temperature and salt composition. Both the Clifford and the Hanna-Phillips models of Martian regolith permeability predict sufficiently high permeabilities to sustain hydrothermal convection. Salts in solution will concentrate in upwelling plumes as the cold surface is approached. As water ice is excluded upon freezing, the remaining solution becomes a more concentrated brine, reaching its eutectic concentration before freezing. Numerical simulations considering several salts (NaCl, CaCl2, MgSO4), and a range of heat fluxes (20 - 100 mW/m2) covering the range of estimated present day heat flux (20 to 40 mW/m2) to moderately elevated conditions (60 to 100 mW/m2) such as might exist in the vicinity of volcanoes and craters, all indicate the same qualitative behavior. A completely liquid, convective regime occurs at depth, overlain by a partially frozen "mushy" layer (but still convecting despite the increased viscosity), overlain by a thin frozen layer at the surface. The thicknesses of these layers depend on the heat flux, surface temperature and the salt. As heat flux increases, the mushy region

  7. Near-Surface Microstructure on Twin-Roll Cast 8906 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Zhou, Xiaorong; Thompson, George E.; Hunter, John A.; Yuan, Yudie

    2015-06-01

    The microstructure of the near-surface region of twin-roll cast foil stock 8906 AlFeSi alloy has been investigated. It was revealed that a near-surface layer with microstructure differing from that of the underlying bulk alloy was generated due to severe surface shear strain during twin-roll casting. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that the near-surface layer consists of nano-sized grains with diameters varying in the range of 50 to 600 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that grain boundaries within the near-surface layer were decorated by aluminum oxide particles and carbon-containing lubricant inclusions. Preferential precipitation of a high population density of cubic α-AlFeSi dispersoids, of 30 to 150 nm diameter, was observed within the near-surface layer. The near-surface layer was associated with shingles on the twin-roll cast alloy surface and the maximum layer thickness of approximately 6 µm was observed at the shingles. Other areas of the surface were either free of the near-surface layer or had a thinner near-surface layer.

  8. Shear wave velocity estimation of the near-surface materials of Chittagong City, Bangladesh for seismic site characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Zillur; Siddiqua, Sumi; Kamal, A. S. M. Maksud

    2016-11-01

    The average shear wave velocity of the near-surface materials down to a depth of 30 m (Vs30) is essential for seismic site characterization to estimate the local amplification factor of the seismic waves during an earthquake. Chittagong City is one of the highest risk cities of Bangladesh for its seismic vulnerability. In the present study, the Vs30 is estimated for Chittagong City using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), small scale microtremor measurement (SSMM), downhole seismic (DS), and correlation between the shear wave velocity (Vs) and standard penetration test blow count (SPT-N). The Vs30 of the near-surface materials of the city varies from 123 m/s to 420 m/s. A Vs30 map is prepared from the Vs30 of each 30 m grid using the relationship between the Holocene soil thickness and the Vs30. Based on the Vs30, the near-surface materials of Chittagong City are classified as site classes C, D, and E according to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), USA and as site classes B, C, and D according to the Eurocode 8. The Vs30 map can be used for seismic microzonation, future planning, and development of the city to improve the earthquake resiliency of the city.

  9. 3D Dynamics of the Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean in the Presence of Freshwater Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, C.; Soloviev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater inflow due to convective rains or river runoff produces lenses of freshened water in the near surface layer of the ocean. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. The gravity current head can include the Kelvin-Helmholtz billows with vertical density inversions. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the pollution transport including oil spills. The near-surface data from the field experiments in the Gulf of Mexico during the SCOPE experiment were available for validation of numerical simulations. In particular, we observed a freshwater layer within a few-meter depth range and, in some cases, a density inversion at the edge of the freshwater lens, which is consistent with the results of numerical simulations. In conclusion, we discuss applicability of these results to the interpretation of Aquarius and SMOS sea surface salinity satellite measurements. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of the near-surface layer of the ocean are essential in the presence of freshwater inflow.

  10. Evaluation of near-surface temperature, humidity, and equivalent temperature from regional climate models applied in type II downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, S. C.; Schoof, J. T.

    2016-04-01

    Atmosphere-surface interactions are important components of local and regional climates due to their key roles in dictating the surface energy balance and partitioning of energy transfer between sensible and latent heat. The degree to which regional climate models (RCMs) represent these processes with veracity is incompletely characterized, as is their ability to capture the drivers of, and magnitude of, equivalent temperature (Te). This leads to uncertainty in the simulation of near-surface temperature and humidity regimes and the extreme heat events of relevance to human health, in both the contemporary and possible future climate states. Reanalysis-nested RCM simulations are evaluated to determine the degree to which they represent the probability distributions of temperature (T), dew point temperature (Td), specific humidity (q) and Te over the central U.S., the conditional probabilities of Td|T, and the coupling of T, q, and Te to soil moisture and meridional moisture advection within the boundary layer (adv(Te)). Output from all RCMs exhibits discrepancies relative to observationally derived time series of near-surface T, q, Td, and Te, and use of a single layer for soil moisture by one of the RCMs does not appear to substantially degrade the simulations of near-surface T and q relative to RCMs that employ a four-layer soil model. Output from MM5I exhibits highest fidelity for the majority of skill metrics applied herein, and importantly most realistically simulates both the coupling of T and Td, and the expected relationships of boundary layer adv(Te) and soil moisture with near-surface T and q.

  11. The contribution of scattering to near-surface attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Marco; Fäh, Donat

    2017-01-01

    The rapid decrease of the acceleration spectral amplitude at high frequencies has widely been modeled by the spectral decay factor kappa (κ). Usually, the path-corrected component of κ, often called κ0, is believed to be a local and frequency-independent site characteristic, in turn representing attenuation related to waves propagating vertically through the very shallow layers beneath the study site. Despite the known relevance of κ0 in a wide range of seismological applications, most methods for its calculation do not fully consider the influence of the scattering component. To account for the scattering component, we present a summary of statistical observations of the seismic wavefield at sites of the Swiss seismic networks. The intrinsic properties of the wavefield show a clear dependency on the local shallow subsoil conditions with differences in the structural heterogeneity of the shallow subsoil layers producing different scattering regimes. Such deviations from the ballistic behavior (i.e., direct waves that sample only distinct directions) are indicative for local structural heterogeneities and the associated level of scatter. Albeit the attenuation term related to scattering depends nonlinearly on the intrinsic term, the results indicate that the commonly used explanation for the high-frequency decay spectrum might not be appropriate but involving the amount of scattering might allow better constrained estimates of κ0.

  12. The contribution of scattering to near-surface attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Marco; Fäh, Donat

    2017-07-01

    The rapid decrease of the acceleration spectral amplitude at high frequencies has widely been modeled by the spectral decay factor kappa (κ). Usually, the path-corrected component of κ, often called κ0, is believed to be a local and frequency-independent site characteristic, in turn representing attenuation related to waves propagating vertically through the very shallow layers beneath the study site. Despite the known relevance of κ0 in a wide range of seismological applications, most methods for its calculation do not fully consider the influence of the scattering component. To account for the scattering component, we present a summary of statistical observations of the seismic wavefield at sites of the Swiss seismic networks. The intrinsic properties of the wavefield show a clear dependency on the local shallow subsoil conditions with differences in the structural heterogeneity of the shallow subsoil layers producing different scattering regimes. Such deviations from the ballistic behavior (i.e., direct waves that sample only distinct directions) are indicative for local structural heterogeneities and the associated level of scatter. Albeit the attenuation term related to scattering depends nonlinearly on the intrinsic term, the results indicate that the commonly used explanation for the high-frequency decay spectrum might not be appropriate but involving the amount of scattering might allow better constrained estimates of κ0.

  13. Spatial-temporal variation of near-surface temperature lapse rates over the Tianshan Mountains, central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan-Jun; Shen, Yanjun; Goetz, Jason; Brenning, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Adequate estimates of near-surface temperature lapse rate (γlocal) are needed to represent air temperature in remote mountain regions with sparse instrumental records such as the mountains of central Asia. To identify the spatial and temporal variations of γlocal in the Tianshan Mountains, long-term (1961-2011) daily maximum, mean, and minimum temperature (Tmax, Tmean, and Tmin) data from 17 weather stations and 1 year of temperature logger data were analyzed considering three subregions: northern slopes, Kaidu Basin, and southern slopes. Simple linear regression was performed to identify relationships between elevation and temperature, revealing spatial and seasonal variations in γlocal. The γlocal are higher on the southern slopes than the northern slopes due to topography and regional climate conditions. Seasonally, γlocal are more pronounced higher in the summer than in the winter months. The γlocal are generally higher for Tmax than Tmean and Tmin. The Kaidu Basin shows similar seasonal variability but with the highest γlocal for Tmean and Tmin occurring in the spring. Formation of γlocal patterns is associated with the interactions of climate factors in different subregions. Overall, annual mean γlocal for Tmax, Tmean, and Tmin in the study's subregions are lower than the standard atmospheric lapse rate (6.5°C km-1), which would therefore be an inadequate choice for representing the near-surface temperature conditions in this area. Our findings highlight the importance of spatial and temporal variations of γlocal in hydrometeorological research in the data-sparse Tianshan Mountains.

  14. The trend of sand flux and the meteorology elements changes in the near-surface layer of Tengger desert in the spring of 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZhengCai; DONG ZhiBao; HAN LanYing; ZHAO AiGuo

    2008-01-01

    Dust storm events, especially those associated with strong winds, are immediately dangerous, and have long-term harmful effects. During a dust storm event, dust in the near-surface atmospheric layer decreases visibility, and changes local meteorological parameters. In this paper, we analyzed levels of near-surface turbulence during and outside a dust storm event and found differences in the degree of turbulence, with wind speed increasing and amounts of windblown sand greatly increasing air turbu-lence during the dust storms compared with the corresponding values on s sunny day. In addition, the wind profile during the dust storm deviated from the normal profile and became more complex. In the near-surface atmospheric layer, sand and dust flux during the dust storm also differed from those on a sunny day.

  15. Description of climate, surface hydrology, and near-surface hydrogeology. Simpevarp 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent [SWECO VIAK AB/Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    This report presents and evaluates the site investigations and primary data on meteorology, surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that are available in the Simpevarp 1.2 'data freeze'. The main objective is to update the previous Simpevarp 1.1 description of the meteorological, surface hydrological and near-surface hydrogeological conditions in the Simpevarp area. Based on the Simpevarp 1.2 dataset, an updated conceptual and descriptive model of the surface and near-surface water flow conditions in the Simpevarp area is presented. In cases where site investigation data are not yet available, regional and/or generic data are used as input to the modelling. GIS- and process-based tools, used for initial quantitative flow modelling, are also presented. The objectives of this initial quantitative modelling are to illustrate, quantify and support the site descriptive model, and also to produce relevant input data to the ecological systems modelling within the SKB SurfaceNet framework.For the Simpevarp 1.2 model, the relevant site investigations include the establishment of one local meteorological station and surface-hydrological stations for discharge measurements, delineation and description of catchment areas, manual discharge measurements in water courses, slug tests in groundwater monitoring wells, and manual groundwater level measurements. In addition, other investigations have also contributed to the modelling, providing data on geometry (including topography), data from surface-based geological investigations and boreholes in Quaternary deposits, and data on the hydrogeological properties of the bedrock. The conceptual and descriptive modelling includes an identification and basic description of type areas, domains and interfaces between domains within the model area. The surface and near-surface flow system is described, including the assignment of hydrogeological properties to HSDs (Hydraulic Soil Domains) of Quaternary deposits based on a

  16. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1989-10-01

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

  17. Influence of the atmospheric opacity cycle on the near surface environment of Gale Crater on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Guzewich, Scott David; Lemmon, Mark T.; Martinez, German; Mason, Emily; Navarro, Sara; Newman, Claire E.; Smith, Michael D.; Retortillo, Alvaro de Vicente

    2016-10-01

    The Mars atmospheric dust changes the capacity of the atmosphere to absorb solar radiation or release outgoing thermal infrared radiation. This alters the atmospheric heat exchange fluxes and can interfere with the global circulation. The response of near surface pressure, temperature and winds has been characterized at the higher northern latitudes of 45 degree N at the Viking landing sites. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on Curiosity allows a similar characterization at near-equatorial latitudes of 4.5 degree S. Using MCAM-880 nm opacities as a measure of local atmospheric dust load, we analyze the response of changes in surface variables measured by REMS and compare to those observed by Viking. As on Viking, diurnal and semidiurnal pressure tide amplitudes track very closely the atmospheric opacity and the mean daily pressure shows the increased wave activity. Temperature tides show a more complex response that combines its sensitivity to changes in dust and cloud opacities. Differences in UV opacities for the REMS set of finite spectral windows are explored during the dust and clear seasons.

  18. Near-surface 3D reflections seismic survey; Sanjigen senso hanshaho jishin tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahigashi, H.; Mitsui, H.; Nakano, O.; Kobayashi, T. [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Faults are being actively investigated across Japan since the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake. Discussed in this report is the application of the 3D near-surface reflection seismic survey in big cities. Data from trenching and drilling is used for the geological interpretation of the surroundings of a fault, and the reflection seismic survey is used to identify the position, etc., of the fault. In this article, when the results obtained from the experimental field are examined, it is found that the conventional 2D imaging reflection survey betrays the limit of its capability when the geological structure is complicated, that the 3D reflection seismic survey, on the contrary, is capable of high-precision imaging and, when augmented by drilling, etc., becomes capable of a more detailed interpretation, and that it also contributes effectively to the improvement of local disaster prevention in big cities. Using as the model the Tachikawa fault that runs near JR Tachikawa Station, embodiment of the 3D reflection seismic survey is reviewed. For the acquisition of data excellent in quality in a 3D reflection seismic survey conducted utilizing the roads in the sector chosen for experiment in the urban area, the shock generating points and receiving points should be positioned by taking into account the parameters in the bin arranging process so that the mid-points will be regularly distributed on the surface. 3 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Near-Surface Attenuation and Velocity Structures in Taiwan from Wellhead and Borehole Recordings Comparisons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yu-Ju; Ma, Kuo-Fong; Wu, Shao-Kai; Hsu, Hsuan-Jui; Hsiao, Wen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing the data from 28 seismic borehole stations deployed by the Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network throughout Taiwan from 2007 to 2014, we estimated the near-surface velocity (Vp and Vs) and attenuation (Qp and Qs...

  20. Probabilistic estimates of the distribution of near-surface (within 1m) permafrost in Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This medium resolution (i.e. 30-m pixels) spatial dataset provides an estimate of the occurrence of near-surface (within 1 m of the ground surface) permafrost in...

  1. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Near Surface Atmospheric Properties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  2. Lithogeochemical Character of Near-Surface Bedrock in the New England Coastal Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geographic information system (GIS) data layer shows the generalized lithologic and geochemical, termed lithogeochemical, character of near-surface bedrock in...

  3. Lithogeochemical Character of Near-Surface Bedrock in the Connecticut, Housatonic and Thames River Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data layer shows the generalized lithologic and geochemical (lithogeochemical) character of near-surface bedrock in the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames...

  4. Probabilistic estimates of the distribution of near-surface (within 1m) permafrost in Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This medium resolution (i.e. 30-m pixels) spatial dataset provides an estimate of the occurrence of near-surface (within 1 m of the ground surface) permafrost in...

  5. Microscale Controls on Ultrasonic Velocity Dispersion in Near-Surface Marine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettemy, G. L.

    2006-05-01

    This effort demonstrates a technique to measure poroelastic and petrophysical parameters that can be monitored over time to document diagenetic and consolidation alterations in the shallow biogeosphere. The signatures of these process effects are revealed largely through scale-dependent estimates of porosity, permeability, and the effective framework moduli that describe particle-particle mechanical interactions. Near- surface marine sediments of the Peru margin (ODP Leg 201) provide a unique dataset with which to study such near-surface processes, especially those associated with depositional, tectonic, and biogeochemical dynamics. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image analysis and broadband (100-1000 kHz) ultrasonic compressional wave experiments are combined to interpret the microscale parameters revealed through velocity dispersion analysis. In particular, (i) back-scattered electron (BSE) images are processed to estimate the local porosity, tortuosity, and resultant permeability of the characteristic topology of each sample; and (ii) bounds for complex-valued grain and frame moduli, following an amended Biot formulation, are estimated by using the microscale imaging parameters and observed velocity dispersion. Several key results are highlighted, with regard to BSE imaging and velocity dispersion analysis, beyond the imaging and Biot parameter inversion. For example, microscale permeabilities are typically an order-of- magnitude larger than core (~2 cm) measurements. This discrepancy is critical to understanding spatial and temporal scale differences between, for example, diffusion and advection of nutrients supplying microbial communities versus tectonic dewatering and the resulting transient meter-scale pore pressure modulation. Broadband velocity dispersion analysis proves to be a powerful tool for detecting sub-wavelength sedimentological heterogeneity. Negative velocity dispersion, for example, can be used to estimate scatterer dimensions, consistent

  6. Spatial variability and landscape controls of near-surface permafrost within the Alaskan Yukon River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Rose, Joshua R.; Rigge, Matthew; Walvoord, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of permafrost is important to understand because of permafrost's influence on high-latitude ecosystem structure and functions. Moreover, near-surface (defined here as within 1 m of the Earth's surface) permafrost is particularly susceptible to a warming climate and is generally poorly mapped at regional scales. Subsequently, our objectives were to (1) develop the first-known binary and probabilistic maps of near-surface permafrost distributions at a 30 m resolution in the Alaskan Yukon River Basin by employing decision tree models, field measurements, and remotely sensed and mapped biophysical data; (2) evaluate the relative contribution of 39 biophysical variables used in the models; and (3) assess the landscape-scale factors controlling spatial variations in permafrost extent. Areas estimated to be present and absent of near-surface permafrost occupy approximately 46% and 45% of the Alaskan Yukon River Basin, respectively; masked areas (e.g., water and developed) account for the remaining 9% of the landscape. Strong predictors of near-surface permafrost include climatic indices, land cover, topography, and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus spectral information. Our quantitative modeling approach enabled us to generate regional near-surface permafrost maps and provide essential information for resource managers and modelers to better understand near-surface permafrost distribution and how it relates to environmental factors and conditions.

  7. Near-surface sensitivity suppression way for diffuse reflective optical tomography: simulation and a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keiko; Fujii, Mamiko

    2007-07-01

    Diffuse reflective optical measurement is a useful approach for monitoring the oxygen consumption of living tissue such as brain and muscle. To improve the oxygen consumption measurement accuracy, we propose a method for suppressing the near-surface sensitivity. Diffuse reflective light is detected at the aperture used for irradiating the light and is used as a cancellation signal for near-field sensitivity in the conventional measurement scheme. Photon fluence density functions and positional dependences of detected light sensitivity to change in absorbance were simulated. The sensitivity detected at the same position (aperture) as irradiation was significantly high for the near-surface region. With our method, the near-surface sensitivity is reduced by more than 90% while keeping target sensitivity almost constant (only 3% deterioration). The near-surface and deep-field sensitivity was measured with a phantom with light (785 nm) modulated at 1 kHz through an optical fiber bundle. It confirmed suppressed the near-surface sensitivity by subtracting the light detected at the same aperture from the light detected at another aperture.

  8. Bearing splitting and near-surface source ranging in the direct zone of deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Nan; Zhou, Shi-Hong; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ren-He

    2016-12-01

    Sound multipath propagation is very important for target localization and identification in different acoustical zones of deep water. In order to distinguish the multipath characteristics in deep water, the Northwest Pacific Acoustic Experiment was conducted in 2015. A low-frequency horizontal line array towed at the depth of around 150 m on a receiving ship was used to receive the noise radiated by the source ship. During this experiment, a bearing-splitting phenomenon in the direct zone was observed through conventional beamforming of the horizontal line array within the frequency band 160 Hz-360 Hz. In this paper, this phenomenon is explained based on ray theory. In principle, the received signal in the direct zone of deep water arrives from two general paths including a direct one and bottom bounced one, which vary considerably in arrival angles. The split bearings correspond to the contributions of these two paths. The bearing-splitting phenomenon is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the bearing-time records and experimental results, and they are well consistent with each other. Then a near-surface source ranging approach based on the arrival angles of direct path and bottom bounced path in the direct zone is presented as an application of bearing splitting and is verified by experimental results. Finally, the applicability of the proposed ranging approach for an underwater source within several hundred meters in depth in the direct zone is also analyzed and demonstrated by simulations. Project supported by the Program of One Hundred Talented People of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434012 and 41561144006).

  9. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-03-22

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life.

  10. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P.; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life.

  11. Assimilation and High Resolution Forecasts of Surface and Near Surface Conditions for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Natacha B.; Bélair, Stéphane; Bilodeau, Bernard; Tong, Linying

    2014-01-01

    A dynamical model was experimentally implemented to provide high resolution forecasts at points of interests in the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and Paralympics Region. In a first experiment, GEM-Surf, the near surface and land surface modeling system, is driven by operational atmospheric forecasts and used to refine the surface forecasts according to local surface conditions such as elevation and vegetation type. In this simple form, temperature and snow depth forecasts are improved mainly as a result of the better representation of real elevation. In a second experiment, screen level observations and operational atmospheric forecasts are blended to drive a continuous cycle of near surface and land surface hindcasts. Hindcasts of the previous day conditions are then regarded as today's optimized initial conditions. Hence, in this experiment, given observations are available, observation driven hindcasts continuously ensure that daily forecasts are issued from improved initial conditions. GEM-Surf forecasts obtained from improved short-range hindcasts produced using these better conditions result in improved snow depth forecasts. In a third experiment, assimilation of snow depth data is applied to further optimize GEM-Surf's initial conditions, in addition to the use of blended observations and forecasts for forcing. Results show that snow depth and summer temperature forecasts are further improved by the addition of snow depth data assimilation.

  12. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  13. Aeration remediation of a polluted waterway increases near-surface coarse and culturable microbial aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M Elias; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2014-04-15

    Aeration remediation is currently used in polluted urban waterways to increase oxygen levels in the water column. Recent studies have provided increasing evidence that the bursting of bubbles at water surfaces introduced by aeration, or other surface disturbances, can transfer viable bacteria to the air. In heavily sewage-polluted waterways these water-originated bacterial aerosols may pose as a health risk to recreators in small boats or residents inhabiting the shoreline. Nonetheless, few studies have explored aerosols above active aeration remediation projects in waterways or investigated how bacterial aerosols change with vertical distance from aeration activities. This study, conducted at the Newtown Creek superfund site in Brooklyn, NY, USA, measured coarse aerosol particles and culturable bacteria in near-surface air above waters undergoing aeration remediation. Regardless of aeration operation culturable bacterial fallout was greater near-surface (0.6m above water) than previously-reported measurements made at 2.5m. Molecular analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences from isolated bacteria demonstrates that water and air shared a large number of bacterial genera and that the genera present in the near-surface aerosols (0.6m) contained water-associated Vibrio and Caulobacter, which were not present at 2.5m, despite the smaller sequence library size from the near-surface. Also, the near-surface microbial assemblage had significantly greater association with sequences detected previously in aquatic environments compared to the 2.5m library. We found compelling evidence that aeration activity contributed to this vertical gradient in bacterial aerosol concentrations and identity. Similar to results from 2.5m, concentrations of near-surface respirable coarse aerosols (aeration was occurring. Culturable bacterial aerosol fallout was also greater near-surface when the aerator was on compared to simultaneous measurements made at 2.5m. Furthermore, when the aerator was

  14. Recharge and discharge of near-surface groundwater in Forsmark. Comparison of classification methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent [Golder Associates AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Per-Olof [Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Taeby (Sweden); Brydsten, Lars [Umeaa University, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science (Sweden); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    wells. The usefulness of hydrochemistry-based RD classification of the Forsmark area is thought to be limited, for instance due to calcite-rich soils and local/shallow groundwater flow systems. Updated RD classifications of the Forsmark area should be made when further data and updated models are available. Based on the findings in this study, it is recommended that the MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 model primarily is used for this purpose. MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 (in combination with groundwater flow models of the deep rock) has the largest potential to identify the most important subset of the near-surface groundwater discharge areas, i.e. discharge areas receiving groundwater that passes the intended repository volume along its flow path. The remaining methods presented in the study should primarily be used as support for the MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 modelling. The supporting data set should include a field-based RD classification of the entire set of monitoring wells in Forsmark (and possibly also other objects of interest), as well as an updated hydrochemistry-based RD classification. However, the present results indicate that Piper plots and single 'age parameters' (such as tritium, used as example here) provide too inconsistent information to be of practical use for RD classification. In order to evaluate the applicability of hydrochemistry-based methods to assess groundwater flow patterns in Forsmark, hydrochemical data need to analyzed further and compared to updated MIKE SHE-MIKE 11 modelling results.

  15. The Role of the Mean State of Arctic Sea Ice on Near-Surface Temperature Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.C.; Bintanja, R.; Hazeleger, W.; Katsman, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Century-scale global near-surface temperature trends in response to rising greenhouse gas concentrations in climate models vary by almost a factor of 2, with greatest intermodel spread in the Arctic region where sea ice is a key climate component. Three factors contribute to the intermodel spread:

  16. Teaching Near-Surface Geophysics within the Matlab/Octave Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Being able to simulate near-surface geophysical data using simple programs can help students grasp the relationship between instrument response and subsurface structure. Computer programs to perform such tasks are sometimes provided with textbooks, but they rarely are open source. This limits the adaptability to the instructor's needs and students cannot look inside the programs to see how the data are simulated and/or processed. The simplicity and efficiency with which MATLAB and Octave allow turning physics and mathematics into computer programs simplifies writing, reading, and editing basic educational near-surface geophysical programs and makes them accessible to students. Here we highlight two Octave/MATLAB-based software packages that are openly available through the GitHub organization NSGeophysics https://github.com/NSGeophysics. The first software package, GPR-O (https://github.com/NSGeophysics/GPR-O), allows for basic ground penetrating radar data analysis and representation. The second software package, Seism-O (https://github.com/NSGeophysics/Seism-O), can be used to simulate various data sets for simple near-surface seismic refraction/reflection investigations. We invite the community to download from, use, change, and contribute to the NSGeophysics repository in the hope that it will serve as a platform for exchanging and developing teaching software for near-surface geophysics.

  17. Greenland meltwater storage in firn limited by near-surface ice formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; MacFerrin, Mike; van As, Dirk; Box, Jason E.; Charalampidis, Charalampos; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of Greenland's current annual mass loss is attributed to runoff from surface melt(1). At higher elevations, however, melt does not necessarily equal runoff, because meltwater can refreeze in the porous near-surface snow and firn2. Two recent studies suggest that all(3) or most(3,4

  18. Near-surface remote sensing of spatial and temporal variation in canopy phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Richardson; Bobby H. Braswell; David Y. Hollinger; Julian P. Jenkins; Scott V. Ollinger

    2009-01-01

    There is a need to document how plant phenology is responding to global change factors, particularly warming trends. "Near-surface" remote sensing, using radiometric instruments or imaging sensors, has great potential to improve phenological monitoring because automated observations can be made at high temporal frequency. Here we build on previous work and...

  19. Consideration of Criteria for a Conceptual Near Surface Radioactive Waste disposal Facility in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nderitu, Stanley Werugia; Kim, Changlak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of the criteria is to limit the consequences of events which could lead to radiation exposures. This study will present an approach for establishing radiological waste acceptance criteria using a safety assessment methodology and illustrate some of its application in establishing limits on the total activity and the activity concentrations of radioactive waste to be disposed in a conceptual near surface disposal facility in Kenya. The approach will make use of accepted methods and computational schemes currently used in assessing the safety of near surface disposal facilities. The study will mainly focus on post-closure periods. The study will employ some specific inadvertent human intrusion scenarios in the development of example concentration ranges for the disposal of near-surface wastes. The overall goal of the example calculations is to illustrate the application of the scenarios in a performance assessment to assure that people in the future cannot receive a dose greater than an established limit. The specific performance assessments will use modified scenarios and data to establish acceptable disposal concentrations for specific disposal sites and conditions. Safety and environmental impacts assessments is required in the post-closure phase to support particular decisions in development, operation, and closure of a near surface repository.

  20. The Role of the Mean State of Arctic Sea Ice on Near-Surface Temperature Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.C.; Bintanja, R.; Hazeleger, W.; Katsman, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Century-scale global near-surface temperature trends in response to rising greenhouse gas concentrations in climate models vary by almost a factor of 2, with greatest intermodel spread in the Arctic region where sea ice is a key climate component. Three factors contribute to the intermodel spread: 1

  1. Seasonal cyclogenesis and the role of near-surface stratified layer in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Tilvi, V.

    The role of the near-surface stratified layer developed due to the spread of low salinity waters under the influence of freshwater influx on the cyclogenesis over the Bay of Bengal is addressed. The seasonal variation of the Effective Oceanic Layer...

  2. Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, Colton; Dorsey, Alison; Louie, John [UNR; Schwering, Paul; Pullammanappallil, Satish

    2016-08-01

    Colton Dudley, Alison Dorsey, Paul Opdyke, Dustin Naphan, Marlon Ramos, John Louie, Paul Schwering, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2013, Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Amer. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists, Pacific Section Annual Meeting, Monterey, Calif., April 19-25.

  3. Greenland meltwater storage in firn limited by near-surface ice formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; MacFerrin, Mike; van As, Dirk; Box, Jason E.; Charalampidis, Charalampos; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556

    Approximately half of Greenland’s current annual mass loss is attributed to runoff from surface melt1. At higher elevations, however, melt does not necessarily equal runoff, because meltwater can refreeze in the porous near-surface snow and firn2. Two recent studies suggest that all3 or most3, 4 of

  4. Greenland meltwater storage in firn limited by near-surface ice formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; MacFerrin, Mike; van As, Dirk; Box, Jason E.; Charalampidis, Charalampos; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    Approximately half of Greenland's current annual mass loss is attributed to runoff from surface melt(1). At higher elevations, however, melt does not necessarily equal runoff, because meltwater can refreeze in the porous near-surface snow and firn2. Two recent studies suggest that all(3) or

  5. The non-static effect of near-surface inhomogeneity on CSAMT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Da; Fayemi, Busayo; Yang, Liangyong; Meng, Xiaohong

    2017-04-01

    Controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) method has several advantages over magnetotelluric (MT) method, which includes the recording of lower noise signal and higher resolution data. However, CSAMT field data can still be distorted by the effect of near surface inhomogeneous body. It may be confused with static effect just like in MT, if three-dimensional subsurface geological body is buried under the receiver. Traditionally, the method used in static correction is adopted similar to that used in MT method for many years. In comparison, MT are the natural electric and magnetic fields in the frequency range of 0.0001 Hz to 500 Hz, while CSAMT fields are applied at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 kHz. Hence, in this paper, the non-static effect of near-surface inhomogeneity in CSAMT was simulated through theoretical modeling and we summarized its characteristics. If the skin depth is much larger than the size of the near-surface inhomogeneous body that is close to the measurement point, the anomalous body causes a static effect which is represented by vertical shift in apparent resistivity curves for all frequencies from their expected values, but when the skin depth is much smaller than the size of the near-surface inhomogeneous body in the vicinity of the measurement point, the apparent resistivity curve at high frequencies remains unchanged, while at lower frequencies shift in value is observed. The near-surface effect may be confused with static effect in data processing; however, it cannot be corrected using previous static correction methods, but by using the two-dimensional inversion method. Hence, for such CSAMT data, both effective processing technique and inversion process is of great significance.

  6. Near-surface geophysical investigations inside the cloister of an historical palace in Lecce, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, L.; Quarta, T.

    2009-04-01

    Near-surface geophysics can play a major role in the framework of the Cultural Heritages diagnostics as the recourse to non-invasive geophysical methods is usually the only way to gain information on subsurface properties that can affect the stability of historical structures and accelerate degradation processes. In most cases the deterioration of ancient buildings is due to various causes: external, such as pollution, biological degradation and adverse climatic or microclimatic conditions; internal, such as a particular geological or hydro-geological setting or a combination of both. Therefore, being able to discriminate between the different sources and to identify the main process of decay becomes essential for the development of effective remediation actions. The present case study shows the main results of an integrated geophysical campaign performed inside the cloister of an important palace in Lecce, Southern Italy, in order to investigate the possible subsurface causes of deterioration affecting its pillars and walls and, more importantly, some altars of the annexed church. The historical building, named Palazzo dei Celestini, was formerly a monastery directly connected to the Basilica of Santa Croce and nowadays is the head office of the Province of Lecce Administration and the Prefecture. With its rich baroque façade, Palazzo dei Celestini and Santa Croce is the most famous architectural complex of the historical centre of Lecce. Its foundations generally rest on a very shallow and sometimes outcropping wet calcarenitic basement, evidenced by previous geophysical surveys performed in the nearby. The high capillarity of the local fine-grained calcarenitic stone used as building and ornamental material for the historical complex was thought to be responsible for the deterioration problems evidenced at some altars of the church and in the lower portion of the walls and pillars of the palace, although a previous microclimatic study inside the Basilica had

  7. Near Surface Geophysical Exploration at The Archaeological Site of San Miguel Tocuila, Basin of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega, A.; Hernandez, E.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Diaz-Molina, O.; Morett, L.; Soler, A.

    2008-12-01

    The village of Tocuila is located on the western margin of Lake Texcoco in central Mexico. Volcanic activity during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene closed the basin's drainage and facilitated the development of a lacustrine environment and subsequent deposition of volcano-sedimentary sequences with abundant archaeological and paleontological record. Tocuila was one of the most prominent suburbs of the main civic ceremonial complex of the Aztecs. The rapid expansion of Mexico City's Metropolitan areas in the last three decades strongly influenced Tocuila's environment and has compromised several of its archaeological and ancient human settlements. A near surface geophysical survey including magnetometry, seismic refraction tomography and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques was conducted to investigate pre-Hispanic structures. The magnetometric survey was performed using an Overhauser magnetometer with an omnidirectional, 0.015 nT/Hz sensor and 1Hz sampling rate over a 80x100 m area, yielding 990 measurements of total intensity magnetic field at 1.0m height above the ground surface. Thirty seismic refraction profiles were obtained with a 48-channel 24 bits Geometrics StrataVisor NZ seismograph, 14 Hz natural frequency vertical geophones with a 2m separation array and an impact source of 5 kg. The GPR survey consisted of 15 cross sections at two different resolutions with a GSSI SIR-3000 instrument, using a GSSI 200 MHz and a RadarTeam 70 MHz antennas. All surveys were georeferenced with a dual frequency GPS local station and a GPS rover attached to the surveying geophysical instruments. Seismic refraction tomography and GPR radargrams show a platform structure of approx. 80x60 m which can be subdivided in three distinctive layers with a total height of ~10m. Based on the history of ancient settlements in the area surrounding Lake Texcoco and considering the characteristics of shape and height of the surveyed structure, we interpreted that the resulting

  8. The Characteristics of Near-surface Velocity During the Upwelling Season on the Northern Portugal Shelf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Observations made on the northern Portugal mid-shelf between May 13 and June 15, 2002 were used to characterise the near-surface velocity during one upwelling season. It was found that in the surface mixed layer, the 'tidal current' was diurnal, but the tidal elevation was semi-diurnal. Both the residual current and the major axes of all tidal constituents were nearly perpendicular to the isobaths and the tidal current ellipses rotated clockwise; the major axis of the major tidal ellipse was about 3 cm s-1. The extremely strong diurnal current in the surface layer was probably due to diurnal heating, cooling, and wind mixing that induced diurnal oscillations, including the diurnal oscillation of wind stress. This is a case different from the results measured in the other layers in this area. The near-inertial spectral peaks occurred with periods ranging from 1 047 min to 1 170 min, the longest periods being observed in deeper layers, and the shortest in the surface layer. Weak inertial events appeared during strong upwelling events, while strong inertial events appeared during downwelling or weak subinertial events. The near-inertial currents were out of phase between 5 m and 35 m layers for almost the entire measurement period, but such relationship was very weak during periods of irregular weak wind. Strong persistent southerly wind blew from May 12 to 17 and forced a significant water transport onshore and established a strong barotropic poleward jet with a surface speed exceeding 20 cm s-1. The subinertial current was related to wind variation, especially in the middle layers of 15 m and 35 m, the maximum correlation between alongshore current and alongshore wind was about 0.5 at the 5 m layer and 0.8 at the 35 m layer. The alongshore current reacted more rapidly than the cross-shore current. The strongest correlation was found at a time lag of 20 h in the upper layer and of 30 h in the deeper layer. The wind-driven surface velocity obtained from the PWP model

  9. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.

  10. New Approach to Investigating Near-Surface Structures for Complex Seismic Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiangWenbo; HeZhanxiang; LiuHong

    2003-01-01

    Addressed in this article is a new approach to investigating the near-surface structures through the use of the electromagnetic sounding. The advantages of the electro-magnetic sounding method and the problems of the nearssurface investigation and their solutions are described. Actual examples from the southwestern Takelamagan, western Qaidam and northern Xinjiang are taken to demonstrate the results and the capability of this approach in solving the nearsurface problems. It is also pointed out that the new approach could become both the basis for designing seismic acquisition parameters and determining the seismic shot locations,as well as supplying near-surface velocity models for seismic data processing so as to improve the quality of seismic sections.

  11. Numerical simulation of hull/propeller interaction of submarine in submergence and near surface conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张楠; 张胜利

    2014-01-01

    Hull/propeller interaction is of great importance for powering performance prediction. The features of hull/propeller interaction of a submarine model with a high-skew five blade propeller in submergence and near surface conditions are numerically simulated. The effect of propeller rotation is simulated by the sliding mesh technique. Free surface is captured by the volume of fluid (VOF) method. Computed results including resistance, thrust, torque and self-propulsion factor are compared with experimental data. It shows fairly good agreement. The resistance and wave pattern of the model at different depths of submergence are computed. And the thrust, torque and self-propulsion factor of the model in submergence and near surface condition are compared to analyze the effect of free surface on self-propulsion performance. The results indicate that free surface has more influence on resistance than that on self-propulsion factors.

  12. Greenland meltwater storage in firn limited by near-surface ice formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; MacFerrin, Mike; van As, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    above sea level), firn has undergone substantial densification, while at lower elevations, where melt is most abundant, porous firn has lost most of its capability to retain meltwater. Here, the formation of near-surface ice layers renders deep pore space difficult to access, forcing meltwater to enter......Approximately half of Greenland's current annual mass loss is attributed to runoff from surface melt(1). At higher elevations, however, melt does not necessarily equal runoff, because meltwater can refreeze in the porous near-surface snow and firn2. Two recent studies suggest that all(3) or most(3...... before firn pore space has been completely filled. Our observations frame the recent exceptional melt summers in 2010 and 2012 (refs 5,6), revealing significant changes in firn structure at different elevations caused by successive intensive melt events. In the upper regions (more than similar to 1,900m...

  13. Potential areas for the near surface disposal of radioactive waste in Pahang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Nazran; Yaacob, Wan Zuhairi Wan; Simon, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Radioactive material has been used in Malaysia since the 1960's. The low level radioactive wastes are generated every year and stored in Nuclear Malaysia. The storage capacities are expected to reach its maximum capacity by the year 2025. Disposal of the radioactive waste is considered as one of the best options for future radioactive and nuclear material generated in Malaysia, hence the necessary site selection. The selection process used the IAEA document as the main reference, supported by site selection procedure applied by various countries. ArcGIS software was used to simulate the selection of the near surface radioactive waste disposal. This paper suggested the best four potential areas for the near surface radioactive waste disposal in Pahang state, Malaysia, the Sg. Lembing, Gambang, Felda Lepar Utara and Cheneh areas. These areas are located within 100 km from the potential radioactive waste producer (Lynas).

  14. Variable near-surface deformation along the Commerce segment of the Commerce geophysical lineament, southeast Missouri to southern Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a plausible link between surface and near-surface tectonic features and the vertical projection of the Commerce geophysical lineament (CGL). The CGL is a 5- to 10-km-wide zone of basement magnetic and gravity anomalies traceable for more than 600 km, extending from Arkansas through southeast Missouri and southern Illinois and into Indiana. Twelve kilometers of high-resolution seismic reflection data, collected at four sites along a 175-km segment of the CGL projection, are interpreted to show varying amounts of deformation involving Tertiary and some Quaternary sediments. Some of the locally anomalous geomorphic features in the northern Mississippi embayment region (i.e., paleoliquefaction features, anomalous directional changes in stream channels, and areas of linear bluff escarpments) overlying the CGL can be correlated with specific faults and/or narrow zones of deformed (faulted and folded) strata that are imaged on high-resolution seismic reflection data. There is an observable change in near-surface deformation style and complexity progressing from the southwest to the northeast along the trace of the CGL. The seismic reflection data collaborate mapping evidence which suggests that this region has undergone a complex history of deformation, some of which is documented to be as young as Quaternary, during multiple episodes of reactivation under varying stress fields. This work, along with that of other studies presented in this volume, points to the existence of at least one major crustal feature outside the currently defined zone of seismic activity (New Madrid Seismic Zone) that should be considered as a significant potential source zone for seismogenic activity within the midcontinent region of the United States. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous measurements of air-sea gas transfer velocity and near surface turbulence at low to moderate winds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Liao, Q.; Fillingham, J. H.; Bootsma, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Parameterization of air-sea gas transfer velocity was routinely made with wind speed. Near surface turbulent dissipation rate has been shown to have better correlation with the gas transfer velocity in a variety of aquatic environments (i.e., the small eddy model) while wind speed is low to moderate. Wind speed model may underestimate gas transfer velocity at low to moderate winds when the near surface turbulence is produced by other environmental forcing. We performed a series of field experiments to measure the CO2 transfer velocity, and the statistics of turbulence immediately below the air-water interface using a novel floating PIV and chamber system. The small eddy model was evaluated and the model coefficient was found to be a non-constant, and it varies with the local turbulent level (figure 1). Measure results also suggested an appropriate scaling of the vertical dissipation profile immediately below the interface under non-breaking conditions, which can be parameterized by the wind shear, wave height and wave age (figure 2). Figure 1. Relation between the coefficient of the small eddy model and dissipation rate. The data also include Chu & Jirka (2003) and Vachon et al. (2010). The solid regression line: α = 0.188log(ɛ)+1.158 Figure 2. Non-dimensional dissipation profiles. Symbols: measured data with the floating PIV. Solid line: regression of measured data with a -0.79 decaying rate. Dash line with -2 slope: Terray et al. (1996) relation. Dash line with two layer structure: Siddiqui & Loewen (2007) relation.

  16. Corn Stover Impacts on Near-Surface Soil Properties of No-Till Corn In Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

    2006-01-06

    Corn stover is a primary biofuel feedstock and its expanded use could help reduce reliance on fossil fuels and net CO2 emissions. Excessive stover removal may, however, negatively impact near-surface soil properties within a short period after removal. We assessed changes in soil crust strength, bulk density, and water content over a 1-yr period following a systematic removal or addition of stover from three no-till soils under corn in Ohio.

  17. Obtaining Near-surface Parameters for Seismic Statics by Using Differential Electric Sounding and Land Sonar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongShihang

    2003-01-01

    The differential electric sounding and land sonar method was a new technique used in recent years. Good results from shallow engineering surveys have been obtained. Tests on obtaining thicknesses and velocities of near-surface Myers were conducted by combining the two approaches. With hammersources, satisfactory results were obtained at depth of about 60min surveying the Quaternary layers in the Shengli oilfield and at depth of about 120 m in the mountainous areas of southern Guizhou.

  18. Automatic monitoring of ecosystem structure and functions using integrated low-cost near surface sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ryu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Hwang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Near surface sensors are able to acquire more reliable and detailed information with higher temporal resolution than satellite observations. Conventional near surface sensors usually work individually, and thus they require considerable manpower from data collection through information extraction and sharing. Recent advances of Internet of Things (IoT) provides unprecedented opportunities to integrate various low-cost sensors as an intelligent near surface observation system for monitoring ecosystem structure and functions. In this study, we developed a Smart Surface Sensing System (4S), which can automatically collect, transfer, process and analyze data, and then publish time series results on public-available website. The system is composed of micro-computer Raspberry pi, micro-controller Arduino, multi-spectral spectrometers made from Light Emitting Diode (LED), visible and near infrared cameras, and Internet module. All components are connected with each other and Raspberry pi intelligently controls the automatic data production chain. We did intensive tests and calibrations in-lab. Then, we conducted in-situ observations at a rice paddy field and a deciduous broadleaf forest. During the whole growth season, 4S obtained landscape images, spectral reflectance in red, green, blue, and near infrared, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR), and leaf area index (LAI) continuously. Also We compared 4S data with other independent measurements. NDVI obtained from 4S agreed well with Jaz hyperspectrometer at both diurnal and seasonal scales (R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 0.059), and 4S derived fPAR and LAI were comparable to LAI-2200 and destructive measurements in both magnitude and seasonal trajectory. We believe that the integrated low-cost near surface sensor could help research community monitoring ecosystem structure and functions closer and easier through a network system.

  19. Characterization of a complex near-surface structure using well logging and passive seismic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjumea, Beatriz; Macau, Albert; Gabàs, Anna; Figueras, Sara

    2016-04-01

    We combine geophysical well logging and passive seismic measurements to characterize the near-surface geology of an area located in Hontomin, Burgos (Spain). This area has some near-surface challenges for a geophysical study. The irregular topography is characterized by limestone outcrops and unconsolidated sediments areas. Additionally, the near-surface geology includes an upper layer of pure limestones overlying marly limestones and marls (Upper Cretaceous). These materials lie on top of Low Cretaceous siliciclastic sediments (sandstones, clays, gravels). In any case, a layer with reduced velocity is expected. The geophysical data sets used in this study include sonic and gamma-ray logs at two boreholes and passive seismic measurements: three arrays and 224 seismic stations for applying the horizontal-to-vertical amplitude spectra ratio method (H/V). Well-logging data define two significant changes in the P-wave-velocity log within the Upper Cretaceous layer and one more at the Upper to Lower Cretaceous contact. This technique has also been used for refining the geological interpretation. The passive seismic measurements provide a map of sediment thickness with a maximum of around 40 m and shear-wave velocity profiles from the array technique. A comparison between seismic velocity coming from well logging and array measurements defines the resolution limits of the passive seismic techniques and helps it to be interpreted. This study shows how these low-cost techniques can provide useful information about near-surface complexity that could be used for designing a geophysical field survey or for seismic processing steps such as statics or imaging.

  20. Distribution of near-surface permafrost in Alaska: estimates of present and future conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Nield, Shawn J.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Finley, Andrew O.

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude regions are experiencing rapid and extensive changes in ecosystem composition and function as the result of increases in average air temperature. Increasing air temperatures have led to widespread thawing and degradation of permafrost, which in turn has affected ecosystems, socioeconomics, and the carbon cycle of high latitudes. Here we overcome complex interactions among surface and subsurface conditions to map nearsurface permafrost through decision and regression tree approaches that statistically and spatially extend field observations using remotely sensed imagery, climatic data, and thematic maps of a wide range of surface and subsurface biophysical characteristics. The data fusion approach generated medium-resolution (30-m pixels) maps of near-surface (within 1 m) permafrost, active-layer thickness, and associated uncertainty estimates throughout mainland Alaska. Our calibrated models (overall test accuracy of ~85%) were used to quantify changes in permafrost distribution under varying future climate scenarios assuming no other changes in biophysical factors. Models indicate that near-surface permafrost underlies 38% of mainland Alaska and that near-surface permafrost will disappear on 16 to 24% of the landscape by the end of the 21st Century. Simulations suggest that near-surface permafrost degradation is more probable in central regions of Alaska than more northerly regions. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for potential remobilization of frozen soil carbon pools under warmer temperatures. Additionally, warmer and drier conditions may increase fire activity and severity, which may exacerbate rates of permafrost thaw and carbon remobilization relative to climate alone. The mapping of permafrost distribution across Alaska is important for land-use planning, environmental assessments, and a wide-array of geophysical studies.

  1. Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography using fat rays: application to near-surface seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordi, Claudio; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-08-01

    Frequency-dependent traveltime tomography does not rely on the high frequency assumption made in classical ray-based tomography. By incorporating the effects of velocity structures in the first Fresnel volume around the central ray, it offers a more realistic and accurate representation of the actual physics of seismic wave propagation and thus, enhanced imaging of near-surface structures is expected. The objective of this work was to apply frequency-dependent first arrival traveltime tomography to surface seismic data that were acquired for exploration scale and near-surface seismic imaging. We adapted a fat ray tomography algorithm from global-earth seismology that calculates the Fresnel volumes based on source and receiver (adjoint source) traveltime fields. The fat ray tomography algorithm was tested on synthetic model data that mimics the dimensions of two field data sets. The field data sets are presented as two case studies where fat ray tomography was applied for near-surface seismic imaging. The data set of the first case study was recorded for high-resolution near-surface imaging of a Quaternary valley (profile length 10 km). All results of fat ray tomography are compared against the results of classical ray-based tomography. We show that fat ray tomography can provide enhanced tomograms and that it is possible to recover more information on the subsurface when compared to ray tomography. However, model assessment based on the column sum of the Jacobian matrix revealed that especially the deep parts of the structure in the fat ray tomograms might not be adequately covered by fat rays. Furthermore, the performance of the fat ray tomography depends on the chosen input frequency in relation to the scale of the seismic survey. Synthetic data testing revealed that the best results were obtained when the frequency was chosen to correspond to an approximate wavelength-to-target depth ratio of 0.1.

  2. Joint Traveltime and Waveform Envelope Inversion for Near-surface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyang; Zhang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    In the linearized seismic full waveform inversion (FWI), it is well known that a good initial model is needed to avoid cycle-skipping issue, especially when the low-frequency components of data are lacking. To solve the problem, we develop a joint first-arrival traveltime and early arrival envelope inversion method (JTE) to build a good near-surface velocity model with low-wavenumber components. The JTE method combines the robustness of nonlinear traveltime inversion and the low-frequency information embedded in the waveform envelope. In two synthetic experiments, we confirm that traveltime inversion constrains the top near-surface velocity structures tightly, while the envelope inversion recovers the low-wavenumber structures with low-velocity objects or layers. Using the results of JTE as starting models, we find that FWI can produce accurate solutions for complex numerical models. In a real-data example, JTE followed by FWI resolves a near-surface velocity model to improve statics corrections for the subsurface stacking image.

  3. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2017-03-06

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  4. Biomolecular Nano-Flow-Sensor to Measure Near-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noji Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated that the measurement of the near-surface flow at the interface between a liquid and solid using a 10 nm-sized biomolecular motor of F1-ATPase as a nano-flow-sensor. For this purpose, we developed a microfluidic test-bed chip to precisely control the liquid flow acting on the F1-ATPase. In order to visualize the rotation of F1-ATPase, several hundreds nanometer-sized particle was immobilized at the rotational axis of F1-ATPase to enhance the rotation to be detected by optical microscopy. The rotational motion of F1-ATPase, which was immobilized on an inner surface of the test-bed chip, was measured to obtain the correlation between the near-surface flow and the rotation speed of F1-ATPase. As a result, we obtained the relationship that the rotation speed of F1-ATPase was linearly decelerated with increasing flow velocity. The mechanism of the correlation between the rotation speed and the near-surface flow remains unclear, however the concept to use biomolecule as a nano-flow-sensor was proofed successfully. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9479-3 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  5. Comparing near-surface and bulk densities of asteroids using radar scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano Marin, Luisa Fernanda; Nolan, Michael C.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Virkki, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Dual-polarization radar measurements of asteroids provide a joint constraint on the near-surface density and porosity, which can give insights on asteroid composition and evolution. Magri et al. (2001) used (433) Eros radar and spacecraft data as calibration for estimating the near-surface densities and porosities of 45 other radar-detected asteroids (36 main-belt and 9 near-Earth). At that time, only (433) Eros had both radar observations and a measured bulk density. Now that there have been spacecraft observations of several other asteroids and radar measurements of the densities of several binary near-Earth asteroids with various compositions, we can expand the calibration to include those objects. We begin by applying the method of Magri et al. to Ceres, Vesta, Itokawa, 1994 CC, 2001 SN263, 1998 QE2, and 2000 DP107 to explore the differences between the bulk density and the near-surface density measured with radar. We expect significant differences between Ceres and Vesta and the small near-Earth asteroids as the porosities of these objects are expected to be quite different. However, we expect that small binary objects likely have similar internal structures, so that any differences should depend on composition and perhaps surface weathering.Reference: Magri et al., "Radar constraints on asteroid Properties using 433 Eros as ground truth". Meteoritics & Planetary Science 36, 1697-1709, 2001.

  6. Electrical injection to contactless near-surface InGaN quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riuttanen, L., E-mail: lauri.riuttanen@aalto.fi; Svensk, O.; Suihkonen, S. [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Kivisaari, P.; Oksanen, J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-08-03

    Charge injection to the prevailing and emerging light-emitting devices is almost exclusively based on the double heterojunction (DHJ) structures that have remained essentially unchanged for decades. In this letter, we report the excitation of a near surface indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum well (QW) by bipolar carrier diffusion from a nearby electrically excited pn-homojunction. The demonstrated near surface QW emitter is covered only by a 10 nm GaN capping leaving the light-emitting mesa perfectly free of metals, other contact, or current spreading structures. The presented proof-of-principle structure, operating approximately with a quantum efficiency of one fifth of a conventional single QW reference structure, provides conclusive evidence of the feasibility of using diffusion injection to excite near surface light-emitting structures needed, e.g., for developing light emitters or photo-voltaic devices based on nanoplasmonics or free-standing nanowires. In contrast to the existing DHJ solutions or optical pumping, our approach allows exciting nanostructures without the need of forming a DHJ, absorbing layers or even electrical contacts on the device surface.

  7. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints.

  8. Near-surface processing on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures: a nanoscale electrical and structural characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greco Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of near-surface processing on the properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures were studied, combining conventional electrical characterization on high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs, with advanced characterization techniques with nanometer scale resolution, i.e., transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM. In particular, a CHF3-based plasma process in the gate region resulted in a shift of the threshold voltage in HEMT devices towards less negative values. Two-dimensional current maps acquired by C-AFM on the sample surface allowed us to monitor the local electrical modifications induced by the plasma fluorine incorporated in the material. The results are compared with a recently introduced gate control processing: the local rapid thermal oxidation process of the AlGaN layer. By this process, a controlled thin oxide layer on surface of AlGaN can be reliably introduced while the resistance of the layer below increase locally.

  9. Near-surface processing on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures: a nanoscale electrical and structural characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Giuseppe; Giannazzo, Filippo; Frazzetto, Alessia; Raineri, Vito; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2011-02-11

    The effects of near-surface processing on the properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures were studied, combining conventional electrical characterization on high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), with advanced characterization techniques with nanometer scale resolution, i.e., transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). In particular, a CHF3-based plasma process in the gate region resulted in a shift of the threshold voltage in HEMT devices towards less negative values. Two-dimensional current maps acquired by C-AFM on the sample surface allowed us to monitor the local electrical modifications induced by the plasma fluorine incorporated in the material.The results are compared with a recently introduced gate control processing: the local rapid thermal oxidation process of the AlGaN layer. By this process, a controlled thin oxide layer on surface of AlGaN can be reliably introduced while the resistance of the layer below increase locally.

  10. Climatic variability of near-surface turbulent kinetic energy over the United States: implications for fire-weather predications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bain

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined the feasibility of using near-surface atmospheric turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) alone or in...

  11. Near-surface final repository for the NPP Chernobyl, Ukraine; Oberflaechennahes Endlager fuer das KKW Tschernobyl, Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Heiko [NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    NUKEM Technologies has realized the project of near-surface final radioactive waste storage at the site of the NPP Chernobyl. The complex includes facilities for treatment and processing of solid wastes, interim storage facilities for high-level waste and a near-surface final repository for conditioned radioactive waste. The project is funded by the European Union in the frame of TACIS.

  12. Effects of Near-Surface Atmospheric Stability and Moisture on Wildfire Behavior and Consequences for Haines Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiyu Sun; Mary Ann Jenkins

    2003-01-01

    Since the 1950s, extensive research has been conducted to investigate the relationship between near-surface atmospheric conditions and large wildfire growth and occurrence. Observational studies have demonstrated that near-surface dryness (e-g., Fahnestock 1965) and atmospheric instability (e-g., Brotak and Reifsnyder 1977) are correlated with large wildfire growth and...

  13. Near-surface Observations of Temperature and Salinity from Profiling Floats: The Diurnal Cycle, Precipitation, and Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. E.; Riser, S.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of near-surface temperature and salinity obtained from Argo-type profiling floats enhanced with an auxiliary Surface Temperature and Salinity (STS) CTD are presented. Using the STS unit, high vertical resolution (Price-Weller-Pinkel (PWP) one-dimensional mixed layer model. Additionally, the near-surface heat budget is examined.

  14. NEAR-SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A HOLOCENE FAULT CONDUCIVE TO GEOTHERMAL FLOW NEAR PYRAMID LAKE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsey, Alison; Dudley, Colton; Louie, John [UNR; Schwering, Paul; Pullammanappallil, Satish [Optim

    2013-06-30

    deposition of the lakebeds in the Quaternary buried and preserved older tufa columns within the section. Near-surface Wenner arrays with a-spacings up to 30 m show a higher resistivity near the faults, and tufa, than away from the faults. Resistivity averages within a few meters of the surface were 33 ± 17 ohm-m on the fault, 13 ± 3 ohm-m east of the fault, and 9 ± 3 ohm-m west of the fault. It is possible that the geothermal waters are fresher, and more resistive, than waters held in the lakebed clays. Water samples from more than 1 km depth in exploration wells have a TDS of 2500 p.p.m., nearly drinking-water quality. The relatively resistive water, perhaps localized by greater permeability along the fault, could explain the higher resistivity measured near the fault. The results show that there is no high-velocity, high-resistivity tufa along the faults below the surface, so we are unable to use buried tufa to locate the faults that may promote geothermal upwelling in this area. We further hypothesize that as sedimentation buried the tufa during the Quaternary, warm geothermal waters re-dissolved it, and re-precipitated it in the cold lake-bottom water.

  15. Uncertainty in Land Cover observations and its impact on near surface climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgievski, Goran; Hagemann, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    , as well as plant productivity are also examined. The analysis of vegetation covered area indicates that the range of uncertainty might be about the same order of magnitude as the estimated historical anthropogenic LC change. For example, the area covered with managed grasses (crops and pasture in MPI-ESM PFT classification) varies from 17 to 26 million km2, and area covered with trees ranges from 15 million km2 up to 51 million km2. These uncertainties in vegetation distribution lead to noticeable variations in atmospheric temperature, humidity, cloud cover, circulation, and precipitation as well as local, regional and global climate forcing. For example, the amount of terrestrial ET ranges from 73 to 77 × 103 km3yr-1in MPI-ESM simulations and this range has about the same order of magnitude as the current estimate of the reduction of annual ET due to recent anthropogenic LC change. This and more impacts of LC uncertainty on the near surface climate will be presented and discussed in the context of LC change. Hartley, A.J., MacBean, N., Georgievski, G., Bontemps, S.: Uncertainty in plant functional type distributions and its impact on land surface models (in review with Remote Sensing of Environment Special Issue)

  16. Thin Film, Near-Surface and Multi-Layer Investigations by Low-Energy {mu}{sup +}SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokscha, T., E-mail: thomas.prokscha@psi.ch; Morenzoni, E.; Suter, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Eshchenko, D.; Garifianov, N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI (Switzerland); Forgan, E. M. [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Keller, H. [Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Litterst, J. [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany); Niedermayer, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI (Switzerland); Nieuwenhuys, G. [Leiden University (Netherlands)

    2004-12-15

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI, Villigen, Switzerland) the beam of low-energy positive polarised muons (LE-{mu}{sup +}) with tunable energy between 0.5 and 30 keV allows the extension of the muon-spin-rotation technique ({mu}SR) to studies on thin films and multi-layers (LE-{mu}{sup +}SR). The range of these muons in solids covers the near-surface region up to implantation depths of about 300 nm. As a sensitive local magnetic probe with a complementary observational time window to other techniques LE-{mu}{sup +}SR offers the unique possibility to gain new insights in these nano-scale objects. After outlining the current status of the LE-{mu}{sup +} beam line we demonstrate the potential of this new technique by presenting the results of recent experiments: i) the direct observation of non-local effects in a superconducting Pb film, ii) the oxygen isotope effect on the in-plane penetration depth in optimally doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, and iii) the first observation of the conduction electron spin polarisation in the Ag spacer of a Fe/Ag/Fe tri-layer.

  17. An overview of the surface and near-surface geology, geomorphology and natural resources of Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sulaimi, J.; Mukhopadhyay, A.

    2000-06-01

    The surface and near-surface geology, geomorphology and natural resources of Kuwait have been reviewed based on the published work. The stratigraphy and structure of the near-surface sediments of Kuwait have been mainly controlled by the Tertiary tectonic activity of the Arabian Shield. The shield started separating from the African mainland by the close of the Eocene and drifted northeastward towards the Asian plate, giving rise to the folding and thrusting of the Zagros Mountains of Iran. The tectonic activity superimposed a northwest-southeast trend over an earlier north-south structural trend, and gave rise to parallel ridges and valleys trending northwest-southeast through differential erosion. It has been possible to identify 15 geomorphic zones and 11 morphostructures from analysis of the surface features of Kuwait. Seven of these morphostructures can be attributed to tectonic processes and two to fluvial processes. It has not been possible, however, to explain satisfactorily the origin of the Jal Az-Zor escarpment or the Ad-Dalmaniyah cliff. The whole of Kuwait can be divided into seven drainage zones. Of these, the internal drainage systems of the Ar-Raudhatain-Umm Al-Aish drainage system and the Ad-Dibdibba drainage system are hydrogeologically most important. The clastic deposits of Kuwait Group sediments, often affected by low-temperature carbonate (calcite and dolomite) and sulfate (gypsum) precipitation, form the surface rock of Kuwait. These are covered by recent aeolian and residual deposits; playa deposits in the enclosed basins; and near the coast, oolitic sediments, beach sands and sabkha deposits. The surface and near-surface deposits of Kuwait contain important reserves of construction sand and gravel as well as the only naturally occurring freshwater reserves of the country. An understanding of the nature of these surface deposits is required for the management of environmental issues like sand encroachment, land-use planning, and soil and

  18. IASI's sensitivity to near-surface carbon monoxide (CO): Theoretical analyses and retrievals on test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauduin, Sophie; Clarisse, Lieven; Theunissen, Michael; George, Maya; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2017-03-01

    Separating concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the boundary layer from the rest of the atmosphere with nadir satellite measurements is of particular importance to differentiate emission from transport. Although thermal infrared (TIR) satellite sounders are considered to have limited sensitivity to the composition of the near-surface atmosphere, previous studies show that they can provide information on CO close to the ground in case of high thermal contrast. In this work we investigate the capability of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) to retrieve near-surface CO concentrations, and we quantitatively assess the influence of thermal contrast on such retrievals. We present a 3-part analysis, which relies on both theoretical forward simulations and retrievals on real data, performed for a large range of negative and positive thermal contrast situations. First, we derive theoretically the IASI detection threshold of CO enhancement in the boundary layer, and we assess its dependence on thermal contrast. Then, using the optimal estimation formalism, we quantify the role of thermal contrast on the error budget and information content of near-surface CO retrievals. We demonstrate that, contrary to what is usually accepted, large negative thermal contrast values (ground cooler than air) lead to a better decorrelation between CO concentrations in the low and the high troposphere than large positive thermal contrast (ground warmer than the air). In the last part of the paper we use Mexico City and Barrow as test cases to contrast our theoretical predictions with real retrievals, and to assess the accuracy of IASI surface CO retrievals through comparisons to ground-based in-situ measurements.

  19. Comparison of near surface and column-integrated atmospheric aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Rudra Prasad

    Optical and chemical properties of size-resolved aerosols in near-surface air at Tudor Hill, Bermuda were measured between July 2006 and June 2009. Vertical distributions of aerosol backscattering and column-averaged aerosol optical properties were characterized with a Micro-pulse lidar (MPL) and a CIMEL automated sun-sky radiometer. The chemical species in size-segregated aerosols in marine air were compared with the surface level aerosol optical properties. The aerosol concentration, along with chemical components, was compared with the surface level wind speed and showed a significant correlation with the sea salt components. The non-sea salt components such as non-sea salt sulfate and ammonium did not show a correlation with the surface level wind speed. A comparison between scattering data at surface level with the extinction coefficient at the lowest altitude bin (75m) from the lidar inversion shows a consistent correlation but is quantitatively different. This quantitative discrepancy was explained based on the hygroscopic growth due to differences in relative humidity in measurement conditions. Aerosol optical properties measured near the surface were often significantly correlated with those averaged over the column. These include scattering by near-surface bulk aerosol at 530 nm versus column aerosol optical depth (AOD), near-surface sub-microm scattering fraction versus column averaged sub-microm scattering fraction, and the average angstrom exponent over column and lidar ratio derived using column integrated size distribution and complex refractive index. We also found that the single scattering albedo (ω o) measured at the surface by combining daily averages of the aerosol absorption and aerosol light scattering were in the same range as the instantaneous ω o retrieved for the column. The relative contribution of submicron aerosol light scattering to total aerosol light scattering is slightly higher in the column relative to the surface. Surface

  20. Detection of near-surface cavities by generalized S-transform of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guang-zhou; Tsoflias, George P.; Li, Chang-jiang

    2016-06-01

    The near-surface cavities can cause a huge hidden trouble for urban infrastructure construction, such as, foundation settlement and roadbed subsidence, and so on. So, it is an important task to detect the underground cavities effectively for many engineering projects. At the same time, because of the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods, detecting the location of the hidden cavities quantitatively is still a technical challenge which needs to be studied further. Base on the study of Xia et al. (Xia et al., 2007), we performed a little modification to the travel time equation for the Rayleigh-wave diffraction. We put forward another way to detect the shallow subsurface voids. The generalized S-transform was adopted to extract the arrival times of the diffracted Rayleigh waves from the near and far-offset boundaries of the void at a certain receiver. Then the arrival times were used to calculate the boundary locations of the void. Three half-space void models and a two-layered void model were used to demonstrate the feasibility and effect of detecting a void with the generalized S-transform. A rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method was adopted in wave field modeling to obtain the synthetic seismic record. Finally, a real world field data was used to verify the detecting effect. The theoretical models and the real world example showed that it is feasible and effective to use the generalized S-transform to detect the near-surface cavities.

  1. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun’s Near-Surface Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Benjamin J.; Hindman, Bradley W.; Toomre, Juri

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of the Sun’s sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10-40 m s-1 (or equivalently 1-3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of downflows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the downflows have a Rossby radius of deformation equal to the depth of the shear layer and we suggest that this equality may not be coincidental.

  2. Helioseismic Imaging of Supergranulation throughout the Sun's Near-Surface Shear Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bradley; Greer, Benjamin; Toomre, Juri

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the Sun's sub-surface convective flows and provide evidence that the pattern of supergranulation is driven at the surface. The pattern subsequently descends slowly throughout the near-surface shear layer in a manner that is inconsistent with a 3-D cellular structure. The flow measurements are obtained through the application of a new helioseismic technique based on traditional ring analysis. We measure the flow field over the course of eleven days and perform a correlation analysis between all possible pairs of depths and temporal separations. In congruence with previous studies, we find that the supergranulation pattern remains coherent at the surface for slightly less than two days and the instantaneous surface pattern is imprinted to a depth of 7 Mm. However, these correlation times and depths are deceptive. When we admit a potential time lag in the correlation, we find that peak correlation in the convective flows descends at a rate of 10 - 30 m s-1 (or equivalently 1 - 3 Mm per day). Furthermore, the correlation extends throughout all depths of the near-surface shear layer. This pattern-propagation rate is well matched by estimates of the speed of down flows obtained through the anelastic approximation. Direct integration of the measured speed indicates that the supergranulation pattern that first appears at the surface eventually reaches the bottom of the near-surface shear layer a month later. Thus, the transit time is roughly equal to a solar rotation period and we suggest this equality may not be coincidental.

  3. Effects of shrub and tree cover increase on the near-surface atmosphere in northern Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydsaa, Johanne H.; Stordal, Frode; Bryn, Anders; Tallaksen, Lena M.

    2017-09-01

    Increased shrub and tree cover in high latitudes is a widely observed response to climate change that can lead to positive feedbacks to the regional climate. In this study we evaluate the sensitivity of the near-surface atmosphere to a potential increase in shrub and tree cover in the northern Fennoscandia region. We have applied the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the Noah-UA land surface module in evaluating biophysical effects of increased shrub cover on the near-surface atmosphere at a fine resolution (5.4 km × 5.4 km). Perturbation experiments are performed in which we prescribe a gradual increase in taller vegetation in the alpine shrub and tree cover according to empirically established bioclimatic zones within the study region. We focus on the spring and summer atmospheric response. To evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric response to inter-annual variability in climate, simulations were conducted for two contrasting years, one warm and one cold. We find that shrub and tree cover increase leads to a general increase in near-surface temperatures, with the highest influence seen during the snowmelt season and a more moderate effect during summer. We find that the warming effect is stronger in taller vegetation types, with more complex canopies leading to decreases in the surface albedo. Counteracting effects include increased evapotranspiration, which can lead to increased cloud cover, precipitation, and snow cover. We find that the strength of the atmospheric feedback is sensitive to snow cover variations and to a lesser extent to summer temperatures. Our results show that the positive feedback to high-latitude warming induced by increased shrub and tree cover is a robust feature across inter-annual differences in meteorological conditions and will likely play an important role in land-atmosphere feedback processes in the future.

  4. Atmospheric dispersion of airborne pollen evidenced by near-surface and columnar measurements in Barcelona, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michaël.; Izquierdo, Rebeca; Jorba, Oriol; Alarcón, Marta; Belmonte, Jordina; Comerón, Adolfo; De Linares, Concepción; Baldasano, José Maria

    2016-10-01

    Hourly measurements of pollen near-surface concentration and lidar-derived profiles of volume and particle depolarization ratios during a 5-day pollination event observed in Barcelona, Spain, between 27 - 31 March, 2015, are presented. Maximum hourly pollen concentrations of 4700 and 1200 m-3 h-1 were found for Platanus and Pinus, respectively, which represented together more than 80 % of the total pollen. . The pollen concentration was found positively correlated with temperature (correlation coefficient, r, of 0.95) and wind speed (r = 0.82) and negatively correlated with relative humidity (r = -0.18). The ground concentration shows a clear diurnal cycle although pollen activity is also detected during nighttime in three occasions and is clearly associated with periods of strong wind speeds. Everyday a clear diurnal cycle caused by the vertical transport of the airborne pollen was visible on the lidar-derived profiles of the volume depolarization ratio with maxima usually reached between 12 and 15 UT. On average the volume depolarization ratios in the pollen plume ranged between 0.08 and 0.22. Except in the cases of nocturnal pollen activity, the correlation coefficients between volume depolarization ratio and near-surface concentration are high (>0.68). The dispersion of the Platanus and Pinus in the atmosphere was simulated with the Nonhydrostatic Multiscale Meteorological Model on the B grid at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center with a newly developed Chemical Transport Model (NMMB/BSC-CTM). Model near-surface daily pollen concentrations were compared to our observations at two sites: in Barcelona and Bellaterra (12 km NE of Barcelona). Model hourly pollen concentrations were compared to our observations in Barcelona. Better results are obtained for Pinus than for Platanus. Guidelines are proposed to improve the dispersion of airborne pollen by atmospheric models.

  5. Scoping survey of perceived concerns, issues, and problems for near-surface disposal of FUSRAP waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.E.; Gilbert, T.L.

    1982-12-01

    This report is a scoping summary of concerns, issues, and perceived problems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste, based on a survey of the current literature. Near-surface disposal means land burial in or within 15 to 20 m of the earth's surface. It includes shallow land burial (burial in trenches, typically about 6 m deep with a 2-m cap and cover) and some intermediate-depth land burial (e.g., trenches and cap similar to shallow land burial, but placed below 10 to 15 m of clean soil). Proposed solutions to anticipated problems also are discussed. The purpose of the report is to provide a better basis for identifying and evaluating the environmental impacts and related factors that must be analyzed and compared in assessing candidate near-surface disposal sites for FUSRAP waste. FUSRAP wastes are of diverse types, and their classification for regulatory purposes is not yet fixed. Most of it may be characterized as low-activity bulk solid waste, and is similar to mill tailings, but with somewhat lower average specific activity. It may also qualify as Class A segregated waste under the proposed 10 CFR 61 rules, but the parent radionuclides of concern in FUSRAP (primarily U-238 and Th-232) have longer half-lives than do the radionuclides of concern in most low-level waste. Most of the references reviewed deal with low-level waste or mill tailings, since there is as yet very little literature in the public domain on FUSRAP per se.

  6. Detection of near-surface and surface-breaking defects using ultrasonic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2012-05-01

    An efficient Finite Element procedure for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect which is located near a free surface in an otherwise homogeneous isotropic half-space is presented. The data provided by this model is then used for simulating an ultrasonic array response for different near-surface and surface-breaking defects. Example results for 2D array (3D defects) are presented and compared with the experiment. Its practical application to the volumetric inspections of thin section is discussed.

  7. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2016-09-06

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green\\'s functions computed from the shot gathers. Migrating shot gathers recorded by 2D and 3D land surveys validates the effectiveness of detecting nearsurface heterogeneities by natural migration. The implication is that more accurate hazard maps can be created by migrating surface waves in land surveys.

  8. CONCEPTION OF A DEVICE FOR CARRYING OUT OF NEAR-SURFACE LASER PHORESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ryzhevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a conception of the electronic-optical device for carrying out of the nearsurface laser phoresis procedure using the dynamical gradient light field (DGLF of the interference type. To select an optimal construction we considered some variants of devices for formation of the such DGLFs. In the framework of a model of biological tissues with nonequilibrium radiation absorption by its microstructures we calculated the general form of the temperature response dependence on the coherence ratio of the affecting DGLF. We proposed a criterion for choice of a laser source on the coherence ratio of its radiation for near-surface laser phoresis with DGLF.

  9. On release of radionuclides from a near-surface radioactive waste repository to the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudelis Arūnas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A closed near-surface radioactive waste repository is the source of various radionuclides causing the human exposure. Recent investigations confirm an effectiveness of the engineering barriers installed in 2006 to prevent the penetration of radionuclides to the environment. The tritium activity concentration in groundwater decreased from tens of kBq/l to below hundreds of Bq/l. The monitoring and groundwater level data suggest the leaching of tritium from previously contaminated layers of unsaturated zone by rising groundwater while 210Pb may disperse as a decay product of 226Ra daughters.

  10. A controlled field pilot for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, Thomas; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2009-01-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow, slotted horizontal well divided into six zones. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from 6 national labs, 2 universities, EPRI, and the USGS. Additionally, modeling of CO2 transport and concentrations in the saturated soil and in the vadose zone was conducted. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  12. Long-term CO2 injection and its impact on near-surface soil microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosdz, Simone; West, Julia M; Jones, David; Rakoczy, Jana; Green, Kay; Barlow, Tom; Blöthe, Marco; Smith, Karon; Steven, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Impacts of long-term CO2 exposure on environmental processes and microbial populations of near-surface soils are poorly understood. This near-surface long-term CO2 injection study demonstrated that soil microbiology and geochemistry is influenced more by seasonal parameters than elevated CO2 Soil samples were taken during a 3-year field experiment including sampling campaigns before, during and after 24 months of continuous CO2 injection. CO2 concentrations within CO2-injected plots increased up to 23% during the injection period. No CO2 impacts on geochemistry were detected over time. In addition, CO2-exposed samples did not show significant changes in microbial CO2 and CH4 turnover rates compared to reference samples. Likewise, no significant CO2-induced variations were detected for the abundance of Bacteria, Archaea (16S rDNA) and gene copy numbers of the mcrA gene, Crenarchaeota and amoA gene. The majority (75%-95%) of the bacterial sequences were assigned to five phyla: Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes The majority of the archaeal sequences (85%-100%) were assigned to the thaumarchaeotal cluster I.1b (soil group). Univariate and multivariate statistical as well as principal component analyses showed no significant CO2-induced variation. Instead, seasonal impacts especially temperature and precipitation were detected. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A Variational Method for Estimating Near-Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Heat Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shuwen; ZHANG Weidong; QIU Chongjian

    2007-01-01

    A variational data assimilation method is proposed to estimate the near-surface soil moisture and surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The method merges the five parts into a cost function, I.e., the differences of wind, potential temperature, and specific humidity gradient between observations and those computed by the profile method, the difference of latent heat fluxes calculated using the ECMWF land surface evaporation scheme and the profile method, and a weak constraint for surface energy balance. By using an optimal algorithm, the best solutions are found. The method is tested with the data collected at Feixi Station (31.41°N, 117.08°E) supported by the China Heavy Rain Experiment and Study (HeRES) during 7-30 June 2001. The results show that estimated near-surface soil moistures can quickly respond to rainfall, and their temporal variation is consistent with that of measurements of average soil moisture over 15-cm top depth with a maximum error less than 0.03 m3 m-3. The surface heat fluxes calculated by this method are consistent with those by the Bowen ratio method, but at the same time it can overcome the instability problem occurring in the Bowen ratio method when the latter is about -1. Meanwhile, the variational method is more accurate than the profile method in terms of satisfying the surface energy balance. The sensitivity tests also show that the variational method is the most stable one among the three methods.

  14. Greenland meltwater storage in firn limited by near-surface ice formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machguth, Horst; Macferrin, Mike; van As, Dirk; Box, Jason E.; Charalampidis, Charalampos; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    2016-04-01

    Approximately half of Greenland’s current annual mass loss is attributed to runoff from surface melt. At higher elevations, however, melt does not necessarily equal runoff, because meltwater can refreeze in the porous near-surface snow and firn. Two recent studies suggest that all or most of Greenland’s firn pore space is available for meltwater storage, making the firn an important buffer against contribution to sea level rise for decades to come. Here, we employ in situ observations and historical legacy data to demonstrate that surface runoff begins to dominate over meltwater storage well before firn pore space has been completely filled. Our observations frame the recent exceptional melt summers in 2010 and 2012 (refs ,), revealing significant changes in firn structure at different elevations caused by successive intensive melt events. In the upper regions (more than ~1,900 m above sea level), firn has undergone substantial densification, while at lower elevations, where melt is most abundant, porous firn has lost most of its capability to retain meltwater. Here, the formation of near-surface ice layers renders deep pore space difficult to access, forcing meltwater to enter an efficient surface discharge system and intensifying ice sheet mass loss earlier than previously suggested.

  15. Influence of near-surface blisters on deuterium transport in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Manhard, A.; von Toussaint, U.

    2017-08-01

    The effect of near-surface blisters on deuterium transport in tungsten is studied by means of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Gentle deuterium plasma loading of different durations and subsequent NRA depth profiling is performed in heavily pre-blistered and unblistered areas on self-damaged tungsten samples. Comparison of the deuterium depth profiles reveals a considerable reduction of the deuterium transport into the bulk due to the presence of near-surface blisters. SEM and NRA results identify the enhanced re-emission of deuterium from the sample due to open blisters as the underlying mechanism, which reduces the deuterium flux into the bulk. Based on a simple analytical hydrogen retention model, the re-emitted deuterium flux by open blisters is determined to be 80% of the implanted deuterium flux in the present conducted experiment. In addition, the deuterium flux into the bulk is reduced by 60% compared to the unblistered case. Hence the presence of blisters is not a general disadvantage in the context of retention, but can be beneficial in slowing down the build up of a certain hydrogen inventory and in reducing the permeation flux.

  16. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  17. Formation of nanocrystalline surface layers in various metallic materials by near surface severe plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Sato, Nobuhiro Tsuji, Yoritoshi Minamino and Yuichiro Koizumi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of the various kinds of metallic materials sheets were severely deformed by wire-brushing at ambient temperature to achieve nanocrystalline surface layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the near surface severe plastic deformation (NS-SPD were characterized by means of TEM. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 30 to 200 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all the severely scratched metallic materials, which are Ti-added ultra-low carbon interstitial free steel, austenitic stainless steel (SUS304, 99.99 wt.%Al, commercial purity aluminum (A1050 and A1100, Al–Mg alloy (A5083, Al-4 wt.%Cu alloy, OFHC-Cu (C1020, Cu–Zn alloy (C2600 and Pb-1.5%Sn alloy. In case of the 1050-H24 aluminum, the depth of the surface nanocrystalline layer was about 15 μm. It was clarified that wire-brushing is an effective way of NS-SPD, and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials.

  18. Near-surface gravity actuated pipe (GAP{sup TM}) system for Brazilian deepwater fluid transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromage, Lionel; Brown, Paul A. [SBM Offshore (Monaco)

    2009-12-19

    The recent discovery of new deep water and ultra-deep water oil and gas fields offshore Brazil, including pre-salt reservoirs, has become a focal point for field development Operators and Contractors. The aggressive nature of fluids (sour, high density) in combination with deeper waters implies potential flow assurance issues. These issues challenge riser and pipeline technology to find cost effective solutions for hydrocarbon fluid transfer in field development scenarios involving phased tied-back. The near-surface GAP{sup TM}, system (Gravity Actuated Pipe{sup TM}), which has been in operation for more than two years on the Kikeh field offshore Malaysia in 1325 m of water between a Dry Tree Unit (SPAR) and a turret-moored FPSO, is considered to meet these challenges since such a product is quasi independent of water depth and takes advantage of being near surface to optimize flow assurance. Furthermore the GAP{sup TM} has undergone technical upgrades when compared to the Kikeh project in order to make it suitable for the more hostile met ocean conditions offshore Brazil. This paper presents the design features, the construction and assembly plans in Brazil and the offshore installation of a GAP fluid transfer system for operation in Brazilian deep waters. (author)

  19. Coseismic landslides reveal near-surface rock strength in a high-relief tectonically active setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallen, Sean F; Clark, Marin K; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    We present quantitative estimates of near-surface rock strength relevant to landscape evolution and landslide hazard assessment for 15 geologic map units of the Longmen Shan, China. Strength estimates are derived from a novel method that inverts earthquake peak ground acceleration models and coseismic landslide inventories to obtain material proper- ties and landslide thickness. Aggregate rock strength is determined by prescribing a friction angle of 30° and solving for effective cohesion. Effective cohesion ranges are from 70 kPa to 107 kPa for 15 geologic map units, and are approximately an order of magnitude less than typical laboratory measurements, probably because laboratory tests on hand-sized specimens do not incorporate the effects of heterogeneity and fracturing that likely control near-surface strength at the hillslope scale. We find that strength among the geologic map units studied varies by less than a factor of two. However, increased weakening of units with proximity to the range front, where precipitation and active fault density are the greatest, suggests that cli- matic and tectonic factors overwhelm lithologic differences in rock strength in this high-relief tectonically active setting.

  20. Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-12-15

    ''Hidden'' geothermal systems are those systems above which hydrothermal surface features (e.g., hot springs, fumaroles, elevated ground temperatures, hydrothermal alteration) are lacking. Emissions of moderate to low solubility gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, He) may be one of the primary near-surface signals from these systems. Detection of anomalous gas emissions related to hidden geothermal systems may therefore be an important tool to discover new geothermal resources. This study investigates the potential for CO2 detection and monitoring in the subsurface and above ground in the near-surface environment to serve as a tool to discover hidden geothermal systems. We focus the investigation on CO2 due to (1) its abundance in geothermal systems, (2) its moderate solubility in water, and (3) the wide range of technologies available to monitor CO2 in the near-surface environment. However, monitoring in the near-surface environment for CO2 derived from hidden geothermal reservoirs is complicated by the large variation in CO2 fluxes and concentrations arising from natural biological and hydrologic processes. In the near-surface environment, the flow and transport of CO2 at high concentrations will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of CO2 migration show that CO2 concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively low geothermal source CO2 fluxes. However, once CO2 seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO2 seepage. In natural ecological systems in the absence of geothermal gas emissions, near-surface CO2 fluxes and concentrations are primarily controlled by CO2 uptake by photosynthesis, production by root respiration, and microbial decomposition of soil/subsoil organic matter, groundwater degassing, and exchange with the atmosphere. Available technologies for monitoring CO2 in

  1. Near-surface monitoring strategies for geologic carbon dioxide storage verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hepple, Robert P.

    2003-10-31

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage verification will be needed to ensure that CO{sub 2} is not leaking from the intended storage formation and seeping out of the ground. Because the ultimate failure of geologic CO{sub 2} storage occurs when CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, and because elevated concentrations of CO{sub 2} near the ground surface can cause health, safety, and environmental risks, monitoring will need to be carried out in the near-surface environment. The detection of a CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal (LOSS) in the near-surface environment is challenging because there are large natural variations in CO{sub 2} concentrations and fluxes arising from soil, plant, and subsurface processes. The term leakage refers to CO{sub 2} migration away from the intended storage site, while seepage is defined as CO{sub 2} passing from one medium to another, for example across the ground surface. The flow and transport of CO{sub 2} at high concentrations in the near-surface environment will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of leakage and seepage show that CO{sub 2} concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively modest CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. However, once CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO{sub 2} seepage. In natural ecological systems with no CO{sub 2} LOSS, near-surface CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations are controlled by CO{sub 2} uptake by photosynthesis, and production by root respiration, organic carbon biodegradation in soil, deep outgassing of CO{sub 2}, and by exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Existing technologies available for monitoring CO{sub 2} in the near-surface environment

  2. A comparison of Argo nominal surface and near-surface temperature for validation of AMSR-E SST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zenghong; Chen, Xingrong; Sun, Chaohui; Wu, Xiaofen; Lu, Shaolei

    2017-05-01

    Satellite SST (sea surface temperature) from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) is compared with in situ temperature observations from Argo profiling floats over the global oceans to evaluate the advantages of Argo NST (near-surface temperature: water temperature less than 1 m from the surface). By comparing Argo nominal surface temperature ( 5 m) with its NST, a diurnal cycle caused by daytime warming and nighttime cooling was found, along with a maximum warming of 0.08±0.36°C during 14:00-15:00 local time. Further comparisons between Argo 5-m temperature/Argo NST and AMSR-E SST retrievals related to wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud water indicate warming biases at low wind speed (28 mm during daytime. The warming tendency is more remarkable for AMSR-E SST/Argo 5-m temperature compared with AMSR-E SST/Argo NST, owing to the effect of diurnal warming. This effect of diurnal warming events should be excluded before validation for microwave SST retrievals. Both AMSR-E nighttime SST/Argo 5-m temperature and nighttime SST/Argo NST show generally good agreement, independent of wind speed and columnar water vapor. From our analysis, Argo NST data demonstrated their advantages for validation of satellite-retrieved SST.

  3. On the efficiency of combined ion implantation for the creation of near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Momenzadeh, Seyed Ali; Antonov, Denis; Fedder, Helmut; Denisenko, Andrej [3. Institute of Physics, Research Center SCoPE and IQST, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Wrachtrup, Joerg [3. Institute of Physics, Research Center SCoPE and IQST, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The efficiency of co-implantation of different ion species to generate near-surface nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is analyzed by comparing the areal densities of NV centers corresponding to various experimental conditions. In particular, the effect of helium (6 keV He{sub 2}{sup +}) and carbon (10 keV C{sup +}) co-implantation within a wide range of ion fluences are studied. The total density of NV centers by co-implantation are shown to be basically a sum of the nitrogen-induced NV centers and those activated from residual nitrogen impurities present in the substrate (approximately 1ppb) by the excess of vacancies at the carbon- and helium-induced ion tracks. Such low efficiency of the co-implantation events is discussed considering the model of local clusters of vacancies at each implantation-induced ion track. This is also experimentally supported by the presence of a photoluminescence (PL) background related to radiation-induced defects measured within all implanted areas with high carbon and helium ion fluences. Further limits set by the annealing temperature are also discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Near-Surface Seasonal Creeping and Subsurface Repeated Seismicity on the Plate-Suture Thrust Fault in Chihshang, Eastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Chu, H.; Angelier, J.; Hu, J.; Rau, R.

    2002-12-01

    The Chihshang fault is one of the most active segments of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, the plate suture between the converging Philippine and Eurasian plates. A destructive earthquake of M 6.2 with substantial surface scarps resulted from rupturing of the Chihshang fault in 1951. From that on, no big earthquake greater than M 6 occurred in this area. Instead, the Chihshang fault reveals a creeping behavior at least during the past 18 observation years. The creepmeter data of daily basis at Chihshang since 1998 revealed different behaviors of surface fault motion at two sites but similar annual shortening rates, 16.2 mm at Tapo site and 15.0 mm at Chinyuan site. Four of five creepmeters showed a seasonal variation, in which the fault only moved, as steadily rapid creeping, during the rainy season, generally from April to October, and remained quite during the rest of year. The only exception is due to the creepmeter located on the mélange-composed slope, where local gravitational landslide played a significant role combined with the tectonic faulting. Comparing to the precipitation data, we inferred that the relatively moderate rainfall is seemingly enough for triggering or facilitating slippages on the surface fault, one or two months before the heavy rains dropped in the wet season. During this observation period from 1998 to 2001, the subsurface seismicity exhibited clusters of micro-earthquakes occurred on the Chihshang fault at the depth of 15-25 km. The repeated earthquakes continuously occurred regardless the wet or the dry seasons, indicating the stress on the Chihshang fault in the shallow crust level of less than 10 km released only by creeping during the wet season. Combination of the near-surface creeping and the subsurface repeated earthquakes provided insights on the mechanical behaviors of the Chihshang fault, which are likely related to the geological materials of the converging island-arc: week mélange in the near-surface fault zone and strong

  5. Seasonal Cycle of the Near-Surface Diurnal Wind Field Over the Bay of La Paz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrent, Cuauhtémoc; Zaitsev, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    The results of numerical simulations of the troposphere over the Bay of La Paz, calculated for the months of January, April, July and October during the period 2006-2010 with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF v3.5) regional model, are used to describe the seasonal features of the diurnal cycle of planetary boundary-layer winds. Two distinct near-surface diurnal flows with strong seasonal variability were identified: (1) a nocturnal and matutinal breeze directed from the subtropical Pacific Ocean, over the Baja California peninsula and the Bay of La Paz, into the Gulf of California that is associated with the regional sea-surface temperature difference between those two major water bodies; and (2) a mid to late afternoon onshore sea-breeze related to the peninsula's daily cycle of insolation heating that evolves with counter-clockwise rotation over the Bay of La Paz. The model results reveal the interaction over Baja California of opposing afternoon sea-breeze fronts that originate from the subtropical Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of California, with a convergence line forming over the peaks of the peninsula's topography and the associated presence of a closed vertical circulation cell over the Bay of La Paz and the adjacent Gulf. The collision of the opposing sea-breeze fronts over the narrow peninsula drives convection that is relatively weak due to the reduced heat source and only appears to produce precipitation sporadically. The spatial structure of the sea-breeze fronts over the Bay of La Paz region is complex due to shoreline curvature and nearby topographic features. A comparison of the numerical results with available meteorological near-surface observations indicates that the modelling methodology adequately reproduced the observed features of the seasonal variability of the local planetary boundary-layer diurnal wind cycle and confirms that the low-level atmospheric circulation over the Bay of La Paz is dominated by kinetic energy in the diurnal band

  6. Near-surface geothermal potential assessment of the region Leogang - Saalbach-Hinterglemm in Salzburg, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottig, Magdalena; Rupprecht, Doris; Hoyer, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Within the EU-funded Alpine Space project GRETA (Near-surface Geothermal Resources in the Territory of the Alpine space), a potential assessment for the use of near-surface geothermal energy is being performed. The focus region for Austria is represented by the two communities Leogang and Saalbach-Hinterglemm where settlements are located in altitudes of about 800 - 1.000 m. In these communities, as well as in large parts of the alpine space region in Austria, winter sports tourism is an important economic factor. The demand for heating and domestic hot water in this region of about 6.000 inhabitants rises significantly in the winter months due to around 2 million guest nights per year. This makes clear why the focus is on touristic infrastructure like alpine huts or hotels. It is a high-altitude area with a large number of remote houses, thus district-heating is not ubiquitous - thus, near-surface geothermal energy can be a useful solution for a self-sufficient energy supply. The objective of detailed investigation within the project is, to which extent the elevation, the gradient and the orientation of the hillside influence the geothermal usability of the shallow underground. To predict temperatures in depths of up to 100 m and therefore make statements on the geothermal usability of a certain piece of land, it is necessary to attain a precise ground-temperature map which reflects the upper model boundary. As there are no ground temperature measurement stations within the region, the GBA has installed four monitoring stations. Two are located in the valley, at altitudes of about 800 m, and two in higher altitudes of about 1.200 m, one on a south- and one on a north-slope. Using a software invented by the University of Soil Sciences in Vienna a ground-temperature map will be calculated. The calculation is based on climatic data considering parameters like soil composition. Measured values from the installed monitoring stations will help to validate or to

  7. Near-surface properties using seismograms from the GONAF-Tuzla vertical array, SE Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, C.; Malin, P. E.; Bohnhoff, M.; Bulut, F.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilic, T.; Kartal, R. F.; Kadirioglu, F. T.; Nurlu, M.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the ICDP-GONAF project (Geophysical Observatory at the North Anatolian Fault) geophone arrays have been installed in 300 m deep boreholes around the eastern Sea of Marmara. The objectives of GONAF are to (1) monitor the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) at the transition from the 1999 Izmit rupture to the Princes Islands segment offshore Istanbul, where a M ~ 7 earthquake can reasonably be expected to occur and (2) to determine ground-motion amplification and near-surface properties at the GONAF sites. Here we use recordings from the first GONAF borehole on the Tuzla peninsula in eastern Istanbul. The array consists of one 1 Hz 3C Mark Products L4 seismometer at the surface, three 1 Hz vertical Mark Products L4 seismometers at 75 m depth-spacing, and 2 Hz and 15 Hz 3C Geospace HS-1 and DM2400 seismometers at 288 m depth. During April - May 2013 this array recorded a microearthquake swarm located ~ 3.5 km epicentral distance south of the Tuzla site. By cross-correlating the continuous Tuzla data with the only swarm event detected by the regional network (20th of April 2013, Md 1.6) we retrieved an additional of 113 events. The swarm and an additional 15 events located throughout the eastern Marmara region were used to analyze the near-surface properties of the Tuzla site. We derive a velocity model from sonic-log measurements which were conducted upon completion of the Tuzla well. This model is confirmed by modeling travel-time curves with forward ray-tracing and by an analysis of spectral interference effects. In the uppermost ~80 m at this site we observe an unexpectedly high velocity lid (VP ~ 4000 m/s) over a much slower (VP ~ 3000 m/s) ~50 m thick zone. These velocity structure leads to interference effects between up and downgoing waves even at the deepest stations. As a result of this the standard spectral ratio technique for deriving the site response becomes poor approximation. However, waveform deconvolution techniques allow determination of the

  8. Near-surface residual stresses and microstructural changes after turning of a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlauer, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are precipitation hardened alloys with complex compositions. They are used in aircraft engines and land-based gas turbines in load bearing structural components that are exposed to high temperatures. Failure mechanisms in this environment are high and low cycle fatigue, creep, and corrosion. During manufacturing, residual stresses are often introduced into the material due to inhomogeneous plastic deformations, both intentionally and unintentionally. One such manufacturing process is metal cutting, which introduces residual stresses in the surface layer. The stress state in the near-surface zone of components is of special interest as the surface often experiences peak loads and cracks have their starting point there. In this thesis, near-surface residual stress distributions and microstructural changes are studied in the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 for two different turning operations, face grooving and facing. Process variables are in both cases cutting speed and feed that have been varied between (10 and 1200) m/min and (0.01 and 0.5) mm, respectively. The first turning technique face grooving, which gives cutting conditions similar to orthogonal cutting, showed a clear dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed. The tensile stress at the surface, the maximum compressive stress below the surface, and the thickness of the affected layer increase with increasing cutting speed. The tensile stresses are constrained to a thin surface layer and compressive residual stresses below the surface dominate the depth profile of the residual stresses. Only at low cutting speed, residual stresses were largely avoided. The second turning technique facing confirmed the dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed and revealed a similar dependency on the feed. Microstructural investigations of near-surface cross-sections by means of transmission electron microscopy showed a zone where the grains had undergone plastic

  9. Spatial and temporal distribution characteristics of near-surface CO2 concentration over China based on GOSAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Cui, Weihong; Sun, Yunhua

    2014-11-01

    To study the spatial and temporal distribution characteristics of near-surface CO2 concentration over China, the data of GOSAT L4B and auxiliary data of Mt Waliguan background observations, population density, total energy consumption (coal) and GDP in 2009 were applied to this study. The ArcGIS Geostatistical Analytical Method was used. The ground-based validation was processed by comparing GOSAT data with Mt Waliguan background observations. The variation characteristics of the near-surface CO2 concentration over China was analysed spatially and temporally. The results show that: GOSAT retrieved near-surface products are consistent with Mt Waliguan ground-based measurement; Near-surface CO2 concentration over China is relatively concentrated, and has significant differences between the East and the West, with a overall characteristic that CO2 concentration in the east of China is high and in the west is low; Near-surface CO2 concentration over China has a significant seasonal variation characteristic, and the monthly average concentration rise to the highest value of 396.512 ppmv in April (spring), which is significantly higher than other seasons, decline to the lowest value of 382.781 ppmv in July (summer); All relationships illustrate a big uncertainty, resulting a conclusion that the reasons causing the spatial distribution of near-surface CO2 concentration may be varied, could not be easily determined as anthropogenic or natural ressons, which need further study.

  10. Near-surface traveltime tomographic inversion using multiple first break picks

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The input data for refraction traveltime tomography are the traveltimes of the first breaks, which are picked using automatic pickers. Although automatic pickers perform satisfactorily overall, no one automatic picker can be characterized as the best one; one picker might fail for traces for which other pickers are accurate and vice versa for other traces. We introduce an iterative method for traveltime tomography, which takes as input traveltimes from a number of pickers. During the inversion scheme inconsistent traveltimes are replaced with more meaningful ones to obtain a smooth near-surface velocity model. The scheme is easily parallelizable and a byproduct of the inversion scheme is a set of consistent traveltimes which is close to the actual traveltimes of the first breaks.

  11. Near-surface monitoring for the ZERT shallow CO2 injection project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strazisar, Brian R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Wells, Arthur W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Diehl, J. Rodney [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Hammack, Richard W. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Veloski, Garret A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2009-12-01

    As part of a collaborative effort operated by the Zero Emission Research and Technology Center (ZERT), a series of two shallow releases of CO2 Was performed at a test site in Bozeman, MT. The purpose of the experiment was to simulate possible leakage scenarios from a carbon capture and storage operation in order to further develop and verify monitoring technologies used to characterize and quantify the release of CO2. The project included collaboration with several research groups and organizations. Presented here are the results of soil-gas monitoring conducted by researchers from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, including CO2 flux measurement, soil-gas analysis, perfluorocarbon tracer monitoring, and soil resistivity measurements. Together, these methods proved to be effective in detecting and characterizing leakage in the near-surface.

  12. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green\\'s functions along the surface instead of simulated Green\\'s functions. The key assumptions are that the scattering bodies are within the depth interrogated by the surface waves, and the Green\\'s functions are recorded with dense receiver sampling along the free surface. This natural migration takes into account all orders of multiples, mode conversions and non-linear effects of surface waves in the data. The natural imaging formulae are derived for both active source and ambient-noise data, and computer simulations show that natural migration can effectively image near-surface heterogeneities with typical ambient-noise sources and geophone distributions.

  13. Post-closure safety assessment of near surface disposal facilities for disused sealed radioactive sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seunghee; Kim, Juyoul, E-mail: gracemi@fnctech.com

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Post-closure safety assessment of near surface disposal facility for DSRS was performed. • Engineered vault and rock-cavern type were considered for normal and well scenario. • {sup 14}C, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 241}Am were primary nuclides contributing large portion of exposure dose. • Near surface disposal of DSRSs containing {sup 14}C, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 241}Am should be restricted. - Abstract: Great attention has been recently paid to the post-closure safety assessment of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) disposal facility for disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRSs) around the world. Although the amount of volume of DSRSs generated from industry, medicine and research and education organization was relatively small compared with radioactive wastes from commercial nuclear power plants, some DSRSs can pose a significant hazard to human health due to their high activities and long half-lives, if not appropriately managed and disposed. In this study, post-closure safety assessment was carried out for DSRSs generated from 1991 to 2014 in Korea in order to ensure long-term safety of near surface disposal facilities. Two kinds of disposal options were considered, i.e., engineered vault type disposal facility and rock-cavern type disposal facility. Rock-cavern type disposal facility has been under operation in Gyeongju city, republic of Korea since August 2015 and engineered vault type disposal facility will be constructed until December 2020 in the vicinity of rock-cavern disposal facility. Assessment endpoint was individual dose to the member of critical group, which was modeled by GoldSim, which has been widely used as probabilistic risk analysis software based on Monte Carlo simulation in the area of safety assessment of radioactive waste facilities. In normal groundwater scenario, the maximum exposure dose was extremely low, approximately 1 × 10{sup −7} mSv/yr, for both disposal options and satisfied the regulatory limit

  14. A Controlled Field Pilot for Testing Near Surface CO2 Detection Techniques and Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L.

    2007-12-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow horizontal, well slotted over 70m of its length and divided into seven zones via packers with mass flow control in each individual zone. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects and those design parameters will be discussed. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from Los Alamos National Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, the National Energy Technology Lab, Pacific Northwest National Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab and West Virginia University. Techniques included eddy covariance, soil gas measurements, hyperspectral imaging for plant stress detection, differential absorption LIDAR (both free space atmospheric and below surface soil gas), tracer studies, water sampling, stable isotope studies, and soil flux chambers. An overview of these results will be presented.

  15. Frequency shifts of resonant modes of the Sun due to near-surface convective scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Jishnu; Antia, H M

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the "surface term." The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun....

  16. Identification of near-surface fault structure using radio magnetotelluric (RMT) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputra, Rifki Mega; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    This study area of Mygdonian Basin in Northern Greece is one of the most active seismic zones in Europe. It is the location where was affected by the largest recent earthquake in 1978 with magnitude 6.5. The geology of this area consist four major units, which are the lower terrace deposit, Holocene deposit, fans, and the metamorphic. Measurement using RMT was intended to get a better understanding of the near-surface fault structure. We used frequency ranges from 16.365 kHz to 863.930 kHz. Due to high frequency and high resistivity in the top layer, the approximation of skin depth is about 35 meters. Data were collected along one profile which had 1,250 meters in length and 50 meters of each station distance, so the RMT soundings gave a total number of 26 data. The RMT model can indicate the surface fault structure.

  17. Field Investigation of a New Recharge Approach for ASR Projects in Near-Surface Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gaisheng; Knobbe, Steven; Reboulet, Edward C; Whittemore, Donald O; Händel, Falk; Butler, James J

    2016-05-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is the artificial recharge and temporary storage of water in an aquifer when water is abundant, and recovery of all or a portion of that water when it is needed. One key limiting factor that still hinders the effectiveness of ASR is the high costs of constructing, maintaining, and operating the artificial recharge systems. Here we investigate a new recharge method for ASR in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers that uses small-diameter, low-cost wells installed with direct-push (DP) technology. The effectiveness of a DP well for ASR recharge is compared with that of a surface infiltration basin at a field site in north-central Kansas. The performance of the surface basin was poor at the site due to the presence of a shallow continuous clay layer, identified with DP profiling methods, that constrained the downward movement of infiltrated water and significantly reduced the basin recharge capacity. The DP well penetrated through this clay layer and was able to recharge water by gravity alone at a much higher rate. Most importantly, the costs of the DP well, including both the construction and land costs, were only a small fraction of those for the infiltration basin. This low-cost approach could significantly expand the applicability of ASR as a water resources management tool to entities with limited fiscal resources, such as many small municipalities and rural communities. The results of this investigation demonstrate the great potential of DP wells as a new recharge option for ASR projects in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers.

  18. Preliminary safety evaluation of an aircraft impact on a near-surface radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Frano, R.; Forasassi, G.; Pugliese, G. [Department of Industrial and Civil Engineering (DICI), University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    The aircraft impact accident has become very significant in the design of a nuclear facilities, particularly, after the tragic September 2001 event, that raised the public concern about the potential damaging effects that the impact of a large civilian airplane could bring in safety relevant structures. The aim of this study is therefore to preliminarily evaluate the global response and the structural effects induced by the impact of a military or commercial airplane (actually considered as a 'beyond design basis' event) into a near surface radioactive waste (RWs) disposal facility. The safety evaluation was carried out according to the International safety and design guidelines and in agreement with the stress tests requirements for the security track. To achieve the purpose, a lay out and a scheme of a possible near surface repository, like for example those of the El Cabril one, were taken into account. In order to preliminarily perform a reliable analysis of such a large-scale structure and to determine the structural effects induced by such a types of impulsive loads, a realistic, but still operable, numerical model with suitable materials characteristics was implemented by means of FEM codes. In the carried out structural analyses, the RWs repository was considered a 'robust' target, due to its thicker walls and main constitutive materials (steel and reinforced concrete). In addition to adequately represent the dynamic response of repository under crashing, relevant physical phenomena (i.e. penetration, spalling, etc.) were simulated and analysed. The preliminary assessment of the effects induced by the dynamic/impulsive loads allowed generally to verify the residual strength capability of the repository considered. The obtained preliminary results highlighted a remarkable potential to withstand the impact of military/large commercial aircraft, even in presence of ongoing concrete progressive failure (some penetration and spalling of the

  19. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the French SIM hydrological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Draper

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of assimilating near-surface soil moisture into the SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM hydrological model over France is examined. Specifically, the root-zone soil moisture in the ISBA land surface model is constrained over three and a half years, by assimilating the ASCAT-derived surface degree of saturation product, using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter. In this experiment ISBA is forced with the near-real time SAFRAN analysis, which analyses the variables required to force ISBA from relevant observations available before the real time data cut-off. The assimilation results are tested against ISBA forecasts generated with a higher quality delayed cut-off SAFRAN analysis. Ideally, assimilating the ASCAT data will constrain the ISBA surface state to correct for errors in the near-real time SAFRAN forcing, the most significant of which was a substantial dry bias caused by a dry precipitation bias. The assimilation successfully reduced the mean root-zone soil moisture bias, relative to the delayed cut-off forecasts, by close to 50 % of the open-loop value. The improved soil moisture in the model then led to significant improvements in the forecast hydrological cycle, reducing the drainage, runoff, and evapotranspiration biases (by 17 %, 11 %, and 70 %, respectively. When coupled to the MODCOU hydrogeological model, the ASCAT assimilation also led to improved streamflow forecasts, increasing the mean discharge ratio, relative to the delayed cut off forecasts, from 0.68 to 0.76. These results demonstrate that assimilating near-surface soil moisture observations can effectively constrain the SIM model hydrology, while also confirming the accuracy of the ASCAT surface degree of saturation product. This latter point highlights how assimilation experiments can contribute towards the difficult issue of validating remotely sensed land surface observations over large spatial scales.

  20. FREQUENCY SHIFTS OF RESONANT MODES OF THE SUN DUE TO NEAR-SURFACE CONVECTIVE SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Antia, H. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India)

    2015-06-20

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term.” The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary three-dimensional (3D) flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt–Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  1. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0degree of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. It is evident, from this analysis, that SCIAMACHY therefore has the potential to

  2. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in-situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0° of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing a seasonal signal that is representative of lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. The presented analysis suggests that

  3. Near-surface gas mapping studies of salt geologic features at Weeks Island and other sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carney, K.R.; Autin, W.J.; Overton, E.B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Field sampling and rapid gas analysis techniques were used to survey near-surface soil gases for geotechnical diagnostic purposes at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and other salt dome locations in southern Louisiana. This report presents the complete data, results and interpretations obtained during 1995. Weeks Island 1994 gas survey results are also briefly summarized; this earlier study did not find a definitive correlation between sinkhole No. 1 and soil gases. During 1995, several hundred soil gas samples were obtained and analyzed in the field by gas chromatography, for profiling low concentrations and gas anomalies at ppm to percent levels. The target gases included hydrogen, methane, ethane and ethylene. To supplement the field data, additional gas samples were collected at various site locations for laboratory analysis of target gases at ppb levels. Gases in the near-surface soil originate predominantly from the oil, from petrogenic sources within the salt, or from surface microbial activity. Surveys were conducted across two Weeks Island sinkholes, several mapped anomalous zones in the salt, and over the SPR repository site and its perimeter. Samples were also taken at other south Louisiana salt dome locations for comparative purposes. Notable results from these studies are that elevated levels of hydrogen and methane (1) were positively associated with anomalous gassy or shear zones in the salt dome(s) and (2) are also associated with suspected salt fracture (dilatant) zones over the edges of the SPR repository. Significantly elevated areas of hydrogen, methane, plus some ethane, were found over anomalous shear zones in the salt, particularly in a location over high pressure gas pockets in the salt, identified in the mine prior to SPR operations. Limited stable isotope ratio analyses, SIRA, were also conducted and determined that methane samples were of petrogenic origin, not biogenic.

  4. Debye series analysis of internal and near-surface fields for a homogeneous sphere illuminated by an axicon-generated vector Bessel beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shitong; Li, Renxian; Yang, Ruiping; Ding, Chunying

    2017-07-01

    The interaction of an axicon-generated vector Bessel beam (AGVBB) with a homogeneous sphere is investigated in the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). An analytical expression of beam shape coefficients (BSCs) is derived using angular spectrum decomposition method (ASDM), and the scattering coefficients are expanded using Debye series (DSE) in order to isolate the contribution of single scattering process. The internal and near-surface electric fields are numerically analyzed, and the effect of beam location, polarization, order of beam, half-cone angle, and scattering process (namely Debye mode p) are mainly discussed. Numerical results show that a curve formed by extreme peaks can be observed, and the electric fields can be locally enhanced after the interaction of AGVBBs with the particle. Internal and near-surface fields, especially its local enhancement, are very sensitive to the beam parameters, including polarization, order, half-cone angle, etc. The internal fields can also be enhanced by various scattering process (or Debye mode p). Such results have important applications in various fields, including particle sizing, optical tweezers, etc.

  5. Clumped isotopes in near-surface atmospheric CO2 over land, coast and ocean in Taiwan and its vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain Laskar, Amzad; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2016-09-01

    Molecules containing two rare isotopes (e.g., 13C18O16O in CO2), called clumped isotopes, in atmospheric CO2 are powerful tools to provide an alternative way to independently constrain the sources of CO2 in the atmosphere because of their unique physical and chemical properties. We presented clumped isotope data (Δ47) in near-surface atmospheric CO2 from urban, suburban, ocean, coast, high mountain ( ˜ 3.2 km a.s.l.) and forest in Taiwan and its vicinity. The primary goal of the study was to use the unique Δ47 signature in atmospheric CO2 to show the extents of its deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium due to different processes such as photosynthesis, respiration and local anthropogenic emissions, which the commonly used tracers such as δ13C and δ18O cannot provide. We also explored the potential of Δ47 to identify/quantify the contribution of CO2 from various sources. Atmospheric CO2 over ocean was found to be in thermodynamic equilibrium with the surrounding surface sea water. Respired CO2 was also in close thermodynamic equilibrium at ambient air temperature. In contrast, photosynthetic activity result in significant deviation in Δ47 values from that expected thermodynamically. The disequilibrium could be a consequence of kinetic effects associated with the diffusion of CO2 in and out of the leaf stomata. We observed that δ18O and Δ47 do not vary similarly when photosynthesis was involved unlike simple water-CO2 exchange. Additionally we obtained Δ47 values of car exhaust CO2 that were significantly lower than the atmospheric CO2 but higher than that expected at the combustion temperature. In urban and suburban regions, the Δ47 values were found to be lower than the thermodynamic equilibrium values at the ambient temperature, suggesting contributions from local combustion emission.

  6. East-west coastal asymmetry in the summertime near surface wind speed and its projected change in future climate over the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Upal; Chakraborty, Rohit; Maitra, Animesh; Singh, A. K.

    2017-05-01

    The behaviors of various meteorological parameters during 1981-2010 are investigated to obtain any asymmetric variability of summertime near surface wind over Indian coastal boundaries. No significant changes were obtained in the trends of surface pressure, surface relative humidity, 2-metre temperature and surface precipitation; although, near surface wind speed is found to have significantly declined on the eastern coast with respect to the western coast during this period. Summertime surface wind speed on the eastern coast have decreased from 3.5 to 2.5 m s- 1 (7 to 5 knots) whereas 4.5 to 4 m s- 1 (9 to 8 knots) during the last three decades (statistical significance level 95%). A decrease in the atmospheric instability may serve as the potential reason for the suppression of severe convective occurrences manifested by a parallel decrease in surface wind speeds over these regions. The local heating up of middle atmosphere (300-500 hPa pressure level) due to increased humidity and the difference in net heat flux over Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal due to the variance of temperature gradient (1000-925 hPa) along the coastal boundaries might be responsible for this climatic disparity between the coastal regions of India since the last three decades. Summertime near surface wind speed projections for Indian sub-continent based on 7 best climate models, for RCP8.5 scenarios, has been calculated to show a mean increase by 10-15% on the eastern coast (Eastern Ghats), 1-2% on the western coasts (Western Ghats), 1-5% decrease in the Indo-Gangetic Basin and 3% decrease in the Gangetic West Bengal and adjoining Bangladesh.

  7. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Kevin B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, Otis R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benjamin, Russ [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, William H [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  8. The sinkhole of Schmalkalden, Germany - Imaging of near-surface subrosion structures and faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Tschache, Saskia; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-04-01

    In November 2010 a sinkhole of 30 m diameter and 20 m depth opened in a residential area in the village Schmalkalden, Germany, which fortunately led to damage of buildings and property only. The collapse was caused by leaching of soluble rocks in the subsurface, called subrosion. For an improved understanding of the processes leading to subrosion and sinkhole development a detailed characterization of the subsurface structures and elastic parameters is required. We used shear wave reflection seismic, which has proven to be a suitable method for high-resolution imaging of the near-surface. The village Schmalkalden is located in southern Thuringia in Germany. Since the Upper Cretaceous the area is dominated by fault tectonics, fractures and joints, which increase the rock permeability. The circulating groundwater leaches the Permian saline deposits in the subsurface and forms upward migrating cavities, which can develop into sinkholes, if the overburden collapses. In the direct vicinity of the backfilled sinkhole, five 2-D shear wave reflection seismic profiles with total length of ca. 900 m and a zero-offset VSP down to 150 m depth were acquired. For the surface profiles a 120-channel landstreamer attached with horizontal geophones and an electrodynamic micro-vibrator, exciting horizontally polarized shear waves, were used. For the VSP survey an oriented borehole probe equipped with a 3C-geophone and electrodynamic and hydraulic vibrators, exciting compression- and shear waves, were utilized. The seismic sections show high-resolution images from the surface to ca. 100 m depth. They display heterogeneous structures as indicated by strong vertical and lateral variations of the reflectors. In the near-surface, depressions are visible and zones of low seismic velocities < 180 m/s show increased attenuation of the seismic wave field. These are probably the result of the fractured underground, due to fault tectonics and the ongoing subrosion. The unstable zones are

  9. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  10. Formaldehyde column density measurements as a suitable pathway to estimate near-surface ozone tendencies from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jason R.; Crawford, James H.; Fried, Alan; Walega, James; Weinheimer, Andrew; Wisthaler, Armin; Müller, Markus; Mikoviny, Tomas; Chen, Gao; Shook, Michael; Blake, Donald R.; Diskin, Glenn; Estes, Mark; Thompson, Anne M.; Lefer, Barry L.; Long, Russell; Mattson, Eric

    2016-11-01

    In support of future satellite missions that aim to address the current shortcomings in measuring air quality from space, NASA's Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign was designed to enable exploration of relationships between column measurements of trace species relevant to air quality at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the DISCOVER-AQ data set, a modest correlation (r2 = 0.45) between ozone (O3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) column densities was observed. Further analysis revealed regional variability in the O3-CH2O relationship, with Maryland having a strong relationship when data were viewed temporally and Houston having a strong relationship when data were viewed spatially. These differences in regional behavior are attributed to differences in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. In Maryland, biogenic VOCs were responsible for 28% of CH2O formation within the boundary layer column, causing CH2O to, in general, increase monotonically throughout the day. In Houston, persistent anthropogenic emissions dominated the local hydrocarbon environment, and no discernable diurnal trend in CH2O was observed. Box model simulations suggested that ambient CH2O mixing ratios have a weak diurnal trend (±20% throughout the day) due to photochemical effects, and that larger diurnal trends are associated with changes in hydrocarbon precursors. Finally, mathematical relationships were developed from first principles and were able to replicate the different behaviors seen in Maryland and Houston. While studies would be necessary to validate these results and determine the regional applicability of the O3-CH2O relationship, the results presented here provide compelling insight into the ability of future satellite missions to aid in monitoring near-surface air quality.

  11. Observation and simulation of near-surface wind and its variation with topography in Urumqi, West China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lili; Li, Zhenjie; He, Qing; Miao, Qilong; Zhang, Huqiang; Yang, Xinghua

    2016-12-01

    Near-surface wind measurements obtained with five 100-m meteorology towers, 39 regional automatic stations, and simulations by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to investigate the spatial structure of topography-driven flows in the complex urban terrain of Urumqi, China. The results showed that the wind directions were mainly northerly and southerly within the reach of 100 m above ground in the southern suburbs, urban area, and northern suburbs, which were consistent with the form of the Urumqi gorge. Strong winds were observed in southern suburbs, whereas the winds in the urban, northern suburbs, and northern rural areas were weak. Static wind occurred more frequently in the urban and northern rural areas than in the southern suburbs. In the southern suburbs, wind speed was relatively high throughout the year and did not show significant seasonal variations. The average annual wind speed in this region varied among 1.9-5.5, 1.1-3.6, 1.2-4.3, 1.2-4.3, and 1.1-3.5 m s -1 within the reach of 100 m above ground at Yannanlijiao, Shuitashan, Liyushan, Hongguangshan, and Midong, respectively. The flow characteristics comprised more airflows around the mountain, where the convergence and divergence were dominated by the terrain in eastern and southwestern Urumqi. Further analysis showed that there was a significant mountain-valley wind in spring, summer, and autumn, which occurred more frequently in spring and summer for 10-11 h in urban and northern suburbs. During daytime, there was a northerly valley wind, whereas at night there was a southerly mountain wind. The conversion time from the mountain wind to the valley wind was during 0800-1000 LST (Local Standard Time), while the conversion from the valley wind to the mountain wind was during 1900-2100 LST. The influence of the mountain-valley wind in Urumqi City was most obvious at 850 hPa, according to the WRF model.

  12. Internal and near-surface electromagnetic fields for a dielectric spheroid illuminated by a zero-order Bessel beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Han, Yiping; Wang, Jiajie; Cui, Zhiwei

    2014-09-01

    Within the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory, scattering from a homogeneous spheroidal particle illuminated by an on-axis zero-order Bessel beam is formulated analytically, with special attention paid to the investigation of internal and near-surface fields. Numerical results concerning the spatial distributions of internal and near-surface fields are presented for various parameter values, such as the half-cone angle of the incident zero-order Bessel beam, the major axis, the minor axis, and the refractive index of the spheroid. The study of internal and near-surface field distributions will contribute to the understanding of Bessel beam scattering by nonspherical particles with sizes close to the incident wavelength.

  13. Trends in Mean Annual Minimum and Maximum Near Surface Temperature in Nairobi City, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lukoye Makokha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the long-term urban modification of mean annual conditions of near surface temperature in Nairobi City. Data from four weather stations situated in Nairobi were collected from the Kenya Meteorological Department for the period from 1966 to 1999 inclusive. The data included mean annual maximum and minimum temperatures, and was first subjected to homogeneity test before analysis. Both linear regression and Mann-Kendall rank test were used to discern the mean annual trends. Results show that the change of temperature over the thirty-four years study period is higher for minimum temperature than maximum temperature. The warming trends began earlier and are more significant at the urban stations than is the case at the sub-urban stations, an indication of the spread of urbanisation from the built-up Central Business District (CBD to the suburbs. The established significant warming trends in minimum temperature, which are likely to reach higher proportions in future, pose serious challenges on climate and urban planning of the city. In particular the effect of increased minimum temperature on human physiological comfort, building and urban design, wind circulation and air pollution needs to be incorporated in future urban planning programmes of the city.

  14. Dryland, calcareous soils store (and lose) significant quantities of near-surface organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Andrew M.; Puttock, Alan K.; Turnbull, Laura; Wainwright, John; Brazier, Richard E.

    2016-04-01

    Semiarid ecosystems are susceptible to changes in dominant vegetation which may have significant implications for terrestrial carbon dynamics. The present study examines the distribution of organic carbon (OC) between particle size fractions in near-surface (0-0.05 m) soil and the water erosion-induced redistribution of particle-associated OC over a grass-shrub ecotone, in a semiarid landscape, subject to land degradation. Coarse (>2 mm) particles have comparable average OC concentrations to the fine (events was monitored over four annual monsoon seasons. Eroded sediment was significantly enriched in OC; enrichment increased significantly across the grass-shrub ecotone and appears to be an enduring phenomenon probably sustained through the dynamic replacement of preferentially removed organic matter. The average erosion-induced OC event yield increased sixfold across the ecotone from grass-dominated to shrub-dominated ecosystems, due to both greater erosion and greater OC enrichment. This erosional pathway is rarely considered when comparing the carbon budgets of grasslands and shrublands, yet this accelerated efflux of OC may be important for long-term carbon storage potentials of dryland ecosystems.

  15. Novel Measurement and Monitoring Approaches for Surface and Near-Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. B.; Sheng, W.; Zhou, R.; Sadeghi, M.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    The top inch of the earth's soil surface is a very dynamic and important layer where physical and biogeochemical processes take place under extreme diurnal and seasonal moisture and temperature variations. Some of these critical surfaces include biocrusts, desert pavements, agricultural lands, mine tailings, hydrophobic forest soils, all of which can significantly impact environmental conditions at large-scales. Natural hazards associated with surface conditions include dust storms, post-fire erosion and flooding in addition to crop failure. Less obvious, though continually occurring, are microbial-induced gas emissions that are also significantly impacted by surface conditions. With so much at stake, it is surprising that in today's technological world there are few if any sensors designed for monitoring the top few mm or cm of the soil surface. In particular, remotely sensed data is expected to provide near-real time surface conditions of our Earth, but we lack effective tools to measure and calibrate surface soil moisture. We are developing multiple methods for measurement and monitoring of surface and near-surface soil water content which include gravimetric as well as electromagnetic approaches. These novel measurement solutions and their prospects to improve soil surface water content determination will be presented.

  16. Near Surface Mounted Composites for Flexural Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Akter Hosen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing structural components require strengthening after a certain period of time due to increases in service loads, errors in design, mechanical damage, and the need to extend the service period. Externally-bonded reinforcement (EBR and near-surface mounted (NSM reinforcement are two preferred strengthening approach. This paper presents a NSM technique incorporating NSM composites, namely steel and carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP bars, as reinforcement. Experimental and analytical studies carried out to explore the performance of reinforced concrete (RC members strengthened with the NSM composites. Analytical models were developed in predicting the maximum crack spacing and width, concrete cover separation failure loads, and deflection. A four-point bending test was applied on beams strengthened with different types and ratios of NSM reinforcement. The failure characteristics, yield, and ultimate capacities, deflection, strain, and cracking behavior of the beams were evaluated based on the experimental output. The test results indicate an increase in the cracking load of 69% and an increase in the ultimate load of 92% compared with the control beam. The predicted result from the analytical model shows good agreement with the experimental result, which ensures the competent implementation of the present NSM-steel and CFRP technique.

  17. Enhanced luminescence of near-surface quantum wells passivated in situ by InP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipsanen, H.; Sopanen, M.; Taskinen, M.; Tulkki, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Optoelectronics Lab.; Ahopelto, J. [VTT Electronics, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The authors have studied the optical properties of MOVPE grown Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As/GaAs structures passivated by in situ deposition of InP on the surface. One monolayer of InP was used for the passivation. The surface recombination was studied by photoluminescence measurements of near-surface Al{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum wells. The luminescence intensity of the passivated samples increased by about five orders of magnitude for quantum wells located at less than 5 nm from the surface as compared to unpassivated samples. Furthermore, the authors observed a blueshift of 15 meV for a passivated surface quantum well. The effect of the thin InP layer on the Fermi level pinning on the surface was studied by photoreflectance of a surface-i-n{sup +} sample. The pinning position was reduced by 0.3 eV from the mid-bandgap value.

  18. Study of near-surface layers of Omerelu area using low velocity layer (LVL method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajani, O.O.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is important that we have good knowledge of the soil type so as to appreciate the enormous resources we are stepping on. It is more compelling for oil explorationists to know more as this will go a long way to determine the success or failure of search for minerals. Seismic methods give a good overview of a wide area though they involve greater logistics and operational requirements than some other geophysical methods. The purpose of present study is to determine the depth of the weathered layer and velocities of near-surface layers over the investigated area. Twelve sample points were picked with a grid system spread over a perimeter of approximately 4km x 4km. The in-house UpSphere computer program was utilised to analyse and display result in a way that makes final interpretation very easy. This program actually removed the burden of plotting the graphs and the contour maps manually. The depth of weathered layer in the study area varies between 12m and 13m. The velocities of the weathered layer and the consolidated layer vary between 500 m/s – 550 m/s and 1790 m/s – 1875 m/s respectively. Also the dip is in the north east – south west direction.

  19. Near surface soil vapor clusters for monitoring emissions of volatile organic compounds from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergas, S J; Hinlein, E S; Reyes, P O; Ostendorf, D W; Tehrany, J P

    2000-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to develop and test a method of determining emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other gases from soil surfaces. Soil vapor clusters (SVCs) were designed as a low dead volume, robust sampling system to obtain vertically resolved profiles of soil gas contaminant concentrations in the near surface zone. The concentration profiles, when combined with a mathematical model of porous media mass transport, were used to calculate the contaminant flux from the soil surface. Initial experiments were conducted using a mesoscale soil remediation system under a range of experimental conditions. Helium was used as a tracer and trichloroethene was used as a model VOC. Flux estimations using the SVCs were within 25% of independent surface flux estimates and were comparable to measurements made using a surface isolation flux chamber (SIFC). In addition, method detection limits for the SVC were an order of magnitude lower than detection limits with the SIFC. Field trials, conducted with the SVCs at a bioventing site, indicated that the SVC method could be easily used in the field to estimate fugitive VOC emission rates. Major advantages of the SVC method were its low detection limits, lack of required auxiliary equipment, and ability to obtain real-time estimates of fugitive VOC emission rates.

  20. [Seasonal Provincial Characteristics of Vertical Distribution of Dust Loadings and Heavy Metals near Surface in City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Shu-ting

    2015-06-01

    With the emergence of urban high-rise building, the vertical space of human daily life gradually extended upward. Seasonal characteristics of vertical distribution of dust loadings and heavy metals near surface are remarkable. In this study, we collected dust deposited on the windowsill at different space height (1th-8th floor) from three buildings in Guiyang city during spring, summer, autumn and winter, and analyzed the deposition fluxes of dust and elements including Ca, Fe, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The results showed that: the total changing trend of vertical distribution of dust loadings was that the deposition fluxes of dust in winter were the highest, followed by those in spring, and the deposition fluxes of dust in summer were the lowest. The degree of variation on dust loadings dependent on the change of elevation was the highest in winter, followed by that in summer, and was relatively lower in spring and autumn. The effect on dust loadings by seasonal changing was relatively heavier on windowsill on the lower level than on the higher level. The levels of elements were the highest in spring dust, while those in autumn were relatively lower. Among the 8 elements, the variability of Zn in dust related to space time variation was the most obvious, and that of Ca was weaker. The atmospheric inversion condition might be one of the reasons that improved the deposition fluxes of dust and the contents of Ph and Zn in dust during winter and spring.

  1. Accumulation of microswimmers near surface due to steric confinement and rotational Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Microscopic swimmers display some intriguing features dictated by Brownian motion, low Reynolds number fluid mechanics, and boundary confinement. We re-examine the reported accumulation of swimming bacteria or bull spermatozoa near the boundaries of a fluid chamber, and propose a kinematic model to explain how collision with surface, confinement and rotational Brownian motion give rise to the accumulation of micro-swimmers near a surface. In this model, an elongated microswimmer invariably travels parallel to the surface after hitting it from any incident angle. It then takes off and swims away from the surface after some time due to rotational Brownian motion. Based on this analysis, we obtain through computer simulation steady state density distributions that reproduce the ones measured for the small bacteria E coli and Caulobacter crescentus, as well as for the much larger bull spermatozoa swimming near surfaces. These results suggest strongly that Brownian dynamics and surface confinement are the dominant factors for the accumulation of microswimmers near a surface.

  2. Geological Carbon Sequestration: A New Approach for Near-Surface Assurance Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Wielopolski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are two distinct objectives in monitoring geological carbon sequestration (GCS: Deep monitoring of the reservoir’s integrity and plume movement and near-surface monitoring (NSM to ensure public health and the safety of the environment. However, the minimum detection limits of the current instrumentation for NSM is too high for detecting weak signals that are embedded in the background levels of the natural variations, and the data obtained represents point measurements in space and time. A new approach for NSM, based on gamma-ray spectroscopy induced by inelastic neutron scatterings (INS, offers novel and unique characteristics providing the following: (1 High sensitivity with a reducible error of measurement and detection limits, and, (2 temporal- and spatial-integration of carbon in soil that results from underground CO2 seepage. Preliminary field results validated this approach showing carbon suppression of 14% in the first year and 7% in the second year. In addition the temporal behavior of the error propagation is presented and it is shown that for a signal at the level of the minimum detection level the error asymptotically approaches 47%.

  3. Investigation to determine the vulnerability of reclaimed land to building collapse using near surface geophysical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoyin, O. O.; Joshua, E. O.; Akinyemi, M. L.; Omeje, M.; Joel, E. S.

    2017-05-01

    Adequate knowledge of the geology and the structures of the subsurface would assist engineers in the best way to carry out constructions to avoid building collapse. In this study, near surface seismic refraction method was used to determine the geotechnical parameters of the subsurface, the results obtained were correlated with the result of borehole data drilled in the study area. The results of seismic refraction method delineated mostly two distinct layers with the first layer having the lower geotechnical parameters. It was observed that in the first layer, the Young’s modulus ranged from 0.168 to 0.458 GPa, shear modulus ranged between 0.068 and 0.185 GPa, the bulk modulus ranged between 0.106 and 0.287 GPa while the bearing capacity ranged from 0.083 to 0.139 MPa. On the other hand, in the second layer, the Young’s modulus ranged between 3.717 and 7.018 GPa, shear modulus ranged from 1.500 to 2.830 GPa while the bulk modulus ranged from 2.383 to 4.449 GPa. Significantly, the formation of the second layer appeared to be more competent than the first layer, therefore engineering construction in this geological setting is recommended to be founded on the second layer at depth ranging between 7 and 16 m.

  4. Highly controllable near-surface swimming of magnetic Janus nanorods: application to payload capture and manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mair, Lamar O; Carpenter, Jerome [Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Evans, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Hall, Adam R [Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC 27401 (United States); Shields, Adam; Superfine, Richard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Ford, Kris; Millard, Michael, E-mail: rsuper@physics.unc.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2011-03-30

    Directed manipulation of nanomaterials has significant implications in the field of nanorobotics, nanobiotechnology, microfluidics and directed assembly. With the goal of highly controllable nanomaterial manipulation in mind, we present a technique for the near-surface manoeuvering of magnetic nanorod swimmers and its application to controlled micromanipulation. We fabricate magnetic Janus nanorods and show that the magnetic rotation of these nanorods near a floor results in predictable translational motion. The nanorod plane of rotation is nearly parallel to the floor, the angle between rod tilt and floor being expressed by {theta}, where 0{sup 0} < {theta} < 20{sup 0}. Orthogonal magnetic fields control in-plane motion arbitrarily. Our model for translation incorporates symmetry breaking through increased drag at the no-slip surface boundary. Using this method we demonstrate considerable rod steerability. Additionally, we approach, capture, and manipulate a polystyrene microbead as proof of principle. We attach Janus nanorods to the surfaces of cells and utilize these rods to manipulate individual cells, proving the ability to manoeuver payloads with a wide range of sizes.

  5. Bond–slip behavior of superelastic shape memory alloys for near-surface-mounted strengthening applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghash, Sherif M.; Ozbulut, Osman E.

    2017-03-01

    The use of superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) bars in the near-surface-mounted (NSM) strengthening application can offer advantages such as improved bond behavior, enhanced deformation capacity, and post-event functionality. This study investigates bond characteristics and load transfer mechanisms between NSM SMA reinforcement and concrete. A modified pull-out test specimen that consists of a C-shaped concrete block, where the NSM reinforcement are placed at the center of gravity of the block, was used for experimental investigations. The effects of various parameters such as epoxy type, bonded length, bar diameter, and mechanical anchorage on the bond behavior were studied. The slip of the SMA reinforcement relative to concrete was measured using an optical measurement system and the bond–slip curves were developed. Results indicate that the sandblasted SMA bars exhibit satisfactory bond behavior when used with the correct filling material in NSM strengthening applications, while the mechanical anchorage of SMA bars can significantly increase the bond resistance.

  6. Near surface spatially averaged air temperature and wind speed determined by acoustic travel time tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Raabe

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic travel time tomography is presented as a possibility for remote monitoring of near surface airtemperature and wind fields. This technique provides line-averaged effective sound speeds changing with temporally and spatially variable air temperature and wind vector. The effective sound speed is derived from the travel times of sound signals which propagate at defined paths between different acoustic sources and receivers. Starting with the travel time data a tomographic algorithm (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique, SIRT is used to calculate area-averaged air temperature and wind speed. The accuracy of the experimental method and the tomographic inversion algorithm is exemplarily demonstrated for one day without remarkable differences in the horizontal temperature field, determined by independent in situ measurements at different points within the measuring field. The differences between the conventionally determined air temperature (point measurement and the air temperature determined by tomography (area-averaged measurement representative for the area of the measuring field 200m x 260m were below 0.5 K for an average of 10 minutes. The differences obtained between the wind speed measured at a meteorological mast and calculated from acoustic measurements are not higher than 0.5 ms-1 for the same averaging time. The tomographically determined area-averaged distribution of air temperature (resolution 50 m x 50 m can be used to estimate the horizontal gradient of air temperature as a pre-condition to detect horizontal turbulent fluxes of sensible heat.

  7. Near-surface viscosity effects on capillary rise of water in nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Barisik, Murat; Kim, BoHung

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present an approach for predicting nanoscale capillary imbibitions using the Lucas-Washburn (LW) theory. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the effects of surface forces on the viscosity of liquid water. This provides an update to the modified LW equation that considered only a nanoscale slip length. An initial water nanodroplet study was performed to properly elucidate the wetting behavior of copper and gold surfaces. Intermolecular interaction strengths between water and corresponding solid surfaces were determined by matching the contact angle values obtained by experimental measurements. The migration of liquid water into copper and gold capillaries was measured by MD simulations and was found to differ from the modified LW equation. We found that the liquid layering in the vicinity of the solid surface induces a higher density and viscosity, leading to a slower MD uptake of fluid into the capillaries than was theoretically predicted. The near-surface viscosity for the nanoscale-confined water was defined and calculated for the thin film of water that was sheared between the two solid surfaces, as the ratio of water shear stress to the applied shear rate. Considering the effects of both the interface viscosity and slip length of the fluid, we successfully predicted the MD-measured fluid rise in the nanotubes.

  8. Characteristics of the near-surface atmosphere over the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, John J.; Nigro, Melissa A.; Lazzara, Matthew A.

    2016-04-01

    Two years of data from a 30 m instrumented tower are used to characterize the near-surface atmospheric state over the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Stable stratification dominates the surface layer at this site, occurring 83% of the time. The strongest inversions occur for wind speeds less than 4 m s-1 and the inversion strength decreases rapidly as wind speed increases above 4 m s-1. In summer unstable stratification occurs 50% of the time and unstable conditions are observed in every season. A novel aspect of this work is the use of an artificial neural network pattern identification technique, known as self-organizing maps, to objectively identify characteristic potential temperature profiles that span the range of profiles present in the 2 year study period. The self-organizing map clustering technique allows the more than 100,000 observed potential temperature profiles to be represented by just 30 patterns. The pattern-averaged winds show distinct and physically consistent relationships with the potential temperature profiles. The strongest winds occur for the nearly well mixed but slightly stable patterns and the weakest winds occur for the strongest inversion patterns. The weakest wind shear over the depth of the tower occurs for slightly unstable profiles and the largest wind shear occurs for moderately strong inversions. Pattern-averaged log wind profiles are consistent with theoretical expectations. The log wind profiles exhibit a kinked profile for the strongest inversion cases indicative of decoupling of the winds between the bottom and top of the tower.

  9. Effects of the March 2015 solar eclipse on near-surface atmospheric electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A J

    2016-09-28

    Measurements of atmospheric electrical and standard meteorological parameters were made at coastal and inland sites in southern England during the 20 March 2015 partial solar eclipse. Clear evidence of a reduction in air temperature resulting from the eclipse was found at both locations, despite one of them being overcast during the entire eclipse. The reduction in temperature was expected to affect the near-surface electric field (potential gradient (PG)) through a reduction in turbulent transfer of space charge. No such effect could be unambiguously confirmed, however, with variability in PG and air-Earth current during the eclipse being comparable to pre- and post-eclipse conditions. The already low solar radiation for this latitude, season and time of day was likely to have contributed to the reduced effect of the eclipse on atmospheric electricity through boundary layer stability. The absence of a reduction in mean PG shortly after time of maximum solar obscuration, as observed during eclipses at lower geomagnetic latitude, implied that there was no significant change in atmospheric ionization from cosmic rays above background variability. This finding was suggested to be due to the relative importance of cosmic rays of solar and galactic origin at geomagnetic mid-latitudes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  10. Directional site resonances and the influence of near-surface geology on ground motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamassa, Ornella; Vidale, John E.; Houston, Heidi; Schwartz, Susan Y.

    1991-05-01

    We examine the horizontal motions at close stations from earthquakes in the Loma Prieta and Whittier Narrows sequences to study the shear wave polarizations. We use a dense, six station array recording 10 aftershocks for the former, and use two events and 11 stations across the Los Angeles area for the latter.We compute the average azimuth of strongest shaking in the shear wave as a function of frequency from 1 to 18 Hz for each record of each earthquake. The direction of shaking at a given frequency often correlates much better with an empirical site resonance direction than with the direction of shaking expected from the focal mechanism of the earthquake. The effect tends to be greatest at the frequencies that are the most amplified. This phenomenon can complicate determination of the earthquake source at frequencies higher than 1 Hz.Further, since sites only 25 meters apart show different preferred directions, very near-surface geology is probably responsible. Estimation of directional site resonances may prove useful for seismic design.

  11. Determination of Aquifer Protective Capacity and Corrosivity of Near Surface Materials in Yenagoa City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Okiongbo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Geoelectrical sounding method was adopted in the evaluation of aquifer protective capacity and corrosivity of near surface materials in Yenagoa city, South South, Nigeria. A total of eleven Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES stations were occupied using the Schlumberger configuration. Five geoelectric layers were identified. Layers four and five are the likely aquiferous horizons with resistivities >280 Sm. The depth to the aquiferous horizon varied between 6.0-52.0 m, and has a rather irregular distribution and thickness. Corrosivity, isopach and longitudinal unit conductance (S maps were generated from the combination of first and second order geoelectric parameters. The results indicate that the INC and Opolo areas of the city are characterized by weak protective capacity (0.1-0.2 mhos while other locations investigated are underlain by materials which could be regarded as moderate (0.2-0.69 mhos to good (0.7-4.9 mhos protective capacity. Resistivity values within the second layer (11.0-53.0 Sm indicate that this layer is moderately aggressive and may likely form corrosion cells which may lead to significant corrosion failures of shallow subsurface piping facilities. The results of this study highlight a set of environmental factors (corrosivity and protective capacity that should not be ignored at the planning stages of residential and industrial estates.

  12. EUV-induced physico-chemical changes in near-surface layers of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, A., E-mail: abartnik@wat.edu.pl [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2 Kaliskiego Street, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2 Kaliskiego Street, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Chernyayeva, O.; Sobczak, J.W. [Institute of Physical Chemistry Polish Academy of Sciences, 44-52 Kasprzaka Street, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-04-15

    In this work a laser-plasma EUV source based on a gas puff target was used for micro- and nanostructuring of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) and poly-oxydiphenylene-pyromellitimide (Kapton HN) foils. The plasma radiation was focused using a gold-plated grazing incidence ellipsoidal collector. The collector allowed for effective focusing of Kr plasma radiation from the wavelength range {lambda} = 9-70 nm. The polymer foils were irradiated in the focal plane or at some distance downstream the focal plane of the EUV collector. The surface morphology of the irradiated polymer samples was investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the chemical changes by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Different kinds of micro- and nanostructures created in near-surface layers of the polymers were obtained. The form of the structures depends on the type of polymer and the EUV exposure. In case of PEN even a single shot was sufficient to obtain visible changes in surface morphology. In case of Kapton clearly visible surface modification requires tens of EUV pulses. To investigate the changes in the chemical structure XPS spectra, corresponding to the valence band of the polymer samples, were measured. Significant differences were revealed in the XPS spectra of irradiated and not-irradiated polymers showing decrease of functional groups containing oxygen was indicated.

  13. Nonlinear Bubble Dynamics And The Effects On Propagation Through Near-Surface Bubble Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Timothy G.

    2004-11-01

    Nonlinear bubble dynamics are often viewed as the unfortunate consequence of having to use high acoustic pressure amplitudes when the void fraction in the near-surface oceanic bubble layer is great enough to cause severe attenuation (e.g. >50 dB/m). This is seen as unfortunate since existing models for acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids are based on linear bubble dynamics. However, the development of nonlinear models does more than just allow quantification of the errors associated with the use of linear models. It also offers the possibility of propagation modeling and acoustic inversions which appropriately incorporate the bubble nonlinearity. Furthermore, it allows exploration and quantification of possible nonlinear effects which may be exploited. As a result, high acoustic pressure amplitudes may be desirable even in low void fractions, because they offer opportunities to gain information about the bubble cloud from the nonlinearities, and options to exploit the nonlinearities to enhance communication and sonar in bubbly waters. This paper presents a method for calculating the nonlinear acoustic cross-sections, scatter, attenuations and sound speeds from bubble clouds which may be inhomogeneous. The method allows prediction of the time dependency of these quantities, both because the cloud may vary and because the incident acoustic pulse may have finite and arbitrary time history. The method can be readily adapted for bubbles in other environments (e.g. clouds of interacting bubbles, sediments, structures, in vivo, reverberant conditions etc.). The possible exploitation of bubble acoustics by marine mammals, and for sonar enhancement, is explored.

  14. Experiment of near surface layer parameters in ice camp over Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of near surface layer parameters over (78.) N drifting ice in ice camp over the Arctic ocean are made using bulk transfer methods with the data from the experiments operated by the Chinese Arctic Scientific Expedition in August 22 September 3, 2003.The results show that the net radiation received by the snow surface is only 3.6 W/m2, among which the main part transported into atmosphere in term of sensible heat and latent heat, which account for 52% and 31% respectively,and less part being transported to deep ice in the conductive process.The bulk transfer coefficient of momentum is about 1.16 x 10-3 in the near neutral layer, which is a little smaller than that obtained over (75.)N drifting ice.However, to compare with the results observed over 75°N drifting ice over the Arctic Ocean in 1999, it can be found that the thermodynamic and momentum of interactions between sea and air are significant different with latitudes, concentration and the scale of sea ice.It is very important on considering the effect of sea-air-ice interaction over the Arctic Ocean when studying climate modeling.

  15. Near surface radial anisotropy in the Rigan area/SE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzad, Taghi; Shomali, Zaher-Hossein; Riahi, Mohammad-Ali; Jarrahi, Maziar

    2017-01-01

    By analyzing Rayleigh and Love wave empirical Green's functions extracted from ambient seismic noise and earthquake data, we obtained near surface radial anisotropy structure beneath the hidden part of the Kahurak fault in the Rigan region, in the southeast of Iran. The deduced seismic radial anisotropy within the hidden part of the Kahurak fault can reveal record of shallow crustal deformation caused by the Rigan earthquake (MW 6.5) occurred on 20 December 2010. Significant radial anisotropy with positive magnitude (VSH > VSV) appears in the shallow subsurface of the upper part of the crust. The magnitude of radial anisotropy varies from predominantly positive (VSH > VSV) to mostly negative (VSH VSV). The thickness of the sedimentary layer varies between 1 and 3 km from the south to the north beneath the study area with an average radial anisotropy of about 5%. However, cross-section profiles indicate that negative anomaly stretches inside a thick sedimentary layer where the aftershocks occurred. Also, the investigation of cross-section profiles reveals that a dipping angle of the hidden part of Kahurak fault is resolved at approximately 85° using the anisotropy pattern. Moreover, the aftershocks generally occurred in the transitional zones where signs of radial anisotropy anomalies change. Our study indicates that the influence of different resolving powers and path coverage density of Rayleigh and Love waves, which can be artificially interpreted as radial anisotropy, have minor effect on calculated radial anisotropy and they are estimated in the range of - 2% to + 2%.

  16. Approximate optimal tracking control for near-surface AUVs with wave disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Su, Hao; Tang, Gongyou

    2016-10-01

    This paper considers the optimal trajectory tracking control problem for near-surface autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) in the presence of wave disturbances. An approximate optimal tracking control (AOTC) approach is proposed. Firstly, a six-degrees-of-freedom (six-DOF) AUV model with its body-fixed coordinate system is decoupled and simplified and then a nonlinear control model of AUVs in the vertical plane is given. Also, an exosystem model of wave disturbances is constructed based on Hirom approximation formula. Secondly, the time-parameterized desired trajectory which is tracked by the AUV's system is represented by the exosystem. Then, the coupled two-point boundary value (TPBV) problem of optimal tracking control for AUVs is derived from the theory of quadratic optimal control. By using a recently developed successive approximation approach to construct sequences, the coupled TPBV problem is transformed into a problem of solving two decoupled linear differential sequences of state vectors and adjoint vectors. By iteratively solving the two equation sequences, the AOTC law is obtained, which consists of a nonlinear optimal feedback item, an expected output tracking item, a feedforward disturbances rejection item, and a nonlinear compensatory term. Furthermore, a wave disturbances observer model is designed in order to solve the physically realizable problem. Simulation is carried out by using the Remote Environmental Unit (REMUS) AUV model to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Geological Carbon Sequestration: A New Approach for Near-Surface Assurance Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, L.

    2011-03-11

    There are two distinct objectives in monitoring geological carbon sequestration (GCS): Deep monitoring of the reservoir's integrity and plume movement and near-surface monitoring (NSM) to ensure public health and the safety of the environment. However, the minimum detection limits of the current instrumentation for NSM is too high for detecting weak signals that are embedded in the background levels of the natural variations, and the data obtained represents point measurements in space and time. A new approach for NSM, based on gamma-ray spectroscopy induced by inelastic neutron scatterings (INS), offers novel and unique characteristics providing the following: (1) High sensitivity with a reducible error of measurement and detection limits, and, (2) temporal- and spatial-integration of carbon in soil that results from underground CO{sub 2} seepage. Preliminary field results validated this approach showing carbon suppression of 14% in the first year and 7% in the second year. In addition the temporal behavior of the error propagation is presented and it is shown that for a signal at the level of the minimum detection level the error asymptotically approaches 47%.

  18. Development of performance assessment methodology for establishment of quantitative acceptance criteria of near-surface radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. R.; Lee, E. Y.; Park, J. W.; Chang, G. M.; Park, H. Y.; Yeom, Y. S. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The contents and the scope of this study are as follows : review of state-of-the-art on the establishment of waste acceptance criteria in foreign near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities, investigation of radiological assessment methodologies and scenarios, investigation of existing models and computer codes used in performance/safety assessment, development of a performance assessment methodology(draft) to derive quantitatively radionuclide acceptance criteria of domestic near-surface disposal facility, preliminary performance/safety assessment in accordance with the developed methodology.

  19. Mitigation of defocusing by statics and near-surface velocity errors by interferometric least-squares migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2015-08-19

    We propose an interferometric least-squares migration method that can significantly reduce migration artifacts due to statics and errors in the near-surface velocity model. We first choose a reference reflector whose topography is well known from the, e.g., well logs. Reflections from this reference layer are correlated with the traces associated with reflections from deeper interfaces to get crosscorrelograms. These crosscorrelograms are then migrated using interferometric least-squares migration (ILSM). In this way statics and velocity errors at the near surface are largely eliminated for the examples in our paper.

  20. The use of Near-surface Geophysics in Evaluating and Assessing Natural Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, L.

    2007-12-01

    The list of natural hazards that transform the physical environmental is extensive: earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, volcanoes, lahars, landslides and debris flows, avalanches, karst/cavern collapse, heavy-metal contamination, permafrost, liquefaction, and magnetic storms. Because these events or conditions can have significant negative impact on health and infrastructure, the need for knowledge about and education of natural hazards is important. Near-surface geophysics can contribute in significant ways to both the knowledge base and wider understanding of these hazards. The discipline encompasses a wide range of methodologies, some of which are described below. A post-tsunami helicopter electromagnetic (EM) survey along the coasts of Aceh, northern Sumatra was used to discriminate between fresh-water and saltwater aquifers., saltwater intrusion occurred close to the coast as a result of the tsunami and deep saltwater occurrences particularly around 30 m depth were mapped up to several kilometers inland. Based on the survey results recommendations were made to locate shallow hand-dug wells and medium depth (60m) water wells. Utilizing airborne EM and magnetic measurements, a detailed assessment of the internal distribution of altered zones within an active volcano; Mount Rainier (NW USA) showed that alteration is much more restricted than had been inferred from surficial exposures alone. The study also suggested that the collapse of fresh, unaltered portions of the volcano is possible, and no flank of the volcano can be considered immune from lahars during eruption. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been used worldwide in a variety of applications from geotechnical investigations related to geologic hazards. These include assessment of transportation infrastructure, which maybe be damaged due to a natural hazard, study of the movement of rock glaciers in the Swiss Alps, and search and recovery of avalanche victims. Permafrost is widespread in polar areas and cold

  1. Near-surface air temperature lapse rates in Xinjiang, northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingxia; Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Shengjie; Zhu, Xiaofan; Che, Yanjun

    2017-01-01

    Lapse rates of near-surface (2 m) air temperature are important parameters in hydrologic and climate simulations, especially for the mountainous areas without enough in-situ observations. In Xinjiang, northwestern China, the elevations range from higher than 7000 m to lower than sea level, but the existing long-term meteorological measurements are limited and distributed unevenly. To calculate lapse rates in Xinjiang, the daily data of near-surface air temperature (T min, T ave, and T max) were measured by automatic weather stations from 2012 to 2014. All the in situ observation stations were gridded into a network of 1.5° (latitude) by 1.5° (longitude), and the spatial distribution and the daily, monthly, seasonal variations of lapse rates for T min, T ave, and T max in Xinjiang are analyzed. The Urumqi River Basin has been considered as a case to study the influence of elevation, aspect, and the wet and dry air conditions to the T min, T ave, and T max lapse rates. Results show that (1) the lapse rates for T min, T ave, and T max vary spatially during the observation period. The spatial diversity of T min lapse rates is larger than that of T ave, and that of T max is the smallest. For each season, T max lapse rates have more negative values than T ave lapse rates which are steeper than T min lapse rates. The weakest spatial diversity usually appears in July throughout a year. (2) The comparison for the three subregions (North, Middle, and South region) exhibits that lapse rates have similar day-to-day and month-to-month characteristics which present shallower values in winter months and steeper values in summer months. The T ave lapse rates in North region are shallower than those in Middle and South region, and the steepest T ave lapse rates of the three regions all appear in April. T min lapse rates are shallower than T max lapse rates. The maximum medians of T min and T max lapse rates for each grid in the three regions all appear in January, whereas the

  2. A Fine-Resolution Radar for Mapping Near-Surface Isochronous Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, T. P.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Braaten, D.; Zimmerman, K.; Akins, T.; Gogineni, S.

    2005-12-01

    Information on the spatial and temporal variation of snow accumulation is required for interpreting satellite-based radar and laser surface elevation measurements made by CryoSAT and ICESAT altimeters. Current methods of using ice cores and analyzing snow pit stratigraphy is time consuming and prone to errors in spatial representation due to the sparse sampling. Remote sensing methods that can map near-surface internal layers for estimating spatial and temporal variation are required. To accomplish this, we developed a 12-18 GHz FMCW radar to map near-surface layers with 3 cm vertical resolution to a depth of about 10 m. We developed the system to be mobile and self-contained so that spatial variability of the accumulation over a large area can be characterized. The fine resolution of this radar is achieved by its wide bandwidth and by illuminating the target area with a plane-wave, which is implemented using an offset-fed parabolic reflector. Traditional wide-beamwidth antennas are susceptible to spherical wave scattering from off-vertical targets that can potentially mask weaker reflections from internal layers. The radar features a fast transmit waveform synthesizer implemented using a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and a phase-locked loop (PLL) using a linear chirp as the reference. The highly linear reference chirp was generated by a direct digital synthesis (DDS) waveform generator and compared against the instantaneous output of the VCO to create a highly linear 12 to 18 GHz transmit chirp. The waveform synthesizer can be swept from 12 to 18 GHz in 500 microseconds. The antenna was mounted on a sled and the radar system was integrated with the antenna feed. We designed and built the sled with a gimbaled antenna mount and sensing control system to ensure that the antenna points at nadir. The radar system was successfully tested at the Summit camp, Greenland, in July 2005. We collected a large amount of data from various locations around Summit camp. The

  3. GEOMORPHIC CONTROLS ON MEADOW ECOSYSTEMS – INSIGHTS INTO LOCAL PROCESSES USING NEAR-SURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES AND GROUND PENETRATING RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geomorphic controls on riparian meadows in the Central Great Basin of Nevada are an important aspect in determining the formation of and planning the management of these systems. The current hypothesis is that both alluvial fan sediment and faulted bedrock steps interact to cont...

  4. GEOMORPHIC CONTROLS ON MEADOW ECOSYSTEMS – INSIGHTS INTO LOCAL PROCESSES USING NEAR-SURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES AND GROUND PENETRATING RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geomorphic controls on riparian meadows in the Central Great Basin of Nevada are an important aspect in determining the formation of and planning the management of these systems. The current hypothesis is that both alluvial fan sediment and faulted bedrock steps interact to cont...

  5. An improved near-surface velocity climatology for the global ocean from drifter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Lucas C.; Mariano, Arthur J.; Lumpkin, Rick

    2017-06-01

    This work updates the methods of Lumpkin and Johnson (2013) to obtain an improved near-surface velocity climatology for the global ocean using observations from undrogued and 15-m drogued Global Drifter Program (GDP) drifters. The proposed procedure includes the correction of the slip bias of undrogued drifters, thus recovering about half of the GDP dataset; and a new approach for decomposing Lagrangian data into mean, seasonal and eddy components, which reduces the smoothing of spatial gradients inherent in data binning methods. The sensitivity of the results to method parameters, the method performance relative to other techniques, and the associated estimation errors, are evaluated using statistics calculated for a test dataset consisting of altimeter-derived geostrophic velocities subsampled at the drifter locations, and for the full altimeter-derived geostrophic velocity fields. It is demonstrated that (1) the correction of drifter slip bias produces statistically similar mean velocities for both drogued and undrogued drifter datasets at most latitudes and reduces differences between their variance estimates, (2) the proposed decomposition method produces pseudo-Eulerian mean fields with magnitudes and horizontal scales closer to time-averaged Eulerian observations than other methods, and (3) standard errors calculated for pseudo-Eulerian quantities underestimate the real errors by a factor of almost two. The improved decomposition method and the inclusion of undrogued drifters in the analysis allows resolving details of the time-mean circulation not well defined in the previous version of the climatology, such as the cross-stream structure of western boundary currents, recirculation cells, and zonally-elongated mid-ocean striations.

  6. Link between DOC in near surface peat and stream water in an upland catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joanna M; Lane, Stuart N; Chapman, Pippa J; Adamson, John K

    2008-10-15

    Hydrologic transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from peat soils may differ to organo-mineral soils in how they responded to changes in flow, because of differences in soil profile and hydrology. In well-drained organo-mineral soils, low flow is through the lower mineral layer where DOC is absorbed and high flow is through the upper organic layer where DOC is produced. DOC concentrations in streams draining organo-mineral soils typically increase with flow. In saturated peat soils, both high and low flows are through an organic layer where DOC is produced. Therefore, DOC in stream water draining peat may not increase in response to changes in flow as there is no switch in flow path between a mineral and organic layer. To verify this, we conducted a high-resolution monitoring study of soil and stream water at an upland peat catchment in northern England. Our data showed a strong positive correlation between DOC concentrations at -1 and -5 cm depth and stream water, and weaker correlations between concentrations at -20 to -50 cm depth and stream water. Although near surface organic material appears to be the key source of stream water DOC in both peat and organo-mineral soils, we observed a negative correlation between stream flow and DOC concentrations instead of a positive correlation as DOC released from organic layers during low and high flow was diluted by rainfall. The differences in DOC transport processes between peat and organo-mineral soils have different implications for our understanding of long-term changes in DOC exports. While increased rainfall may cause an increase in DOC flux from peat due to an increase in water volume, it may cause a decrease in concentrations. This response is contrary to expected changes in DOC exports from organo-mineral soils, where increase rainfall is likely to result in an increase in flux and concentration.

  7. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Draper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations might benefit an operational hydrological model, specifically Météo-France's SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM model. Soil moisture data derived from ASCAT backscatter observations are assimilated into SIM using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter (SEKF over 3.5 years. The benefit of the assimilation is tested by comparison to a delayed cut-off version of SIM, in which the land surface is forced with more accurate atmospheric analyses, due to the availability of additional atmospheric observations after the near-real time data cut-off. However, comparing the near-real time and delayed cut-off SIM models revealed that the main difference between them is a dry bias in the near-real time precipitation forcing, which resulted in a dry bias in the root-zone soil moisture and associated surface moisture flux forecasts. While assimilating the ASCAT data did reduce the root-zone soil moisture dry bias (by nearly 50%, this was more likely due to a bias within the SEKF, than due to the assimilation having accurately responded to the precipitation errors. Several improvements to the assimilation are identified to address this, and a bias-aware strategy is suggested for explicitly correcting the model bias. However, in this experiment the moisture added by the SEKF was quickly lost from the model surface due to the enhanced surface fluxes (particularly drainage induced by the wetter soil moisture states. Consequently, by the end of each winter, during which frozen conditions prevent the ASCAT data from being assimilated, the model land surface had returned to its original (dry-biased climate. This highlights that it would be more effective to address the precipitation bias directly, than to correct it by constraining the model soil moisture through data assimilation.

  8. Near-surface geophysical methods for investigating the Buyukcekmece landslide in Istanbul, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Esref; Alp, Hakan; Ozel, Oguz; Gorgun, Ethem; Martino, Salvatore; Lenti, Luca; Bourdeau, Celine; Bigarre, Pascal; Coccia, Stella

    2016-11-01

    In this study, near-surface geophysical techniques are used to investigate the physical characteristics of the Buyukcekmece landslide (Istanbul, Turkey). The Buyukcekmece landslide has continuous activity at a low velocity and is classified as a complex mechanism. It includes rototranslational parts, several secondary scarps, several landslide terraces, and evidence of two earth flows. It mainly develops in the clayey layers of the Danismen Formation. According to our findings, P-wave velocities ranging from 300 m/s to 2400 m/s do not provide notable discrimination between sliding mass and stable soil. They show variations in blocks reflecting a complex structure. We obtained the S-wave velocity structure of the landslide up to 80 m by combining the analysis of MASW and ReMi. It is clear that S-wave velocities are lower in the landslide compared to those of the stable area. Identical S-wave velocities for the entire area at depths higher than 60 m may point out the maximum thickness of the landslide mass. Resonance frequencies obtained from the H/V analysis of the landslide area are generally higher than those of the stable area. The depths computed by using an empirical relationship between the resonance frequency and the soil thickness point out the failure surfaces from 10 to 50 m moving downslope from the landslide crown area. The resistivity values within the landslide are generally lower than 30 Ω m, i.e., a typical value for remolded clayey debris. The geophysical results reflect an overview of the geological model, but the complexity of the landslide makes it difficult to map the landslide structure in detail.

  9. Near-surface remote sensing of spatial and temporal variation in canopy phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew D; Braswell, Bobby H; Hollinger, David Y; Jenkins, Julian P; Ollinger, Scott V

    2009-09-01

    There is a need to document how plant phenology is responding to global change factors, particularly warming trends. "Near-surface" remote sensing, using radiometric instruments or imaging sensors, has great potential to improve phenological monitoring because automated observations can be made at high temporal frequency. Here we build on previous work and show how inexpensive, networked digital cameras ("webcams") can be used to document spatial and temporal variation in the spring and autumn phenology of forest canopies. We use two years of imagery from a deciduous, northern hardwood site, and one year of imagery from a coniferous, boreal transition site. A quantitative signal is obtained by splitting images into separate red, green, and blue color channels and calculating the relative brightness of each channel for "regions of interest" within each image. We put the observed phenological signal in context by relating it to seasonal patterns of gross primary productivity, inferred from eddy covariance measurements of surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange. We show that spring increases, and autumn decreases, in canopy greenness can be detected in both deciduous and coniferous stands. In deciduous stands, an autumn red peak is also observed. The timing and rate of spring development and autumn senescence varies across the canopy, with greater variability in autumn than spring. Interannual variation in phenology can be detected both visually and quantitatively; delayed spring onset in 2007 compared to 2006 is related to a prolonged cold spell from day 85 to day 110. This work lays the foundation for regional- to continental-scale camera-based monitoring of phenology at network observatory sites, e.g., National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) or AmeriFlux.

  10. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Seasonal variability in bacterial and fungal diversity of the near-surface atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Robert M; Clements, Nicholas; Emerson, Joanne B; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Hannigan, Michael P; Fierer, Noah

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi are ubiquitous throughout the Earth's lower atmosphere where they often represent an important component of atmospheric aerosols with the potential to impact human health and atmospheric dynamics. However, the diversity, composition, and spatiotemporal dynamics of these airborne microbes remain poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes across two aerosol size fractions at urban and rural sites in the Colorado Front Range over a 14-month period. Coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter samples were collected at weekly intervals with both bacterial and fungal diversity assessed via high-throughput sequencing. The diversity and composition of the airborne communities varied across the sites, between the two size fractions, and over time. Bacteria were the dominant type of bioaerosol in the collected air samples, while fungi and plants (pollen) made up the remainder, with the relative abundances of fungi peaking during the spring and summer months. As bacteria made up the majority of bioaerosol particles, we analyzed the bacterial communities in greater detail using a bacterial-specific 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach. Overall, bacterial taxonomic richness and the relative abundances of specific bacterial taxa exhibited significant patterns of seasonality. Likewise, airborne bacterial communities varied significantly between sites and across aerosol size fractions. Source-tracking analyses indicate that soils and leaves represented important sources of bacteria to the near-surface atmosphere across all locations with cow fecal bacteria also representing an important source of bioaerosols at the more rural sites during early fall and early spring. Together, these data suggest that a complex set of environmental factors, including changes in atmospheric conditions and shifts in the relative importance of available microbial sources, act to control the composition of microbial bioaerosols in rural and

  12. Modeling and observational occurrences of near-surface drainage in Utopia Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F.; Sejourne, A.; Kargel, J.; Godin, E.

    2016-12-01

    During the past 15 years, evidence for an ice-rich planet Mars has rapidly mounted, become increasingly varied in terms of types of deposits and types of observational data, and has become more widespread across the surface. The mid-latitudes of Mars, especially Utopia Planitia, show many types of interesting landforms similar to those in periglacial landscapes on Earth that suggest the presence of ice-rich permafrost. These include thermal contraction polygonal networks, scalloped terrains similar to thermokarst pits, debris flows, small mounds like pingos and rock glaciers. Here, we address questions concerning the influence of meltwater in the Utopia Planitia (UP) landscape using analogs of near-surface melting and drainage along ice-wedge troughs on Bylot Island, northern Canada. In Utopia Planitia, based on the identification of sinuous channel-like pits within polygonal networks, we suggest that episodic underground melting was possible under severe periglacial climate conditions. In UP, the collapse pattern and morphology of unconnected sinuous elongated pits that follow the polygon crack are similar to underground melting in Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada). Based on this terrestrial analogue, we develop a thermal model that consists of a thick insulating dusty layer over ice-saturated dust during a period of slight climatic warming relative to today's climate. In the model, the melting point is reached at depths down to 150 m. We suggest that small-scale melting could have occurred below ground within ground-ice polygonal fractures and pooled in underground cavities. Then the water may have been released episodically causing mechanical erosion as well as undermining and collapse. After melting, the dry surface dusty layer might have been blown away, thus exposing the degraded terrain of the substrate layer.

  13. Near-surface wind fields for San Francisco Bay--historical and 21st century projected time series

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — To support Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) in the San Francisco Bay (v2.1), time series of historical and 21st-century near-surface wind fields (eastward and...

  14. Tomographic inversion of near-surface Q factor by combining surface and cross-hole seismic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Fa; Zheng, Hao; Zhu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Ming-Chao; Zhai, Tong-Li

    2016-03-01

    The estimation of the quality factor Q plays a fundamental role in enhancing seismic resolution via absorption compensation in the near-surface layer. We present a new geometry that can be used to acquire field data by combining surface and cross-hole surveys to decrease the effect of geophone coupling on Q estimation. In this study, we drilled number of receiver holes around the source hole, each hole has different depth and each geophone is placed geophones into the bottom of each receiver hole to avoid the effect of geophone coupling with the borehole wall on Q estimation in conventional cross-hole seismic surveys. We also propose a novel tomographic inversion of the Q factor without the effect of the source signature, and examine its stability and reliability using synthetic data. We estimate the Q factors of the near-surface layer in two different frequency bands using field data acquired in the Dagang Oilfield. The results show that seismic absorption in the near-surface layer is much greater than that in the subsurface strata. Thus, it is of critical practical importance to enhance the seismic solution by compensating for near-surface absorption. In addition, we derive different Q factors from two frequency bands, which can be treated, to some extent, as evidence of a frequency-dependent Q.

  15. Differences in heat budgets of the near-surface Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal: Implications for the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    An analysis of the heat budgets of the near-surface Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal shows significant differences between them during the summer monsoon (June-September). In the Arabian Sea the winds associated with the summer monsoon are stronger...

  16. Safety Assessment Methodologies and Their Application in Development of Near Surface Waste Disposal Facilities--ASAM Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batandjieva, B.; Metcalf, P.

    2003-02-25

    Safety of near surface disposal facilities is a primary focus and objective of stakeholders involved in radioactive waste management of low and intermediate level waste and safety assessment is an important tool contributing to the evaluation and demonstration of the overall safety of these facilities. It plays significant role in different stages of development of these facilities (site characterization, design, operation, closure) and especially for those facilities for which safety assessment has not been performed or safety has not been demonstrated yet and the future has not been decided. Safety assessments also create the basis for the safety arguments presented to nuclear regulators, public and other interested parties in respect of the safety of existing facilities, the measures to upgrade existing facilities and development of new facilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has initiated a number of research coordinated projects in the field of development and improvement of approaches to safety assessment and methodologies for safety assessment of near surface disposal facilities, such as NSARS (Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study) and ISAM (Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities) projects. These projects were very successful and showed that there is a need to promote the consistent application of the safety assessment methodologies and to explore approaches to regulatory review of safety assessments and safety cases in order to make safety related decisions. These objectives have been the basis of the IAEA follow up coordinated research project--ASAM (Application of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities), which will commence in November 2002 and continue for a period of three years.

  17. Development of near surface seismic methods for urban and mining applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Brodic, Bojan; Place, Joachim; Juhlin, Christopher; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    There is a great need to improve our understanding of the geological conditions in the shallow subsurface. Direct observations of the subsurface are cumbersome and expensive, and sometimes impossible. Urban and mining areas are especially challenging due to various sources of noise such as from traffic, buildings, cars, city trains, trams, bridges and high-voltage power-lines. Access is also restricted both in time and space, which requires the equipment to be versatile, fast to set up and pack, and produces the least disruptions. However, if properly designed and implemented, geophysical methods are capable of imaging detailed subsurface structures and can successfully be used to provide crucial information for site characterizations, infrastructure planning, brown- and near-field exploration, and mine planning. To address some of these issues Uppsala University, in collaboration with a number of public authorities, research organizations and industry partners, has recently developed a prototype broadband (0-800 Hz based on digital sensors) multi-component seismic landstreamer system. The current configuration consists of three segments with twenty 3C-sensors each 2 m apart and an additional segment with twenty 3C-sensors each 4 m apart, giving a total streamer length of 200 m. These four segments can be towed in parallel or in series, which in combination with synchronized wireless and cabled sensors can address a variety of complex near surface problems. The system is especially geared for noisy environments and areas where high-resolution images of the subsurface are needed. The system has little sensitivity to electrical noise and measures sensor tilt, important in rough terrains, so it can immediately be corrected for during the acquisition. Thanks to the digital sensors, the system can also be used for waveform tomography and multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Both these methods require low frequencies and these are often sacrificed in

  18. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  19. Optimizing measurement geometry for seismic near-surface full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuber, André; Manukyan, Edgar; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-09-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is an increasingly popular tool for analysing seismic data. Current practise is to record seismic data sets that are suitable for reflection processing, that is, a very dense spatial sampling and a high fold are required. Using tools from optimized experimental design (ED), we demonstrate that such a dense sampling is not necessary for FWI purposes. With a simple noise-free acoustic example, we show that only a few suitably selected source positions are required for computing high-quality images. A second, more extensive study includes elastic FWI with noise-contaminated data and free-surface boundary conditions on a typical near-surface setup, where surface waves play a crucial role. The study reveals that it is sufficient to employ a receiver spacing in the order of the minimum shear wavelength expected. Furthermore, we show that horizontally oriented sources and multicomponent receivers are the preferred option for 2-D elastic FWI, and we found that with a small amount of carefully selected source positions, similarly good results can be achieved, as if as many sources as receivers would have been employed. For the sake of simplicity, we assume in our simulations that the full data information content is available, but data pre-processing and the presence of coloured noise may impose restrictions. Our ED procedure requires an a priori subsurface model as input, but tests indicate that a relatively crude approximation to the true model is adequate. A further pre-requisite of our ED algorithm is that a suitable inversion strategy exists that accounts for the non-linearity of the FWI problem. Here, we assume that such a strategy is available. For the sake of simplicity, we consider only 2-D FWI experiments in this study, but our ED algorithm is sufficiently general and flexible, such that it can be adapted to other configurations, such as crosshole, vertical seismic profiling or 3-D surface setups, also including larger scale

  20. Estimation of Swiss methane emissions by near surface observations and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Stephan; Brian, Oney; Leuenberger, Markus; Bamberger, Ines; Eugster, Werner; Steinbacher, Martin; Meinhardt, Frank; Brunner, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. It is released from both natural and anthropogenic processes and its atmospheric burden has more than doubled since preindustrial times. Current CH4 emission estimates are associated with comparatively large uncertainties both globally and regionally. For example, the Swiss national greenhouse gas inventory assigns an uncertainty of 18% to the country total anthropogenic CH4 emissions as compared to only 3% for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In Switzerland, CH4 is thought to be mainly released by agricultural activities (ruminants and manure management >80%), while natural emissions from wetlands and wild animals represent a minor source (~3 %). The country total and especially the spatial distribution of CH4 emission within Switzerland strongly differs between the national and different European scale inventories. To validate the 'bottom-up' Swiss CH4 emission estimate and to reduce its uncertainty both in total and spatially, 'top-down' methods combining atmospheric CH4 observations and regional scale transport simulations can be used. Here, we analyse continuous, near surface observations of CH4 concentrations as collected within the newly established CarboCountCH measurement network (http://www.carbocount.ch). The network consists of 4 sites situated on the Swiss Plateau, comprising a tall tower site (217 m), two elevated (mountaintop) sites and a small tower site (32 m) in flat terrain. In addition, continuous CH4 observations from the nearby high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (Alps) and the mountaintop site Schauinsland (Germany) were used. Two inversion frameworks were applied to the CH4 observations in combination with source sensitivities (footprints) calculated with the regional scale version of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. One inversion system was based on a Bayesian framework, while the other utilized an extended Kalman filter approach. The transport

  1. Quantifying the spatial variability in critical zone architecture through surface mapping and near-surface geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, R.; Del Vecchio, J.; Mount, G.; Hayes, J. L.; Comas, X.; Guo, L.; Lin, H.; Zarif, F.; Forsythe, B.; Brantley, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    the spatial heterogeneity of surface cover mapped in the catchment. Our study exemplifies how multidisciplinary approaches such as surface mapping, drilling, and near-surface geophysical methods can be used to understand the critical zone across spatial scales and can efficiently inform models of critical zone structure.

  2. Relevance of wildfires on dust emissions via interaction with near-surface wind pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Jähn, Michael; Schepanski, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Mineral dust is a key player in the Earth system and shows diverse impacts on the radiation budget, cloud microphysics, marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Eventually, it also affects our modern way of life. Not only dust emissions from barren or unvegetated soil surfaces like deserts or uncultivated croplands are important sources of airborne mineral dust. Also, during fire events dust is entrained into the atmosphere and appears to contribute noteworthy to the atmospheric dust burden. The underlying process, which drives dust entrainment during fires, is the so-called pyro-convection. The high temperatures in the center of a fire result in an upward motion of the heated air. Subsequently, air flows towards the fire replacing the raising air. The resulting accelerated winds are able to mobilize soil and dust particles up to a size of several millimeters, depending of both the size and the strength of the fire. Several measurements have shown that up to 80% of the mass fraction of the emitted particles during natural or prescribed fires is related to soil or dust particles. The particles are then mixed externally with the combustion aerosols into the convective updraft and were finally inject into altitudes above the planetary boundary layer where they can be distributed and transported over long distances by the atmospheric circulation. To investigate the impacts of such fires on the near-surface wind pattern and the potential for dust emissions via exceeding typical threshold velocities, high resolved Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) with the All Scale Atmospheric Model (ASAM) were executed. In the framework of this study, the influences of different fire properties (fire intensity, size, and shape) and different atmospheric conditions on the strength and extent of fire-related winds and finally their relevance for dust emissions were investigated using sensitivity studies. Prescribed fires are omnipresent during dry seasons and pyro-convection is a mechanism

  3. Near-surface structural examination of human tooth enamel subject to in vitro demineralization and remineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Carmen Veronica

    The early stages of chemical tooth decay are governed by dynamic processes of demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel that initiates along the surface of the tooth. Conventional diagnostic techniques lack the spatial resolution required to analyze near-surface structural changes in enamel at the submicron level. In this study, slabs of highly-polished, decay-free human enamel were subjected to 0.12M EDTA and buffered lactic acid demineralizing agents and MI Paste(TM) and calcifying (0.1 ppm F) remineralizing treatments in vitro. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), a technique typically used for thin film analysis, provided depth profiles of crystallinity changes in surface enamel with a resolution better than 100 nm. In conjunction with nanoindentation, a technique gaining acceptance as a means of examining the mechanical properties of sound enamel, these results were corroborated with well-established microscopy and Raman techniques to assess the nanohardness, morphologies and chemical nature of treated enamel. Interestingly, the average crystallite size of surface enamel along its c-axis dimension increased by nearly 40% after a 60 min EDTA treatment as detected by GIXD. This result was in direct contrast to the obvious surface degradation observed by microscopic and confocal Raman imaging. A decrease in nanohardness from 4.86 +/- 0.44 GPa to 0.28 +/- 0.10 GPa was observed. Collective results suggest that mineral dissolution characteristics evident on the micron scale may not be fully translated to the nanoscale in assessing the integrity of chemically-modified tooth enamel. While an intuitive decrease in enamel crystallinity was observed with buffered lactic acid-treated samples, demineralization was too slow to adequately quantify the enamel property changes seen. MI Paste(TM) treatment of EDTA-demineralized enamel showed preferential growth along the a-axis direction. Calcifying solution treatments of both demineralized sample types

  4. High resolution observations of the near-surface wind field over an isolated mountain and in a steep river canyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Butler

    2014-06-01

    numerical grid resolutions of around 4 km or larger wind predictions are not likely to be good predictors of local near-surface winds at sub-grid scales in complex terrain. The data from this effort are archived and available at: http://www.firemodels.org/index.php/windninja-introduction/windninja-publications.

  5. Description of climate, surface hydrology, and near-surface hydrogeology. Preliminary site description. Forsmark area - version 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof [Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Werner, Kent [SWECO VIAK AB/Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Juston, John [DBE Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-06-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is conducting site investigations at two different locations, the Forsmark and Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. The results from the investigations at the sites are used as a basic input to the development of Site Descriptive Models (SDM). The SDM shall summarise the current state of knowledge of the site, and provide parameters and models to be used in further analyses within Safety Assessment, Repository Design and Environmental Impact Assessment. The present report is a background report describing the meteorological conditions and the modelling of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology in support of the Forsmark version 1.2 SDM based on the data available in the Forsmark 1.2 'data freeze' (July 31, 2004). The groundwater is very shallow, with groundwater levels within one meter below ground as an annual mean for almost all groundwater monitoring wells. Also, the annual groundwater level amplitude is less than 1.5 m for most wells. The shallow groundwater levels mean that there is a strong interaction between evapotranspiration, soil moisture and groundwater. In the modelling, surface water and near-surface groundwater divides are assumed to coincide. The small-scale topography implies that many local, shallow groundwater flow systems are formed in the Quaternary deposits, overlaying more large-scale flow systems associated with groundwater flows at greater depths. Groundwater level time series from wells in till and bedrock within the same areas show a considerably higher groundwater level in the till than in the bedrock. The observed differences in levels are not fully consistent with the good hydraulic contact between overburden and bedrock indicated by the hydraulic tests in the Quaternary deposits. However, the relatively lower groundwater levels in the bedrock may be caused by the horizontal to sub-horizontal highly

  6. Application of near-surface geophysics as part of a hydrologic study of a subsurface drip irrigation system along the Powder River floodplain near Arvada, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, James I.; Veloski, Garret; Smith, Bruce D.; Minsley, Burke J.; Engle, Mark A.; Lipinski, Brian A.; Hammack, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming has occurred since 1997. National attention related to CBNG development has focused on produced water management, which is the single largest cost for on-shore domestic producers. Low-cost treatment technologies allow operators to reduce their disposal costs, provide treated water for beneficial use, and stimulate oil and gas production by small operators. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems are one potential treatment option that allows for increased CBNG production by providing a beneficial use for the produced water in farmland irrigation.Water management practices in the development of CBNG in Wyoming have been aided by integrated geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic studies of both the disposal and utilization of water. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have utilized multi-frequency airborne, ground, and borehole electromagnetic (EM) and ground resistivity methods to characterize the near-surface hydrogeology in areas of produced water disposal. These surveys provide near-surface EM data that can be compared with results of previous surveys to monitor changes in soils and local hydrology over time as the produced water is discharged through SDI.The focus of this investigation is the Headgate Draw SDI site, situated adjacent to the Powder River near the confluence of a major tributary, Crazy Woman Creek, in Johnson County, Wyoming. The SDI system was installed during the summer of 2008 and began operation in October of 2008. Ground, borehole, and helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) conductivity surveys were conducted at the site prior to the installation of the SDI system. After the installation of the subsurface drip irrigation system, ground EM surveys have been performed quarterly (weather permitting). The geophysical surveys map the heterogeneity of the near-surface

  7. Near surface geophysics: application of FD-EMI sounding to the study of historical resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manstein, Yu. A.; Manstein, A. K.; Scozzari, A.

    2009-04-01

    Sounding with alternating electromagnetic fields has gained a growing attention and a broad usage during the last three decades, including Frequency Domain Electromagnetic Induction (FD-EMI) sounding methods. A portable electromagnetic sensor (EMS-NEMFIS), developed at IPGG (Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences), which is based on such principle, is described in this work. Among the various application areas of such an instrument, focus in this work is given to the near-surface investigation of historical resources. The description of the device goes through the following steps: - Architecture of the instrument - Signal extraction principle - Tests and characterization Then, experiences made by using frequency-domain EMI soundings for geophysical applications in archaeology are presented, in order to assess the capability of the approach in such operative framework. In particular, case studies from the South Altay mountains and from Siberia have been selected to be shown in this context. The burial mounds of Pazyryk culture, dated 2500-3000 B.C., can be found over the wide area of South Altay mountains in Russia, Mongolia and China. This nomadic civilization belongs to the group of Mediterranean cultures. These people stayed in the Altay mountains for quite a short time - just a couple of centuries. Maybe they escaped from Europe due to Alexander Makedonsky wars or to some other unknown reason, and then went back to Europe. They burial mounds were kept safe because the wooden funeral cameras were buried into permafrost. However, recently, due to global warming, some of those cameras were melt, leading to a decay process. The information about presence of the ice lens inside of the mound is vital for decision to excavate the mound or not. Dozens of such a mounds were explored using NEMFIS during the years 2005 - 2007. Estimation of presence of the ice in some of them helped to find few good conserved burial cameras and safe a lot of resources for

  8. The gold/high temperature superconductor interface; metallicity of the near surface region and a search for the proximity effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessau, D.S.; Shen, Z.; Wells, B.O.; Spicer, W.E. (Stanford Electronics Labs, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (USA)); List, R.S.; Arko, A.J.; Bartlett, R.J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA)); Olson, C.G. (Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (USA)); Mitzi, D.B.; Eom, C.B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Geballe, T.H. (Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (USA))

    1991-05-01

    We have used high resolution photoemission spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of a wide variety of gold/high temperature superconductor interfaces, the majority of which were formed by low-temperature (20 K) gold evaporations on cleaved high quality single crystals. For {ital c}-axis interfaces formed on the 123 family of superconductors, we find that the gold deposition essentially destroys the metallicity of the superconducting substrate in the near surface region ({similar to}5 A), while the near surface region of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} remains metallic. We have also used photoemission spectroscopy to search for a proximity-effect induced superconducting gap in gold overlayers on {ital c}-axis single crystals and {ital a}-axis thin films, though no such effect was found.

  9. The gold/high temperature superconductor interface: Metallicity of the near surface region and a search for the proximity effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessau, D.S.; Shen, Z.X.; Wells, B.O.; Spicer, W.E. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Electronics Labs.); List, R.S.; Arko, A.J.; Bartlett, R.J.; Fisk, Z.; Cheong, S.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Olson, C.G. (Ames Lab., IA (USA)); Mitzi, D.B.; Eom, C.B.; Kapitulnik, A.; Geballe, T.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Physics); Schirber, J.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (U

    1990-01-01

    We have used high resolution photoemission spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of a wide variety of gold/high temperature superconductor interfaces, the majority of which were formed by low-temperature (20K) gold evaporations on cleaved high quality single crystals. For c-axis interfaces formed on the 123 family of superconductors, we find that the gold deposition essentially destroys the metallicity of the superconducting substrate in the near surface region ({approximately}5{angstrom}), while the near surface region of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} remains metallic. We have also used photoemission spectroscopy to search for a proximity-effect superconducting gap in gold overlayers on c-axis single crystals and a-axis thin films, though no such effect was found. 30 refs., 6 figs.

  10. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  11. Field observations and results of a 1-D boundary layer model for developing near-surface temperature maxima in the Western Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn G. Gallaher

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Summer sea ice extent in the Western Arctic has decreased significantly in recent years resulting in increased solar input into the upper ocean. Here, a comprehensive set of 'in situ' shipboard, on-ice, and autonomous ice-ocean measurements were made of the early stages of formation of the near-surface temperature maximum (NSTM in the Canada Basin. These observations along with the results from a 1-D turbulent boundary layer model indicate that heat storage associated with NSTM formation is largely due to the absorption of penetrating solar radiation just below a protective summer halocline. The depth of the summer halocline was found to be the most important factor for determining the amount of solar radiation absorbed in the NSTM layer, while halocline strength controlled the amount of heat removed from the NSTM by turbulent transport. Observations using the Naval Postgraduate School Turbulence Frame show that the NSTM was able to persist despite periods of intermittent turbulence because transport rates were too small to remove significant amounts of heat from the NSTM layer. The development of the early and late summer halocline and NSTM were found to be linked to summer season buoyancy and wind events. For the early summer NSTM, 1-D boundary layer model results show that melt pond drainage provides sufficient buoyancy to the summer halocline to prevent subsequent wind events from mixing out the NSTM. For the late summer NSTM, limited freshwater inputs reduce the strength of the summer halocline making the balance between interfacial stresses and buoyancy more tenuous. As a result, the late summer NSTM is an ephemeral feature dependent on local wind conditions, while the early summer NSTM is more persistent and able to store heat in the near-surface ocean beyond the summer season.

  12. Decadal regional air quality simulations over Europe in present climate: near surface ozone sensitivity to external meteorological forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Katragkou

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Regional air quality decadal simulations were carried out using the air quality model CAMx driven off-line by the regional climate model RegCM3 for the time slice 1991–2000 using two different datasets of external meteorological forcing to constrain RegCM3: the ERA40 global atmospheric reanalysis dataset and the output from the GCM ECHAM5. The focus of this work is to compare the perfect lateral boundary conditions experiment with the GCM driven control experiment and to investigate how this external meteorological forcing affects near surface ozone. The different RegCM3 meteorological forcings resulted in changes of near surface ozone over Europe ranging between ±5 ppb for winter and summer, while all model parameterizations and anthropogenic emissions remained unchanged. Changes in near surface ozone are induced by changes in meteorological fields and biogenic emissions, which are on-line calculated and meteorology-dependent. The model simulations suggest that the change in solar radiation is the factor that mostly modulates the ozone changes in summer. During winter season it is found that the induced changes in NOx explain about 40% of the ozone variability. The meteorological induced changes in biogenic emissions are quite low for winter with rather small impact on ozone while they are more temperature than radiation dependent. Using multiple regression analysis to associate the changes in near surface ozone with the respective changes in selected meteorological parameters and ozone precursors, an explained variance of 70% in summer and 60% in winter is reproduced.

  13. Near-surface snow particle dynamics from particle tracking velocimetry and turbulence measurements during alpine blowing snow storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamit, Nikolas O.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2016-12-01

    Many blowing snow conceptual and predictive models have been based on simplified two-phase flow dynamics derived from time-averaged observations of bulk flow conditions in blowing snow storms. Measurements from the first outdoor application of particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) of near-surface blowing snow yield new information on mechanisms for blowing snow initiation, entrainment, and rebound, whilst also confirming some findings from wind tunnel observations. Blowing snow particle movement is influenced by complex surface flow dynamics, including saltation development from creep that has not previously been measured for snow. Comparisons with 3-D atmospheric turbulence measurements show that blowing snow particle motion immediately above the snow surface responds strongly to high-frequency turbulent motions. Momentum exchange from wind to the dense near-surface particle-laden flow appears significant and makes an important contribution to blowing snow mass flux and saltation initiation dynamics. The more complete and accurate description of near-surface snow particle motions observable using PTV may prove useful for improving blowing snow model realism and accuracy.

  14. A Comprehensive Laboratory Study to Improve Ground Truth Calibration of Remotely Sensed Near-Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeian, E.; Tuller, M.; Sadeghi, M.; Sheng, W.; Jones, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    Optical satellite and airborne remote sensing (RS) have been widely applied for characterization of large-scale surface soil moisture distributions. However, despite the excellent spatial resolution of RS data, the electromagnetic radiation within the optical bands (400-2500 nm) penetrates the soil profile only to a depth of a few millimeters; hence obtained moisture estimates are limited to the soil surface region. Furthermore, moisture sensor networks employed for ground truth calibration of RS observations commonly exhibit very limited spatial resolution, which consequently leads to significant discrepancies between RS and ground truth observations. To better understand the relationship between surface and near-surface soil moisture, we employed a benchtop hyperspectral line-scan imaging system to generate high resolution surface reflectance maps during evaporation from soil columns filled with source soils covering a wide textural range and instrumented with a novel time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensor array that allows monitoring of near surface moisture at 0.5-cm resolution. A recently developed physical model for surface soil moisture predictions from shortwave infrared reflectance was applied to estimate surface soil moisture from surface reflectance and to explore the relationship between surface and near-surface moisture distributions during soil drying. Preliminary results are very promising and their applicability for ground truth calibration of RS observations will be discussed.

  15. A Layer-Stripping Method for 3D Near-Surface Velocity Model Building Using Seismic First-Arrival Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taikun Shi; Jianzhong Zhang; Zhonglai Huang; Changkun Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of 3D near-surface velocity model building, we develop a layer-stripping method using seismic first-arrival times. The velocity model within a Common Mid-Point (CMP) gather is assumed to be stratified into thin layers, and the velocity of each layer var-ies linearly with depth. The thickness and velocity of the top layer are estimated using minimum-offset first-arrival data in a CMP gather. Then the top layer is stripped and the second layer becomes a new top layer. After removing the effect of the top layer from the former first-arrival data, the new first-arrival data are obtained and then used to estimate the parameters of the second layer. In this manner, the velocity model, being regarded as that at a CMP location, is built layer-by-layer from the top to the bottom. A 3D near-surface velocity model is then formed using the velocity models at all CMP locations. The tests on synthetic and observed seismic data show that the layer-stripping method can be used to build good near-surface velocity models for static correction, and its computation speed is ap-proximately hundred times faster than that of grid tomography.

  16. In Situ Determination of the Transport Properties of Near-Surface Concrete Using AC Impedance Spectroscopy Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipeng Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The durability of existing concrete structures has increasingly attracted widespread attention in recent years. The phenomenon of performance degradation is often associated with the intrusion of hazardous ions from outside. As the first barrier to external substances intrusion, the near-surface concrete plays an important role in durability. So the performance of in-service concrete structures often depends on the transport properties of the near-surface concrete. Accordingly, information on service conditions and life prediction can be obtained by testing these transport properties. In this paper, an in situ method for chloride ion diffusion coefficient determination is proposed based on the relationship between the alternating current impedance spectroscopy parameters and the chloride ion diffusion coefficient. By a rational design, the new method can synthetically reflect the transport properties of near-surface concrete and is not affected by the presence of the reinforcing bar. In addition, the experimental results show that the method is in good agreement with “PERMIT” migration test which has been widely used. The proposed method is less time consuming and nondestructive and has good reproducibility.

  17. Multi-scale modeling study of the source contributions to near-surface ozone and sulfur oxides levels over California during the ARCTAS-CARB period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ozone (O3 problems and the increasing sulfur oxides (SOx=SO2+SO4 ambient concentrations over South Coast (SC and other areas of California (CA are affected by both local emissions and long-range transport. In this paper, multi-scale tracer and full-chemistry simulations with the STEM atmospheric chemistry model are used to assess the contribution of local emission sources to SC O3 and evaluate the impacts of transported sulfur and local emissions on the SC sulfur budget during the ARCTAS-CARB experiment period in 2008. Sensitivity simulations quantify contributions of biogenic and fire emissions to SC O3 levels. California biogenic and fire emissions contribute 3–4 ppb to near-surface O3 over SC, with larger contributions to other regions in CA. Long-range transport from Asia is estimated to enhance surface SO4 over SC by ~0.5 μg/sm3, and the higher SOx levels (up to ~0.7 ppb of SO2 and ~6 μg/sm3 of SO4 observed above ~6 km did not affect surface air quality in the study region. Enhanced near-surface SOx levels over SC during the flight week were attributed mostly to local emissions. Two anthropogenic SOx emission inventories (EIs from the California Air Resources Board (CARB and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA are compared and applied in 60 km and 12 km chemical transport simulations, and the results are compared with observations. The CARB EI shows improvements over the National Emission Inventory (NEI by EPA, but generally underestimates surface SC SOx by about a factor of two. Maritime (mostly shipping emissions contribute to the high SO2 levels over the ocean and on-shore, and fine SO4 over the downwind areas is impacted by maritime sources. Maritime emissions also modify the NOx-VOC limitations over coastal

  18. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars. III. The structure of small-scale magnetic flux concentrations

    CERN Document Server

    Beeck, Benjamin; Cameron, Robert H; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    The convective envelopes of cool main-sequence stars harbour magnetic fields with a complex global and local structure. These fields affect the near-surface convection and the outer stellar atmospheres in many ways and are responsible for the observable magnetic activity of stars. Our aim is to understand the local structure in unipolar regions with moderate average magnetic flux density. These correspond to plage regions covering a substantial fraction of the surface of the Sun (and likely also the surface of other Sun-like stars) during periods of high magnetic activity. We analyse the results of 18 local-box magnetohydrodynamics simulations covering the upper layers of the convection zones and the photospheres of cool main-sequence stars of spectral types F to early M. The average vertical field in these simulations ranges from 20 to 500G. We find a substantial variation of the properties of the surface magnetoconvection between main-sequence stars of different spectral types. As a consequence of a reduced...

  19. Venus surface and near surface anomalies on the Northern hemisphere observed by VIRTIS/VEX: First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, G.; Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Basilevski, A.; Drossart, P.; Piccioni, G.

    2009-04-01

    Venus nightside emission measurements of VIRTIS on Venus Express provide the opportunity of surface studies in the narrow near infrared atmospheric windows. The measurements as well as detailed new radiative transfer simulations show that radiance ratios in the emission windows between 1.0 and 1.35 m with respect to the 1.02 m window can be used to extract information about the surface elevation and temperature. Based on these analyses, first surface and near surface anomalies are identified on the Northern hemisphere of Venus, which are due to deviations of the elevation - temperature correlation in certain small areas. The data are selected from VIRTIS-M-IR nightside measurements. To ensure minimal atmospheric influence on the measured signatures, only pushbroom observations with small observation angles close to nadir are taken into account. The radiative transfer simulation technique considers absorption, emission, and multiple scattering by gaseous and particulate constituents of the atmosphere. Look-up tables of quasi-monochromatic gas absorption cross-sections are calculated using appropriate spectral line data bases and line profiles and a line-by-line procedure. Empirical continuum absorption coefficients are determined from a 'VIRTIS reference spectrum'. In order to derive the parameters of the H2SO4 clouds, Mie theory is applied. Multiple scattering is considered by a Successive Order procedure. The synthetic quasi-monochromatic intensity spectra at the model top level of the atmosphere are convolved with the VIRTIS spectral response function. The surface windows at 1.02, 1.10 and 1.18 m exhibit a clear dependence of transmitted radiation on topographical features and, thus, on surface thermal emission, since an elevation change of 12 km results in a temperature change of 100 K. In the first approximation, the radiance ratios are affine linear functions of the surface temperature. This is demonstrated by both measurements and simulations. In general, the

  20. MHD simulations of near-surface convection in cool main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Beeck, Benjamin; Reiners, Ansgar

    2014-01-01

    The solar photospheric magnetic field is highly structured owing to its interaction with the convective flows. Its local structure has a strong influence on the profiles of spectral lines not only by virtue of the Zeeman effect, but also through the modification of the thermodynamical structure (e.g. line weakening in hot small-scale magnetic structures). Many stars harbor surface magnetic fields comparable to or larger than the Sun at solar maximum. Therefore, a strong influence of the field on the surface convection and on spectral line profiles can be expected. We carried out 3D local-box MHD simulations of unipolar magnetized regions (average fields of 20, 100, and 500G) with parameters corresponding to six main-sequence stars (spectral types F3V to M2V). The influence of the magnetic field on the convection and the local thermodynamical structure were analyzed in detail. For three spectral lines, we determined the impact of the magnetic field on the disc-integrated Stokes-I profiles. Line weakening has i...

  1. Near-Surface & High Resolution Seismic Imaging of the Bennett Thrust Fault in the Indio Mountains of West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennemann, A.; Karplus, M. S.; Kaip, G.; Harder, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Indio Mountains in southwest Texas, 34 km southwest of Van Horn at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) field station using newly acquired active-source seismic data. These new data are the first active-source seismic data acquired at the UTEP field station. The dominant regional lithologies in this area comprise a transgressive sequence nearly 2 km in total stratigraphic thickness, formed by extensional processes. The area is highly faulted with multiple fault generations. I will show images of the Bennett Thrust Fault, a northwest-striking, northeast-dipping fault associated with the Laramide Orogeny and discuss the near-surface geometries of this fault and adjacent rock units. This region is a pre-salt analog for similar areas that are ideal for petroleum reservoirs, such are reservoirs off the coasts of Brazil and Angola. While there are no petroleum plays in the Indio Mountains region, imaging and understanding subsurface structural and lithological geometries and how that geometry directs potential fluid flow has implications for other regions with petroleum plays. I will present processed data and interpretation of a 1 km 2-D near-surface, high-resolution seismic reflection line. Along the 1 km line, we collected a lower frequency dataset using 100 third-pound explosions and a higher frequency dataset produced from 500 sledge-hammer blows at the same 100 source points (5 blows will be stacked at each source point). The lower frequency data set will be the focus of this presentation. The data will be processed using standard seismic reflection practices using ProMAX. This image will be imported into Petrel to create a model of the faults' geometries and the sedimentary layers. My research will identify near-surface structures, fault geometries and lithologies.

  2. Modeling Heat Transfer to Explain Observed Temperature Anomalies in Near-Surface Ice, Greenland Ice Sheet Ablation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B. H.; Harper, J. T.; Meierbachtol, T. W.; Humphrey, N. F.; Johnson, J. V.

    2016-12-01

    Measured ice temperatures in over 30 boreholes at 6 different field sites within the Greenland Ice Sheet ablation area indicate that the near-surface ice temperature warms toward the margin. The rate of warming is significantly greater than the atmospheric lapse rate, meaning that the mean annual ice temperature is far warmer than the mean annual air temperature near the margin. Theoretically, ice within 15 meters of the surface should oscillate seasonally around the mean air temperature. However, observations of mean ice and air temperatures differ by as much as 5 degrees Celsius. Here we numerically model heat transfer in ice to investigate the physical processes that could drive this discrepancy. Modeling results are compared to measured ice temperatures in the first 20 meters of ice below the surface. First, we model pure conduction to analyze the thermal effect of snow accumulation, a fixed melting temperature, ablation at the ice surface, emergent flow of ice, and long-term changes in the mean air temperature. Next, we consider a secondary process beyond pure conduction with the air - a latent heat flux which adds energy by refreezing meltwater below the surface. While our measurement locations have no open crevasses exposed to the surface, borehole field observations reveal that void spaces exist below the ice surface. These subsurface voids could provide a route for water to move to depth where it then refreezes and adds energy to the surrounding ice, thus warming ice above the mean air temperature. Finally, we use the near-surface results as a boundary condition for heat transfer through the full thickness of the ice column. The subsequent model output is compared to borehole temperature measurements at depth to examine the effect of near-surface heat transfer on the rest of the ice column.

  3. G.POT: a method for the assessment and mapping of the near-surface geothermal potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasso, Alessandro; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2017-04-01

    Shallow geothermal systems are widely recognised as a valuable technology for the heating and cooling of buildings. The most adopted technology is the Borehole Heat Exchanger (BHE), since it can be installed almost everywhere. However, the economic viability of BHEs depends on the thermal load that can be efficiently exchanged with the ground, i.e. the near-surface geothermal potential. We present the G.POT (Geothermal POTential) method for the assessment of near-surface geothermal potential as a function of the thermal conductivity and capacity of the ground, of its initial temperature, of the thermal resistance of the BHE and of the duration of the sinusoidal thermal load cycle, which reproduces the typical pattern of a thermal load during a heating or a cooling season. The function was calibrated from the results of numerical heat transfer simulations, performed varying the values of the aforementioned parameters over broad ranges. G.POT is a simple mathematical tool which can be easily implemented for the large-scale assessment and mapping of the near-surface geothermal potential for heating or cooling purpose. An example of its application is also shown, and advice is provided on the processing of input parameters. References A. Casasso, R. Sethi, G.POT: A quantitative method for the assessment and mapping of the shallow geothermal potential, Energy 106 (2016) 765-773. A. Casasso, R. Sethi, Assessment and mapping of the shallow geothermal potential in the province of Cuneo (Piedmont, NW Italy), Renewable Energy 102, Part B (2017) 306-315.

  4. Using of standard marine radar for determination of a water surface and an atmosphere near-surface layer parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, Nikolay A.; Bakhanov, Victor V.; Ermoshkin, Aleksei V.; Kazakov, Vasily I.; Kemarskaya, Olga N.; Titov, Victor I.; Troitskaya, Yulia I.

    2014-10-01

    At present time radar methods of the seas and oceans diagnostics are actively developing. Using of the radar stations based on satellites and planes allows to receive information on a sea surface and a atmosphere near-surface layer with coverage of big water surface areas independently of day time. The developed methods of satellite radio images processing can be applied to marine radar stations. In Institute of Applied Physics RAS works on sea surface diagnostics systems development on the basis of standard marine radar are actively conducted. Despite smaller coverage of the territory in comparison with satellite data, marine radar have possibility to record spatially temporary radar images and to receive information on a surrounding situation quickly. This work deals with results of the researches which were conducted within the international expedition in the Atlantic Ocean in the autumn of 2012 on a route Rotterdam (Netherlands) - Ushuaya (Argentina) - Antarctica — Ushuaya. During this expedition a complex measurements of a sea surface, a atmosphere near-surface layer parameters and subsurface currents in the wide range of hydroweather conditions, including the storm were carried out. The system developed in IAP RAS on the basis of a marine radar ICOM MR-1200RII and the ADC (Analog Digital Converter) block for data recording on the personal computer was used. Display of a non-uniform near-surface current on sea surface radar images in storm conditions is shown. By means of the high-speed anemometer and meteorological station the measurements of the atmosphere parameters were carried out. Comparison of the anemometer data with calculated from radar images is carried out. Dependence of radar cross section from wind speed in the wide range of wind speeds, including storm conditions is investigated. Possibility of marine radar using for surface waves intensity and ice situation estimates also as icebergs detection is shown.

  5. Effect of Saturated Near Surface on Nitrate and Ammonia Nitrogen Losses in Surface Runoff at the Loess Soil Hillslope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-bin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water pollution from agricultural fields is a global problem and cause of eutrophication of surface waters. A laboratory study was designed to evaluate the effects of near-surface hydraulic gradients on NO3–N and NH4–N losses in surface runoff from soil boxes at 27% slope undersimulated rainfall of a loess soil hillslope. Experimental treatments included two near-surface hydraulic gradients (free drainage, FD; saturation, SA, three fertilizer application rates (control, no fertilizer input; low, 120 kg N ha-1; high, 240 kg N ha-1, and simulated rainfall of 100 mm h-1 was applied for 70 min. The results showed that saturated near-surface soil moisture had dramatic effects on NO3–N and NH4–N losses and water quality. Under the low fertilizer treatment, average NO3–N concentrations in runoff water of SA averaged 2.2 times greater than that of FD, 1.6 times greater for NH4–N. Under the high fertilizer treatment, NO3–N concentrations in runoff water from SA averaged 5.7 times greater than that of FD, 4.3 times greater for NH4–N. Nitrogen loss formed with NO3–N is dominant during the event, but not NH4–N. Under the SA condition, the total loss of NO3–N from low fertilizer treatment was 34.2 to 42.3% of applied nitrogen, while under the FD treatment that was 3.9 to 6.9%. However, the total loss of NH4–N was less than 1% of applied nitrogen. These results showed that saturated condition could make significant contribution to water quality problems.

  6. The impact of grid and spectral nudging on the variance of the near-surface wind speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2015-01-01

    variance in the Weather Research and Forecasting model is analyzed. Simulations are run on nested domains with horizontal grid spacing 15 and 5 km over the Baltic Sea region. For the 15 km domain, 36-hr simulations initialized each day are compared with 11-day simulations with either grid or spectral......Grid and spectral nudging are effective ways of preventing drift from large scale weather patterns in regional climate models. However, the effect of nudging on the wind-speed variance is unclear. In this study, the impact of grid and spectral nudging on near-surface and upper boundary layer wind...

  7. Fast relaxation of a hexagonal Poiseuille shear-induced near-surface phase in a threadlike micellar solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, W A; Butler, P D; Magid, L J; Han, Z; Slawecki, T M

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of near-surface conformations in complex fluids under flow should dramatically affect their rheological properties. We have made the first measurements resolving the decay kinetics of a hexagonal phase induced in a threadlike polyionic micellar system under Poiseuille shear near a quartz surface. Upon cessation of shearing flow, this minimum interference crystalline phase formed within approximately 20 microm of the surface "melts" to a metastable two-dimensional liquid of aligned micelles in approximately 0.7 s. This is some three orders of magnitude shorter than the time required for bulk (Couette) shear-aligned micelles in this system to reach a fully entangled state.

  8. Using CYGNSS to Observe Convectively Driven Near-Surface Winds in Tropical Precipitation Systems During Madden-Julian Oscillation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Li, Xuanli; Mecikalski, John; Hoover, Kacie; Castillo, Tyler; Chronis, Themis

    2017-01-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation OKLMA 1411 UTC Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a multi-satellite constellation that launched 15 December 2016. The primary objective of CYGNSS is to use bistatic Global Positioning System (GPS) reflectometry to accurately measure near-surface wind speeds within the heavily raining inner core of tropical cyclones. CYGNSS also features rapid revisit times over a given region in the tropics - ranging from several minutes to a few hours, depending on the constellation geometry at that time. Despite the focus on tropical cyclones, the ability of CYGNSS to provide rapid updates of winds, unbiased by the presence of precipitation, has many other potential applications related to general tropical convection.

  9. Observations of Near-Surface Scattering with a Dense Profile of Shots Recorded by an Underground Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Atterholt, J.; Bowden, D. C.; Caton, R.; Gribler, G.; Liberty, L. M.; Mandic, V.; Meyers, P.; Prestegard, T.; Tsai, V. C.

    2016-12-01

    We operated a combined passive-active array experiment at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in the Black Hills of South Dakota. SURF is located at the former Homestake Mine, which is the deepest underground mine in North America. The passive array has 24 broadband stations with 9 surface stations and 15 underground sites deployed in mine drifts to depths up to 1478 m. We conducted a series of three active-source experiments: (1) a land streamer and weight drop system produced over 4300 source points at 4 m intervals on 5 profiles in and near the city of Lead, SD; (2) a set of nine-component surveys conducted at the 1250 and 1478 m levels of the mine; and (3) an underground land streamer survey on the 518 m level. The surface shot data was well recorded whenever the shot point was within approximately 1500 m of most receivers. The results were compromised by a failure of a precision, absolute timing system we assembled for recording shot times. We developed a two-stage, multichannel cross-correlation method to graphically edit and provide precise timing for these shots that assumes the travel time to each receiver was constant within a specified averaging distance. The resulting redundancy was exploited in a least squares inversion similar to surface consistent static estimations. The data show compelling evidence for extreme variation in source coupling. We observe laterally continuous areas where the dominant direct wave signal recorded underground shifts between P and S propagation modes on scale lengths of the order of 100 m. We hypothesis that the along line variations are an indication of near-surface scattering created by a combination of heterogeneity in the weathered layer and human generated heterogeneity from mining. The land streamer data provide estimates of near-surface of Vp from first break picks and Vs from a joint inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves and H/V ratios. For this meeting we expect to combine the data from the near-surface

  10. Influence of a single lightning on the intensity of an air electric field and acoustic emission of near surface rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Smirnov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a single lightning discharge on electric field intensity in the near ground atmosphere was investigated. The effect appeared as a sharp fall of electric field potential gradient from 80 V m−1 up to −21 V m−1. The process of intensity recovery is described by flat capacitor model with characteristic time of recovery of 17 c. Simultaneously with electric field, the acoustic emission response in the near surface rocks on lightning discharge was registered in the frequency range of 6.5–11 kHz.

  11. Numerical simulation of the observed near-surface East India Coastal Current on the continental slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Shankar, D.; Chatterjee, Abhisek; Vinayachandran, P. N.

    2017-08-01

    We simulate the East India Coastal Current (EICC) using two numerical models (resolution 0.1° × 0.1°), an oceanic general circulation model (OGCM) called Modular Ocean Model and a simpler, linear, continuously stratified (LCS) model, and compare the simulated current with observations from moorings equipped with acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed on the continental slope in the western Bay of Bengal (BoB). We also carry out numerical experiments to analyse the processes. Both models simulate well the annual cycle of the EICC, but the performance degrades for the intra-annual and intraseasonal components. In a model-resolution experiment, both models (run at a coarser resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° ) simulate well the currents in the equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO), but the performance of the high-resolution LCS model as well as the coarse-resolution OGCM, which is good in the EICC regime, degrades in the eastern and northern BoB. An experiment on forcing mechanisms shows that the annual EICC is largely forced by the local alongshore winds in the western BoB and remote forcing due to Ekman pumping over the BoB, but forcing from the EIO has a strong impact on the intra-annual EICC. At intraseasonal periods, local (equatorial) forcing dominates in the south (north) because the Kelvin wave propagates equatorward in the western BoB. A stratification experiment with the LCS model shows that changing the background stratification from EIO to BoB leads to a stronger surface EICC owing to strong coupling of higher order vertical modes with wind forcing for the BoB profiles. These high-order modes, which lead to energy propagating down into the ocean in the form of beams, are important only for the current and do not contribute significantly to the sea level.

  12. Imaging Near-Surface Controls on Hot Spring Expression Using Shallow Seismic Refraction in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A. N.; Lindsey, C.; Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Larson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We used shallow seismic refraction to image near-surface materials in the vicinity of a small group of hot springs, located in the Morning Mist Springs area of Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Seismic velocities in the area surveyed range from a low of 0.3 km/s to a high of approximately 2.5 km/s. The survey results indicate an irregular surface topography overlain by silty sediments. The observed seismic velocities are consistent with a subsurface model in which sorted sands and gravels, probably outwash materials from the Pinedale glaciation, are overlain by silts and fine sands deposited in the flat-lying areas of the Morning Springs area. These findings are supported by published geologic maps of the area and well logs from a nearby borehole. The near-surface materials appear to be saturated with discharging hydrothermal fluids of varying temperature, and interbedded with semi-lithified geothermal deposits (sinter). We hypothesize that the relatively low-conductivity deposits of fines at the surface may serve to confine a shallow, relatively low-temperature (sub-boiling) hydrothermal aquifer, and that the distribution of sinter in the shallow subsurface plays an important role in determining the geometry of hydrothermal discharge (hot springs) at the land surface. Few studies of the shallow controls on hot spring expression exist for the Yellowstone caldera, and the present study therefore offers a unique glimpse into near-subsurface fluid flow controls.

  13. Near-Surface Meteorology During the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS): Evaluation of Reanalyses and Global Climate Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, G.; Shupe, M.D.; Caldwell, P.M.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Persson, O.; Boyle, J.S.; Kelley, M.; Klein, S.A.; Tjernstrom, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric measurements from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) are used to evaluate the performance of three atmospheric reanalyses (European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF)- Interim reanalysis, National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) reanalysis, and NCEP-DOE (Department of Energy) reanalysis) and two global climate models (CAM5 (Community Atmosphere Model 5) and NASA GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) ModelE2) in simulation of the high Arctic environment. Quantities analyzed include near surface meteorological variables such as temperature, pressure, humidity and winds, surface-based estimates of cloud and precipitation properties, the surface energy budget, and lower atmospheric temperature structure. In general, the models perform well in simulating large-scale dynamical quantities such as pressure and winds. Near-surface temperature and lower atmospheric stability, along with surface energy budget terms, are not as well represented due largely to errors in simulation of cloud occurrence, phase and altitude. Additionally, a development version of CAM5, which features improved handling of cloud macro physics, has demonstrated to improve simulation of cloud properties and liquid water amount. The ASCOS period additionally provides an excellent example of the benefits gained by evaluating individual budget terms, rather than simply evaluating the net end product, with large compensating errors between individual surface energy budget terms that result in the best net energy budget.

  14. Near surface properties of mixtures of propylammonium nitrate with n-alkanols 2. Nanotribology and fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, James; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob

    2015-10-28

    Colloid probe friction force microscopy (FFM) has been used to study the lubricity of propylammonium nitrate (PAN) mixed with n-alkanols confined between sliding silica and mica surfaces. Mixtures of PAN with butanol, hexanol, octanol and dodecanol were investigated for various n-alkanol volume fractions to elucidate the effect of n-alkanol hydrocarbon chain length and concentration on shear forces. For all n-alkanols friction decreases with n-alkanol vol%. The trends in friction reduction with n-alkanol vol% do not correlate with changes in the bulk phase viscosity or the near surface nanostructure, and colloid probe atomic force microscope (AFM) fluid dynamic measurements showed that none of the mixtures shear thin. Thus, the reduction in friction is attributed to the n-alkanol disrupting solvophobic interactions between boundary layer propylammonium ions adsorbed to the mica and near surface liquid layers. The lowest friction is obtained for pure dodecanol, which is attributed to the dodecanol forming a robust boundary layer. Friction for the other pure n-alkanols is higher because the lateral attractions between adsorbed n-alkanols are too weak to facilitate the formation of a strong boundary layer, commensurate with the decreased hydrocarbon chain length.

  15. Correlation of near-surface stratigraphy and physical properties of clayey sediments from Chalco Basin, Mexico, using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón-Freyre, Dora; Cerca, Mariano; Hernández-Marín, Martín.

    2003-08-01

    Detailed measurements of water content, liquid and plastic limits, electric conductivity, grain-size distribution, specific gravity, and compressibility were performed on the upper 7 m of the lacustrine sequence from the Chalco Basin, Valley of Mexico. Eight stratigraphic units consisting of alternating layers of clay, silt, sand, and gravel of volcanic origin are described for this sequence. The analysis of contrasts in the physical properties permitted to identify potential reflectors of radar waves: (i) change in the electrical conductivity at 0.4 m depth; (ii) increment in the clay and water content at 0.8 m depth; (iii) bimodal behavior of the water content at 1.3 m depth; (iv) increment in the sand content and decrease in water content at 2.6 m depth; and (v) the presence of a pyroclastic unit at 3.7 m depth. Radargrams with frequencies of 900 and 300 MHz were collected on a grid of profiles covering the study area. Correlation of radargrams with the reference section permitted the spatial interpolation of variations in the physical properties and the near-surface stratigraphy. Contrary to the expected in these clayey sediments, electric contrast enhanced by variations in water content and grain size permitted the recording of the near-surface sedimentary structures. Distinctive radar signatures were identified between reflectors. Furthermore, lateral discontinuities of the reflectors and their vertical displacements permitted the identification of deformational features within the sequence.

  16. Use of weather research and forecasting model outputs to obtain near-surface refractive index structure constant over the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun; Wu, Xiaoqing; Li, Xuebin; Zhu, Wenyue; Qiao, Chunhong; Rao, Ruizhong; Mei, Haipin

    2016-06-13

    The methods to obtain atmospheric refractive index structure constant (Cn2) by instrument measurement are limited spatially and temporally and they are more difficult and expensive over the ocean. It is useful to forecast Cn2 effectively from Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) outputs. This paper introduces a method that WRF Model is used to forecast the routine meteorological parameters firstly, and then Cn2 is calculated based on these parameters by the Bulk model from the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) over the ocean near-surface. The corresponding Cn2 values measured by the micro-thermometer which is placed on the ship are compared with the ones forecasted by WRF model to determine how this method performs. The result shows that the forecasted Cn2 is consistent with the measured Cn2 in trend and the order of magnitude as a whole, as well as the correlation coefficient is up to 77.57%. This method can forecast some essential aspects of Cn2 and almost always captures the correct magnitude of Cn2, which experiences fluctuations of two orders of magnitude. Thus, it seems to be a feasible and meaningful method that using WRF model to forecast near-surface Cn2 value over the ocean.

  17. Improving snow process modeling with satellite-based estimation of near-surface-air-temperature lapse rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Sun, Litao; Shrestha, Maheswor; Li, Xiuping; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Kun; Lu, Hui; Chen, Deliang

    2016-10-01

    In distributed hydrological modeling, surface air temperature (Tair) is of great importance in simulating cold region processes, while the near-surface-air-temperature lapse rate (NLR) is crucial to prepare Tair (when interpolating Tair from site observations to model grids). In this study, a distributed biosphere hydrological model with improved snow physics (WEB-DHM-S) was rigorously evaluated in a typical cold, large river basin (e.g., the upper Yellow River basin), given a mean monthly NLRs. Based on the validated model, we have examined the influence of the NLR on the simulated snow processes and streamflows. We found that the NLR has a large effect on the simulated streamflows, with a maximum difference of greater than 24% among the various scenarios for NLRs considered. To supplement the insufficient number of monitoring sites for near-surface-air-temperature at developing/undeveloped mountain regions, the nighttime Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer land surface temperature is used as an alternative to derive the approximate NLR at a finer spatial scale (e.g., at different elevation bands, different land covers, different aspects, and different snow conditions). Using satellite-based estimation of NLR, the modeling of snow processes has been greatly refined. Results show that both the determination of rainfall/snowfall and the snowpack process were significantly improved, contributing to a reduced summer evapotranspiration and thus an improved streamflow simulation.

  18. Near-surface permeability in a supraglacial drainage basin on the Llewellyn Glacier, Juneau Icefield, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, L.; Zok, A.; Manga, M.

    2014-03-01

    Supraglacial channel networks link time varying melt production and meltwater routing on temperate glaciers. Such channel networks often include components of both surface transport in streams and subsurface porous flow through near-surface ice, firn or snowpack. Although subsurface transport if present will likely control network transport efficacy, it is the most poorly characterized component of the system. We present measurements of supraglacial channel spacing and network properties on the Juneau Icefield, subsurface water table height, and time variation of hydraulic characteristics including diurnal variability in water temperature. We combine these data with modeling of porous flow in weathered ice to infer near-surface permeability. Estimates are based on an observed phase lag between diurnal water temperature variations and discharge, and independently on measurement of water table surface elevation away from a stream. Both methods predict ice permeability on a 1-10 m scale in the range of 10-10-10-11 m2. These estimates are considerably smaller than common parameterizations of surface water flow on bare ice in the literature, as well as smaller than most estimates of snowpack permeability. For supraglacial environments in which porosity/permeability creation in the subsurface is balanced by porous flow of meltwater, our methods provide an estimate of microscale hydraulic properties from observations of supraglacial channel spacing.

  19. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2016-04-26

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green\\'s function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  20. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source-domain FTI is capable of automatically generating a background velocity that can kinematically match the reconstructed plane-wave sources of early arrivals with true plane-wave sources. This method does not require picking first arrivals for inversion, which is one of the most challenging aspects of ray-based first-arrival tomographic inversion. Moreover, compared with conventional Born-based methods, source-domain FTI can distinguish between slower or faster initial model errors via providing the correct sign of the model gradient. In addition, this method does not need estimation of the source wavelet, which is a requirement for receiver-domain wave-equation velocity inversion. The model derived from source-domain FTI is then used as input to early-arrival waveform inversion to obtain the short-wavelength velocity components. We have tested the workflow on synthetic and field seismic data sets. The results show source-domain FTI can generate reasonable background velocities for early-arrival waveform inversion even when subsurface velocity reversals are present and the workflow can produce a high-resolution near-surface velocity model.

  1. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han; Huang, Yunsong; Guo, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green's function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  2. Near-surface meteorology during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS: evaluation of reanalyses and global climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. de Boer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric measurements from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS are used to evaluate the performance of three reanalyses (ERA-Interim, NCEP/NCAR and NCEP/DOE and two global climate models (CAM5 and NASA GISS ModelE2 in simulation of the high Arctic environment. Quantities analyzed include near surface meteorological variables such as temperature, pressure, humidity and winds, surface-based estimates of cloud and precipitation properties, the surface energy budget, and lower atmospheric temperature structure. In general, the models perform well in simulating large scale dynamical quantities such as pressure and winds. Near-surface temperature and lower atmospheric stability, along with surface energy budget terms are not as well represented due largely to errors in simulation of cloud occurrence, phase and altitude. Additionally, a development version of CAM5, which features improved handling of cloud macro physics, is demonstrated to improve simulation of cloud properties and liquid water amount. The ASCOS period additionally provides an excellent example of the need to evaluate individual budget terms, rather than simply evaluating the net end product, with large compensating errors between individual surface energy budget terms resulting in the best net energy budget.

  3. Updated cloud physics improve the modelled near surface climate of Antarctica of a regional atmospheric climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. van Wessem

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The physics package of the polar version of the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2 has been updated from RACMO2.1 to RACMO2.3. The update constitutes, amongst others, the inclusion of a parameterization for cloud ice super-saturation, an improved turbulent and radiative flux scheme and a changed cloud scheme. In this study the effects of these changes on the modelled near-surface climate of Antarctica are presented. Significant biases remain, but overall RACMO2.3 better represents the near-surface climate in terms of the modelled surface energy balance, based on a comparison with > 750 months of data from nine automatic weather stations located in East Antarctica. Especially the representation of the sensible heat flux and net longwave radiative flux has improved with a decrease in biases of up to 40 %. These improvements are mainly caused by the inclusion of ice super-saturation, which has led to more moisture being transported onto the continent, resulting in more and optically thicker clouds and more downward longwave radiation. As a result, modelled surface temperatures have increased and the bias, when compared to 10 m snow temperatures from 64 ice core observations, has decreased from −2.3 K to −1.3 K. The weaker surface temperature inversion consequently improves the representation of the sensible heat flux, whereas wind speed remains unchanged.

  4. The climate influence of anthropogenic land-use changes on near-surface wind energy potential in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; WANG Yuan; CHU HuiYun; TANG JianPing

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the potential impact of climate change on wind energy in China. The climate change of near-surface wind energy potential in China under the background of global warming and its association with anthropogenic land-use changes are investigated by calculating the difference in surface wind speeds between the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and the observations since the re-analysis dataset contains the influence of large-scale climate changes due to greenhouse gases, it is less sensitive to regional surface processes associated with land types. The surface wind data in this study consist of long-tarm observations from 604 Chinese Roution Meteorological Stations and theNCEP/NCAR reanalysis data from 1960-1999. The results suggest that the observed mean wind speeds significantly weakened and the near-surface wind power trended downward due to urbanization and other land-use changes in the last 40 years. The mean wind energy weakened by -3.84 W·m-2 per decade due to the influence of anthropogenic land-use change, which is close to the observed climate change (-4.51 W·m-2/10 a).

  5. Ground Plane and Near-Surface Thermal Analysis for NASA's Constellation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.; Scola, Salvatore; Leahy, Frank F.; Sharp, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Most spacecraft thermal analysis tools assume that the spacecraft is in orbit around a planet and are designed to calculate solar and planetary fluxes, as well as radiation to space. On NASA Constellation projects, thermal analysts are also building models of vehicles in their pre-launch condition on the surface of a planet. This process entails making some modifications in the building and execution of a thermal model such that the radiation from the planet, both reflected albedo and infrared, is calculated correctly. Also important in the calculation of pre-launch vehicle temperatures are the natural environments at the vehicle site, including air and ground temperatures, sky radiative background temperature, solar flux, and optical properties of the ground around the vehicle. A group of Constellation projects have collaborated on developing a cohesive, integrated set of natural environments that accurately capture worst-case thermal scenarios for the pre-launch and launch phases of these vehicles. The paper will discuss the standardization of methods for local planet modeling across Constellation projects, as well as the collection and consolidation of natural environments for launch sites. Methods for Earth as well as lunar sites will be discussed.

  6. Evolution of Near-surface Flows Inferred from High-resolution Ring-diagram Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bogart, Richard S; Baldner,; Basu, Sarbani

    2015-01-01

    Ring-diagram analysis of acoustic waves observed at the photosphere can provide a relatively robust determination of the sub-surface flows at a particular time under a particular region. The depth of penetration of the waves is related to the size of the region, hence the depth extent of the measured flows is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. Most ring-diagram analysis has focused on regions of extent ~15{\\deg} (180 Mm) or more in order to provide reasonable mode sets for inversions. HMI data analysis also provides a set of ring fit parameters on a scale three times smaller. These provide flow estimates for the outer 1% (7 Mm) of the Sun only, with very limited depth resolution, but with spatial resolution adequate to map structures potentially associated with the belts and regions of magnetic activity. There are a number of systematic effects affecting the determination of flows from local helioseismic analysis of regions over different parts of the observable disk, not all well understood. I...

  7. Near-surface electromagnetic, rock magnetic, and geochemical fingerprinting of submarine freshwater seepage at Eckernförde Bay (SW Baltic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hendrik; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Nehmiz, Wiebke; Hamer, Kay

    2011-04-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge in coastal settings can massively modify the hydraulic and geochemical conditions of the seafloor. Resulting local anomalies in the morphology and physical properties of surface sediments are usually explored with seismo-acoustic imaging techniques. Controlled source electromagnetic imaging offers an innovative dual approach to seep characterization by its ability to detect pore-water electrical conductivity, hence salinity, as well as sediment magnetic susceptibility, hence preservation or diagenetic alteration of iron oxides. The newly developed electromagnetic (EM) profiler Neridis II successfully realized this concept for a first time with a high-resolution survey of freshwater seeps in Eckernförde Bay (SW Baltic Sea). We demonstrate that EM profiling, complemented and validated by acoustic as well as sample-based rock magnetic and geochemical methods, can create a crisp and revealing fingerprint image of freshwater seepage and related reductive alteration of near-surface sediments. Our findings imply that (1) freshwater penetrates the pore space of Holocene mud sediments by both diffuse and focused advection, (2) pockmarks are marked by focused freshwater seepage, underlying sand highs, reduced mud thickness, higher porosity, fining of grain size, and anoxic conditions, (3) depletion of Fe oxides, especially magnetite, is more pervasive within pockmarks due to higher concentrations of organic and sulfidic reaction partners, and (4) freshwater advection reduces sediment magnetic susceptibility by a combination of pore-water injection (dilution) and magnetite reduction (depletion). The conductivity vs. susceptibility biplot resolves subtle lateral litho- and hydrofacies variations.

  8. Near-Surface Circulation and Fate of Upper Layer Fresh Water from Rivers Runoff and Rain in the Bay of Bengal near Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Near -Surface Circulation and Fate of Upper Layer Fresh...Water from Rivers Runoff and Rain in the Bay of Bengal near Sri Lanka Luca Centurioni Scripps Institution of Oceanography 9500 Gilman Drive...GOALS Improve the knowledge of the near -surface circulation in the BoB and of the pathways through which the freshwater fluxes occur. OBJECTIVES

  9. Multi-scale modeling study of the source contributions to near-surface ozone and sulfur oxides levels over California during the ARCTAS-CARB period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic high surface ozone (O3 levels and the increasing sulfur oxides (SOx = SO2+SO4 ambient concentrations over South Coast (SC and other areas of California (CA are affected by both local emissions and long-range transport. In this paper, multi-scale tracer, full-chemistry and adjoint simulations using the STEM atmospheric chemistry model are conducted to assess the contribution of local emission sourcesto SC O3 and to evaluate the impacts of transported sulfur and local emissions on the SC sulfur budgetduring the ARCTAS-CARB experiment period in 2008. Sensitivity simulations quantify contributions of biogenic and fire emissions to SC O3 levels. California biogenic and fire emissions contribute 3–4 ppb to near-surface O3 over SC, with larger contributions to other regions in CA. During a long-range transport event from Asia starting from 22 June, high SOx levels (up to ~0.7 ppb of SO2 and ~1.3 ppb of SO4 is observed above ~6 km, but they did not affect CA surface air quality. The elevated SOx observed at 1–4 km is estimated to enhance surface SOx over SC by ~0.25 ppb (upper limit on ~24 June. The near-surface SOx levels over SC during the flight week are attributed mostly to local emissions. Two anthropogenic SOx emission inventories (EIs from the California Air Resources Board (CARB and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA are compared and applied in 60 km and 12 km chemical transport simulations, and the results are compared withobservations. The CARB EI shows improvements over the National Emission Inventory (NEI by EPA, but generally underestimates surface SC SOx by about a factor of two. Adjoint sensitivity analysis indicated that SO2 levels at 00:00 UTC (17:00 local time at six SC surface sites were influenced by previous day maritime emissions over the

  10. Description of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes the modelling of the surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that was performed for the final site descriptive model of Forsmark produced in the site investigation stage, SDM-Site Forsmark. The comprehensive investigation and monitoring programme forms a strong basis for the developed conceptual and descriptive model of the hydrological and near-surface hydrological system of the site investigation area. However, there are some remaining uncertainties regarding the interaction of deep and near-surface groundwater and surface water of importance for the understanding of the system: The groundwaters in till below Lake Eckarfjaerden, Lake Gaellbotraesket, Lake Fiskarfjaerden and Lake Bolundsfjaerden have high salinities. The hydrological and hydrochemical interpretations indicate that these waters are relict waters of mainly marine origin. From the perspective of the overall water balance, the water below the central parts of the lakes can be considered as stagnant. However, according to the hydrochemical interpretation, these waters also contain weak signatures of deep saline water. Rough chloride budget calculations for the Gaellbotraesket depression also raise the question of a possible upward flow of deep groundwater. No absolute conclusion can be drawn from the existing data analyses regarding the key question of whether there is a small ongoing upward flow of deep saline water. However, Lake Bolundsfjaerden is an exception where the clear downward flow gradient from the till to the bedrock excludes the possibility of an active deep saline source. The available data indicate that there are no discharge areas for flow systems involving deep bedrock groundwater in the northern part of the tectonic lens, where the repository is planned to be located (the so-called 'target area'). However, it can not be excluded that such discharge areas exist. Data indicate that the prevailing downward vertical flow gradients from the QD to

  11. Refraction tomography mapping of near-surface dipping layers using landstreamer data at East Canyon Dam, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Markiewicz, R.D.; Xia, J.

    2008-01-01

    We apply the P-wave refraction-tomography method to seismic data collected with a landstreamer. Refraction-tomography inversion solutions were determined using regularization parameters that provided the most realistic near-surface solutions that best matched the dipping layer structure of nearby outcrops. A reasonably well matched solution was obtained using an unusual set of optimal regularization parameters. In comparison, the use of conventional regularization parameters did not provide as realistic results. Thus, we consider that even if there is only qualitative a-priori information about a site (i.e., visual) - in the case of the East Canyon Dam, Utah - it might be possible to minimize the refraction nonuniqueness by estimating the most appropriate regularization parameters.

  12. Study of Near-Surface Models in Large-Eddy Simulations of a Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, I.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Mansour, N. N.

    2004-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a widely used technique in armospheric modeling research. In LES, large, unsteady, three dimensional structures are resolved and small structures that are not resolved on the computational grid are modeled. A filtering operation is applied to distinguish between resolved and unresolved scales. We present two near-surface models that have found use in atmospheric modeling. We also suggest a simpler eddy viscosity model that adopts Prandtl's mixing length model (Prandtl 1925) in the vicinity of the surface and blends with the dynamic Smagotinsky model (Germano et al, 1991) away from the surface. We evaluate the performance of these surface models by simulating a neutraly stratified atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. [Responses of rice growth and development to elevated near-surface layer ozone (O3) concentration: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yu-long; Shi, Guang-yao; Wang, Yun-xia; Zhu, Jian-guo

    2008-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is recognized as one of the most important air pollutants. At present, the worldwide average tropospheric O3 concentration has been increased from an estimated pre-industrial level of 38 nl L(-1) (25-45 nl L(-1), 8-h summer seasonal average) to approximately 50 nl L(-1) in 2000, and to 80 nl L(-1) by 2100 based on most pessimistic projections. Oryza sativa L. (rice) is the most important grain crop in the world, and thus, to correctly evaluate how the elevated near-surface layer O3 concentration will affect the growth and development of rice is of great significance. This paper reviewed the chamber (including closed and open top chamber)-based studies about the effects of atmospheric ozone enrichment on the rice visible injury symptoms, photosynthesis, water relationship, phenology, dry matter production and allocation, leaf membrane protective system, and grain yield and its components. Further research directions in this field were discussed.

  14. Fast relaxation of a hexagonal Poiseuille shear-induced near-surface phase in a threadlike micellar solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, W.A. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6393 (United States); Butler, P.D.; Slawecki, T.M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Magid, L.J.; Han, Z. [Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The dynamics of near-surface conformations in complex fluids under flow should dramatically affect their rheological properties. We have made the first measurements resolving the decay kinetics of a hexagonal phase induced in a threadlike polyionic micellar system under Poiseuille shear near a quartz surface. Upon cessation of shearing flow, this minimum interference crystalline phase formed within {approximately}20 {mu}m of the surface {open_quotes}melts{close_quotes} to a metastable two-dimensional liquid of aligned micelles in {approximately}0.7 s. This is some three orders of magnitude shorter than the time required for bulk (Couette) shear-aligned micelles in this system to reach a fully entangled state. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Field measurements and modeling of attenuation from near-surface bubbles for frequencies 1-20 kHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Peter H; Choi, Jee Woong; Williams, Neil J; Graber, Hans C

    2008-09-01

    Measurements of excess attenuation from near-surface bubbles from the Shallow Water '06 experiment are reported. These are transmission measurements made over the frequency range 1-20 kHz, and they demonstrate a frequency, grazing angle, and wind speed dependence in attenuation. Data modeling points to bubble void fractions of order 10(-6) in effect for wind speeds 10-13 m/s. Simultaneous measures of wind speed made within 1.5 and 11 km of the open water experimental location differed by 2 m/s in their respective 30 min average; this has cautionary implications for empirical models for bubble attenuation that are a strong function of wind speed.

  16. Using continuous measurements of near-surface atmospheric water vapor isotopes to document snow-air interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Winkler, Renato; Satow, Kazuhide; Prie, Frederic; Bayou, Nicolas; Brun, Eric; Cuffey, Kurt; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Dumont, Marie; Guillevic, Myriam; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Landais, Amaelle; Popp, Trevor; Risi, Camille; Steffen, Konrad; Stenni, Barbara; Sveinbjornsdottir, Arny

    2014-05-01

    Water stable isotope data from Greenland ice cores provide key paleoclimatic information. However, post-depositional processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, a monitoring of the isotopic composition δ18O and δD at several height levels (up to 13 meter) of near-surface water vapor, precipitation and snow in the first 0.5 cm from the surface has been conducted during three summers (2010-2012) at NEEM, NW Greenland. We observe a clear diurnal cycle in both the value and gradient of the isotopic composition of the water vapor above the snow surface. The diurnal amplitude in δD is found to be ~15‰. The diurnal isotopic composition follows the absolute humidity cycle. This indicates a large flux of vapor from the snow surface to the atmosphere during the daily warming and reverse flux during the daily cooling. The isotopic measurements of the flux of water vapor above the snow give new insights into the post depositional processes of the isotopic composition of the snow. During nine 1-5 days periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and near-surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated using the CROCUS snow model that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or deposition. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in near-surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic variations and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in-between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in near-surface vapor isotopic composition. This is consistent with an estimated 60% mass turnover of surface snow per day driven by snow

  17. Performance assessment and licensing issues for United States commercial near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birk, S.M.

    1997-10-01

    The final objective of performance assessment for a near-surface LLW disposal facility is to demonstrate that potential radiological impacts for each of the human exposure pathways will not violate applicable standards. This involves determining potential pathways and specific receptor locations for human exposure to radionuclides; developing appropriate scenarios for each of the institutional phases of a disposal facility; and maintaining quality assurance and control of all data, computer codes, and documentation. The results of a performance assessment should be used to demonstrate that the expected impacts are expected to be less than the applicable standards. The results should not be used to try to predict the actual impact. This is an important distinction that results from the uncertainties inherent in performance assessment calculations. The paper discusses performance objectives; performance assessment phases; scenario selection; mathematical modeling and computer programs; final results of performance assessments submitted for license application; institutional control period; licensing issues; and related research and development activities.

  18. FPDSO with near-surface-disconnect-drilling system. A new approach based on familiar technology and cost effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Terje

    2000-07-01

    Kvaerner's Field Development business has developed a new concept for simultaneously drilling and producing from a monohull unit. The concept offers full weathervaning capabilities, but is best suited for deep-water areas with a predominant weather direction. The idea is built on known principles, arranged and combined in a novel and unique manner. The concept has been analysed for the conditions typical of the Gulf of Mexico and Brazil. Kvaerner has recently developed a complete portfolio of new solutions for Floating, Production, Drilling, Storage and Offloading (FPDSO) units. The latest contribution is based on the so-called near-surface-disconnect-drilling system. The vessel has separate drilling and production facilities (turret/swivel area) and so attains a high level of safety onboard.

  19. Formation of recent martian debris flows by melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F; Forget, F; Mangold, N; Peulvast, J P

    2002-01-04

    The observation of small gullies associated with recent surface runoff on Mars has renewed the question of liquid water stability at the surface of Mars. The gullies could be formed by groundwater seepage from underground aquifers; however, observations of gullies originating from isolated peaks and dune crests question this scenario. We show that these landforms may result from the melting of water ice in the top few meters of the martian subsurface at high obliquity. Our conclusions are based on the analogy between the martian gullies and terrestrial debris flows observed in Greenland and numerical simulations that show that above-freezing temperatures can occur at high obliquities in the near surface of Mars, and that such temperatures are only predicted at latitudes and for slope orientations corresponding to where the gullies have been observed on Mars.

  20. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, W J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  1. Assessment of near-surface dissolution at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, G.O.

    1985-07-01

    The area at and near the WIPP site was examined for evidence of karst development on the geomorphic surface encompassing the site. Certain surficial depressions of initial concern were identified as blowouts in sand dune fields (shallow features unrelated to karstification). An ancient stream system active more than 500,000 yr ago contained more water than any system since. During that time (Gatuna, Middle Pleistocene), many karst features such as Clayton Basin and Nash Draw began to form in the region. Halite was probably dissolved from parts of the Rustler Formation at that time. Dissolution of halite and gypsum from intervals encountered in Borehole WIPP-33 west of the WIPP site occurred during later Pleistocene time (i.e., <450,000 yr ago). However, there is no evidence of active near-surface dissolution within a belt to the east of WIPP-33 in the vicinity of the WIPP shaft. 26 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Formation of Recent Martian Debris Flows by Melting of Near-Surface Ground Ice at High Obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F.; Forget, F.; Mangold, N.; Peulvast, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    The observation of small gullies associated with recent surface runoff on Mars has renewed the question of liquid water stability at the surface of Mars. The gullies could be formed by groundwater seepage from underground aquifers; however, observations of gullies originating from isolated peaks and dune crests question this scenario. We show that these landforms may result from the melting of water ice in the top few meters of the martian subsurface at high obliquity. Our conclusions are based on the analogy between the martian gullies and terrestrial debris flows observed in Greenland and numerical simulations that show that above-freezing temperatures can occur at high obliquities in the near surface of Mars, and that such temperatures are only predicted at latitudes and for slope orientations corresponding to where the gullies have been observed on Mars.

  3. Citywide Impacts of Cool Roof and Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic Deployment on Near-Surface Air Temperature and Cooling Energy Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca, F.; Georgescu, M.; Mahalov, A.; Moustaoui, M.; Martilli, A.

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of mitigation strategies that combat global warming, urban heat islands (UHIs), and urban energy demand can be crucial for urban planners and energy providers, especially for hot, semi-arid urban environments where summertime cooling demands are excessive. Within this context, summertime regional impacts of cool roof and rooftop solar photovoltaic deployment on near-surface air temperature and cooling energy demand are examined for the two major USA cities of Arizona: Phoenix and Tucson. A detailed physics-based parametrization of solar photovoltaic panels is developed and implemented in a multilayer building energy model that is fully coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale numerical model. We conduct a suite of sensitivity experiments (with different coverage rates of cool roof and rooftop solar photovoltaic deployment) for a 10-day clear-sky extreme heat period over the Phoenix and Tucson metropolitan areas at high spatial resolution (1-km horizontal grid spacing). Results show that deployment of cool roofs and rooftop solar photovoltaic panels reduce near-surface air temperature across the diurnal cycle and decrease daily citywide cooling energy demand. During the day, cool roofs are more effective at cooling than rooftop solar photovoltaic systems, but during the night, solar panels are more efficient at reducing the UHI effect. For the maximum coverage rate deployment, cool roofs reduced daily citywide cooling energy demand by 13-14 %, while rooftop solar photovoltaic panels by 8-11 % (without considering the additional savings derived from their electricity production). The results presented here demonstrate that deployment of both roofing technologies have multiple benefits for the urban environment, while solar photovoltaic panels add additional value because they reduce the dependence on fossil fuel consumption for electricity generation.

  4. Season Spotter: Using Citizen Science to Validate and Scale Plant Phenology from Near-Surface Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kosmala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a rapidly changing climate on the biosphere is an urgent area of research for mitigation policy and management. Plant phenology is a sensitive indicator of climate change and regulates the seasonality of carbon, water, and energy fluxes between the land surface and the climate system, making it an important tool for studying biosphere–atmosphere interactions. To monitor plant phenology at regional and continental scales, automated near-surface cameras are being increasingly used to supplement phenology data derived from satellite imagery and data from ground-based human observers. We used imagery from a network of phenology cameras in a citizen science project called Season Spotter to investigate whether information could be derived from these images beyond standard, color-based vegetation indices. We found that engaging citizen science volunteers resulted in useful science knowledge in three ways: first, volunteers were able to detect some, but not all, reproductive phenology events, connecting landscape-level measures with field-based measures. Second, volunteers successfully demarcated individual trees in landscape imagery, facilitating scaling of vegetation indices from organism to ecosystem. And third, volunteers’ data were used to validate phenology transition dates calculated from vegetation indices and to identify potential improvements to existing algorithms to enable better biological interpretation. As a result, the use of citizen science in combination with near-surface remote sensing of phenology can be used to link ground-based phenology observations to satellite sensor data for scaling and validation. Well-designed citizen science projects targeting improved data processing and validation of remote sensing imagery hold promise for providing the data needed to address grand challenges in environmental science and Earth observation.

  5. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. S.; Christidis, N.; Stott, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by controlling black carbon is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC), produces a positive radiative forcing of about +0.25 Wm-2 over the 20th century, compared with +2.52 Wm-2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, -0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 yr of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to the period being examined as fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from fBC unscaled by the detection analysis. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  6. Parameterizing radiative transfer to convert MAX-DOAS dSCDs into near-surface box-averaged mixing ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sinreich

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel parameterization method to convert multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS differential slant column densities (dSCDs into near-surface box-averaged volume mixing ratios. The approach is applicable inside the planetary boundary layer under conditions with significant aerosol load, and builds on the increased sensitivity of MAX-DOAS near the instrument altitude. It parameterizes radiative transfer model calculations and significantly reduces the computational effort, while retrieving ~ 1 degree of freedom. The biggest benefit of this method is that the retrieval of an aerosol profile, which usually is necessary for deriving a trace gas concentration from MAX-DOAS dSCDs, is not needed. The method is applied to NO2 MAX-DOAS dSCDs recorded during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area 2006 (MCMA-2006 measurement campaign. The retrieved volume mixing ratios of two elevation angles (1° and 3° are compared to volume mixing ratios measured by two long-path (LP-DOAS instruments located at the same site. Measurements are found to agree well during times when vertical mixing is expected to be strong. However, inhomogeneities in the air mass above Mexico City can be detected by exploiting the different horizontal and vertical dimensions probed by the MAX-DOAS and LP-DOAS instruments. In particular, a vertical gradient in NO2 close to the ground can be observed in the afternoon, and is attributed to reduced mixing coupled with near-surface emission inside street canyons. The existence of a vertical gradient in the lower 250 m during parts of the day shows the general challenge of sampling the boundary layer in a representative way, and emphasizes the need of vertically resolved measurements.

  7. Vertical changes in the probability distribution of downward irradiance within the near-surface ocean under sunny conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernez, Pierre; Stramski, Dariusz; Darecki, Miroslaw

    2011-07-01

    Time series measurements of fluctuations in underwater downward irradiance, Ed, within the green spectral band (532 nm) show that the probability distribution of instantaneous irradiance varies greatly as a function of depth within the near-surface ocean under sunny conditions. Because of intense light flashes caused by surface wave focusing, the near-surface probability distributions are highly skewed to the right and are heavy tailed. The coefficients of skewness and excess kurtosis at depths smaller than 1 m can exceed 3 and 20, respectively. We tested several probability models, such as lognormal, Gumbel, Fréchet, log-logistic, and Pareto, which are potentially suited to describe the highly skewed heavy-tailed distributions. We found that the models cannot approximate with consistently good accuracy the high irradiance values within the right tail of the experimental distribution where the probability of these values is less than 10%. This portion of the distribution corresponds approximately to light flashes with Ed > 1.5?, where ? is the time-averaged downward irradiance. However, the remaining part of the probability distribution covering all irradiance values smaller than the 90th percentile can be described with a reasonable accuracy (i.e., within 20%) with a lognormal model for all 86 measurements from the top 10 m of the ocean included in this analysis. As the intensity of irradiance fluctuations decreases with depth, the probability distribution tends toward a function symmetrical around the mean like the normal distribution. For the examined data set, the skewness and excess kurtosis assumed values very close to zero at a depth of about 10 m.

  8. Estimation of the near surface soil water content during evaporation using air-launched ground-penetrating radar

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2014-01-01

    Evaporation is an important process in the global water cycle and its variation affects the near sur-face soil water content, which is crucial for surface hydrology and climate modelling. Soil evaporation rate is often characterized by two distinct phases, namely, the energy limited phase (stage-I) and the soil hydraulic limited period (stage-II). In this paper, a laboratory experiment was conducted using a sand box filled with fine sand, which was subject to evaporation for a period of twenty three days. The setup was equipped with a weighting system to record automatically the weight of the sand box with a constant time-step. Furthermore, time-lapse air-launched ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements were performed to monitor the evaporation process. The GPR model involves a full-waveform frequency-domain solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for wave propagation in three-dimensional multilayered media. The accuracy of the full-waveform GPR forward modelling with respect to three different petrophysical models was investigated. Moreover, full-waveform inversion of the GPR data was used to estimate the quantitative information, such as near surface soil water content. The two stages of evaporation can be clearly observed in the radargram, which indicates qualitatively that enough information is contained in the GPR data. The full-waveform GPR inversion allows for accurate estimation of the near surface soil water content during extended evaporation phases, when a wide frequency range of GPR (0.8-5.0 GHz) is taken into account. In addition, the results indicate that the CRIM model may constitute a relevant alternative in solving the frequency-dependency issue for full waveform GPR modelling.

  9. Reconstructing synthetic hourly time series of near-surface air temperatures in a mountainous region of the tropical Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, E.; Ortega, S.; Gonzalez-Duque, D.; Alvarez-Villa, O. D.; Ruiz-Carrascal, D.

    2016-12-01

    There is a need to quantify near-surface air temperatures in areas of ongoing and projected faster upper-tropospheric warming. Twenty-two high-resolution data loggers were deployed along a steep altitudinal gradient in the Colombian Central Cordillera. Digital sensors were distributed in the range [4,891-1,611 m] and are collecting hourly near-surface temperature, relative humidity and dew point data. To date, records of the oldest data loggers span back to mid Dec 2008. A reconstruction methodology was used to generate long term temperature series at an hourly resolution. The approach included spatio-temporal interpolations where there was sufficient information from data-loggers, but relied on the typical behavior of the diurnal cycle when there was not hourly information to interpolate from. The typical diurnal cycle for each month was described using a "characteristic curve," created from hourly data-logger records. This characteristic curves allow to generate hourly data using daily temperatures. It is worth noticing that the ENSO signal is included in the synthetic series as it is already captured by daily temperature records. Comparisons with actual temperature records yield monthly mean errors of -0.38°C, and Pearson and Spearman correlations reaching values above 0.910. Synthetic hourly time series are also reconstructed through the analysis of the vertical profiles of reanalysis and ground-truth data. In this case, mean errors increase to -0.98°C and the lowest correlations decrease to 0.784. The tropical altitudinal transect is already providing numerous insights to understand convective processes in a site where large vertical temperature gradients exist, and that is projected to warm up faster that the surrounding lowlands.

  10. Finite-difference modeling and dispersion analysis of high-frequency love waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    Love-wave propagation has been a topic of interest to crustal, earthquake, and engineering seismologists for many years because it is independent of Poisson's ratio and more sensitive to shear (S)-wave velocity changes and layer thickness changes than are Rayleigh waves. It is well known that Love-wave generation requires the existence of a low S-wave velocity layer in a multilayered earth model. In order to study numerically the propagation of Love waves in a layered earth model and dispersion characteristics for near-surface applications, we simulate high-frequency (>5 Hz) Love waves by the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method. The air-earth boundary (the shear stress above the free surface) is treated using the stress-imaging technique. We use a two-layer model to demonstrate the accuracy of the staggered-grid modeling scheme. We also simulate four-layer models including a low-velocity layer (LVL) or a high-velocity layer (HVL) to analyze dispersive energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that: (1) the staggered-grid FD code and stress-imaging technique are suitable for treating the free-surface boundary conditions for Love-wave modeling, (2) Love-wave inversion should be treated with extra care when a LVL exists because of a lack of LVL information in dispersions aggravating uncertainties in the inversion procedure, and (3) energy of high modes in a low-frequency range is very weak, so that it is difficult to estimate the cutoff frequency accurately, and "mode-crossing" occurs between the second higher and third higher modes when a HVL exists. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  11. Characterization of Near-Surface Geology and Possible Voids Using Resistivity and Electromagnetic Methods at the Gran Quivira Unit of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, Central New Mexico, June 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Land, Lewis A.; Teeple, Andrew P.

    2006-01-01

    At the Gran Quivira Unit of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument in central New Mexico, a partially excavated pueblo known as Mound 7 has recently become architecturally unstable. Historical National Park Service records indicate both natural caves and artificial tunnels may be present in the area. Knowledge of the local near-surface geology and possible locations of voids would aid in preservation of the ruins. Time-domain and frequency-domain electromagnetic as well as direct-current resistivity methods were used to characterize the electrical structure of the near-surface geology and to identify discrete electrical features that may be associated with voids. Time-domain electromagnetic soundings indicate three major electrical layers; however, correlation of these layers to geologic units was difficult because of the variability of lithologic data from existing test holes. Although resistivity forward modeling was unable to conclusively determine the presence or absence of voids in most cases, the high-resistivity values (greater than 5,000 ohm-meters) in the direct-current resistivity data indicate that voids may exist in the upper 50 meters. Underneath Mound 7, there is a possibility of large voids below a depth of 20 meters, but there is no indication of substantial voids in the upper 20 meters. Gridded lines and profiled inversions of frequency-domain electromagnetic data showed excellent correlation to resistivity features in the upper 5 meters of the direct-current resistivity data. This technique showed potential as a reconnaissance tool for detecting voids in the very near surface.

  12. Updated model for radionuclide transport in the near-surface till at Forsmark - Implementation of decay chains and sensitivity analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pique, Angels; Pekala, Marek; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Trinchero, Paolo; Vries, Luis Manuel de [Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    The Forsmark area has been proposed for potential siting of a deep underground (geological) repository for radioactive waste in Sweden. Safety assessment of the repository requires radionuclide transport from the disposal depth to recipients at the surface to be studied quantitatively. The near-surface quaternary deposits at Forsmark are considered a pathway for potential discharge of radioactivity from the underground facility to the biosphere, thus radionuclide transport in this system has been extensively investigated over the last years. The most recent work of Pique and co-workers (reported in SKB report R-10-30) demonstrated that in case of release of radioactivity the near-surface sedimentary system at Forsmark would act as an important geochemical barrier, retarding the transport of reactive radionuclides through a combination of retention processes. In this report the conceptual model of radionuclide transport in the quaternary till at Forsmark has been updated, by considering recent revisions regarding the near-surface lithology. In addition, the impact of important conceptual assumptions made in the model has been evaluated through a series of deterministic and probabilistic (Monte Carlo) sensitivity calculations. The sensitivity study focused on the following effects: 1. Radioactive decay of {sup 135}Cs, {sup 59}Ni, {sup 230}Th and {sup 226}Ra and effects on their transport. 2. Variability in key geochemical parameters, such as the composition of the deep groundwater, availability of sorbing materials in the till, and mineral equilibria. 3. Variability in hydraulic parameters, such as the definition of hydraulic boundaries, and values of hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and the deep groundwater inflow rate. The overarching conclusion from this study is that the current implementation of the model is robust (the model is largely insensitive to variations in the parameters within the studied ranges) and conservative (the Base Case calculations have a

  13. AfricaArray International Geophysics Field School: Applications of Near Surface Geophysics to challenges encountered in mine planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. J.; Jones, M. Q.; Durrheim, R. J.; Nyblade, A.; Snyman, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Hard rock exploration and mining presents many opportunities for the effective use of near surface geophysics. For over 10 years the AfricaArray international geophysics field school has been hosted at a variety of mines in South Africa. While the main objective of the field school is practical training for the next generation of geophysicists, being hosted at a mine has allowed us to investigate applications of near surface geophysics in the early stages of mine planning and development as geophysics is often cheaper and faster than drilling. Several applications include: detailed delineation of dykes and stringer dykes, physical property measurements on drill core for modeling and marker horizons, determination of overburden thickness, locations of water and faults. Dolerite dykes are usually magnetic and are associated with loss of ground (i.e. where the dyke replaces the ore and thus reduces the amount of ore available) and safety/stability concerns. Thus the accurate mapping of dykes and narrow stringers that are associated with them are crucial to the safe planning of a mine. We have acquired several case studies where ground magnetic surveys have greatly improved on the resolution and detail of airborne magnetic surveys in regions of complicated dyke swarms. In many cases, thin stringer dykes of less than 5 cm have been detected. Physical property measurements of these dykes can be used to distinguish between different ages of dykes. It is important to accurately determine overburden thickness when planning an open pit mine as this directly affects the cost of development. Depending on the nature of the overburden, both refraction seismic and or DC resistivity can provide continuous profiling in the area of interest that fills in gaps between boreholes. DC resistivity is also effective for determining water associated with dykes and structures that may affect mine planning. The field school mainly addresses the training of a variety of students. The core

  14. Near-surface and columnar measurements with a micro pulse lidar of atmospheric pollen in Barcelona, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michaël; Izquierdo, Rebeca; Alarcón, Marta; Belmonte, Jordina; Comerón, Adolfo; Baldasano, José Maria

    2016-06-01

    We present for the first time continuous hourly measurements of pollen near-surface concentration and lidar-derived profiles of particle backscatter coefficients and of volume and particle depolarization ratios during a 5-day pollination event observed in Barcelona, Spain, between 27 and 31 March 2015. Daily average concentrations ranged from 1082 to 2830 pollen m-3. Platanus and Pinus pollen types represented together more than 80 % of the total pollen. Maximum hourly pollen concentrations of 4700 and 1200 m-3 were found for Platanus and Pinus, respectively. Every day a clear diurnal cycle caused by the vertical transport of the airborne pollen was visible on the lidar-derived profiles with maxima usually reached between 12:00 and 15:00 UT. A method based on the lidar polarization capabilities was used to retrieve the contribution of the pollen to the total aerosol optical depth (AOD). On average the diurnal (09:00-17:00 UT) pollen AOD was 0.05, which represented 29 % of the total AOD. Maximum values of the pollen AOD and its contribution to the total AOD reached 0.12 and 78 %, respectively. The diurnal means of the volume and particle depolarization ratios in the pollen plume were 0.08 and 0.14, with hourly maxima of 0.18 and 0.33, respectively. The diurnal mean of the height of the pollen plume was found at 1.24 km with maxima varying in the range of 1.47-1.78 km. A correlation study is performed (1) between the depolarization ratios and the pollen near-surface concentration to evaluate the ability of the former parameter to monitor pollen release and (2) between the depolarization ratios as well as pollen AOD and surface downward solar fluxes, which cause the atmospheric turbulences responsible for the particle vertical motion, to examine the dependency of the depolarization ratios and the pollen AOD upon solar fluxes. For the volume depolarization ratio the first correlation study yields to correlation coefficients ranging 0.00-0.81 and the second to

  15. Combining Modis and Quikscat Data to Delineate Surface and Near-Surface Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Neumann, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, increasing melt has been measured on the Greenland Ice Sheet, along with mass loss as determined from satellite data, Monitoring the state of the Greenland Ice Sheet becomes critical especially because it is actively losing mass, and the ice sheet has a sea-level rise potential of 7 in. However measurement of the extent of surface melt varies depending on the sensor used, whether it is passive or active microwave or visible or thermal infrared. We have used remote-sensing data products to study surface and near-surface melt characteristics of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We present a blended MODIS-QS melt daily product for 2007 [1]. The products, including Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily land-surface temperature (LST) and a special daily melt product derived from the QuikSCAT (QS) scatterometer [2,3] show consistency in delineating the melt boundaries on a daily basis in the 2007 melt season [I], though some differences are identified. An assessment of maximum melt area for the 2007 melt shows that the QSCAT product detects a greater amount of melt (862,769 square kilometers) than is detected by the MODIS LST product (766,184 square kilometers). The discrepancy is largely because the QS product can detect both surface and near-surface melt and the QS product captures melt if it occurred anytime during the day while the MODIS product is obtained from a point in time on a given day. However on a daily bases, other factors influence the measurement of melt extent. In this work we employ the digital-elevation model of Bamber et al. [4] along with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) data to study some areas and time periods in detail during the 2007 melt season. We focus on times in which the QS and MODIS LST products do not agree exactly. We use NCEP and elevation data to analyze the atmospheric factors forcing the melt process, to gain an improved understanding of the conditions that lead to melt

  16. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jones

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by the aerosol's control is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about + 0.25 Wm−2 over the 20th century, compared with a little under + 2.5 Wm−2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, -0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 years of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to a number of analysis choices, and fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from the unscaled simulation. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by controlling black carbon is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about +0.25 Wm−2 over the 20th century, compared with +2.52 Wm−2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, −0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 yr of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to the period being examined as fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from fBC unscaled by the detection analysis. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. Impact assessment of ionizing radiation on human and non-human biota from the vicinity of a near-surface radioactive waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedveckaite, T; Gudelis, A; Vives i Batlle, J

    2013-05-01

    This work describes the radiological assessment of the near-surface Maisiagala radioactive waste repository (Lithuania) over the period 2005-2012, with focus on water pathways and special emphasis on tritium. The study includes an assessment of the effect of post-closure upgrading, the durability of which is greater than 30 years. Both human and terrestrial non-human biota are considered, with local low-intensity forestry and small farms being the area of concern. The radiological exposure was evaluated using the RESRAD-OFFSITE, RESRAD-BIOTA and ERICA codes in combination with long-term data from a dedicated environmental monitoring programme. All measurements were performed at the Lithuanian Institute of Physics as part of this project. It is determined that, after repository upgrading, radiological exposure to humans are significantly lower than the human dose constraint of 0.2 mSv/year valid in the Republic of Lithuania. Likewise, for non-human biota, dose rates are below the ERICA/PROTECT screening levels. The potential annual effective inhalation dose that could be incurred by the highest-exposed human individual (which is due to tritiated water vapour airborne release over the most exposed area) does not exceed 0.1 μSv. Tritium-labelled drinking water appears to be the main pathway for human impact, representing about 83 % of the exposure. Annual committed effective dose (CED) values for members of the public consuming birch sap as medical practice are calculated to be several orders of magnitude below the CEDs for the same location associated with drinking of well water. The data presented here indicate that upper soil-layer samples may not provide a good indication of potential exposure to terrestrial deep-rooted trees, as demonstrated by an investigation of stratified (3)H in soil moisture, expressed on a wet soil mass basis, in an area with subsurface contamination.

  19. A Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm for Ice-sheet Radar Echograms Applied to Ground-Based Near-Surface Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onana, Vincent De Paul; Koenig, Lora Suzanne; Ruth, Julia; Studinger, Michael; Harbeck, Jeremy P.

    2014-01-01

    Snow accumulation over an ice sheet is the sole mass input, making it a primary measurement for understanding the past, present, and future mass balance. Near-surface frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radars image isochronous firn layers recording accumulation histories. The Semiautomated Multilayer Picking Algorithm (SAMPA) was designed and developed to trace annual accumulation layers in polar firn from both airborne and ground-based radars. The SAMPA algorithm is based on the Radon transform (RT) computed by blocks and angular orientations over a radar echogram. For each echogram's block, the RT maps firn segmented-layer features into peaks, which are picked using amplitude and width threshold parameters of peaks. A backward RT is then computed for each corresponding block, mapping the peaks back into picked segmented-layers. The segmented layers are then connected and smoothed to achieve a final layer pick across the echogram. Once input parameters are trained, SAMPA operates autonomously and can process hundreds of kilometers of radar data picking more than 40 layers. SAMPA final pick results and layer numbering still require a cursory manual adjustment to correct noncontinuous picks, which are likely not annual, and to correct for inconsistency in layer numbering. Despite the manual effort to train and check SAMPA results, it is an efficient tool for picking multiple accumulation layers in polar firn, reducing time over manual digitizing efforts. The trackability of good detected layers is greater than 90%.

  20. Impacts of Irrigation on the Heat Fluxes and Near-Surface Temperature in an Inland Irrigation Area of Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Irrigated agriculture has the potential to alter regional to global climate significantly. We investigate how irrigation will affect regional climate in the future in an inland irrigation area of northern China, focusing on its effects on heat fluxes and near-surface temperature. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model, we compare simulations among three land cover scenarios: the control scenario (CON, the irrigation scenario (IRR, and the irrigated cropland expansion scenario (ICE. Our results show that the surface energy budgets and temperature are sensitive to changes in the extent and spatial pattern of irrigated land. Conversion to irrigated agriculture at the contemporary scale leads to an increase in annual mean latent heat fluxes of 12.10 W m−2, a decrease in annual mean sensible heat fluxes of 8.85 W m−2, and a decrease in annual mean temperature of 1.3 °C across the study region. Further expansion of irrigated land increases annual mean latent heat fluxes by 18.08 W m−2, decreases annual mean sensible heat fluxes by 12.31 W m−2, and decreases annual mean temperature by 1.7 °C. Our simulated effects of irrigation show that changes in land use management such as irrigation can be an important component of climate change and need to be considered together with greenhouse forcing in climate change assessments.

  1. Physics-Based Continuous Simulation of Long-Term Near-Surface Hydrologic Response for the Coos Bay Experimental Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, B. A.; Loague, K.; Montgomery, D. R.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2007-12-01

    The study reported here employed the physics-based InHM to simulate continuous hydrologic response from 1990 through 1996 for the Coos Bay (CB1) experimental catchment. InHM dynamically simulates 3D variably- saturated subsurface flow using Richards equation and 2D surface and open channel flow using the diffusion- wave approximation to the depth-integrated shallow-water equations. The uniqueness of the boundary-value problem (BVP) used in a previous study to successfully simulate three sprinkling experiments was assessed, via model performance evaluation against piezometric and discharge data, for 33 events extracted from the seven- year continuous record. The simulations conducted in this effort suggest the potential for interaction between the deeper water table and near-surface hydrologic response, which is in agreement with the detailed field observations made during the CB1 sprinkling experiments. The InHM simulations could not adequately reproduce the observed pore-water pressures, suggesting that detailed characterization of the locations and connectivities of bedrock fractures would be necessary to simulate distributed hydrologic response at locations where bedrock fracture flow is important. The results from this study suggest that uniqueness is a problem for physics-based models when employing a BVP used successfully for smaller magnitude storms to simulate larger storms. The long-term simulations conducted here, combined with previous event-based hydrologic- response simulations and field-based observations, highlight the challenges in characterizing / simulating fractured bedrock flow at small catchments like CB1.

  2. Cross validation of geotechnical and geophysical site characterization methods: near surface data from selected accelerometric stations in Crete (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupasakis, C.; Tsangaratos, P.; Rozos, D.; Rondoyianni, Th.; Vafidis, A.; Kritikakis, G.; Steiakakis, M.; Agioutantis, Z.; Savvaidis, A.; Soupios, P.; Papadopoulos, I.; Papadopoulos, N.; Sarris, A.; Mangriotis, M.-D.; Dikmen, U.

    2015-06-01

    The specification of the near surface ground conditions is highly important for the design of civil constructions. These conditions determine primarily the ability of the foundation formations to bear loads, the stress - strain relations and the corresponding settlements, as well as the soil amplification and corresponding peak ground motion in case of dynamic loading. The static and dynamic geotechnical parameters as well as the ground-type/soil-category can be determined by combining geotechnical and geophysical methods, such as engineering geological surface mapping, geotechnical drilling, in situ and laboratory testing and geophysical investigations. The above mentioned methods were combined, through the Thalis ″Geo-Characterization″ project, for the site characterization in selected sites of the Hellenic Accelerometric Network (HAN) in the area of Crete Island. The combination of the geotechnical and geophysical methods in thirteen (13) sites provided sufficient information about their limitations, setting up the minimum tests requirements in relation to the type of the geological formations. The reduced accuracy of the surface mapping in urban sites, the uncertainties introduced by the geophysical survey in sites with complex geology and the 1D data provided by the geotechnical drills are some of the causes affecting the right order and the quantity of the necessary investigation methods. Through this study the gradual improvement on the accuracy of site characterization data is going to be presented by providing characteristic examples from a total number of thirteen sites. Selected examples present sufficiently the ability, the limitations and the right order of the investigation methods.

  3. Variations of Near Surface Energy Balance Caused by Land Cover Changes in the Semiarid Grassland Area of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun’ou Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies the Dynamics of Land System (DLS model to simulating the land cover under the designed scenarios and then analyzes the effects of land cover conversion on energy flux in the semiarid grassland area of China with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The results indicate that the grassland will show a steadily upgrowing trend under the coordinated environmental sustainability (CES scenario. Compared to the CES scenario, the rate of increase in grassland cover is lower, while the rate of increase in urban land cover will be higher under the rapid economic growth (REG scenario. Although the conversion from cropland to grassland will reduce the energy flux, the expansion of urban area and decreasing of forestry area will bring about more energy flux. As a whole, the energy flux of near surface will obviously not change under the CES scenario, and the climate therefore will not be possible to be influenced greatly by land cover change. The energy flux under the REG scenario is higher than that under the CES scenario. Those research conclusions can offer valuable information for the land use planning and climate change adaptation in the semiarid grassland area of China.

  4. Geochemical assessment of light gaseous hydrocarbons in near-surface soils of Kutch–Saurashtra: Implication for hydrocarbon prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Lakshmi Srinivasa Rao; T Madhavi; D Srinu; M S Kalpana; D J Patil; A M Dayal

    2013-02-01

    Light hydrocarbons in soil have been used as direct indicators in geochemical hydrocarbon exploration, which remains an unconventional path in the petroleum industry. The occurrence of adsorbed soil gases, methane and heavier homologues were recorded in the near-surface soil samples collected from Kutch–Saurashtra, India. Soil gas alkanes were interpreted to be derived from deep-seated hydrocarbon sources and have migrated to the surface through structural discontinuities. The source of hydrocarbons is assessed to be thermogenic and could have been primarily derived from humic organic matter with partial contribution from sapropelic matter. Gas chromatographic analyses of hydrocarbons desorbed from soil samples through acid extraction technique showed the presence of methane through -butane and the observed concentrations (in ppb) vary from: methane (C1) from 4–291, ethane (C2) from 0–84, propane (C3) from 0–37, i-butane (iC4) from 0–5 and -butane (nC4) from 0–4. Carbon isotopes measured for methane and ethane by GC-C-IRMS, range between −42.9‰ to −13.3‰ (Pee Dee Belemnite – PDB) and −21.2‰ to −12.4‰ (PDB), respectively. The increased occurrence of hydrocarbons in the areas near Anjar of Kutch and the area south to Rajkot of Saurashtra signifies the area potential for oil and gas.

  5. Velocity amplitudes in global convection simulations: The role of the Prandtl number and near-surface driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Bridget; Miesch, Mark S.; Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the velocity amplitude in global simulations of solar convection, U, may be systematically over-estimated. Motivated by these recent results, we explore the factors that determine U and we consider how these might scale to solar parameter regimes. To this end, we decrease the thermal diffusivity κ along two paths in parameter space. If the kinematic viscosity ν is decreased proportionally with κ (fixing the Prandtl number Pr = ν / κ), we find that U increases but asymptotes toward a constant value, as found by Featherstone and Hindman (2016). However, if ν is held fixed while decreasing κ (increasing Pr), we find that U systematically decreases. We attribute this to an enhancement of the thermal content of downflow plumes, which allows them to carry the solar luminosity with slower flow speeds. We contrast this with the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection which is not subject to this luminosity constraint. This dramatic difference in behavior for the two paths in parameter space (fixed Pr or fixed ν) persists whether the heat transport by unresolved, near-surface convection is modeled as a thermal conduction or as a fixed flux. The results suggest that if solar convection can operate in a high-Pr regime, then this might effectively limit the velocity amplitude. Small-scale magnetism is a possible source of enhanced viscosity that may serve to achieve this high-Pr regime.

  6. Influences of specific land use/land cover conversions on climatological normals of near-surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Robert C.; Gallo, Kevin P.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantification of the effects of land use/land cover (LULC) changes on proximal measurements of near-surface air temperature is crucial to a better understanding of natural and anthropogenically induced climate change. In this study, data from stations utilized in deriving U.S. climatological temperature normals were analyzed in conjunction with NCEP-NCAR 50-Year Reanalysis (NNR) estimates and highly accurate LULC change maps in order to isolate the effects of LULC change from other climatological factors. While the “Normals” temperatures exhibited considerable warming in both minima and maxima, the NNR data revealed that the majority of the warming of maximum temperatures was not due to nearby LULC change. Warming of minimum temperatures was roughly evenly split between the effects of LULC change and other influences. Furthermore, the effects of LULC change varied considerably depending upon the particular type of land cover conversion that occurred. Urbanization, in particular, was found to result in warming of minima and maxima, while some LULC conversions that might be expected to have significantly altered nearby temperatures (e.g., clear-cutting of forests) did not.

  7. Safety assessment on the human intrusion scenarios of near surface disposal facility for low and very low level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Wook; Park, Jin Baek [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Ho [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The second-stage near surface disposal facility for low and very low level radioactive waste's permanent disposal is to be built. During the institutional control period, the inadvertent intrusion of the general public is limited. But after the institutional control period, the access to the general public is not restricted. Therefore human who has purpose of residence and resource exploration can intrude the disposal facility. In this case, radioactive effects to the intruder should be limited within regulatory dose limits. This study conducted the safety assessment of human intrusion on the second-stage surface disposal facility through drilling and post drilling scenario. Results of drilling and post drilling scenario were satisfied with regulatory dose limits. The result showed that post-drilling scenario was more significant than drilling scenario. According to the human intrusion time and behavior after the closure of the facility, dominant radionuclide contributing to the intruder was different. Sensitivity analyses on the parameters about the human behavior were also satisfied with regulatory dose limits. Especially, manual redistribution factor was the most sensitive parameter on exposure dose. A loading plan of spent filter waste and dry active waste was more effective than a loading plan of spent filter waste and other wastes for the radiological point of view. These results can be expected to provide both robustness and defense in depth for the development of safety case further.

  8. On the contribution of lakes in predicting near-surface temperature in a global weather forecasting model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Stockdale

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of lakes in numerical weather prediction is investigated in a set of global simulations performed with the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. A Fresh shallow-water Lake model (FLake is introduced allowing the coupling of both resolved and subgrid lakes (those that occupy less than 50% of a grid-box to the IFS atmospheric model. Global fields for the lake ancillary conditions (namely lake cover and lake depth, as well as initial conditions for the lake physical state, have been derived to initialise the forecast experiments. The procedure for initialising the lake variables is described and verified with particular emphasis on the importance of surface water temperature and freezing conditions. The response of short-range near surface temperature to the representation of lakes is examined in a set of forecast experiments covering one full year. It is shown that the impact of subgrid lakes is beneficial, reducing forecast error over the Northern territories of Canada and over Scandinavia particularly in spring and summer seasons. This is mainly attributed to the lake thermal effect, which delays the temperature response to seasonal radiation forcing.

  9. Features, events, processes, and safety factor analysis applied to a near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, M.E.; Dolinar, G.M.; Lange, B.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    An analysis of features, events, processes (FEPs) and other safety factors was applied to AECL`s proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface LLRW disposal facility. The FEP analysis process which had been developed for and applied to high-level and transuranic disposal concepts was adapted for application to a low-level facility for which significant efforts in developing a safety case had already been made. The starting point for this process was a series of meetings of the project team to identify and briefly describe FEPs or safety factors which they thought should be considered. At this early stage participants were specifically asked not to screen ideas. This initial list was supplemented by selecting FEPs documented in other programs and comments received from an initial regulatory review. The entire list was then sorted by topic and common issues were grouped, and issues were classified in three priority categories and assigned to individuals for resolution. In this paper, the issue identification and resolution process will be described, from the initial description of an issue to its resolution and inclusion in the various levels of the safety case documentation.

  10. Near-surface permeability in a supraglacial drainage basin on the Llewellyn glacier, Juneau Ice Field, British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Karlstrom

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supraglacial channel networks link time varying solar forcing and melt water routing on temperate glaciers. We present measurements of supraglacial channel spacing and network properties on the Juneau Icefield, subsurface water table height, and time variation of hydraulic characteristics including diurnal variability in water temperature. We combine these data with modeling of porous flow in weathered ice to infer near-surface permeability. Estimates are based on an observed phase lag between diurnal water temperature variations and discharge, and independently on measurement of water table surface elevation away from a stream. Both methods predict ice permeability on a 1–10 m scale in the range of 10–10–10–11 m2. These estimates are considerably smaller than common parameterizations of surface water flow on bare ice in the literature, as well as smaller than estimates of snowpack permeability. For supraglacial environments in which porosity/permeability creation in the subsurface is balanced by porous flow of melt water, our methods provide an estimate of microscale hydraulic properties from macroscale, remote observations of supraglacial channel spacing.

  11. On the variability of near-surface screen temperature anomalies in the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew R

    2016-09-28

    Near-surface air temperature (NSAT) anomalies during the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse are investigated at 266 UK sites, using operational data. The high density of observing sites, together with the wide range of ambient meteorological conditions, provided an unprecedented opportunity for analysis of the spatial variability of NSAT anomalies under relatively uniform eclipse conditions. Anomalies ranged from -0.03°C to -4.23°C (median -1.02°C). The maximum (negative) anomaly lagged the maximum obscuration by 15 min on average. Cloud cover impacted strongly on NSAT anomalies, with larger anomalies in clear-sky situations (peclipse, the topographical influences on NSAT anomalies were apparently dominated by variations in residual nocturnal inversion strength, as suggested by significant correlations between post-sunrise temperature and NSAT anomaly at clear-sky sites (larger negative anomalies with lower post-sunrise temperatures). The largest NSAT anomaly occurred at a coastal site where flow transitioned from onshore to offshore during the eclipse, in a situation with large coastal temperature gradients associated with antecedent nocturnal cooling.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  12. Presence of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in near-surface sediments of an oil spill area in Bohai Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuanglin; Zhang, Shengyin; Dong, Heping; Zhao, Qingfang; Cao, Chunhui

    2015-11-15

    In order to determine the source of organic matter and the fingerprint of the oil components, 50 samples collected from the near-surface sediments of the oil spill area in Bohai Sea, China, were analyzed for grain size, total organic carbon, aliphatic hydrocarbons (AHs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentrations of C15-35 n-alkanes and 16 United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) priority pollutant PAHs were found in the ranges of 0.88-3.48μg g(-1) and 9.97-490.13ng/g, respectively. The terrestrial organic matters characterized by C27-C35 n-alkanes and PAHs, resulting from the combustion of higher plants, are dominantly contributed from the transportation of these plants by rivers. Marine organic matters produced from plankton and aquatic plants were represented by C17-C26 n-alkanes in AHs. Crude oil, characterized by C17-C21 n-alkanes, unresolved complex mixture (UCM) with a mean response factor of C19 n-alkanes, low levels of perylene, and a high InP/(InP+BghiP) ratio, seeped into the oceans from deep hydrocarbon reservoirs, as a result of geological faults.

  13. Components of near-surface energy balance derived from satellite soundings – Part 1: Net available energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mallick

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a relatively simple method for recovering global fields of near-surface net available energy (the sum of the sensible and latent heat flux or the difference between the net radiation and surface heat accumulation using satellite visible and infra-red products derived from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and MODIS (MOderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer platforms. The method focuses on first specifying net surface radiation by considering its various shortwave and longwave components. This was then used in a surface energy balance equation in conjunction with satellite day–night surface temperature difference to derive 12 h discrete time estimates of surface, system heat capacity and heat accumulation, leading directly to retrieval for surface net available energy. Both net radiation and net available energy estimates were evaluated against ground truth data taken from 30 terrestrial tower sites affiliated to the FLUXNET network covering 7 different biome classes. This revealed a relatively good agreement between the satellite and tower data, with a pooled root mean square deviation of 98 and 72 W m−2 for net radiation and net available energy, respectively, although both quantities were underestimated by approximately 25 and 10%, respectively relative to the tower observations. Analysis of the individual shortwave and longwave components of the net radiation revealed the downwelling shortwave radiation to be the main source of this systematic underestimation.

  14. Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Fischer, M.L.

    2010-02-28

    We use process-based modeling techniques to characterize the temporal features of natural biologically controlled surface CO{sub 2} fluxes and the relationships between the assimilation and respiration fluxes. Based on these analyses, we develop a signal-enhancing technique that combines a novel time-window splitting scheme, a simple median filtering, and an appropriate scaling method to detect potential signals of leakage of CO{sub 2} from geologic carbon sequestration sites from within datasets of net near-surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements. The technique can be directly applied to measured data and does not require subjective gap filling or data-smoothing preprocessing. Preliminary application of the new method to flux measurements from a CO{sub 2} shallow-release experiment appears promising for detecting a leakage signal relative to background variability. The leakage index of ?2 was found to span the range of biological variability for various ecosystems as determined by observing CO{sub 2} flux data at various control sites for a number of years.

  15. Near surface geophysics techniques and geomorphological approach to reconstruct the hazard cave map in historical and urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, M.; Loperte, A.; Perrone, A.

    2009-04-01

    This work, carried out with an integrated methodological approach, focuses on the use of near surface geophysics techniques, such as ground penetrating radar GPR and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and geomorphological analysis, in order to reconstruct the cave distribution and geometry in a urban context and, in particular, in historical centres. In fact, there are a lot of historical Mediterranean sites born on an original rupestrian settlement, of which often the new generations forgot the memory and new urban areas built on them burying any marks. The interaction during recent centuries between human activity (caves excavation, birth and growth of an urban area) and the characters of the natural environment were the reasons of a progressive increase in hazard and vulnerability levels of several sites. The reconstruction of a detailed cave map distribution is the first step to define the anthropic and geomorphological hazard in urban areas, fundamental basis for planning and assessing the risk. The integrated near surface geophysics and geomorphological techniques have been applied to the case study of Tursi hilltop town and its older nucleus called Rabatana, located in the south-western sector of the Basilicata (southern Italy), representing an interesting example of the deep bond between natural and man-made environments such as precious cultural heritage. The history of this settlement has always been deeply connected with the characteristics of the neighbouring environment and it seems possible that the first settlement was built by excavating the slopes of the sandy relief. It was a typical rupestrian settlement, where meteoric water was stored inside some cisterns excavated on the slopes. During recent centuries, the increase in territory development by humans produced an increase in cave excavation in the Tursi-Rabatana urban area. To reconstruct the extremely complex near-surface hypogeal environment excavated in the sandy layers, a geophysical

  16. Effect of Shock Wave on Fabricated Anti-Blast Wall and Distribution Law Around the Wall Under Near Surface Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; LIU Jingbo; YAN Qiushi

    2008-01-01

    The loads of shock wave effect on fabricated anti-blast wall and distribution law around the wall were investigated by using near surface explosion test method and FEM.The pressure-time histories and variety law on the foreside and backside of the anti-blast wall were adopted in the tests of variety of different explosion distances and dynamites,as well as in the comparison between the test and numerical calculation.The test results show that the loads of shock wave effect on the anti-blast wall were essen-tially consistent with calculation results using criterion under surface explosion when explosion distances exceed 2 m,the distribution of overpressure behind wall was gained according to variety law based on small-large-small.It is also demonstrated that the peak overpressure behind wall had commonly appeared in wall height by 1.5--2.5 multiples,and the peak overpressures of protective building behind wall could be reduced effectively by using the fabricated anti-blast wall.

  17. Evaluation of Near-Surface Gases in Marine Sediments to Assess Subsurface Petroleum Gas Generation and Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Abrams

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gases contained within near-surface marine sediments can be derived from multiple sources: shallow microbial activity, thermal cracking of organic matter and inorganic materials, or magmatic-mantle degassing. Each origin will display a distinctive hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon composition as well as compound-specific isotope signature and thus the interpretation of origin should be relatively straightforward. Unfortunately, this is not always the case due to in situ microbial alteration, non-equilibrium phase partitioning, mixing, and fractionation related to the gas extraction method. Sediment gases can reside in the interstitial spaces, bound to mineral or organic surfaces and/or entrapped in carbonate inclusions. The interstitial sediment gases are contained within the sediment pore space, either dissolved in the pore waters (solute or as free (vapour gas. The bound gases are believed to be attached to organic and/or mineral surfaces, entrapped in structured water or entrapped in authigenic carbonate inclusions. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the gas types found within shallow marine sediments and examine issues related to gas sampling and extraction. In addition, the paper will discuss how to recognise mixing, alteration and fractionation issues to best interpret the seabed geochemical results and determine gas origin to assess subsurface petroleum gas generation and entrapment.

  18. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuse, Hiraku, E-mail: fuseh@ipu.ac.jp; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fujisaki, Tatsuya [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0331 (Japan); Shinoda, Kazuya [Graduate School of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Miyamoto, Katsumi [Department of Radiological Technology, Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Sakae, Takeji [Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro{sup ®} polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  19. Atmospheric anomalies and anomalies of electricity in the near-surface atmosphere before the Kamchatka earthquake of January 30, 2016, based on the data from the Paratunka Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. V.; Korsunova, L. P.; Smirnov, S. E.; Hegai, V. V.

    2017-07-01

    The 15-min data of vertical ionosphere sounding and 10-min data from measurements of the vertical component ( Ez) of the near-surface quasistatic atmospheric electrical field and the respective values of electrical conductance of near-surface air at the Paratunka complex geophysical observatory in the period from January 28 to January 30, 2016 have been analyzed to reveal the possible anomalies preceding the M = 7.2 earthquake that occurred on January 30, 2016, at 0325 UT. The distance between the observatory and epicenter was 117 km. These anomalies have been revealed, and the majority of them, in our opinion, may be related to the processes of earthquake preparation.

  20. Meteorological, hydrological and hydrogeological monitoring data and near-surface hydrogeological properties data from Laxemar-Simpevarp. Site descriptive modelling SDM-Site Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent (EmpTec, Taeby (Sweden)); Oehman, Johan (Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Holgersson, Bjoern (SWECO VIAK, Stockholm (Sweden)); Roennback, Kristoffer (Aqualog AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Marelius, Fredrick (WSP Sverige, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    This report presents and analyses meteorological, hydrological and hydrogeological time-series data and near-surface hydrogeological properties data from the Laxemar-Simpevarp area, available in SKB's Sicada database at time of the Laxemar 2.3 data freeze (Aug. 31, 2007). The meteorological data set includes data from two local stations, located on the island of Aespoe and at Plittorp, located further inland. In addition, the data evaluation uses a longer-term data set from 7 surrounding stations, operated by SMHI. As part of this study, a time series is constructed of the water content of snow. According to the data evaluation, the site-average annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration can be estimated to be on the order of 600 and 535 mm, respectively. In particular, precipitation demonstrates a near-coastal gradient, with less precipitation at the coast compared to areas further inland. The surface-water level data set includes data from 4 lake-level gauging stations and 3 sea-level gauging stations. All lakes are located above sea level, including the near-coastal Lake Soeraa. Hence, no intrusion of sea water to lakes takes place. There is a strong co-variation among the monitored lake-water levels, typically with maxima during spring and minima during late summer and early autumn. Concerning the sea as a hydraulic boundary, the maximum and minimum sea levels (daily averages) during the site-investigation period were -0.52 and 0.71 metres above sea level, respectively, whereas the average sea level was 0.03 metres above sea level (RHB 70). The data set on stream discharge, surface-water temperature and electrical conductivity includes data from 9 discharge-gauging stations in 7 streams. Based on the discharge data, the site-average specific discharge for the years 2005-2007 can be estimated to 165 mm/y, which is within the interval of the estimated long-term average. Overall, discharge-data errors are likely to be small. The hydrogeological

  1. Surface slip and off-fault deformation patterns in the 2013 MW 7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake: Implications for controls on the distribution of near-surface coseismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, Robert; Hollingsworth, James; Dolan, James F.

    2014-12-01

    of 398 fault offsets measured by visual analysis of WorldView high-resolution satellite imagery with deformation maps produced by COSI-Corr subpixel image correlation of Landsat-8 and SPOT5 imagery reveals significant complexity and distributed deformation along the 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake. Average slip along the main trace of the fault was 4.2 m, with local maximum offsets up to 11.4 m. Comparison of slip measured from offset geomorphic features, which record localized slip along the main strand of the fault, to the total displacement across the entire width of the surface deformation zone from COSI-Corr reveals ˜45% off-fault deformation. While previous studies have shown that the structural maturity of the fault exerts a primary control on the total percentage of off-fault surface deformation, large along-strike variations in the percentage of strain localization observed in the 2013 rupture imply the influence of important secondary controls. One such possible secondary control is the type of near-surface material through which the rupture propagated. We therefore compared the percentage off-fault deformation to the type of material (bedrock, old alluvium, and young alluvium) at the surface and the distance of the fault to the nearest bedrock outcrop (a proxy for sediment thickness along this hybrid strike slip/reverse slip fault). We find significantly more off-fault deformation in younger and/or thicker sediments. Accounting for and predicting such off-fault deformation patterns has important implications for the interpretation of geologic slip rates, especially for their use in probabilistic seismic hazard assessments, the behavior of near-surface materials during coseismic deformation, and the future development of microzonation protocols for the built environment.

  2. Geophysical monitoring of near surface CO2 injection at Svelvik - Learnings from the CO2FieldLab experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querendez, Etor; Romdhane, Anouar; Jordan, Michael; Eliasson, Peder; Grimstad, Alv-Arne

    2014-05-01

    A CO2 migration field laboratory for testing monitoring methods and tools has been established in the glaciofluvial-glaciomarine Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, near Oslo (Norway). At the site, feasibility, sensitivity, acquisition geometry and usefulness of various surface and subsurface monitoring tools are investigated during controlled CO2 injection experiments. In a first stage, a shallow CO2 injection experiment was conducted in September 2011. Approximately 1700 kg of CO2 was injected at 18 m depth below surface in an unconsolidated sand formation. The objectives of this experiment were to (i) detect and, where possible, quantify migrated CO2 concentrations at the surface and very shallow subsurface, (ii) evaluate the sensitivity of the monitoring tools and (iii) study the impact of the vadose zone on observed measurements. Results showed that all deployed monitoring tools (for surface and near-surface gas monitoring, subsurface water monitoring and subsurface geophysical monitoring) where able to detect the presence of CO2 even though the CO2 plume did not migrate vertically as expected in what was thought to be an homogeneous unconsolidated sand structure. The upper part of the site revealed to be more heterogeneous than expected, mainly due to the highly variable lamination and channelling of the morainic sediments and to the presence of pebble and cobble beds sporadically showing throughout the deposits. Building on the learnings from the 18m depth injection experiment, a second experiment is being planned for a deeper injection, at a depth of 65m. Re-processing of the appraisal 2D multi-channel seismic with state-of-the-art processing techniques, like Linear Radon coherent and random noise attenuation and Full Waveform Inversion followed by pre-stack depth migration, corroborate the presence of heterogeneities at the near surface. Based on the re-interpreted seismic sections, a more realistic 3D geomodel, where the complex topography of the site

  3. Conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide transport in near-surface systems at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pique, Angels; Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-11-15

    In the framework of the SR-Site safety assessment, a conceptual and numerical modelling of radionuclide reactive transport in near-surface systems (including till and clay systems) at Forsmark has been carried out. The objective was to evaluate the retention capacity of the near-surface systems, composed of Quaternary deposits, which would be the last natural barrier for an eventual radionuclide release from the deep repository prior to reaching the biosphere. The studied radionuclides are 14C, 129I, 36Cl, 94Nb, 59Ni, 93Mo, 79Se, 99Tc, 230Th, 90Sr, 226Ra, 135Cs and U. Conceptual description and numerical simulations of radionuclide reactive transport show that cation exchange and surface complexation on illite are active processes for the retention of several radionuclides (U, Th, Ni, Cs, Sr, Ra). Surface complexation on iron hydroxide is an active process in the till system, able to effectively retain U and Ni. Another retention process of importance is the incorporation of the radionuclides into mineral phases, either by the precipitation of pure phases or solid solutions. Quantitative modelling has been useful to illustrate the incorporation of C and Sr in the carbonate solid solution in the considered model domains (till and clay), as well as the precipitation of uraninite in the clay sediments and the precipitation of native selenium and radiobarite in the till. Other mineral phases that could, a priori, retain U, Se, Nb and Tc do not precipitate in the simulations, either due to the pH-Eh conditions and/or because the dissolved concentration of the element is not high enough under the considered simulation conditions. It is important to keep in mind that changes in these parameters and in the boundary conditions could modify the predicted behaviour of these elements. The radionuclides that are most significantly retarded are Th, Ni and Cs, mainly through sorption onto illite. Therefore, if the amount of illite (or available sorption sites) decreases, the

  4. Near-surface ice-rich regolith in mid Utopia Planitia, Mars, and its formation by thaw-freeze cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, R. J.; Conway, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    material derived from the north polar cap deposits and transported to the mid-latitudes by katabatic winds. Fifth, the ice-enrichment of the PUPU is distinct from and independent of loess deposition and accumulation. As is the case with their presumed analogues on Earth, we hypothesise that the Martian PPLs form in fine-grained sediments that have accumulated episodically; these sediments undergo post-deposition infiltration by melt water, possibly derived of surface snow or ice precipitated atmospherically. Fine-grained sediments facilitate cryosuction, which is the attraction of water towards a freezing front, and the formation of segregated ice lenses. Metre-thick (near-surface) ice-cemented permafrost has been observed in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Diffusive exchange between the atmosphere and the near-surface sediments is the process by which ice cementation could have taken place. However, diffusive exchanges to the full depth of the PUPU are not considered to be possible unless this occurs episodically.

  5. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Defining near-surface groundwater flow regimes in the semi-arid glaciated plains of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, M Jim; Barbour, S Lee; Schmeling, Erin E

    2016-06-01

    The dominant transport mechanisms controlling the migration of contaminants in geologic media are advection and molecular diffusion. To date, defining which transport mechanism dominates in saturated, non-lithified sediments has been difficult. Here, we illustrate the value of using detailed profiles of the conservative stable isotope values of water (δ(2)H and δ(18)O) to identify the dominant processes of contaminant transport (i.e. diffusion- or advection-dominated transport) in near-surface, non-lithified, saturated sediments of the Interior Plains of North America (IPNA). The approach presented uses detailed δ(18)O analyses of glacial till, glaciolacustrine clay, and fluvial sand core samples taken to depths of 11-50 m below ground at 22 sites across the IPNA to show whether transport in the fractured and oxidized sediments is dominated by advection or diffusion. Diffusion is by far the dominant transport mechanism in fine-textured lacustrine and glacial till sediments, but lateral advection dominates transport in sand-rich sediments and some oxidized, fine-textured lacustrine and glacial till sediments. The approach presented has a number of applications, including identifying dominant transport mechanisms in geomedia and potential protective barriers for underlying aquifers or surface waters, constraining groundwater transport models, and selecting optimum locations for monitoring wells. These findings should be applicable to most glaciated regions of the world that are composed of similar hydrogeologic units (i.e. low K clay till layers overlain by higher K coarse-textured aquifers or weathered clay till layers) and may also be applicable to non-glaciated regions exhibiting similar hydrogeologic characteristics.

  7. Estimating the Soil Moisture Profile by Assimilating Near-Surface Observations with the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The paper investigates the ability to retrieve the true soil moisture profile by assimilating near-surface soil moisture into a soil moisture model with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation scheme,including the effect of ensemble size, update interval and nonlinearities in the profile retrieval, the required time for full retrieval of the soil moisture profiles, and the possible influence of the depth of the soil moisture observation. These questions are addressed by a desktop study using synthetic data. The "true"soil moisture profiles are generated from the soil moisture model under the boundary condition of 0.5 cm d-1 evaporation. To test the assimilation schemes, the model is initialized with a poor initial guess of the soil moisture profile, and different ensemble sizes are tested showing that an ensemble of 40 members is enough to represent the covariance of the model forecasts. Also compared are the results with those from the direct insertion assimilation scheme, showing that the EnKF is superior to the direct insertion assimilation scheme, for hourly observations, with retrieval of the soil moisture profile being achieved in 16 h as compared to 12 days or more. For daily observations, the true soil moisture profile is achieved in about 15 days with the EnKF, but it is impossible to approximate the true moisture within 18 days by using direct insertion. It is also found that observation depth does not have a significant effect on profile retrieval time for the EnKF. The nonlinearities have some negative influence on the optimal estimates of soil moisture profile but not very seriously.

  8. Small-scale spatial variation in near-surface turbidites around the JFAST site near the Japan Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Shuro; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Kasaya, Takafumi

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to improve our understanding of the depositional processes associated with turbidites related to recent earthquake events. A series of short sediment cores (ca. 20-30 cm long) were recovered from the landward slope of the Japan Trench around JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) site C0019 by a remotely operated vehicle, KAIKO 7000 II, and the sample sites were accurately located using an LBL (long base line) acoustic navigation system. The properties of the cores were analyzed using visual observations, soft X-ray radiographs, smear slides, measurement of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, and analysis of radioactive elements (134Cs, 137Cs, and excess 210Pb). For the first time, small-scale (ca. 200-1000 m) spatial variations in recent earthquake-triggered deep-sea turbidites, the formation of which was probably linked to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, are described. We also examine the submarine landslide that probably generated the sediment unit below the turbidites, which is thought to be an important process in the study area. The spatial distribution and characteristics of the near-surface seismoturbidite obtained immediately after the earthquake, presented here, will enable precise calibration of offshore evidence of recent earthquakes, and thus facilitate the use of the sedimentary archive for paleoseismic interpretations. Furthermore, although sampling for turbidite seismology on steep slopes has not been widely performed previously, our results suggest that the recent event deposits may be continuously tracked from the slope to the basin using a combination of the present sampling method and conventional large-scale investigation techniques.

  9. Two-Dimensional Variational Analysis of Near-Surface Moisture from Simulated Radar Refractivity-Related Phase Change Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken-ichi SHIMOSE; Ming XUE; Robert D.PALMER; Jidong GAO; Boon Leng CHEONG; David J.BODINE

    2013-01-01

    Because they are most sensitive to atmospheric moisture content,radar refractivity observations can provide high-resolution information about the highly variable low-level moisture field.In this study,simulated radar refractivity-related phase-change data were created using a radar simulator from realistic high-resolution model simulation data for a dryline case.These data were analyzed using the 2DVAR system developed specifically for the phase-change data.Two sets of experiments with the simulated observations were performed,one assuming a uniform target spacing of 250 m and one assuming nonuniform spacing between 250 m to 4 km.Several sources of observation error were considered,and their impacts were examined.They included errors due to ground target position uncertainty,typical random errors associated with radar measurements,and gross error due to phase wrapping.Without any additional information,the 2DVAR system was incapable of dealing with phase-wrapped data directly.When there was no phase wrapping in the data,the 2DVAR produced excellent analyses,even in the presence of both position uncertainty and random radar measurement errors.When a separate pre-processing step was applied to unwrap the phase-wrapped data,quality moisture analyses were again obtained,although the analyses were smoother due to the reduced effective resolution of the observations by interpolation and smoothing involved in the unwrapping procedure.The unwrapping procedure was effective even when significant differences existed between the analyzed state and the state at a reference time.The results affirm the promise of using radar refractivity phase-change measurements for near-surface moisture analysis.

  10. Extracting the near surface stoichiometry of BiFe0.5Mn0.5O3 thin films; a finite element maximum entropy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, F.; Monsen, A.; Li, Z. S.; Choi, E. -M.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Xiong, J.; Jia, Q. X.; Wahlstrom, E.; Wells, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    The surface and near-surface chemical composition of BiFe0.5Mn0.5O3 has been studied using a combination of low photon energy synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy, and a newly developed maximum entropy finite element model from which it is possible to extract the depth dependent chemical compositi

  11. A new regional tectonic map of the consolidated crystalline basement of sedimentary basins and near-surface fold structures of the Ural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinin, V. S.; Martyshko, P. S.; Osipov, V. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    A new approach to the tectonic zoning of the consolidated crystalline basement and near-surface fold structures, taking into account the specific features of the structure of the Earth's crust is suggested. As a result, a new regional tectonic map of these complexes of the Ural region was created.

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars. IV. Effect of small-scale magnetic flux concentrations on centre-to-limb variation and spectral lines

    CERN Document Server

    Beeck, Benjamin; Cameron, Robert H; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields affect the local structure of the photosphere of stars. They can considerably influence the radiative properties near the optical surface, flow velocities, and the temperature and pressure profiles. We aim at understanding qualitatively the influence of small magnetic flux concentrations in unipolar plage regions on the centre-to-limb variation of the intensity and its contrast and on the shape of spectral line profiles in cool main-sequence stars. We analyse the bolometric and continuum intensity and its angular dependence of 24 radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the near-surface layers of main-sequence stars with six different sets of stellar parameters (spectral types F to early M) and four different average magnetic field strengths (including the non-magnetic case). We also calculated disc-integrated profiles of three spectral lines. The small magnetic flux concentrations formed in the magnetic runs of simulations have a considerable impact on the intensity and its centre-to-limb...

  13. The Present Near-Surface Inventory of Water on Mars: How well does it Constrain the Existence of a Former Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Carr and Head (Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 726-732, 2015) have estimated that the size of the present-day inventory of near-surface water on Mars (that which exists in climatically exchangeable reservoirs) is equal to a global equivalent layer (GEL) ~34 m deep. Based on this estimate, they have attempted to extrapolate the evolution of this inventory backward in time, taking into account the introduction of new water by volcanism and outflow channel activity and the loss of water by exospheric escape. They conclude that, at the end of the Noachian, Mars had a near-surface water inventory of ~24 m which, they argue, was incompatible with the existence of a former ocean. Here, we argue that the uncertainties associated with Carr and Head analysis are significant and preclude its use as a reliable constraint on the size of the Noachian inventory of water or the presence of an early ocean. Indeed, consideration of the geologic evolution of the northern plains suggest that, if early Mars possessed an inventory of water sufficient to form an early ocean, then a frozen relic of that body may survive at depth to the present day. While sublimation undoubtedly depleted some fraction of the ocean's initial inventory of ice, the subsequent accumulation of ~0.5 - 1.5 km of sediments and volcanics, combined with recurrent episodes of outflow channel activity and obliquity-driven polar ice redistribution, could have led to the development of a complex volatile stratigraphy throughout the northern plains (at depths far below those that can be assessed as part of the present-day near-surface inventory). Thus, even if the present near-surface inventory of ice could be determined with high precision, it would place no constraint on either the past near-surface inventory of H2O or the former presence of a northern ocean.

  14. Predicting root zone soil moisture with soil properties and satellite near-surface moisture data across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D.; Manfreda, S.; Keller, K.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Satellite-based near-surface (0-2 cm) soil moisture estimates have global coverage, but do not capture variations of soil moisture in the root zone (up to 100 cm depth) and may be biased with respect to ground-based soil moisture measurements. Here, we present an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) hydrologic data assimilation system that predicts bias in satellite soil moisture data to support the physically based Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) infiltration model, which estimates root zone soil moisture with satellite soil moisture data. The SMAR-EnKF model estimates a regional-scale bias parameter using available in situ data. The regional bias parameter is added to satellite soil moisture retrievals before their use in the SMAR model, and the bias parameter is updated continuously over time with the EnKF algorithm. In this study, the SMAR-EnKF assimilates in situ soil moisture at 43 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) monitoring locations across the conterminous U.S. Multivariate regression models are developed to estimate SMAR parameters using soil physical properties and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) evapotranspiration data product as covariates. SMAR-EnKF root zone soil moisture predictions are in relatively close agreement with in situ observations when using optimal model parameters, with root mean square errors averaging 0.051 [cm3 cm-3] (standard error, s.e. = 0.005). The average root mean square error associated with a 20-fold cross-validation analysis with permuted SMAR parameter regression models increases moderately (0.082 [cm3 cm-3], s.e. = 0.004). The expected regional-scale satellite correction bias is negative in four out of six ecoregions studied (mean = -0.12 [-], s.e. = 0.002), excluding the Great Plains and Eastern Temperate Forests (0.053 [-], s.e. = 0.001). With its capability of estimating regional-scale satellite bias, the SMAR-EnKF system can predict root zone soil moisture over broad extents and has

  15. Physics-Based Simulations of Near-Surface Hydrologic Response for a Steep, Unchanneled Catchment Near Coos Bay, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, B. A.; Loague, K.; Vanderkwaak, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    The comprehensive physics-based hydrologic-response model InHM was used to simulate 3D variably- saturated flow and solute transport for three controlled sprinkling experiments at the Coos Bay 1 (CB1) experimental catchment in the Oregon Coast Range. InHM dynamically simulates 3D variably-saturated subsurface flow using Richards equation and 2D surface and open channel flow using the diffusion-wave approximation to the depth-integrated shallow-water equations. The InHM-simulated hydrologic-response was evaluated against observed discharge, pressure head, total head, soil-water content, and deuterium concentration records. Runoff generation, tensiometric / piezometric response, pore-water pressure generation, and solute (tracer) transport were all simulated well for the soil. The InHM simulations indicate that the 3D geometry and hydraulic characteristics of the layered geologic interfaces at CB1 can control the development of saturation and pore-water pressures at the soil-saprolite interface. The weathered bedrock piezometric response and runoff contribution were not simulated well in this study, most likely as a result of the uncertainty in the weathered bedrock layer geometry and fractured-rock hydraulic properties. Sensitivity analyses for the CB1 boundary-value problem indicate that: (i) hysteretic unsaturated flow in the CB1 soil is important for accurate hydrologic-response simulation, (ii) using an impermeable boundary condition to represent layered geologic interfaces leads to large errors in simulated magnitudes of runoff generation and pore-water pressure development, and (iii) field-based retention curve measurements can dramatically improve variably-saturated hydrologic-response simulation at sites with steep soil-water retention curves. The near-surface CB1 simulations demonstrate that physics-based models like InHM are useful for characterizing detailed spatio-temporal hydrologic-response, developing process-based concepts, and identifying

  16. Long-Term Fuid Flow Measurements From Widely Varied Oceanic Settings Elucidate Near-Surface Hydrologic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, M. D.; Brown, K. M.

    2003-12-01

    processes involved, ultimately leading to a better understanding of the overall hydrologic system. Our greater understanding of the near-surface hydrological environment has also increased our understanding of shallow sediment biological and geochemical processes. The serendipitous collection of data from the OOST region of Nicoya containing synchronous hydrologic events suggests that CAT meters may also prove to be effective monitors of volumetric strain such as that associated with aseismic creep events.

  17. Detection of Crystalline Hematite Mineralization on Mars by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer: Evidence for Near-surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P. R.; Bandfield, J. L.; Clark, R. N.; Edgett, K. S.; Hamilton, V. E.; Hoefen, T.; Kieffer, H. H.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Lane, M. D.; Malin, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission has discovered a remarkable accumulation of crystalline hematite ((alpha-Fe2O3) that covers an area with very sharp boundaries approximately 350 by 350-750 km in size centered near 2 S latitude between 0 and 5 W longitude (Sinus Meridiani). Crystalline hematite is uniquely identified by the presence of fundamental vibrational absorption features centered near 300, 450, and >525/cm, and by the absence of silicate fundamentals in the 1000/cm region. Spectral features resulting from atmospheric CO2, dust, and water ice were removed using a radiative transfer model. The spectral properties unique to Sinus Meridiani were emphasized by removing the average spectrum of the surrounding region. The depth and shape of the hematite fundamental bands show that the hematite is crystalline and relatively coarse grained (>5-10 micron). Diameters up to and greater than 100s of micrometers are permitted within the instrumental noise and natural variability of hematite spectra. Hematite particles 30 micron in diameter to 40-60% for unpacked 10 micron powders. The hematite in Sinus Meridiani is thus distinct from the fine-grained (diameter <5-10 micron), red, crystalline hematite considered, on the basis of visible, near-IR data, to be a minor spectral component in Martian bright regions like Olympus-Amazonis. Sinus Meridiani hematite is closely associated with a smooth, layered, friable surface that is interpreted to be sedimentary in origin. This material may be the uppermost surface in the region, indicating that it could be a late-stage sedimentary unit, or it could be a layered portion of the heavily cratered plains units. We consider five possible mechanisms for the formation of coarse-grained, crystalline hematite. These processes fall into two classes depending on whether they require a significant amount of near-surface water: (1) chemical precipitation that includes origin by (a

  18. In-situ observations of water vapor isotopes in near surface air over Lakes Superior and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, L.; Meyer, A. L.; Griffis, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes play an important role in the climate of the midwestern to northeastern United States. Evaporation from the lakes is not well quantified, and the factors controlling lake evaporation are not fully understood. Two isotopic tracer methods have been used to study lake evaporation. The first is a lake water isotopic mass balance to solve for evaporation rates from precipitation and runoff inputs and the residual lake water. The second method is monitoring downwind precipitation and atmospheric water vapor for evidence of lake evaporation. Accurate estimates of the isotopic composition of evaporation from the lakes are critical inputs in both methods for modern and paleo studies. Traditionally, evaporation is assumed to follow the Craig-Gordon model of isotopic fractionation. To our knowledge, this model has not been tested on large lakes like the Great Lakes, whose evaporation flux strongly influences the moisture in the air above the lake. To test the Craig-Gordon model, we made measurements of the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios above the surface of Lakes Superior and Michigan during June 2016 during a 4-day cruise on the R/V Blue Heron research vessel that traveled from Duluth, MN to Milwaukee, WI. Air was sampled at 2 intakes, approximately 5 m and 15 m above the lake surface, using an LGR triple water vapor isotope analyzer. The isotopic composition of lake water became more enriched in the heavy isotopes from Lake Superior to Lake Michigan. The timing of these measurements in late spring is not an optimal time to observe evaporation off the lakes, because often the lake temperature is cooler than the air temperature, thereby suppressing the evaporation flux. At times, vertical gradients of water vapor mixing in the near surface air approached 2,000-3,000 ppm, with higher moisture at the lower intake than the upper intake. At night, we observed times when this gradient reversed, and there was higher moisture aloft compared to the

  19. Mass balance and near-surface ice temperature structure of Baishui Glacier No.1 in Mt.Yulong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jiankuo; HE Yuanqing; LI Shuang; WANG Shijin; NIU Hewen; XIN Huijuan; PU Tao

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation and ablation of a glacier directly reflect its mass income and wastage,and ice temperature indicates glacier's climatic and dynamic conditions.Glaciological studies at Baishui Glacier No.1 in Mt.Yulong are important for estimating recent changes of the cryosphere in Hengduan Mountains.Increased glacier ablation and higher ice temperatures can cause the incidents of icefall.Therefore,it is important to conduct the study of glacier mass balance and ice temperature,but there are few studies in relation to glacier's mass balance and active-layer temperature in China's monsoonal temperate glacier region.Based on the field observations of mass balance and glacier temperature at Baishui Glacier No.1,its accumulation,ablation,net balance and near-surface ice temperature structure were analyzed and studied in this paper.Results showed that the accumulation period was ranged from October to the following mid-May,and the ablation period occurred from mid-May to October,suggesting that the ablation period of temperate glacier began about 15 days earlier than that of continental glaciers,while the accumulation period began about 15 days later.The glacier ablation rate was 6.47 cm d-1 at an elevation of 4600 m between June 23 and August 30,and it was 7.4 cm d-1 at 4800 m between June 26 and July 11 in 1982,moreover,they respectively increased to 9.2 cm d-1 and 10.8 cm d-1 in the corresponding period and altitude in 2009,indicating that glacier ablation has greatly intensified in the past years.The temperature of the main glacier body was close to melting point in summer,and it dropped from the glacier surface and reached a minimum value at a depth of 4-6 m in the ablation zone.The temperature then rose to around melting point with the depth increment.In winter,the ice temperature rose gradually with the increasing depth,and close to melting point at the depth of 10 m.Compared with the data from 1982,the glacier temperature has risen in the ablation zone in

  20. Deep ancient fluids in the continental crust and their impact on near-surface economic, environmental and biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballentine, Christopher; Warr, Oliver; Sutcliffe, Chelsea; McDermott, Jill; Fellowes, Jonathan; Holland, Greg; Mabry, Jennifer; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    With a few exceptions the mobility of water, oil and gas, provides for an ephemeral view of subsurface fluids relative to geological or planetary timescales. Aquifers supplying water for drinking and irrigation have mean residence ages from hundreds to tens of thousands of years; Hydrothermal systems can be active for hundreds of thousands to millions of years forming key mineral reserves; Sedimentary basin formation expels fluids during compaction and generates oil and gas on times scales of millions to hundreds of millions of years. Within these exemplar systems biological activity can play a crucial role by mediating system oxidation state: releasing arsenic into shallow groundwaters; precipitating ore bodies; generating methane; and biodegrading oil. It is becoming increasingly apparent that fluids resident in fractures and porespace in the crystalline basement underlying many of these systems can have a mean residence time that ranges from tens to hundreds of millions of years [1,2] to billions of years [3,4]. These fluids are highly saline and trace element rich; they are abundant in nitrogen, hydrogen, methane and helium and can contain microbes that have uniquely adapted to these isolated environments [5]. We are actively expanding discovery of sites with fluids exhibiting extreme age and have recently shown that these systems contribute to half of the terrestrial hydrogen production; a key component in biosphere energy and carbon cycles [6]. Tectonic or thermal release of these fluids can result in helium deposits; possible ore body generation and the inoculation of near-surface systems with microbial biota protected in the deep surface; the controls and rate of fluid release to shallow systems can fundamentally change the nature of some shallow systems. These deep ancient fluids represent a little tapped scientific resource for understanding how life survives and evolves in such isolation, how life is transported and communicates in extremis together and

  1. Near Surface Controls on Magma Fragmentation and Ash Generation during Contemporaneous Magmatic and Phreatomagmatic Activity: Insights from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Hoskuldsson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Magma-water interaction (MWI) influences both eruption style and resulting pyroclast grain size (and transport properties). We explore both the mechanisms and consequences of MWI by examining tephra deposits from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires within the Krafla fissure system, northern Iceland. Here, contemporaneous fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments, causing both dry magmatic and variably wet phreatomagmatic activity. As all vents shared the same initial magma composition, the range of pyroclastic (ash fall, wet surge, dry surge and scoria) deposits provides an excellent sample suite to explore fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Sample analysis of the opening phreatomagmatic phase shows that ash components of individual size fractions exhibit a linear increase [from 8% (1φ) to 77% (>4φ)] in the proportion of dense blocky fragments with decreasing size (Figure). The proportion of vesicular particles decreases concurrently, but shards comprise an increasing proportion of the vesicular size fraction [from 6% (1φ) to 70% (>4φ)]. Free crystals, lithic and microcrystalline grains are ~10% of all size classes. We compare these morphological data to (1) bubble size distributions (BSDs) and (2) the spatial distribution of preserved volatiles in matrix glass, which record the degassing history and pressure/rate of quenching, respectively. Measured BSDs for quenched Pele's tears within the opening phreatomagmatic ash deposit show a modal bubble diameter of 20-30 µm (by number) or 150-200 µm (by volume), comparable to those from Kilauea Iki fire fountains in Hawaii. Elevated dissolved sulphur concentrations (≤ 550 ppm) in phreatomagmatic ash compared to magmatic scoria (~180 ppm), however, suggests either faster quench rates and/or greater fragmentation depths. To discriminate between these alternatives, we analyse BSDs in ash from the magmatic phase, which requires determining the optimal particle size for

  2. Numerical modelling of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosson, Emma (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran; Sassner, Mona (DHI Sverige AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    SKB is currently performing site investigations at two potential sites for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. This report presents results of water flow and solute transport modelling of the Forsmark site. The modelling reported in this document focused on the near-surface groundwater, i.e. groundwater in Quaternary deposits and shallow rock, and surface water systems, and was performed using the MIKE SHE tool. The most recent site data used in the modelling were delivered in the Forsmark 2.3 dataset, which had its 'data freeze' on March 31, 2007. The present modelling is performed in support of the final version of the Forsmark site description that is produced during the site investigation phase. In this work, the hydrological modelling system MIKE SHE has been used to describe near-surface groundwater flow and the contact between groundwater and surface water at the Forsmark site. The surface water system at Forsmark is described with the one-dimensional 'channel flow' modelling tool MIKE 11, which is fully and dynamically integrated with MIKE SHE. The MIKE SHE model was updated with data from the F2.3 data freeze. The main updates concerned the geological description of the saturated zone and the time series data on water levels and surface water discharges. The time series data used as input data and for calibration and validation was extended until the Forsmark 2.3 data freeze (March 31, 2007). The present work can be subdivided into the following four parts: 1. Update of the numerical flow model. 2. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of the model parameters. 3. Validation of the calibrated model, followed by evaluation and identification of discrepancies between measurements and model results. 4. Additional sensitivity analysis and calibration in order to resolve the problems identified in point three above. The main actions taken during the calibration can be summarised as follows: 1. The potential evapotranspiration was

  3. Understanding groundwater fracture-flow and near surface soil throughflow mixing within a mountain catchment using 36Cl/Cl, Yosemite National Park, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G. D.; Conklin, M. H.; Nimz, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    In high elevation montane basins, there are typically limited observations to characterize watersheds. In this study we successfully use 36Cl and Cl- to characterize groundwater and near-surface water contributions to the upper Merced River and it's tributaries from Happy Isles to El Portal. Water fluxes typically consist of a variety of surface, near-surface and groundwater flow paths, which are complicated by faulted, folded, and fractured terrain. Surface water, snow, groundwater, and springs were sampled seasonally from July 2004 to October 2007. Snow 36Cl/Cl ratios are 3-30 times lower than in the Merced River water, but 36Cl/Cl ratios in the river increase 3-7 times from baseflow to the snowmelt season. This observation can be explained by characterizing endmembers in the watershed, and by determining how these endmembers vary temporally. Three endmembers mix in the catchment, and they include near-surface water with Cl- concentrations of 0.09 mg/L and 36Cl/Cl of 9976x10-15, groundwater primarily in contact with granitic rock with Cl- of 0.39 mg/L and 36Cl/Cl of 10711x10-15, and groundwater primarily in contact with metasedimentary rock with Cl- of 32.7 mg/L and 36Cl/Cl of 71x10-15. Metamorphic- dominated groundwater and granitic-dominated groundwater are further characterized by Ca2+/Cl- ratios (granitic-dominated groundwater is greater than 5, and metamorphic-dominated groundwater is less than 1). As the season transitions from snowmelt to baseflow, Cl- and 36Cl/Cl in surface water becomes more characteristic of both granitic and metamorphic-dominated groundwater depending on location. Plotting 1/Cl- verses 36Cl/Cl elucidates mixing lines which indicate that both groundwater endmembers have undergone evapotranspiration, but only the metamorphic-dominated groundwater shows evidence of incorporating significant amounts of rock chloride. The near-surface water is the dominant endmember during the snowmelt season and has similar Cl- concentrations as snow (~0

  4. Structure of the 1906 near-surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault, San Francisco Peninsula segment, near Woodside, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, C.M.; Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Grove, Karen; Goldman, M.R.

    2016-07-08

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and refraction images of the 1906 surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault near Woodside, California reveal evidence for one or more additional near-surface (within about 3 meters [m] depth) fault strands within about 25 m of the 1906 surface rupture. The 1906 surface rupture above the groundwater table (vadose zone) has been observed in paleoseismic trenches that coincide with our seismic profile and is seismically characterized by a discrete zone of low P-wave velocities (Vp), low S-wave velocities (Vs), high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios. A second near-surface fault strand, located about 17 m to the southwest of the 1906 surface rupture, is inferred by similar seismic anomalies. Between these two near-surface fault strands and below 5 m depth, we observed a near-vertical fault strand characterized by a zone of high Vp, low Vs, high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios on refraction tomography images and near-vertical diffractions on seismic-reflection images. This prominent subsurface zone of seismic anomalies is laterally offset from the 1906 surface rupture by about 8 m and likely represents the active main (long-term) strand of the San Andreas Fault at 5 to 10 m depth. Geometries of the near-surface and subsurface (about 5 to 10 m depth) fault zone suggest that the 1906 surface rupture dips southwestward to join the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at about 5 to 10 m below the surface. The 1906 surface rupture forms a prominent groundwater barrier in the upper 3 to 5 m, but our interpreted secondary near-surface fault strand to the southwest forms a weaker barrier, suggesting that there has been less or less-recent near-surface slip on that strand. At about 6 m depth, the main strand of the San Andreas Fault consists of water-saturated blue clay (collected from a hand-augered borehole), which is similar to deeply weathered serpentinite observed within the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at

  5. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Barr, J.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Repasky, K.S.; Lewicki, J.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, T.; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Wielopolski, L.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-10-20

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  6. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Nehrir, A.R.; Humphries, S.D.; Keith, C.J.; Shaw, J.A.; Rouse, J.H.; Cunningham, A.B.; Benson, S.M.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.W.; Diehl, J.R.; Strazisar, B.R.; Fessenden, J.E.; Rahn, T.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Barr, J.L.; Pickles, W.L.; Jacobson, J.D.; Silver, E.A.; Male, E.J.; Rauch, H.W.; Gullickson, K.S.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2010-01-01

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 The Author(s).

  7. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, L.H.; Wielopolski, L.; Dobeck, L. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Humphries, S. D.; Barr, J. L.; Keith, C. J.; Shaw, J. A.; Rouse, J. H.; Cunningham, A. B.; Benson, S. M.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Lewicki, J. L.; Wells, A. W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, B. R.; Fessenden, J. E.; Rahn, T. A.; Amonette, J. E.; Barr, J. L.; Pickles, W. L.; Jacobson, J. D.; Silver, E. A.; Male, E. J.; Rauch, H. W.; Gullickson, K. S.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.

    2010-03-01

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO{sub 2} transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO{sub 2} release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO{sub 2} transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO{sub 2} from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U.S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO{sub 2} through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  8. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, Lee H. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Dobeck, Laura M. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Repasky, Kevin S. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Nehrir, Amin R. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Humphries, Seth D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Barr, Jamie L. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Keith, Charlie J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Shaw, Joseph A. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Rouse, Joshua H. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Cunningham, Alfred B. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Benson, Sally M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Global Climate and Energy Project; Oldenburg, Curtis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Lewicki, Jennifer L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Wells, Arthur W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Diehl, J. Rodney [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Strazisar, Brian R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Fessenden, Julianna E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Div. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Rahn, Thom A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Div. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Amonette, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barr, Jon L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pickles, William L. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Jacobson, James D. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Silver, Eli A. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Male, Erin J. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Earth and Planetary Sciences; Rauch, Henry W. [Univ. of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography; Gullickson, Kadie S. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Trautz, Robert [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Kharaka, Yousif [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Wielopolski, Lucien [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2010-03-01

    A controlled field pilot has been developed in Bozeman, Montana, USA, to study near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. A slotted horizontal well divided into six zones was installed in the shallow subsurface. The scale and CO2 release rates were chosen to be relevant to developing monitoring strategies for geological carbon storage. The field site was characterized before injection, and CO2 transport and concentrations in saturated soil and the vadose zone were modeled. Controlled releases of CO2 from the horizontal well were performed in the summers of 2007 and 2008, and collaborators from six national labs, three universities, and the U. S. Geological Survey investigated movement of CO2 through the soil, water, plants, and air with a wide range of near surface detection techniques. An overview of these results will be presented.

  9. Bayesian belief network for CO2 leak detection by near-surface flux rates for CO2 and perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Small, M. J.; Ogretim, E.; Gray, D. D.; Bromhal, G. S.; Strazisar, B. R.; Wells, A. W.

    2010-12-01

    To incorporate the use of multiple geologic sequestration monitoring techniques, a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) for leak detection inference is applied to integrate the information provided by different techniques deployed at a site. In this study, two monitoring methods, near-surface soil CO2 flux and perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracer concentration, are included in the BBN. First, possible near-surface flux rates for CO2 and PFC tracer as a function of distance from a leakage point are simulated by TOUGH2, given different leakage rates and permeabilities. Then, the natural near-surface CO2 flux and background PFC tracer concentration measured at the Zero Emission Research and Technology (ZERT) site are used to determine critical values for leak inference and to calculate the probabilities of leak detection given a monitoring network. A BBN of leak detection is established by combing the TOUGH2 simulations and the background characterization of near-surface CO2 flux and PFC tracer at the sequestration site. The results show a positive correlation between the detection abilities of PFC tracer and soil CO2 flux, but the PFC tracer is more sensitive for detecting a leak in most cases. The BBN of leak detection including both soil CO2 flux and PFC tracer concentration gives an integrated probability estimation of leak detection for different permeability and leakage rates for a given monitoring network. A BBN developed using the proposed methodology can be used to help site engineers and decision makers to evaluate leakage signals and the risk of undetected leakage, given a suite of monitoring techniques and site conditions.

  10. Modeling near-surface firn temperature in a cold accumulation zone (Col du Dôme, French Alps): from a physical to a semi-parameterized approach

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the thermal regime of glaciers is crucial for glacier hazard assessment, especially in the context of a changing climate. In particular, the transient thermal regime of cold accumulation zones needs to be modeled. A modeling approach has therefore been developed to determine this thermal regime using only near-surface boundary conditions coming from meteorological observations. In the first step, a surface energy balance (SEB) model accounting for water percolation and radiation p...

  11. Near-surface mapping using SH-wave and P-wave seismic land-streamer data acquisition in Illinois, U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugin, Andre J.M.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; McBride, J.H.; Bexfield, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    SH-wave and P-wave high-resolution seismic reflection combined with land-streamer technology provide 3D regional maps of geologic formations that can be associated with aquifers and aquitards. Examples for three study areas are considered to demonstrate this. In these areas, reflection profiling detected near-surface faulting and mapped a buried glacial valley and its aquifers in two settings. The resulting seismic data can be used directly to constrain hydrogeologic modeling of shallow aquifers.

  12. Characterizing near-surface firn from the scattered signal component of glacier surface reflections detected in airborne radio-echo sounding measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, A.; Grima, C.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Cawkwell, F.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    With recent summer warming, surface melt on Canadian Arctic ice caps has intensified and extended to higher elevations in ice cap accumulation areas. Consequently, more meltwater percolates into the near-surface firn, and refreezes as ice layers where firn temperatures are below freezing. This process can increase firn densification rates, causing a lowering of the glacier surface height even in the absence of mass changes. Thus, knowledge of spatio-temporal variations in the near-surface firn stratigraphy is important for interpreting altimetrically-derived estimates of ice cap mass balance. We investigate the use of the scattering signal component of glacier surface reflections in airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) measurements to characterize the near-surface firn stratigraphy. The scattering signal distribution over Devon Ice Cap is compared to firn stratigraphy derived from ground-based radar data. We identify three distinct firn facies zones at different elevation ranges. The scattered signal component changes significantly between the different firn facies zones: low scattering correlates to laterally homogeneous firn containing thin, flat and continuous ice layers at elevations above 1800 m and below 1200 m, where firn consists mainly of ice. Higher scattering values are found from 1200-1800 m where the firn contains discrete, undulating ice layers. No correlation was found between the scattering component and surface roughness. Modelled scattering values for the measured roughness were significantly less than the observed values, and did not reproduce their observed spatial distribution. This indicates that the scattering component is determined mainly by the structure of near-surface firn. Our results suggest that the scattering component of surface reflections from airborne RES measurements has potential for characterizing heterogeneity in the spatial structure of firn that is affected by melting and refreezing processes.

  13. Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS): Imagery of near-surface phytoplankton pigment concentrations from the first coastal ocean dynamics experiment (CODE-1), March - July 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, M. R.; Zion, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the first Coastal Ocean Dynamics Experiment, images of ocean color were collected from late March until late July, 1981, by the Coastal Zone Color Scanner aboard Nimbus-7. Images that had sufficient cloud-free area to be of interest were processed to yield near-surface phytoplankton pigment concentrations. These images were then remapped to a fixed equal-area grid. This report contains photographs of the digital images and a brief description of the processing methods.

  14. Application of 2D electrical resistivity imaging and cone penetration test (CPT) to assess the harzadous effect of near surface water on foundations in Lagos Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoyin, O. O.; Joshua, E. O.; Akinyemi, M. L.; Omeje, M.; Joel, E. S.

    2017-05-01

    Adequate information on the condition of the subsurface is very important for site evaluation for engineering purposes. In this study two dimensional (2D) geoelectrical resistivity survey and cone penetration tests were conducted to study the hazardous effect of excess near surface water on the foundation of building in a reclaimed land located at Victoria Island area of Lagos State. The results of the inverted 2D geoelectrical resistivity data revealed three distinct geoelectrical layers characterized by low to moderate electrical resistivity of 2.23 and 129Ωm and 9.46 to 636Ωm respectively. The topsoil is characterized by wet sandy soil, which is underlain by sandy clay and banded at the below by a geologic formation of low resistivity which is suspected to be clay. The clay material may be responsible for the excess water retention observed in the area. The CPT method on the other hand revealed a geological formation of low resistance to penetration between 2-3 kg/cm2 from the topsoil to a depth of 7 m, which may be the effect of excess water in the near surface. This study revealed that the foundation of building may not be founded directly on the soil in any reclaimed land as this may result in collapse as a result of upward migration of water to the near surface.

  15. Three-dimensional soil moisture profile retrieval by assimilation of near-surface measurements: Simplified Kalman filter covariance forecasting and field application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jeffrey P.; Willgoose, Garry R.; Kalma, Jetse D.

    2002-12-01

    The Kalman filter data assimilation technique is applied to a distributed three-dimensional soil moisture model for retrieval of the soil moisture profile in a 6 ha catchment using near-surface soil moisture measurements. A simplified Kalman filter covariance forecasting methodology is developed based on forecasting of the state correlations and imposed state variances. This covariance forecasting technique, termed the modified Kalman filter, was then used in a 1 month three-dimensional field application. Two updating scenarios were tested: (1) updating every 2 to 3 days and (2) a single update. The data used were from the Nerrigundah field site, near Newcastle, Australia. This study demonstrates the feasibility of data assimilation in a quasi three-dimensional distributed soil moisture model, provided simplified covariance forecasting techniques are used. It also identifies that (1) the soil moisture profile cannot be retrieved from near-surface soil moisture measurements when the near-surface and deep soil layers become decoupled, such as during extreme drying events; (2) if simulation of the soil moisture profile is already good, the assimilation can result in a slight degradation, but if the simulation is poor, assimilation can yield a significant improvement; (3) soil moisture profile retrieval results are independent of initial conditions; and (4) the required update frequency is a function of the errors in model physics and forcing data.

  16. Climate of the Greenland ice sheet using a high-resolution climate model – Part 2: Near-surface climate and energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ettema

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface climate of the Greenland ice sheet is characterized by persistent katabatic winds and quasi-permanent temperature deficit. Using a high resolution (11 km regional climate model allows for detailed study of the spatial variability in these phenomena and the underlying atmospheric processes.

    The near-surface temperature distribution over the ice sheet is clearly affected by elevation, latitude, large scale advection, meso-scale topographic features and the occurrence of summer melt. The lowest annual temperatures of −30.5 °C are found north of the highest elevations of the GrIS, whereas the lowest southern margins are warmest (−3.5 °C.

    Over the ice sheet, a persistent katabatic wind system develops due to radiative surface cooling and the gently slope of the surface. The strongest wind speeds are seen in the northeast where the strong large scale winds, low cloud cover and concave surface force a continuous supply of cold air, which enhances the katabatic forcing. The radiative cooling of the surface is controlled by the net longwave emission and transport of heat towards the surface by turbulence. In summer this mechanism is much weaker, leading to less horizontal variability in near-surface temperatures and wind speed.

  17. Regulatory review and confidence building in post-closure safety assessments and safety cases for near surface disposal facilities, IAEA ASAM coordinated research project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belfadhel, M.B. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Waste and Geosciences Div., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Benbelfadhelm@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca; Bennett, D.G. [Galson Science Limited, Oakham (United Kingdom); Gonzales, A. [Iberdrola Ingeniera y Consultoria, Madrid (Spain); Metcalf, P. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nys, V. [Association Vincotte Nucleaire, Brussels (Belgium); Simeonov, G. [Nuclear Regulatory Agency, Sofia (Bulgaria); Zeleznik, N. [ARAO-Agency of Radwaste Management, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2006-07-01

    The IAEA successfully concluded a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) called ISAM, which focused on the development of an Improved Safety Assessment Methodology for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (1997-2002). In November 2002, and as an extension of ISAM, the IAEA launched a new CRP called ASAM, designed to test the Application of the Safety Assessment Methodology by considering a range of near surface disposal facilities. The ASAM work programme is being implemented by three application working groups and two cross-cutting working groups. The application working groups are testing the applicability of the ISAM methodology by assessing an existing disposal facility in Hungary, a copper mine in South Africa, and a hypothetical facility containing heterogenous wastes, such as disused sealed sources. The first cross-cutting working group is addressing a number of technical issues that are common to all near-surface disposal facilities, while the second group, the Regulatory Review Working Group (RRWG) is developing guidance on how to gain confidence in safety assessments and safety cases, and on how to conduct regulatory reviews of safety assessments. This paper provides a brief overview of the work being conducted by the Regulatory Review Working Group. (author)

  18. A Hybrid Interpolation for Reconstructing Near-Surface Model%混合插值法重构近地表模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏亦文; 王彦春

    2012-01-01

    When both the number of control points and the size of grid become large, TPS based reconstruction of near-surface model is often very time-consuming. Therefore, such method affects the efficiency of building near-surface model in the static correction. To address this problem, a hybrid interpolation combining TPS with cubic spline interpolation is used for reconstructing near surface model. Firstly, not only recursive LU decomposition but also GPU based LU decomposition is used to solve large linear system of equations. And then, TPS interpolation function is created. Secondly, the grid is rarefied with appropriate steps in the X and Y directions and then, TPS interpolation function is evaluated on the sparse grid. Based on which cubic spline interpolation function is created and then, it calculates the value of the other points. Finally, OpenGL visualizes the 3D near-surface model. The experimental results show that this algorithm speeds up the reconstruction of near-surface model and approximates the TPS interpolation in accuracy.%当控制点多和网格稠密时,基于薄板样条(TPS)插值的近地表模型重构往往很耗时,影响了静校正中近地表建模的效率.针对此问题,采用一种TPS插值和三次样条插值相结合的混合插值法重构近地表模型.首先利用矩阵递归LU分解及GPU加速的LU分解算法求解大型线性方程组,建立TPS插值函数;然后在X和Y方向上使用适当的步长对网格进行抽稀,运用TPS插值函数计算稀疏网格点的值,再通过稀疏网格点建立三次样条插值函数并计算剩余网格点的值;最后用OpenGL实现近地表模型的三维可视化.实验结果表明,文中算法提高了近地表模型重构的速度,其精度接近TPS插值精度.

  19. Femtosecond writing of near-surface waveguides in lithium niobate for low-loss electro-optical modulators of broadband emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukharin, Mikhail A.; Skryabin, Nikolay N.; Khudyakov, Dmitriy V.; Vartapetov, Sergey K.

    2016-05-01

    In the investigation we demonstrated technique of direct femtosecond laser writing of tracks with induced refractive index at record low depth under surface of lithium niobate (3-15 μm). It was shown that with the help of proposed technique one can be written claddings of near surface optical waveguides that plays a key role in fabrication of fast electro-optical modulators with low operating voltage. Fundamental problem resolved in the investigation consists in suppression of negative factors impeding femtosecond inscription of waveguides at low depths. To prevent optical breakdown of crystal surface we used high numerical aperture objectives for focusing of light. It was shown, that advanced heat accumulation regime of femtosecond inscription is inapplicable for writing of near-surface waveguides, and near the surface waveguides should be written in non-thermal regime in contrast to widespread femtosecond writing at depths of tens micrometers. Inscribed waveguides were examined for optical losses and polarization properties. It was experimentally shown, that femtosecond written near surface waveguides have such advantages over widely used proton exchanged and Ti-diffusion waveguides as lower optical losses (down to 0.3 dB/cm) and maintaining of all polarization states of propagation light, which is crucial for development of electro-optical modulators for broadband and ultrashort laser emission. Novelty of the results consists in technique of femtosecond inscription of waveguides at record low depths under the surface of crystals. As compared to previous investigations in the field (structures at depths near 50 um with buried electrodes), the obtained waveguides could be used with simple closely adjacent on-surface electrodes.

  20. Application of a coupled microwave, energy and water transfer model to relate passive microwave emission from bare soils to near-surface water content and evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Simmonds

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the stability of the relation between microwave emission from the soil and the average near-surface water content in the case of relatively smooth, bare soils, and then considers the extent to which microwave radiometry can be used to estimate the effective surface resistance to vapour transfer, which is also related to the near-surface water status. The analysis is based on the use of a model (MICRO-SWEAT which couples a microwave radiative transfer model with a SVAT scheme that describes the exchanges of water vapour, energy and sensible heat at the land surface. Verification of MICRO-SWEAT showed good agreement (about 3K RMSE between predicted L band (1.4 GHz brightness temperature over soils with contrasting texture during a multi-day drydown, and those measured using a truck-mounted radiometer. There was good agreement between the measured and predicted relations between the average water content of the upper 2 cm of the soil profile and the brightness temperature normalised with respect to the radiometric surface temperature. Some of the scatter in this relationship was attributable to diurnal variation in the magnitude of near-surface gradients in temperature and water content, and could be accounted for by using the physically-based simulation model. The influence of soil texture on this relationship was well-simulated using MICRO-SWEAT. The paper concludes by demonstrating how MICRO-SWEAT can be used to establish a relationship between the normalised brightness temperature and the surface resistance for use in the prediction of evaporation using the Penman-Montheith equation.

  1. High-resolution shear-wave seismic reflection as a tool to image near-surface subrosion structures - a case study in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2016-10-01

    Subrosion is the subsurface leaching of soluble rocks that results in the formation of depression and collapse structures. This global phenomenon is a geohazard in urban areas. To study near-surface subrosion structures, four shear-wave seismic reflection profiles, with a total length of ca. 332 m, were carried out around the famous leaning church tower of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany, which shows an inclination of 4.93° from the vertical. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by soluble Permian deposits, and the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault is assumed to be a main pathway for water to leach the evaporite. The seismic profiles were acquired with the horizontal micro-vibrator ELVIS, developed at Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics (LIAG), and a 72 m long landstreamer equipped with 72 horizontal geophones. The high-resolution seismic sections show subrosion-induced structures to a depth of ca. 100 m and reveal five features associated with the leaching of Permian deposits: (1) lateral and vertical varying reflection patterns caused by strongly heterogeneous strata, (2) discontinuous reflectors, small offsets, and faults, which show the underground is heavily fractured, (3) formation of depression structures in the near-surface, (4) diffractions in the unmigrated seismic sections that indicate increased scattering of the seismic waves, and (5) varying seismic velocities and low-velocity zones that are presumably caused by fractures and upward-migrating cavities. A previously undiscovered southward-dipping listric normal fault was also found, to the north of the church. It probably serves as a pathway for water to leach the Permian formations below the church and causes the tilting of the church tower. This case study shows the potential of horizontal shear-wave seismic reflection to image near-surface subrosion structures in an urban environment with a horizontal resolution of less than 1 m in the uppermost 10

  2. An Analysis of Simulated and Observed Global Mean Near-Surface Air Temperature Anomalies from 1979 to 1999: Trends and Attribution of Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, R. M.; Ko, M. K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The 1979 - 1999 response of the climate system to variations in solar spectral irradiance is estimated by comparing the global averaged surface temperature anomalies simulated by a 2D (two dimensional) energy balance climate model to observed temperature anomalies. We perform a multiple regression of southern oscillation index and the individual model responses to solar irradiance variations, stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol loading, stratospheric ozone trends, and greenhouse gases onto each of five near-surface temperature anomaly data sets. We estimate the observed difference in global mean near surface air temperature attributable to the solar irradiance difference between solar maximum and solar minimum to be between 0.06 and 0.11 K, and that 1.1 - 3.8% of the total variance in monthly mean near-surface air temperature data is attributable to nations in solar spectral irradiance. For the five temperature data sets used in our analysis, the trends in raw monthly mean temperature anomaly data have a large range, spanning a factor of 3 from 0.06 to 0.17 K/decade. However. our analysis suggests that trends in monthly temperature anomalies attributable to the combination of greenhouse gas, stratospheric ozone, and tropospheric sulfate aerosol variations are much more consistent among data sets, ranging from 0.16 to 0.24 K/decade. Our model results suggest that roughly half of the warming from greenhouse gases is cancelled by the cooling from changes in stratospheric ozone. Tropospheric sulfate aerosol loading in the present day atmospheric contributes significantly to the net radiative forcing of the present day climate system. However, because the change in magnitude and latitudinal distribution of tropospheric sulfate aerosol has been small over the past 20 years, the change in the direct radiative forcing attributable to changes in aerosol loading over this time is also small.

  3. Inferring near surface soil temperature time series from different land uses to quantify the variation of heat fluxes into a shallow aquifer in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfersberger, Hans; Rock, Gerhard; Draxler, Johannes C.

    2017-09-01

    Different land uses exert a strong spatially distributed and temporal varying signal of heat fluxes from the surface in or out of the ground. In this paper we show an approach to quantify the heat fluxes into a groundwater body differentiating between near surface soil temperatures under grass, forest, asphalt, agriculture and surface water bodies and heat fluxes from subsurface structures like heated basements or sewage pipes. Based on observed time series of near surface soil temperatures we establish individual parameters (e.g. shift, moving average) of a simple empirical function that relates air temperature to soil temperature. This procedure is useful since air temperature time series are readily available and the complex energy flux processes at the soil atmosphere interface do not need to be described in detail. To quantify the heat flux from heated subsurface structures that have lesser depths to the groundwater table the 1D heat conduction module SoilTemp is developed. Based on soil temperature time series observed at different depths in a research lysimeter heat conduction and heat storage capacity values are calibrated disregarding their dependence on the water content. With SoilTemp the strong interaction between time series of groundwater temperature and groundwater level, near surface soil temperatures and the basement temperatures in heated buildings could be evaluated showing the dynamic nature of thermal gradients. The heat fluxes from urban areas are calculated considering the land use patterns within a spatial unit by mixing the heat fluxes from basements with those under grass and asphalt. The heat fluxes from sewage pipes and of sewage leakage are shown to be negligible for evaluated pipe diameters and sewage discharges. The developed methodology will allow to parameterize the upper boundary of heat transport models and to differentiate between the heat fluxes from different surface usages and their dynamics into the subsurface.

  4. Distortion of Near-Surface Seawater Temperature Structure by a Moored-Buoy Hull and Its Effect on Skin Temperature and Heat Flux Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Ando

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that the accuracy of temperature measurements by surface-moored buoys may be affected by distortions of the near-surface temperature structure by the buoy hull on calm, sunny days. We obtained the first definite observational evidence that the temperature near the hull was not horizontally homogeneous at the same nominal depth. We observed large temperature differences of 1.0 K or more between thermometers at 0.2 m depth. The distortion of the surface temperature field yielded an error in estimates of daytime net surface heat flux up to more than 30 Wm–2.

  5. Use of acoustic wave travel-time measurements to probe the near-surface layers of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Osaki, Y.; Shibahashi, H.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The variation of solar p-mode travel times with cyclic frequency nu is shown to provide information on both the radial variation of the acoustic potential and the depth of the effective source of the oscillations. Observed travel-time data for waves with frequency lower than the acoustic cutoff frequency for the solar atmosphere (approximately equals 5.5 mHz) are inverted to yield the local acoustic cutoff frequency nu(sub c) as a function of depth in the outer convection zone and lower atmosphere of the Sun. The data for waves with nu greater than 5.5 mHz are used to show that the source of the p-mode oscillations lies approximately 100 km beneath the base of the photosphere. This depth is deeper than that determined using a standard mixing-length calculation.

  6. Floristic composition and plant succession on near-surface radioactive-waste-disposal facilities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1946, low-level radioactive waste has been buried in shallow landfills within the confines of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Five of these sites were studied for plant composition and successional patterns by reconnaissance and vegetation mapping. The data show a slow rate of recovery for all sites, regardless of age, in both the pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine communities. The sites are not comparable in succession or composition because of location and previous land use. The two oldest sites have the highest species diversity and the only mature trees. All sites allowed to revegetate naturally tend to be colonized by the same species that originally surrounded the sites. Sites on historic fields are colonized by the old field flora, whereas those in areas disturbed only by grazing are revegetated by the local native flora.

  7. Influence of near-surface stratigraphy on coastal landslides at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Lake Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Kayen, R.E.; Cochrane, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Lake-level change and landslides are primary controls on the development of coastal environments along the coast of northeastern Lake Michigan. The late Quaternary geology of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore was examined with high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and boreholes. Based on sequence-stratigraphic principles, this study recognizes ten stratigraphic units and three major unconformities that were formed by late Pleistocene glaciation and postglacial lake-level changes. Locally high sediment supply, and reworking by two regressions and a transgression have produced a complex stratigraphy that is prone to episodic failure. In 1995, a large landslide deposited approximately 1 million m3 of sediment on the lake floor. The highly deformed landslide deposits, up to 18 m thick, extend 3-4 km offshore and unconformably overlie well-stratified glacial and lacustrine sediment. The landslide-prone bluff is underlain by channel-fill deposits that are oriented nearly perpendicular to the shoreline. The paleochannels are at least 10 m deep and 400 m wide and probably represent stream incision during a lake-level lowstand about 10.3 ka B.P. The channels filled with sediment during the subsequent transgression and lake-level highstand, which climaxed about 4.5 ka B.P. As lake level fell from the highstand, the formation of beach ridges and sand dunes sealed off the channel and isolated a small inland lake (Glen Lake), which lies 5 m above the level of Lake Michigan and may be a source of piped groundwater. Our hypothesis is that the paleochannels act as conduits for pore water flow, and thereby locally reduce soil strength and promote slope failure.

  8. Quasi-plane-hypothesis of strain coordination for RC beams seismically strengthened with externally-bonded or near-surface mounted fiber reinforced plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Zeng, Xiantao; Liu, Hanlong; Zhou, Fengjun

    2013-03-01

    The application of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP), including carbon FRP and glass FRP, for structural repair and strengthening has grown due to their numerous advantages over conventional materials such as externally bonded reinforcement (EBR) and near-surface mounted (NSM) strengthening techniques. This paper summarizes the results from 21 reinforced concrete beams strengthened with different methods, including externally-bonded and near-surface mounted FRP, to study the strain coordination of the FRP and steel rebar of the RC beam. Since there is relative slipping between the RC beam and the FRP, the strain of the FRP and steel rebar of the RC beam satisfy the quasi-plane-hypothesis; that is, the strain of the longitudinal fiber that parallels the neutral axis of the plated beam within the scope of the effective height ( h 0) of the cross section is in direct proportion to the distance from the fiber to the neutral axis. The strain of the FRP and steel rebar satisfies the equation: ɛ FRP= βɛ steel, and the value of β is equal to 1.1-1.3 according to the test results.

  9. Complementary modelling of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Grandia, Fidel; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2008-10-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) is conducting a comprehensive geoscientific characterization of two alternative sites to allocate a deep geological repository of high level nuclear waste. The Site Characterization Program also includes the near-surface systems, which are expected to constitute the last geological barrier between the repository system and the earth's surface. The evaluation of the retention capacity of the near surface systems is, therefore, very relevant for the site characterization program. From the geological point of view, near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits that overlay a granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the most abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit (approx75% of surface extension) and the remainder is made up of clayey materials (glacial and post-glacial clays). These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time scale considered in this work, is calcium carbonate (calcite). This mineral is found along with clay minerals (e.g. illite) and Fe(III) hydroxides. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with minor amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich levels (gyttja) which can promote reducing conditions in the system. The assessment of the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark was developed in an earlier work, that focused on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is an improvement of the geochemical conceptual and numerical model already presented, based on data available in the Site Descriptive Model v 1.2 (Forsmark). Regarding the geochemical variability of the Quaternary deposits present at Forsmark and its implications on radionuclide mobility through the near-surface systems, a

  10. Sensitivity of June Near-Surface Temperatures and Precipitation in the Eastern United States to Historical Land Cover Changes Since European Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, John E.; Pielke, Roger A.; Steyaert, Louis T.; Knox, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Land cover changes alter the near surface weather and climate. Changes in land surface properties such as albedo, roughness length, stomatal resistance, and leaf area index alter the surface energy balance, leading to differences in near surface temperatures. This study utilized a newly developed land cover data set for the eastern United States to examine the influence of historical land cover change on June temperatures and precipitation. The new data set contains representations of the land cover and associated biophysical parameters for 1650, 1850, 1920, and 1992, capturing the clearing of the forest and the expansion of agriculture over the eastern United States from 1650 to the early twentieth century and the subsequent forest regrowth. The data set also includes the inferred distribution of potentially water-saturated soils at each time slice for use in the sensitivity tests. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System, equipped with the Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere Feedback (LEAF-2) land surface parameterization, was used to simulate the weather of June 1996 using the 1992, 1920, 1850, and 1650 land cover representations. The results suggest that changes in surface roughness and stomatal resistance have caused present-day maximum and minimum temperatures in the eastern United States to warm by about 0.3 C and 0.4 C, respectively, when compared to values in 1650. In contrast, the maximum temperatures have remained about the same, while the minimums have cooled by about 0.1 C when compared to 1920. Little change in precipitation was found.

  11. Formation of recent gullies and debris-flows on Mars by the melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, F.; Costard, F.; Mangold, N.; Peulvast, J.-P.

    2001-11-01

    The observation of small gullies associated with recent surface run-off on Mars by Mars Global Surveyor has renewed the question of liquid water stability at the surface of Mars. In their initial analyses, Malin and Edgett [1] suggested that the gullies could be formed by groundwater seepage from underground aquifers. However, observations of gullies originating from the top of peaks question this scenario. We show here that these landforms are more likely to result from the melting of liquid water in the first meter of the Martian subsurface at high obliquity. On the one hand, this is suggested by the analogy between the martian gullies and terrestrial debris flows observed in Greenland which are known to result from the thawing of near-surface ground when above-freezing temperatures are reached. On the other hand, numerical simulations show that above-freezing temperatures can occur at high obliquities in the near-surface of Mars, and that such temperatures are only predicted at latitudes and for slope orientations corresponding exactly to where the gullies have been observed on Mars. [1] Malin M.C. and Edgett K.E. Science 288, 2330-2335 (2000).

  12. Age-Orientation Relationships of Northern Hemisphere Martian Gullies and "Pasted-on" Mantling Unit: Implications for Near-Surface Water Migration in Mars' Recent History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N. T.; Lackner, C. N.

    2005-01-01

    The finding of abundant, apparently young, Martian gullies with morphologies indicative of formation by flowing fluid was surprising in that volumes of near-surface liquid water in sufficient quantities to modify the surface geology were not thought possible under current conditions. Original hypotheses on origin of gullies were mostly centered on groundwater seepage and surface runoff and melting of near-surface ground ice. More recently, melting of snow deposited in periods of higher obliquity has been proposed as a possible origin of the gullies. Tied to this hypothesis is the supposition that the "pasted-on" mantling unit observed in association with many gullies is composed of remnant snowpack. The mantling unit has distinct rounded edge on its upper boundary and exhibits features suggestive of flow noted that the uppermost part of the mantle marks where gullies begin, suggesting that the source of water for the gullies was within the mantle. The mantle is found preferentially on cold, pole-facing slopes and, where mantled and non-mantled slopes are found together, gullies are observed incised into the latter. In other cases, the mantling material lacks gullies.

  13. Sensitivity of June Near-Surface Temperatures and Precipitation in the Eastern United States to Historical Land Cover Changes Since European Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, John E.; Pielke, Roger A.; Steyaert, Louis T.; Knox, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Land cover changes alter the near surface weather and climate. Changes in land surface properties such as albedo, roughness length, stomatal resistance, and leaf area index alter the surface energy balance, leading to differences in near surface temperatures. This study utilized a newly developed land cover data set for the eastern United States to examine the influence of historical land cover change on June temperatures and precipitation. The new data set contains representations of the land cover and associated biophysical parameters for 1650, 1850, 1920, and 1992, capturing the clearing of the forest and the expansion of agriculture over the eastern United States from 1650 to the early twentieth century and the subsequent forest regrowth. The data set also includes the inferred distribution of potentially water-saturated soils at each time slice for use in the sensitivity tests. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System, equipped with the Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere Feedback (LEAF-2) land surface parameterization, was used to simulate the weather of June 1996 using the 1992, 1920, 1850, and 1650 land cover representations. The results suggest that changes in surface roughness and stomatal resistance have caused present-day maximum and minimum temperatures in the eastern United States to warm by about 0.3 C and 0.4 C, respectively, when compared to values in 1650. In contrast, the maximum temperatures have remained about the same, while the minimums have cooled by about 0.1 C when compared to 1920. Little change in precipitation was found.

  14. Climate of the Greenland ice sheet using a high-resolution climate model – Part 2: Near-surface climate and energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ettema

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of near-surface variables and surface energy balance components over the Greenland ice sheet are presented, using the output of a regional atmospheric climate model for the period 1958–2008. The model was evaluated in Part 1 of this paper.

    The near-surface temperature over the ice sheet is affected by surface elevation, latitude, longitude, large-scale and small-scale advection, occurrence of summer melt and mesoscale topographical features. The atmospheric boundary layer is characterised by a strong temperature inversion, due to continuous longwave cooling of the surface. In combination with a gently sloping surface the radiative loss maintains a persistent katabatic wind. This radiative heat loss is mainly balanced by turbulent sensible heat transport towards the surface. In summer, the surface is near radiative balance, resulting in lower wind speeds. Absorption of shortwave radiation and a positive subsurface heat flux due to refreezing melt water are heat sources for surface sublimation and melt.

    The strongest temperature deficits (>13 °C are found on the northeastern slopes, where the strongest katabatic winds (>9 m s−1 and lowest relative humidity (<65% occur. Due to strong large scale winds, clear sky (cloud cover <0.5 and a concave surface, a continuous supply of cold dry air is generated, which enhances the katabatic forcing and suppresses subsidence of potentially warmer free atmosphere air.

  15. Estimation of high-resolution near-surface freeze/thaw state by the integration of microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing data on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianjie; Shi, Jiancheng; Hu, Tongxi; Zhao, Lin; Zou, Defu; Wang, Tianxing; Ji, Dabin; Li, Rui; Wang, Pingkai

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate how the complementarity between microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing can be exploited for a high-resolution near-surface freeze/thaw state estimation. The basic idea is to establish a feasible relationship between the microwave-derived freeze/thaw state and thermal infrared observations. A quantitative freeze/thaw index from microwave observations at 18.7 and 36.5 GHz is innovatively defined and is assumed to be linearly correlated with land surface temperature from thermal infrared observations. Thus, a linear regression method is proposed and verified to be effective over a multiscale network of Naqu of the Tibetan Plateau. In order to demonstrate the potentiality of the proposed method, it is implemented in the entire Tibetan Plateau. It is found that the linear relationship is quite reliable for most areas and can obtain a high-resolution near-surface soil freeze/thaw state with integrated information from microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing. The validation of the high-resolution freeze/thaw state against soil temperature measured at active layer monitoring sites along the Qinghai-Tibet Highway illustrates a moderate accuracy over a decade scale. This study provides new insights for high-resolution freeze/thaw mapping beyond the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission.

  16. Asymmetry in generation of near-surface X-rays by 33 MeV electrons at grazing interaction with a thin Si plate in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplin, V.V., E-mail: kaplin@tpu.ru

    2015-07-15

    Recently observed effect of an asymmetry in X-ray generation by 33 MeV electrons in a 50 μm Si plate oriented along an internal beam of a betatron is described. The evolution of angular patterns formed by the X-rays generated in the Si plate having a length of 4 mm along the electron beam direction, when changing the plate orientation relative to the electron beam, is presented. The experimental results showed for the first time preferential generation of X-rays on the Si plate surface, which was external with respect to the center of the accelerator. At grazing incidence of electrons on this surface the radiation was emitted along the Si plate surface in the cone, which was several times narrower than the cone of ordinary bremsstrahlung emitted along electron beam direction. At grazing interaction of electrons with the internal Si plate surface facing towards the center of the accelerator, the generation of the near-surface radiation was not observed. It is supposed that the presence of the magnetic field of accelerator is decisive for the formation of the observed effect of asymmetry in X-ray generation by electrons in the long Si plate because of possible realization on external plate surface a “magneto-crystalline undulator” regime of near-surface electron motion.

  17. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

    2010-03-01

    A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

  18. Ray-tracing traveltime tomography versus wave-equation traveltime inversion for near-surface seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-05-11

    Full-waveform inversion of land seismic data tends to get stuck in a local minimum associated with the waveform misfit function. This problem can be partly mitigated by using an initial velocity model that is close to the true velocity model. This initial starting model can be obtained by inverting traveltimes with ray-tracing traveltime tomography (RT) or wave-equation traveltime (WT) inversion. We have found that WT can provide a more accurate tomogram than RT by inverting the first-arrival traveltimes, and empirical tests suggest that RT is more sensitive to the additive noise in the input data than WT. We present two examples of applying WT and RT to land seismic data acquired in western Saudi Arabia. One of the seismic experiments investigated the water-table depth, and the other one attempted to detect the location of a buried fault. The seismic land data were inverted by WT and RT to generate the P-velocity tomograms, from which we can clearly identify the water table depth along the seismic survey line in the first example and the fault location in the second example.

  19. The relationship of near-surface active faulting to megathrust splay fault geometry in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Northrup, C.; Pratt, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    We interpret regionally extensive, active faults beneath Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, to be structurally linked to deeper megathrust splay faults, such as the one that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Western PWS in particular is unique; the locations of active faulting offer insights into the transition at the southern terminus of the previously subducted Yakutat slab to Pacific plate subduction. Newly acquired high-resolution, marine seismic data show three seismic facies related to Holocene and older Quaternary to Tertiary strata. These sediments are cut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of megathrust splay. Crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A distinct boundary coinciding beneath the Hinchinbrook Entrance causes a systematic fault trend change from N30E in southwestern PWS to N70E in northeastern PWS. The fault trend change underneath Hinchinbrook Entrance may occur gradually or abruptly and there is evidence for similar deformation near the Montague Strait Entrance. Landward of surface expressions of the splay fault, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes. Surface exposures of Tertiary rocks throughout PWS along with new apatite-helium dates suggest long-term and regional uplift with localized, fault-controlled subsidence.

  20. Ecological controls on N2O emission in surface litter and near-surface soil of a managed grassland: modelling and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Robert F.; Neftel, Albrecht; Calanca, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    Large variability in N2O emissions from managed grasslands may occur because most emissions originate in surface litter or near-surface soil where variability in soil water content (θ) and temperature (Ts) is greatest. To determine whether temporal variability in θ and Ts of surface litter and near-surface soil could explain this in N2O emissions, a simulation experiment was conducted with ecosys, a comprehensive mathematical model of terrestrial ecosystems in which processes governing N2O emissions were represented at high temporal and spatial resolution. Model performance was verified by comparing N2O emissions, CO2 and energy exchange, and θ and Ts modelled by ecosys with those measured by automated chambers, eddy covariance (EC) and soil sensors on an hourly timescale during several emission events from 2004 to 2009 in an intensively managed pasture at Oensingen, Switzerland. Both modelled and measured events were induced by precipitation following harvesting and subsequent fertilizing or manuring. These events were brief (2-5 days) with maximum N2O effluxes that varied from Nm-2h-1 in early spring and autumn to > 3 mgNm-2h-1 in summer. Only very small emissions were modelled or measured outside these events. In the model, emissions were generated almost entirely in surface litter or near-surface (0-2 cm) soil, at rates driven by N availability with fertilization vs. N uptake with grassland regrowth and by O2 supply controlled by litter and soil wetting relative to O2 demand from microbial respiration. In the model, NOx availability relative to O2 limitation governed both the reduction of more oxidized electron acceptors to N2O and the reduction of N2O to N2, so that the magnitude of N2O emissions was not simply related to surface and near-surface θ and Ts. Modelled N2O emissions were found to be sensitive to defoliation intensity and timing which controlled plant N uptake and soil θ and Ts prior to and during emission events. Reducing leaf area index (LAI

  1. Evolution of the Near-surface Flows Inferred from High-resolution Ring-diagram Analysis of HMI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Richard S.; Baldner, Charles; Basu, Sarbani

    2014-06-01

    Ring-diagram analysis of acoustic waves observed at the photosphere provides in principle a relatively robust determination of the sub-surface flows at a particular time under a particular region. The depth of penetration of the waves is related to the size of the region, hence the depth extent of the measured flows is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. Most ring-analysis has focused on regions of extent ~15 deg (200 Mm) or more in order to provide reasonable mode sets for inversions. The HMI analysis pipeline however also provides a set of ring fit parameters on a scale three times smaller. These provide flow estimates for the outer 1% (7 Mm) of the Sun only, with very limited depth resolution, but with spatial resolution adequate to map structures.potentially associated with the belts and regions of magnetic activity. There are a number of systematic effects affecting the determination of flows from local helioseismic analysis of regions over different parts of the observable disc, not all well-understood. In this study we characterize those systematic effects with higher spatial resolution. This enable us to remove them more effectively as we map the temporal and spatial evolution of the flows, leaving open the question of their mean structure which is most affected by the systematics. We present results for the ring-diagram determination of the flow anomalies corresponding to the torsional oscillation pattern in differential rotation and analogous patterns in the meridional cell structure over the early part of the current solar cycle observed by HMI.

  2. Near-Surface Plasma Characterization of the 12.5-kW NASA TDU1 Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani

    2015-01-01

    To advance the state-of-the-art in Hall thruster technology, NASA is developing a 12.5-kW, high-specific-impulse, high-throughput thruster for the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission. In order to meet the demanding lifetime requirements of potential missions such as the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission, magnetic shielding was incorporated into the thruster design. Two units of the resulting thruster, called the Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS), were fabricated and are presently being characterized. The first of these units, designated the Technology Development Unit 1 (TDU1), has undergone extensive performance and thermal characterization at NASA Glenn Research Center. A preliminary lifetime assessment was conducted by characterizing the degree of magnetic shielding within the thruster. This characterization was accomplished by placing eight flush-mounted Langmuir probes within each discharge channel wall and measuring the local plasma potential and electron temperature at various axial locations. Measured properties indicate a high degree of magnetic shielding across the throttle table, with plasma potential variations along each channel wall being less than or equal to 5 eV and electron temperatures being maintained at less than or equal to 5 eV, even at 800 V discharge voltage near the thruster exit plane. These properties indicate that ion impact energies within the HERMeS will not exceed 26 eV, which is below the expected sputtering threshold energy for boron nitride. Parametric studies that varied the facility backpressure and magnetic field strength at 300 V, 9.4 kW, illustrate that the plasma potential and electron temperature are insensitive to these parameters, with shielding being maintained at facility pressures 3X higher and magnetic field strengths 2.5X higher than nominal conditions. Overall, the preliminary lifetime assessment indicates a high degree of shielding within the HERMeS TDU1, effectively

  3. Evaluation of representativeness of near-surface winds in station measurements, global and regional reanalysis for Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Frank; Kaiser-Weiss, Andrea K.; Heene, Vera; Borsche, Michael; Keller, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Within the preparation activities for a European COPERNICUS Climate Change Service (C3S) several ongoing research projects analyse the potential of global and regional model-based climate reanalyses for applications. A user survey in the FP7-project CORE-CLIMAX revealed that surface wind (10 m) is among the most frequently used parameters of global reanalysis products. The FP7 project UERRA (Uncertainties in Ensembles of Regional Re-Analysis) has the focus on regional European reanalysis and the associated uncertainties, also from a user perspective. Especially in the field of renewable energy planning and production there is a need for climatological information across all spatial scales, i.e., from climatology at a certain site to the spatial scale of national or continental renewable energy production. Here, we focus on a comparison of wind measurements of the Germany's meteorological service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) with global reanalyses of ECWMF and a regional reanalysis for Europe based on DWD's NWP-model COSMO (performed by the Hans-Ertel-Center for Weather Research, University of Bonn). Reanalyses can provide valuable additional information on larger scale variability, e.g. multi-annual variation over Germany. However, changes in the observing system, model errors and biases have to be carefully considered. On the other hand, the ground-based observation networks partly suffer from change of the station distribution, changes in instrumentation, measurements procedures and quality control as well as local changes which might modify their spatial representativeness. All these effects might often been unknown or hard to characterize, although plenty of the meta-data information has been recorded for the German stations. One focus of the presentation will be the added-value of the regional reanalysis.

  4. Near-Surface Investigation of Groundwater Contamination in the Regolith Aquifer of Palladan, Zaria using Borehole log and Tomography Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Jegede

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Two geophysical Tomography techniques- Electrical resistivity and Seismic refraction were used to investigate the subsurface of a potentially polluted dumpsite in Palladan a densely populated area of Zaria, with a view to examining the possible subsurface distribution of groundwater contamination plume. The presence of domestic wells in the residences of the people which are distances 10.0 to 30.0 m from the dump facilitated analysis of water chemistry to enhance the geophysical interpretation. The groundwater level in the dumpsite site was found to be higher than the surrounding area, thereby creating a local deviation from the regional groundwater flow. Due to this the contaminants from the waste site spread out in the nearby soil and groundwater. The resistivity models clearly show a top layer of about 10.0 m thickness with low resistivity, whereas the resistivity has an inverse correlation with distance from the waste disposal site. Bore hole log shows that the top upper 10.0 m of soil consists of loose permeable laterite with high water content followed by a layer of degraded sand before the weathered basement which suggests the possibility of the contamination penetrating deeper into the regolith aquifer. This agrees with the result of the water chemistry analysis which shows elevation in concentration of contaminants above the WHO guidelines. The borehole log also indicated the presence of fracture basement at a depth of 23.0 m this correlated well with the Seismic refraction result. The study therefore suggests that these fractures also facilitate the migration of the contaminants. Based on the combined results, the contamination plume seems to have migrated not less than 500.0 m in the southern direction which is also the direction of hydraulic gradient.

  5. Near-surface temperature profiles collected from an Arctic Wave Glider (AWG) near the Arctic ice-edge in the Beaufort Sea from July 29, 2011 to September 23, 2011 (NODC Accession 0088841)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in the attached files are near-surface temperature profiles collected by an Arctic Wave Glider (AWG) from July 29-Sept 23, 2011. Temperatures were collected...

  6. The Importance of Baseline Surveys of Near-Surface Gas Geochemistry for CCS Monitoring, as Shown from Onshore Case Studies in Northern and Southern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaubien Stan E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of the integrity of onshore geological carbon capture and storage projects will require an approach that integrates various methods with different spatial and temporal resolutions. One method proven to be quite effective for site assessment, leakage monitoring, and leakage verification is near-surface gas geochemistry, which includes soil gas concentration and gas flux measurements. Anomalous concentrations or fluxes, relative to the natural background values, can indicate the potential occurrence of a leak. However the natural background can be quite variable, especially for CO2, due to biological production and accumulation in the soil that changes as a function of soil type, land use, geology, temperature, water content, and various other parameters. To better understand how these parameters influence natural, near-surface background values, and to examine the potential of different sampling strategies as a function of the survey goals, this paper reports results from two highly different case studies, one from northern Europe (Voulund, Denmark and one from southern Europe (Sulcis, Sardinia, Italy. The small Voulund site, with its homogeneous soil, climate, and topography, was surveyed twice (in fall and in spring within the EU-funded SiteChar project to examine the effects of different land use practices and seasons on baseline values. Forested land was found to have lower CO2 concentrations during both campaigns compared to cultivated and heath land, and higher CH4 values during the spring sampling campaign. Continuous monitoring probes showed much more detail, highlighting seasonal changes in soil gas CO2 concentrations linked primarily to temperature variations. The much larger Sulcis site, studied within an ENEA-funded project on potential CO2-ECBM (Enhanced Coal Bed Methane deployment, was surveyed at the regional scale and on detailed grids and transects for site assessment purposes. Despite the completely different soil

  7. Characterization of radar (GPR) signatures and physical properties of a near-surface granular stratigraphy in the Valley of Queretaro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerca, M.; Carreon-Freyre, D.

    2007-05-01

    Coupled use of GPR surveying with three different frequencies (300, 900, and 2000 MHz) and physical attributes determinations in a granular near-surface sequence gives insights into the effects of water content and type to the velocity of EM wave propagation (permittivity). Using known depth reflectors in the estimation of velocities for each frequency allowed obtaining vertical differences in velocity. Characteristic radar signatures were obtained for each of the 5 layers composing the horizontally stratified near-surface sequence studied. The sequence is composed of a cover of organic (0 - 0.5 m) and carbonated (0.5 - 1.0 m) soils over a pyroclastic (1 - 4.5 m), sandy gravel (4.5 - 5.6 m), silty sand (5.6 - 7.5 m), and welded tuff (7.5 - ? m). Selected physical attributes measured in detail each 15 cm of the sequence included grain size, relative strength, bulk dry density, water content (gravimetric and volumetric), specific density, and electrical conductivity. The correlation of physical properties with radargrams show the potential of GPR for characterizing layers with a similar set of interrelated physical attributes. However, the analysis of radar signatures assumes a certain degree of homogeneity in the attributes of a layer and the record of certain attributes depends, at least partially, of the frequency. For instance, small voids at the base of the carbonate soil were recorded as air wave hyperboles only with the 900 MHz frequency. Since no significant water content contrasts are observed in the sequence, the difference in the estimation of velocities of propagation from water content measurements using the Topp equation and the velocities obtained with the known reflector method can be associated to the contribution of dielectric losses. Thus, any model representing the bulk permittivity of clay bearing sequences should consider the effects of conductive losses. In our case, these effects can be related to the presence of different clay materials that

  8. Coil response inversion for very early time modelling of helicopter-borne time-domain electromagnetic data and mapping of near-surface geological layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schamper, Cyril Noel Clarence; Auken, Esben; Sørensen, Kurt Ingvard K.I.

    2014-01-01

    by the geometry of the transmitter loop, we denote it the 'Coil Response'. The modelling of a helicopter-borne time-domain system by an equivalent electronic circuit shows that the time decay of the coil response remains identical whatever the position of the receiver loop, which is confirmed by field......Very early times in the order of 2-3 μs from the end of the turn-off ramp for time-domain electromagnetic systems are crucial for obtaining a detailed resolution of the near-surface geology in the depth interval 0-20 m. For transient electromagnetic systems working in the off time, an electric...... current is abruptly turned off in a large transmitter loop causing a secondary electromagnetic field to be generated by the eddy currents induced in the ground. Often, however, there is still a residual primary field generated by remaining slowly decaying currents in the transmitter loop. The decay...

  9. Effect of the applied potential of the near surface microstructure of a 316L steel submitted to tribocorrosion in sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favero, M [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Stadelmann, P [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Mischler, S [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-08-07

    The tribocorrosion behaviour of a 316L austenitic stainless steel sliding against alumina was investigated under electrochemical control in sulfuric acid using a tribometer with a ball on flat configuration. Tests were conducted by applying either a passive potential (metal covered by an oxide film) or a cathodic potential (no passive film, negligible corrosion) to the steel. Friction, wear and anodic current were monitored. The near surface microstructure of wear tracks was analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significantly higher wear was observed at the passive potential compared with the cathodic potential. Chemical reactions could not account for this difference in deterioration. TEM analysis revealed that the plastic behaviour of the metal, and thus its response to wear, depends on the prevailing electrochemical conditions, the passive potential showing larger deformation than the cathodic. This effect was attributed to the presence of the passive film that induces residual stresses and interferes with dislocation activity.

  10. Characterizing near-surface firn using the scattered signal component of the glacier surface return from airborne radio-echo sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Anja; Grima, Cyril; Sharp, Martin; Blankenship, Donald D.; Young, Duncan A.; Cawkwell, Fiona; Dowdeswell, Julian A.

    2016-12-01

    We derive the scattered component (hereafter referred to as the incoherent component) of glacier surface echoes from airborne radio-echo sounding measurements over Devon Ice Cap, Arctic Canada, and compare the scattering distribution to firn stratigraphy observations from ground-based radar data. Low scattering correlates to laterally homogeneous firn above 1800 m elevation containing thin, flat, and continuous ice layers and below 1200 m elevation where firn predominantly consists of ice. Increased scattering between elevations of 1200-1800 m corresponds to firn with inhomogeneous, undulating ice layers. No correlation was found to surface roughness and its theoretical incoherent backscattering values. This indicates that the scattering component is mainly influenced by the near-surface firn stratigraphy, whereas surface roughness effects are minor. Our results suggest that analyzing the scattered signal component of glacier surface echoes is a promising approach to characterize the spatial heterogeneity of firn that is affected by melting and refreezing processes.

  11. Photoluminescence of anti-modulation doped near-surface GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well structures exposed to hydrogen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bumaj, Y A; Goldkhan, R; Shtajn, N; Golombek, A; Nakov, V; Cheng, T S

    2002-01-01

    The anti-modulation Si-doped GaAs/AlGaAs structures with near-surface single quantum wells grown by molecular-beam epitaxy were exposed to hydrogen plasma at 260 deg C and investigated by low-temperature photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation and photoreflectance spectroscopy. After hydrogenation, the quenching of the exciton luminescence for the below AlGaAs band gap excitation due to the increase of electric field in the structure has been observed. The effect is consistent with unpinning of Fermi level from mid gap of nominally undoped (p-type) GaAs cap layer due to passivation of surface states by hydrogen without neutralization of shallow impurities in the epilayers

  12. Characterisation of carbonate rocks from near-surface cross-hole and reflection GPR investigations - A case study from southeast Zealand, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Looms, Majken Caroline; Hansen, Thomas Mejer

    Carbonates found in the near-surface of southeast Zealand, eastern Denmark, are analogous to deposits serving as groundwater and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Danish region. The study site is located in the Boesdal limestone quarry. A 20 by 20 m area of the bottom of the quarry was levelled using...... to facilitate deeper imaging of the carbonates. The section studied with the cross-hole data is water-saturated. Simple 1D modelling of the cross-hole data indicates a strong drop in GPR velocity at 7 to 8 m depth. Different 2D inversion strategies are tested for fine scale resolution of the inter...... are included in the inversion algorithm are tested and compared to the results obtained using the more traditional approaches. The GPR investigations may contribute to setting the framework for future fine-grained models designed to simulate fluid and gas flow in groundwater and hydrocarbon reservoirs....

  13. Influence of the near-surface water film thickness on the characteristics and conditions of water-coal fuel particles inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syrodoy Samen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental studies of thermal pretreatment processes complex and inflammation of water coal fuel’s particles (WCF, which surface is covered with water film, have been presented there. The research has been carried out with using of three fuel types (cannel coal, coal B and filter cake: they have essentially different thermo physical characteristics. The results of our studies have been shown that the dynamics of the near-surface water film evaporation and fuel inflammation depends significantly on coal type. It has also been analyzed the influence of water layer thickness on the conditions of WCF particles inflammation. It has been established the time of water film evaporation is about 70% due to the whole induction period.

  14. Reply to comment on "A simple model for the short-time evolution of near-surface current and temperature profiles"

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, A D; Jenkins, Alastair D.; Ward, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This is our response to a comment by Walter Eifler on our paper `A simple model for the short-time evolution of near-surface current and temperature profiles' (arXiv:physics/0503186, accepted for publication in Deep-Sea Research II). Although Eifler raises genuine issues regarding our model's validity and applicability, we are nevertheless of the opinion that it is of value for the short-term evolution of the upper-ocean profiles of current and temperature. The fact that the effective eddy viscosity tends to infinity for infinite time under a steady wind stress may not be surprising. It can be interpreted as a vertical shift of the eddy viscosity profile and an increase in the size of the dominant turbulent eddies under the assumed conditions of small stratification and infinite water depth.

  15. Near-Surface Sensing of Vegetative Heavy Metal Stress: Method Development for an Accelerated Assessment of Mine Tailing Waste and Remediation Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. T.; Gottfried, M.; Berglund, E.; Rodriguez, G.; Ceckanowicz, D. J.; Cutter, N.; Badgeley, J.

    2014-12-01

    The boom and bust history of mineral extraction in the American southwest is visible today in tens of thousands of abandoned and slowly decaying mine installations that scar the landscape. Mine tailing piles, mounds of crushed mineral ore, often contain significant quantities of heavy metal elements which may leach into surrounding soils, surface water and ground water. Chemical analysis of contaminated soils is a tedious and time-consuming process. Regional assessment of heavy metal contamination for treatment prioritization would be greatly accelerated by the development of near-surface imaging indices of heavy-metal vegetative stress in western grasslands. Further, the method would assist in measuring the ongoing effectiveness of phytoremedatian and phytostabilization efforts. To test feasibility we ground truthed nine phytoremediated and two control sites sites along the mine-impacted Kerber Creek watershed in Saguache County, Colorado. Total metal concentration was determined by XRF for both plant and soil samples. Leachable metals were extracted from soil samples following US EPA method 1312. Plants were identified, sorted into roots, shoots and leaves, and digested via microwave acid extraction. Metal concentrations were determined with high accuracy by ICP-OES analysis. Plants were found to contain significantly higher concentrations of heavy metals than surrounding soils, particularly for manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), barium (Ba), and lead (Pb). Plant species accumulated and distributed metals differently, yet most showed translocation of metals from roots to above ground structures. Ground analysis was followed by near surface imaging using an unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with visible/near and shortwave infrared (0.7 to 1.5 μm) cameras. Images were assessed for spectral shifts indicative of plant stress and attempts made to correlate results with measured soil and plant metal concentrations.

  16. Analysis of the horizontal two-dimensional near-surface structure of a winter tornadic vortex using high-resolution in situ wind and pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryohei; Kusunoki, Kenichi; Sato, Eiichi; Mashiko, Wataru; Inoue, Hanako Y.; Fujiwara, Chusei; Arai, Ken-ichiro; Nishihashi, Masahide; Saito, Sadao; Hayashi, Syugo; Suzuki, Hiroto

    2015-06-01

    The horizontal two-dimensional near-surface structure of a tornadic vortex within a winter storm was analyzed. The tornadic vortex was observed on 10 December 2012 by the high-resolution in situ observational linear array of wind and pressure sensors (LAWPS) system in conjunction with a high-resolution Doppler radar. The 0.1 s maximum wind speed and pressure deficit near the ground were recorded as 35.3 m s-1 and -3.8 hPa, respectively. The horizontal two-dimensional distributions of the tornadic vortex wind and pressure were retrieved by the LAWPS data, which provided unprecedented observational detail on the following important features of the near-surface structure of the tornadic vortex. Asymmetric convergent inflow toward the vortex center existed. Total wind speed was strong to the right and rear side of the translational direction of the vortex and weak in the forward part of the vortex possibly because of the strong convergent inflow in that region. The tangential wind speed profile of the vortex was better approximated using a modified Rankine vortex rather than the Rankine vortex both at 5 m above ground level (agl) and 100 m agl, and other vortex models (Burgers-Rott vortex and Wood-White vortex) were also compared. The cyclostrophic wind balance was violated in the core radius R0 and outside the core radius in the forward sector; however, it was held with a relatively high accuracy of approximately 14% outside the core of the vortex in the rearward sector (from 2 R0 to 5 R0) near the ground.

  17. Surface charge dynamics and OH and H number density distributions in near-surface nanosecond pulse discharges at a liquid / vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Caroline; Petrishchev, Vitaly; Yin, Zhiyao; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2015-10-01

    The present work provides insight into surface charge dynamics and kinetics of radical species reactions in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained at a liquid-vapor interface, above a distilled water surface. The near-surface plasma is sustained using two different discharge configurations, a surface ionization wave discharge between two exposed metal electrodes and a double dielectric barrier discharge. At low discharge pulse repetition rates (~100 Hz), residual surface charge deposition after the discharge pulse is a minor effect. At high pulse repetition rates (~10 kHz), significant negative surface charge accumulation over multiple discharge pulses is detected, both during alternating polarity and negative polarity pulse trains. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and two-photon absorption LIF (TALIF) line imaging are used for in situ measurements of spatial distributions of absolute OH and H atom number densities in near-surface, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas. Both in a surface ionization wave discharge and in a double dielectric barrier discharge, peak measured H atom number density, [H] is much higher compared to peak OH number density, due to more rapid OH decay in the afterglow between the discharge pulses. Higher OH number density was measured near the regions with higher plasma emission intensity. Both OH and especially H atoms diffuse out of the surface ionization wave plasma volume, up to several mm from the liquid surface. Kinetic modeling calculations using a quasi-zero-dimensional H2O vapor / Ar plasma model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The results demonstrate the experimental capability of in situ radical species number density distribution measurements in liquid-vapor interface plasmas, in a simple canonical geometry that lends itself to the validation of kinetic models.

  18. Near-surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Díaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Muñoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle) that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air) and snow skin temperature (T-skin) helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  19. Evaluation of Surface and Near-Surface Melt Characteristics on the Greenland Ice Sheet using MODIS and QuikSCAT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.

    2009-01-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet has been the focus of much attention recently because of increasing melt in response to regional climate warming. To improve our ability to measure surface melt, we use remote-sensing data products to study surface and near-surface melt characteristics of the Greenland Ice Sheet for the 2007 melt season when record melt extent and runoff occurred. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily land-surface temperature (LST), MODIS daily snow albedo, and a special diurnal melt product derived from QuikSCAT (QS) scatterometer data, are all effective in measuring the evolution of melt on the ice sheet. These daily products, produced from different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, are sensitive to different geophysical features, though QS- and MODIS-derived melt generally show excellent correspondence when surface melt is present on the ice sheet. Values derived from the daily MODIS snow albedo product drop in response to melt, and change with apparent grain-size changes. For the 2007 melt season, the QS and MODIS LST products detect 862,769 square kilometers and 766,184 square kilometers of melt, respectively. The QS product detects about 11% greater melt extent than is detected by the MODIS LST product probably because QS is more sensitive to surface melt, and can detect subsurface melt. The consistency of the response of the different products demonstrates unequivocally that physically-meaningful melt/freeze boundaries can be detected. We have demonstrated that these products, used together, can improve the precision in mapping surface and near-surface melt extent on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  20. Analysis and modelling of the temporal stability of throughfall and near-surface soil moisture at the plot scale in the Italian pre-Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuecco, Giulia; van Meerveld, Ilja; Penna, Daniele; Hopp, Luisa; Borga, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal variation in soil moisture at different scales is crucial for hydrological sciences. In forested areas, spatial patterns in throughfall and vegetation characteristics are expected to control soil moisture variability. However, few studies have focused on the influence of throughfall spatial patterns on near-surface soil moisture. Therefore, this study aimed to: i) investigate the relation between the spatial patterns of throughfall and near-surface soil moisture at the plot scale for a forested hillslope, ii) compare the temporal stability of throughfall and soil moisture with canopy characteristics, and iii) assess the controls on the correlation between throughfall and soil moisture temporal stability by means of a dynamic soil moisture model. Throughfall and soil moisture measurements were taken in a 500 m2 experimental plot on the hillslope of a densely forested catchment (Ressi) in the Italian pre-Alps between April 2013 and March 2014. The main tree species in the plot are beech and chestnut. The median diameter at breast height of the trees in the plot is 4 cm (range 1-61 cm). Fifty buckets (collecting area: 556 cm2; capacity: 162 mm) were randomly distributed in the plot for throughfall measurements, while a bucket was also installed in a nearby open area (approximately 150 m from the experimental plot) to collect rainfall. Volumetric soil moisture content was measured at 50 points, about 30 cm upslope of each bucket, at two depths (0-7 and 0-12 cm) before and after 23 rainfall events (7.7 mm to 156 mm) using portable TDR (Time Domain Reflectivity) probes. Canopy openness and leaf area index (LAI) were determined from hemispherical pictures at each bucket. For the measured events throughfall and soil moisture spatial patterns were not significantly or only weakly correlated, likely due to the lateral and vertical redistribution of water in the soil profile during the 2-36 hour period between the end of the rainfall

  1. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2007-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  2. The effect of injection molding conditions on the near-surface rubber morphology, surface chemistry, and adhesion performance of semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weakley-Bollin, Shannon Christine

    This thesis investigated the effect of injection molding processing variables, resin formulation and mold material on the resulting morphology and properties of semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers in parts molded on large presses with fully developed flow. Five different polymer resins and two different coating types were investigated, and the near-surface morphology was found to be dependent on material formulation, processing parameters, and geometry. For painted TPO, changes in the near-surface rubber morphology and surface chemistry based on material and processing conditions had no significant effect on the adhesion performance. For metal plated ABS, the adhesion performance was found to be heavily dependent on the rubber surface morphology, which varied with material formulation and processing conditions. One of the most significant findings was that forged aluminum injection molding tooling had little effect on the surface morphology or adhesion performance of either polypropylene or the two TPO formulations examined, despite the five-fold increase in thermal conductivity over traditional tool steel. Surface chemistry, however, was found to be affected by cooling rate, depending on material formulation. A UV stabilizer additive was found concentrated at 2.5 atomic percent on the surface of the aluminum molded part, but not the steel molded part, demonstrating a possible opportunity for using additives and aluminum tooling to create "designer surfaces". Processing conditions were found to have a competing role in metal plated ABS, where conditions that lowered surface stress and improved adhesion by a factor of 15 also increased the amount of bulk molded-in stress by nearly 7%. Both factors were found to play an important role in adhesion performance due to the effect of surface stress on the quality of the resulting etch structure. The bulk stress must be minimized to due to the large mechanical and thermal mismatch between the polymer and metal layers

  3. Four years of ozone measurements in the Central Amazon - Effects of increasing deforestation rates and different meteorological conditions on near surface concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Stefan; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Pöhlker, Christopher; Saturno, Jorge; Walter, David; Ditas, Florian; Könemann, Tobias; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Yañez-Serrano, Ana Maria; Souza, Rodrigo; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    The ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) site (02°08'38.8''S, 58°59'59.5''W) is located in the remote Amazon rainforest, allowing atmospheric and forest studies away from nearby anthropogenic emission sources. Starting with continuous measurements of vertical mixing ratio profiles of H2O, CO2 and O3 in April 2012 at 8 heights between 0.05 m and 80 m above ground, the longest continuous record of near surface O3 in the Amazon rainforest was established. Black carbon (BC), CO and micrometeorological measurements are available for the same period. During intensive campaigns, NOx was measured as well using the same profile system, and, therefore several month of simultaneous NOx measurements are available. During a period of about four months also direct flux measurements of O3 are available. Here, we analyze the long term and seasonal variability of near surface O3 mixing ratios with respect to air pollution, deposition and transport. The Central Amazon is characterized by a clear seasonal precipitation pattern (ca. 350 mm around March and ca. 80 mm around September), correlating strongly with ozone mixing ratios. Since 2012 deforestation rates have increased again in the Amazon, leading to higher air pollution especially during the drier season in the last years. For several strong pollution events we compared the effects of long and short distance biomass burning on O3 and NOx mixing ratios using back trajectories and satellite data. By comparing O3 mixing ratios with solar radiation, Bowen ratio, several trace gases and aerosol loads (Volatile Organic Compounds, CO and BC), different correlation patterns throughout the year that are linked to the sources (transport of O3 and precursors) and sinks (stomatal uptake and chemical reactions) are investigated. For example, the last months of 2015 were strongly influenced by an extraordinary El Niño phenomenon, leading to much drier conditions and enhanced biomass burning in the Amazon, which prolonged the period of

  4. A study on the direct effect of anthropogenic aerosols on near surface air temperature over Southeastern Europe during summer 2000 based on regional climate modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zanis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work it is investigated the direct shortwave effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the near surface temperature over Southeastern Europe and the atmospheric circulation during summer 2000. In summer 2000, a severe heat-wave and droughts affected many countries in the Balkans. The study is based on two yearly simulations with and without the aerosol feedback of the regional climate model RegCM3 coupled with a simplified aerosol model. The surface radiative forcing associated with the anthropogenic aerosols is negative throughout the European domain with the more negative values in Central and Central-eastern Europe. A basic pattern of the aerosol induced changes in air temperature at the lower troposphere is a decrease over Southeastern Europe and the Balkan Peninsula (up to about 1.2°C thus weakening the pattern of the climatic temperature anomalies of summer 2000. The aerosol induced changes in air temperature from the lower troposphere to upper troposphere are not correlated with the respective pattern of the surface radiative forcing implying the complexity of the mechanisms linking the aerosol radiative forcing with the induced atmospheric changes through dynamical feedbacks of aerosols on atmospheric circulation. Investigation of the aerosol induced changes in the circulation indicates a southward shift of the subtropical jet stream playing a dominant role for the decrease in near surface air temperature over Southeastern Europe and the Balkan Peninsula. The southward shift of the jet exit region over the Balkan Peninsula causes a relative increase of the upward motion at the northern flank of the jet exit region, a relative increase of clouds, less solar radiation absorbed at the surface and hence relative cooler air temperatures in the lower troposphere between 45° N and 50° N. The southward extension of the lower troposphere aerosol induced negative temperature changes in the latitudinal band 35° N–45° N over the

  5. Evidence for near-Surface NiOOH Species in Solution-Processed NiOx Selective Interlayer Materials: Impact on Energetics and the Performance of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, Erin L.; Meyer, Jens; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Garcia, Andres; Berry, Joseph J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.; Kahn, Antoine; Armstrong, Neal R.

    2011-11-22

    The characterization and implementation of solution-processed, wide bandgap nickel oxide (NiO{sub x}) hole-selective interlayer materials used in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are discussed. The surface electrical properties and charge selectivity of these thin films are strongly dependent upon the surface chemistry, band edge energies, and midgap state concentrations, as dictated by the ambient conditions and film pretreatments. Surface states were correlated with standards for nickel oxide, hydroxide, and oxyhydroxide components, as determined using monochromatic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements show changes in the surface chemistries directly impact the valence band energies. O₂-plasma treatment of the as-deposited NiO{sub x} films was found to introduce the dipolar surface species nickel oxyhydroxide (NiOOH), rather than the p-dopant Ni₂O₃, resulting in an increase of the electrical band gap energy for the near-surface region from 3.1 to 3.6 eV via a vacuum level shift. Electron blocking properties of the as-deposited and O₂-plasma treated NiO{sub x} films are compared using both electron-only and BHJ devices. O₂-plasma-treated NiO{sub x} interlayers produce electron-only devices with lower leakage current and increased turn on voltages. The differences in behavior of the different pretreated interlayers appears to arise from differences in local density of states that comprise the valence band of the NiO{sub x} interlayers and changes to the band gap energy, which influence their hole-selectivity. The presence of NiOOH states in these NiO{sub x} films and the resultant chemical reactions at the oxide/organic interfaces in OPVs is predicted to play a significant role in controlling OPV device efficiency and lifetime.

  6. Research advance of near-surface mounted fiber-reinforced polymer to concrete%表层嵌贴FRP-混凝土黏结加固研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童谷生; 蔡少杰

    2014-01-01

    Near-surface mounted(NSM)fiber-reinforced polymer(FRP)reinforcement is one of the latest and most promising strength-ening techniques for reinforced concrete(RC)structures.Research on this topic mainly focused on the bonding mechanism and the flexural strengthening.The paper presents bond mechanics of NSM FRP bars/strips to concrete including the bond test methods ,effect of test vari-ables,bond failure modes,analytical modeling,local bond shear stress-slip relationship.It provides a critical review of existing research in this area,identifies gaps of knowledge,and outlines directions for further research.%表层嵌贴FRP修复加固混凝土结构是一种富有前景的新型技术,目前该技术领域的研究主要集中在黏结机理和抗弯加固两方面。论述表层嵌贴FRP-混凝土的试验方法、主要控制参数、破坏模式、黏结机理、界面黏结滑移本构关系等。最后,对目前国内外表层嵌贴FRP-混凝土黏结性能的研究现状进行探讨,希望为表层嵌贴FRP加固技术的进一步研究发展提供方向。

  7. Long-term trends and extremes in observed daily precipitation and near surface air temperature in the Philippines for the period 1951-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinco, Thelma A.; de Guzman, Rosalina G.; Hilario, Flaviana D.; Wilson, David M.

    2014-08-01

    Observed daily precipitation and near surface air temperature data from 34 synoptic weather stations in the Philippines for the period 1951-2010 were subjected to trend analysis which revealed an overall warming tendency compared to the normal mean values for the period 1961-1990. This warming trend can be observed in the annual mean temperatures, daily minimum mean temperatures and to a lesser extent, daily maximum mean temperatures. Precipitation and temperature extremes for the period 1951-2010 were also analysed relative to the mean 1961-1990 baseline values. Some stations (Cotabato, Iloilo, Laoag and Tacloban,) show increases in both frequency and intensity of extreme daily rainfall events which are significant at the 95% level with none of the stations showing decreasing trends. The frequency of daily temperature maximum above the 99th percentile (hot days) and nights at the 1st percentile (cold nights) suggests that both days and nights in particular are becoming warmer. Such indicators of a warming trend and increase in extreme events in the Philippines are discussed in the context of similar national, regional (Asia Pacific) and global studies. The relevance of such empirically based climatology studies, particularly for nations such as the Philippines which are increasingly vulnerable to the multiple impacts of global climate change, is also considered.

  8. Resistivity distribution from mid-crustal conductor to near-surface across the 1200 km long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System, southern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Sebastian; Schill, Eva; Pavez, Maximiliano; Díaz, Daniel; Muñoz, Gerard; Morata, Diego; Kohl, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Mid-crustal conductors are a common phenomenon in magnetotelluric studies. In the Andean Cordillera of southern Chile, they appear to concentrate along major fault zones. A high-resolution, broad-band magnetotelluric survey including 31 stations has been carried out along two profiles perpendicular to (1) the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Systems (LOFS) and (2) the Villarrica-Quetrupillán-Lanín volcanic lineament running parallel to the Mocha-Villarrica Fault Zone (MVFZ). The survey aimed at tracing one of the known conductors from mid-crustal depth to near-surface along these faults. Directionality and dimensionality were analysed using tensor decomposition. Phase tensors and induction arrows reveal two major geoelectric strike directions following the strike of LOFS and MVFZ. 2-D inversion shows low resistivity zones along both fault systems down to a depth of >10 km, where the brittle-ductile transition is expected. Along the LOFS, the two anomalies are linked to (1) Lake Caburgua, where the LOFS broadens to about 2 km of lateral extension and seems to represent a pull-apart structure, and (2) the intersection with the Villarrica-Quetrupillán-Lanín volcanic lineament, where seismic activity was observed during the latest eruption in March 2015. A connection of the mid-crustal conductor to the ESE-WNW-striking fault zones is indicated from the presented data.

  9. Modeling near-surface firn temperature in a cold accumulation zone (Col du Dôme, French Alps): from a physical to a semi-parameterized approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, A.; Vincent, C.; Six, D.; Wagnon, P.; Piard, L.; Ginot, P.

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of the thermal regime of glaciers is crucial for glacier hazard assessment, especially in the context of a changing climate. In particular, the transient thermal regime of cold accumulation zones needs to be modeled. A modeling approach has therefore been developed to determine this thermal regime using only near-surface boundary conditions coming from meteorological observations. In the first step, a surface energy balance (SEB) model accounting for water percolation and radiation penetration in firn was applied to identify the main processes that control the subsurface temperatures in cold firn. Results agree well with subsurface temperatures measured at Col du Dôme (4250 m above sea level (a.s.l.)), France. In the second step, a simplified model using only daily mean air temperature and potential solar radiation was developed. This model properly simulates the spatial variability of surface melting and subsurface firn temperatures and was used to accurately reconstruct the deep borehole temperature profiles measured at Col du Dôme. Results show that percolation and refreezing are efficient processes for the transfer of energy from the surface to underlying layers. However, they are not responsible for any higher energy uptake at the surface, which is exclusively triggered by increasing energy flux from the atmosphere due to SEB changes when surface temperatures reach 0 °C. The resulting enhanced energy uptake makes cold accumulation zones very vulnerable to air temperature rise.

  10. Modeling near-surface firn temperature in a cold accumulation zone (Col du Dôme, French Alps: from a physical to a semi-parameterized approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gilbert

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the thermal regime of glaciers is crucial for glacier hazard assessment, especially in the context of a changing climate. In particular, the transient thermal regime of cold accumulation zones needs to be modeled. A modeling approach has therefore been developed to determine this thermal regime using only near-surface boundary conditions coming from meteorological observations. In the first step, a surface energy-balance (SEB model accounting for water percolation was applied to identify the main processes that control the subsurface temperatures in cold firn. Results agree well with subsurface temperatures measured at Col du Dôme (4250 m a.s.l., France. In the second step, a simplified model using only daily mean air temperature and potential solar radiation was developed. This model properly simulates the spatial variability of surface melting and subsurface firn temperatures and was used to accurately reconstruct the deep borehole temperature profiles measured at Col du Dôme. Results show that percolation and refreezing are efficient processes for the transfer of energy from the surface to underlying layers. However, they are not responsible for any higher energy uptake at the surface, which is exclusively triggered by increasing energy flux from the atmosphere due to SEB changes when surface temperature reach 0 °C. The resulting enhanced energy uptake makes cold accumulation zones very vulnerable to air temperature rise.

  11. Assessment of the MAR regional climate model over the Antarctic Peninsula (1999 - 2009) through spaceborne enhanced spatial resolution melting maps and near-surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R.; Tedesco, M.; Alexander, P. M.; Fettweis, X.; Steiner, N.; Gallee, H.

    2012-12-01

    We report results assessing the outputs of the regional climate model Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) over the Antarctic peninsula for the period 1999 - 2009. Specifically, we compare maps of melt extent and duration generated by MAR with those obtained from the enhanced spatial resolution product (~ 5 km) distributed by the NASA Scatterometer Climate Record Pathfinder (SCP), at Brigham Young University (Utah, USA). Snowmelt is estimated from remote sensing observations using both a canonical threshold-based approach and a novel method based on wavelet methodology. MAR outputs are also evaluated against available surface observations (e.g., near-surface temperature, wind speed and direction, etc.). The additional effects of blowing snow upon the surface and energy balance can be uniquely explored by simulations in Antarctica (as compared to Greenland, for example). Because of this, as of the time of abstract submission, MAR is set up to run for a scenario with blowing snow as well as a scenario without blowing snow. Our final assessment will present the results of both, providing insight into the sensitivity of MAR outputs to the blowing snow model.

  12. Lead isotopic compositions of soil and near-surface till profiles from a watershed containing arsenic-enriched groundwater in coastal Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert; Foley, Nora; Wandless, Gregory; Dillingham, Jeremy; Colvin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Lead isotope compositions of soils and near-surface tills from an area of coastal Maine known to have groundwater with anomalously high arsenic contents were measured in order to determine the source of the lead and, by inference, possible sources of arsenic. Five soil and till sites were selected for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. To construct profiles of the soil and till horizons, five samples were collected at 10-cm intervals from the surface to the base of each horizon. Total lead and arsenic concentrations and lead isotopic compositions were measured for 48 leaches and bulk residues. The soils and tills are underlain by sulfidic schists of the Penobscot Formation. Several generations of minerals containing arsenic and lead exist in the regional bedrock, including rock-forming silicates (feldspar and micas), sulfide minerals formed during diagenesis (for example, arsenic-rich pyrite), and sulfide and oxide minerals that formed as a result of Silurian metamorphic and igneous events (for example, arsenopyrite, galena, iron-oxides, and arsenic-sulfides). A young group of secondary minerals (for example, iron-hydroxides, arsenic-hydroxides, lead-sulfate, and arsenic-jarosite) formed from recent weathering and pedogenic processes.

  13. Probability of liquid radionuclide release of a near surface repository; Probabilidade de liberacao liquida de radionuclideos de um repositorio proximo a superficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Lais A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: lais@con.ufrj.br; frutuoso@con.ufrj.br; Passos, Erivaldo; Alves, Antonio Sergio [ELETRONUCLEAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Seguranca Nuclear]. E-mail: epassos@eletronuclear.gov.br; asergi@eletronuclear.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    The safety analysis of a near surface repository for medium and low activity wastes leads to investigating accident scenarios related to water infiltration phenomena. The probability of radionuclide release through the infiltration water could be estimated with the aid of suitable probabilistic models. For the analysis, the repository system is divided into two subsystems: the first, due to the barriers against the water infiltration (backfill material and container), and the second one comprising the barriers against the leaching of radionuclide to the biosphere (solid matrix and geosphere). The repository system is supposed to have its components (barriers) working in an active parallel mode. The probability of the system failure is obtained from the logical structure of a failure tree. The study was based on the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) technique for the most significant radionuclides within the radioactive packages system of low and medium activity, and so the probability of failure of the system for each radionuclide during the time period of institutional control was obtained. (author)

  14. High-resolution calculation of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique: II. Near surface shear layer with the rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Hotta, H; Yokoyama, T

    2014-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique we can extend our global convection simulation to $0.99\\,R_{\\odot}$ and include near the top of our domain small-scale convection with short time scales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of a NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range $r=0.95-0.975R_\\odot$. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward directed meridional flow and a NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the $\\langle v'_r v'_\\theta\\rangle$ correlation of turbulent velocities. The orig...

  15. High-resolution Calculation of the Solar Global Convection with the Reduced Speed of Sound Technique. II. Near Surface Shear Layer with the Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R ⊙ and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R ⊙. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation results from rotationally aligned convection cells ("banana cells"). The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  16. Conceptual designs of near surface disposal facility for radioactive waste arising from the facilities using radioisotopes and research facilities for nuclear energy development and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Akihiro; Yoshimori, Michiro; Okoshi, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Abe, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Various kinds of radioactive waste is generating from the utilization of radioisotopes in the field of science, technology, etc. and the utilization and development of nuclear energy. In order to promote the utilization of radionuclides and the research activities, it is necessary to treat and dispose of radioactive waste safely and economically. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), which are the major waste generators in Japan in these fields, are promoting the technical investigations for treatment and disposal of the radioactive waste co-operately. Conceptual design of disposal facility is necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of waste disposal business and to determine the some conditions such as the area size of the disposal facility. Three institutes share the works to design disposal facility. Based on our research activities and experiences of waste disposal, JAERI implemented the designing of near surface disposal facilities, namely, simple earthen trench and concrete vaults. The designing was performed based on the following three assumed site conditions to cover the future site conditions: (1) Case 1 - Inland area with low groundwater level, (2) Case 2 - Inland area with high groundwater level, (3) Case 3 - Coastal area. The estimation of construction costs and the safety analysis were also performed based on the designing of facilities. The safety assessment results show that the safety for concrete vault type repository is ensured by adding low permeability soil layer, i.e. mixture of soil and bentonite, surrounding the vaults not depending on the site conditions. The safety assessment results for simple earthen trench also show that their safety is ensured not depending on the site conditions, if they are constructed above groundwater levels. The construction costs largely depend on the depth for excavation to build the repositories. (author)

  17. Conceptual designs of near surface disposal facility for radioactive waste arising from the facilities using radioisotopes and research facilities for nuclear energy development and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Akihiro; Yoshimori, Michiro; Okoshi, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tadatoshi; Abe, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Various kinds of radioactive waste is generating from the utilization of radioisotopes in the field of science, technology, etc. and the utilization and development of nuclear energy. In order to promote the utilization of radionuclides and the research activities, it is necessary to treat and dispose of radioactive waste safely and economically. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), which are the major waste generators in Japan in these fields, are promoting the technical investigations for treatment and disposal of the radioactive waste co-operately. Conceptual design of disposal facility is necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of waste disposal business and to determine the some conditions such as the area size of the disposal facility. Three institutes share the works to design disposal facility. Based on our research activities and experiences of waste disposal, JAERI implemented the designing of near surface disposal facilities, namely, simple earthen trench and concrete vaults. The designing was performed based on the following three assumed site conditions to cover the future site conditions: (1) Case 1 - Inland area with low groundwater level, (2) Case 2 - Inland area with high groundwater level, (3) Case 3 - Coastal area. The estimation of construction costs and the safety analysis were also performed based on the designing of facilities. The safety assessment results show that the safety for concrete vault type repository is ensured by adding low permeability soil layer, i.e. mixture of soil and bentonite, surrounding the vaults not depending on the site conditions. The safety assessment results for simple earthen trench also show that their safety is ensured not depending on the site conditions, if they are constructed above groundwater levels. The construction costs largely depend on the depth for excavation to build the repositories. (author)

  18. Topographic Controls on Southern California Ecosystem Function and Post-fire Recovery: a Satellite and Near-surface Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, George

    Southern Californian wildfires can influence climate in a variety of ways, including changes in surface albedo, emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the production of tropospheric ozone. Ecosystem post-fire recovery plays a key role in determining the strength, duration, and relative importance of these climate forcing agents. Southern California's ecosystems vary markedly with topography, creating sharp transitions with elevation, aspect, and slope. Little is known about the ways topography influences ecosystem properties and function, particularly in the context of post-fire recovery. We combined images from the USGS satellite Landsat 5 with flux tower measurements to analyze pre- and post-fire albedo and carbon exchanged by Southern California's ecosystems in the Santa Ana Mountains. We reduced the sources of external variability in Landsat images using several correction methods for topographic and bidirectional effects. We used time series of corrected images to infer the Net Ecosystem Exchange and surface albedo, and calculated the radiative forcing due to CO2 emissions and albedo changes. We analyzed the patterns of recovery and radiative forcing on north- and south-facing slopes, stratified by vegetation classes including grassland, coastal sage scrub, chaparral, and evergreen oak forest. We found that topography strongly influenced post-fire recovery and radiative forcing. Field observations are often limited by the difficulty of collecting ground validation data. Current instrumentation networks do not provide adequate spatial resolution for landscape-level analysis. The deployment of consumer-market technology could reduce the cost of near-surface measurements, allowing the installation of finer-scale instrument networks. We tested the performance of the Microsoft Kinect sensor for measuring vegetation structure. We used Kinect to acquire 3D vegetation point clouds in the field, and used these data to compute plant height, crown diameter, and

  19. Forcing Mechanisms for the Variations of Near-surface Temperature Lapse Rates along the Himalayas, Tibetan Plateau (HTP) and Their Surroundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattel, D. B.; Yao, T.; Ullah, K.; Islam, G. M. T.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the monthly characteristics of near-surface temperature lapse rates (TLRs) (i.e., governed by surface energy balance) based on the 176 stations 30-year (1980 to 2010) dataset covering a wide range of topography, climatic regime and relief (4801 m) in the HTP and its surroundings. Empirical analysis based on techniques in thermodynamics and hydrostatic system were used to obtain the results. Steepest TLRs in summer is due to strong dry convection and shallowest in winter is due to inversion effect is the general pattern of TLR that reported in previous studies in other mountainous region. Result of this study reports a contrast variation of TLRs from general patterns, and suggest distinct forcing mechanisms in an annual cycle. Shallower lapse rate occurs in summer throughout the regions is due to strong heat exchange process within the boundary layer, corresponding to the warm and moist atmospheric conditions. There is a systematic differences of TLRs in winter between the northern and southern slopes the Himalayas. Steeper TLRs in winter on the northern slopes is due to intense cooling at higher elevations, corresponding to the continental dry and cold air surges, and considerable snow-temperature feedback. The differences in elevation and topography, as well as the distinct variation of turbulent heating and cooling, explain the contrast TLRs (shallower) values in winter on the southern slopes. Distinct diurnal variations of TLRs and its magnitudes between alpine, dry, humid and coastal regions is due to the variations of adiabatic mixing during the daytime in the boundary layer i.e., associated with the variations in net radiations, elevation, surface roughness and sea surface temperature. The findings of this study is useful to determine the temperature range for accurately modelling in various field such as hydrology, glaciology, ecology, forestry, agriculture, as well as inevitable for climate downscaling in complex mountainous terrain.

  20. Shallow Subsurface Soil Moisture Dynamics in the Root-Zone and Bulk Soil of Sparsely Vegetated Land Surfaces as Impacted by Near-Surface Atmospheric State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental state variable that provides the water necessary for plant growth and evapotranspiration. Soil moisture has been extensively studied in the context of bare surface soils and root zones. Less attention has focused on the effects of sparse vegetation distributions, such as those typical of agricultural cropland and other natural surface environments, on soil moisture dynamics. The current study explores root zone, bulk soil, and near-surface atmosphere interactions in terms of soil moisture under different distributions of sparse vegetation using multi-scale laboratory experimentation and numerical simulation. This research is driven by the need to advance our fundamental understanding of soil moisture dynamics in the context of improving water conservation and next generation heat and mass transfer numerical models. Experimentation is performed in a two-dimensional 7.3 m long intermediate scale soil tank interfaced with a climate-controlled wind tunnel, both of which are outfitted with current sensor technologies for measuring atmospheric and soil variables. The soil tank is packed so that a sparsely vegetated soil is surrounded by bulk bare soil; the two regions are separated by porous membranes to isolate the root zone from the bulk soil. Results show that in the absence of vegetation, evaporation rates vary along the soil tank in response to longitudinal changes in humidity; soil dries fastest upstream where evaporation rates are highest. In the presence of vegetation, soil moisture in the bulk soil closest to a vegetated region decreases more rapidly than the bulk soil farther away. Evapotranspiration rates in this region are also higher than the bulk soil region. This study is the first step towards the development of more generalized models that account for non-uniformly distributed vegetation and land surfaces exhibiting micro-topology.

  1. C-di-GMP Regulates Motile to Sessile Transition by Modulating MshA Pili Biogenesis and Near-Surface Motility Behavior in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher J; Utada, Andrew; Davis, Kimberly R; Thongsomboon, Wiriya; Zamorano Sanchez, David; Banakar, Vinita; Cegelski, Lynette; Wong, Gerard C L; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls the motile to biofilm life style switch. Yet, little is known about how this occurs. In this study, we report that changes in c-di-GMP concentration impact the biosynthesis of the MshA pili, resulting in altered motility and biofilm phenotypes in V. cholerae. Previously, we reported that cdgJ encodes a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase and a ΔcdgJ mutant has reduced motility and enhanced biofilm formation. Here we show that loss of the genes required for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MshA) pilus biogenesis restores motility in the ΔcdgJ mutant. Mutations of the predicted ATPase proteins mshE or pilT, responsible for polymerizing and depolymerizing MshA pili, impair near surface motility behavior and initial surface attachment dynamics. A ΔcdgJ mutant has enhanced surface attachment, while the ΔcdgJmshA mutant phenocopies the high motility and low attachment phenotypes observed in a ΔmshA strain. Elevated concentrations of c-di-GMP enhance surface MshA pilus production. MshE, but not PilT binds c-di-GMP directly, establishing a mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling input in MshA pilus production. Collectively, our results suggest that the dynamic nature of the MshA pilus established by the assembly and disassembly of pilin subunits is essential for transition from the motile to sessile lifestyle and that c-di-GMP affects MshA pilus assembly and function through direct interactions with the MshE ATPase.

  2. Remote Monitoring of Near-Surface Soil Moisture Dynamics In Unstable Slopes Using a Low-Power Autonomous Resistivity Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Meldrum, P.; Gunn, D.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Uhlemann, S.; Swift, R. T.; Kuras, O.; Inauen, C.; Hutchinson, D.; Butler, S.

    2016-12-01

    ERT monitoring has been demonstrated in numerous studies as an effective means of imaging near surface processes for applications as diverse as permafrost studies and contaminated land assessment. A limiting factor in applying time-lapse ERT for long-term studies in remote locations has been the availability of cost-effective ERT measurement systems designed specifically for monitoring applications. Typically, monitoring is undertaken using repeated manual data collection, or by building conventional survey instruments into a monitoring setup. The latter often requires high power and is therefore difficult to operate remotely without access to mains electricity. We describe the development of a low-power resistivity imaging system designed specifically for remote monitoring, taking advantage of, e.g., solar power and data telemetry. Here, we present the results of two field deployments. The system has been installed on an active railway cutting to provide insights into the effect of vegetation on the moisture dynamics in unstable infrastructure slopes and to gather subsurface information for pro-active remediation measures. The system, comprising 255 electrodes, acquires 4596 reciprocal measurement pairs twice daily during standard operation. In case of severe weather events, the measurement schedule is reactively changed, to gather high temporal resolution data to image rainfall infiltration processes. The system has also been installed along a leaking and marginally stable canal embankment; a less favourable location for remote monitoring, with limited solar power and poor mobile reception. Nevertheless, the acquired data indicated the effectiveness of remedial actions on the canal. The ERT results showed that one leak was caused by the canal and fixed during remediation, while two other "leaks" were shown to be effects of groundwater dynamics. The availability of cost-effective, low-power ERT monitoring instrumentation, combined with an automated workflow of

  3. An Ultra-Wideband, Microwave Radar for Measuring Snow Thickness on Sea Ice and Mapping Near-Surface Internal Layers in Polar Firn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Ben; Gomez-Garcia, Daniel; Leuschen, Carl; Paden, John; Rodriguez-Morales, Fernando; Patel, Azsa; Markus, Thorsten; Holt, Benjamin; Gogineni, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Sea ice is generally covered with snow, which can vary in thickness from a few centimeters to >1 m. Snow cover acts as a thermal insulator modulating the heat exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, and it impacts sea-ice growth rates and overall thickness, a key indicator of climate change in polar regions. Snow depth is required to estimate sea-ice thickness using freeboard measurements made with satellite altimeters. The snow cover also acts as a mechanical load that depresses ice freeboard (snow and ice above sea level). Freeboard depression can result in flooding of the snow/ice interface and the formation of a thick slush layer, particularly in the Antarctic sea-ice cover. The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an ultra-wideband, microwave radar capable of operation on long-endurance aircraft to characterize the thickness of snow over sea ice. The low-power, 100mW signal is swept from 2 to 8GHz allowing the air/snow and snow/ ice interfaces to be mapped with 5 c range resolution in snow; this is an improvement over the original system that worked from 2 to 6.5 GHz. From 2009 to 2012, CReSIS successfully operated the radar on the NASA P-3B and DC-8 aircraft to collect data on snow-covered sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic for NASA Operation IceBridge. The radar was found capable of snow depth retrievals ranging from 10cm to >1 m. We also demonstrated that this radar can be used to map near-surface internal layers in polar firn with fine range resolution. Here we describe the instrument design, characteristics and performance of the radar.

  4. Geo-electrical investigation of near surface conductive structures suitable for groundwater accumulation in a resistive crystalline basement environment: A case study of Isuada, southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayode, J. S.; Adelusi, A. O.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Bawallah, M.; Olowolafe, T. S.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a geophysical surveying for groundwater identification in a resistive crystalline basement hard rock in Isuada area, Southwestern Nigeria. Very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic and electrical resistivity geophysical techniques combined with well log were used to characterize the concealed near surface conductive structures suitable for groundwater accumulation. Prior to this work; little was known about the groundwater potential of this area. Qualitative and semi-quantitative interpretations of the data collected along eight traverses at 20 m spacing discovered conductive zones suspected to be fractures, faults, and cracks which were further mapped using Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) technique. Forty VES stations were utilized using Schlumberger configurations with AB/2 varying from 1 to 100 m. Four layers i.e. the top soil, the weathered layer, the partially weathered/fractured basement and the fresh basement were delineated from the interpreted resistivity curves. The weathered layers constitute the major aquifer unit in the area and are characterized by moderately low resistivity values which ranged between about 52 Ωm and 270 Ωm while the thickness varied from 1 to 35 m. The depth to the basement and the permeable nature of the weathered layer obtained from both the borehole and the hand-dug wells was used to categorize the groundwater potential of the study area into high, medium and low ratings. The groundwater potential map revealed that about 45% of the study area falls within the low groundwater potential rating while about 10% constitutes the medium groundwater potential and the remaining 45% constitutes high groundwater potential. The low resistivity, thick overburden, and fractured bedrock constitute the aquifer units and the series of basement depressions identified from the geoelectric sections as potential conductive zones appropriate for groundwater development.

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: hotta@ucar.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ☉} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ☉}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  6. Extracting near-surface QL between 1-4 Hz from higher-order noise correlations in the Euroseistest area, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendel, A.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge of the quality factor of near-surface materials is of fundamental interest in various applications. Attenuation can be very strong close to the surface and thus needs to be properly assessed. In recent years, several researchers have studied the retrieval of attenuation coefficients from the cross correlation of ambient seismic noise. Yet, the determination of exact amplitude information from noise-correlation functions is, in contrast to the extraction of traveltimes, not trivial. Most of the studies estimated attenuation coefficients on the regional scale and within the microseism band. In this paper, we investigate the possibility to derive attenuation coefficients from seismic noise at much shallower depths and higher frequencies (>1 Hz). The Euroseistest area in northern Greece offers ideal conditions to study quality factor retrieval from ambient noise for different rock types. Correlations are computed between the stations of a small scale array experiment (station spacings Love wave arrivals on the transverse component and on Love wave quality factors QL. The analysis is performed for selected stations being either situated on soft soil or on weathered rock. Phase slowness is extracted using a slant-stack method. Attenuation parameters are inferred by inspecting the relative amplitude decay of Love waves with increasing interstation distance. We observe that the attenuation coefficient γ and QL can be reliably extracted for stations situated on soft soil whereas the derivation of attenuation parameters is more problematic for stations that are located on weathered rock. The results are in acceptable conformance with theoretical Love wave attenuation curves that were computed using 1-D shear wave velocity and quality factor profiles from the Euroseistest area.

  7. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2007-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  8. Variability in the Subtropical-Tropical Cells and its Effect on Near-Surface Temperature of the Equatorial Pacific: a Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Lübbecke

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A set of experiments utilising different implementations of the global ORCA-LIM model with horizontal resolutions of 2°, 0.5° and 0.25° is used to investigate tropical and extra-tropical influences on equatorial Pacific SST variability at interannual to decadal time scales. The model experiments use a bulk forcing methodology building on the global forcing data set for 1958 to 2000 developed by Large and Yeager (2004 that is based on a blend of atmospheric reanalysis data and satellite products. Whereas representation of the mean structure and transports of the (sub-tropical Pacific current fields is much improved with the enhanced horizontal resolution, there is only little difference in the simulation of the interannual variability in the equatorial regime between the 0.5° and 0.25° model versions, with both solutions capturing the observed SST variability in the Nino3 region. The question of remotely forced oceanic contributions to the equatorial variability, in particular, the role of low-frequency changes in the transports of the Subtropical Cells (STCs, is addressed by a sequence of perturbation experiments using different combinations of fluxes. The solutions show the near-surface temperature variability to be governed by wind-driven changes in the Equatorial Undercurrent. The relative contributions of equatorial and off-equatorial atmospheric forcing differ between interannual and longer, (multi-decadal timescales: for the latter there is a significant impact of changes in the equatorward transport of subtropical thermocline water associated with the lower branches of the STCs, related to variations in the off-equatorial trade winds. A conspicuous feature of the STC variability is that the equatorward transports in the interior and along the western boundary partially compensate each other at both decadal and interannual time scales, with the strongest transport extrema occurring during El Ni~no episodes. The behavior is

  9. Variation in Near-Surface Soil Water Content and Matric Potential Across a Semiarid Shrub-Grass Ecotone: Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhark, E. W.; Small, E.

    2001-12-01

    The 20th century shrub invasion of semiarid grasslands in New Mexico is one example of the transition of a semiarid herbaceous to woody plant ecosystem. A key factor controlling plant productivity and reproduction in semiarid environments is water availability in the soil. We characterize the hydrologic changes resulting from the shrub invasion, specifically the hydrologic advantage that shrubs hold over grasses, to pinpoint the primary factor(s) that contribute to the invasion. Observations are based on measurements of near surface soil moisture and matric potential across the transition. We focus on the differences between the grass and shrub environments. Our previous research has shown that in both environments, maximum spatial soil moisture variations exist at the plant-to-interspace scale, on the order of meters. Therefore, we now focus on individual plant canopy and interspace patches. We hypothesize that the critical hydrologic difference(s) contributing to the shrub invasion exist at this scale. During the 2001 summer monsoon season we used the TDR (time domain reflectometry) method to measure soil water content. In both environments, TDR probe arrays are installed laterally covering the surface of nine plant canopies in total and their adjacent interspaces, using 128 probes. One array in each environment contains TDR probes inserted both at the surface and at depths. In addition, soil matric potential is measured adjacent to selected TDR probes both laterally and vertically. Matric potential is measured using a total of 64 heat dissipation sensors. The probe arrays are designed to capture the effects of topographic relief and plant shading. Measurements are made and recorded hourly. We focus on initial dry soil conditions, wetting events, and subsequent dry down sequences following natural rainfall events. Results suggest that during any rain event, shrub canopies accumulate a greater percentage of precipitation applied to an area than grass canopies

  10. A missing piece of the puzzle in climate change hotspots: Near-surface turbulent interactions controlling ET-soil moisture coupling in semiarid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Gianotti, Daniel J.; Rigden, Angela J.; Salvucci, Guido D.; Kirchner, James W.; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-04-01

    Being located in the transitional zone between dry and wet climate areas, semiarid ecosystems (and their associated ecohydrological processes) play a critical role in controlling climate change and global warming. Land evapotranspiration (ET), which is a central process in the climate system and a nexus of the water, energy and carbon cycles, typically accounts for up to 95% of the water budget in semiarid areas. Thus, the manner in which ET is partitioned into soil evaporation and plant transpiration in these settings is of practical importance for water and carbon cycling and their feedbacks to the climate system. ET (and its partitioning) in these regions is primarily controlled by surface soil moisture which varies episodically under stochastic precipitation inputs. Important as the ET-soil moisture relationship is, it remains empirical, and physical mechanisms governing its nature and dynamics are underexplored. Thus, the objective of this study is twofold: (1) to provide observational evidence for the influence of surface cover conditions on ET-soil moisture coupling in semiarid regions using soil moisture data from NASA's SMAP satellite mission combined with independent observationally based ET estimates, and (2) to develop a relatively simple mechanistic modeling platform improving our physical understanding of interactions between micro and macroscale processes controlling ET and its partitioning in partially vegetated areas. To this end, we invoked concepts from recent progress in mechanistic modeling of turbulent energy flux exchange in bluff-rough regions, and developed a physically based ET model that explicitly accounts for how vegetation-induced turbulence in the near-surface region influences soil drying and thus ET rates and dynamics. Model predictions revealed nonlinearities in the strength of the ET-soil moisture relationship (i.e., ∂ET/∂θ) as vegetation cover fraction increases, accounted for by the nonlinearity of surface

  11. CSEM IMAGING OF THE NEAR SURFACE DYNAMICS AND ITS IMPACT FOR FOUNDATION STABILITY AT QUARTER 27, 15th OF MAY CITY, HELWAN, EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hemali Ibrahim A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we involve the Control Source Electromagnetic (CSEM Technique to image the dynamic migration center of the near surface fractures, fissures, and cracks in a new dwelling area at 15th of May city close to Cairo. This area forms the center of the zonal weakness of the subsoil, which in turn, interact with the weight center of the construction leading to catastrophiccollapses.The control source electromagnetic technique has been developed recently to monitor the migration of the weakness center represented as the accumulative fissures and cracks in thenear surface. Three composite profiles of wide and planshet mesh data have been collected in 2008. This survey has been followed by performing two profiles in 2010; one of these profiles has been repeated to observe the situation changes, and the second profile has been measured between the other two profiles of2008. The last profile had been performed to study the mutual relation between the measurements of the two cycles. The objectives of the whole process are to validate the capability of the technique to pick the minor changes of the weakness center, consequently, study its relation to the weight center of the adjacent construction to produce a recommended procedure to minimizethe destruction resources at the site of investigation.The measured data has been interpreted and represented in graphs showing the distribution of the heterogeneity of the geoelectric parameters in the subsoil, furthermore, in a series of geoelectric cross section representing the applied frequencies used during the survey. The study concludes that (1 the center of the cracked zone is moving upward closer to the surface of the ground and heaver, (2 the water content is moving downward producing soil dryness at the shallow depths, and (3 the site became more stable in 2010 than 2008, however, the destruction resources remain warning with collapse events. Furthermore, the situation reflects

  12. Observed particle sizes and fluxes of Aeolian sediment in the near surface layer during sand-dust storms in the Taklamakan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Wen; He, Qing; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xinghua; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Fuyin; Mamtimin, Ali; Liu, Xinchun; Wang, Mingzhong; Zhao, Yong; Zhi, Xiefei

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring, modeling and predicting the formation and movement of dust storms across the global deserts has drawn great attention in recent decades. Nevertheless, the scarcity of real-time observations of the wind-driven emission, transport and deposition of dusts has severely impeded progress in this area. In this study, we report an observational analysis of sand-dust storm samples collected at seven vertical levels from an 80-m-high flux tower located in the hinterland of the great Taklamakan Desert for ten sand-dust storm events that occurred during 2008-2010. We analyzed the vertical distribution of sandstorm particle grain sizes and horizontal sand-dust sediment fluxes from the near surface up to 80 m high in this extremely harsh but highly representative environment. The results showed that the average sandstorm grain size was in the range of 70 to 85 μm. With the natural presence of sand dunes and valleys, the horizontal dust flux appeared to increase with height within the lower surface layer, but was almost invariant above 32 m. The average flux values varied within the range of 8 to 14 kg m-2 and the vertical distribution was dominated by the wind speed in the boundary layer. The dominant dust particle size was PM100 and below, which on average accounted for 60-80 % of the samples collected, with 0.9-2.5 % for PM0-2.5, 3.5-7.0 % for PM0-10, 5.0-14.0 % for PM0-20 and 20.0-40.0 % for PM0-50. The observations suggested that on average the sand-dust vertical flux potential is about 0.29 kg m-2 from the top of the 80 m tower to the upper planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere through the transport of particles smaller than PM20. Some of our results differed from previous measurements from other desert surfaces and laboratory wind-dust experiments, and therefore provide valuable observations to support further improvement of modeling of sandstorms across different natural environmental conditions.

  13. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC epi-layers by near-surface ion implantation: Influence of the ion species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hallén, A. [School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Royal Institute of Technology, SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-11-07

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a prevailing point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers, and it plays a decisive role in controlling the charge carrier lifetime. One concept of reducing the V{sub C}-concentration is based on carbon self-ion implantation in a near surface layer followed by thermal annealing. This leads to injection of carbon interstitials (C{sub i}'s) and annihilation of V{sub C}'s in the epi-layer “bulk”. Here, we show that the excess of C atoms introduced by the self-ion implantation plays a negligible role in the V{sub C} annihilation. Actually, employing normalized implantation conditions with respect to displaced C atoms, other heavier ions like Al and Si are found to be more efficient in annihilating V{sub C}'s. Concentrations of V{sub C} below ∼2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} can be reached already after annealing at 1400 °C, as monitored by deep-level transient spectroscopy. This corresponds to a reduction in the V{sub C}-concentration by about a factor of 40 relative to the as-grown state of the epi-layers studied. The negligible role of the implanted species itself can be understood from simulation results showing that the concentration of displaced C atoms exceeds the concentration of implanted species by two to three orders of magnitude. The higher efficiency for Al and Si ions is attributed to the generation of collision cascades with a sufficiently high energy density to promote C{sub i}-clustering and reduce dynamic defect annealing. These C{sub i}-related clusters will subsequently dissolve during the post-implant annealing giving rise to enhanced C{sub i} injection. However, at annealing temperatures above 1500 °C, thermodynamic equilibrium conditions start to apply for the V{sub C}-concentration, which limit the net effect of the C{sub i} injection, and a competition between the two processes occurs.

  14. Hydrogeophysical Cyberinfrastructure For Real-Time Interactive Browser Controlled Monitoring Of Near Surface Hydrology: Results Of A 13 Month Monitoring Effort At The Hanford 300 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, T.; Henrie, A.; Johnson, D.

    2013-12-01

    . This infrastructure was used for the acquisition and processing of an electrical geophysical timelapse survey which was collected over a highly instrumented field site in the Hanford 300 Area. Over a 13 month period between November 2011 and December 2012 1823 timelapse datasets were collected (roughly 5 datasets a day for a total of 23 million individual measurements) on three parallel resistivity lines of 30 m each with 0.5 meter electrode spacing. In addition, hydrological and environmental data were collected from dedicated and general purpose sensors. This dataset contains rich information on near surface processes on a range of different spatial and temporal scales (ranging from hourly to seasonal). We will show how this cyberinfrastructure was used to manage and process this dataset and how the cyberinfrastructure can be used to access, mine and visualize the resulting data and information.

  15. Combining moving inlets for measuring gradients of reactive trace gases and thoron measurements for the determination of near surface fluxes -first results from the Amazon rain forest-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörgel, Matthias; Artaxo, Paulo; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto; Trebs, Ivonne; Vega, Oscar; Yañez-Serrano, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many compounds of interest no fast response sensors for the determination of eddy covariance fluxes are available. Therefore, flux-gradient relationships are used. The most common are the aerodynamic gradient method and the modified Bowen ratio method. For those approaches some assumptions have to be made which restrict their use. An alternative approach to calculate these fluxes might be given by the "thoron clock" method. The radon isotope Thoron (220Rn) is exhaled from the soil and has a half life time of 56 seconds. Therefore, it exists in measureable amounts only close to the ground and is hardly advected. Its only source is the radioactive decay of Thorium in soil. As it is a noble gas Thoron is not influenced by biochemical processes in air. Consequently, its concentration profile only depends on vertical mixing and the radioactive decay which is a physical constant. According to Lehmann et al. (1999) and Plake and Trebs (2013) a transport-time can be directly calculated from two heights thoron concentration/activity for the layer in-between without further assumptions. From this transport time the transfer velocity is derived which is then applied to calculate the fluxes of other (reactive) trace gases. A major advantage of the method is that the transport-time is known and using the measured concentration profile the chemical loss of a compound can be directly calculated and corrected for. We have applied this method for a first time in the Amazon rainforest during a field campaign at the ATTO site 150 km North East of Manaus in the dry season of 2014. We measured gradients of NO, NO2, O3, HONO and VOCs by using a movable inlet on a lift system close to the forest floor (0.19 m, 0.52 m and 1.59 m). A Thoron profile was measure in parallel at the lower two heights. First results of the gradients, the transport times and some preliminary flux values will be presented. References: Lehmann, B.E., Lehmann, M., Neftel, A .: 220 Radon calibration of near-surface

  16. Linking the Presence of Surfactant Associated Bacteria on the Sea Surface and in the Near Surface Layer of the Ocean to Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Bryan; Dean, Cayla; Kurata, Naoko; Soloviev, Alex; Tartar, Aurelien; Shivji, Mahmood; Perrie, William; Lehner, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Several genera of bacteria residing on the sea surface and in the near-surface layer of the ocean have been found to be involved in the production and decay of surfactants. Under low wind speed conditions, these surfactants can suppress short gravity capillary waves at the sea surface and form natural sea slicks. These features can be observed with both airborne and satellite-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR). We have developed a new method for sampling the sea surface microlayer that has reduced contamination from the boat and during lab handling of samples. Using this new method, a series of experiments have been conducted to establish a connection between the presence of surfactant-associated bacteria in the upper layer of the ocean and sea slicks. DNA analysis of in situ samples taken during a RADARSAT-2 satellite overpass in the Straits of Florida during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill showed a higher abundance of surfactant-associated bacterial genera in the slick area as compared to the non-slick area. These genera were found to be more abundant in the subsurface water samples collected as compared to samples taken from the sea surface. The experiment was repeated in the Straits of Florida in September 2013 and was coordinated with TerraSAR-X satellite overpasses. The observations suggest that the surfactants contributing to sea slick formation are produced by marine bacteria in the organic matter-rich water column and move to the sea surface by diffusion or advection. Thus, within a range of wind-wave conditions, the organic materials present in the water column (such as dissolved oil spills) can be monitored with SAR satellite imagery. In situ sampling was also performed in the Gulf of Mexico in December 2013 during RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X satellite overpasses. Areas near natural oil seeps identified from archived TerraSAR-X imagery were targeted for in situ sampling. A number of samples from this location have been analyzed to determine the

  17. Assessing the accuracy of 1-D analytical heat tracing for estimating near-surface sediment thermal diffusivity and water flux under transient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; McCallum, Andrew M.; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Andersen, Martin S.

    2015-08-01

    Amplitude decay and phase delay of oscillating temperature records measured at two vertical locations in near-surface sediments can be used to infer water fluxes, thermal diffusivity, and sediment scour/deposition. While methods that rely on the harmonics-based analytical heat transport solution assume a steady state water flux, many applications have reported transient fluxes but ignored the possible violation of this assumption in the method. Here we use natural heat tracing as an example to investigate the extent to which changes in the water flux, and associated temperature signal nonstationarity, can be separated from other influences. We systematically scrutinize the assumption of steady state flow in analytical heat tracing and test the capabilities of the method to detect the timing and magnitude of flux transients. A numerical model was used to synthesize the temperature response to different step and ramp changes in advective thermal velocity magnitude and direction for both a single-frequency and multifrequency temperature boundary. Time-variable temperature amplitude and phase information were extracted from the model output with different signal-processing methods. We show that a worst-case transient flux induces a temperature nonstationarity, the duration of which is less than 1 cycle for realistic sediment thermal diffusivities between 0.02 and 0.13 m2/d. However, common signal-processing methods introduce erroneous temporal spreading of advective thermal velocities and significant anomalies in thermal diffusivities or sensor spacing, which is used as an analogue for streambed scour/deposition. The most time-variant spectral filter can introduce errors of up to 57% in velocity and 33% in thermal diffusivity values with artifacts spanning ±2 days around the occurrence of rapid changes in flux. Further, our results show that analytical heat tracing is unable to accurately resolve highly time-variant fluxes and thermal diffusivities and does not allow

  18. Ten Years of Near-Surface-Sensitive Satellite Observations of Carbon Dioxide and Methane: Selected Results Related to Natural and Anthropogenic Sources and Sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, M. A.; Reuter, M.; Schneising, O.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Prior to the recently successfully launched OCO-2 mission, global near-surface-sensitive satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have been made with SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT during 2002-2012 and are still being made since 2009 with TANSO-FTS/GOSAT, which also deliver atmospheric methane (CH4). The SCIAMACHY and GOSAT overlapping time series of atmospheric column-averaged mole fractions, i.e., XCO2 and XCH4, now cover more than 10 years. During the last years significant progress has been made in improving the quality of the XCO2 and XCH4 data products retrieved from SCIAMACHY and GOSAT and in extending the time series so that more and more applications can be addressed. In this presentation we present some recent results related to CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks. The SCIAMACHY products have been generated using retrieval algorithms developed at University of Bremen. For XCO2 we use an ensemble of data products generated using GOSAT retrieval algorithms developed in Japan (at NIES), in the US (at NASA/JPL and collaborating institutes) and at European institutions (University of Leicester, UK, and SRON, Netherlands, in collaboration with KIT, Germany). Focus will be on three applications: (i) An assessment of the strength of the European terrestrial carbon sink during 2003-2010 based on an ensemble of SCIAMACHY (2003-2010) and GOSAT (2010) XCO2 data products, (ii) an assessment of CO2 and NO2 anthropogenic emission and emission ratio trends using co-located SCIAMACHY XCO2 and NO2 observations over Europe, North America and East Asia, and (iii) an analysis of SCIAMACHY XCH4 retrievals during 2006-2011 over North America focusing on fugitive methane emissions from oil and gas production using tight geological formations ("fracking"). It will be shown that (i) the European terrestrial carbon sink appears to be stronger than expected, (ii) that recent Chinese CO2 and NO2 emissions are increasing but with a trend towards reduced NO2-to-CO2 emission ratios pointing to

  19. Effects of maquis clearing on the properties of the soil and on the near-surface hydrological processes in a semi-arid Mediterranean environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pirastru

    2014-12-01

    the macropores in the grassed soil being destroyed after the maquis had been cleared and the soil ploughed. The results of this work are helpful for predicting the changes in the hydraulic properties of the soil and in the near-surface hydrological processes in similar Mediterranean environments where the natural vegetation has been cleared. These changes must be taken into consideration when developing rainfall-runoff models for flood forecasting and water yield evaluation.

  20. Using machine learning to produce near surface soil moisture estimates from deeper in situ records at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) locations: Analysis and applications to AMSR-E satellite validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Evan J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Bell, Jesse E.; Boyles, Ryan

    2016-12-01

    Surface soil moisture is a critical parameter for understanding the energy flux at the land atmosphere boundary. Weather modeling, climate prediction, and remote sensing validation are some of the applications for surface soil moisture information. The most common in situ measurement for these purposes are sensors that are installed at depths of approximately 5 cm. There are however, sensor technologies and network designs that do not provide an estimate at this depth. If soil moisture estimates at deeper depths could be extrapolated to the near surface, in situ networks providing estimates at other depths would see their values enhanced. Soil moisture sensors from the U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) were used to generate models of 5 cm soil moisture, with 10 cm soil moisture measurements and antecedent precipitation as inputs, via machine learning techniques. Validation was conducted with the available, in situ, 5 cm resources. It was shown that a 5 cm estimate, which was extrapolated from a 10 cm sensor and antecedent local precipitation, produced a root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) of 0.0215 m3/m3. Next, these machine-learning-generated 5 cm estimates were also compared to AMSR-E estimates at these locations. These results were then compared with the performance of the actual in situ readings against the AMSR-E data. The machine learning estimates at 5 cm produced an RMSE of approximately 0.03 m3/m3 when an optimized gain and offset were applied. This is necessary considering the performance of AMSR-E in locations characterized by high vegetation water contents, which are present across North Carolina. Lastly, the application of this extrapolation technique is applied to the ECONet in North Carolina, which provides a 10 cm depth measurement as its shallowest soil moisture estimate. A raw RMSE of 0.028 m3/m3 was achieved, and with a linear gain and offset applied at each ECONet site, an RMSE of 0.013 m3/m3 was possible.

  1. 海浪干扰环境下 UUV 近水面深度控制%Depth control method for UUV maneuvering near surface under wave disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐大伟; 吴迪; 侯恕萍; 赵玉飞

    2014-01-01

    由于在强耦合条件下,积分变结构控制的极点配置问题十分复杂。为了研究了无人水下航行器(UUV)近水面深度控制问题,在积分变结构控制器的设计之中加入了可拓控制理论,为UUV深度控制系统设计了可拓积分变结构控制算法,在解决极点配置问题的同时提高了控制器的鲁棒性。同时,在UUV近水面航行时,海浪引起的深度变化对其运动控制产生了严重的影响,主要表现为在舵的剧烈抖动与磨损、能源的不必要消耗等。针对此问题,采用了非线性输出干扰观测器估计海浪带来的深度方向的干扰,并结合李亚普诺夫理论证明了其稳定性。最后,将所设计的可拓积分变结构控制器与估计得到的海浪干扰应用在 UUV仿真系统中,结果证明了方法的有效性与工程实际意义。%This paper mainly studies the near surface depth control problems of the unmanned underwater vehicle ( UUV) .Due to the strong coupling condition of the UUV dynamics , the pole assignment of the integral variable structure control could be rather complicated .So in this paper , the authors extended the traditional integral variable structure control with the extension control algorithm and designed an extension integral variable structure controller with increased robustness when solving the pole assignment problem with the UUV depth control system .In the meantime , frequent changes in the depth caused by the ocean waves generated lots of problems with the motion con -trol of the UUVs when operated near the surface , such as wear and tear of the motors , consumption of energy , etc. Based on the mathematical model of the ocean wave , this paper estimates the disturbance of the depth according to the nonlinear output disturbance observer with the stability proved by the Lyapunov theory .Finally, the controller and observer were used in the depth control simulation system .The results demonstrate

  2. Near surface geotechnical and geophysical data cross validated for site characterization applications. The cases of selected accelerometric stations in Crete island (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupasakis, Constantinos; Tsangaratos, Paraskevas; Rozos, Dimitrios; Rondoyianni, Theodora; Vafidis, Antonis; Steiakakis, Emanouil; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Soupios, Pantelis; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Sarris, Apostolos; Mangriotis, Maria-Dafni; Dikmen, Unal

    2015-04-01

    The near surface ground conditions are highly important for the design of civil constructions. These conditions determine primarily the ability of the foundation formations to bear loads, the stress - strain relations and the corresponding deformations, as well as the soil amplification and corresponding peak ground motion in case of dynamic loading. The static and dynamic geotechnical parameters as well as the ground-type/soil-category can be determined by combining geotechnical and geophysical methods, such as engineering geological surface mapping, geotechnical drilling, in situ and laboratory testing and geophysical investigations. The above mentioned methods were combined for the site characterization in selected sites of the Hellenic Accelerometric Network (HAN) in the area of Crete Island. The combination of the geotechnical and geophysical methods in thirteen (13) sites provided sufficient information about their limitations, setting up the minimum tests requirements in relation to the type of the geological formations. The reduced accuracy of the surface mapping in urban sites, the uncertainties introduced by the geophysical survey in sites with complex geology and the 1-D data provided by the geotechnical drills are some of the causes affecting the right order and the quantity of the necessary investigation methods. Through this study the gradual improvement on the accuracy of the site characterization data in regards to the applied investigation techniques is presented by providing characteristic examples from the total number of thirteen sites. As an example of the gradual improvement of the knowledge about the ground conditions the case of AGN1 strong motion station, located at Agios Nikolaos city (Eastern Crete), is briefly presented. According to the medium scale geological map of IGME the station was supposed to be founded over limestone. The detailed geological mapping reveled that a few meters of loose alluvial deposits occupy the area, expected

  3. CO2FieldLab project. Near-surface downhole electrical resistivity monitoring for CO2 shallow injection at the Svelvik ridge (Norway).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denchik, N.; Pezard, P.; Paris, J.; Geeraert, M.; Henry, G.; Baqué, L.; Barry, S.; Neyens, D.

    2012-04-01

    The CO2FieldLab shallow injection experiment is a collaborative effort aimed at developing, verifying, and evaluating near-surface monitoring techniques for geological sequestration of CO2. The objective is to create a downhole leakage of CO2 in order to demonstrate whether existing monitoring techniques have the ability to detect and quantify the CO2 loss. The CO2FieldLab project associates collaboration from several research groups and organizations (SINTEF, NGI, BRGM, BGS, CNRS, imaGeau and Schlumberger). For this, the field Laboratory for monitoring CO2 migration and leakage was established in Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, located in the Drammensfjord 50 km south of Oslo (Norway). It is a glaciofluvial-glaciomarine terminal deposit formed during the last deglaciation. The depth to the bedrock is located between 300 and 400 m. The central part of the ridge is aerially exposed up to 70 m above sea level, constituting a phreatic aquifer. The characterization phase and associated modelling suggest that the site is suitable for studying both gas migration and leakage at shallow depths. The shallow aquifer (down to 50 m) consists in a relatively homogeneous sand body with a depositional dip of about 10° to the North. The shallow injection experiment took place in September of 2011 and consisted in an injection of CO2 at a depth of 20 m from a 45° inclined well. The purpose of this phase was to simulate a point source leakage, which could possibly occur due to failure of a deep well completion. A total mass of 1.67 ton of CO2 was injected over a period of 6 days. The water table was located at 60 cm depth during the experiment and a transition from fresh to salt pore water was found below 12 m depth. An integrated set of surface and downhole strategies was deployed across a 64 m2 square monitoring area: cross-hole radar, water and gas phases physico-chemical parameters (BRGM); multi-hole electrical ALERT system (BGS), CO2 concentration in soils and gas

  4. Near Surface Structure of the Frijoles Strand of the San Gregorio Fault, Point Año Nuevo, San Mateo County, California, from Seismic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L.; Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Weber, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    SGFZ. Projection of this low-velocity zone to the surface location of the Frijoles strand suggests a 45° southwest dip on the fault. We also stacked the seismic data to generate a reflection image of the subsurface along the profile. Our seismic reflection image also shows evidence of a southwest-dipping main trace, as well as a second fault located approximately 183 m west of the main Frijoles strand. It appears that there is a component of reverse motion in the upper 200 m. Due to the presence of offset reflectors near the top of the image, we infer that faulting extends to the near surface, but the age of the most recent ruptures cannot be determined without additional paleoseismic investigations. The width and complexity (including reverse motion) of the faults inferred in our seismic images suggests that rupture and strong shaking may occur over a relatively wide area during the next large-magnitude earthquake on the Frijoles strand of the SGFZ.

  5. Laparoscopic real-time en-face differential optical topography of near-surface heterogeneity by using an applicator probe with the maximum-density radially alternating illumination and detection fiber-channels

    CERN Document Server

    Piao, Daqing; Holyoak, G Reed; Patel, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a laparoscopic applicator probe and a method thereof for real-time en-face topographic mapping of near-surface heterogeneity for potential use in intraoperative margin assessment during minimally invasive oncological procedures. The probe fits in a 12mm port and houses at its maximum 128 copper-coated 750um fibers that form radially alternating illumination (70 fibers) and detection (58 fibers) channels. By simultaneously illuminating the 70 source channels of the probe that is in contact with a scattering medium and concurrently measuring the light diffusely propagated to the 58 detector channels, the presence of near-surface optical heterogeneities can be resolved in an en-face 9.5mm field-of-view in real-time. Visualization of a subsurface margin of strong attenuation contrast at a depth up to 3mm is demonstrated at one wavelength at a frame rate of 1.25Hz.

  6. DEPSCoR FY 99: Use of Stochastic Modeling of Stratigraphic Relationships in High Resolution Seismic Reflection Data for Prediction of the Distribution of Acoustic and Geotechnical Property Variability in Near Surface Sediments on the East China Sea Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    Distribution of Acoustic and Geotechnical Property Variability in Near Surface Sediments on the East China Sea Continental Margin Louis R. Bartek Department of...East China Sea Continental Margin 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...collecting data. During survey 221099 in the East China Sea (ECS) and the Yellow Sea (YS) we collected 191 km of 210 cubic inch Generator Injector Air

  7. Electron Concentration in the Near-Surface Graded-Gap Layer of MBE n-Hg1- x Cd x Te ( x = 0.22-0.40) Determined from the Capacitance Measurements of MIS-Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Nesmelov, S. N.; Dzyadukh, S. M.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Lyapunov, D. V.

    2017-05-01

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of MIS structures based on the graded-gap n-Hg1- x Cd x Te ( x = 0.22-0.40) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy were experimentally studied in the temperature range of 9-77 K. The concentrations of majority charge carriers in the near-surface layer of the semiconductor are determined from the capacitance value at the minimum of the (C-V) characteristic due to the high-frequency behavior of the capacitance characteristics of the structures with graded-gap layers with respect to the recharge time of surface states. The electron concentration in the near-surface layer of the graded-gap n-Hg1- x Cd x Te at x = 0.22-0.23 in the working layer, found from the value of the capacitance at the minimum, considerably exceeds the integral electron concentration determined by the Hall method. With an increase in the composition in the working layer to x = 0.30-0.40, the difference in the values of the electron concentrations decreases substantially for the near-surface layers with close compositions on the surface. The results obtained are explained by the appearance of additional native defects of donor type in the near-surface graded-gap layer, and this effect is most clearly manifested at large composition gradients in the graded-gap layer. The results of processing of experimental C-V characteristics are in qualitative agreement with the results of studying the electron concentration distribution over the film thickness performed by the Hall method.

  8. EU project 'ThermoMap'. Model for assessing near-surface geothermal energy potentials; Das EU-Projekt 'ThermoMap'. Modell zur Abschaetzung oberflaechennaher Geothermiepotenziale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertermann, David [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). GeoZentrum Nordbayern

    2011-10-15

    The EU project ''ThermoMap'' aims to evaluate the near-surface geothermal energy potential of the participating countries. The existing geoscience data sets are the fundament for this. Based on the problem and the objectives of the project, the author of the contribution under consideration explains the concept of work, presents the estimation model in a simplified form and gives an insight into the determination of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity.

  9. Boundary-volume integral equation numerical modeling for complex near surface%复杂地表边界元-体积元波动方程数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管西竹; 符力耘; 陶毅; 于更新

    2011-01-01

    复杂近地表引起来自深部构造的地震反射信号振幅和相位的异常变化,是影响复杂近地表地区地震资料品质的主要原因.本文采用边界元-体积元方法,通过求解含复杂地表的波动积分方程,来模拟地震波在复杂近地表构造中的传播.其中,边界元法模拟地形起伏和表层地质结构对地震波传播的影响;体积元法模拟起伏地表下非均质低降速层的影响.与其他数值模拟方法比较,其主要优点为几何上精确描述不规则地表界面,实现精确模拟自由表面对地震波的边界散射;显式应用近地表地层界面的连续边界条件,实现半解析的数值模拟;分区处理近地表复杂结构,有效模拟复杂地表下非均匀介质对地震波场的体散射.数值试验结果表明了该方法的实用性和有效性.%Complex near surface causes the anomalous variation of the amplitude and phase of seismic reflection signal from deep structures, and it is the most important factor to degrade the quality of seismic data. In this paper, we use the boundary-volume integral equation technique to simulate the seismic wave propagation in the complex near surface structure by solving the wave propagation equation with complex near surface condition. In the boundary-volume integral equation technique, the boundary element method can simulate irregular surface and geological structure for seismic wave propagation, and the volume element method can simulate the effect of the heterogeneous medium in low subweathered zone for the seismic wave propagation. Compared with other numerical simulation methods, the main advantage of the boundary-volume integral equation technique is its accurate geometric description of irregular surface and interface to simulate the boundary scattering waves by the free surface; it explicitly applies the continuous boundary conditions of the complex near surface to implement the semi-analytical numerical simulation; it

  10. 基于超声TOFD法的近表面缺陷检测实验研究%Experimental study on near surface defect detection based on ultrasonic TOFD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海卫; 曹江萍; 李刚; 杜文波

    2015-01-01

    在传统的超声TOFD法当中,存在着一定的表面检测盲区。针对这一情况,可采用TOFD与A型脉冲反射超声检测结合以及采用TOFD纵波三次反射的TOFDW检测模式检测近表面缺陷。本文阐述了这两种检测近表面缺陷方法的检测原理,然后结合人工缺陷试块,对这两种检测方法进行了实验验证。结果表明,TOFD与A型脉冲反射超声检测结合以及采用TOFDW检测模式均能够对近表面缺陷进行有效的检测。%In the traditional ultrasonic TOFD method, there is a certain surface detection blind area. In this case, the TOFD and A type pulse reflection ultrasonic detection is used, and the near surface defect is detected by the TOFDW detection mode of wave and TOFD wave. In this paper, the detection principle of these two methods of detecting near surface defects is described, and the experimental verification is carried out with the method of two kinds of detection methods. The results show that the combination of TOFD and A pulse echo ultrasonic detection and TOFDW detection mode can be used to detect near surface defects.

  11. Anticyclonic-cyclonic eddies and their impact on near-surface chlorophyll stocks and oxygen supersaturation over the Campeche Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-De-León, David Alberto; Monreal-Gómez, MaríA. Adela; Signoret, Martha; Aldeco, Javier

    2004-05-01

    Physical and biological data were gathered over the Campeche Canyon area, Gulf of Mexico, in summer 1999. These include hydrographical and meteorological parameters, and oxygen content, as well as, at some oceanographic stations, suspended particulate matter (SPM), chlorophyll-a, and in vivo natural fluorescence profiles. Dry air from the east set up a latent heat flux that ranged from 50 to 300 Wm-2. The wind mixed layer (ML) was isothermal and averaged 40 m thick, but with a noticeable increase of oxygen supersaturation toward the northwest. Temperature and dynamic height structure reveal an anticyclone-cyclone eddy pair. At the southeastern part of the study area a noticeable thermal gradient was observed toward the shelf break of the Campeche Bank, which corresponded to a tilting up (doming) of low oxygen saturation midwater to near the base of the ML. This doming of isotherms along the margin of the Campeche escarpment is likely an upper-ocean response to the sharp gradient in water depth between the canyon and outer continental shelf. It is suggested that the doming of midwater on to the Campeche escarpment and at the head of the Canyon, as denoted by locally low values of oxygen saturation, plays an important role in the biological patterns. Throughout the field area, the values of total SPM were higher than reported previously for subtropical open ocean environments. The impact of autotrophic-heterotrophic biogeochemical processes on chlorophyll was reflected in the local deepening of the deep of chlorophyll maximum (DCM) and the depth of the euphotic zone within the anticyclonic eddy.

  12. BUCKLING OF NEAR SURFACE LOCAL DELAMINATION AND DELAMINATION EXPANDING IN A CYLINDRICAL LAMINATED SHELL%层合圆柱壳体表层局部分层屈曲及其扩展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖道国; 王熙; 苏丹

    2002-01-01

    应用能量法研究了对称铺层的闭合圆柱形层合壳体的表层局部分层屈曲问题;表层分层形式有三角形、椭圆和双纽线;分析了母层壳、子层壳的几何参数、物理参数同分层屈曲临界应变值之间的关系;给出了子层分层为椭圆的分层扩展的可能发生方向.

  13. Direct measurement of grain acceleration in the near-surface coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with Rosetta/OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Guettler, Carsten; Hoefner, Sebastian; Sierks, Holger; Tubiana, Cecilia; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; OSIRIS-Team

    2016-10-01

    We for the first time directly measure the acceleration of individual fragments in the inner coma (interval of 2 hours, and measure their projected velocities as a function of time. The fragments are accelerated at a constant rate either away from the nucleus or towards it, and to both directions in the horizontal dimension. The magnitude of the acceleration is compatible with both gas drag and rocket force induced by the sublimation of ice contained in the material, but approximately one order of magnitude larger than the local gravity. Some of these fragments are likely to escape from the gravitational field of the nucleus and feed the comet's debris trail, while others will fall back to the surface or senter orbit. A significant fraction of the comet's northern hemisphere is thought to be covered by such airfall material (Thomas et al., 2015). This paper describes our images and trajectory analysis, discusses the implications for fragment ejection and acceleration mechanisms, and the expected fate of the fragments.References: N. Thomas et al. (2015), A&A 583, A17.

  14. Estimating the near-surface site response to mitigate earthquake disasters at the October 6th city, Egypt, using HVSR and seismic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel M.E. Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The damage caused by earthquake occurrences in different localities necessitates the evaluation of the subsurface structure. A priori estimation of the site effects became a major challenge for an efficient mitigation of the seismic risk. In the case of moderate to large earthquakes, at some distances from large events, severe damage often occurred at zones of unfavorable geotechnical conditions that give rise to significant site effects. The damage distribution in the near-source area is also significantly affected by fault geometry and rupture history. The microtremor (background noises and shallow seismic surveys (through both the seismic refraction and Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW were carried out in a specific area (The club of October 6 city and its adjacent space area. The natural periods derived from the HVSR (Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio analysis vary from 0.37 to 0.56 s. The shallow seismic refraction data, which were conducted at the area, are used to determine the attenuation of P-waves (Qp in different layers, using the pulse-width technique. The evaluation of the site response at the studied area yields amplification factor of the ground motion, ranging between 2.4 and 4.4.

  15. Dynamic downscaling of near-surface air temperature at the basin scale using WRF-a case study in the Heihe River Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoduo PAN; Xin Li; Xiaokang SHI; Xujun HAN; Lihui LUO; Liangxu WANG

    2012-01-01

    The spatial resolution of general circulation models (GCMs) is too coarse to represent regional climate variations at the regional,basin,and local scales required for many environmental modeling and impact assessments.Weather research and forecasting model (WRF) is a nextgeneration,fully compressible,Euler non-hydrostatic mesoscale forecast model with a run-time hydrostatic option.This model is useful for downscaling weather and climate at the scales from one kilometer to thousands of kilometers,and is useful for deriving meteorological parameters required for hydrological simulation too.The objective of this paper is to validate WRF simulating 5 km/ 1 h air temperatures by daily observed data of China Meteorological Administration (CMA) stations,and by hourly in-situ data of the Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research Project.The daily validation shows that the WRF simulation has good agreement with the observed data; the R2 between the WRF simulation and each station is more than 0.93; the absolute of meanbias error (MBE) for each station is less than 2℃; and the MBEs of Ejina,Mazongshan and Alxa stations are near zero,with R2 is more than 0.98,which can be taken as an unbiased estimation.The hourly validation shows that the WRF simulation can capture the basic trend of observed data,the MBE of each site is approximately 2℃,the R2 of each site is more than 0.80,with the highest at 0.95,and the computed and observed surface air temperature series show a significantly similar trend.

  16. Seasonal variation of near surface black carbon and satellite derived vertical distribution of aerosols over a semi-arid station in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Raja Obul Reddy; Gugamsetty, Balakrishnaiah; Kotalo, Rama Gopal; Nagireddy, Siva Kumar Reddy; Tandule, Chakradhar Rao; Thotli, Lokeswara Reddy; Shaik, Nazeer Hussain; Maraka, Vasudeva Reddy; Rajuru, Ramakrishna Reddy; Surendran Nair, Suresh Babu

    2017-02-01

    Extensive measurements of aerosol black carbon mass concentration (BC) and vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosols have been carried out using Aethalometer and CALIPSO level - 2 satellite data from December 2012 to November 2014 over a semi-arid station, Anantapur. We found a bimodal distribution in the mass concentrations of BC aerosols on a diurnal scale. A sharp peak was observed during morning rush hours (7:00 to 8:00 LT) almost an hour after the local sunrise. After which, a broad nocturnal peak was found during 21:00 to 22:00 LT. The seasonal mean BC concentrations (Mixed layer height (ML)) were found to be 3.45 ± 1.44 μg/m3 (676 ± 117 m), 2.55 ± 0.85 μg/m3 (1215 ± 190 m), 1.22 ± 0.31 μg/m3 (1134 ± 194 m) and 1.75 ± 0.70 μg/m3 (612 ± 135 m), during the winter, summer, monsoon and post-monsoon respectively. The vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficient and back scattering ratio profiles were derived from Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) showed a strong seasonal variation with aerosols mostly confined below 2 km during the post-monsoon and winter seasons whereas in the other two seasons, the aerosol layer expands beyond 6 km. Depolarization ratios (> 0.2) are higher during summer and monsoon at higher altitude regions demonstrate the presence of dust particles, which contribute to the large aerosol extinction at higher levels. These results are further supported by the backward trajectory cluster analysis.

  17. Detailed Geological Modelling in Urban Areas focused on Structures relevant to the Near Surface Groundwater Flow in the context of Climatic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, T.; Pallesen, T. M.; Jensen, N. P.; Mielby, S.; Sandersen, P.; Kristensen, M.

    2015-12-01

    This case demonstrates a practical example from the city of Odense (DK) where new geological modeling techniques has been developed and used in the software GeoScene3D, to create a detailed voxel model of the anthropogenic layer. The voxel model has been combined with a regional hydrostratigraphic layer model. The case is part of a pilot project partly financed by VTU (Foundation for Development of Technology in the Dan