WorldWideScience

Sample records for local heating effects

  1. Global and local Joule heating effects seen by DE 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    In the altitude region between 350 and 550 km, variations in the ion temperature principally reflect similar variations in the local frictional heating produced by a velocity difference between the ions and the neutrals. Here, the distribution of the ion temperature in this altitude region is shown, and its attributes in relation to previous work on local Joule heating rates are discussed. In addition to the ion temperature, instrumentation on the DE 2 satellite also provides a measure of the ion velocity vector representative of the total electric field. From this information, the local Joule heating rate is derived. From an estimate of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity it is also possible to estimate the global (height-integrated) Joule heating rate. Here, the differences and relationships between these various parameters are described.

  2. Effect of Localized Heating on Three-Dimensional Flat-Plate Oscillating Heat Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Thompson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was conducted, both thermally and visually, on a three-dimensional flat-plate oscillating heat pipe (3D FP-OHP to characterize its performance under localized heat fluxes while operating in the bottom heating mode and charged with acetone at a filling ratio of 0.73. The cooling area was held constant and three heating areas of 20.16 cm2, 11.29 cm2, and 1.00 cm2 were investigated, respectively. It was found that as the heating area was reduced and higher heat fluxes were imposed, the thermal resistance increased and the amplitude of thermal oscillations in the evaporator increased and became more chaotic. Using neutron radiography, it was observed that fluid oscillations did not occur in outer channels located away from the region of local heating. Although the thermal resistance increased during localized heating, a maximum heat flux of 180 W/cm2 was achieved with the average evaporator temperature not exceeding 90∘C.

  3. Raman probing of competitive laser heating and local recrystallization effect in ZnO nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J D; Parkinson, P; Ren, F F; Gu, S L; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C

    2012-10-01

    The competitive laser-induced local heating and recrystallization effects in ZnO nanocrystals embedded in a MgO/ZnO stack are reported via resonance Raman spectra. The dependence of the intensity, energy, and resonance effects of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon on laser excitation condition are discussed in the context of Fröhlich interaction. Redistribution of defects, impurity-diffusion, and grain regrowth caused by thermal and photochemical effects lead to significant changes in coupling strength of electron-phonon interaction, and the resonance behaviors are strongly affected by the interplay of local heating, heat trapping, and local structural modification in such nanostructures.

  4. Localized heating on silicon field effect transistors: device fabrication and temperature measurements in fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elibol, Oguz H; Reddy, Bobby; Nair, Pradeep R; Dorvel, Brian; Butler, Felice; Ahsan, Zahab S; Bergstrom, Donald E; Alam, Muhammad A; Bashir, Rashid

    2009-10-07

    We demonstrate electrically addressable localized heating in fluid at the dielectric surface of silicon-on-insulator field-effect transistors via radio-frequency Joule heating of mobile ions in the Debye layer. Measurement of fluid temperatures in close vicinity to surfaces poses a challenge due to the localized nature of the temperature profile. To address this, we developed a localized thermometry technique based on the fluorescence decay rate of covalently attached fluorophores to extract the temperature within 2 nm of any oxide surface. We demonstrate precise spatial control of voltage dependent temperature profiles on the transistor surfaces. Our results introduce a new dimension to present sensing systems by enabling dual purpose silicon transistor-heaters that serve both as field effect sensors as well as temperature controllers that could perform localized bio-chemical reactions in Lab on Chip applications.

  5. Effects of local heat and cold treatment on surface and articular temperature of arthritic knees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, Frederikus G.J.; Rasker, Johannes J.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of locally applied heat and cold treatments on skin and intraarticular temperature in patients with arthritis. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with arthritis of the knee were divided at random into 4 treatment groups (ice chips, nitrogen cold air, ligno-

  6. Local warming of groundwaters caused by the urban heat island effect in Istanbul, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Tolga; Yetemen, Omer

    2009-07-01

    The urban heat island (UHI) is a result of urbanization, causing local microclimatologic changes such as increase in ambient temperature. Factors causing the UHI effect are anthropogenic energy release, energy absorption by concrete, tarmac structures and traffic, although the main factor is the replacement of vegetation with man-made structures. These factors cause heating of not only local air but also subsurface and groundwater. Observations of groundwater temperatures from the urban, southern part of Istanbul (Turkey) and the rural, northern part of Istanbul revealed that the urban groundwater temperatures were 3.5°C higher than the rural. Urbanization is a direct consequence of improvements in technology and modern life. However, this comes at the cost of an ever-increasing demand for energy. Exploitation of low-enthalpy geothermal energy is an attractive alternative to fossil fuel based energies. From the environmental point of view, clean and cheap energy is the most preferable, with heat pumps being the best choice for recovery purposes. Usage of elevated groundwater temperature in the heat pumps in urban areas increases the efficiency of the heat pump system and yields more thermal energy than that of rural groundwater. This system may be applicable to Istanbul.

  7. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-28

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.

  8. Spectral non-uniform temperature and non-local heat transfer in the spin Seebeck effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Konstantin S; Sinova, Jairo; Finkel'stein, Alexander M

    2013-01-01

    Recently discovered spin-dependent thermoelectric effects have merged spin, charge, and thermal physics, known as spin caloritronics, of which the spin Seebeck effect is its most puzzling. Here we present a theory of this effect driven by subthermal non-local phonon heat transfer and spectral non-uniform temperature. The theory explains its non-local behaviour from the fact that phonons that store the energy (thermal) and the phonons that transfer it (subthermal) are located in different parts of the spectrum and have different kinetics. This gives rise to a spectral phonon distribution that deviates from local equilibrium along the substrate and is sensitive to boundary conditions. The theory also predicts a non-magnon origin of the effect in ferromagnetic metals in agreement with observations in recent experiments. Equilibration of the heat flow from the substrate to the Pt probe and backwards leads to a vertical spin current produced by the spin-polarized electrons dragged by the thermal phonons.

  9. The effect of substrate wettability on the breakdown of a locally heated fluid film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, D. V.; Kirichenko, D. P.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of the equilibrium contact angle of wetting on the dynamics of the dry patch propagation and on the critical heat flux upon the breakdown of a water film that is heated locally from the substrate side is studied experimentally. The equilibrium contact angle is varied from 27° ± 6° to 74° ± 9° (with no changes in the thermophysical properties of the system) through the use of different types of surface grinding. The studies are performed for three flow modes: (a) a fluid film that freely flows down along a substrate with an inclination of 5° to the horizon, (b) a film that moves along a horizontal substrate under the influence of hydrostatic pressure, and (c) a static film on a horizontal substrate. It is found that the substrate wettability has a significant effect on the dry patch propagation rate and its final size in all these cases, but has almost no effect on the threshold heat flux at which the breakdown of a film occurs.

  10. Plasmonic near-touching titanium oxide nanoparticles to realize solar energy harvesting and effective local heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiahao; Liu, Pu; Ma, Churong; Lin, Zhaoyong; Yang, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to 2000 nm covering the solar irradiation spectrum completely. The absorptivity of the fabricated array is greater than 90% in the whole spectral range. And the broadband and strong absorption is due to the plasmon hybridization and hot spot generation from near-touching TiO1.67 nanoparticles with different sizes. What is more, the local heating of a TiO1.67 nanoparticle layer is fast and effective. The temperature increases quickly from 30 °C to 80 °C within 200 seconds. This local heating can realize rapid solar-enabled evaporation which can find applications in large-scale distillation and seawater desalination. These findings actually open a pathway for applications of these newly developed plasmonic materials in the energy and environment fields.Through the excitation of plasmon resonance, the energy of plasmonic nanoparticles either reradiates through light scattering or decays into energetic electrons (absorption). The plasmon-induced absorption can greatly enhance the efficiency of solar energy harvesting, local heating, photodetection and photocatalysis. Here, we demonstrate that heavily self-doped titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO1.67 analogue arising from oxygen vacancies in rutile TiO2) with the plasmon resonance dominated by an interband transition shows strong absorption to build a broadband perfect absorber in the wavelength range from 300 to

  11. Effect heat stress on subcellular localization of Ca2+ in tomato fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Garbaczewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to compare the fruit cell ultrastructure and subcellular localization of Ca2+ after heat stress with the use of the potassium antimonate method (Slocum and Roux 1982, Tretyn et al. 1992. The tomato plants Robin cv., relatively tolerant to heat stress, were grown under uncontrolled greenhouse conditions to the stage of fruiting. The plants were placed for 20h in two temperature regimes: 23oC (optimal temperature or 40oC (heat stress in darkness, under water vapour saturated atmosphere. Immediately after heat stress the fruits were harvested to estimate water soluble and insoluble calcium contents and subcellular localization of Ca2+. After heating the concentration of calcium in tomato fruits increased about twice. In both temperature treatments the water soluble fractions were lower than insoluble ones at smaller differences between insoluble and soluble fractions after heat stress. The shapes and localization of Ca2+ detected with the use of potassium antimonate method show that in fruits of control plants the precipitates were numerous, small and of oval shape. They were dispersed in cytosol or adjoined to endoplasmic reticulum or to external membrane of chloroplast. In the fruit of heated plants the precipitates were irregular in shape, amorphous and singly dispersed in the cytosol. We observed also some cytological changes in the structure of membranes and organelles of the plants of both experimental treatments. The heat induced increase of calcium content and the changes in subcellular localization of Ca2+ under heat stress suggest that calcium ions may be involved in avoiding heat injury. The problem requires more detailed further investigations.

  12. The effect of heat transfer laws and thermal conductances on the local stability of an endoreversible heat engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Vargas, L [Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria en Ingenieria y Tecnologias Avanzadas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. IPN No. 2580, L. Ticoman, Mexico D.F. 07340 (Mexico); Reyes-Ramirez, I [Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria en Ingenieria y Tecnologias Avanzadas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. IPN No. 2580, L. Ticoman, Mexico D.F. 07340 (Mexico); Sanchez, N [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. No. 9 U.P. Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)

    2005-04-21

    In a recent paper (Santillan et al 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 2068-72) the local stability of a Curzon-Ahlborn-Novikov (CAN) engine with equal conductances in the coupling with thermal baths was analysed. In this work, we present a local stability analysis of an endoreversible engine operating at maximum power output, for common heat transfer laws, and for different heat conductances {alpha} and {beta}, in the isothermal couplings of the working substance with the thermal sources T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} (T{sub 1} > T{sub 2}). We find that the relaxation times, in the cases analysed here, are a function of {alpha}, {beta}, the heat capacity C, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2}. Besides, the eigendirections in a phase portrait are also functions of {tau} = T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} and the ratio {beta}/{alpha}. From these findings, phase portraits for the trajectories after a small perturbation over the steady-state values of internal temperatures are presented, for some significant situations. Finally, we discuss the local stability and energetic properties of the endoreversible CAN heat engine.

  13. Effect of functional electrostimulation on impaired skin vasodilator responses to local heating in spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Janssen, T.W.; Green, D.J.; Minson, C.T.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces vascular adaptations below the level of the lesion, such as impaired cutaneous vasodilation. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences are unclear. The aim of this study is to examine arm and leg cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) responses to local heat

  14. The Effect of Inclination Angle on Critical Heat Flux in a Locally Heated Liquid Film Moving Under the Action of Gas Flow in a Mini-Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachenko Egor M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensively evaporating liquid films moving under the action of the cocurrent gas flow in a microchannel are promising for the use in modern cooling systems of semiconductor devices with high local heat release. This work has studied the dependence of the critical heat flux on the inclination angle of the channel. It has been found that the inclination angle in the plane parallel to the flow has no significant effect on the critical heat flux. Whereas the inclination angle in the plane perpendicular to the flow, on the contrary, significantly changes the value of the critical heat flux. However, for a given flow rate of fluid there is a threshold gas velocity at which the critical heat flux does not differ from the case of zero inclination of the channel. Thus, it can be concluded that the cooling system based on shear-driven liquid films can be potentially used when direction of the gravity changes.

  15. Response of Local Nitric Oxide Release to Manual Acupuncture and Electrical Heat in Humans: Effects of Reinforcement Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Xing Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to examine the influences of manual acupuncture (MA and electrical heat corresponding to reinforcing methods on nitric oxide (NO release over the skin regions in humans. A device with collecting solution was taped to the skin surface along pericardium (PC or lung (LU meridian. Acupuncture needles were gently inserted into PC 4 with reinforcing stimulation (low force/rate for 20 minutes in the MA group. LU11 on the finger was heated (43-44°C by electrical heat for 20 minutes. Biocapture was consecutively conducted for two 20-minute intervals during and after each treatment. Total nitrite and nitrate (NOx- in the collecting samples were quantified using chemiluminescence in blinded fashion. Baseline NOx- levels are higher and tended to be higher over PC and LU acupoints during the 1st biocapture. NOx- levels over PC regions were consistently increased by MA during both intervals. NOx- concentrations over LU acupoints were increased and tended to be increased by electrical heat in the 1st and 2nd biocapture. The results suggest that reinforcing MA and electrical heat induce NO released from the local skin regions with higher levels at acupoints, which improve local circulation and contribute to the beneficial effects of the therapies.

  16. Heat Transport of Non-Local Effect with Modulated SMBI on HL-2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hong-Juan; DING Xuan-Tong; YAO Liang-Hua; FENG Bei-Bin; LIU Ze-Tian; GAO Ya-Dong; LI Wei; LI Xue-Hong; DUAN Xu-Ru; YANG Qing-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Modulated supersonic molecular beam (SMB) injection is introduced to study transport features of non-local transport phenomenon on HL-2A.Repetitive non-local effect induced by modulated SMBI allows Fourier transformation of the temperature perturbation,yielding detailed investigation of the pulse propagation. Fourier analysis provides evidence for existence of internal transport barriers.Meanwhile,experimental progress of nonlocal effect was made in the HL-2A Tokamak in 2007.The core electron temperature Te rise increases from 18% to more than 40% and the duration of the Te rise could be prolonged by changing the conditions of SMB injection.

  17. Thermoelastic bending of locally heated orthotropic shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, V. P.; Gol'tsev, A. S.

    2007-03-01

    The thermoelastic bending of locally heated orthotropic shells is studied using the classical theory of thermoelasticity of thin shallow orthotropic shells and the method of fundamental solutions. Linear distribution of temperature over thickness and the Newton's law of cooling are assumed. Numerical analysis is carried out for orthotropic shells of arbitrary Gaussian curvature made of a strongly anisotropic material. The behavior of thermal forces and moments near the zone of local heating is studied for two areas of thermal effect: along a coordinate axis and along a circle of unit radius. Generalized conclusions are drawn

  18. The Photovoltaic Heat Island Effect: Larger solar power plants increase local temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Minor, Rebecca L.; Allen, Nathan A.; Cronin, Alex D.; Brooks, Adria E.; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell A.

    2016-01-01

    While photovoltaic (PV) renewable energy production has surged, concerns remain about whether or not PV power plants induce a “heat island” (PVHI) effect, much like the increase in ambient temperatures relative to wildlands generates an Urban Heat Island effect in cities. Transitions to PV plants alter the way that incoming energy is reflected back to the atmosphere or absorbed, stored, and reradiated because PV plants change the albedo, vegetation, and structure of the terrain. Prior work on the PVHI has been mostly theoretical or based upon simulated models. Furthermore, past empirical work has been limited in scope to a single biome. Because there are still large uncertainties surrounding the potential for a PHVI effect, we examined the PVHI empirically with experiments that spanned three biomes. We found temperatures over a PV plant were regularly 3–4 °C warmer than wildlands at night, which is in direct contrast to other studies based on models that suggested that PV systems should decrease ambient temperatures. Deducing the underlying cause and scale of the PVHI effect and identifying mitigation strategies are key in supporting decision-making regarding PV development, particularly in semiarid landscapes, which are among the most likely for large-scale PV installations. PMID:27733772

  19. The Photovoltaic Heat Island Effect: Larger solar power plants increase local temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Minor, Rebecca L.; Allen, Nathan A.; Cronin, Alex D.; Brooks, Adria E.; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell A.

    2016-10-01

    While photovoltaic (PV) renewable energy production has surged, concerns remain about whether or not PV power plants induce a “heat island” (PVHI) effect, much like the increase in ambient temperatures relative to wildlands generates an Urban Heat Island effect in cities. Transitions to PV plants alter the way that incoming energy is reflected back to the atmosphere or absorbed, stored, and reradiated because PV plants change the albedo, vegetation, and structure of the terrain. Prior work on the PVHI has been mostly theoretical or based upon simulated models. Furthermore, past empirical work has been limited in scope to a single biome. Because there are still large uncertainties surrounding the potential for a PHVI effect, we examined the PVHI empirically with experiments that spanned three biomes. We found temperatures over a PV plant were regularly 3–4 °C warmer than wildlands at night, which is in direct contrast to other studies based on models that suggested that PV systems should decrease ambient temperatures. Deducing the underlying cause and scale of the PVHI effect and identifying mitigation strategies are key in supporting decision-making regarding PV development, particularly in semiarid landscapes, which are among the most likely for large-scale PV installations.

  20. The Photovoltaic Heat Island Effect: Larger solar power plants increase local temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, Greg A; Minor, Rebecca L; Allen, Nathan A; Cronin, Alex D; Brooks, Adria E; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell A

    2016-10-13

    While photovoltaic (PV) renewable energy production has surged, concerns remain about whether or not PV power plants induce a "heat island" (PVHI) effect, much like the increase in ambient temperatures relative to wildlands generates an Urban Heat Island effect in cities. Transitions to PV plants alter the way that incoming energy is reflected back to the atmosphere or absorbed, stored, and reradiated because PV plants change the albedo, vegetation, and structure of the terrain. Prior work on the PVHI has been mostly theoretical or based upon simulated models. Furthermore, past empirical work has been limited in scope to a single biome. Because there are still large uncertainties surrounding the potential for a PHVI effect, we examined the PVHI empirically with experiments that spanned three biomes. We found temperatures over a PV plant were regularly 3-4 °C warmer than wildlands at night, which is in direct contrast to other studies based on models that suggested that PV systems should decrease ambient temperatures. Deducing the underlying cause and scale of the PVHI effect and identifying mitigation strategies are key in supporting decision-making regarding PV development, particularly in semiarid landscapes, which are among the most likely for large-scale PV installations.

  1. The Effect of Contact Angle on Dynamics of Dry Spots Spreading in a Horizontal Layer of Liquid at Local Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitsev D.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of equilibrium contact angle on dynamics of dry spot spreading at disruption of a horizontal water layer heated locally from the substrate was studied using the high-speed Schlieren technique. Different methods of working surface processing were applied; this allowed variations of the equilibrium contact angle from 27±6° to 74±9° without a change in thermal properties of the system. It is found out that substrate wettability significantly affects the propagation velocity of dry spot and its final size. It is also found out that the velocity of contact line propagation is higher in the areas of substrate with a higher temperature.

  2. The effect of local dry heat pack application on recovering the bruising associated with the subcutaneous injection of heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci Akpinar, Reva

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of the local dry heat pack application on recovering or alleviating the bruising associated with the subcutaneous injection of heparin. In studies conducted to prevent the bruising associated with the subcutaneous injection of heparin, it is observed that bruising cannot be prevented completely; however, there is a decrease in frequencies and sizes of bruising. There is no study aimed at accelerating the bruising recovery. Quasi-experimental. Thirty-three patients, who were treated for heparin and had bruising in the injection site, were included in the study. One of their upper arms with bruising was considered as the experimental arm, and the other upper arm with bruising was considered as the control arm. 'Local dry heat pack' application was performed on the bruising area in the experimental arm 72 hours after the heparin injection. As the bruising areas in the other upper arm were considered as the control arm, no application was performed. The sizes of bruising areas were drawn on the transparent film and determined as square centimetre. The size of bruising areas was 3·21 ± 3·78 cm² in the experimental arm and 5·22 ± 4·45 cm² in the control arm 120 hours after the injections. The difference between the bruising sizes of the experimental and control arms was statistically significant. It was observed that 'local dry heat pack' application had a positive effect on the recovery of bruising, associated with the subcutaneous injection of heparin. The acceleration of bruising recovery will enable decreasing patients' anxieties, improving their body image and increasing their adherence to therapy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Localized rapid heating process for precision chalcogenide glass molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; He, Peng; Yu, Jianfeng; Lee, L. James; Yi, Allen Y.

    2015-10-01

    Precision glass molding is an important process for high volume optical fabrication. However, conventional glass molding is a bulk heating process that usually requires a long thermal cycle, where molding assembly and other mechanical parts are heated and cooled together. This often causes low efficiency and other heating and cooling related problems, such as large thermal expansion in both the molds and molded optics. To cope with this issue, we developed a localized rapid heating process to effectively heat only very small part of the glass. This localized rapid heating study utilized a fused silica wafer coated with a thin graphene layer to heat only the surface of the glass. The graphene coating functions as an electrical resistant heater when a power source was applied across the thin film coating, generating heat on and near the coating. The feasibility of this process was validated by both experiments and numerical simulation. To demonstrate the advantages of the localized rapid heating, both localized rapid heating process and bulk heating process were performed and carefully compared. The uniformity and quality of the molded sample by localized rapid heating process was also demonstrated. In summary, localized rapid heating process by using graphene coated fused silica wafer was characterized and can be readily implemented in replication of micro scale chalcogenide glasses. A fused silica wafer coated with a thin graphene layer was utilized for localized rapid heating only the surface of the glass. The graphene coating functions as an electrical resistant heater when a power source was applied across the thin film coating, generating high temperature on and near the coating. This process is fast and efficient since only interested areas are heated without affecting the entire glass substrate or the mold assembly. The uniformity and quality of the molded sample by localized rapid heating process was demonstrated by comparing both localized rapid heating

  4. Local electron heating in nanoscopic conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; Sai, Na; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    The electron current density in nanoscale junctions is typically several orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding one in bulk electrodes. Consequently, the electron-electron scattering rate increases substantially in the junction. This leads to local electron heating of the underlying Fermi sea [1] in analogy to the local ionic heating that is due to the increased electron-phonon scattering rates [2]. By using a novel hydrodynamic formulation of transport [3], we predict the bias dependence of local electron heating in quasi-ballistic nanoscale conductors [1], its effect on ionic heating [1], and the consequent observable changes in the inelastic conductance [4]. [1] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, accepted in Nano Letters (2006). [2] Y.-C. Chen, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. 3, 1961 (2003); Nano Lett. 4, 1709 (2004); Nano Lett. 5, 621 (2005). M. J. Montgomery, T. N. Todorov, and A. P. Sutton, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 14, 5377 (2002). [3] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. in press. [4] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, in preparation.

  5. Results from the Phoenix Urban Heat Island (UHI) experiment: effects at the local, neighbourhood and urban scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sabatino, S.; Leo, L. S.; Hedquist, B. C.; Carter, W.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2009-04-01

    in terms of local buoyancy fluxes and possible wind flow modifications by such thermally driven flows will be elucidated. The results are of consequence for understanding microclimate of large cities in order to derive urbanizations schemes for numerical models and to set-up suitable heat mitigation strategies. REFERENCES Brazel, AJ, Gober, P., Lee, S., Grossman-Clarke, S., Zehnder, J., Hedquist, B. and Comparri, E 2007: Dynamics and determinants of urban heat island change (1990-2004) with Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Climate Research 33, 171-182. Di Sabatino S, Hedquist BC, Carter W, Leo LS, Fernando HJS. 2009. Phoenix urban heat island experiment: effects of built elements. Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium on the Urban Environment, Phoenix, Arizona. Emmanuel, R. and Fernando HJS 2007: Effects of urban form and thermal properties in urban heat island mitigation in hot humid and hot arid climates: The cases of Colombo, Sri Lanka and Phoenix, USA. Climate Research 34, 241-251. Golden JS. 2004. The built environment induced urban heat island in rapidly urbanizing arid regions: a sustainable urban engineering complexity. Environmental Sciences 1(4):321-349. Hedquist, BC, Brazel, AJ, Di Sabatino, S., Carter, W. and Fernando, HJS 2009: Phoenix urban heat island experiment: micrometeorological aspects. Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium on the Urban Environment, Phoenix, Arizona.

  6. Local business models for district heat production; Kaukolaemmoen paikalliset liiketoimintamallit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, L.; Pesola, A.; Vanhanen, J.

    2012-12-15

    Local district heating business, outside large urban centers, is a profitable business in Finland, which can be practiced with several different business models. In addition to the traditional, local district heating business, local district heat production can be also based on franchising business model, on integrated service model or on different types of cooperation models, either between a local district heat producer and industrial site providing surplus heat or between a local district heat producer and a larger district heating company. Locally available wood energy is currently utilized effectively in the traditional district heating business model, in which a local entrepreneur produces heat to consumers in the local area. The franchising model is a more advanced version of the traditional district heating entrepreneurship. In this model, franchisor funds part of the investments, as well as offers centralized maintenance and fuel supply, for example. In the integrated service model, the local district heat producer offers also energy efficiency services and other value-added services, which are based on either the local district heat suppliers or his partner's expertise. In the cooperation model with industrial site, the local district heating business is based on the utilization of the surplus heat from the industrial site. In some cases, profitable operating model approach may be a district heating company outsourcing operations of one or more heating plants to a local entrepreneur. It can be concluded that all business models for district heat production (traditional district heat business model, franchising, integrated service model, cooperative model) discussed in this report can be profitable in Finnish conditions, as well for the local heat producer as for the municipality - and, above all, they produce cost-competitive heat for the end-user. All the models were seen as viable and interesting and having possibilities for expansion Finland

  7. Dissecting the Biochemical and Transcriptomic Effects of a Locally Applied Heat Treatment on Developing Cabernet Sauvignon Grape Berries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecourieux, Fatma; Kappel, Christian; Pieri, Philippe; Charon, Justine; Pillet, Jérémy; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Renaud, Christel; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, David

    2017-01-01

    Reproductive development of grapevine and berry composition are both strongly influenced by temperature. To date, the molecular mechanisms involved in grapevine berries response to high temperatures are poorly understood. Unlike recent data that addressed the effects on berry development of elevated temperatures applied at the whole plant level, the present work particularly focuses on the fruit responses triggered by direct exposure to heat treatment (HT). In the context of climate change, this work focusing on temperature effect at the microclimate level is of particular interest as it can help to better understand the consequences of leaf removal (a common viticultural practice) on berry development. HT (+ 8°C) was locally applied to clusters from Cabernet Sauvignon fruiting cuttings at three different developmental stages (middle green, veraison and middle ripening). Samples were collected 1, 7, and 14 days after treatment and used for metabolic and transcriptomic analyses. The results showed dramatic and specific biochemical and transcriptomic changes in heat exposed berries, depending on the developmental stage and the stress duration. When applied at the herbaceous stage, HT delayed the onset of veraison. Heating also strongly altered the berry concentration of amino acids and organic acids (e.g., phenylalanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and malate) and decreased the anthocyanin content at maturity. These physiological alterations could be partly explained by the deep remodeling of transcriptome in heated berries. More than 7000 genes were deregulated in at least one of the nine experimental conditions. The most affected processes belong to the categories “stress responses,” “protein metabolism” and “secondary metabolism,” highlighting the intrinsic capacity of grape berries to perceive HT and to build adaptive responses. Additionally, important changes in processes related to “transport,” “hormone” and “cell wall” might contribute to the

  8. Comparison of the effects of millimeter wave irradiation, general bath heating, and localized heating on neuronal activity in the leech ganglion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Sergii; Siegel, Peter H.; Wagenaar, Daniel A.; Pikov, Victor

    2013-02-01

    The use of electrically-induced neuromodulation has grown in importance in the treatment of multiple neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, epilepsy, chronic pain, cluster headaches and others. While electrical current can be applied locally, it requires placing stimulation electrodes in direct contact with the neural tissue. Our goal is to develop a method for localized application of electromagnetic energy to the brain without direct tissue contact. Toward this goal, we are experimenting with the wireless transmission of millimeter wave (MMW) energy in the 10-100 GHz frequency range, where penetration and focusing can be traded off to provide non-contact irradiation of the cerebral cortex. Initial experiments have been conducted on freshly-isolated leech ganglia to evaluate the real-time changes in the activity of individual neurons upon exposure to the MMW radiation. The initial results indicate that low-intensity MMWs can partially suppress the neuronal activity. This is in contrast to general bath heating, which had an excitatory effect on the neuronal activity. Further studies are underway to determine the changes in the state of the membrane channels that might be responsible for the observed neuromodulatory effects.

  9. An approach to analyzing the intensity of the daytime surface urban heat island effect at a local scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenlai

    2009-04-01

    A landscape index LI is proposed to evaluate the intensity of the daytime surface urban heat island (SUHI) effect at a local scale. Three aspects of this landscape index are crucial: the source landscape, the sink landscape, and the contribution of source and sink landscapes to the intensity of the SUHI. Source and sink landscape types are identified using the thermo-band of Landsat 7 with a spatial resolution of 60 m, along with appropriate threshold values for the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, Modified Normalized Difference Water Index, and Normalized Difference Built-up Index. The landscape index was defined as the ratio of the contributions of the source and sink landscapes to the intensity of the SUHI. The intensity of the daytime SUHI is assessed with the help of the landscape index. Our analysis indicates the landscape index can be used to evaluate and compare the intensity of the daytime SUHI for different areas.

  10. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehade, Ali Ahmad; Gualous, Hasna Louahlia; Le Masson, Stephane; Fardoun, Farouk; Besq, Anthony

    2013-03-18

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance.

  11. Human local and total heat losses in different temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Yin, Hui; Di, Yuhui; Liu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of operative temperature on the local and total heat losses, and the relationship between the heat loss and thermal sensation. 10 local parts of head, neck, chest, abdomen, upper arm, forearm, hand, thigh, leg and foot are selected. In all these parts, convection, radiation, evaporation, respiration, conduction and diffusion heat losses are analyzed when operative temperature is 23, 28, 33 and 37 °C. The local heat losses show that the radiation and convection heat losses are mainly affected by the area of local body, and the heat loss of the thigh is the most in the ten parts. The evaporation heat loss is mainly affected by the distribution of sweat gland, and the heat loss of the chest is the most. The total heat loss of the local body shows that in low temperature, the thigh, leg and chest have much heat loss, while in high temperature, the chest, abdomen, thigh and head have great heat loss, which are useful for clothing design. The heat losses of the whole body show that as the operative temperature increases, the radiation and convection heat losses decrease, the heat losses of conduction, respiration, and diffusion are almost constant, and the evaporation heat loss increases. By comparison, the heat loss ratios of the radiation, convection and sweat evaporation, are in agreement with the previous researches. At last, the formula about the heat loss ratio of convection and radiation is derived. It's useful for thermal comfort evaluation and HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Competition between the Thermal Gradient and the Bimorph Effect in Locally Heated MEMS Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    modeling. As a result, bidirectional bending has been experimentally observed and interpreted as the competition between bimorph and thermal gradient effects. The competition has illustrated the importance of including the thermal gradient effect in the behavior analysis of bimorph driven MEMS/NEMS devices....

  13. Effect of localized heat treatment on the weld line shift in deep drawing of tailor welded blanks (TWBs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satya Suresh V. V., N.; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Ratna Sudheer, G.

    2016-10-01

    This work relates to warm forming of a tailor welded blank (TWB) where in two or more material blanks are welded together and subjected to localized heating before forming to obtain a desired square cup shape. A novel method of selective heating is carried out by using a split punch and a die in which the high strength blank material is subjected to localized heating by the hot punch so as to induce tailored properties by selective heating to soften it thus reducing and controlling the movement of the weld line during forming. TWB sheets which has different thickness/strength need selective heating and cooling to control weld line shift. The stronger material is subjected to localized softening and thereby decreasing the flow stress thus allowing the blank material to flow into the die cavity. Care has been taken so that the heat is not transferred to the weaker blank material otherwise it will lead to further weakening of the part. For this, cooling mechanism is provided by circulating ice water/coolant to the weaker part. The present work is aimed at studying the weld line shift of TWB's of two different materials namely IFHS and DP 590. Cracks appeared in the weld during forming for drawing ratios greater than 1.7. From the results it was found that the weld line shift is considerably reduced as compared with the results using a single punch. Also it was noticed that there is considerable increase in cup height. Local softening increased the formability of the high strength blank material.

  14. Effects of finite wall thickness and sinusoidal heating on convection in nanofluid-saturated local thermal non-equilibrium porous cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsabery, A. I.; Chamkha, A. J.; Saleh, H.; Hashim, I.; Chanane, B.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of finite wall thickness and sinusoidal heating on convection in a nanofluid-saturated local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) porous cavity are studied numerically using the finite difference method. The finite thickness vertical wall of the cavity is maintained at a constant temperature and the right wall is heated sinusoidally. The horizontal insulated walls allow no heat transfer to the surrounding. The Darcy law is used along with the Boussinesq approximation for the flow. Water-based nanofluids with Cu nanoparticles are chosen for investigation. The results of this study are obtained for various parameters such as the Rayleigh number, periodicity parameter, nanoparticles volume fraction, thermal conductivity ratio, ratio of wall thickness to its height and the modified conductivity ratio. Explanation for the influence of the various above-mentioned parameters on the streamlines, isotherms, local Nusselt number and the weighted average heat transfer is provided with regards to the thermal conductivities of nanoparticles suspended in the pure fluid and the porous medium. It is shown that the overall heat transfer is significantly increased with the relative non-uniform heating. Further, the convection heat transfer is shown to be inhibited by the presence of the solid wall. The results have possible applications in the heat-storage fluid-saturated porous systems and the applications of the high power heat transfer.

  15. Effect of a Local Laser Heat Treatment on the Formability of Multi-layered 6000 Series Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merklein, Marion; Herrmann, Jürgen

    The production of multi-layered aluminum alloys using the Accumulative Roll Bonding Process (ARB) is an auspicious possibility to fabricate nanostructured sheet material with enhanced mechanical properties. The increased strength qualifies these semi-finished products for lightweight applications in automotive industry. However, the ARB process also leads to a reduced ductility of the ultra-fine grained material. Furthermore, failure mechanisms like delamination can occur during forming operations. A local short term laser heat treatment according to the Tailor Heat Treated Blanks technology can be applied in order to enhance the formability and prevent failure. Multi-layered sheets of the aluminum alloy AA6014 were produced in a warm rolling process. The mechanical properties as well as the bond strength are investigated within this contribution using tensile tests and T-peel tests. The material characterization is carried out in dependency of the heat treatment temperature. Air bending tests in combination with a local laser heat treatment are used in order to investigate the formability of the multi-layered aluminum sheets.

  16. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  17. Effect of rib angle on local heat/mass transfer distribution in a two-pass rib-roughened channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, P. R.; Han, J. C.; Lau, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    The naphthalene sublimation technique is used to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of turbulent air flow in a two-pass channel. A test section that resembles the internal cooling passages of gas turbine airfoils is employed. The local Sherwood numbers on the ribbed walls were found to be 1.5-6.5 times those for a fully developed flow in a smooth square duct. Depending on the rib angle-of-attack and the Reynolds number, the average ribbed-wall Sherwood numbers were 2.5-3.5 times higher than the fully developed values.

  18. Local Laser Heat Treatments of Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Hietala, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.

    In this work UHS structural and abrasion resistant (AR) steels were heat treated with a single 4 kW Yb: YAG-laser beam. Aim of the softening heat treatments was to enhance the formability locally with minimized strength lose. 1.8 mm thick B24CR boron steel was used for hardening tests. Study presents the possibilities and limitations in laser processing showing that a single laser beam is suitable for heat treating of sheets through the whole cross-section up to the thickness of 6 mm. In the case of the 6 mm thick sheets, the achieved maximum temperature in the cross-section varies as a function of the depth. Consequently, the microstructure and mechanical properties differ between the surfaces and the center of the cross-section (layered microstructure). For better understanding, all layers were tested in tensile tests. The 10 mm thick sheet was heat treated separately on the both surfaces by heating to a lower temperature range to produce a shallow tempered layer. The tensile and bendability tests as well as hardness measurements indicated that laser heat treatment can be used to highly improve the bendability locally without significant strength losses. Laser process has been optimized by transverse scanning movement and with a simple FE-model.

  19. Market: local heating; Markedsanalyse: lokale energisentraler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naper, Linn R.; Bjoerndalen, Joergen

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how the market for local heating in Norway actually works, whether it is (sufficiently) competition, and what influences the growth opportunities in this market. Local heating can play an important role in ensuring a high proportion of renewable energy for heating and industrial processes. However, this requires a functioning market. The theoretical basis for market analysis is Michael Porter's Five Forces model, which incorporates information about different aspects of a market with a view to evaluate the competitive pressure. The model focuses on customers, competitors and their suppliers, substitutes and potential intruders in the market. This model is complemented by simple economic theory of perfect competition and the concept of perfect competition. (eb)

  20. Hepatic Thermal Ablation: Effect of Device and Heating Parameters on Local Tissue Reactions and Distant Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Erik; Goldberg, S Nahum; Kumar, Gaurav; Wang, Yuanguo; Gourevitch, Svetlana; Sosna, Jacob; Moon, Tyler; Brace, Christopher L; Ahmed, Muneeb

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To determine whether variable hepatic microwave ablation (MWA) can induce local inflammation and distant pro-oncogenic effects compared with hepatic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in an animal model. Materials and Methods In this institutional Animal Care and Use Committee-approved study, F344 rats (150 gm, n = 96) with subcutaneous R3230 breast adenocarcinoma tumors had normal non-tumor-bearing liver treated with RFA (70°C × 5 minutes), rapid higher-power MWA (20 W × 15 seconds), slower lower-power MWA (5 W × 2 minutes), or a sham procedure (needle placement without energy) and were sacrificed at 6 hours to 7 days (four time points; six animals per arm per time point). Ablation settings produced 11.4 mm ± 0.8 of coagulation for all groups. Distant tumor growth rates were determined to 7 days after treatment. Liver heat shock protein (HSP) 70 levels (at 72 hours) and macrophages (CD68 at 7 days), tumor proliferative indexes (Ki-67 and CD34 at 7 days), and serum and tissue levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) at 6 hours, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) at 72 hours, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at 72 hours after ablation were assessed. All data were expressed as means ± standard deviations and were compared by using two-tailed t tests and analysis of variance for selected group comparisons. Linear regression analysis of tumor growth curves was used to determine pre- and posttreatment growth curves on a per-tumor basis. Results At 7 days, hepatic ablations with 5-W MWA and RFA increased distant tumor size compared with 20-W MWA and the sham procedure (5-W MWA: 16.3 mm ± 1.1 and RFA: 16.3 mm ± 0.9 vs sham: 13.6 mm ± 1.3, P < .01, and 20-W MWA: 14.6 mm ± 0.9, P < .05). RFA and 5-W MWA increased postablation tumor growth rates compared with the 20-W MWA and sham arms (preablation growth rates range for all arms: 0.60-0.64 mm/d; postablation: RFA: 0.91 mm/d ± 0.11, 5-W MWA: 0.91 mm/d ± 0.14, P < .01 vs pretreatment; 20-W MWA: 0.69 mm/d ± 0

  1. Numerical simulation on heat transfer inside rotating porous disk subjected to local heat flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; XingDan; ZHANG; JingZhou; TAN; XiaoMing

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulation was carried out to study the centrifugally-driven flow and heat transfer inside rotating metallic porous disk subjected to local heat flux. The effects of rotational speed, solid thermal conductivity and porosity on heat transfer were analyzed. The thermal transport coefficient, defined as the ratio of local heat flux to maximum temperature difference on the disk, was introduced to evaluate the thermal transport capacity in rotating porous disk. For convenience, the conjugation between convective heat transfer inside the rotating porous disk and convective heat transfer over the rotating disk surface was decoupled in the present study. Firstly, the convective heat transfer over the free rotating disk surface was investigated indi-vidually to determine the heat transfer coefficient over the disk surface to the ambient air. Then the convective heat transfer over a rotating disk surface was treated as the thermal boundary condition for the computation of convective heat transfer in-side rotating porous disk. Under the present research conditions, the results show that the centrifugally-driven flow is enhanced significantly with the increase of rotational speed. Consequently, the maximum temperature on the disk surface is decreased and the temperature distribution tends to be uniform. The thermal transport capacity in rotating porous disk is also enhanced with the increase of solid thermal conductivity or the decrease of solid porosity. In the rotating porous disk, the solid phase heat transfer is clearly the dominant mode of heat transport and the fluid phase makes an incremental contribution to the total heat transfer.

  2. Effects of local microclimates on the surface sensible heat flux on a mid-latitude alpine valley glacier using Large-Eddy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Tobias; Galos, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    While the large-scale climate conditions play an important role in shaping the environment in which glaciers exist, the mass and energy balance of each individual glacier are dictated by local conditions. Given the complex mountain topography around alpine glaciers, it is not trivial to find a direct link between the large-scale atmospheric motions and the local-scale weather conditions at an individual glacier. Non-local dynamic effects due to the surrounding complex topography can significantly modify the spatial variability of exchange processes, either by small scale circulations or episodic entrainment of heat and momentum by burst events. Motivated by the fact that distributed glacier models strongly rely on the quality of high resolution forcing data to adequately represent the glacier wide ablation and accumulation processes, the present study investigates (i) whether non-local topographic effects have a significant impact on the spatial distribution of turbulent sensible heat fluxes (local microclimates) over alpine glaciers, and (ii) how much variability is smoothed out when using linearly interpolated fields together with the commonly used bulk approach. To answer these questions, we perform highly resolved and properly designed case experiments by Large-Eddy Simulations with real topography to determine the impact of topographic flow features on the spatial variability of the surface sensible heat flux and compare the fields with those derived with the bulk approach. The analysis shows that there is a significant spatial variability of the mean fluxes with values ranging from -10 Wm-2 to -120 Wm-2. Since the sensible heat flux can make up to 40% of the total melting on mid-latitude alpine valley glaciers, the heterogeneity of the fluxes can substantially dictate the local melting rates. When estimating the glacier-wide surface heat fluxes on the basis of point-measurements and the bulk approach, a considerable amount of spatial information is lost. All

  3. The Effect of Local Heat and Cold Therapy on the Intraarticular and Skin Surface Temperature of the Knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, F.G.J.; Rasker, J.J.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Overmars, H.J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of local application of ice chips, ligno-paraffin, short-wave diathermy, and nitrogen-cold air on skin and intraarticular temperature. Methods. Forty-two healthy subjects were divided into 4 treatment groups. A temperature probe was inserted into the knee joint ca

  4. Non-local model analysis of heat pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Takuya [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-10-01

    A new theoretical model equation which includes the non-local effect in the heat flux is proposed to study the transient transport phenomena. A non-local heat flux, which is expressed in terms of the integral equation, is superimposed on the conventional form of the heat flux. This model is applied to describe the experimental results from the power switching [Stroth U, et al 1996 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 38 1087] and the power modulation experiments [Giannone L, et al 1992 Nucl. Fusion 32 1985] in the W7-AS stellarator. A small fraction of non-local component in the heat flux is found to be very effective in modifying the response against an external modulation. The transient feature of the transport property, which are observed in the response of heat pulse propagation, are qualitatively reproduced by the transport simulations based on this model. A possibility is discussed to determine the correlation length of the non-local effect experimentally by use of the results of transport simulations. (author)

  5. The Effect of Local Heat and Cold Therapy on the Intraarticular and Skin Surface Temperature of the Knee

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of local application of ice chips, ligno-paraffin, short-wave diathermy, and nitrogen-cold air on skin and intraarticular temperature. Methods. Forty-two healthy subjects were divided into 4 treatment groups. A temperature probe was inserted into the knee joint cavity and another placed on the overlying skin, and changes in temperature over 3 hours, by treatment group, were recorded. Results. The mean skin surface temperature dropped from 27.9°C to 11.5°C af...

  6. Integrating local urban climate modelling and mobile sensor data for personal exposure assessments in the context of urban heat island effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberham, Maximilian; Hertel, Daniel; Schlink, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Deeper knowledge about urban climate conditions is getting more important in the context of climate change, urban population growth, urban compaction and continued surface sealing. Especially the urban heat island effect (UHI) is one of the most significant human induced alterations of Earth's surface climate. According to this the appearance frequency of heat waves in cities will increase with deep impacts on personal thermal comfort, human health and local residential quality of citizens. UHI can be very heterogenic within a city and research needs to focus more on the neighborhood scale perspective to get further insights about the heat burden of individuals. However, up to now, few is known about local thermal environmental variances and personal exposure loads. To monitor these processes and the impact on individuals, improved monitoring approaches are crucial, complementing data recorded at conventional fixed stations. Therefore we emphasize the importance of micro-meteorological modelling and mobile measurements to shed new light on the nexus of urban human-climate interactions. Contributing to this research we jointly present the approaches of our two PhD-projects. Firstly we illustrate on the basis of an example site, how local thermal conditions in an urban district can be simulated and predicted by a micro-meteorological model. Secondly we highlight the potentials of personal exposure measurements based on an evaluation of mobile micro-sensing devices (MSDs) and analyze and explain differences between model predictions and mobile records. For the examination of local thermal conditions we calculated ENVI-met simulations within the "Bayerischer Bahnhof" quarter in Leipzig (Saxony, Germany; 51°20', 12°22'). To accomplish the maximum temperature contrasts within the diverse built-up structures we chose a hot summer day (25 Aug 2016) under autochthonous weather conditions. From these simulations we analyzed a UHI effect between the model core (urban area

  7. Study on localized induction heating for wafer level packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems(MEMS)are being developed as a new multi-disciplinary technology,which will undoubtedly have a revolutionary impact on the future of human life.However,with the development of MEMS technology,the packaging has become the main technical obstacle to the commercialization of MEMS.An approach to MEMS packaging by high-frequency electromagnetic induction heating at wafer level is presented in terms of numerical simulation and experimental study.The structure of inductor is firstly designed and optimized.Then the heating situation of PCB board is verified.The results indicate that the heat impact on the chip during the packaging process can be effectively reduced by local induction heating packaging,therefore the thermal stress on the chip is considerably lowered.This method can effectively improve the reliability of the MEMS devices.

  8. Local Fractional Fourier Series Solutions for Nonhomogeneous Heat Equations Arising in Fractal Heat Flow with Local Fractional Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fractal heat flow within local fractional derivative is investigated. The nonhomogeneous heat equations arising in fractal heat flow are discussed. The local fractional Fourier series solutions for one-dimensional nonhomogeneous heat equations are obtained. The nondifferentiable series solutions are given to show the efficiency and implementation of the present method.

  9. Local heat preconditioning in skin sparing mastectomy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saahil; Rolph, Rachel; Cornelius, Victoria; Harder, Yves; Farhadi, Jian

    2013-12-01

    Experimental data has shown an association with a reduction of flap necrosis after local heat-application to a supraphysiological level resulting from the up-regulation of heat shock proteins, such as HSP-32. The proteins maintained capillary perfusion and increased tissue tolerance to ischaemia. The purpose of this translational study was to evaluate the effect of local heat preconditioning before skin sparing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. A prospective non-randomised trial was performed from July 2009-April 2010. 50 consecutive patients at risk of skin flap necrosis (BMI >30, sternal-to-nipple distance>26 cm or breast size>C-cup) were included. Twenty-five patients were asked to heat-precondition their breast 24-h prior to surgery using a hot water bottle with a water temperature of 43 °C (thermometers provided), in three 30-min cycles interrupted by spontaneous cooling to room temperature. Skin flap necrosis was defined by the need for surgical debridement. LDI images were taken pre- and post-mastectomy to demonstrate an increase in tissue vascularity. 36% of women (n=25) without local heat-treatment developed skin flap necrosis, 12% developed skin flap necrosis in the treatment group, resulting in a 24% difference (n=25; p=0.047 (95%CI 1%-47%)). LDI scanning of the heated breast demonstrated an increase in vascularity compared to the contralateral non-heated breast. Median length of inpatient stay for treatment group was 4 days (95%CI(4, 7)), controls 8 days (95%CI(8, 9) (p=mastectomy. ACTRN12612001197820. II. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermal response of a flat heat pipe sandwich structure to a localized heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajal, G.; Peterson, G.P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States). Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; Sobhan, C.B. [National Institute of Technology, Calicut (India). Center for Nanotechnology, Department of Mechanical Engineering; Queheillalt, D.T.; Wadley, H.N.G. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Material Science and Engineering Department

    2006-10-15

    The temperature distribution across a flat heat pipe sandwich structure, subjected to an intense localized thermal flux has been investigated both experimentally and computationally. The aluminum sandwich structure consisted of a pair of aluminum alloy face sheets, a truncated square honeycomb (cruciform) core, a nickel metal foam wick and distilled water as the working fluid. Heat was applied via a propane torch to the evaporator side of the flat heat pipe, while the condenser side was cooled via natural convective and radiative heat transfer. A novel method was developed to estimate experimentally, the heat flux distribution of the torch on the evaporator side. This heat flux distribution was modeled using a probability function and validated against the experimental data. Applying the estimated heat flux distribution as the surface boundary condition, a finite volume analysis was performed for the wall, wick and vapor core regions of the flat heat pipe to obtain the field variables in these domains. The results were found to agree well with the experimental data indicating the thermal spreading effect of the flat heat pipe. (author)

  11. Specific heat of a non-local attractive Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calegari, E.J., E-mail: eleonir@ufsm.br [Laboratório de Teoria da Matéria Condensada, Departamento de Física, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Lobo, C.O. [Laboratório de Teoria da Matéria Condensada, Departamento de Física, UFSM, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Magalhaes, S.G. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litorânea s/n, 24210, 346, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Chaves, C.M.; Troper, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    The specific heat C(T) of an attractive (interaction G<0) non-local Hubbard model is investigated within a two-pole approximation that leads to a set of correlation functions, which play an important role as a source of anomalies as the pseudogap. For a giving range of G and n{sub T} (where n{sub T}=n{sub ↑}+n{sub ↓}), the specific heat as a function of the temperature presents a two peak structure. Nevertehelesss, the presence of a pseudogap eliminates the two peak structure. The effects of the second nearest-neighbor hopping on C(T) are also investigated.

  12. Local Mass and Heat Transfer on a Turbine Blade Tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Local mass and heat transfer measurements on a simulated high-pressure turbine blade-tip surface are conducted in a linear cascade with a nonmoving tip endwall, using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The effects of tip clearance (0.86–6.90% of chord are investigated at various exit Reynolds numbers (4–7 × 105 and turbulence intensities (0.2 and 12.0%.

  13. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  14. Solar steam generation by heat localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Hadi; Ni, George; Marconnet, Amy Marie; Loomis, James; Yerci, Selcuk; Miljkovic, Nenad; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Currently, steam generation using solar energy is based on heating bulk liquid to high temperatures. This approach requires either costly high optical concentrations leading to heat loss by the hot bulk liquid and heated surfaces or vacuum. New solar receiver concepts such as porous volumetric receivers or nanofluids have been proposed to decrease these losses. Here we report development of an approach and corresponding material structure for solar steam generation while maintaining low optical concentration and keeping the bulk liquid at low temperature with no vacuum. We achieve solar thermal efficiency up to 85% at only 10 kW m(-2). This high performance results from four structure characteristics: absorbing in the solar spectrum, thermally insulating, hydrophilic and interconnected pores. The structure concentrates thermal energy and fluid flow where needed for phase change and minimizes dissipated energy. This new structure provides a novel approach to harvesting solar energy for a broad range of phase-change applications.

  15. Local Climate Classification and Dublin’s Urban Heat Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent re-evaluation of urban heat island (UHI studies has suggested that the urban effect may be expressed more meaningfully as a difference between Local Climate Zones (LCZ, defined as areas with characteristic dimensions of between one and several kilometers that have distinct effects on climate at both micro-and local-scales (city streets to neighborhoods, rather than adopting the traditional method of comparing urban and rural air temperatures. This paper reports on a UHI study in Dublin (Ireland which maps the urban area into LCZ and uses these as a basis for carrying out a UHI study. The LCZ map for Dublin is derived using a widely available land use/cover map as a basis. A small network of in-situ stations is deployed into different LCZ across Dublin and additional mobile temperature traverses carried out to examine the thermal characteristics of LCZ following mixed weather during a 1 week period in August 2010. The results show LCZ with high impervious/building coverage were on average >4 °C warmer at night than LCZ with high pervious/vegetated coverage during conditions conducive to strong UHI development. The distinction in mean LCZ nocturnal temperature allows for the generation of a heat map across the entire urban area.

  16. Local Heating with Lithographically Fabricated Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold are compa......Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold...... are compared in the visible and near-infrared regions numerically and experimentally with samples fabricated using e-beam lithography. Results show that plasmonic titanium nitride nanodisks are efficient local heat sources and outperform gold nanodisks in the biological transparency window, dispensing the need...... for complex particle geometries....

  17. Strong contributions of local background climate to urban heat islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Lee, Xuhui; Smith, Ronald B.; Oleson, Keith

    2014-07-01

    The urban heat island (UHI), a common phenomenon in which surface temperatures are higher in urban areas than in surrounding rural areas, represents one of the most significant human-induced changes to Earth's surface climate. Even though they are localized hotspots in the landscape, UHIs have a profound impact on the lives of urban residents, who comprise more than half of the world's population. A barrier to UHI mitigation is the lack of quantitative attribution of the various contributions to UHI intensity (expressed as the temperature difference between urban and rural areas, ΔT). A common perception is that reduction in evaporative cooling in urban land is the dominant driver of ΔT (ref. 5). Here we use a climate model to show that, for cities across North America, geographic variations in daytime ΔT are largely explained by variations in the efficiency with which urban and rural areas convect heat to the lower atmosphere. If urban areas are aerodynamically smoother than surrounding rural areas, urban heat dissipation is relatively less efficient and urban warming occurs (and vice versa). This convection effect depends on the local background climate, increasing daytime ΔT by 3.0 +/- 0.3 kelvin (mean and standard error) in humid climates but decreasing ΔT by 1.5 +/- 0.2 kelvin in dry climates. In the humid eastern United States, there is evidence of higher ΔT in drier years. These relationships imply that UHIs will exacerbate heatwave stress on human health in wet climates where high temperature effects are already compounded by high air humidity and in drier years when positive temperature anomalies may be reinforced by a precipitation-temperature feedback. Our results support albedo management as a viable means of reducing ΔT on large scales.

  18. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    SP, of theelectrode reaction. eta is the overvoltage at the electrode. This equation is appliedto a high temperature carbonate fuel cell. It is shown that the Peltier entropyterm by far exceeds the heat production due to the irreversible losses, and thatthe main part of heat evolved at the cathode is reabsorbed......The heat evolution at a single irreversibly working electrode is treated onthe basis of the Brønsted heat principle. The resulting equation is analogous to the expression for the total heat evolution in a galvanic cellwith the exception that –DeltaS is substituted by the Peltier entropy, Delta...

  19. Wafer level bonding using localized radio-frequency induction heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A wafer level bonding technique by localized induction heating has been developed and demonstrated in this paper.A suitable fabrication process scheme has also been established for the localized induction heating and bonding.It takes only about 20 seconds to complete the bonding process.The temperatures of solder loops and the central area of solder loops are above 300°C and below 70°C,respectively.Due to the solder reflow,robust and hermetic glass wafer bonding is accomplished,and the average tensile strength is 6.42 MPa.Under-heated or over-heated bonding has been found to result in cracks at bonding interfaces and sputtering layer,which degrades the bonding qualities.

  20. Contributions to urban heat island on the local neighborhood scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Daniel; Schlink, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Already today around half of the global population is living in urban regions and recent studies expect a further increase until mid-21st century. Therefore, especially in the context of climate change, an increasing amount of urban inhabitants are affected by urban climate and air quality. One special characteristic of urban climate is the urban heat island (UHI) effect, where urbanized regions are warmer than the rural surroundings. With respect to climate change and the growing urbanization it is obvious that the UHI effect will tend to be intensified. To keep our cities worth living, it is necessary to think about adaptation and mitigation strategies which refer to both, climate protection as well as utilization of chances resulting from climate changes. One step to a more precisely adaptation, particularly on the neighborhood scale, is an improved understanding of the magnitude of bio geophysical processes (e.g.: radiation balance, convection efficiency, evapotranspiration, storage heat, anthropogenic heat etc.), which contribute to the urban warming. Considering that UHI can be expressed as temperature difference ΔT between urban and rural areas, we can interpret these processes as how they would change temperature, because of energy redistribution, from a rural area to an urbanized region. Up to now on the local scale there is a knowledge gap about these processes. The mentioned processes are parts of a surface energy balance (based on the work of Zhao et al., 2014). That means they refer to the surface UHI effect and not to the canopy layer UHI effect. Assuming that the urban region is a volume with the top at the height of the canopy layer, we can approximately identify the surface UHI effect as the canopy layer UHI effect since the information comes from both the surface and the atmosphere inside. This assumption is not valid for Zhao's approach because they analyzed whole cities and could neglect such processes within the volume. This contribution

  1. Transport in nanoscale systems: hydrodynamics, turbulence, and local electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale systems is usually described as an open-boundary scattering problem. This picture, however, says nothing about the dynamical onset of steady states, their microscopic nature, or their dependence on initial conditions [1]. In order to address these issues, I will first describe the dynamical many-particle state via an effective quantum hydrodynamic theory [2]. This approach allows us to predict a series of novel phenomena like turbulence of the electron liquid [2], local electron heating in nanostructures [3], and the effect of electron viscosity on resistance [4]. I will provide both analytical results and numerical examples of first-principles electron dynamics in nanostructures using the above approach. I will also discuss possible experimental tests of our predictions. Work supported in part by NSF and DOE. [1] N. Bushong, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Approach to steady-state transport in nanoscale systems'' Nano Letters, 5 2569 (2005); M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, ``Transport in nanoscale systems: the microcanonical versus grand-canonical picture,'' J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, ``Hydrodynamic approach to transport and turbulence in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/05123326; J. Phys. Cond. Matt., in press. [3] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Local electron heating in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/0605312; Nano Letters, in press. [4] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale and M. Di Ventra, ``Dynamical corrections to the DFT-LDA electron conductance in nanoscale systems,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005).

  2. Creation of skyrmions and antiskyrmions by local heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshibae, Wataru; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2014-10-01

    Heating a system usually increases entropy and destroys order. However, there are also cases where heating gives a system the energy to overcome the potential barrier to reach a state with a nontrivial ordered pattern. Whether heating can manipulate the topological nature of the system is especially important. Here, we theoretically show by microsimulation that local heating can create topological magnetic textures, skyrmions, in a ferromagnetic background of chiral magnets and dipolar magnets. The resulting states depend sharply on intensity and spot size of heating, as well as the interaction to stabilize the skyrmions. Typically, the creation process is completed within 0.1 ns and 10 nm at the shortest time and smallest size, and these values can be longer and larger according to the choice of system. This finding will lead to the creation of skyrmions at will, which constitutes an important step towards their application to memory devices.

  3. Effect of curing by products coating on localized heat generation and dielectric breakdown in low-density polyethylene film; Teimitsudo poriechiren firumu no kyokusho hatsunetsu to zetsuen hakai ni oyobosu kakyozai bunkai zansa tofu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Nagao, M.; Kosaki, M. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aici (Japan); Mizuno, Y. [Nagoya Inst. of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-08-20

    Polyethylene is used widely as electrical insulating materials for electric power cables, while the heat-resistance and mechanical properties of low-density polyethylene are problematic since the crystal melting point thereof is around 105 to 110{degree}C. In this paper, curing by-products such as acetophenone are coated on the surface of low-density polyethylene film specimens to make the same diffusing into said specimen, and the effects thereof on localized heat generation and dielectric breakdown are examined. The following matters are clarified by the results of this study. Under dc voltage application, the increasing of temperature is observable in lower electrical field and more remarkable localized heat generation can be found simultaneously with the decrease of breakdown strength in said specimens compared with an un-coated specimen. Especially in acetophenone-coated specimen, dielectric breakdown strength is decreased to about half. Under ac voltage application, localized heat generation is increased and breakdown strength is decreased somewhat. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Interface oscillation of subcooled flow boiling in locally heated microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. T.; Peng, X. F.

    2009-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to understand flow boiling of subcooled de-ionized water in locally heated parallel microchannels. High-speed visualization technology was employed to visually observe the transient phase change process in an individual microchannel. Signal analysis method was employed in studying the interface movement and phase change process. The phase change at locally heated condition was different from those at entirely heated condition where elongated bubble(s) stayed quasi-stable for a long time without venting out. Diversified and intensive interface oscillation was observed occurring on both of the upstream and downstream bubble caps. Evaporation and condensation modes were characterized with distinguished oscillation frequencies. The film-driven oscillations of both evaporating and condensing interfaces generally operated at higher frequencies than the oscillations driven by nucleation or dropwise condensation.

  5. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D., E-mail: grundler@ph.tum.de [Lehrstuhl für Physik funktionaler Schichtsysteme, Physik-Department E10, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany)

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  6. Local/global analysis applications to ground-coupled heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Anzi, Adnan [College of Engineering, Department of Architecture, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Code No. 13060, Safat (Kuwait); Krarti, Moncef [CEAE Department, CB 428, University of Colorado, 80309, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, a new local/global analysis technique is developed to solve multi-dimensional ground-coupled heat transfer problems. In particular, the novel method is applied in this paper to determine foundation heat transfer for buildings with slab-on-grade floors. It is found that analytical solutions can be used successfully to capture thermal bridging effect when integrated in the developed local/global analysis technique. In addition, it is found that significant savings in computational effort can be achieved with no sacrifice in accuracy when local/global analysis is used. (authors)

  7. Local Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers using Oval Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with either a circular tube or an elliptical tube in crossflow. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.56 x 10-3 to 15.6 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 630 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. The elliptical tube had an aspect ratio of 3:1 and a/H equal to 4.33. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of circular and oval tubes and their relationship to the complex horseshoe vortex system that forms in the flow stagnation region. Fin surface stagnation-region Nusselt numbers are shown to be proportional to the square-root of Reynolds number.

  8. Characterization of local heat fluxes around ICRF antennas on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campergue, A.-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Jacquet, P.; Monakhov, I.; Arnoux, G.; Brix, M.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    When using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating, enhanced power deposition on Plasma-Facing Components (PFCs) close to the antennas can occur. Experiments have recently been carried out on JET with the new ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) to characterize the heat fluxes on the protection of the JET ICRF antennas, using Infra-Red (IR) thermography measurement. The measured heat flux patterns along the poloidal limiters surrounding powered antennas were compared to predictions from a simple RF sheath rectification model. The RF electric field, parallel to the static magnetic field in front of the antenna, was evaluated using the TOPICA code, integrating a 3D flattened model of the JET A2 antennas. The poloidal density variation in front of the limiters was obtained from the mapping of the Li-beam or edge reflectometry measurements using the flux surface geometry provided by EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. In many cases, this simple model can well explain the position of the maximum heat flux on the different protection limiters and the heat-flux magnitude, confirming that the parallel RF electric field and the electron plasma density in front of the antenna are the main driving parameters for ICRF-induced local heat fluxes.

  9. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  10. Efficient localized heating of silver nanoparticles by low-fluence femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Sivayoganathan, M. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Duley, W.W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Zhou, Y., E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Obtained efficient localized heating (melting) of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure, which is induced by the excitation of surface plasmon under femtosecond laser irradiation. • Resonance condition is not required here for surface plasmon induced efficient heating; this is different from previous studies where surface plasmon resonance is usually used to obtain enough heating generation. Compared to the previous studies of off-resonance laser heating, the laser fluence used in this study to obtain melting of silver nanoparticles is much lower, only 7.2 mJ/cm{sup 2}. • Beside surface plasmon itself induced heating, surface plasmon induced polymer shell deformation which resulted in electron and ion emission was identified to have certain contribution to the heating of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure. - Abstract: Highly localized heating can be obtained in plasmonic nanomaterials using laser excitation but the high fluences required often produce unacceptable damage in and near irradiated components and structures. In this work we show that plasmonic nanostructures involving aggregated Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be heated effectively without attendant damage to the surrounding material when these structures are irradiated with many overlapping femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at very low fluence. Under these conditions, the effectiveness of heating is such that the temperature of 50 nm Ag NPs can be raised to their melting point from room temperature. Aggregates of these NPs are then observed to grow into larger spherical particles as laser heating continues. Imaging of these materials shows that the initiation of melting in individual Ag NPs depends on the local geometry surrounding each NP and on the polarization of the incident laser radiation. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations indicate that melting is triggered by localized surface plasmon (LSP)-induced electric field enhancement at “hotspots”.

  11. The Urban Heat Island Effect and the Role of Vegetation to Address the Negative Impacts of Local Climate Changes in a Small Brazilian City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Dener Lima Alves

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the influence of urban-geographical variables on determining heat islands and proposes a model to estimate and spatialize the maximum intensity of urban heat islands (UHI. Simulations of the UHI based on the increase of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, using multiple linear regression, in Iporá (Brazil are also presented. The results showed that the UHI intensity of this small city tended to be lower than that of bigger cities. Urban geometry and vegetation (UI and NDVI were the variables that contributed the most to explain the variability of the maximum UHI intensity. It was observed that areas located in valleys had lower thermal values, suggesting a cool island effect. With the increase in NDVI in the central area of a maximum UHI, there was a significant decrease in its intensity and size (a 45% area reduction. It is noteworthy that it was possible to spatialize the UHI to the whole urban area by using multiple linear regression, providing an analysis of the urban set from urban-geographical variables and thus performing prognostic simulations that can be adapted to other small tropical cities.

  12. Heating Effect On Serpentine Jades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-H.; Menu, M.

    2010-08-01

    Besides nephrite, serpentine is also frequently employed as a jade material in China since the Neolithic period. Translucent or opaque, serpentine presents diverse colors, including yellow-green, green, dark green, and tan, which are related to its chemical composition and occasionally to its associated sub-major minerals. Serpentine could be subjected to color change due to secondary alterations or weathering. In this study, we mainly focus on the heating effect on serpentine, as some ancient serpentine jades may have been exposed to heat for some different reasons, such as carving, funeral ceremony or imitating. A series of non-heated and heat-treated raw serpentine jades are examined using Raman spectroscopy and other complementary methods. The subtle change of molecular structure and color of serpentine due to the heat treatment is reported in detail.

  13. Heat savings and heat generation technologies: Modelling of residential investment behaviour with local health costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zvingilaite, Erika; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    their primary heating source with secondary heating e.g. a woodstove. This choice results in increased indoor air pollution with fine particles causing health effects. We integrate health cost due to use of woodstoves into household optimisation of heating expenditures. The results show that due...... for private consumers decrease by 66% when all have the option to shift to the technology with lowest variable costs. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All Rights reserved...

  14. Heat savings and heat generation technologies: Modelling of residential investment behaviour with local health costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zvingilaite, Erika; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    their primary heating source with secondary heating e.g. a woodstove. This choice results in increased indoor air pollution with fine particles causing health effects. We integrate health cost due to use of woodstoves into household optimisation of heating expenditures. The results show that due...... heating comfort is minimised. The private solution may deviate from the socio-economical optimal solution and we suggest changes to policy to incentivise the individuals to make choices more in line with the socio-economic optimal mix of energy savings and technologies. The households can combine...

  15. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the local condensation heat transfer in a plate heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstein, V.; Kabelac, S.

    2012-11-01

    Plate heat exchanger (PHE) are today widely used in industrial heat transfer applications due to their good thermal performance, modest space requirement, easy accessibility to all areas and their lower capital and operating costs as compared to shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Although authoritative models for the design of PHE used as condensers are missing, the number of applications where a PHE is operating as a condenser increases. On the way to a reliable model based on physical approaches for the prediction of heat transfer and pressure drop during the condensation process inside a PHE, the flow and heat interactions as well as their dependence on the geometrical parameters of the corrugated plates and the operating conditions must be studied in detail. In this work the stepwise procedure for the fundamental construction of such a model is described. An experimental setup was built to analyze the characteristics of the two-phase-flow in PHE. A single gap, consisting of two transparent corrugated plates, was tested with a two-phase flow of air/water and also with boiling refrigerant R365mfc. Flow pattern maps were constructed for plates with corrugation angles of 27 and 63 degrees relative to the direction of flow. Investigations of the local heat transfer coefficients and the pressure drop were done with the same plates. The measurement of the local heat transfer coefficients was carried out by the use of the "Temperature Oscillation InfraRed Thermography" (TOIRT) method. Based on these results three main flow patterns are defined: film flow, bubbly flow and slug flow. For each of the three flow patterns an own model for the heat transfer and pressure drop mechanism are developed and the heat transfer coefficient and the friction factor is calculated with different equations depending on the actual steam quality, mass flow and geometrical parameters by means of a flow pattern map. The theory of the flow pattern based prediction models is proved with own

  16. Effect of the heating surface enhancement on the heat transfer coefficient for a vertical minichannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecka Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to estimate effect of the heating surface enhancement on FC-72 flow boiling heat transfer for a vertical minichannel 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. Two types of enhanced heating surfaces were used: one with minicavities distributed unevenly, and the other with capillary metal fibrous structure. It was to measure temperature field on the plain side of the heating surface by means of the infrared thermography and to observe the two-phase flow patterns on the enhanced foil side. The paper analyses mainly the impact of the microstructured heating surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as heat transfer coefficient dependences on the distance along the minichannel length. The data obtained using two types of enhanced heating surfaces in experiments was compared with the data when smooth foil as the heating surface was used. The highest local values of heat transfer coefficient were obtained using enhanced foil with minicavities - in comparison to other cases. Local values of heat transfer coefficient received for capillary fibrous structure were the lowest, even compared with data obtained for smooth foil. Probably this porous structure caused local flow disturbances.

  17. Local entropy generation analysis of a rotary magnetic heat pump regenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

    1990-04-01

    The rotary magnetic heat pump has attractive thermodynamic performance but it is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of the regenerator. This study uses local entropy generation analysis to evaluate the regenerator design and to suggest design improvements. The results show that performance of the proposed design is dominated by heat transfer related entropy generation. This suggests that enhancement concepts that improve heat transfer should be considered, even if the enhancement causes a significant increase in viscous losses (pressure drop). One enhancement technique, the use of flow disrupters, was evaluated and the results showed that flow disrupters can significantly reduce thermodynamic losses.

  18. Chemothermal Therapy for Localized Heating and Ablation of Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Shan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemothermal therapy is a new hyperthermia treatment on tumor using heat released from exothermic chemical reaction between the injected reactants and the diseased tissues. With the highly minimally invasive feature and localized heating performance, this method is expected to overcome the ubiquitous shortcomings encountered by many existing hyperthermia approaches in ablating irregular tumor. This review provides a relatively comprehensive review on the latest advancements and state of the art in chemothermal therapy. The basic principles and features of two typical chemothermal ablation strategies (acid-base neutralization-reaction-enabled thermal ablation and alkali-metal-enabled thermal/chemical ablation are illustrated. The prospects and possible challenges facing chemothermal ablation are analyzed. The chemothermal therapy is expected to open many clinical possibilities for precise tumor treatment in a minimally invasive way.

  19. Effect of orientation on heat transfer in pulsating heat pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumova A. M.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental research of orientation effect on heat transfer characteristics of a pulsating heat pipe (PHP. It is shown that transport of either mass or heat depends on PHP orientation against it`s axis. As a consequence of comparing experimental data with other authors’ results it was concluded that PHP thermal resistance depends not only on orientation but on some other determinal factors such as device construction and thermophysical properties of heat carrier.

  20. Thermal balance and quantum heat transport in nanostructures thermalized by local Langevin heat baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sääskilahti, K; Oksanen, J; Tulkki, J

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of thermal transport in practical nanostructures requires making tradeoffs between the size of the system and the completeness of the model. We study quantum heat transfer in a self-consistent thermal bath setup consisting of two lead regions connected by a center region. Atoms both in the leads and in the center region are coupled to quantum Langevin heat baths that mimic the damping and dephasing of phonon waves by anharmonic scattering. This approach treats the leads and the center region on the same footing and thereby allows for a simple and physically transparent thermalization of the system, enabling also perfect acoustic matching between the leads and the center region. Increasing the strength of the coupling reduces the mean-free path of phonons and gradually shifts phonon transport from ballistic regime to diffusive regime. In the center region, the bath temperatures are determined self-consistently from the requirement of zero net energy exchange between the local heat bath and each atom. By solving the stochastic equations of motion in frequency space and averaging over noise using the general fluctuation-dissipation relation derived by Dhar and Roy [J. Stat. Phys. 125, 801 (2006)], we derive the formula for thermal current, which contains the Caroli formula for phonon transmission function and reduces to the Landauer-Büttiker formula in the limit of vanishing coupling to local heat baths. We prove that the bath temperatures measure local kinetic energy and can, therefore, be interpreted as true atomic temperatures. In a setup where phonon reflections are eliminated, the Boltzmann transport equation under gray approximation with full phonon dispersion is shown to be equivalent to the self-consistent heat bath model. We also study thermal transport through two-dimensional constrictions in square lattice and graphene and discuss the differences between the exact solution and linear approximations.

  1. Improving the crash behavior of structural components made of advanced high strength steel by local heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, L.; Daamen, M.; Hirt, G.; Bambach, M.

    2016-11-01

    High manganese TWIP steel belongs to the second generation of advanced high strength steels. During the production of strip material, the microstructure and hence the mechanical properties of TWIP steel can be adapted to the specific needs of crash relevant structures. Whereas typically the whole steel strip is heat-treated after cold rolling, a local heat treatment can be applied to tailor the properties accordingly. In this work, a method is presented to identify a suitable process window for the local laser heat treatment of TWIP steel. The material is strain hardened and afterwards heat-treated at various temperatures for a short time. The influence of the respective heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties is evaluated and the most appropriate heat treatment is then reproduced using laser heating. To verify the effect of a local laser heat treatment at a structural component, crash boxes with different heat treatment patterns were produced and tested. The dynamic crash tests show that the local heat treatment can be used to improve the crash behavior of structural components. In addition, their deformation path can be influenced by using adapted heat treatment patterns and the crash behavior can be controlled.

  2. Numerical and experimental study of local heat transfer enhancement in helically coiled pipes. Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzoli, F.; Cattani, L.; Rainieri, S.; Zachár, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the last years, the attention of heat transfer equipments manufacturers turned toward helically coiled-tube heat exchangers, especially with regards to applications for viscous and/or particulate products. The recent progress achieved in numerical simulation motivated many research groups to develop numerical models for this kind of apparatuses. These models, intended both to improve the knowledge of the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms in curved geometries and to support the industrial design of this kind of apparatuses, are usually validated throughout the comparison with either theoretical or experimental evidences by considering average heat transfer performances. However, this approach doesn't guarantee that the validated models are able to reproduce local effects in details, which are so important in this kind of non-standard geometries. In the present paper a numerical model of convective heat transfer in coiled tubes for laminar flow regime was formulated and discussed. Its goodness was checked throughout the comparison with the latest experimental outcomes of Bozzoli et al. [1] in terms of convective heat flux distribution along the boundary of the duct, by ensuring the effectiveness of the model also in the description of local behaviours. Although the present paper reports only preliminary results of this simulation/validation process, it could be of interest for the research community because it proposes a novel approach that could be useful to validate many numerical models for nonstandard geometries.

  3. Arctic Ocean stability: The effects of local cooling, oceanic heat transport, freshwater input, and sea ice melt with special emphasis on the Nansen Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudels, Bert

    2016-07-01

    The Arctic loses energy to space and heat is transported northward in the atmosphere and ocean. The largest transport occurs in the atmosphere. The oceanic heat flux is significantly smaller, and the warm water that enters the Arctic Ocean becomes covered by a low-salinity surface layer, which reduces the heat transfer to the sea surface. This upper layer has two distinct regimes. In most of the deep basins it is due to the input of low-salinity shelf water, ultimately conditioned by net precipitation and river runoff. The Nansen Basin is different. Here warm Atlantic water is initially in direct contact with and melts sea ice, its upper part being transformed into less dense surface water. The characteristics and depth of this layer are determined as functions of the temperature of the Atlantic water and for different energy losses using a one-dimensional energy balance model. The amount of transformed Atlantic water is estimated for two different sea ice melt rates and the assumption of a buoyant boundary outflow. To create the upper layer sea ice formed elsewhere has to drift to the Nansen Basin. With reduced ice cover, this ice drift might weaken and the ice could disappear by the end of winter. The surface buoyancy input would disappear, and the upper layer might eventually convect back into the Atlantic water, reducing the formation of less dense Polar water. The created ice-free areas would release more heat to the atmosphere and affect the atmospheric circulation.

  4. Flow impinging effect of critical heat flux and nucleation boiling heat transfer on a downward facing heating surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Huai-En; Chen, Mei-Shiue; Chen, Jyun-Wei; Lin, Wei-Keng; Pei, Bau-Shei [National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science

    2015-05-15

    Boiling heat transfer has a high heat removal capability in convective cooling. However, the heat removal capability of downward-facing boiling is significantly worse than that of upward-facing cases because of the confined buoyancy effect. This study was inspired by the conception of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) condition relevant to the in-vessel retention (IVR) design of Westinghouse AP1000 plant. In the present study, a small-scale test facility had been established to investigate the local phenomena of boiling heat transfer under a downward-facing horizontal heated surface with impinging coolant flow. In this study, the surface temperature, heat flux information and several specific scenes of bubbles are taken down throughout the boiling processes for detailed investigation. It is observed that bubbles are confined under the downward-facing heated surface, which causes a worse heat transfer rate and a lower critical heat flux (CHF) limit than upward-facing boiling. Nevertheless, the impinging coolant flow is found to disturb the thermal boundary layer formed by the heated surface, so the CHF increases with an increase of coolant flow rate. In addition, during nucleate boiling, it is discovered that the growth, combination and dissipation of bubbles induce turbulent wakes and therefore enhance the heat transfer capability.

  5. Active chimney effect using heated porous layers: optimum heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehiris, Abdelhak; Ameziani, Djamel-Edine; Rahli, Omar; Bouhadef, Khadija; Bennacer, Rachid

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to treat numerically the problem of the steady mixed convection that occurs in a vertical cylinder, opened at both ends and filled with a succession of three fluid saturated porous elements, namely a partially porous duct. The flow conditions fit with the classical Darcy-Brinkman model allowing analysing the flow structure on the overall domain. The induced heat transfer, in terms of local and average Nusselt numbers, is discussed for various controlling parameters as the porous medium permeability, Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. The efficiency of the considered system is improved by the injection/suction on the porous matrices frontier. The undertaken numerical exploration particularly highlighted two possible types of flows, with and without fluid recirculation, which principally depend on the mixed convection regime. Thus, it is especially shown that recirculation zones appear in some domain areas under specific conditions, obvious by a negative central velocity and a prevalence of the natural convection effects, i.e., turnoff flow swirls. These latter are more accentuated in the areas close to the porous obstacles and for weak permeability. Furthermore, when fluid injection or suction is considered, the heat transfer increases under suction and reduces under injection. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  6. Novel localized heating technique on centrifugal microfluidic disc with wireless temperature monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of centrifugal microfluidic disc suggest the need for electrical interface in the disc to perform active biomedical assays. In this paper, we have demonstrated an active application powered by the energy harvested from the rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disc. A novel integration of power harvester disc onto centrifugal microfluidic disc to perform localized heating technique is the main idea of our paper. The power harvester disc utilizing electromagnetic induction mechanism generates electrical energy from the rotation of the disc. This contributes to the heat generation by the embedded heater on the localized heating disc. The main characteristic observed in our experiment is the heating pattern in relative to the rotation of the disc. The heating pattern is monitored wirelessly with a digital temperature sensing system also embedded on the disc. Maximum temperature achieved is 82 °C at rotational speed of 2000 RPM. The technique proves to be effective for continuous heating without the need to stop the centrifugal motion of the disc.

  7. Linear irreversible heat engines based on local equilibrium assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumida, Yuki; Okuda, Koji

    2015-08-01

    We formulate an endoreversible finite-time Carnot cycle model based on the assumptions of local equilibrium and constant energy flux, where the efficiency and the power are expressed in terms of the thermodynamic variables of the working substance. By analyzing the entropy production rate caused by the heat transfer in each isothermal process during the cycle, and using the endoreversible condition applied to the linear response regime, we identify the thermodynamic flux and force of the present system and obtain a linear relation that connects them. We calculate the efficiency at maximum power in the linear response regime by using the linear relation, which agrees with the Curzon-Ahlborn (CA) efficiency known as the upper bound in this regime. This reason is also elucidated by rewriting our model into the form of the Onsager relations, where our model turns out to satisfy the tight-coupling condition leading to the CA efficiency.

  8. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects.

  9. Selective domain wall depinning by localized Oersted fields and Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgaz, Dennis; Kläui, Mathias; Heyne, Lutz; Boulle, Olivier; Zinser, Fabian; Krzyk, Stephen; Fonin, Mikhail; Rüdiger, Ulrich; Backes, Dirk; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2008-09-01

    Using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, the possibility to selectively move a domain wall locally by applying current pulses through a Au nanowire adjacent to a permalloy element is studied. We find that the domain wall depinning field is drastically modified with increasing current density due to the Joule heating and the Oersted field of the current, and controlled motion due to the Oersted field without any externally applied fields is achieved. By placing the domain wall at various distances from the Au wire, we determine the range of the Joule heating and the Oersted field and both effects can be separated.

  10. Localized corrosion of aluminum alloys for OTEC heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, S C

    1979-01-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen, pH and temperature on the rate of initiation and growth of pitting and crevice corrosion of aluminum alloy 5052 and pure aluminum have been determined. Variations in pH and temperature rather than dissolved oxygen are shown to account for increased corrosion rates of 5000 series aluminum alloys that have been reported for deep ocean exposures. The impact of these results on the use of aluminum for OTEC heat exchanger tubing and on possible approaches to corrosion control are discussed.

  11. Harvesting Nanocatalytic Heat Localized in Nanoalloy Catalyst as a Heat Source in a Nanocomposite Thin Film Thermoelectric Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Shan, Shiyao; Luo, Jin; Mott, Derrick M; Maenosono, Shinya; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-10-20

    This report describes findings of an investigation of harvesting nanocatalytic heat localized in a nanoalloy catalyst layer as a heat source in a nanocomposite thin film thermoelectric device for thermoelectric energy conversion. This device couples a heterostructured copper-zinc sulfide nanocomposite for thermoelectrics and low-temperature combustion of methanol fuels over a platinum-cobalt nanoalloy catalyst for producing heat localized in the nanocatalyst layer. The possibility of tuning nanocatalytic heat in the nanocatalyst and thin film thermoelectric properties by compositions points to a promising pathway in thermoelectric energy conversion.

  12. Effects of Lewis number on coupled heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subjected to external convective heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Anjun; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Hongbin; Critser, John

    2009-03-01

    Heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subject to the boundary condition of the third kind is investigated. The closed form of temperature and concentration distributions, the local Nusselt number based on the total external heat transfer and convective heat transfer inside the tube, as well as the Sherwood number were obtained. The effects of Lewis number and Biot number on heat and mass transfer were investigated.

  13. Heat-Pipe-Associated Localized Thermoelectric Power Generation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan-Jo; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Jang, Ju-Chan; Lee, Wook-Hyun; Lee, Ki-Woo

    2014-06-01

    The present study focused on how to improve the maximum power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system and move heat to any suitable space using a TEG associated with a loop thermosyphon (loop-type heat pipe). An experimental study was carried out to investigate the power output, the temperature difference of the thermoelectric module (TEM), and the heat transfer performance associated with the characteristic of the researched heat pipe. Currently, internal combustion engines lose more than 35% of their fuel energy as recyclable heat in the exhaust gas, but it is not easy to recycle waste heat using TEGs because of the limited space in vehicles. There are various advantages to use of TEGs over other power sources, such as the absence of moving parts, a long lifetime, and a compact system configuration. The present study presents a novel TEG concept to transfer heat from the heat source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any location. This simple and novel design for a TEG can be applied to future hybrid cars. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate power of around 1.8 V with T TEM = 58°C. The heat transfer performance of a loop-type heat pipe with various working fluids was investigated, with water at high heat flux (90 W) and 0.05% TiO2 nanofluid at low heat flux (30 W to 70 W) showing the best performance in terms of power generation. The heat pipe can transfer the heat to any location where the TEM is installed.

  14. Thermal model of local ultrasound heating of biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedogovor, V. A.; Sigal, V. L.; Popsuev, E. I.

    1996-09-01

    Possibilities of creation of controlled temperature fields in deep-seated biological tissue with the use of an endocavity ultrasound applicator with surface cooling are considered. Mathematical models are proposed and calculated that make it possible to construct acoustic and thermal fields in biotissues depending on the thermophysical and ultrasound characteristics of the medium being irradiated and to reveal situations and effects that are important for solving problems of practical medicine in the field of local ultrasound hyperthermia and thermotherapy of tissue.

  15. Localized self-heating in large arrays of 1D nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monereo, O.; Illera, S.; Varea, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sauerwald, T.; Schütze, A.; Cirera, A.; Prades, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal efficiency was attributed to the small dimensions of the objects). Infrared thermography and Raman spectroscopy were used to map the temperature profiles of films based on random arrangements of carbon nanofibers during self-heating. Both the techniques demonstrate consistently that heating concentrates in small regions, the here-called ``hot-spots''. On correlating dynamic temperature mapping with electrical measurements, we also observed that these minute hot-spots rule the resistance values observed macroscopically. A physical model of a random network of 1D resistors helped us to explain this observation. The model shows that, for a given random arrangement of 1D nanowires, current spreading through the network ends up defining a set of spots that dominate both the electrical resistance and power dissipation. Such highly localized heating explains the high power savings observed in larger nanostructured systems. This understanding opens a path to design highly efficient self-heating systems, based on random or pseudo-random distributions of 1D nanostructures.One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer a promising path towards highly efficient heating and temperature control in integrated microsystems. The so called self-heating effect can be used to modulate the response of solid state gas sensor devices. In this work, efficient self-heating was found to occur at random networks of nanostructured systems with similar power requirements to highly ordered systems (e.g. individual nanowires, where their thermal

  16. Urban Heat Island Effect Actions - Neighborhood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisville Metro Government — The urban heat island effect — defined as the difference in temperature between the core of Louisville and its suburbs — contributes to heat-related illnesses and...

  17. Measurements of local convective heat transfer coefficients on ice accretion shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimilli, R. V.; Keshock, E. G.; Smith, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The thin-skin heat rate technique was used to determine local convective heat transfer coefficients for four representative ice accretion shapes. The shapes represented three stages of glaze ice formation and one rime ice formation; the ice models had varying degrees of surface roughness. In general, convective heat transfer was higher in regions where the model's surfaces were convex and lower in regions where the surfaces were concave. The effect of roughness was different for the glaze and rime ice shapes. On the glaze ice shapes, roughness increased the maximum Nu by 80 percent, but the other Nu values were virtually unchanged. On the rime ice shape, the Nu numbers near the stagnation point were unchanged. The maximum Nu value increased by 45 percent, and the Nu number downstream of the peak increased by approximately 150 percent.

  18. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN TITANIUM ALLOY DURING ELECTRON BEAM LOCAL POST-WELD HEAT TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Furong; Huo Lixing; Zhang Yufeng; Liu Fangjun; Chen Gang

    2005-01-01

    The distributions of temperature and residual stresses in thin plates of BT20 titanium alloy are numerically analyzed by three-dimensional finite element software during electron beam welding and electron beam local post-weld heat treatment (EBLPWHT). Combined with numerical calculating results, the effects of different EBLPWHT mode and parameters, including heat treating position,heating width and heating time, on the distribution of welding residual stresses are analyzed. The results show that, the residual tensile stresses in weld center can be largely decreased when the weld is heat treated at back preface of the plate. The numerical results also indicated that the magnitude of the residual longitudinal stresses of the weld and the zone vicinity of the weld is decreased, and the range of the residual longitudinal stresses is increased along with the increase of heating width and heating time.

  19. Effects of heat current on magnetization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetro, Francesco Antonio; Brechet, Sylvain; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    The work is aimed at investigating the interplay between spin dynamics and heat currents in single-crystal Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). The irreversible thermodynamics for a continuous medium predicts that a thermal gradient, in the presence of magnetization waves, produces a magnetic induction field, thus a magnetic analog of the well-known Seebeck effect. Time-resolved transmission measurements revealed a change in the attenuation of magnetization waves propagating along the thermal gradient when the gradient is reversed. This magnetic damping change can be accounted for by the Magnetic Seebeck effect. In order to characterize this effect further, we have conducted studies on magnetization dynamic in YIG single crystal samples placed in various geometrical configurations, e.g. with YIG disks in which magnetic vortices might be present. Various magnetic resonance schemes were used, e.g. local probes and cavities.

  20. Time-resolved, local temperature measurements during pulsed laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Li Chen; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Gutmann, Jochen S, E-mail: kappes@mpip-mainz.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To analyse processes during laser heating, one needs to be able to measure temperatures of about 1000 K within one microsecond and with micrometre resolution. To achieve this accuracy, we set up a high-performance optical detection system with a microsecond gated camera in combination with selected interference filters to detect the thermal emission spectrum in the visible range. By fitting the emission spectrum to Planck's law, we are able to collect an area temperature profile for time intervals as short as one microsecond. Thus we can show that a polymer film, which is doped with an organic dye for energy conversion, can reach temperatures of at least 900 K, which is high above its 'normal' decomposition temperature. It is, furthermore, possible to relate the temperature to the effect of the laser beam on the polymer film.

  1. Improving the performance of district heating systems by utilization of local heat boosters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falcone, A.; Dominkovic, D. F.; Pedersen, A. S.

    LTDH grid as they will have the strategical role of connecting the heating system with the electrical energy coming from the intermittent and fluctuating renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. In this paper a case study of district heating system is presented and analysed. The goal......District Heating (DH) plays an important role into the Danish energy green transition towards the future sustainable energy systems. The new, 4 th generation district heating network, the so called Low Temperature District Heating (LTDH), tends to lower the supply temperature of the heat down to 40......-50°C with return temperatures of 20-30 °C. This kind of heating system has many advantages and among all of them, it allows utilization of the heat coming from low exergy heat sources, as well as to decrease the grid heat losses. Electrical energy driven heat sources are also integrated into the future...

  2. Welding of Semiconductor Nanowires by Coupling Laser-Induced Peening and Localized Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickey, Kelly M.; Nian, Qiong; Zhang, Genqiang; Chen, Liangliang; Suslov, Sergey; Bhat, S. Venkataprasad; Wu, Yue; Cheng, Gary J.; Ruan, Xiulin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that laser peening coupled with sintering of CdTe nanowire films substantially enhances film quality and charge transfer while largely maintaining basic particle morphology. During the laser peening phase, a shockwave is used to compress the film. Laser sintering comprises the second step, where a nanosecond pulse laser beam welds the nanowires. Microstructure, morphology, material content, and electrical conductivities of the films are characterized before and after treatment. The morphology results show that laser peening can decrease porosity and bring nanowires into contact, and pulsed laser heating fuses those contacts. Multiphysics simulations coupling electromagnetic and heat transfer modules demonstrate that during pulsed laser heating, local EM field enhancement is generated specifically around the contact areas between two semiconductor nanowires, indicating localized heating. The characterization results indicate that solely laser peening or sintering can only moderately improve the thin film quality; however, when coupled together as laser peen sintering (LPS), the electrical conductivity enhancement is dramatic. LPS can decrease resistivity up to a factor of ~10,000, resulting in values on the order of ~105 Ω-cm in some cases, which is comparable to CdTe thin films. Our work demonstrates that LPS is an effective processing method to obtain high-quality semiconductor nanocrystal films.

  3. Welding of Semiconductor Nanowires by Coupling Laser-Induced Peening and Localized Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickey, Kelly M.; Nian, Qiong; Zhang, Genqiang; Chen, Liangliang; Suslov, Sergey; Bhat, S. Venkataprasad; Wu, Yue; Cheng, Gary J.; Ruan, Xiulin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that laser peening coupled with sintering of CdTe nanowire films substantially enhances film quality and charge transfer while largely maintaining basic particle morphology. During the laser peening phase, a shockwave is used to compress the film. Laser sintering comprises the second step, where a nanosecond pulse laser beam welds the nanowires. Microstructure, morphology, material content, and electrical conductivities of the films are characterized before and after treatment. The morphology results show that laser peening can decrease porosity and bring nanowires into contact, and pulsed laser heating fuses those contacts. Multiphysics simulations coupling electromagnetic and heat transfer modules demonstrate that during pulsed laser heating, local EM field enhancement is generated specifically around the contact areas between two semiconductor nanowires, indicating localized heating. The characterization results indicate that solely laser peening or sintering can only moderately improve the thin film quality; however, when coupled together as laser peen sintering (LPS), the electrical conductivity enhancement is dramatic. LPS can decrease resistivity up to a factor of ~10,000, resulting in values on the order of ~105 Ω-cm in some cases, which is comparable to CdTe thin films. Our work demonstrates that LPS is an effective processing method to obtain high-quality semiconductor nanocrystal films. PMID:26527570

  4. local alternative sources for cogeneration combined heat and power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agll, Abdulhakim Amer

    Global demand for energy continues to grow while countries around the globe race to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions by implementing policy measures and advancing technology. Sustainability has become an important issue in transportation and infrastructure development projects. While several agencies are trying to incorporate a range of sustainability measures in their goals and missions, only a few planning agencies have been able to implement these policies and they are far from perfect. The low rate of success in implementing sustainable policies is primarily due to incomplete understanding of the system and the interaction between various elements of the system. The conventional planning efforts focuses mainly on performance measures pertaining to the system and its impact on the environment but seldom on the social and economic impacts. The objective of this study is to use clean and alternative energy can be produced from many sources, and even use existing materials for energy generation. One such pathway is using wastewater, animal and organic waste, or landfills to create biogas for energy production. There are three tasks for this study. In topic one evaluated the energy saving that produced from combined hydrogen, heat, and power and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions by using local sustainable energy at the Missouri S&T campus to reduce energy consumption and fossil fuel usage. Second topic aimed to estimate energy recovery and power generation from alternative energy source by using Rankin steam cycle from municipal solid waste at Benghazi-Libya. And the last task is in progress. The results for topics one and two have been presented.

  5. Interface delamination of the thermal barrier coating subjected to local heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the possible failure modes of the thermal barrier coating (TBC) used to protect the scramjet combustion chamber, the local heating via laser beam irradiation was utilized to simulate the service condition of high thermal flux and high temperature gradient. Firstly, the experimental method and process were described and the typical fracture morphology of the TBC under test were provided. Then, the theoretical and finite element modeling were carried out to study the temperature, deformation and stresses of the specimen when the top ceramic coat was subjected to local heating, and to demonstrate the mechanism on the failure of the TBC. It is revealed that the interface delamination shall appear and ultimately lead to the failure of the TBC under such thermal loading of local quick heating. According to the outcome of this study, the driving force of the interface delamination is influenced greatly by the key structural parameters and performance matching. Moreover, by utilizing the rules of the effects of these parameters on the fracture driving force, there is some possibility for the designer to optimize the performances of the TBC.

  6. A new computational method for fractal heat-diffusion via local fractional derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Geng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractal heat-conduction problem via local fractional derivative is investigated in this paper. The solution of the fractal heat-diffusion equation is obtained. The characteristic equation method is proposed to find the analytical solution of the partial differential equation in fractal heat-conduction problem.

  7. Characteristic equation method for fractal heat-transfer problem via local fractional calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Geng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the fractal heat-transfer problem described by the theory of local fractional calculus is considered. The non-differentiable-type solution of the heat-transfer equation is obtained. The characteristic equation method is proposed as a powerful technology to illustrate the analytical solution of the partial differential equation in fractal heat transfer.

  8. Measurement of localized heating in the focus of an optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celliers, Peter M. [Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Conia, Jerome [Cell Robotics, Inc., 2715 Broadbent Parkway NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Localized heating in the focus of an optical trap operating in water can result in a temperature rise of several kelvins. We present spatially resolved measurements of the refractive-index distribution induced by the localized heating produced in an optical trap and infer the temperature distribution. We have determined a peak temperature rise in water of 4 K in the focus of a 985-nm-wavelength 55-mW laser beam. The localized heating is directly proportional to power and the absorption coefficient. The temperature distribution is in excellent agreement with a model based on the heat equation. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  9. Local fractional Euler’s method for the steady heat-conduction problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the local fractional Euler’s method is proposed to consider the steady heat-conduction problem for the first time. The numerical solution for the local fractional heat-relaxation equation is presented. The comparison between numerical and exact solutions is discussed.

  10. Characteristic of Local Boiling Heat Transfer of Ammonia / Water Binary Mixture on the Plate Type Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Akiyama, Hirokuni; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) are expected to be the next generation energy production systems. Both systems use a plate type evaporator, and ammonia or ammonia/water mixture as a working fluid. It is important to clarify heat transfer characteristic for designing efficient power generation systems. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients and visualization were performed for ammonia /water mixture (z = 0.9) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5 - 15 kg/m2s), heat flux (15 - 23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7 - 0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of vapor quality and mass flux, and decrease with an increase of heat flux, and the influence of the flow pattern on the local heat transfer coefficient is observed.

  11. Local heat transfer in an in-line tube bundle with asymmetrical flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the local heat transfer in themiddle of a small in-line tube bundle with longitudinal to transverse pitches of $1.5\\times 1.8$ are performed at a Reynolds number of $30\\,000$. Asymmetrical distributions of the local heat transfer are found. The distributions are in good agreement...... with earlier flow measurements. The mean heat transfer rate is only little affected bythe asymmetrical conditions....

  12. Local Non-Similarity Solution of Coupled Heat-Mass Transfer of a Flat Plate with Uniform Heat Flux in a Laminar Parallel Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    The coupled heat and mass transfer problem of gas flow over a UHF flat plate with its wall coated with sublimable substance was been solved by local non-smimilarity method.Considerations have been given also to the effect of non-saturation of the sublimable substance in the oncoming flow and the normal injection velocity at the surface.Analytical results are given for local Noselt and Sherwood Numbers at the various locations.

  13. Development of high effectiveness droplet heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, W. J., III; Sekins, K. M.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1985-04-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been carried out to assess the feasibility of developing high effectiveness, high temperature droplet heat exchangers and to identify practical applications for this type of direct contact heat exchanger. The droplet heat exchanger (DHX) concept studies uses a counterflowing gas and droplet configuration, uniformly sized droplets or particles, and a uniform dispersion of droplets in gas to achieve high heat exchanger effectiveness. Direct contact between the heat transfer media eliminates the solid heat transfer surfaces that are used in conventional heat exchangers and is expected to make very high temperature heat transfer practical. Low temperature simulation tests and analysis have been used to demonstrate that uniformly sized droplets can be generated over a wide range of fluid properties and operating conditions appropriate for high temperature droplet heat exchanger applications. One- and two-dimensional, two-phase flow and heat transfer computer models have been developed and used to characterize both individual component configurations and overall DHX heat transfer rates and effectiveness. The computer model and test data began to diverge as the operating pressure was increased, indicating a need for more general transport rate correlations and a better understanding of the two-phase flows that govern DHX operation.

  14. Momentum transport and non-local transport in heat-flux-driven magnetic reconnection in HEDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Fox, Will; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    Strong magnetic fields are readily generated in high-energy-density plasmas and can affect the heat confinement properties of the plasma. Magnetic reconnection can in turn be important as an inverse process, which destroys or reconfigures the magnetic field. Recent theory has demonstrated a novel physics regime for reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas where the magnetic field is advected into the reconnection layer by plasma heat flux via the Nernst effect. In this work we elucidate the physics of the electron dissipation layer in this heat-flux-driven regime. Through fully kinetic simulation and a new generalized Ohm's law, we show that momentum transport due to the heat-flux-viscosity effect provides the dissipation mechanism to allow magnetic field line reconnection. Scaling analysis and simulations show that the characteristic width of the current sheet in this regime is several electron mean-free-paths. These results additionally show a coupling between non-local transport and momentum transport, which in turn affects the dynamics of the magnetic field. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008655.

  15. Intermittency and local heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Rappazzo, A F

    2012-06-29

    Evidence for nonuniform heating in the solar wind plasma near current sheets dynamically generated by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is obtained using measurements from the ACE spacecraft. These coherent structures only constitute 19% of the data, but contribute 50% of the total plasma internal energy. Intermittent heating manifests as elevations in proton temperature near current sheets, resulting in regional heating and temperature enhancements extending over several hours. The number density of non-Gaussian structures is found to be proportional to the mean proton temperature and solar wind speed. These results suggest magnetofluid turbulence drives intermittent dissipation through a hierarchy of coherent structures, which collectively could be a significant source of coronal and solar wind heating.

  16. Localized electron heating during magnetic reconnection in MAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T.; Tanabe, H.; Watanabe, T. G.; Hayashi, Y.; Imazawa, R.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Michael, C.; The MAST Team

    2016-10-01

    Significant increase in the plasma temperature above 1 keV was measured during the kilogauss magnetic field reconnection of two merging toroidal plasmas under the high-guide field and collision-less conditions. The electron temperature was observed to peak significantly at the X-point inside the current sheet, indicating Joule heating caused by the toroidal electric field along the X-line. This peaked temperature increases significantly with the guide field, in agreement with the electron mean-free path calculation. The slow electron heating in the downstream suggests energy conversion from ions to electrons through ion-electron collisions in the bulk plasma as the second electron heating mechanism in the bulk plasma. The electron density profile clearly reveals the electron density pile-up / fast shock structures in the downstream of reconnection, suggesting energy conversion from ion flow energy to ion thermal energy as well as significant ion heating by reconnection outflow.

  17. Local heat stroke prevention plans in Japan: characteristics and elements for public health adaptation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gerardo Sanchez; Imai, Chisato; Masumo, Kanako

    2011-12-01

    The adverse health effects from hot weather and heat waves represent significant public health risks in vulnerable areas worldwide. Rising temperatures due to climate change are aggravating these risks in a context of fast urbanization, population growth and societal ageing. However, environmental heat-related health effects are largely preventable through adequate preparedness and responses. Public health adaptation to climate change will often require the implementation of heat wave warning systems and targeted preventive activities at different levels. While several national governments have established such systems at the country level, municipalities do not generally play a major role in the prevention of heat disorders. This paper analyzes selected examples of locally operated heat-health prevention plans in Japan. The analysis of these plans highlights their strengths, but also the need of local institutions for assistance to make the transition towards an effective public health management of high temperatures and heat waves. It can also provide useful elements for municipal governments in vulnerable areas, both in planning their climate change and health adaptation activities or to better protect their communities against current health effects from heat.

  18. Local and transient structural changes in stratum corneum at high electric fields: contribution of Joule heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, U; Gallo, S; Hui, S W; Gusbeth, Ch; Neumann, E

    2005-09-01

    Electroporation of skin is accompanied by local heating, such that thermally induced structural changes of the stratum corneum (SC) accompany the field effect. Comparing on the time scale, the local changes in structure, temperature and conductance of the SC, during and after the pulse, it is seen that Joule heating also facilitates the subsequent molecular transport. It is found that the transport of medium-sized, ionic molecules occurs through localized transport regions (LTR). The size of a LTR increases with the pulse length, whereas the density of the LTRs increases with increasing voltage, for instance at U(SC=)80 V, the LTR cover approximately 0.02--1% of the surface area. The state of low resistance within the LTR is long-lived. During high voltage application, the center of the LTR is heated above the phase transition temperature of the SC lipids (70 degrees C) and the heat front propagates outwards. Inside the SC, the pulse causes aggregates of small-sized vesicles. At a higher temperature, the aggregate formation and their disappearance are delayed. Multiple pulses with the applied voltage of U(appl)=80 V induce the formation of long-lasting vesicle aggregates with a diameter of slashed circle=1--30 microm, covering 0.05--0.5% of the total sample area. The electric energy dissipated within the LTR during high voltage application is apparently sufficient to raise the temperature well above the phase transition temperature of the lipids of the SC, accounting for the conformational changes from the multi-lamella to the vesicular structures.

  19. Application of a structure with a diode thermal effect for solar heating and cooling of a building; Application d'une structure a effet de diode thermique au chauffage et a la climatisation solaire d'un local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukadida, N. [Faculte des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Vullierme, J.J. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Mecanique et d' Aerotechnique (ENSMA), Lab. d' Etudes Thermiques, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study is to present the effect of a structure with a diode thermal effect on the building thermal behavior. Numerical simulations allowed us to compare the thermal behavior of a building equipped with this structure on its east, south and west frontages to that of standing or conventional building with large or low inertia. Results showed that the structure has a diode thermal effect mainly for the heating application. The revetment nature of the interior structure sides has an effect on the total coefficient of heat transfer The efficiency of this structure is sensible for cases where we can allow a low temperature inside the building during the winter season for a heating application and a high temperature during the summer season for a cooling application. (authors)

  20. Numerical study of the conjugate heat transfer in a horizontal pipe heated by Joulean effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touahri Sofiane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The three dimensional mixed convection heat transfer in a electrically heated horizontal pipe conjugated to a thermal conduction through the entire solid thickness is investigated by taking into account the thermal dependence of the physical properties of the fluid and the outer heat losses. The model equations of continuity, momentum and energy are numerically solved by the finite volume method. The pipe thickness, the Prandtl and the Reynolds numbers are fixed while the Grashof number is varied from 104to107. The results obtained show that the dynamic and thermal fields for mixed convection are qualitatively and quantitatively different from those of forced convection, and the local Nusselt number at the interface solid-fluid is not uniform: it has considerable axial and azimuthally variations. The effect of physical variables of the fluid depending on temperature is significant, which justifies its inclusion. The heat transfer is quantified by the local and average Nusselt numbers. We found that the average Nusselt number of solid-fluid interface of the duct increases with the increase of Grashof number. We have equally found out that the heat transfer is improved thanks to the consideration of the thermo dependence of the physical properties. We have tried modelling the average Nusselt number as a function of Richardson number. With the parameters used, the heat transfer is quantified by the correlation: NuA=12.0753 Ri0.156

  1. A Surface Heat Disturbance Method for Measuring Local TIssue Blood Perfusion Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PengJianshu; TianYongquan

    1996-01-01

    A non-damage method for measuring local tissue blood perfusion rate by surface heat disturbance and its two special embodiments for realizing this measurement are presented in this paper,In the derivation of mathematical model,the Pennes equation is used,and two parameters which are very diffcult to be known-the arterial blood temperature Ta and the metabolic heat generation rate qm,have been eliminated.So if has provided a feasible basis for application.In this paper,the performance and the adaptable condition of the measurement method and its structure peculiarities are discussed over a wide variety of parameters.Moreover,the effectiveness of the measurement method has been demonstrated by means of the quantitative measurement of tissue in vitro,the comparative measurement of animal under artificial perfusion and the dependence measurement in human body.

  2. Low-temperature heat capacity and localized vibrational modes in natural and synthetic tetrahedrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Curzio, E.; May, A. F.; Delaire, O.; McGuire, M. A.; Lu, X.; Liu, Cheng-Yun; Case, E. D.; Morelli, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    The heat capacity of natural (Cu12-x (Fe, Zn, Ag)x(Sb, As)4S13) and synthetic (Cu12-xZnxSb4S13 with x = 0, 1, 2) tetrahedrite compounds was measured between 2 K and 380 K. It was found that the temperature dependence of the heat capacity can be described using a Debye term and three Einstein oscillators with characteristic temperatures that correspond to energies of ˜1.0 meV, ˜2.8 meV, and ˜8.4 meV. The existence of localized vibrational modes, which are assigned to the displacements of the trigonally coordinated Cu atoms in the structure, is discussed in the context of anharmonicity and its effect on the low lattice thermal conductivity exhibited by these compounds.

  3. Studying the Dynamics of Breakdown of Thin Horizontal Liquid Layers with Local Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spesivtsev Serafim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of liquid layers breakdown when heated locally from the substrate side was made. Water and ethanol were used as working liquids with a layer thickness of 300 μm. Basic steps of the breakdown process were found and mean velocities of the dry spot formation were determined; the values are 0.06 mm/sec for ethanol and 5.15 mm/sec for water. The formation of residual layer over the hot-spot before the breakdown has been found for both liquids. The creation of a droplet cluster near the heating region is observed when using water as a working fluid. It was shown that evaporation is one of the general factors influencing the process of layer breakdown and dry spot formation as well as thermocapillary effect.

  4. District Heating and CHP - Local Possibilities for Global Climate Change Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Difs, Kristina

    2010-07-01

    Global warming, in combination with increasing energy demand and higher energy prices, makes it necessary to change the energy use. To secure the energy supply and to develop sustainable societies, construction of energy-efficient systems is at the same time most vital. The aim of this thesis is therefore to identify how a local energy company, producing district heating (DH), district cooling (DC) and electricity in combined heat and power (CHP) plants, can contribute to resource-efficient energy systems and cost-effective reductions of global carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions, along with its customers. Analyses have been performed on how a local energy company can optimise their DH and DC production and what supply-side and demand-side measures can lead to energy-efficient systems in combination with economic and climate change benefits. The energy company in focus is located in Linkoeping, Sweden. Optimisation models, such as MODEST and reMIND, have been used for analysing the energy systems. Scenario and sensitivity analyses have also been performed for evaluation of the robustness of the energy systems studied. For all analyses a European energy system perspective was applied, where a fully deregulated European electricity market with no bottlenecks or other system failures was assumed. In this thesis it is concluded that of the DH-supply technologies studied, the biomass gasification applications and the natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) CHP are the technologies with the largest global CO{sub 2} reduction potential, while the biomass-fuelled plant that only produces heat is the investment with the smallest global CO{sub 2} reduction and savings potential. However, the global CO{sub 2} reduction potential for the biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) CHP and NGCC CHP, the two technologies with highest electricity efficiencies, is highly dependent on the assumptions made about marginal European electricity production. Regarding the effect on

  5. Local Entropy Production in Turbulent Shear Flows: A Tool for Evaluating Heat Transfer Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. HERWIG; F. KOCK

    2006-01-01

    Performance evaluation of heat transfer devices can be based on the overall entropy production in these devices.In our study we therefore provide equations for the systematic and detailed determination of local entropy production due to dissipation of mechanical energy and due to heat conduction, both in turbulent flows. After turbulence modeling has been incorporated for the fluctuating parts the overall entropy production can be determined by integration with respect to the whole flow domain. Since, however, entropy production rates show very steep gradients close to the wall, numerical solutions are far more effective with wall functions for the entropy production terms. These wall functions are mandatory when high Reynolds number turbulence models are used. For turbulent flow in a pipe with an inserted twisted tape as heat transfer promoter it is shown that based on the overall entropy production rate a clear statement from a thermodynamic point of view is possible. For a certain range of twist strength there is a decrease in overall entropy production compared to the case without insert. Also, the optimum twist strength can be determined. This information is unavailable when only pressure drop and heat transfer data are given.

  6. Thermocapillary convection in a liquid layer with local heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Val' tsiferov, Yu.V.; Ryazantsev, Yu.S.; Shevtsova, V.M.

    1988-03-01

    The motion induced in a liquid by a heat pulse from an ultraviolet laser is mathematically described. The shape of the region occupied by the liquid and the initial position of the zone heated and colored by the radiation is shown. The velocity and temperature distributions on the surface and in the body of the liquid were determined numerically. The theoretical results were compared with the experimental data of Al'vares-Suares and Ryazantsev. Features of the behavior of the velocity and temperature at the liquid surface are closely associated with the nature of the motion in the body of the liquid caused by the surface thermocapillary forces. The development of vortex motion and heat propagation in a layer is illustrated.

  7. Local Heat and Mass Transfer for Gas—Solid Two Phase Flow in CFB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengLu; Ming-HengShi

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the flow characteristics and the local heat and mass transfer between coarse wet particles and hot gas in the circulaing fluidized bed(CFB) has been performed.A twothermocouple contrast method was developed to measure the local gas and solid temperature along the height of the bed.The influences of air superficial velocity,solid rate and initial moisture content on the local heat and mass transfer between gas and sloid were examined.The correlations of heat and mass transfer coefficients between gas and coarse wet particles in CFB were obtained.

  8. Detection of Localized Heat Damage in a Polymer Matrix Composite by Thermo-Elastic Method (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2007-437 DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY THERMO-ELASTIC METHOD (PREPRINT) John Welter...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY THERMO-ELASTIC METHOD (PREPRINT) 5c...Include Area Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 1 DETECTION OF LOCALIZED HEAT DAMAGE IN A POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE BY

  9. Thermal Heat and Power Production with Models for Local and Regional Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saether, Sturla

    1999-07-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is the description and modelling of combined heat and power systems as well as analyses of thermal dominated systems related to benefits of power exchange. Large power plants with high power efficiency (natural gas systems) and heat production in local heat pumps can be favourable in areas with low infrastructure of district heating systems. This system is comparable with typical combined heat and power (CHP) systems based on natural gas with respect to efficient use of fuel energy. The power efficiency obtainable from biomass and municipal waste is relatively low and the advantage of CHP for this system is high compared to pure power production with local heat pumps for heat generation. The advantage of converting pure power systems into CHP systems is best for power systems with low power efficiency and heat production at low temperature. CHP systems are divided into two main groups according to the coupling of heat and power production. Some CHP systems, especially those with strong coupling between heat and power production, may profit from having a thermal heat storage subsystem. District heating temperatures direct the heat to power ratio of the CHP units. The use of absorption chillers driven by district heating systems are also evaluated with respect to enhancing the utilisation of district heating in periods of low heat demand. Power exchange between a thermal dominated and hydropower system is found beneficial. Use of hydropower as a substitute for peak power production in thermal dominated systems is advantageous. Return of base load from the thermal dominated system to the hydropower system can balance in the net power exchange.

  10. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  11. Modeling of fuel vapor jet eruption induced by local droplet heating

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2014-01-10

    The evaporation of a droplet by non-uniform heating is numerically investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the fuel-vapor jet eruption observed in the flame spread of a droplet array under microgravity condition. The phenomenon was believed to be mainly responsible for the enhanced flame spread rate through a droplet cloud at microgravity conditions. A modified Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a local phase change model is utilized to describe the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It is found that the localized heating creates a temperature gradient along the droplet surface, induces the corresponding surface tension gradient, and thus develops an inner flow circulation commonly referred to as the Marangoni convection. Furthermore, the effect also produces a strong shear flow around the droplet surface, thereby pushing the fuel vapor toward the wake region of the droplet to form a vapor jet eruption. A parametric study clearly demonstrated that at realistic droplet combustion conditions the Marangoni effect is indeed responsible for the observed phenomena, in contrast to the results based on constant surface tension approximation

  12. Skin blood flow and local temperature independently modify sweat rate during passive heat stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Jonathan E; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Brothers, R Matthew; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2010-11-01

    Sweat rate (SR) is reduced in locally cooled skin, which may result from decreased temperature and/or parallel reductions in skin blood flow. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature each independently attenuate sweating. In protocols I and II, eight subjects rested supine while wearing a water-perfused suit for the control of whole body skin and internal temperatures. While 34°C water perfused the suit, four microdialysis membranes were placed in posterior forearm skin not covered by the suit to manipulate skin blood flow using vasoactive agents. Each site was instrumented for control of local temperature and measurement of local SR (capacitance hygrometry) and skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry). In protocol I, two sites received norepinephrine to reduce skin blood flow, while two sites received Ringer solution (control). All sites were maintained at 34°C. In protocol II, all sites received 28 mM sodium nitroprusside to equalize skin blood flow between sites before local cooling to 20°C (2 sites) or maintenance at 34°C (2 sites). In both protocols, individuals were then passively heated to increase core temperature ~1°C. Both decreased skin blood flow and decreased local temperature attenuated the slope of the SR to mean body temperature relationship (2.0 ± 1.2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased skin blood flow, P = 0.01; 1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 0.07 ± 0.05 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)·°C(-1) for the effect of decreased local temperature, P = 0.02). Furthermore, local cooling delayed the onset of sweating (mean body temperature of 37.5 ± 0.4 vs. 37.6 ± 0.4°C, P = 0.03). These data demonstrate that local cooling attenuates sweating by independent effects of decreased skin blood flow and decreased local skin temperature.

  13. US local action on heat and health: are we prepared for climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Marie S; Jackman, Dana K; Wyman, Michelle; Manarolla, Xico; Gronlund, Carina J; Brown, Daniel G; Brines, Shannon J; Schwartz, Joel; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2010-04-01

    Global climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves, hot weather, and temperature variability, which contribute to mortality and illness. Baseline information on local efforts to reduce heat vulnerability, including public advisories; minimizing greenhouse gas emissions; and mitigating urban heat islands, is lacking. We designed a survey about local government programs to prevent health problems and reduce heat exposure during heatwaves and administered it to 285 US communities. Of 70 respondents, 26 indicated that excessive heat events are a significant issue for the local government; 30 had established preventive programs. Local government leadership and public health impacts of heat were cited most frequently as extremely important determinants of preventive programs, followed by implementation costs, economic impacts of hot weather, and greenhouse gas emissions mitigation. Cool paving materials and vegetated roofs were common heat mitigation strategies. Fact sheets and case studies were desired guidance for protecting communities during hot weather. New partnerships and financial resources are needed to support more widespread local action to prevent adverse health consequences of climate change and promote environmental sustainability.

  14. A local heating system using wood fuels from farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiukaanniemi, E.; Kurvinen, T. [Research and Development Centre of Kajaani, REDEC, Kajaani (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    This report is a part of the a project on sustainable biomass utilization chains. The project belongs to a larger group of studies on northern biomass utilization by the Thule Institute and the University of Oulu. A cooperative energy society working in the municipality of Perho (3400 inhabitants) in Finland has been studied in this report. The cooperative energy society delivers energy which is generated from wood chips to the Perho municipality. Generated energy has a competitive price compared with fuel oils. In addition, harvesting, chipping and transporting give the members of the society an extra income. Members need not to make any investments in new equipment in order to work in the co-operative society because the machinery needed is the same as the one they use for other forestry activities. The price of the energy generated by wood chips is bound to the price of alternative fuels. There is a 5 MW district heating plant in Perho municipality containing a 1.4 MW solid fuel fired boiler with grate and 1.6 MW and 2.0 MW oil fired boilers. An investment in a heating plant containing a solid fuel fired boiler is often many times greater than that of one containing an oil fired boiler. There are many advantages which are hard to evaluate in generating energy from wood fuel. E.g. employment, increased income from taxes, an increase in the cash flow in the municipality and the advantages for forest growth. When undersized trees are removed from a forest stand, the remaining trees will grow better. The advantage of forestry is, however, hard to evaluate in cash terms. There has been an estimate that the advantage is 50-100 FIM/ha/a when compared to the yield of unthinned pine forest. Studies have shown that the money paid for energy in the area may be recycled several times in purchasing products and services in the area. In Perho municipality, it has been estimated that over half million FIM of extra cash has been generated and invested in the area by the

  15. Local thermal sensation modeling-a review on the necessity and availability of local clothing properties and local metabolic heat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselá, S; Kingma, B R M; Frijns, A J H

    2017-03-01

    Local thermal sensation modeling gained importance due to developments in personalized and locally applied heating and cooling systems in office environments. The accuracy of these models depends on skin temperature prediction by thermophysiological models, which in turn rely on accurate environmental and personal input data. Environmental parameters are measured or prescribed, but personal factors such as clothing properties and metabolic rates have to be estimated. Data for estimating the overall values of clothing properties and metabolic rates are available in several papers and standards. However, local values are more difficult to retrieve. For local clothing, this study revealed that full and consistent data sets are not available in the published literature for typical office clothing sets. Furthermore, the values for local heat production were not verified for characteristic office activities, but were adapted empirically. Further analyses showed that variations in input parameters can lead to local skin temperature differences (∆Tskin,loc  = 0.4-4.4°C). These differences can affect the local sensation output, where ∆Tskin,loc  = 1°C is approximately one step on a 9-point thermal sensation scale. In conclusion, future research should include a systematic study of local clothing properties and the development of feasible methods for measuring and validating local heat production. © 2016 The Authors. Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Analyzing screen heat insulation and its effect on energy consumption while heating building envelopes in conditions of intermittent heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vytchikov Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to screen heat insulation and its effect on energy consumption while heating building envelopes in conditions of intermittent heating. It also describes the non-stationary process of heat transfer through heat insulated outer walls. The authors introduce calculation results of specific energy consumption for heating insulated and non-insulted outer walls. The paper proves that energy consumption for heating insulated outer walls depends on the thickness of non-aerated air-space insulation The research shows positive effects of using thermal protection systems with screen thermal insulation in outer building envelopes in conditions of intermitten heating.

  17. Thermocapillary deformation in a locally heated layer of silicone oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakhovskaia, E. V.; Marchuk, I. V.; Fedorets, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The processes of heat and mass transfer in systems with liquid-gas interface are of interest to a wide range of problems. Thermocapillary flows have an important role in such systems. Thermocapillary deformation of silicone oil layer was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscope Zeiss LSM 510 Meta. The numerical solution of the problem was obtained in the lubrication approximation theory for two-dimensional axisymmetric thermocapillary flow. The model takes into account the surface tension, viscosity, gravity and heat transfer in the substrate. Evaporation is neglected. The numerical algorithm for the joint solution of the energy equation and the evolution equation for the liquid layer thickness has been developed. Stationary solutions have been obtained by the establishment method. The dependences of the depth of thermocapillary deformation on the layer thickness were obtained for silicone oils of different viscosities. It was found that the value of the relative deformation decreases nonlinearly with increasing the initial layer thickness. There is a good qualitative agreement of numerical results and experimental data.

  18. Effects of gas bubble production on heat transfer from a volumetrically heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Geoffrey R.

    Aqueous solutions of uranium salts may provide a new supply chain to fill potential shortfalls in the availability of the most common radiopharmaceuticals currently in use worldwide, including Tc99m which is a decay product of Mo99. The fissioning of the uranium in these solutions creates Mo99 but also generates large amounts of hydrogen and oxygen from the radiolysis of the water. When the dissolved gases reach a critical concentration, bubbles will form in the solution. Bubbles in the solution affect both the fission power and the heat transfer out of the solution. As a result, for safety and production calculations, the effects of the bubbles on heat transfer must be understood. A high aspect ratio tank was constructed to simulate a section of an annulus with heat exchangers on the inner and outer steel walls to provide cooling. Temperature measurements via thermocouples inside the tank and along the outside of the steel walls allowed the calculation of overall and local heat transfer coefficients. Different air injection manifolds allowed the exploration of various bubble characteristics and patterns on heat transfer from the pool. The manifold type did not appear to have significant impact on the bubble size distributions in water. However, air injected into solutions of magnesium sulfate resulted in smaller bubble sizes and larger void fractions than those in water at the same injection rates. One dimensional calculations provide heat transfer coefficient values as functions of the superficial gas velocity in the pool.

  19. Heat shock and heat shock protein 70i enhance the oncolytic effect of replicative adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Y S; Blackwell, J L; Li, H; Wang, M; Lei, X; Curiel, D T

    2001-12-01

    Replication-competent viruses are currently being evaluated for their cancer cell-killing properties. These vectors are designed to induce tumor regression after selective viral propagation within the tumor. However, replication-competent viruses have not resulted heretofore in complete tumor eradication in the clinical setting. Recently, heat shock has been reported to partially alleviate replication restriction on an avian adenovirus (Ad) in a human lung cancer cell line. Therefore, we hypothesized that heat shock and overexpression of heat shock protein (hsp) would support the oncolytic effect of a replication-competent human Ad. To this end, we tested the oncolytic and burst kinetics of a replication-competent Ad after exposure to heat shock or to inducible hsp 70 overexpression by a replication-deficient Ad (Adhsp 70i). Heat-shock resulted in augmentation of Ad burst and oncolysis while decreasing total intracellular Ad DNA. Overexpression of hsp 70i also enhanced Ad-mediated oncolysis but did not decrease intracellular Ad DNA levels. We conclude that heat shock and Adhsp 70i enhance the Ad cell-killing potential via distinct mechanisms. A potential therapeutic implication would be the use of local hyperthermia to augment oncolysis by increasing the burst of replication-competent Ad. The role of hsp in Ad-mediated oncolysis should be additionally explored.

  20. Measurement of the heat transfer and the film cooling effectiveness at a film-cooled leading edge of a turbine blade and derivation of a local model. Pt. C: derivation of a local model. Final report; Messung von Waermeuebergang und Filmkuehleffektivitaet im Bereich der filmgekuehlten Vorderkante eines Turbinenschaufelprofils und Ableitung lokaler Modelle. T. C: Ableitung lokaler Modelle. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, H.P.; Biba, S.

    1998-03-31

    Today, the heat transfer on a film-cooled leading edge of a high pressure turbine blade is calculated either by simple but inaccurate correlations or highly complex 3-D-simulations of the entire blade flow. The aim of the project was to derive an improved local model of the heat transfer at the leading edge in order to develop new, more precise correlations. This was done in order to minimize the cooling mass flow requirements and therefore to improve the efficiency of gas turbines. A new simple model of the near wall flow at the film cooled leading edge was derived. The model is based on the modification of the well-known turbulent boundary layer flow at a flat plate. This leads to semi-empirical correlations for the prediction of the adiabatic film cooling effectiveness and the heat transfer coefficient. The parameters of these correlations are matched to measurements at a film cooled leading edge model. By applying the correlations, the heat transfer at the leading edge can be predicted sufficiently accurate in dependence on the downstream distance, the blowing ratio and the Reynolds-number. The correlations can be implemented in existing 2-D-methods for the design of a blade cooling configuration. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Waermeeintrag an einer filmgekuehlten Vorderkante einer Hochdruckturbinenschaufel wird derzeit mittels einfacher, nicht hinreichend genauer Korrelationen oder durch komplexe 3-D-Simulationen der Stroemung berechnet. Ziel des Vorhabens ist es, zur Minimierung des Kuehlungsmassenstroms und damit zur Wirkungsgradverbesserung der Gasturbine ein verbessertes lokales Modell des Waermeuebergangs und genauere Korrelationen herzuleiten. Im Vorhaben wurde ein Modell fuer die wandnahe Stroemung an einer filmgekuehlten Vorderkante entwickelt. Das Modell beruht auf der Modifikation der bekannten turbulenten Grenzschicht an einer ebenen Platte. Die Modellierung fuehrt zu halb-empirischen Korrelationen fuer die adiabate Filmkuehleffektivitaet und dem

  1. Techno-economic analysis of a local district heating plant under fuel flexibility and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    Brovst is a small district in Denmark. This paper analyses the use of local renewable resources in the district heating systems of Brovst. The present use of fossil fuels in the Brovst district heating plant (DHP) represents an increasing environmental and climate-related load. Therefore, an inve......Brovst is a small district in Denmark. This paper analyses the use of local renewable resources in the district heating systems of Brovst. The present use of fossil fuels in the Brovst district heating plant (DHP) represents an increasing environmental and climate-related load. Therefore......, an investigation has been made to reduce the use of fossil fuels for district heating system and make use of the local renewable resources (biogas, solar, and heat pump) for district heating purposes. In this article, the techno-economic assessment is achieved through the development of a suite of models......PRO, which has been used to analyze the integration of a large-scale energy system into the domestic district heating system. A model of the current work on the basis of information from the Brovst plant (using fossil fuel) is established and named as a reference option. Then, four other options...

  2. Local fractional Laplace series expansion method for diffusion equation arising in fractal heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sheng-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we first propose the local fractional Laplace series expansion method, which is a coupling method of series expansion method and Laplace transform via local fractional differential operator. An illustrative example for handling the diffusion equation arising in fractal heat transfer is given.

  3. A note on analytical solutions of nonlinear fractional 2D heat equation with non-local integral terms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O S IYIOLA; F D ZAMAN

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we consider the (2+1) nonlinear fractional heat equation with non-local integral terms and investigate two different cases of such non-local integral terms. The first has to do with the time-dependent non-local integral term and the second is the space-dependent non-local integral term. Apart from the nonlinear nature of these formulations, the complexity due to the presence of the non-local integral terms impelled us to use a relatively new analytical technique called q-homotopy analysis method to obtain analytical solutions to both cases in the form of convergent series with easily computable components. Our numerical analysis enables us to show the effects of non-local terms and the fractional-order derivative on the solutions obtained by this method.

  4. The Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA). VII. A SKIRT radiative transfer model and insights on dust heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaene, S.; Baes, M.; Tamm, A.; Tempel, E.; Bendo, G.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Camps, P.; Cooray, A.; De Looze, I.; De Vis, P.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Fritz, J.; Galametz, M.; Gentile, G.; Madden, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Verstocken, S.

    2017-03-01

    The radiation from stars heats dust grains in the diffuse interstellar medium and in star-forming regions in galaxies. Modelling this interaction provides information on dust in galaxies, a vital ingredient for their evolution. It is not straightforward to identify the stellar populations heating the dust, and to link attenuation to emission on a sub-galactic scale. Radiative transfer models are able to simulate this dust-starlight interaction in a realistic, three-dimensional setting. We investigate the dust heating mechanisms on a local and global galactic scale, using the Andromeda galaxy (M 31) as our laboratory. We have performed a series of panchromatic radiative transfer simulations of Andromeda with our code SKIRT. The high inclination angle of M 31 complicates the 3D modelling and causes projection effects. However, the observed morphology and flux density are reproduced fairly well from UV to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Our model reveals a realistic attenuation curve, compatible with previous, observational estimates. We find that the dust in M 31 is mainly (91% of the absorbed luminosity) heated by the evolved stellar populations. The bright bulge produces a strong radiation field and induces non-local heating up to the main star-forming ring at 10 kpc. The relative contribution of unevolved stellar populations to the dust heating varies strongly with wavelength and with galactocentric distance. The dust heating fraction of unevolved stellar populations correlates strongly with NUV-r colour and specific star formation rate. These two related parameters are promising probes for the dust heating sources at a local scale. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  5. Flower garden trees' ability to absorb solar radiation heat for local heat reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad; Hamdani

    2017-06-01

    Banda Aceh as an urban area tends to have a high air temperature than its rural surroundings. A simple way to cool Banda Aceh city is by planting urban vegetation such as home gardens or parks. In addition to aesthetics, urban vegetation plays an important role as a reducer of air pollution, oxygen producer, and reducer of the heat of the environment. To create an ideal combination of plants, knowledge about the ability of plants to absorb solar radiation heat is necessary. In this study, some types of flowers commonly grown by communities around the house, such as Michelia Champaka, Saraca Asoka, Oliander, Adenium, Codiaeum Variegatum, Jas Minum Sambac, Pisonia Alba, Variegata, Apium Graveolens, Elephantopus Scaber, Randia, Cordylin.Sp, Hibiscus Rosasinensis, Agave, Lili, Amarilis, and Sesamum Indicum, were examined. The expected benefit of this research is to provide information for people, especially in Banda Aceh, on the ability of each plant relationship in absorbing heat for thermal comfort in residential environments. The flower plant which absorbs most of the sun's heat energy is Hibiscus Rosasinensis (kembang sepatu) 6.2 Joule, Elephantopus Scaber.L (tapak leman) 4.l Joule. On the other hand, the lowest heat absorption is Oliander (sakura) 0.9 Joule.

  6. A computational study of droplet evaporation with fuel vapor jet ejection induced by localized heat sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-05-12

    Droplet evaporation by a localized heat source under microgravity conditions was numerically investigated in an attempt to understand the mechanism of the fuel vapor jet ejection, which was observed experimentally during the flame spread through a droplet array. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a local phase change model in order to effectively capture the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It was found that the surface tension gradient caused by the temperature variation within the droplet creates a thermo-capillary effect, known as the Marangoni effect, creating an internal flow circulation and outer shear flow which drives the fuel vapor into a tail jet. A parametric study demonstrated that the Marangoni effect is indeed significant at realistic droplet combustion conditions, resulting in a higher evaporation constant. A modified Marangoni number was derived in order to represent the surface force characteristics. The results at different pressure conditions indicated that the nonmonotonic response of the evaporation rate to pressure may also be attributed to the Marangoni effect.

  7. Heat transfer in fuel oil storage tank at thermal power plants with local fuel heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova Svetlana A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of mathematical modeling of the thermal control system in fuel oil storage, in the presence of heat source at the lower boundary of the region, in the framework of models of incompressible viscous fluid are presented. Solved the system of differential equations of non-stationary Navier-Stokes equations, the energy equation and the heat equation with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Takes into account the processes of heat exchange region considered with the environment. A comparative analysis of the dependence of average temperatures of oil in the volume of the tank on the time calculated by the simplified (balanced method and obtained as a result of numerical simulation are performed.

  8. Heat conduction in nanoscale materials: a statistical-mechanics derivation of the local heat flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiantao

    2014-09-01

    We derive a coarse-grained model for heat conduction in nanoscale mechanical systems. Starting with an all-atom description, this approach yields a reduced model, in the form of conservation laws of momentum and energy. The model closure is accomplished by introducing a quasilocal thermodynamic equilibrium, followed by a linear response approximation. Of particular interest is the constitutive relation for the heat flux, which is expressed nonlocally in terms of the spatial and temporal variation of the temperature. Nanowires made of copper and silicon are presented as examples.

  9. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and effectiveness in corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Bayram; İpek, Osman

    2017-02-01

    In this study, heat transfer rate and effectiveness of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were investigated experimentally. Chevron angles of plate heat exchangers are β = 30° and β = 60°. For this purpose, experimentally heating system used plate heat exchanger was designed and constructed. Thermodynamic analysis of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were carried out. The heat transfer rate and effectiveness values are calculated. The experimental results are shown that heat transfer rate and effectiveness values for β = 60° is higher than that of the other. Obtained experimental results were graphically presented.

  10. Finite heat-capacity effects in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence the finite heat capacity of the matrix of regenerators on the performance of cryocoolers. The dynamics of the various parameters is treated in the harmonic approximation focussing on the finite heat-capacity effects, real-gas effects, and heat conduction. It is assumed that the flow resistance is zero, that the heat contact between the gas and the matrix is perfect, and that there is no mass storage in the matrix. Based on an energy-flow analysis, the limiting temperature, temperature profiles in the regenerator, and cooling powers are calculated. The discussion refers to pulse-tube refrigerators, but it is equally relevant for Stirling coolers and GM-coolers.

  11. The Local Balances of Vorticity and Heat for Blocking Anticyclones in a Spectral General Circulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Steven L.

    1986-07-01

    Blocking anticyclones that appear in perpetual January simulations of a spectral general circulation model are examined. Blocks in three geographical regions are studied: the North Pacific, the North Atlantic and western North America. Local time-averaged balances of vorticity and heat are evaluated for composite cases of blocking. The following common relationships emerged from these budgets.The time-mean divergence term is, in general, a flat-order term in the vorticity balance throughout the troposphere and its pattern over severe orography is closely related to the underlying topography. Above the surface layer, the horizontal advection of time-mean absolute vorticity by the mean wind mainly balances the divergence term with the net effect of the time-mean vorticity forcing being a tendency for the blocking pattern to propagate downstream. The transient eddy vorticity transports act to shift the block upstream and hence they mainly offset the downstream tendency due to the time-mean flow; the magnitude of the eddy vorticity term is typically one-third to one-half that of the divergence or advection terms alone. Frictional dissipation is negligible everywhere except near the ground where it primarily offsets the divergence term.The horizontal advection of the time-mean temperature field by the mean wind throughout the troposphere is a first-order term in the beat balance and is mainly responsible for maintaining the block's thermal perturbations; it is predominately balanced by adiabatic heating in the free troposphere and by diabatic heating near the surface. Transient eddy heat transports act to dissipate the block's thermal perturbations at all levels, while diabatic heating does not exhibit a systematic relationship with the temperature field at any level.A quasi-geostrophic diagnosis of the ageostrophic motion field suggests that dynamical processes which strongly affect the vorticity balance may be more important to the maintenance of model blocks than

  12. Plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Hassan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Optical localized heating in the nanoscale has recently attracted great attention due to its unique small hot spot size with high energy. However, the hot spot size is conventionally constrained by the diffraction limit. Plasmonic localized heating can provide solutions to this limitation in nanoscale patterning, cancer treatment, and data storage. Plasmonic approaches to overcome the diffraction limit in hot spot size have mainly utilized the excitation of surface plasmon or localized surface plasmon resonance. However, achieving plasmonic localized heating by the excitation of magnetic polariton has not been researched extensively yet. In this work, we numerically investigated the optical response of a nanoscale metamaterial composed of a gold nanowire array and a gold film separated by an ultrathin polymer spacer using ANSYS High Frequency Structural Simulator. A strong absorption peak at the wavelength of 760 nm was exhibited, and the underlying physical mechanism for the strong absorption was verified via the local electromagnetic field distribution to be magnetic resonance excitation. An inductor-capacitor circuit model was used to predict the magnetic resonance wavelength and compare with the numerical results for varied geometrical parameters. Volume loss density due to the strong local optical energy confinement was transferred as heat generation to an ANSYS thermal solver to obtain the local temperature profile. The steady state temperature profile shows an average temperature of 145 °C confined in a local area as small as 33 nm within the spacer, with a full-width at half-maximum of 50 nm along the x-direction. Moreover, the temperature rise from ambient drops to half its maximum value at a distance of 5 nm from the top of the spacer along the z-direction. This clearly demonstrates plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation. Furthermore, the transient temperature profile shows that the system reached

  13. The effectiveness of a heated air curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Daria

    2014-11-01

    Air curtains are high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in the doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The air curtain effectiveness E is defined as the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an opposing buoyancy force on the air curtain effectiveness. Such an opposing buoyancy force arises for example if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. We conducted small-scale experiments using water as the working fluid with density differences created by salt and sugar. The effectiveness of a downwards blowing air curtain was measured for situations in which the initial density of the air curtain was less than both the indoor and the outdoor fluid density, which corresponds to the case of a heated air curtain. We compare the effectiveness of the heated air curtain to the case of the neutrally buoyant air curtain. It is found that the effectiveness starts to decrease if the air curtain is heated beyond a critical temperature. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model to describe the dynamics of the buoyant air curtain. Numerical results obtained from solving this model corroborate our experimental findings.

  14. Effects of heat acclimation on time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Maria; Jakobson, Ainika; Havik, Merle; Timpmann, Saima; Burk, Andres; Ööpik, Vahur; Allik, Jüri; Kreegipuu, Kairi

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive performance is impaired during prolonged exercise in hot environment compared to temperate conditions. These effects are related to both peripheral markers of heats stress and alterations in CNS functioning. Repeated-exposure to heat stress results in physiological adaptations, and therefore improvement in exercise capacity and cognitive functioning are observed. The objective of the current study was to clarify the factors contributing to time perception under heat stress and examine the effect of heat acclimation. 20 young healthy male subjects completed three exercise tests on a treadmill: H1 (at 60% VO(2)peak until exhaustion at 42°C), N (at 22°C; duration equal to H1) and H2 (walk until exhaustion at 42°C) following a 10-day heat acclimation program. Core temperature (T(C)) and heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived fatigue and exertion were obtained continuously during the exercise, and blood samples of hormones were taken before, during and after the exercise test for estimating the prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol response to acute exercise-heat stress. Interval production task was performed before, during and after the exercise test. Lower rate of rise in core temperature, heart rate, hormone response and subjective ratings indicated that the subjects had successfully acclimated. Before heat acclimation, significant distortions in produced intervals occurred after 60 minutes of exercise relative to pre-trial coefficients, indicating speeded temporal processing. However, this effect was absent after in acclimated subjects. Blood prolactin concentration predicted temporal performance in both conditions. Heat acclimation slows down the increase in physiological measures, and improvement in temporal processing is also evident. The results are explained within the internal clock model in terms of the pacemaker-accumulator functioning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Localized Beampipe Heating due to $e^{-}$ Capture and Nuclear Excitation in Heavy Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, S R

    2001-01-01

    At heavy ion colliders, two major sources of beam loss are expected to be $e^+e^-$ production, where the $e^-$ is bound to one of the nuclei, and photonuclear excitation and decay via neutron emission. Both processes alter the ions charged to mass ratio by well defined amounts, creating beams of particles with altered magnetic rigidity. These beams will deposit their energy in a localized region of the accelerator, causing localized heating, The size of the target region depends on the collider optics. For medium and heavy ions, at design luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider, local heating may be more than an order of magnitude higher than expected. This could cause magnet quenches if the local cooling is inadequate. The altered-rigidity beams will also produce localized radiation damage. The beams could also be extracted and used for fixed target experiments.

  16. Transient mass transfer caused by local surface heating in close binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modisette, J. J.; Kondo, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The surge of mass from one component of a binary system resulting from local surface heating is analyzed. The impact of such surges on the companion can produce transient phenomena such as those seen in X-ray binaries, RS CVn objects, and cataclysmic variables. The heating may be caused by nonlinear g-mode oscillations or by X-ray heating by the companion in X-ray binaries, among other possible mechanisms. As an example, model calculations have been performed for a surge, triggered by a relatively moderate local heating, in a hypothetical X-ray binary; the results show that such a surge can account for X-ray turn-ons.

  17. The role of local heating in the formation process of UV written optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Harpøth, Anders; Andersen, Marc

    2005-01-01

    A behavior is reported where the index change process used for UV writing of integrated optical waveguides in deuterium loaded Ge:SiO2 glass can become unstable and suddenly switch off or on. It is shown that such discontinuities are associated with abrupt changes in the amount of absorbed UV power....... We suggest that these events are controlled by a coupling between UV absorption, local heating and the D2-GeO2 reaction rate. From our findings we predict, and confirm experimentally, that strong waveguides can not be fabricated under normal UV writing conditions in thin core layers with a low...... initial UV absorption. Our findings show that an improved understanding of the waveguide formation process and future process development requires that thermal effects are taken into account....

  18. Spin Seebeck devices using local on-chip heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Stephen M., E-mail: swu@anl.gov; Fradin, Frank Y.; Hoffman, Jason; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    A micro-patterned spin Seebeck device is fabricated using an on-chip heater. Current is driven through a Au heater layer electrically isolated from a bilayer consisting of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (insulating ferrimagnet) and a spin detector layer. It is shown that through this method it is possible to measure the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (SSE) for small area magnetic devices, equivalent to traditional macroscopic SSE experiments. Using a lock-in detection technique, it is possible to more sensitively characterize both the SSE and the anomalous Nernst effect (ANE), as well as the inverse spin Hall effect in various spin detector materials. By using the spin detector layer as a thermometer, we can obtain a value for the temperature gradient across the device. These results are well matched to values obtained through electromagnetic/thermal modeling of the device structure and with large area spin Seebeck measurements.

  19. A Green's function approach to local rf heating in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C J; Atalar, E

    2001-05-01

    Current safety regulations for local radiofrequency (rf) heating, developed for externally positioned rf coils, may not be suitable for internal rf coils that are being increasingly used in interventional MRI. This work presents a two-step model for rf heating in an interventional MRI setting: (1) the spatial distribution of power in the sample from the rf pulse (Maxwell's equations); and (2) the transformation of that power to temperature change according to thermal conduction and tissue perfusion (tissue bioheat equation). The tissue bioheat equation is approximated as a linear, shift-invariant system in the case of local rf heating and is fully characterized by its Green's function. Expected temperature distributions are calculated by convolving (averaging) transmit coil specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions with the Green's function. When the input SAR distribution is relatively slowly varying in space, as is the case with excitation by external rf coils, the choice of averaging methods makes virtually no difference on the expected heating as measured by temperature change (deltaT). However, for highly localized SAR distributions, such as those encountered with internal coils in interventional MRI, the Green's function method predicts heating that is significantly different from the averaging method in current regulations. In our opinion, the Green's function method is a better predictor since it is based on a physiological model. The Green's function also elicits a time constant and scaling factor between SAR and deltaT that are both functions of the tissue perfusion rate. This emphasizes the critical importance of perfusion in the heating model. The assumptions made in this model are only valid for local rf heating and should not be applied to whole body heating.

  20. Region effects influence local tree species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklefs, Robert E; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-19

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species.

  1. Towards improved magnetic fluid hyperthermia: major-loops to diminish variations in local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Menendez, Cristina; Serantes, David; Ruso, Juan M; Baldomir, Daniel

    2017-06-07

    In the context of using magnetic nanoparticles for heat-mediated applications, the need of an accurate knowledge of the local (at the nanoparticle level) heat generation in addition to the usually studied global counterpart has been recently highlighted. Such a need requires accurate knowledge of the links among the intrinsic particle properties, system characteristics and experimental conditions. In this work we have investigated the role of the particles' anisotropy polydispersity in relation to the amplitude (Hmax) of the AC magnetic field using a Monte Carlo technique. Our results indicate that it is better to use particles with large anisotropy for enhancing global heating, whereas for achieving homogeneous local heating it is better to use lower anisotropy particles. The latter ensures that most of the system undergoes major-loop hysteresis conditions, which is the key-point. This is equivalent to say that low-anisotropy particles (i.e. with less heating capability) may be better for accurate heat-mediated applications, which goes against some research trends in the literature that seek for large anisotropy (and hence heating) values.

  2. SOLID FUEL OF HYDROCARBON, WOOD AND AGRICULTURAL WASTE FOR LOCAL HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Belarus oil refining and oil producing industries are paid close attention. On the background of the active maintaining the level of oil processing and volume of oil extraction in our country and in the countries of the Eurasian Economic Union there is a steady formation of hydrocarbon-containing waste; therefore recycling of the latter is an urgent task to improve the competitiveness of production. The most cost-effective way of using hydrocarbon waste is the conversion of it into power resources. In this case it is possible to obtain significant power-saving and economic effect of the combined use of a hydrocarbon, wood, agricultural and other combustible waste, meanwhile improving the ecological situation at the sites of waste storage and creating a solid fuel with the necessary energy and specified physical-and-chemical properties. A comprehensive solution of a recycling problem makes it possible to use as energy resources a lot of waste that has not found application in other technologies, to produce alternative multi-component fuel which structure meets environmental and energy requirement for local heating systems. In addition, the implementation of such technology will make it possible to reduce power consumption of enterprises of various kinds that consume fuel and will also increase the share of local fuels in the energy balance of a particular region.

  3. Heat Effects on Living Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Hare

    1961-01-01

    This review of knowledge concerning the effects of high temperatures on plants was undertaken in preparation for research aimed at determining how forest fires affect physiological processes in woody species. Major subjects discussed include morphological and physiological responses to high temperatures, external and internal factors governing these responses,...

  4. Impact of Heat Wave Definitions on the Added Effect of Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Mortality in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentan Dong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat waves are associated with increased mortality, however, few studies have examined the added effect of heat waves. Moreover, there is limited evidence for the influence of different heat wave definitions (HWs on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, the capital of China. The aim of this study was to find the best HW definitions for cardiovascular mortality, and we examined the effect modification by an individual characteristic on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, a typical northern city in China. We applied a Poisson generalized additive approach to estimate the differences in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves (using 12 HWs compared with non-heat-wave days in Beijing from 2006 to 2009. We also validated the model fit by checking the residuals to ensure that the autocorrelation was successfully removed. In addition, the effect modifications by individual characteristics were explored in different HWs. Our results showed that the associations between heat waves and cardiovascular mortality differed from different HWs. HWs using the 93th percentile of the daily average temperature (27.7 °C and a duration ≥5 days had the greatest risk, with an increase of 18% (95% confidence interval (CI: 6%, 31% in the overall population, 24% (95% CI: 10%, 39% in an older group (ages ≥65 years, and 22% (95% CI: 3%, 44% in a female group. The added effect of heat waves was apparent after 5 consecutive heat wave days for the overall population and the older group. Females and the elderly were at higher risk than males and younger subjects (ages <65 years. Our findings suggest that heat wave definitions play a significant role in the relationship between heat wave and cardiovascular mortality. Using a suitable definition may have implications for designing local heat early warning systems and protecting the susceptible populations during heat waves.

  5. Cycloheximide- and puromycin-induced heat resistance : different effects on cytoplasmic and nuclear luciferases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, AA; Kanon, B; Konings, AWT; Bensaude, O; Kampinga, HH

    2000-01-01

    Inhibition of translation can result in cytoprotection against heat shock. The mechanism of this protection has remained elusive so far. Here, the thermoprotective effects of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) and puromycin were investigated, using as reporter firefly luciferase localized

  6. NONINVASIVE MEASUREMENT OF LOCAL THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY USING BACKSCATTERED ULTRASOUND AND FOCUSED ULTRASOUND HEATING

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Previously, noninvasive methods of estimating local tissue thermal and acoustic properties using backscattered ultrasound have been proposed in the literature. In this article, a noninvasive method of estimating local thermal diffusivity in situ during focused ultrasound heating using beamformed acoustic backscatter data and applying novel signal processing techniques is developed. A high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer operating at subablative intensities is employed to create...

  7. Average Natural Convective Heat Transfer of Air-cooled Condensing Heat Exchanger of Emergency Cooldown Tank - Effect of Tube Banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seon Jeong; Lee, Hee Joon [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Jun; Moon, Joo Hyung; Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young-In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Recently emergency cooldown tank(ECT) is a great concern of passive cooling system for the safety of nuclear reactor. After the operation of a conventional passive cooling system for an extended period, however, the water level falls as a result of the evaporation from the ECT, as steam is emitted from the open top of the tank. In this study, the effect of heat transfer area at the air cooled condensing heat exchanger was investigated by changing 5×5 tube banks into 4×4 and 3×3. Moreover, each of air-side natural convective heat transfer coefficient of tube banks was compared to existing correlations. This study presents the effect of heat transfer area at air-cooled condensing heat exchanger. As heat transfer area decreased, the temperature of outlet increased. In other words, the cooling performance got lower with the decrease of heat transfer area. In addition, the average natural convective heat transfer coefficient was 15.3 W/m{sup 2}/K from the 4×4 tube banks, and 4.92 W/m{sup 2}/K from the 3×3 tube banks, which had quite a large error more than 46% especially with the value of 4×4 tube banks compared to the value from correlation equation. Therefore, according to this result, it is needed to measure the local heat transfer coefficient of vertical cylinder more elaborately in further study.

  8. Heat transfer in inclined air rectangular cavities with two localized heat sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy M. Elsherbiny

    2015-12-01

    The investigation used rectangular enclosures with position ratios of the heaters, B1 = 0.25, B2 = 0.75, size ratio, ɛ = 0.25, and covered Rayleigh numbers based on scale length, s/A ranging from 103 to 106. The tilt angle from the horizontal was changed from Φ = 0° to 180°, and the aspect ratio was taken as A = 1, 5, and 10. The results are presented graphically in the form of streamlines and isotherm contour plots. The heat transfer characteristics, and average Nusselt numbers were also presented. A correlation for Nu is also given.

  9. Application of Thin-Film Thermocouples to Localized Heat Transfer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.; Smith, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes a proof-of-concept experiment on thin-film thermocouples used for localized heat transfer measurements applicable to experiments on hot parts of turbine engines. The paper has three main parts. The first part describes the thin-film sensors and manufacturing procedures. Attention is paid to connections between thin-film thermocouples and lead wires, which has been a source of problems in the past. The second part addresses the test arrangement and facility used for the heat transfer measurements modeling the conditions for upcoming warm turbine tests at NASA LeRC. The paper stresses the advantages of a modular approach to the test rig design. Finally, we present the results of bulk and local heat flow rate measurements, as well as overall heat transfer coefficients obtained from measurements in a narrow passage with an aspect ratio of 11.8. The comparison of bulk and local heat flow rates confirms applicability of thin-film thermocouples to upcoming warm turbine tests.

  10. Turbulent flow regime in coiled tubes: local heat-transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzoli, F.; Cattani, L.; Mocerino, A.; Rainieri, S.

    2017-08-01

    Wall curvature represents a widely adopted technique for enhancing heat transfer: the fluid flowing inside a coiled pipe experiences the centrifugal force and this phenomenon induces local maxima in the velocity distribution that locally increase the temperature gradients at the wall by enhancing the heat transfer both in the laminar and in the turbulent flow regime. Consequently, the distribution of the velocity field over the cross-section of the tube is strongly uneven thus leading to significant variations along the circumferential angular coordinate of the convective heat-transfer coefficient at the wall internal surface: in particular, it shows higher values at the outer bend side of the coil than at the inner bend side. The aim of the present work is to estimate experimentally the local convective heat-transfer coefficient at the fluid wall interface in coiled tubes when turbulent flow regime occurs. In particular, the temperature distribution maps on the external coil wall are employed as input data of the inverse heat conduction problem in the wall and a solution approach based on the Tikhonov regularisation is implemented. The results, obtained with water as working fluid, are focused on the fully developed region in the turbulent flow regime in the Reynolds number range of 5000 to 12,000. For the sake of completeness, the overall efficiency of the coiled tubes under test is assessed under a first-law performance evaluation criterion.

  11. Governing Uncertainties in Sustainable Energy Transitions—Insights from Local Heat Supply in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Bornemann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The governance of sustainable energy transitions (SET is facing multiple technological, economic, societal and political uncertainties. In practice, these energy-related uncertainties play a role not only at the level of “major politics,” but also in the policymaking of local decision makers and planners. This paper seeks to attain a more differentiated understanding of how uncertainties concerning the energy transition play out and are dealt with in policymaking and planning “on the ground.” To do so, the paper combines conceptual reflections with an explorative empirical study on local heat supply policy in Switzerland. In conceptual regards, it proposes some distinctions of types of uncertainties related to energy transitions, and a typology of strategic decision options for dealing with uncertainty. On this basis, the paper reveals similarities and differences regarding the perception of uncertainties and ways of dealing with them in a number of Swiss cities. These insights evoke further questions about the causes and effects of different sensitivities to uncertainty and ways of dealing with them.

  12. Effective heat strain index using pocket computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamon, E; Ryan, C

    1981-08-01

    An effective heat strain index (EHSI) using a hand calculator with memory is suggested for on-site evaluation of prevailing hot ambient conditions. The inputs to the programmed calculator include dry-bulb, wet-bulb and globe temperatures, and estimates of metabolism and air movements. The index is based on a program for calculation of the total heat balance and on the efficiency of sweating. The display of information on the ambient conditions EHSI display is one of following: no strain; low strain; high strain; or time limits of exposure.

  13. Modelling heating effects in cryocooled protein crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J; Fayz, K; Fell, B; Garman, E

    2001-01-01

    With the application of intense X-ray beams from third generation synchrotron sources, damage to cryocooled macromolecular crystals is being observed more commonly . In order to fully utilize synchrotron facilities now available for studying biological crystals, it is essential to understand the processes involved in radiation damage and beam heating so that, if possible, action can be taken to slow the rate of damage. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been applied to model the heating effects of X-rays on cryocooled protein crystals, and to compare the relative cooling efficiencies of nitrogen and helium.

  14. Localized bulk electron heating with ICRF mode conversion in the JET tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantsinen, M.J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Eester, D. Van

    2004-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance frequencies (ICRF) mode conversion has been developed for localized on-axis and off-axis bulk electron heating on the JET tokamak. The fast magnetosonic waves launched from the low-field side ICRF antennas are mode-converted to short-wavelength waves on the high-field side...

  15. Light-Induced Local Heating for Thermophoretic Manipulation of DNA in Polymer Micro- and Nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Larsen, Niels Bent; Kristensen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for making polymer chips with a narrow-band near-infrared absorber layer that enables light-induced local heating of liquids inside fluidic micro- and nanochannels fabricated by thermal imprint in polymethyl methacrylate. We have characterized the resulting liquid temperature...

  16. Local temperature redistribution and structural transition during joule-heating-driven conductance switching in VO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suhas; Pickett, Matthew D; Strachan, John Paul; Gibson, Gary; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2013-11-13

    Joule-heating induced conductance-switching is studied in VO2 , a Mott insulator. Complementary in situ techniques including optical characterization, blackbody microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and numerical simulations are used. Abrupt redistribution in local temperature is shown to occur upon conductance-switching along with a structural phase transition, at the same current.

  17. The Herschel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) VII: A SKIRT radiative transfer model and insights on dust heating

    CERN Document Server

    Viaene, S; Tamm, A; Tempel, E; Bendo, G; Blommaert, J A D L; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Camps, P; Cooray, A; De Looze, I; De Vis, P; Fernandez-Ontiveros, J A; Fritz, J; Galametz, M; Gentile, G; Madden, S; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, L; Verstocken, S

    2016-01-01

    The radiation of stars heats dust grains in the diffuse interstellar medium and in star-forming regions in galaxies. Modelling this interaction provides information on dust in galaxies, a vital ingredient for their evolution. It is not straightforward to identify the stellar populations heating the dust, and to link attenuation to emission on a sub-galactic scale. Radiative transfer models are able to simulate this dust-starlight interaction in a realistic, three-dimensional setting. We investigate the dust heating mechanisms on a local and global galactic scale, using the Andromeda galaxy (M31) as our laboratory. We perform a series of panchromatic radiative transfer simulations of Andromeda with our code SKIRT. The high inclination angle of M31 complicates the 3D modelling and causes projection effects. However, the observed morphology and flux density are reproduced fairly well from UV to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Our model reveals a realistic attenuation curve, compatible with previous, observational es...

  18. Impact of Heat Wave Definitions on the Added Effect of Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Mortality in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wentan; Zeng, Qiang; Ma, Yue; Li, Guoxing; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-09-21

    Heat waves are associated with increased mortality, however, few studies have examined the added effect of heat waves. Moreover, there is limited evidence for the influence of different heat wave definitions (HWs) on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, the capital of China. The aim of this study was to find the best HW definitions for cardiovascular mortality, and we examined the effect modification by an individual characteristic on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, a typical northern city in China. We applied a Poisson generalized additive approach to estimate the differences in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves (using 12 HWs) compared with non-heat-wave days in Beijing from 2006 to 2009. We also validated the model fit by checking the residuals to ensure that the autocorrelation was successfully removed. In addition, the effect modifications by individual characteristics were explored in different HWs. Our results showed that the associations between heat waves and cardiovascular mortality differed from different HWs. HWs using the 93th percentile of the daily average temperature (27.7 °C) and a duration ≥5 days had the greatest risk, with an increase of 18% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6%, 31%) in the overall population, 24% (95% CI: 10%, 39%) in an older group (ages ≥65 years), and 22% (95% CI: 3%, 44%) in a female group. The added effect of heat waves was apparent after 5 consecutive heat wave days for the overall population and the older group. Females and the elderly were at higher risk than males and younger subjects (ages wave definitions play a significant role in the relationship between heat wave and cardiovascular mortality. Using a suitable definition may have implications for designing local heat early warning systems and protecting the susceptible populations during heat waves.

  19. Explanation of how to run the global local optimization code (GLO) to find surface heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S; Sahai, V; Stein, W

    1999-03-01

    From the evaluation[1] of the inverse techniques available, it was determined that the Global Local Optimization Code[2] can determine the surface heat flux using known experimental data at various points in the geometry. This code uses a whole domain approach in which an analysis code (such as TOPAZ2D or ABAQUS) can be run to get the appropriate data needed to minimize the heat flux function. This document is a compilation of our notes on how to run this code to find the surface heat flux. First, the code is described and the overall set-up procedure is reviewed. Then, creation of the configuration file is described. A specific configuration file is given with appropriate explanation. Using this information, the reader should be able to run GLO to find the surface heat flux.

  20. Attenuating the surface Urban Heat Island within the Local Thermal Zones through land surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Ouyang, Wanlu

    2017-02-01

    Inefficient mitigation of excessive heat is attributed to the discrepancy between the scope of climate research and conventional planning practice. This study approaches this problem at both domains. Generally, the study, on one hand, claims that the climate research of the temperature phenomenon should be at local scale, where implementation of planning and design strategies can be more feasible. On the other hand, the study suggests that the land surface factors should be organized into zones or patches, which conforms to the urban planning and design manner. Thus in each zone, the land surface composition of those excessively hot places can be compared to the zonal standard. The comparison gives guidance to the modification of the land surface factors at the target places. Specifically, this study concerns the Land Surface Temperature (LST) in Wuhan, China. The land surface is classified into Local Thermal Zones (LTZ). The specifications of temperature sensitive land surface factors are relative homogeneous in each zone and so is the variation of the LST. By extending the city scale analysis of Urban Heat Island into local scale, the Local Surface Urban Heat Islands (LSUHIs) are extracted. Those places in each zone that constantly maintain as LSUHI and exceed the homogenous LST variation are considered as target places or hotspots with higher mitigation or adaptation priority. The operation is equivalent to attenuate the abnormal LST variation in each zone. The framework is practical in the form of prioritization and zoning, and mitigation strategies are essentially operated locally.

  1. Effects of spatial dispersion in near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel metallic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Henkel, Carsten; Joulain, Karl; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    We study the heat transfer between two parallel metallic semi-infinite media with a gap in the nanometer-scale range. We show that the near-field radiative heat flux saturates at distances smaller than the metal skin depth when using a local dielectric constant and investigate the origin of this effect. The effect of non-local corrections is analysed using the Lindhard-Mermin and Boltzmann-Mermin models. We find that local and non-local models yield the same heat fluxes for gaps larger than 2 nm. Finally, we explain the saturation observed in a recent experiment as a manifestation of the skin depth and show that heat is mainly dissipated by eddy currents in metallic bodies.

  2. New experimental results on local heat transfer inside a rectangular channel with rib-roughened surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, D.; Gramazio, P.; Vitali, L.; Niro, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present new experimental results on local heat transfer characteristics of a forced air-flow through a 12-mm-height, rectangular channel of 1:10 aspect ratio, with square-cross-section ribs mounted onto the lower surface. Data are collected on a completely redesigned test section. Specifically, the electric heater is made of very thin copper tracks, in direct contact with the air flow and covering at 97.5% the channel lower surface to guarantee a very uniform heat flux. The copper tracks are laminated onto a 2-mm thick board of FR-4 glass epoxy to provide negligible heat conduction inside the plate and heat losses from its sides. Finally, the channel walls are in XPS and, into the upper one, a double glazing consisting of two 120 mm x 120 mm Germanium windows is mounted to allow optical access to the IR camera and to reduce local heat dispersions. Data here presented refer to convection over 4 mm x 2 mm ribs in transverse configuration for Reynolds numbers, based on the duct hydraulic diameter, ranging between 700 and 8000. Preliminary tests show how the new apparatus has significantly improved the quality, the ease and the quickness of the measurements.

  3. Remote Sensing-Based Characterization of Settlement Structures for Assessing Local Potential of District Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nast

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, heating of houses and commercial areas is one of the major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. When considering the drastic impact of an increasing emission of greenhouse gases as well as the finiteness of fossil resources, the usage of efficient and renewable energy generation technologies has to be increased. In this context, small-scale heating networks are an important technical component, which enable the efficient and sustainable usage of various heat generation technologies. This paper investigates how the potential of district heating for different settlement structures can be assessed. In particular, we analyze in which way remote sensing and GIS data can assist the planning of optimized heat allocation systems. In order to identify the best suited locations, a spatial model is defined to assess the potential for small district heating networks. Within the spatial model, the local heat demand and the economic costs of the necessary heat allocation infrastructure are compared. Therefore, a first and major step is the detailed characterization of the settlement structure by means of remote sensing data. The method is developed on the basis of a test area in the town of Oberhaching in the South of Germany. The results are validated through detailed in situ data sets and demonstrate that the model facilitates both the calculation of the required input parameters and an accurate assessment of the district heating potential. The described method can be transferred to other investigation areas with a larger spatial extent. The study underlines the range of applications for remote sensing-based analyses with respect to energy-related planning issues.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of local thermal diffusivity using backscattered ultrasound and focused ultrasound heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ajay; Kaczkowski, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    Previously, noninvasive methods of estimating local tissue thermal and acoustic properties using backscattered ultrasound have been proposed in the literature. In this article, a noninvasive method of estimating local thermal diffusivity in situ during focused ultrasound heating using beamformed acoustic backscatter data and applying novel signal processing techniques is developed. A high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer operating at subablative intensities is employed to create a brief local temperature rise of no more than 10 degrees C. Beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data are collected during heating and cooling using a clinical ultrasound scanner. Measurements of the time-varying "acoustic strain", that is, spatiotemporal variations in the RF echo shifts induced by the temperature related sound speed changes, are related to a solution of the heat transfer equation to estimate the thermal diffusivity in the heated zone. Numerical simulations and experiments performed in vitro in tissue mimicking phantoms and excised turkey breast muscle tissue demonstrate agreement between the ultrasound derived thermal diffusivity estimates and independent estimates made by a traditional hot-wire technique. The new noninvasive ultrasonic method has potential applications in thermal therapy planning and monitoring, physiological monitoring and as a means of noninvasive tissue characterization.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Thermocapillary Deformation and Film Breakdown in a Locally Heated Thin Horizontal Volatile Liquid Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakhovskaya Ella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of thermocapillary deformation and film breakdown in a thin horizontal layer of viscous incompressible liquid with a free surface is considered. The deformable liquid layer is locally heated. The problem of thermocapillary deformation of the locally heated horizontal liquid layer has been solved numerically for two-dimensional unsteady case. The lubrication approximation theory is used. Capillary pressure, viscosity and gravity are taken into account. Evaporating rate is supposed to be proportional to the temperature difference between the liquid and ambient. Heat transfer in the substrate is also simulated. The numerical algorithm for the joint solution of the energy equation and the evolution equation for the thickness of liquid layer has been developed. The model predicts the thermocapillary deformation of the liquid surface and the formation of dry spots. The dynamics of liquid surface, the dry spots formation and the velocity of the contact line have been calculated. The deformation of the free surface has been calculated for different values of the heating power and thickness of the liquid layer. The effect of surface tension coefficient and wetting contact angle on the velocity of the contact line motion has been analyzed. It has been obtained that the velocity of the contact line increases with the increase of the wetting contact angle value and of the surface tension coefficient.

  6. Locally-rotationally-symmetric Bianchi type-V cosmology with heat flow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C P Singh; A Beesham

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present a spatially homogeneous locally-rotationally-symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type-V cosmological model with perfect fluid and heat flow. A general approach is introduced to solve Einstein’s field equations using a law of variation for the mean Hubble parameter, which is related to average scale factor of the model that yields a constant value for the deceleration parameter. Exact solutions that correspond to singular and non-singular models are found with heat flow. The physical constraints on the solution and, in particular, the thermodynamical laws that govern such solutions are discussed in some detail.

  7. Local or district heating by natural gas: Which is better from energetic, environmental and economic point of views?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzarin, R.; Noro, M. [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola, 3-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2006-02-01

    Generally, a CHP plant coupled with district heating is considered more efficient than traditional local heating systems from an economic and environmental point of view. This is certainly true for municipal waste CHP plants, but for plants fuelled by natural gas the important developments of the last years regarding both boilers (premixed and modulating burners, condensing boilers, etc.) and mechanical vapour compression and absorption heat pumps can change the traditional view. At the same time also district heating plants improved. Therefore it is worth to analyse the whole matter comparing advantages and disadvantages of the different alternatives, with a wide difference between them. The paper reports on the analysis of major district heating natural gas based technologies (vapour and gas turbines, internal combustion engine, combined cycles); the cost of heat and power produced in these plants is compared to the cost of producing the same quantity of electrical energy by a reference GTCC-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle (actually the most efficient technology for pure electrical production) and the cost of heat production by modern local heating technologies using natural gas as fuel (condensing boilers, electrical, gas engine and absorption heat pumps). Regarding energy efficiency and emissions, modern local heating turns out to be more efficient than district heating for most CHP technologies. However, the same does not happen from an economic point of view, because in Italy natural gas used by cogeneration plants is subjected to a much lower taxation than local heating technologies. (author)

  8. Phase coherence of 0.1 Hz microvascular tone oscillations during the local heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeva, I. A.

    2017-06-01

    The origin of the mechanisms of blood flow oscillations at low frequencies is discussed. It is known that even isolated arteriole demonstrates oscillations with the frequency close to 0.1 Hz, which is caused by the synchronous activity of myocyte cells. On the other hand, oscillations with close frequency are found in the heart rate, which are associated with quite different mechanism. The main purpose of this work is to study phase coherence of the blood flow oscillations in the peripheral vessels under basal and perturbed conditions. Local heating which locally influences the microvascular tone, as one of currently elucidated in sufficient detail physiological test, was chosen. During such provocation blood flow though the small vessels significantly increases because of vasodilation induced by the local synthesis of nitric oxide. In the first part of the paper microvascular response to the local test is quantified in healthy and pathological conditions of diabetes mellitus type 1. It is obtained that regardless of the pathology, subjects with high basal perfusion had lower reserve for vasodilation, which can be caused by the low elasticity of microvascular structure. Further synchronization of pulsations of the heated and undisturbed skin was evaluated on the base of wavelet phase coherency analysis. Being highly synchronised in basal conditions 0.1 Hz pulsations became more independent during heating, especially during NO-mediated vasodilation.

  9. Design of shell-and-tube heat exchangers when the fouling depends on local temperature and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, D. [HTFS, Hyprotech, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are normally designed on the basis of a uniform and constant fouling resistance that is specified in advance by the exchanger user. The design process is then one of determining the best exchanger that will achieve the thermal duty within the specified pressure drop constraints. It has been shown in previous papers [Designing shell-and-tube heat exchangers with velocity-dependant fouling, 34th US national Heat Transfer Conference, 20-22 August 2000, Pittsburg, PA; Designing shell-and-tube heat exchangers with velocity-dependant fouling, 2nd Int. Conf. on Petroleum and Gas Phase Behavior and Fouling, 27-31 August 2000, Copenhagen] that this approach can be extended to the design of exchangers where the design fouling resistance depends on velocity. The current paper briefly reviews the main findings of the previous papers and goes on to treat the case where the fouling depends also on the local temperatures. The Ebert-Panchal [Analysis of Exxon crude-oil, slip-stream coking data, Engineering Foundation Conference on Fouling Mitigation of Heat Exchangers, 18-23 June 1995, California] form of fouling rate equation is used to evaluate this fouling dependence. When allowing for temperature effects, it becomes difficult to divorce the design from the way the exchanger will be operated up to the point when the design fouling is achieved. However, rational ways of separating the design from the operation are proposed. (author)

  10. An instrument for local radiative heat transfer measurement around a horizontal tube immersed in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavizedeh, N.; Adams, R.L.; Welty, J.R.; Goshayeshi, A. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

    1990-05-01

    An instrument for the measurement of the radiative component of total heat transfer in a high-temperature gas fluidized bed is described. The main objective of this paper is to emphasize the design, instrumentation, and calibration of this device. The results are presented and discussed elsewhere (Alavizadeh, 1985; Alavizadeh et al., 1985). The design makes use of a silicon window to transmit the radiative heat flux to a thermopile-type heat flow detector located at the base of a cavity. The window material thermal conductivity is sufficiently large to prevent conduction errors due to the convective component of total heat transfer. Also, its transmission and mechanical hardness are well suited for the fluid bed environment. The device has been calibrated using a blackbody source both before and after exposure to a fluidized bed, indicating the effect of the abrasive bed environment on performance. The instrument has been used to measure local radiative heat transfer around a horizontal tube. Typical results for a particle size of 2.14 mm and a bed tempeature of 1,050 K are presented and discussed to illustrate instrument performance.

  11. Effects of the distribution density of a biomass combined heat and power plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in village-town systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Kang, Jian

    2017-11-01

    The building of biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants is an effective means of developing biomass energy because they can satisfy demands for winter heating and electricity consumption. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the distribution density of a biomass CHP plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in a village-town system. The distribution density is determined based on the heat transmission threshold, and the heat utilisation efficiency is determined based on the heat demand distribution, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss. The objective of this study was to ascertain the optimal value for the heat transmission threshold using a multi-scheme comparison based on an analysis of these factors. To this end, a model of a biomass CHP plant network was built using geographic information system tools to simulate and generate three planning schemes with different heat transmission thresholds (6, 8, and 10 km) according to the heat demand distribution. The heat utilisation efficiencies of these planning schemes were then compared by calculating the gross power, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss of the biomass CHP plant for each scenario. This multi-scheme comparison yielded the following results: when the heat transmission threshold was low, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was high and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively small. In contrast, when the heat transmission threshold was high, the distribution density of the network was low and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively large. When the heat transmission threshold was 8 km, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was optimised for efficient heat utilisation. To promote the development of renewable energy sources, a planning scheme for a biomass CHP plant network that maximises heat utilisation efficiency can be obtained using the optimal heat transmission threshold and the nonlinearity

  12. Local fractional variational iteration algorithm II for non-homogeneous model associated with the non-differentiable heat flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we begin with the non-homogeneous model for the non-differentiable heat flow, which is described using the local fractional vector calculus, from the first law of thermodynamics in fractal media point view. We employ the local fractional variational iteration algorithm II to solve the fractal heat equations. The obtained results show the non-differentiable behaviors of temperature fields of fractal heat flow defined on Cantor sets.

  13. Influence of heat wave definitions to the added effect of heat waves on daily mortality in Nanjing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Bi, Jun; Chen, Jin; Chen, Xiaodong; Huang, Lei; Zhou, Lian

    2015-02-15

    Few studies have explored the added effect of heat waves, especially in China. Moreover, no prior studies have assessed whether the choice of heat wave definitions affected this added effect. This study compared the associations between heat waves defined by different heat wave definitions (HWs) and cause-specific mortality in warm season in Nanjing, China. A distributed lag model was applied to evaluate the differences in daily mortality during heat-wave days (defined using 15 HWs) compared with non-heat-wave days in Nanjing, during 2007 to 2013. For different HWs, model fits were examined by the Akaike Information Criterion for quasi-Poisson and effects were compared by stratified analysis and bootstrapping. In addition, we explored the effect modifications by individual characteristics under different HWs. Different HWs resulted in considerable differences in associations between heat waves and mortality. Heat waves defined as ≥4 consecutive days with daily average temperature >98th percentile had the best model fit and were associated with an increase of 24.6% (95% CI: 15.6%, 34.3%) total mortality, 46.9% (95% CI: 33.0%, 62.3%) cardiovascular mortality, 32.0% (95% CI: 8.5%, 60.5%) respiratory mortality, 51.3% (95% CI: 23.4%, 85.6%) stroke mortality, 63.4% (95% CI: 41.5%, 88.8%) ischemic heart disease mortality, and 47.6% (95% CI: 14.5%, 90.3%) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality at lag day 2. Under different HWs, added effects of heat waves on mortality were higher for females versus males, the elderly versus young residents, and people with low education versus those with high education. Results were less sensitive to the inclusion of air pollutants. Heat wave definition plays a critical role in the relationship between heat waves and mortality. Selecting an appropriate definition of heat waves is therefore important to design local heat warning systems and to reduce the burden of disease during heat waves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  14. On the locality of parallel transport of heat carrying electrons in the SOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chankin, A.V., E-mail: Alex.Chankin@ipp.mpg.de; Coster, D.P.

    2015-08-15

    A continuum Vlasov–Fokker–Planck code KIPP is used to assess the degree of locality of parallel transport of heat carrying electrons (HCE) in collisional SOLs. It is shown that for typical SOL collisionalities, the HCE are marginally collisionless which puts into question successful parameterization of kinetic code results of transport parameters such as parallel heat flux and ion–electron thermoforce in the present 2D fluid codes. A kinetic solution for the case of 90% recycling at the target and factor 10T{sub e} drop along the field line is also presented, showing the degree of heat flux ‘limiting’ upstream and ‘enhancement’ downstream, compared to predictions of the Braginskii’s (or Spitzer–Härm’s) formulas. Possible causes of these features are discussed.

  15. Local stress and heat flux in atomistic systems involving three-body forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youping

    2006-02-01

    Local densities of fundamental physical quantities, including stress and heat flux fields, are formulated for atomistic systems involving three-body forces. The obtained formulas are calculable within an atomistic simulation, in consistent with the conservation equations of thermodynamics of continuum, and can be applied to systems with general two- and three-body interaction forces. It is hoped that this work may correct some misuse of inappropriate formulas of stress and heat flux in the literature, may clarify the definition of site energy of many-body potentials, and may serve as an analytical link between an atomistic model and a continuum theory. Physical meanings of the obtained formulas, their relation with virial theorem and heat theorem, and the applicability are discussed.

  16. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam, E-mail: sganesh@iitk.ac.in

    2016-04-15

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress – such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage – is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors.

  17. Neurophysiological effects of exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelands, B; De Pauw, K; Meeusen, R

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue during prolonged exercise is a multifactorial phenomenon. The complex interplay between factors originating from both the periphery and the brain will determine the onset of fatigue. In recent years, electrophysiological and imaging tools have been fine-tuned, allowing for an improved understanding of what happens in the brain. In the first part of the review, we present literature that studied the changes in electrocortical activity during and after exercise in normal and high ambient temperature. In general, exercise in a thermo-neutral environment or at light to moderate intensity increases the activity in the β frequency range, while exercising at high intensity or in the heat reduces β activity. In the second part, we review literature that manipulated brain neurotransmission, through either pharmacological or nutritional means, during exercise in the heat. The dominant outcomes were that manipulations changing brain dopamine concentration have the potential to delay fatigue, while the manipulation of serotonin had no effect and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition was detrimental for performance in the heat. Research on the effects of neurotransmitter manipulations on brain activity during or after exercise is scarce. The combination of brain imaging techniques with electrophysiological measures presents one of the major future challenges in exercise physiology/neurophysiology.

  18. Osmotic and Heat Stress Effects on Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Julian

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate embryonic development, early skin, muscle, and bone progenitor populations organize into segments known as somites. Defects in this conserved process of segmentation lead to skeletal and muscular deformities, such as congenital scoliosis, a curvature of the spine caused by vertebral defects. Environmental stresses such as hypoxia or heat shock produce segmentation defects, and significantly increase the penetrance and severity of vertebral defects in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we show that a brief exposure to a high osmolarity solution causes reproducible segmentation defects in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Both osmotic shock and heat shock produce border defects in a dose-dependent manner, with an increase in both frequency and severity of defects. We also show that osmotic treatment has a delayed effect on somite development, similar to that observed in heat shocked embryos. Our results establish osmotic shock as an alternate experimental model for stress, affecting segmentation in a manner comparable to other known environmental stressors. The similar effects of these two distinct environmental stressors support a model in which a variety of cellular stresses act through a related response pathway that leads to disturbances in the segmentation process. PMID:28006008

  19. Local Heat Transfer to an Evaporating Sessile Droplet in an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, M. J.; Howe, C. M.; Di Marco, P.; Robinson, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Local heat transfer of an evaporating sessile droplet under a static electric field is an underdeveloped topic. In this research an 80 μl water droplet is placed in the centre of a 25 μm thick stainless steel substrate. A static electric field is applied by an electrode positioned 10 mm above the substrate. A high speed thermal imaging camera is placed below the substrate to capture the thermal footprint of the evaporating droplet. Four electric fields were characterised; 0, 5, 10 and 11 kV/cm. As the electric field is increased the contact angle was observed to decrease. The local heat flux profile, peak and radial location of this peek were observed to be independent of the applied electric field for all test points for this working fluid and surface combination.

  20. Unveiling the dominant gas heating mechanism in local LIRGs and ULIRGs

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Torres, Miguel A; Romero-Canizales, Cristina; Colina, Luis; Bondi, Marco; Giroletti, Marcello; Torrelles, Jose Maria; Polatidis, Antonis

    2008-01-01

    We show preliminary results from a sample of Luminous and Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs, respectively) in the local universe, obtained from observations using the Very Large Array (VLA), the Multi-Element Radio Link Interferometer Network (MERLIN), and the European VLBI Network (EVN). The main goal of our high-resolution, high-sensitivity radio observations is to unveil the dominant gas heating mechanism in the central regions of local (U)LIRGs. The main tracer of recent star-formation in (U)LIRGs is the explosion of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), which are the endproducts of the explosion of massive stars and yield bright radio events. Therefore, our observations will not only allow us to answer the question of the dominant heating mechanism in (U)LIRGs, but will yield also the CCSN rate and the star-formation rate (SFR) for the galaxies of the sample.

  1. Initiative for local district heating. New chances for municipal utilities. Boundary conditions for the heat market; Initiative Nahwaerme. Neue Chancen fuer Stadtwerke. Rahmenbedingungen fuer den Waermemarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Michael [K.Group GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Bereich Nachhaltige Energieversorgung und Stadtentwicklung

    2009-06-15

    In the regulated market, municipal utilities are forced to find new fields of activity. The heat market offers good chances. For example, local district heating grids can be established, independent power generation can be encouraged, and new services can be offered which may increase customer loyalty. The district heating initiative of the Baden-Wuerttemberg Minister of the Environment was launched early in 2009 with the intention to offer valuable assistance to the municipal utilities. (orig.)

  2. Local infusion of ascorbate augments NO-dependent cutaneous vasodilatation during intense exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Robert D; Fujii, Naoto; Alexander, Lacy M; Paull, Gabrielle; Louie, Jeffrey C; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-09-01

    Recent work demonstrates that nitric oxide (NO) contributes to cutaneous vasodilatation during moderate (400 W of metabolic heat production) but not high (700 W of metabolic heat production) intensity exercise bouts performed in the heat (35°C). The present study evaluated whether the impairment in NO-dependent cutaneous vasodilatation was the result of a greater accumulation of reactive oxygen species during high (700 W of metabolic heat production) relative to moderate (500 W of metabolic heat production) intensity exercise. It was shown that local infusion of ascorbate (an anti-oxidant) improves NO-dependent forearm cutaneous vasodilatation during high intensity exercise in the heat. These findings provide novel insight into the physiological mechanisms governing cutaneous blood flow during exercise-induced heat stress and provide direction for future research exploring whether oxidative stress underlies the impairments in heat dissipation that may occur in older adults, as well as in individuals with pathophysiological conditions such as type 2 diabetes. Nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cutaneous vasodilatation is reportedly diminished during exercise performed at a high (700 W) relative to moderate (400 W) rate of metabolic heat production. The present study evaluated whether this impairment results from increased oxidative stress associated with an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during high intensity exercise. On two separate days, 11 young (mean ± SD, 24 ± 4 years) males cycled in the heat (35°C) at a moderate (500 W) or high (700 W) rate of metabolic heat production. Each session included two 30 min exercise bouts followed by 20 and 40 min of recovery, respectively. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was monitored at four forearm skin sites continuously perfused via intradermal microdialysis with: (1) lactated Ringer solution (Control); (2) 10 mm ascorbate (Ascorbate); (3) 10 mm l-NAME; or (4) 10 mm ascorbate + 10 mm l-NAME (Ascorbate + l

  3. Consistent pattern of local adaptation during an experimental heat wave in a pipefish-trematode host-parasite system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne H Landis

    Full Text Available Extreme climate events such as heat waves are expected to increase in frequency under global change. As one indirect effect, they can alter magnitude and direction of species interactions, for example those between hosts and parasites. We simulated a summer heat wave to investigate how a changing environment affects the interaction between the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle as a host and its digenean trematode parasite (Cryptocotyle lingua. In a fully reciprocal laboratory infection experiment, pipefish from three different coastal locations were exposed to sympatric and allopatric trematode cercariae. In order to examine whether an extreme climatic event disrupts patterns of locally adapted host-parasite combinations we measured the parasite's transmission success as well as the host's adaptive and innate immune defence under control and heat wave conditions. Independent of temperature, sympatric cercariae were always more successful than allopatric ones, indicating that parasites are locally adapted to their hosts. Hosts suffered from heat stress as suggested by fewer cells of the adaptive immune system (lymphocytes compared to the same groups that were kept at 18°C. However, the proportion of the innate immune cells (monocytes was higher in the 18°C water. Contrary to our expectations, no interaction between host immune defence, parasite infectivity and temperature stress were found, nor did the pattern of local adaptation change due to increased water temperature. Thus, in this host-parasite interaction, the sympatric parasite keeps ahead of the coevolutionary dynamics across sites, even under increasing temperatures as expected under marine global warming.

  4. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldratt, E; Yeshurun, Y; Greenfield, A J

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  5. Oil Circulation Effects on Evaporation Heat Transfer in Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger using R134A

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Jaekyoo; Chang, Youngsoo; Kang, Byungha

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study was performed for oil circulation effects on evaporation heat transfer in the brazed type plate heat exchangers using R134A. In this study, distribution device was installed to ensure uniform flow distribution in the refrigerant flow passage, which enhances heat transfer performance of plate type heat exchanger. Tests were conducted for three evaporation temperature; 33℃, 37℃, and 41℃ and several oil circulation conditions. The nominal conditions of refrigerant are as follo...

  6. IDENTIFYING THE LOCAL SURFACE URBAN HEAT ISLAND THROUGH THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current characterization of the Land Surface Temperature (LST at city scale insufficiently supports efficient mitigations and adaptations of the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI at local scale. This research intends to delineate the LST variation at local scale where mitigations and adaptations are more feasible. At the local scale, the research helps to identify the local SUHI (LSUHI at different levels. The concept complies with the planning and design conventions that urban problems are treated with respect to hierarchies or priorities. Technically, the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite image products are used. The continuous and smooth latent LST is first recovered from the raw images. The Multi-Scale Shape Index (MSSI is then applied to the latent LST to extract morphological indicators. The local scale variation of the LST is quantified by the indicators such that the LSUHI can be identified morphologically. The results are promising. It can potentially be extended to investigate the temporal dynamics of the LST and LSUHI. This research serves to the application of remote sensing, pattern analysis, urban microclimate study, and urban planning at least at 2 levels: (1 it extends the understanding of the SUHI to the local scale, and (2 the characterization at local scale facilitates problem identification and support mitigations and adaptations more efficiently.

  7. Characteristic of local boiling heat transfer of ammonia and ammonia / water binary mixture on the plate type evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Power generation using small temperature difference such as ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) is expected to be the countermeasures against global warming problem. As ammonia and ammonia/water are used in evaporators for OTEC and DTEC as working fluids, the research of their local boiling heat transfer is important for improvement of the power generation efficiency. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients were performed for ammonia /water mixture ( z = 0.9-1) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5-15 kg/m2 s), heat flux (15-23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7-0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of mass flux and composition of ammonia, and decrease with an increase of heat flux.

  8. Melting heat transfer effects on stagnation point flow of micropolar fluid saturated in porous medium with internal heat generation (absorption)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.A.A.MAHMOUD; S.E.WAHEED

    2014-01-01

    The effect of melting heat transfer on the two dimensional boundary layer flow of a micropolar fluid near a stagnation point embedded in a porous medium in the presence of internal heat generation/absorption is investigated. The governing non-linear partial differential equations describing the problem are reduced to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations solved numerically using the Chebyshev spectral method. Numerical results for velocity, angular velocity and temperature profiles are shown graphically and discussed for different values of the inverse Darcy number, the heat generation/absorption parameter, and the melting parameter. The effects of the pertinent parameters on the local skin-friction coefficient, the wall couple stress, and the local Nusselt number are tabulated and discussed. The results show that the inverse Darcy number has the effect of enhancing both velocity and temperature and suppressing angular velocity. It is also found that the local skin-friction coefficient decreases, while the local Nusselt number increases as the melting parameter increases.

  9. Effect of Joule heating on electrokinetic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Barbaros; Li, Dongqing

    2008-03-01

    The Joule heating (JH) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in electrokinetic flow due to the presence of electrical potential gradient and electrical current. JH may become pronounced for applications with high electrical potential gradients or with high ionic concentration buffer solutions. In this review, an in-depth look at the effect of JH on electrokinetic processes is provided. Theoretical modeling of EOF and electrophoresis (EP) with the presence of JH is presented and the important findings from the previous studies are examined. A numerical study of a fused-silica capillary PCR reactor powered by JH is also presented to extend the discussion of favorable usage of JH.

  10. Heat transfer analysis of catheters used for localized tissue cooling to attenuate reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Thomas L; Mitchell, Jennifer E; Merrill, Denise R

    2016-08-01

    Recent revascularization success for ischemic stroke patients using stentrievers has created a new opportunity for therapeutic hypothermia. By using short term localized tissue cooling interventional catheters can be used to reduce reperfusion injury and improve neurological outcomes. Using experimental testing and a well-established heat exchanger design approach, the ɛ-NTU method, this paper examines the cooling performance of commercially available catheters as function of four practical parameters: (1) infusion flow rate, (2) catheter location in the body, (3) catheter configuration and design, and (4) cooling approach. While saline batch cooling outperformed closed-loop autologous blood cooling at all equivalent flow rates in terms of lower delivered temperatures and cooling capacity, hemodilution, systemic and local, remains a concern. For clinicians and engineers this paper provides insights for the selection, design, and operation of commercially available catheters used for localized tissue cooling.

  11. The footprint of urban heat island effect in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Decheng; Zhao, Shuqing; Zhang, Liangxia; Sun, Ge; Liu, Yongqiang

    2015-06-10

    Urban heat island (UHI) is one major anthropogenic modification to the Earth system that transcends its physical boundary. Using MODIS data from 2003 to 2012, we showed that the UHI effect decayed exponentially toward rural areas for majority of the 32 Chinese cities. We found an obvious urban/rural temperature "cliff", and estimated that the footprint of UHI effect (FP, including urban area) was 2.3 and 3.9 times of urban size for the day and night, respectively, with large spatiotemporal heterogeneities. We further revealed that ignoring the FP may underestimate the UHI intensity in most cases and even alter the direction of UHI estimates for few cities. Our results provide new insights to the characteristics of UHI effect and emphasize the necessity of considering city- and time-specific FP when assessing the urbanization effects on local climate.

  12. Local field effects in periodic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porvatkina, O. V.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this article we investigate dielectric and magnetic properties of periodic metamaterials taking into account the so-called local field effect, caused by interaction between single particles the material consists of. We also consider the spatial dispersion effects. As a result, generalized Clausius-Mossotti techniques have been extended to the case of periodic metamaterials; permittivity tensor and permeability tensor were obtained.

  13. Physiological effects after exposure to heat : A brief literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Many employees are exposed to heat stress during their work. Although the direct effects of heat are well reported, the long term physiological effects occurring after heat exposure are hardly described. The present manuscript addresses these issues in the form of a brief literature review. Repeated

  14. An Inquiry into the Effect of Heating on Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Din Yan

    2009-01-01

    Investigations that study the effect of heating on ascorbic acid are commonly performed in schools, but the conclusions obtained are quite variable and controversial. Some results indicate that heating may destroy vitamin C, but others suggest that heating may have no effect. This article reports an attempt to resolve this confusion through a…

  15. Physiological effects after exposure to heat : A brief literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Many employees are exposed to heat stress during their work. Although the direct effects of heat are well reported, the long term physiological effects occurring after heat exposure are hardly described. The present manuscript addresses these issues in the form of a brief literature review. Repeated

  16. Length Effect on the Thermal Performance of a Heat Pipe for NPP Decay Heat Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Joseph; Lee, Jae Young [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    After Fukushima accident, importance and necessity of passive safety for nuclear power plant have been emphasized. Due to its passive characteristic, heat pipe is seriously considered as an alternative device of the active safety system for removing decay heat from the reactor core. Among many possible applications of heat pipe in NPP, we considered the application to the control rod. In the situation of SBO(Station Black Out) due to BDBA(Beyond Design Basis Accident) in a PWR, control rods are dropped in to nuclear reactor core automatically. Thus, it is expected that applying heat pipe function to control rod can enhance reactor safety by removing decay heat of fuel assembly. Considering the height of the control rod, L/D of the heat pipe would be larger than 400 if the given diameter is assumed to be similar to the diameter of the control rod. Thus, it may not be the matter for small heat pipes, it is necessary to consider the effects of L/D for the large L/D heat pipes. There for, length effect on the thermal performance of heat pipe for decay heat removal was experimentally investigated in this study. Through this study, the L/D effect on the thermal performance of the large L/D heat pipe for nuclear reactor has been studied.

  17. Analysis and modeling of localized heat generation by tumor-targeted nanoparticles (Monte Carlo methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanattalab, Ehsan; SalmanOgli, Ahmad; Piskin, Erhan

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the tumor-targeted nanoparticles that influence heat generation. We suppose that all nanoparticles are fully functionalized and can find the target using active targeting methods. Unlike the commonly used methods, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment procedure proposed in this study is purely noninvasive, which is considered to be a significant merit. It is found that the localized heat generation due to targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher than other areas. By engineering the optical properties of nanoparticles, including scattering, absorption coefficients, and asymmetry factor (cosine scattering angle), the heat generated in the tumor's area reaches to such critical state that can burn the targeted tumor. The amount of heat generated by inserting smart agents, due to the surface Plasmon resonance, will be remarkably high. The light-matter interactions and trajectory of incident photon upon targeted tissues are simulated by MIE theory and Monte Carlo method, respectively. Monte Carlo method is a statistical one by which we can accurately probe the photon trajectories into a simulation area.

  18. Application of the predicted heat strain model in development of localized, threshold-based heat stress management guidelines for the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlinson, Steve; Jia, Yunyan Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Existing heat stress risk management guidelines recommended by international standards are not practical for the construction industry which needs site supervision staff to make instant managerial decisions to mitigate heat risks. The ability of the predicted heat strain (PHS) model [ISO 7933 (2004). Ergonomics of the thermal environment analytical determination and interpretation of heat stress using calculation of the predicted heat strain. Geneva: International Standard Organisation] to predict maximum allowable exposure time (D lim) has now enabled development of localized, action-triggering and threshold-based guidelines for implementation by lay frontline staff on construction sites. This article presents a protocol for development of two heat stress management tools by applying the PHS model to its full potential. One of the tools is developed to facilitate managerial decisions on an optimized work-rest regimen for paced work. The other tool is developed to enable workers' self-regulation during self-paced work.

  19. A Simple Framework for the Dynamic Response of Cirrus Clouds to Local Diabatic Radiative Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, C T

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analytical framework for the dynamic response of cirrus to a local radiative flux convergence, expressible in terms of three independent modes of cloud evolution. Horizontally narrow and tenuous clouds within a stable environment adjust to radiative heating by ascending gradually across isentropes while spreading sufficiently fast so as to keep isentropic surfaces nearly flat. More optically dense clouds experience very concentrated heating, and if they are also very broad, they develop a convecting mixed layer. Along isentropic spreading still occurs, but in the form of turbulent density currents rather than laminar flows. A third adjustment mode relates to evaporation, which erodes cloudy air as it lofts. The dominant mode is determined from two dimensionless numbers, whose predictive power is shown in comparisons with high resolution numerical cloud simulations. The power and simplicity of the approach hints that fast, sub-grid scale radiative-dynamic atmospheric interactions m...

  20. Co-localization of the heat shock protein and human immunoglobulin G in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Chun-guang; LIU Yan-fang; LI Kai-nan; YU Lu; CUI Ji-hong; LI Jing; YANG Shou-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Elevated levels of serum immunoglobulin observed in patients with cancers of epithelial origin, including carcinomas of breast, colon, and liver1,2 have been interpreted as humoral responses of host to cancer growth.3 Recently, Qiu et al4 described in detail that human cancers of epithelial origin, including carcinomas of breast, colon, liver, lung, established epithelial cancer lines, produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) in their cytoplasm. Under normal conditions, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have multiple cellular functions, such as folding and translocating newly synthesized proteins. When a cell is injured or under stress, HSPs refold damaged protein or facilitate degradation of proteins. In most cancers, heat shock proteins can capture tumour specific peptide to inhibit the growth of cancer. This study demonstrated that human IgG and HSPs are co-localized in hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Local kinetic effects in two-dimensional plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Califano, F; Veltri, P

    2012-01-27

    Using direct numerical simulations of a hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell model, kinetic processes are investigated in a two-dimensional turbulent plasma. In the turbulent regime, kinetic effects manifest through a deformation of the ion distribution function. These patterns of non-Maxwellian features are concentrated in space nearby regions of strong magnetic activity: the distribution function is modulated by the magnetic topology, and can elongate along or across the local magnetic field. These results open a new path on the study of kinetic processes such as heating, particle acceleration, and temperature anisotropy, commonly observed in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  2. A study on effective use of heat transfer additives in the process of steam condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemuri, Srinivas; Kim, Kwang J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Kang, Yong Tae [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Systems Engineering, KyungHee University, KyungHee (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    It is well known that the additives in absorption chillers play a significant role in increasing absorber performance. Realizing that the additives in absorption chillers circulate throughout the system including the condensers, we investigated the effect of additives in the condenser. Reported herein are the results of the experimental and theoretical investigations done by using effective heat transfer additives for enhancing heat transfer coefficient in condensation of steam over a horizontal copper (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) tube surface. By using effective additives, the condensation heat transfer coefficient can be enhanced as much as 1.47 times when compared to filmwise condensation. The steam condensation, which occurred in our experiments while using effective additives, was mostly pseudo-dropwise like. In our experiments, we noted that the use of heat transfer additive such as 2-ethoxyethanol for steam condensation was highly effective. This increase in heat transfer coefficient can be attributed to concept of Marangoni effect. It is understood that this surface convection is caused by local variations in the interfacial tension. So far there has been very little noted literature available on the theoretical aspect of surface tension effect on enhancing heat transfer rate in steam condensation. In the current research we try to explain the surface tension effect for enhancing heat transfer rate in steam condensation using effective heat transfer additives. (author)

  3. 毫米波辐照下大鼠皮肤温度场及血液灌注率影响%Local heating of murine skin by millimeter waves:effect of blood perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡双喜; 邓逗逗; 范春利; 杨立; 孙丰瑞

    2012-01-01

    根据Pennes方程和毫米波在动物皮肤内的传播特性,建立了在33.5 GHz毫米波同辐照强度下的大鼠皮肤的非稳态多层传热模型.在二维柱坐标下进行离散计算,得到了长时间辐照条件下不同皮肤深度的温度变化规律,并将理论结果与实验数据进行了比较.在284 mW/cm2和853 mW/cm2辐照强度下,理论结果和实验结果基本一致;在474 mW/cm2和664 mW/cm2辐照强度下,有一定的误差,但误差仍不超过1℃,验证了该理论模型的准确性.分析了实际趋肤深度内的温度分布,发现毫米波引起的生物热效应的最高温度点并非在皮肤表面,而是皮下某点,其与表面辐照中心点的温差可超过1℃.进一步分析了血液灌注率对温度场的影响,发现在讨论的温度范围内,血液灌注率的变化对毫米波辐照下的皮肤表面温度场的影响较小.%We built up a transient thermal multilayer model for heating of human skin with high power millimeter waves by finite volume method (FVM) based on Pennes' bioheat transfer equation. We analyzed the calculated results and compared them with the experimental ones. The errors were no more than 1 ℃, especially at the incident power densities of 284 and 853 mW/cm2. The computing results agreed closely with the experimental ones. The veracity and reliability of finite volume model were validated. We charted the temperature changes with depth in the energy penetration depth at different radiation intensity of steady state. It was found that the maximum temperature spot caused by millimeter wave was not on the skin surface, but at some spot in subcutaneous. The difference in temperature between these two spots could be more than 1 ℃. The effect of blood perfusion rate on the temperature of skin surface was further analyzed. The change of blood perfu-sion rate had little effect on the temperature of skin surface in the temperature range studied in this paper.

  4. Plasma heating effects during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G. K.; Dixon, R. D.

    Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO2 (10.6 (MU)m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 (MU)m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO2 and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

  5. Predictions of heat transfer coefficients of supercritical carbon dioxide using the overlapped type of local neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junghui Chen; Kuan-Po Wang [Chung-Yuan Christian University (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ming-Tsai Liang [I-Shou University (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2005-06-01

    An overlapped type of local neural network is proposed to improve accuracy of the heat transfer coefficient estimation of the supercritical carbon dioxide. The idea of this work is to use the network to estimate the heat transfer coefficient for which there is no accurate correlation model due to the complexity of the thermo-physical properties involved around the critical region. Unlike the global approximation network (e.g. backpropagation network) and the local approximation network (e.g. the radial basis function network), the proposed network allows us to match the quick changes in the near-critical local region where the rate of heat transfer is significantly increased and to construct the global smooth perspective far away from that local region. Based on the experimental data for carbon dioxide flowing inside a heated tube at the supercritical condition, the proposed network significantly outperformed some the conventional correlation method and the traditional network models. (Author)

  6. Localized Edge Vibrations and Edge Reconstruction by Joule Heating in Graphene Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Mads; Fürst, Joachim Alexander; Jauho, Antti-Pekka;

    2010-01-01

    for current-induced edge reconstruction using density functional theory. Our calculations provide evidence for localized vibrations at edge interfaces involving unpassivated armchair edges. We demonstrate that these vibrations couple to the current, estimate their excitation by Joule heating, and argue......Control of the edge topology of graphene nanostructures is critical to graphene-based electronics. A means of producing atomically smooth zigzag edges using electronic current has recently been demonstrated in experiments [Jia et al., Science 323, 1701 (2009)]. We develop a microscopic theory...

  7. TRACE assessment on local condensation heat transfer in presence of non-condensable gas inside a vertical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Jin; Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kap; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    TRACE assessment was performed to investigate local condensation heat transfer coefficients in the presence of a noncondensable gas inside a vertical tube. The data obtained from pure steam and steam/nitrogen mixture condensation experiments were compared to study the effects of noncondensable nitrogen gas on the annular film condensation phenomena. The condenser tube had a small inner diameter of 13mm (about 1/2-in.) and this experiment had been performed to prove the effectiveness of the a Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), which is a small modular integral-type pressurized water reactor that is developed for the dual purposes of seawater desalination and small-scaled power generation. In the case of nitrogen presence, TRACE results show the converged results but the prediction is different from experimental data. The candidate reasons can be focused on several models, such as the film thickness calculation, surface area, and condensation heat transfer correlations, etc. In the case of pure steam condensation case, TRACE results shows large oscillations and do not converge. This should be investigated in detail to identify the reason. Until now, the oscillation in thermal hydraulic parameters results from the film thickness calculation and surface area calculation. For future works, the whole sets of the experiment will be assessed and the improvement of TRACE will be performed.

  8. Local underemployment and the discouraged worker effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M. van; Hooimeijer, P.; Mulder, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of poor local labour market opportunities on occupational achievement is an important aspect of the spatial mismatch hypothesis. Much of the research has concentrated on the direct link between geographical access to jobs and employment outcomes. In contrast, little attention has been giv

  9. Local underemployment and the discouraged worker effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, M. van; Hooimeijer, P.; Mulder, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of poor local labour market opportunities on occupational achievement is an important aspect of the spatial mismatch hypothesis. Much of the research has concentrated on the direct link between geographical access to jobs and employment outcomes. In contrast, little attention has been

  10. Adverse effects of dental local anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meechan, J G; Rood, J P

    1997-10-01

    This paper considers the adverse effects that a patient may suffer as a result of anticipating an injection of dental local anaesthetic. Although most of these are extremely rare (a testimony to good technique), the dental practitioner should be aware of the possibility of their occurrence and of ways to deal with them.

  11. Peer effects and local congestion in networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currarini, Sergio; Fumagalli, E.; Panebianco, Fabrizio

    We study linear quadratic games played on a network. Agents face peer effects with distance-one neighbors, and strategic substitution with distance-two neighbors (local congestion). For this class of games, we show that an interior equilibrium exists both in the high and in the low regions of the

  12. Local Stability Analysis for a Thermo-Economic Irreversible Heat Engine Model under Different Performance Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Barranco-Jiménez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A recent work reported a local stability analysis of a thermo-economical model of an irreversible heat engine working under maximum power conditions. That work showed that after small perturbations to the working temperatures, the system decreases exponentially to the steady state characterized by two different relaxation times. This work extends the local stability analysis considering other performance regimes: the Maximum Efficient Power (MEP and the Ecological Function (EF regimes. The relaxation time was shown under different performance regimes as functions of the temperature ratio τ = T2/T1, with T1 > T2, the fractional fuel cost f and a lumped parameter R related to the internal irreversibilities degree. Under Maximum Efficient Power conditions the relaxation times are less than the relaxation times under both Maximum Ecological function and Maximum Power. At Maximum Power Efficient conditions, the model gives better stability conditions than for the other two regimes.

  13. Sequential and selective localized optical heating in water via on-chip dielectric nanopatterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Ahmed M; Biswas, Roshni; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2017-07-24

    We study the use of nanopatterned silicon membranes to obtain optically-induced heating in water. We show that by varying the detuning between an absorptive optical resonance of the patterned membrane and an illumination laser, both the magnitude and response time of the temperature rise can be controlled. This allows for either sequential or selective heating of different patterned areas on chip. We obtain a steady-state temperature of approximately 100 °C for a 805.5nm CW laser power density of 66 µW/μm(2) and observe microbubble formation. The ability to spatially and temporally control temperature on the microscale should enable the study of heat-induced effects in a variety of chemical and biological lab-on-chip applications.

  14. Study on the ionospheric effects with different heat-conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fang; ZHAO Zhengyu; NI Binbin; ZHANG Yuannong

    2007-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed.Based on the numerical simulation results,the spatial effects of the ionosphere,mainly consisting of the change on electron density(ED)and electron temperature(ET),heated by the high frequency(HF)pump wave have been analyzed quantitatively.Results are presented as the space-time evolution regulation on the main parameters of the ionosphere resulted by the HF heating waves under the different heat-conditions,iust as different regions,such as high latitude and mid-low latitude;different heating power or frequency,such as underdense heating and over-dense heating and regions at different altitudes.The heating effects in different regions with different heating conditions have been presented in figures.Finally,some primary conclusions are given by comparing the simulation results with experimental observation.

  15. About the possible options for models of convective heat transfer in closed volumes with local heating source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of mathematical modeling of convective heat transfer in air area surrounded on all sides enclosing structures, in the presence of heat source at the lower boundary of the media are presented. Solved the system of differential equations of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations with the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The process of convective heat transfer is calculated using the models of turbulence Prandtl and Prandtl-Reichard. Takes into account the processes of heat exchange region considered with the environment. Is carried out the analysis of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient at interfaces “air – enclosures”. The distributions average along the gas temperature range are obtained.

  16. Revealing local variability properties of human heartbeat intervals with the local effective Hölder exponent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struzik, Z.R.

    2000-01-01

    The local effective H'older exponent has been applied to evaluate the variability of heart rate locally at an arbitrary position (time) and resolution (scale). The local effective H'older exponent [8, 9] used is effectively insensitive to local polynomial trends in heartbeat rate due to the use of t

  17. Revealing Local Variablity Properties of Human Heartbeat Intervals with the Local Effective Hölder Exponent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struzik, Z.R.

    2001-01-01

    The local effective Holder exponent has been applied to evaluate the variability of heart rate locally at an arbitrary position (time) and resolution (scale). The local effective Holder exponent [1,2] used is effectively insensitive to local polynomial trends in heartbeat rate due to the use of the

  18. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shestakov, Aleksei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stolken, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vignes, Ryan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  19. Local heat transfer coefficients during the evaporation of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R-134a in a plate heat exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILA ŽIVKOVIĆ

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The evaporation heat transfer coefficient of the refrigerant R-134a in a vertical plate heat exchanger was investigated experimentally. The area of the plate was divided into several segments along the vertical axis. For each of the segments, the local value of the heat transfer coefficient was calculated and presented as a function of the mean vapor quality in the segment. Owing to the thermocouples installed along the plate surface, it was possible to determine the temperature distribution and vapor quality profile inside the plate. The influences of the mass flux, heat flux, pressure of system and the flow configuration on the heat transfer coefficient were also taken into account and a comparison with literature data was performed.

  20. Inductive heat property of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in AC magnetic field for local hyperthermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Donglin; ZENG Xianwei; XIA Qisheng; TANG Jintian

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with different magnetic properties were prepared by coprecipitation of Fe3+ and Fe2+ with aqueous NaOH solution.The inductive heat properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in an alternating current (AC) magnetic field were investigated for local hyperthermia. The maximum saunder the optimum conditions of Fe3+:Fe2+ molar ratio at 1.8:1. The Ms of Fe3O4 nanoparticles decreased as the Fe3+ /Fe2+ molar ratio increased. But the coercivity Hc increases with the increasing of Fe3+ /Fe2+ molar ratio. Exposed in the AC magnetic field for 29 min, the temperatures of physiological saline suspension containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles were 42-97.5 ℃.The inductive heat property of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in AC magnetic field decreases as Hc increases, but increases with the increasing of Ms. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be useful as good thermoseeds for localized hyperthermia treatment of cancers.

  1. Peltier-effect module for highly localized temperature manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Wang, Wanjun; Murphy, Michael C.

    1999-11-01

    A Peltier-effect module suitable for applications that require manipulation of the temperature (cooling or heating) of microsized subjects or at a highly localized spot was developed. The module was constructed from a commercial electronic refrigeration device based on the Peltier effect with an array of microprobes attached to its top surface. The microprobes were fabricated using the LIGA (German acronym for lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung) process—one of the microelectromechanical systems technologies. The 1000-μm-tall microprobes were fabricated on a titanium plate and then bonded onto the top surface of a commercial Peltier device. When an electrical current was supplied to the Peltier device, the top surface (with microprobes) of the device was cooled and the other side was heated. Heat was conducted from a microsample on the tip of microprobe to the top surface of the Peltier device. A dynamic model of the module was developed and numerical simulation studies were conducted. The prototype module was tested and the experimental results matched well with those predicted by the numerical simulations. The maximum difference between the temperature of a microsample and that at the surface of the Peltier device was approximately 1 °C.

  2. Effects of temperature distribution and level on heat transfer on a rotating free disk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xi; XU Guo-qiang; LUO Xiang

    2011-01-01

    In gas turbine engines, with the existence of the intense forced convection and significant buoyancy effects, temperature distribution and level on turbine or compressor disks affect the heat transfer characteristics strongly. In this paper, numerical simulations were performed to analyze these influences for a free disk, with the laminar and turbulent flow respectively. The influences of temperature distribution on the heat transfer were observed by using incompressible cooling air, and temperature profiles of nth order monomial and polynomial were assumed on the disk. The analysis revealed that the heat transfer for two flow states on the free disk is determined by the exponent n of the monomial profile when specifying the rotating Reynolds number; for an arbitrary polynomial profile, the local Nusselt number can be deduced from results of monomial profiles. To study the effects of temperature level on heat transfer singly, monomial profiles were used and the local Nusselt number of compressible and incompressible cooling air were compared. And both for two flow states, the following conclusions could be drawn: the relative difference of local Nusselt number is mainly controlled by nondimensional local temperature difference, and almost independent of the monomial's coefficient C, exponent n and the rotating Reynolds number. Subsequently, a correction method for heat transfer of the free disk is presented and verified computationally, with which the local Nusselt number, obtained with a uniform and low temperature profile, can be revised by arbitrary distribution and high temperature magnitude.

  3. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is invoked to study the effect of solar-wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type-III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type-III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar-flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir-wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Riegel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations {approximately}1%. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action-principle approach is used to develop a theory of nonlinear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability.

  4. Various Local Heating Events in the Earliest Phase of Flux Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Shin; Katsukawa, Yukio; Cheung, Mark C. M.

    2017-02-01

    Emerging flux regions (EFRs) are known to exhibit various sporadic local heating events in the lower atmosphere. To investigate the characteristics of these events, especially to link the photospheric magnetic fields and atmospheric dynamics, we analyze Hinode, Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), and Solar Dynamics Observatory data of a new EFR in NOAA AR 12401. Out of 151 bright points (BPs) identified in Hinode/SOT Ca images, 29 are overlapped by an SOT/SP scan. Seven BPs in the EFR center possess mixed-polarity magnetic backgrounds in the photosphere. Their IRIS UV spectra (e.g., Si iv 1402.8 Å) are strongly enhanced and red- or blueshifted, with tails reaching +/- 150 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which is highly suggestive of bi-directional jets; each brightening lasts for 10–15 minutes, leaving flare-like light curves. Most of this group show bald patches, the U-shaped photospheric magnetic loops. Another 10 BPs are found in unipolar regions at the EFR edges. They are generally weaker in UV intensities and exhibit systematic redshifts with Doppler speeds up to 40 {km} {{{s}}}-1, which could exceed the local sound speed in the transition region. Both types of BPs show signs of strong temperature increase in the low chromosphere. These observational results support the physical picture that heating events in the EFR center are due to magnetic reconnection within cancelling undular fields like Ellerman bombs, while the peripheral heating events are due to shocks or strong compressions caused by fast downflows along the overlying arch filament system.

  5. Effects of Heat Shock on Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋亮年

    1994-01-01

    The changes of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) during the heat shock response have been studied using a human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS-8603) as the model. The expression of the heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) mRNA in HOS-8603 cells has been enhanced markedly after a heat treatment at 43 ℃ for 30 min. A mild thermal pretreatment (42℃ for 1 h) protects the HOS-8603 cells against a subsequent heat challenge (46℃). This induced thermotolerance is reflected by the increase of cell viability of HOS-8603 cells. The GR binding activity in HOS-8603 cells decreased rapidly after the heat treatment at 43℃; only 42. 61% of controls were detected 60 min after the heat treatment. However, there was no significant change in the dissociation constant value (Kd). These results indicate that the heat shock induce not only the heat shock mRNA expression, but also the rapid reduction in GR binding activity, suggesting that there might be a functional relationship between GR action and the heat shock response.

  6. Examining the Role of Local Climate Zones in Urban Heat Island Assessment Using Remotely-Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcher, P. S.; Brunsell, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    More than half of the world population resides in urban areas where the urban heat island (UHI) effect enhances heat-related hazards. To mitigate the impacts of rising temperatures, it is necessary to develop tools to help public administrators formulate strategies to reduce heat exposure, increase access to cooling, and modify building design. We used Google Earth Engine's Landsat archive to classify local climate zones (LCZ) that consist of ten urban and seven non-urban classifications of land cover. To examine the influence of urban morphology on the surface energy balance (SEB) in high-density, medium-density, and low-density urban regions over one annual cycle, we used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) products. We used the triangle method to examine variability in energy balance partitioning in relation to urban density. As urban density decreases, the variation of evapotranspiration increases. These results indicate that variations in the SEB can be detected using the LCZ classification method. The results from analysis in Fr-LST space of the annual cycles over several years can be used to detect changes in the SEB as urbanization increases.

  7. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertürk, M. Arcan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 and Division of MR Research, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A., E-mail: bottoml@mri.jhu.edu [Division of MR Research, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  8. Local convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of CuO/water nanofluid in a microchannel heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabi, A. R.; Zarrinabadi, S.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Hashemabadi, S. H.; Salimi, M.

    2017-02-01

    Forced convective heat transfer in a microchannel heat sink (MCHS) using CuO/water nanofluids with 0.1 and 0.2 vol% as coolant was investigated. The experiments were focused on the heat transfer enhancement in the channel entrance region at Re Hydraulic performance of the MCHS was also estimated by measuring friction factor and pressure drop. Results showed that higher convective heat transfer coefficient was obtained at the microchannel entrance. Maximum enhancement of the average heat transfer coefficient compared with deionized water was about 40 % for 0.2 vol% nanofluid at Re = 1150. Enhancement of the convective heat transfer coefficient of nanofluid decreased with further increasing of Reynolds number.

  9. Effect of Corrugation Angle on Heat Transfer Studies of Viscous Fluids in Corrugated Plate Heat Exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sreedhara Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation heat transfer studies are conducted in corrugated plate heat exchangers (PHEs having three different corrugation angles of 300, 400 and 500. The plate heat exchangers have a length of 30 cm and a width of 10 cm with a spacing of 5 mm. Water and 20% glycerol solution are taken as test fluids and hot fluid is considered as heating medium. The wall temperatures are measured along the length of exchanger at seven different locations by means of thermocouples. The inlet and outlet temperatures of test fluid and hot fluid are measured by means of four more thermocouples. The experiments are conducted at a flowrate ranging from 0.5 lpm to 6 lpm with the test fluid. Film heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number are determined from the experimental data. These values are compared with different corrugation angles. The effects of corrugation angles on heat transfer rates are discussed.

  10. Investigation on reticle heating effect induced overlay error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mijung; Kim, Geunhak; Kim, SeoMin; Lee, Byounghoon; Kim, Seokkyun; Lim, Chang-moon; Kim, Myoungsoo; Park, Sungki

    2014-04-01

    As design rule of semiconductor decreases continuously, overlay error control gets more and more important and challenging. It is also true that On Product Overlay (OPO) of leading edge memory device shows unprecedented level of accuracy, owing to the development of precision optics, mechanic stage and alignment system with active compensation method. However, the heating of reticle and lens acts as a dominant detriment against further improvement of overlay. Reticle heating is more critical than lens heating in current advanced scanners because lens heating can be mostly compensated by feed-forward control algorithm. In recent years, the tools and technical ideas for reticle heating control are proposed and thought to reduce the reticle heating effect. Nevertheless, it is not still simple to predict the accurate heating amount and overlay. And it is required to investigate the parameters affecting reticle heating quantitatively. In this paper, the reticle pattern density and exposure dose are considered as the main contributors, and the effects are investigated through experiments. Mask set of various transmittance are prepared by changing pattern density. After exposure with various doses, overlay are measured and analyzed by comparing with reference marks exposed in heating free condition. As a result, it is discovered that even in the case of low dose and high transmittance, reticle heating is hardly avoidable. It is also shown that there is a simple relationship among reticle heating, transmittance and exposure dose. Based on this relationship, the reticle heating is thought to be predicted if the transmittance and dose are fixed.

  11. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass transfer along a ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Keywords: Variable viscosity, Chemical Reaction, Viscous Dissipation, Finite difference method, Suction.

  12. The effect of magnetic field on nanofluids heat transfer through a uniformly heated horizontal tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami, N.; Kazemnejad Banari, A.; Malekzadeh, A.; Pouranfard, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effects of magnetic field on forced convection heat transfer of Fe3O4-water nanofluid with laminar flow regime in a horizontal pipe under constant heat flux conditions were studied, experimentally. The convective heat transfer of magnetic fluid flow inside the heated pipe with uniform magnetic field was measured. Fe3O4 nanoparticles with diameters less than 100 nm dispersed in water with various volume concentrations are used as the test fluid. The effect of the external magnetic field (Ha = 33.4 ×10-4 to 136.6 ×10-4) and nanoparticle concentrations (φ = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1%) on heat transfer characteristics were investigated. Results showed that by the presence of a magnetic field, increase in nanoparticle concentration caused reduction of convection heat transfer coefficient. In this condition, heat transfer decreased up to 25%. Where, in the absence of an external magnetic field, adding magnetic nanoparticles increased convection heat transfer more than 60%. It was observed that the Nusselt number decreased by increasing the Hartmann number at a specified concentration of magnetic nanofluids, that reduction about 25% in heat transfer rate could be found.

  13. Effect of heat and heat acclimatization on cycling time trial performance and pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Racinais, Sebastien; Périard, Julien D; Karlsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effects of heat-acclimatization on performance and pacing during outdoor cycling time-trials (TT, 43.4km) in the heat. METHODS: Nine cyclists performed 3 TTs in hot ambient conditions (TTH, ∼37ºC) on the first (TTH-1), sixth (TTH-2) and fourteenth (TTH-3) days of trainin...

  14. The diffusion model of fractal heat and mass transfer in fluidized bed a local fractional arbitrary Euler-Lagrange formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, the local fractional arbitrary Euler-Lagrange formula are utilized to address the diffusion model of fractal heat and mass transfer in a fluidized bed based on the Fick's law with local fractional vector calculus. This article has been corrected. Link to the correction 10.2298/TSCI150923149E

  15. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT HEAT EXCHANGERS ON THE WASTE-HEAT DRIVEN THERMOACOUSTIC ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID W. Y. KHOO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the efficiency of the SCORE thermoacoustic engine, it is important to investigate the heat transfer between the bulge or theconvolution and the regenerator. Heat transfer due to convection has greatinfluence on performance of the thermoacoustic engine. The total heat transfer from the bulge or the convolution to the first few layers of the regenerator is mainly due to convection and radiation. In this paper, the two modes of heat transfers, convection and radiation are under investigation numerically. The main objective of the present study is to find an ideal shape of the bulge which transports heat from the cooking stove to regenerator. Four different designs of the bulge are proposed in this work. Numerical method FluentTM CFD modelling with surface to surface (S2S radiation method is chosen to study the radiation effect. The main challenge in the development of the models of such system is to simulate the coupled heat transfer effect and the temperature gradient across both the bulge and porous media surfaces. The results show a very limited amount of heat transfer by convection on all the bulge simulated cases, with a dominant radiative heat transfer over the convective heat transfer while convection was found to be dominant in the convolution simulated case. By looking at the heat fluxes solely, convolution design is recommended to improve the engine performance as it possesses higher total heat flux comparatively but most of it was found to be by convection rather than radiation. The results were validated analytically in a recent accepted paper and found to be in good agreement. To accurately predict the heat transfer in the model, conduction must also be included in future studies as well.

  16. Heat Waves in the United States: Mortality Risk during Heat Waves and Effect Modification by Heat Wave Characteristics in 43 U.S. Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. Brooke; Bell, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Devastating health effects from recent heat waves, and projected increases in frequency, duration, and severity of heat waves from climate change, highlight the importance of understanding health consequences of heat waves. Objectives We analyzed mortality risk for heat waves in 43 U.S. cities (1987–2005) and investigated how effects relate to heat waves’ intensity, duration, or timing in season. Methods Heat waves were defined as ≥ 2 days with temperature ≥ 95th percentile for the community for 1 May through 30 September. Heat waves were characterized by their intensity, duration, and timing in season. Within each community, we estimated mortality risk during each heat wave compared with non-heat wave days, controlling for potential confounders. We combined individual heat wave effect estimates using Bayesian hierarchical modeling to generate overall effects at the community, regional, and national levels. We estimated how heat wave mortality effects were modified by heat wave characteristics (intensity, duration, timing in season). Results Nationally, mortality increased 3.74% [95% posterior interval (PI), 2.29–5.22%] during heat waves compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality risk increased 2.49% for every 1°F increase in heat wave intensity and 0.38% for every 1-day increase in heat wave duration. Mortality increased 5.04% (95% PI, 3.06–7.06%) during the first heat wave of the summer versus 2.65% (95% PI, 1.14–4.18%) during later heat waves, compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality impacts and effect modification by heat wave characteristics were more pronounced in the Northeast and Midwest compared with the South. Conclusions We found higher mortality risk from heat waves that were more intense or longer, or those occurring earlier in summer. These findings have implications for decision makers and researchers estimating health effects from climate change. PMID:21084239

  17. Local heat transfer measurements on a rotating flat blade model with a single film hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqiang Xu; Bin Yang; Zhi Tao; Zhenming Zhao; Hongwei Wu

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to measure the heat transfer coefficient distributions on a flat blade model under rotating oper-ating conditions.A steady-state thermochromic liquid crystal technique was employed to measure the surface temperature,and all the signals from the rotating reference frame were collected by the telemetering instrument via a wireless connection.Both air and CO2 were used as coolant. Results show that the rotational effect has a significant influence on the heat transfer coefficient distributions.The pro-files of hg/ho,which is the ratio of heat transfer coefficient with film cooling to that without film cooling,deflect towards the high-radius locations on both the pressure surface and suction surface as the rotation number(Rt)increases,and the deflective tendency is more evident on the suction surface.The variations in mainstream Reynolds number(ReD)and blowing ratio(M)present different distribu-tions of hg/ho on the pressure and suction surfaces,respectively.Furthermore,the coolant used for CO2 injection is prone to result in lower heat transfer coefficients.

  18. Numerical study on transient local entropy generation in pulsating turbulent flow through an externally heated pipe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hüseyin Yapici; Gamze Baştürk; Nesrın Kayataş; Şenay Yalçin

    2005-10-01

    This study presents an investigation of transient local entropy generation rate in pulsating turbulent flow through an externally heated pipe. The flow inlet to the pipe pulsates at a constant period and amplitude, only the velocity oscilates. rate in pulsating turbulent flow through an externally heated pipe. The flow inlet to the pipe pulsates at a constant period and amplitude, only the velocity oscilates. The simulations are extended to include different pulsating flow cases (sinusoidal flow, step flow, and saw-down flow) and for varying periods. The flow and temperature fields are computed numerically with the help of the Fluent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, and a computer program developed by us by using the results of the calculations performed for the flow and temperature fields. In all investigated cases, the irreversibility due to the heat transfer dominates. With the increase of flow period, the highest levels of the total entropy generation rates increase logarithmically in the case of sinusoidal and saw-down flow cases whereas they are almost constant and the highest total local entropy is also generated in the step case flow. The Merit number oscillates periodically in the pulsating flow cases along the flow time. The results of this study indicate that flow pulsation has an adverse effect on the ratio of the useful energy transfer rate to the irreversibility rate.

  19. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S N Maitra

    2000-10-01

    The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating ratesto the wetted area and to the nose of the missile are also investigated. Finally four numerical examples are cited to estimate the errors, in heat transfers and heating ratesto both wetted area and nose region of the missile, arising out of neglecting the gravitational forces.

  20. Local Administrators’ Leadresship Behaviours’ Effects on Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayhan ÖZKAN

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is; to define the Local Administrators’ (Governor, Deputy Governor, District Governor leadership behaviors’ effects on education, according to the views of the local administrators in different positions as Governor, Deputy Governor, District Governor and education administrators with different kind of duties as National Education Principals in the cities and school headmasters. The research becomes from the Governors, Deputy Governors, District Governors, National Education Principals in the cities, National Education Principals in the districts, Primary School Headmasters and high school headmasters who are serving in all the 81 cities of Turkey. The exemplify becomes from 81 Governors, 81 Deputy Governors, 81 National Education Principals of the cities, 81 District Governors, 81 National Education Principals of the districts and 81 school headmasters, totally 567 people. In the research as a datum collecting tool questionnaire and negotiation forms had been used and separately applied to the local and education administrators. The questions in the questionnaires which had developed for the two separate groups had been in the same number and style. The data were analyzed by using variation analyses (Anova, Kruskall Wallis analyses and LSD test had been used. According to the results of the research, there are important differences between the views of the local and education administrators who are serving in different regions.

  1. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  2. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  3. Investigation of effect of oblique ridges on heat transfer in plate heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosád, Jan; Dvořák, Václav

    2014-03-01

    This article deals with numerical investigation of flow in plate heat exchangers. These are counterflow heat exchangers formed by plates. These plates are shaped by the ridges to intensify heat transfer. The objective of the work is the investigation of effect of straight oblique triangular ridges for increasing of heat transfer and pressure losses. The ridges on adjacent plates intersect and thus form a channel of complex shape. The research includes various types of ridges with different fillets and ridges spacing.The work also investigates the number of ridges that is necessary for optimization calculations. Obtained data are analysed and the heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss are evaluated. Conclusion describes the effect of fillets, ridges pitch and number of ridges.

  4. Study on modeling of resist heating effect correction in EB mask writer EBM-9000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Haruyuki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Suganuma, Mizuna; Kato, Yasuo; Yashima, Jun; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Anze, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Munehiro

    2015-07-01

    Resist heating effect which is caused in electron beam lithography by rise in substrate temperature of a few tens or hundreds of degrees changes resist sensitivity and leads to degradation of local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). Increasing writing pass count and reducing dose per pass is one way to avoid the resist heating effect, but it worsens writing throughput. As an alternative way, NuFlare Technology is developing a heating effect correction system which corrects CD deviation induced by resist heating effect and mitigates LCDU degradation even in high dose per pass conditions. Our developing correction model is based on a dose modulation method. Therefore, a kind of conversion equation to modify the dose corresponding to CD change by temperature rise is necessary. For this purpose, a CD variation model depending on local pattern density was introduced and its validity was confirmed by experiments and temperature simulations. And then the dose modulation rate which is a parameter to be used in the heating effect correction system was defined as ideally irrelevant to the local pattern density, and the actual values were also determined with the experimental results for several resist types. The accuracy of the heating effect correction was also discussed. Even when deviations depending on the pattern density slightly remains in the dose modulation rates (i.e., not ideal in actual), the estimated residual errors in the correction are sufficiently small and acceptable for practical 2 pass writing with the constant dose modulation rates. In these results, it is demonstrated that the CD variation model is effective for the heating effect correction system.

  5. On Effectiveness and Entropy Generatioin in Heat Exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiongDaxi; LiZhixin; 等

    1996-01-01

    Some conceptual problems were discussed in the present paper,Firstly,according to the physical meaning of effectiveness,a new expression of effectiveness was developed by using an ideal heat exchnager model and temperature histogram method,in which the non-uniform inlet temperature profile was considered.Secondly,the relation of entropy generation number to effectiveness was studied,it was pointed out that both of them could express the perfect degree of a heat exchanger to the second thermodynamic law.Finally,to describe both quantity and quality of heat transferred in a heat exchanger a criterion named as comperhensive thermal performance coefficient (CTPE) was presented.

  6. Effect of heating rate on the pyrolysis yields of rapeseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-05-15

    The pyrolysis yields of rapeseed were investigated applying thermogravimetric analysis technique. The pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 1273K at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50K/min in a dynamic nitrogen flow of 40cc/min. Effects of heating rate on the mass losses from the rapeseed were examined using the derivative thermogravimetric analysis profiles. This study showed that important differences on the pyrolytic behavior of rapeseed are observed when heating rate is changed. At the lower heating rates, the maximum rates of mass losses were relatively low. When the heating rate was increased, maximum rates of mass losses also increased. These variations were interpreted by the heterogeneous structure of biomass. Heating rates also concluded to affect the shape of the peaks. Increase in the heating rate shifted the main peak on the DTG profile to the lower temperatures. At low heating rates, there is probably resistance to mass or heat transfer inside the biomass particles. However, increase in heating rate overcame these restrictions, and led to higher conversion rates. The final pyrolysis temperatures were also affected from the variation of the heating rate. Activation energy values were first increased and then decreased depending on the heating rates. (author)

  7. EFFECTS OF CONSTANT EXCITATION ON LOCAL BIFURCATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-qiang; CHEN Yu-shu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the constant excitation on the local bifurcation of the periodic solutions in the 1:2 internal resonant systems were analyzed based on the singularity theory. It is shown that the constant excitation make influence only when there exist some nonlinear terms, in the oscillator with lower frequency. Besides acting as main bifurcation parameter, the constant excitation, together with coefficients of some nonlinear terms,may change the values of unfolding parameters and the type of the bifurcation. Under the non-degenerate cases, the effect of the third order terms can be neglected.

  8. Modeling terahertz heating effects on water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torben T.L.; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Jepsen, Peter Uhd;

    2010-01-01

    We apply Kirchhoff’s heat equation to model the influence of a CW terahertz beam on a sample of water, which is assumed to be static. We develop a generalized model, which easily can be applied to other liquids and solids by changing the material constants. If the terahertz light source is focused...... down to a spot with a diameter of 0.5 mm, we find that the steadystate temperature increase per milliwatt of transmitted power is 1.8◦C/mW. A quantum cascade laser can produce a CW beam in the order of several milliwatts and this motivates the need to estimate the effect of beam power on the sample...... temperature. For THz time domain systems, we indicate how to use our model as a worst-case approximation based on the beam average power. It turns out that THz pulses created from photoconductive antennas give a negligible increase in temperature. As biotissue contains a high water content, this leads...

  9. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE MIXED CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER IN ANNULUS HEATED BY JOULEAN EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Touahri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we numerically study the three-dimensional mixed convection heat transfer in the annular space between tow concentric horizontal pipes, the external pipe is heated by an electrical intensity passing through its small thickness while the inner cylinder is insulated. The convection in the fluid domain is conjugated to thermal conduction in the pipes solid thickness. The physical properties of the fluid are thermal dependant. The heat losses from the external outside pipe surface to the surrounding ambient are considered. The model equations of continuity, momenta and energy are numerically solved by a finite volume method with a second order spatiotemporal discretization. The obtained results show the three dimensional aspect of the thermal and dynamical fields with considerable variations of the viscosity and moderate variations of the fluid thermal conductivity. As expected, the mixed convection Nusselt number becomes more superior to that of the forced convection when the Grashof number is increased. At the solid-fluid interface, the results show clearly the azimuthal and axial variations of the local heat flux and the local Nusselt numbers. Following these results, we have tried modelling the average Nusselt numberNuA as a function of Richardson numberRi. With the parameters used, the heat transfer is quantified by the correlation:NuA= 9.9130 Ri0.0816.

  10. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  11. Stiff-stilbene photoswitch ruptures bonds not by pulling but by local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Tim; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-06-21

    The photochemical cis→trans-isomerization of stiff-stilbene (1-(1-indanyliden)indan) was previously used to trigger the ring opening of cyclobutene, i.e. the retro [2+2] cycloaddition leading to butadiene, mechanically. However, the forces generated by stiff-stilbene during photoisomerization are limited, so it is unclear in how far the mechanical properties of stiff-stilbene determine the efficiency of the bond rupture. Here we present a computational study in which we investigate the mechanochemical properties of this reaction. We show that the mechanical work transmitted from stiff-stilbene to cyclobutene is much too low to account for the observed facilitation of the ring opening. Hence, local heating resulting from the absorption of a photon by stiff-stilbene and efficient non-radiative decay are the key elements initiating this reaction.

  12. A complex variable meshless local Petrov-Galerkin method for transient heat conduction problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qi-Fang; Dai Bao-Dong; Li Zhen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the complex variable moving least-square (CVMLS) approximation,a complex variable meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (CVMLPG) method is presented for transient heat conduction problems.The method is developed based on the CVMLS approximation for constructing shape functions at scattered points,and the Heaviside step function is used as a test function in each sub-domain to avoid the need for a domain integral in symmetric weak form.In the construction of the well-performed shape function,the trial function of a two-dimensional (2D) problem is formed with a one-dimensional (1 D) basis function,thus improving computational efficiency.The numerical results are compared with the exact solutions of the problems and the finite element method (FEM).This comparison illustrates the accuracy as well as the capability of the CVMLPG method.

  13. A finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wang

    2012-10-01

    A new finite volume method for cylindrical heat conduction problems based on local analytical solution is proposed in this paper with detailed derivation. The calculation results of this new method are compared with the traditional second-order finite volume method. The newly proposed method is more accurate than conventional ones, even though the discretized expression of this proposed method is slightly more complex than the second-order central finite volume method, making it cost more calculation time on the same grids. Numerical result shows that the total CPU time of the new method is significantly less than conventional methods for achieving the same level of accuracy. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anomaly mediation in local effective theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dine, Michael; Draper, Patrick [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics,Santa Cruz CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-02-17

    The phenomenon known as “anomaly mediation” can be understood in a variety of ways. Rather than an anomaly, certain gaugino bilinear terms are required by local supersymmetry and gauge invariance (the derivation of these terms is in some cases related to anomalies in scale invariance or R symmetries). We explain why the gaugino bilinear is required in supersymmetric gauge theories with varying number of colors and flavors. By working in the Higgs phase, gauging a flavor group, or working below the scale of gaugino condensation, each of these theories has a local effective description in which we can identify the bilinear term, establishing its necessity in the microscopic theory. For example, in theories that exhibit gaugino condensation, the potential in the very low energy theory is supersymmetric precisely due to the relation between the nonperturbative superpotential and the gaugino bilinear terms. Similarly, the gravitino mass appears from its coupling to the gaugino bilinear.

  15. Maldistribution in airewater heat pump evaporators. Part 1: Effects on evaporator, heat pump and system level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Gunda; Palm, Björn; Elmegaard, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to quantify the effect of evaporator maldistribution onoperating costs of air-water heat pumps. In the proposed simulation model maldistributionis induced by two parameters describing refrigerant phase and air flow distribution.Annual operating costs are calculated...... based on heat pump performance at distinct operatingconditions. Results show that percentage increase of operating costs is similar for thethree considered climate zones, even though the effect of maldistribution on heat pumpperformance varies with operating conditions. Differences in terms of absolute...

  16. The measurement of surface heat flux using the Peltier effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shewen, E.C. (Pavement Management Systems Ltd., Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)); Hollands, K.G.T., Raithby, G.D. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    Calorimetric methods for measuring surface heat flux use Joulean heating to keep the surface isothermal. This limits them to measuring the heat flux of surfaces that are hotter than their surroundings. Presented in this paper is a method whereby reversible Peltier effect heat transfer is used to maintain this isothermality, making it suitable for surfaces that are either hotter or colder than the surroundings. The paper outlines the theory for the method and describes physical models that have been constructed, calibrated, and tested. The tested physical models were found capable of measuring heat fluxes with an absolute accuracy of 1 percent over a wide range of temperature (5-50C) and heat flux (15-500 W/m{sup 2}), while maintaining isothermality to within 0.03 K. A drawback of the method is that it appears to be suited only for measuring the heat flux from thick metallic plates.

  17. Reversed Shear Alfv'en Eigenmode Stabilization by Localized Electron Cyclotron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeeland, M. A.; Lohr, J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Nazikian, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Austin, M. E.; Rhodes, T. L.; Holcomb, C.; Makowski, M. A.; McKee, G. R.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2007-11-01

    Reversed shear Alfv'en eigenmode (RSAE) activity in DIII-D is observed to be stabilized by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the minimum of the safety factor (qmin) in neutral beam heated discharges with reversed magnetic shear. The degree of RSAE stabilization and the volume averaged neutron production (Sn) are highly dependent on ECH deposition location relative to qmin. Ideal MHD simulations predict RSAE existence during ECH, indicating that the mode disappearance is due to kinetic effects not taken into account by the ideal MHD model. While discharges with ECH stabilization of RSAEs have higher Sn than discharges with significant RSAE activity, neutron production remains strongly reduced (up to 60%), indicating the bulk of the deficit is not due to RSAEs alone.

  18. The Immunology of a Healing Response in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Treated with Localized Heat or Systemic Antimonial Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lakhal-Naouar

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of systemic antimonial (sodium stibogluconate, Pentostam, SSG treatment versus local heat therapy (Thermomed for cutaneous leishmaniasis was studied previously and showed similar healing rates. We hypothesized that different curative immune responses might develop with systemic and local treatment modalities.We studied the peripheral blood immune cells in a cohort of 54 cutaneous Leishmania major subjects treated with SSG or TM. Multiparameter flow cytometry, lymphoproliferative assays and cytokine production were analyzed in order to investigate the differences in the immune responses of subjects before, on and after treatment.Healing cutaneous leishmaniasis lead to a significant decline in circulating T cells and NKT-like cells, accompanied by an expansion in NK cells, regardless of treatment modality. Functional changes involved decreased antigen specific CD4+ T cell proliferation (hyporesponsiveness seen with CD8+ T cell depletion. Moreover, the healing (or healed state was characterized by fewer circulating regulatory T cells, reduced IFN-γ production and an overall contraction in polyfunctional CD4+ T cells.Healing from cutaneous Leishmaniasis is a dynamic process that alters circulating lymphocyte populations and subsets of T, NK and NKT-like cells. Immunology of healing, through local or systemic treatments, culminated in similar changes in frequency, quality, and antigen specific responsiveness with immunomodulation possibly via a CD8+ T cell dependent mechanism. Understanding the evolving immunologic changes during healing of human leishmaniasis informs protective immune mechanisms.

  19. Particle shape effect on heat transfer performance in an oscillating heat pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiu-hung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of alumina nanoparticles on the heat transfer performance of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP was investigated experimentally. A binary mixture of ethylene glycol (EG and deionized water (50/50 by volume was used as the base fluid for the OHP. Four types of nanoparticles with shapes of platelet, blade, cylinder, and brick were studied, respectively. Experimental results show that the alumina nanoparticles added in the OHP significantly affect the heat transfer performance and it depends on the particle shape and volume fraction. When the OHP was charged with EG and cylinder-like alumina nanoparticles, the OHP can achieve the best heat transfer performance among four types of particles investigated herein. In addition, even though previous research found that these alumina nanofluids were not beneficial in laminar or turbulent flow mode, they can enhance the heat transfer performance of an OHP.

  20. Propinquity of current and vortex structures: effects on collisionless plasma heating

    CERN Document Server

    Parashar, Tulasi N

    2016-01-01

    Intermittency of heating in weakly collisional plasma turbulence is an active subject of research, with significant potential impact on understanding of the solar wind, solar corona and astrophysical plasmas. Recent studies suggest a role of vorticity in plasma heating. In magnetohydrodynamics small scale vorticity is generated near current sheets and this effect persists in kinetic plasma, as demonstrated here with hybrid and fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. Furthermore, vorticity enhances local kinetic effects, with a generalized resonance condition selecting sign-dependent enhancements or reductions of proton heating and thermal anisotropy. In such plasmas heating is correlated with vorticity and current density, but more strongly with vorticity. These results help explain several prior results that find kinetic effects and energization near to, but not centered on, current sheets. Evidently intermittency in kinetic plasma involves multiple physical quantities, and the associated coherent ...

  1. Brain mediators of the effects of noxious heat on pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, Lauren Y; Lindquist, Martin A; Bolger, Niall; Wager, Tor D

    2014-08-01

    Recent human neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural correlates of either noxious stimulus intensity or reported pain. Although useful, analyzing brain relationships with stimulus intensity and behavior separately does not address how sensation and pain are linked in the central nervous system. In this study, we used multi-level mediation analysis to identify brain mediators of pain--regions in which trial-by-trial responses to heat explained variability in the relationship between noxious stimulus intensity (across 4 levels) and pain. This approach has the potential to identify multiple circuits with complementary roles in pain genesis. Brain mediators of noxious heat effects on pain included targets of ascending nociceptive pathways (anterior cingulate, insula, SII, and medial thalamus) and also prefrontal and subcortical regions not associated with nociceptive pathways per se. Cluster analysis revealed that mediators were grouped into several distinct functional networks, including the following: somatosensory, paralimbic, and striatal-cerebellar networks that increased with stimulus intensity; and 2 networks co-localized with "default mode" regions in which stimulus intensity-related decreases mediated increased pain. We also identified "thermosensory" regions that responded to increasing noxious heat but did not predict pain reports. Finally, several regions did not respond to noxious input, but their activity predicted pain; these included ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellar regions, and supplementary motor cortices. These regions likely underlie both nociceptive and non-nociceptive processes that contribute to pain, such as attention and decision-making processes. Overall, these results elucidate how multiple distinct brain systems jointly contribute to the central generation of pain.

  2. CFD study on local fluid-to-wall heat transfer in packed beds and field synergy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenping; Xu, Min; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    To reach the target of smaller pressure drop and better heat transfer performance, packed beds with small tube-to-particle diameter ratio ( D/d pheat transfer coefficient is an important factor determining the performance of this type of beds. In this work, local fluid- to-wall heat transfer characteristic in packed beds was studied by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at different Reynolds number for D/d p=1.5, 3.0 and 5.6. The results show that the fluid-to-wall heat transfer coefficient is oscillating along the bed with small tube-to-particle diameter ratio. Moreover, this phenomenon was explained by field synergy principle in detail. Two arrangement structures of particles in packed beds were recommended based on the synergy characteristic between flow and temperature fields. This study provides a new local understanding of fluid-to-wall heat transfer in packed beds with small tube-to-particle diameter ratio.

  3. Lattice specific heat and local density of states of Ni-based dilute alloys at low temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P D Semlaty; Kapil Dev; P N Ram

    2006-06-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the low-temperature lattice specific heat of Ni-based dilute alloys has been carried out. Lattice Green's function method has been used to calculate the local density of states of substitutional impurities and lattice specific heat in different alloys. The resonance condition has been investigated for possible occurrence of resonance modes. Except in NiCr and NiMn, low-frequency resonance modes have been obtained in all the alloys. However, no localized mode was obtained. The impurity-induced increase in lattice specific heat is explained on the basis of the obtained resonance modes. The calculation shows an excellent agreement with the measured lattice specific heat in these alloys

  4. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  5. Strategies to Reduce the Harmful Effects of Extreme Heat Events: A Four-City Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalonne L. White-Newsome

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme heat events (EHEs are becoming more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in the 21st century. These events can disproportionately impact the health of low-income, minority, and urban populations. To better understand heat-related intervention strategies used by four U.S. cities, we conducted 73 semi-structured interviews with government and non-governmental organization leaders representing public health, general social services, emergency management, meteorology, and the environmental planning sectors in Detroit, MI; New York City, NY; Philadelphia, PA and Phoenix, AZ—cities selected for their diverse demographics, climates, and climate adaptation strategies. We identified activities these leaders used to reduce the harmful effects of heat for residents in their city, as well as the obstacles they faced and the approaches they used to evaluate these efforts. Local leaders provided a description of how local context (e.g., climate, governance and city structure impacted heat preparedness. Despite the differences among study cities, political will and resource access were critical to driving heat-health related programming. Upon completion of our interviews, we convened leaders in each city to discuss these findings and their ongoing efforts through day-long workshops. Our findings and the recommendations that emerged from these workshops could inform other local or national efforts towards preventing heat-related morbidity and mortality.

  6. Strategies to reduce the harmful effects of extreme heat events: a four-city study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L; McCormick, Sabrina; Sampson, Natalie; Buxton, Miatta A; O'Neill, Marie S; Gronlund, Carina J; Catalano, Linda; Conlon, Kathryn C; Parker, Edith A

    2014-02-13

    Extreme heat events (EHEs) are becoming more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in the 21st century. These events can disproportionately impact the health of low-income, minority, and urban populations. To better understand heat-related intervention strategies used by four U.S. cities, we conducted 73 semi-structured interviews with government and non-governmental organization leaders representing public health, general social services, emergency management, meteorology, and the environmental planning sectors in Detroit, MI; New York City, NY; Philadelphia, PA and Phoenix, AZ-cities selected for their diverse demographics, climates, and climate adaptation strategies. We identified activities these leaders used to reduce the harmful effects of heat for residents in their city, as well as the obstacles they faced and the approaches they used to evaluate these efforts. Local leaders provided a description of how local context (e.g., climate, governance and city structure) impacted heat preparedness. Despite the differences among study cities, political will and resource access were critical to driving heat-health related programming. Upon completion of our interviews, we convened leaders in each city to discuss these findings and their ongoing efforts through day-long workshops. Our findings and the recommendations that emerged from these workshops could inform other local or national efforts towards preventing heat-related morbidity and mortality.

  7. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Dutta; Ajit Rajiva; Dileep Andhare; Gulrez Shah Azhar; Abhiyant Tiwari; Perry Sheffield; Ahmedabad Heat and Climate Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. Materials and Methods: This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmen...

  8. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. Materials and Methods: This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219 and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. Results: The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1 Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2 workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3 workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4 few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. Conclusion: This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for

  9. The effect of heating direction on flow boiling heat transfer of R134a in micro-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingchen; Jia, Li; Dang, Chao; Peng, Qi

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents effects of heating directions on heat transfer performance of R134a flow boiling in micro- channel heat sink. The heat sink has 30 parallel rectangular channels with cross-sectional dimensions of 500μm width 500μm depth and 30mm length. The experimental operation condition ranges of the heat flux and the mass flux were 13.48 to 82.25 W/cm2 and 373.3 to 1244.4 kg/m2s respectively. The vapor quality ranged from 0.07 to 0.93. The heat transfer coefficients of top heating and bottom heating both were up to 25 kW/m2 K. Two dominate transfer mechanisms of nucleate boiling and convection boiling were observed according to boiling curves. The experimental results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 13.9% higher than top heating in low heat flux, while in high heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 9.9%.higher than the top heating, because bubbles were harder to divorce the heating wall. And a modified correlation was provided to predict heat transfer of top heating.

  10. Effect of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone in submerged arc welding process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Om; Sunil Pandey

    2013-12-01

    Submerged arc welding (SAW) is a fusion joining process, known for its high deposition capabilities. This process is useful in joining thick section components used in various industries. Besides joining, SAW can also be used for surfacing applications. Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) produced within the base metal as a result of tremendous heat of arc is of big concern as it affects the performance of welded/surfaced structure in service due to metallurgical changes in the affected region. This work was carried out to investigate the effect of polarity and other SAW parameters on HAZ size and dilution and to establish their correlations. Influence of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone was then carried out. Four levels of heat input were used to study their effect on % dilution and HAZ area at both the electrode positive and electrode negative polarities. Proper management of heat input in welding is important, because power sources can be used more efficiently if one knows how the same heat input can be applied to get the better results. Empirical models have been developed using statistical technique.

  11. Effects of ridged walls on the heat transfer in a heated square duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.S.; Rodriguez, W.V. [Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico DF (Mexico). Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM, Coordinacion de Ingenieria de Procesos Industrails y Ambientales, Circuito Interior; Issa, R. [LEGI-MOST, INPG, Grenoble (France)

    2005-05-01

    Turbulent flows in rectangular cooling ducts of rocket engine thrust chambers are characterized by secondary motions of Prandtl's first and second kinds. These secondary currents play a prominent part in heat transfer between the thrust chamber and the cooling gas conveyed in the duct. Previous numerical and experimental works reveal that attaching ridges on the walls of the duct causes the formation of new secondary flows of Prandtl's second kind. These new structures are likely to increase the heat transfer. The present study has investigated numerically, through large eddy simulations, the effects of different forms of ridges on heat transfer in straight square duct flows. (author)

  12. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Heated Perimeter on Forced Convection Heat Transfer of he i at a Supercritical Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, D.; Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Hama, K.

    2008-03-01

    The forced convection heat transfer coefficients were measured on two pairs of test plates all 6.0 mm in width and located face to face on inner walls of a rectangular duct. Each pair having length of 20 mm and 80 mm, respectively, was connected in series electrically. The rectangular duct was 420 mm in length and 5 mm×6 mm in inner cross section. The experiments were performed for inlet temperatures from 2.2 to 6.5 K, flow velocities from 0.1 to 5.6 m/s, and at a supercritical pressure of 2.8 atm. Comparison of the obtained Nusselt numbers with the former results with a single test plate showed the clear effect of a heated perimeter. Non-dimensional heat transfer equation including the effect of heated perimeter is presented.

  14. Indirect Measurement of Local Condensing Heat-Transfer Coefficient Around Horizontal Finned Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    5.9 Effect of Tube Insulation on Sieder -Tate-Type Coefficient (C ) and Modified Coefficient (C.) for All Tubes •t Atmospheric Pressure...specific tube C Sleder-Tate-type coefficient in eqn. (4.2) C Modified Sieder -Tate-type coefficient in eqn. (5.2) D Tube diameter (m) D Equivalent diameter...an outside diameter equal to the fin root diameter). The Inside heat-transfer coefficent is given by a Sieder -Tate-type equation (4.2) and is

  15. Constructs of highly effective heat transport paths by bionic optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Xinguang; (程新广); LI; Zhixin; (李志信); GUO; Zengyuan; (过增元)

    2003-01-01

    The optimization approach based on the biological evolution principle is used to construct the heat transport paths for volume-to-point problem. The transport paths are constructed by inserting high conductivity materials in the heat conduction domain where uniform or nonuniform heat sources exist. In the bionic optimization process, the optimal constructs of the high conductivity material are obtained by numerically simulating the evolution and degeneration process according to the uniformity principle of the temperature gradient. Finally, preserving the features of the optimal constructs, the constructs are regularized for the convenience of engineering manufacture. The results show that the construct obtained by bionic optimization is approximate to that obtained by the tree-network constructal theory when the heat conduction is enhanced for the domain with a uniform heat source and high conductivity ratio of the inserting material to the substrate, the high conductivity materials are mainly concentrated on the heat outlet for the case with a uniform heat source and low thermal conductivity ratio, and for the case with nonuniform heat sources, the high conductivity material is concentrated in the heat source regions and construacts several highly effective heat transport paths to connect the regions to the outlet.

  16. An outdoor investigation of the absorption degradation of single-junction amorphous silicon photovoltaic module due to localized heat/hot spot formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Osayemwenre Gilbert O; Meyer Edson L; Mamphweli Sampson

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the absorbance degradation of single-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic (PV) module, due to the presence of localized heat. The decrease in optical density is a huge challenge due to the long-term degradation of PV modules. The reduction in solar cell optical density causes a decline in its conversion efficiency. This decreases the photogenerating current, hence reduces the effective efficiency of the PV device. An infrared thermography was used for mapping the module temperature profile. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used for the absorption characterization. The rationale behind the outdoor deployment was to deduce a practical effect of hot spot formation on the module’s absorption ability.The results show a direct correlation between localized heat and the absorption degradation.

  17. Contact Angle Effects in Boiling Heat Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Urquiola, Erwin; Fujita, Yasunobu

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports boiling experiments with pure water and surfactant solutions of SDS on horizontal heating surface. The static contact angle, rather than the surface tension value, was found to be the leading factor for the results and probably its prev

  18. Effects of electrode surface roughness on motional heating of trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Kuan-Yu; Chuang, Issac L

    2016-01-01

    Electric field noise is a major source of motional heating in trapped ion quantum computation. While the influence of trap electrode geometries on electric field noise has been studied in patch potential and surface adsorbate models, only smooth surfaces are accounted for by current theory. The effects of roughness, a ubiquitous feature of surface electrodes, are poorly understood. We investigate its impact on electric field noise by deriving a rough-surface Green's function and evaluating its effects on adsorbate-surface binding energies. At cryogenic temperatures, heating rate contributions from adsorbates are predicted to exhibit an exponential sensitivity to local surface curvature, leading to either a large net enhancement or suppression over smooth surfaces. For typical experimental parameters, orders-of-magnitude variations in total heating rates can occur depending on the spatial distribution of absorbates. Through careful engineering of electrode surface profiles, our results suggests that heating ra...

  19. Further understanding of twisted tape effects as tube insert for heat transfer enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Khader, Mazen M.

    2006-12-01

    Tube inserts are used as heat transfer enhancement tool for both retrofit and new design of shell and tube heat exchangers. This paper discusses and reviews the characteristics and performance of twisted tapes. The theory and application are also addressed. Industrial case study was selected to illustrate the behaviour effect that the twisted tapes impose at various laminar, transition and turbulent flow regions. This effect was demonstrated by changing the inside tube diameter and twist ratio through evaluating selected exchanger design parameters such as: local heat transfer coefficient, friction factor and pressure drop. Testing the exponent powers for Re and Pr at both laminar and turbulent regions were carried out. General design considerations are outlined for the use of twisted tapes in shell and tube heat exchangers.

  20. Electroweak Hall Effect of Neutrino and Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo

    2015-01-01

    The inversion of temperature at the solar corona is hard to understand from classical physics, and the coronal heating mechanism remains unclear. The heating in the quiet region seems contradicting with the thermodynamics and is a keen problem for physicists. A new mechanism for the coronal heating based on the neutrino radiative transition unique in the corona region is studied. The probability is enormously amplified by an electroweak Chern-Simons form and overlapping waves, and the sufficient energy is transfered. Thus the coronal heating is understood from the quantum effects of the solar neutrino.

  1. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Mohd Hafizi Mat; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-12-09

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable.

  2. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable.

  3. The interrealtionship between locally applied heat, ageing and skin blood flow on heat transfer into and from the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Alshahmmari, Faris; Yim, Jong Eun; Hamdan, Adel; Lee, Haneul; Neupane, Sushma; Shetye, Gauri; Moniz, Harold; Chen, Wei-Ti; Cho, Sungkwan; Pathak, Kunal; Malthane, Swapnil; Shenoy, Samruddha; Somanaboina, Karunakar; Alshaharani, Mastour; Nevgi, Bhakti; Dave, Bhargav; Desai, Rajavi

    2011-07-01

    In response to a thermal stress, skin blood flow (BF) increases to protect the skin from damage. When a very warm, noxious, heat source (44 °C) is applied to the skin, the BF increases disproportionately faster than the heat stress that was applied, creating a safety mechanism for protecting the skin. In the present investigation, the rate of rise of BF in response to applied heat at temperatures between 32 °C and 40 °C was examined as well as the thermal transfer to and from the skin with and without BF in younger and older subjects to see how the skin responds to a non-noxious heat source. Twenty male and female subjects (10 - 20-35 years, 10 - 40-70 years) were examined. The arms of the subjects were passively heated for 6 min with and without vascular occlusion by a thermode at temperatures of 32, 36, 38 or 40 °C. When occlusion was not used during the 6 min exposure to heat, there was an exponential rise in skin temperature and BF in both groups of subjects over the 6-min period. However, the older subjects achieved similar skin temperatures but with the expenditure of fewer calories from the thermode than was seen for the younger subjects (p<0.05). BF was significantly less in the older group than the younger group at rest and after exposure to each of the three warmest thermode temperatures (p<0.05). As was seen for noxious temperatures, after a delay, the rate of rise of BF at the three warmest thermode temperatures was faster than the rise in skin temperature in the younger group but less in the older group of subjects. Thus, a consequence of ageing is reduced excess BF in response to thermal stress increasing susceptibility to thermal damage. This must be considered in modelling of BF.

  4. Effect of heat loss in a geothermal reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, Mandalagiri Subbarayappa

    This paper reports a three-dimensional (3D) numerical study to determine the effect of heat loss on the transient heat transport and temperature distribution in a geothermal reservoir. The operation of a geothermal power plant, which is essentially an injection-production process, involves

  5. Climate Change Effects on Heat Waves and Future Heat Wave-Associated IHD Mortality in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of future climate change on the occurrence of heat waves and its implications for heat wave-related mortality due to ischemic heart diseases (IHD in Germany is studied. Simulations of 19 regional climate models with a spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° forced by the moderate climate change scenario A1B are analyzed. Three model time periods of 30 years are evaluated, representing present climate (1971–2000, near future climate (2021–2050, and remote future climate (2069–2098. Heat waves are defined as periods of at least three consecutive days with daily mean air temperature above the 97.5th percentile of the all-season temperature distribution. Based on the model simulations, future heat waves in Germany will be significantly more frequent, longer lasting and more intense. By the end of the 21st century, the number of heat waves will be tripled compared to present climate. Additionally, the average duration of heat waves will increase by 25%, accompanied by an increase of the average temperature during heat waves by about 1 K. Regional analyses show that stronger than average climate change effects are observed particularly in the southern regions of Germany. Furthermore, we investigated climate change impacts on IHD mortality in Germany applying temperature projections from 19 regional climate models to heat wave mortality relationships identified in a previous study. Future IHD excess deaths were calculated both in the absence and presence of some acclimatization (i.e., that people are able to physiologically acclimatize to enhanced temperature levels in the future time periods by 0% and 50%, respectively. In addition to changes in heat wave frequency, we incorporated also changes in heat wave intensity and duration into the future mortality evaluations. The results indicate that by the end of the 21st century the annual number of IHD excess deaths in Germany attributable to heat waves is expected to rise by factor 2

  6. Decision support for optimal location of local heat source for small district heating system on the example of biogas plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciapała Bartłomiej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing a new district heating system requires making decisions affecting entire range of following activities and wellness of the system. The article presents methodics of choosing optimal location and crucial customers with three approaches to optimisation process, discuss obtained results and obstacles. Further improvements and potential applications are named.

  7. Hydration Effects on Human Physiology and Exercise-Heat Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    AD REPORT NO T7-90 HYDRATION EFFECTS :N HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND EXERCISE-HEA PERFORMANCE Co U S ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE N OF I ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE...effects on human physiology and exercise.-heat performance 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Michael N. Sawka, Andrew J. Young. William A. Latzka, P. Darrell...acknowledge Ms. Patricia DeMusis for preparing the manuscript. AD Report No. HYDRATION EFFECTS ON HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND EXERCISE-HEAT PERFORMANCE by Michael N

  8. Local thermal pressurization triggered by flash heating causes dramatic weakening in water-saturated gouges at subseismic slip rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Togo, Tetsuhiro; Chen, Jianye; Kitajima, Hiroko; Wang, Yu; He, Honglin

    2017-04-01

    High-velocity friction studies on water-saturated gouges in recent years have demonstrated that the wet gouges subjected to high-velocity shear tend to have smaller peak and steady-state friction, much shorter slip-weakening distance and lower fracture energy, as compared to the air-dry gouges. Thermal pressurization, compaction-induced pressurization, and flash heating were previously recognized to be the important weakening mechanisms in causing these behaviors. However, in spite of theoretical expectation, there is few evidence to support the occurrence of flash heating in wet gouges, mainly due to the superimposition of multiple weakening mechanisms especially for thermal pressurization. We devised friction experiments to study the role of flash heating in dynamic weakening of water-saturated gouges. In each experiment, we used a pressure vessel to impose a pore pressure of 2.0 MPa on the gouge layer sandwiched between porous ceramics blocks, and applied a long preslide of 1.0 m in displacement before starting the experiment at the target slip rate. By doing so we could (1) suppress rapid thermal pressurization in the bulk gouge layer by means of the designed drained condition and elevated temperature of phase transition of pore water; (2) suppress or even eliminate the pressurization effects due to compaction especially at the very beginning of the experiment. The experiments were performed on a granular gouge (mainly quartz, plagioclase, calcite and illite) and a clay-rich gouge (illite and chlorite ˜58 wt%), which were both collected from the Qingchuan fault of the Longmenshan fault system. For the granular gouge, the steady-state friction coefficients (μss) are 0.39-0.42 at slip rates (V ) of 100 μm/s-10 mm/s; however, at V ≥40 mm/s, the friction coefficients (μ) decrease suddenly at the onset of the slip. For instance, μ reduces by 0.29 within displacement of 0.05-0.08m at V =100 mm/s. For the clay-rich gouge, μss increases from 0.24 to 0.34 as V

  9. Effect of Chemical Reaction on Convective Heat Transfer of Boundary Layer Flow in Nanofluid over a Wedge with Heat Generation/Absorption and Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Kasmani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to examine the convective heat transfer of nanofluid past a wedge subject to first-order chemical reaction, heat generation/absorption and suction effects. The influence of wedge angle parameter, thermophoresis, Dufour and Soret type diffusivity are included. The local similarity transformation is applied to convert the governing nonlinear partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. Shooting method integrated with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is used to solve the ordinary differential equations. The skin friction, heat and mass transfer rates as well as the effects of various parameters on velocity, temperature and solutal concentration profiles are analyzed. The results indicate that when the chemical reaction parameter increases, the heat transfer coefficient increases while the mass transfer coefficient decreases. The effect of chemical reaction parameter is very important in solutal concentration field compared to velocity and temperature profiles since it decreases the solutal concentration of the nanoparticle.

  10. Finite Span Effects on Flap Heating and Effectiveness in a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Flap Span on Centerline Heating Distribution(15 Deflection) ........ ......................... 46 35 Span Edge Effect on Centerline Heat Transfer...Pressure Distributions at 87.5% Chord Station ....... ...................... 50 39 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Pressure Distribution ........... 52 40...Distribution at 87.5% Chord Station ..... ............... 55 43 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Heat Transfer Distribution ..... 56 44 Finite Span Effects

  11. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  12. Accumulated Effects of Work under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    for acclimatized men. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air- Conditioning Engineers ( ASHRAE ), on the other hand recommended that the... refrigeration . The sera and urines were kept frozen until just prior to analysis. 2. Blood and urine chemical analysis: Within 5 min after the urine was pa...All the certificates of illness stored in the archives of the plants were collected for each employee from January 1st 1971 to December 31, 1976. The

  13. Effects of heat stress on day-old broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R A; Weathers, W W; Smith, J

    1984-09-01

    Short-term heat stress can occur when chicks are transported from the hatchery to growing facilities. Two experiments were conducted to determine the possible effects of short-term heat stress on growth and feed conversion of broiler (Hubbard X Hubbard) chicks. The heat stress was accomplished by placing chicks in Jamesway 252 incubators at dry bulb temperatures ranging from 40 to 45 C for variable times. Growth, feed consumption, and mortality were measured for 16 days following the heat stress. Short sublethal heat stress significantly reduced growth rate to 16 days in these experiments without any effect on feed conversion ratio. The results indicate that the hatchery industry should avoid overheating chicks even for periods as short as 1 hr.

  14. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF HYPOEUTECTOID CONSTRUCTIONS STEELS AT CARBONITRIDING WITH LOCAL INDUCTION CYCLIC HEATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Tkachenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of mechanical characteristics of details of the soil-cultivating car. Structurization at cyclic heating of steels. The reasons of an intensification of diffusion at cyclic heating. Structure crushing, impact strength and hardness increase.

  15. Beneficial effects of microwave-assisted heating versus conventional heating in noble metal nanoparticle synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Naween; García, Stephany; Zhou, Jiping; Humphrey, Simon M

    2012-11-27

    An extensive comparative study of the effects of microwave versus conventional heating on the nucleation and growth of near-monodisperse Rh, Pd, and Pt nanoparticles has revealed distinct and preferential effects of the microwave heating method. A one-pot synthetic method has been investigated, which combines nucleation and growth in a single reaction via precise control over the precursor addition rate. Using this method, microwave-assisted heating enables the convenient preparation of polymer-capped nanoparticles with improved monodispersity, morphological control, and higher crystallinity, compared with samples heated conventionally under otherwise identical conditions. Extensive studies of Rh nanoparticle formation reveal fundamental differences during the nucleation phase that is directly dependent on the heating method; microwave irradiation was found to provide more uniform seeds for the subsequent growth of larger nanostructures of desired size and surface structure. Nanoparticle growth kinetics are also markedly different under microwave heating. While conventional heating generally yields particles with mixed morphologies, microwave synthesis consistently provides a majority of tetrahedral particles at intermediate sizes (5-7 nm) or larger cubes (8+ nm) upon further growth. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates that Rh seeds and larger nanoparticles obtained from microwave-assisted synthesis are more highly crystalline and faceted versus their conventionally prepared counterparts. Microwave-prepared Rh nanoparticles also show approximately twice the catalytic activity of similar-sized conventionally prepared particles, as demonstrated in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of cyclohexene. Ligand exchange reactions to replace polymer capping agents with molecular stabilizing agents are also easily facilitated under microwave heating, due to the excitation of polar organic moieties; the ligand exchange proceeds with excellent retention of

  16. Effect of surface etching on condensing heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Sung Chul; Park, Jae Won; Jung, Jiyeon; Choi, Chonggun; Choi, Gyu Hong; Hwang, Seung Sik; Chung, Tae Yong; Shin, Donghoon [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Jun [Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    This study conducted experiments on humid air condensation during heat transfer in an air preheating exchanger attached to a home condensing boiler to improve thermal efficiency. An etchant composed of sulfuric acid and sodium nitrate was used to create roughness on the heat exchanger surface made from STS430J1L. A counter flow heat exchanger was fabricated to test the performance of heat transfer. Results showed that the overall heat transfer coefficients of all specimens treated with etchant improved with respect to the original specimens (not treated with etchant), and the overall heat transfer coefficient of the 60 s etching specimen increased by up to 15%. However, the increasing rate of the heat transfer coefficient was disproportional to the etching time. When the etching time specifically increased above 60 s, the heat transfer coefficient decreased. This effect was assumed to be caused by surface characteristics such as contact angle. Furthermore, a smaller contact angle or higher hydrophilicity leads to higher heat transfer coefficient.

  17. Decentralization Policy and Effectiveness of Local Government Organization in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Muh. Tang

    2014-01-01

    In the era of decentralization policy implementation, the local bureaucracy (Indonesian: Organisasi Perangkat Daerah) has strategic position in the local government system. It is so as the instruments and the fundamental base of the local government in implementing its affairs and as the media to realize the vision, mission, and the objectives of local government. The successful of local government is determined by the effectiveness of the local bureaucracy. This study aims to examine the eff...

  18. Reproducibility of Cutaneous Vascular Conductance Responses to Slow Local Heating Assessed Using seven-Laser Array Probes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dawson, E.A.; Low, D.A.; Meeuwis, I.H.; Kerstens, F.G.; Atkinson, C.L.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gradual local heating of the skin induces a largely NO-mediated vasodilatation. However, use of this assessment of microvascular health is limited because little is known about its reproducibility. METHODS: Healthy volunteers (n = 9) reported twice to the laboratory. CVC, derived from las

  19. Thermo-economic optimization of secondary distribution network of low temperature district heating network under local conditions of South Korea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Byung Sik; Imran, Muhammad; Hoon, Im-Yong

    2017-01-01

    A secondary distribution network of a low temperature district heating system is designed and optimized for a residential apartment complex under the local conditions of South Korea in the TRNSYS simulation environment. The residential apartment complex is a typical example of Korean residential...

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Local Heat Therapy Versus Intravenous Sodium Stibogluconate for the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmania Major Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Dermatotrophic Leishmania species such as L. major, L. tropica , and L. mexicana are thermosensitive with higher temperatures limiting amastigote replication...Wahid M, Bismullah M, Quinnell RJ, et al. (2005) Efficacy of thermotherapy to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica in Kabul...A Randomized Controlled Trial of Local Heat Therapy Versus Intravenous Sodium Stibogluconate for the Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmania major

  1. A (S)TEM Gas Cell Holder with Localized Laser Heating for In Situ Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehraeen, Shareghe [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology; McKeown, Joseph T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Condensed Matter and Materials Division; Deshmukh, Pushkarraj V. [E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc., Export, PA (United States); Evans, James E. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology; Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Chemical and Materials Science Division; Abellan, Patricia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Chemical and Materials Science Division; Xu, Pinghong [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Reed, Bryan W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Condensed Matter and Materials Division; Taheri, Mitra L. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering; Fischione, Paul E. [E.A. Fischione Instruments, Inc., Export, PA (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology; Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Chemical and Materials Science Division; Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    2013-03-04

    We report that the advent of aberration correction for transmission electron microscopy has transformed atomic resolution imaging into a nearly routine technique for structural analysis. Now an emerging frontier in electron microscopy is the development of in situ capabilities to observe reactions at atomic resolution in real time and within realistic environments. Here we present a new in situ gas cell holder that is designed for compatibility with a wide variety of sample type (i.e., dimpled 3-mm discs, standard mesh grids, various types of focused ion beam lamellae attached to half grids). Its capabilities include localized heating and precise control of the gas pressure and composition while simultaneously allowing atomic resolution imaging at ambient pressure. The results show that 0.25-nm lattice fringes are directly visible for nanoparticles imaged at ambient pressure with gas path lengths up to 20 μm. Additionally, we quantitatively demonstrate that while the attainable contrast and resolution decrease with increasing pressure and gas path length, resolutions better than 0.2 nm should be accessible at ambient pressure with gas path lengths less than the 15 μm utilized for these experiments.

  2. Thermo capillary and buoyancy convection in a fluid locally heated on its free surface; Convection thermocapillaire et thermogravitaire dans un fluide chauffe localement sur sa surface libre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, E.

    1997-09-26

    coupled buoyancy and thermo-capillary convection lead to a convective motion of the interface liquid/gas which drastically changes the heat and mass transfer across the liquid layer. Two experiments were considered, depending on the fluid: oil or mercury. The liquid is set in a cooled cylindrical vessel, and heated by a heat flux across the center of the free surface. The basic flow, in the case of oil, is a torus. When the heat parameter increases, a stationary flow appears as petals or rays when the aspect ratio. The lateral confinement selects the azimuthal wavelength. In the case of petals-like flow, a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation is underlined. The turbulence is found to be `weak`, even for the largest values of the Marangoni number (Ma = 1.3 10{sup 5}). In the case of mercury, the thermo-capillary effect is reduced to zero to impurities at the surface which have special trajectories we describe and compare to a simpler experiment. Only the buoyancy forces induce a unstationary, weakly turbulent flow as soon as the heating power exceeds 4W (Ra = 4.5 10{sup 3}, calculated with h = 1 mm). The past part concerns the analysis of the effect on the flow of the boundary conditions, the geometry, the Prandtl number and the buoyancy force with the help of the literature. Results concerning heat transfer, in particular the exponent of the law Nusselt number vs. heating power, were compared with available data. (author) 115 refs.

  3. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates cutaneous vasodilation during local heating and is attenuated in middle-aged human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Rebecca S; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Smith, Caroline J; Berkowitz, Dan E; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-06-01

    Local skin heating is used to assess microvascular function in clinical populations because NO is required for full expression of the response; however, controversy exists as to the precise NO synthase (NOS) isoform producing NO. Human aging is associated with attenuated cutaneous vasodilation but little is known about the middle aged, an age cohort used for comparison with clinical populations. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) is the primary isoform mediating NO production during local heating, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation would be reduced in middle-aged skin. Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) and during acetylcholine dose-response (ACh-DR: 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, 100.0 mmol/l) protocols. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of 24 men and women; age cohorts were 12 middle-aged (53 ± 1 yr) and 12 young (23 ± 1 yr). Sites served as control, nonselective NOS inhibited [N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)], inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibited (1400W), and neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibited (N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine). After full expression of the local heating response, l-NAME was perfused at all sites. Cutaneous vascular conductance was measured and normalized to maximum (%CVC(max): Nitropress). l-NAME reduced %CVCmax at baseline, all phases of the local heating response, and at all ACh concentrations compared with all other sites. iNOS inhibition reduced the initial peak (53 ± 2 vs. 60 ± 2%CVC(max); P vasodilation during local heating (52 ± 6 vs. 68 ± 4%CVC(max); P = 0.013) and ACh perfusion (50 mmol/l: 83 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 2%CVC(max); 100 mmol/l: 83 ± 4 vs. 92 ± 3%CVC(max); both P = 0.03) were reduced in middle-aged skin. There were no differences in NOS isoform expression obtained from skin biopsy samples between groups (all P > 0.05). These data suggest that eNOS mediates the production of NO during local heating and that cutaneous vasodilation is attenuated in middle-aged skin.

  4. Big infrastructures effects on local developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Vendemmia

    2011-10-01

    articulation and of translation between different extensive layers of the multi-scaled urban ‘cake’“ (Read, 2007 it will not be astonishing to discover, in Naples Metropolitan Area, new peripheral commercial centralities on the trucks of an old roman street. This synergy, raised in some urban nodes, is the result of a slow bottom-up process. Meanwhile, as the opposite top-down development, and as a consequence of the industrial sector reorganization, faster global dynamics create “new centralities” producing effects at the local scale and increasing the fragmentation. Moreover, it must be taken into account that these layers and processes are not only restricted to physical networks but they are shaped also by economical and social interactions, and that a network is always global and local in all its points (Latour, Nous n'avons jamais été modernes. Essai d'anthropologie symétrique, 1991.From a methodological point of you, a first interpretation of the city growth has driven to the compilation of thematic maps and photographical reports. The information, learned through the graphical and photographical process, were supported by a theoretical approach about both urban development in general and Naples growth in particular. 

  5. Effects of system-bath coupling on Photosynthetic heat engine: A polaron master equation approach

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, M; Zhao, X L; Yi, X X

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the polaron master equation, which offers the possibilities to interpolate between weak and strong system-bath coupling, to study how system-bath couplings affect charge transfer processes in Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) inspired quantum heat engine (QHE) model in a wide parameter range. The effects of bath correlation and temperature, together with the combined effects of these factors are also discussed in details. The results show a variety of dynamical behaviours. We interpret these results in terms of noise-assisted transport effect and dynamical localization which correspond to two mechanisms underpinning the transfer process in photosynthetic complexes: One is resonance energy transfer and the other is dynamical localization effect captured by the polaron master equation. The effects of system-bath coupling and bath correlation are incorporated in the effective system-bath coupling strength determining whether noise-assisted transport effect or dynamical localization...

  6. High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, Cyclones and localized heating

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2011-01-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is currently the most important facility used to generate extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic radiation in the ionosphere. In order to produce this ELF radiation the HAARP transmitter radiates a strong beam of high-frequency (HF) waves modulated at ELF. This HF heating modulates the electrons' temperature in the D region ionosphere and leads to modulated conductivity and a time-varying current which then radiates at the modu...

  7. High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, Cyclones and localized heating

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2011-01-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is currently the most important facility used to generate extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic radiation in the ionosphere. In order to produce this ELF radiation the HAARP transmitter radiates a strong beam of high-frequency (HF) waves modulated at ELF. This HF heating modulates the electrons' temperature in the D region ionosphere and leads to modulated conductivity and a time-varying current which then radiates at the modu...

  8. Tube array heat transfer in fluidized beds; a study of particle size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, T.Y.; Welty, J.R. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-07-01

    Experiments were performed with an array of horizontal tubes, arranged in a regular equilateral triangular pattern, immersed in a fluidized bed operating at 812 {Kappa}. Data are reported for heat transfer between the bed and a centrally-located tube in the array. Both total and radiative heat transfer rates were measured for superficial velocities spanning the range from packed bed conditions to over twice the minimum fluidization velocity. Results are presented for five different-size particles. Local heat transfer values, measured around the tube periphery, and integrated averages are reported for all test conditions. Comparisons are also made between the heat transfer behavior of a tube in an array and that for a single tube in a hot fluidized bed under the same overall operating conditions. The results of this comparison suggests that the two mechanisms, gas convection and radiation, are competing effects.

  9. Effective Heat Transfer Enhancement in Finned Tube Heat Exchanger with Different Fin Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.Livingston1 , P. Selvakumar2

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available During cross flow in a heat exchanger, heat transfer in the front portion of the tube is more compared to back portion of the tube. This is due to less formation of vortices at the backside of the tube. For uniform heat transfer to take place throughout the tube, it is necessary to increase the vortex formation at the rear side of the tube. The aim of this study is to explore the possibilities of improving the flow structure and thereby increasing uniform heat transfer around the tubes by introducing special type of fin arrangement over the tubes. The effect of shape and orientation of the fin on vortex generation and respective heat transfers are studied numerically. It have been identified that by introducing special type of fin arrangement over the tube there is a possibility for increase the vortex formation at the rear portion of the tube, which significantly leads to creation of uniform heat transfer all around the tube.

  10. Effects of thermal property variations on the liquid flow and heat transfer in microchannel heat sinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhigang [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Huai, Xiulan; Tao, Yujia; Chen, Huanzhuo [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2007-12-15

    Three-dimensional conjugate numerical simulations using the inlet, average and variable thermal properties respectively were performed for the laminar water flow and heat transfer in rectangular microchannels with D{sub h} of 0.333 mm at Re of 101-1775. Both average and variable properties are adopted in data reduction. The calculated local and average characteristics of flow and heat transfer are compared among different methods, and with the experiments, correlations and simplified theoretical solution data from published literatures. Compared with the inlet property method, both average and variable property methods have significantly lower f{sub app}, but higher convective heat transfer coefficient h{sub z} and Nu{sub z}. Compared with the average property method, the variable property method has higher f{sub app}Re{sub ave} and lower h{sub z} at the beginning, but lower f{sub app}Re{sub ave} and higher h{sub z} at the later section of the channel. The calculated Nu{sub ave} agree well with the Sieder-Tate correlation and the recently reported experiment, validating the traditional macroscale theory in predicting the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the dimension and Re range of the present work. (author)

  11. Effects of heat on cut mark characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenberger, Lukas; Schutkowski, Holger

    2017-02-01

    Cut marks on bones provide crucial information about tools used and their mode of application, both in archaeological and forensic contexts. Despite a substantial amount of research on cut mark analysis and the influence of fire on bones (shrinkage, fracture pattern, recrystallisation), there is still a lack of knowledge in cut mark analysis on burnt remains. This study provides information about heat alteration of cut marks and whether consistent features can be observed that allow direct interpretation of the implemented tools used. In a controlled experiment, cut marks (n=25) were inflicted on pig ribs (n=7) with a kitchen knife and examined using micro-CT and digital microscopy. The methods were compared in terms of their efficacy in recording cut marks on native and heat-treated bones. Statistical analysis demonstrates that floor angles and the maximum slope height of cuts undergo significant alteration, whereas width, depth, floor radius, slope, and opening angle remain stable. Micro-CT and digital microscopy are both suitable methods for cut mark analysis. However, significant differences in measurements were detected between both methods, as micro-CT is less accurate due to the lower resolution. Moreover, stabbing led to micro-fissures surrounding the cuts, which might also influence the alteration of cut marks.

  12. Effects of aqueous humor hydrodynamics on human eye heat transfer under external heat sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiang, Kor L; Ooi, Ean H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the eye models developed in the late 90s and early 00s considers only heat conduction inside the eye. This assumption is not entirely correct, since the anterior and posterior chambers are filled aqueous humor (AH) that is constantly in motion due to thermally-induced buoyancy. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of the human eye is developed to investigate the effects AH hydrodynamics have on the human eye temperature under exposure to external heat sources. If the effects of AH flow are negligible, then future models can be developed without taking them into account, thus simplifying the modeling process. Two types of external thermal loads are considered; volumetric and surface irradiation. Results showed that heat convection due to AH flow contributes to nearly 95% of the total heat flow inside the anterior chamber. Moreover, the circulation inside the anterior chamber can cause an upward shift of the location of hotspot. This can have significant consequences to our understanding of heat-induced cataractogenesis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Added effect of heat wave on mortality in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Lim, Youn Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    A heat wave could increase mortality owing to high temperature. However, little is known about the added (duration) effect of heat wave from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and different effect sizes depending on the definition of heat waves and models. A distributed lag non-linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the added effect of heat wave on mortality after adjusting for long-term and intra-seasonal trends and apparent temperature. We evaluated the cumulative relative risk of the added wave effect on mortality on lag days 0-30. The models were constructed using nine definitions of heat wave and two relationships (cubic spline and linear threshold model) between temperature and mortality to leave out the high temperature effect. Further, we performed sensitivity analysis to evaluate the changes in the effect of heat wave on mortality according to the different degrees of freedom for time trend and cubic spline of temperature. We found that heat wave had the added effect from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and it was considerable in the aspect of cumulative risk because of the lagged influence. When heat wave was defined with a threshold of 98th percentile temperature and ≥2, 3, and 4 consecutive days, mortality increased by 14.8 % (7.5-22.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI)), 18.1 % (10.8-26.0, 95 % CI), 18.1 % (10.7-25.9, 95 % CI), respectively, in cubic spline model. When it came to the definitions of 90th and 95th percentile, the risk increase in mortality declined to 3.7-5.8 % and 8.6-11.3 %, respectively. This effect was robust to the flexibility of the model for temperature and time trend, while the definitions of a heat wave were critical in estimating its relationship with mortality. This finding could help deepen our understanding and quantifying of the relationship between heat wave and mortality and select an appropriate definition of heat wave and temperature model in the future

  14. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimurthy, M.; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2016-06-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing (Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio (l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  15. Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a slot air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, Adimurthy; Katti, Vadiraj V.

    2017-02-01

    Local distribution of wall static pressure and heat transfer on a smooth flat plate impinged by a normal slot air jet is experimental investigated. Present study focuses on the influence of jet-to-plate spacing ( Z/D h ) (0.5-10) and Reynolds number (2500-20,000) on the fluid flow and heat transfer distribution. A single slot jet with an aspect ratio ( l/b) of about 22 is chosen for the current study. Infrared Thermal Imaging technique is used to capture the temperature data on the target surface. Local heat transfer coefficients are estimated from the thermal images using `SMART VIEW' software. Wall static pressure measurement is carried out for the specified range of Re and Z/D h . Wall static pressure coefficients are seen to be independent of Re in the range between 5000 and 15,000 for a given Z/D h . Nu values are higher at the stagnation point for all Z/D h and Re investigated. For lower Z/D h and higher Re, secondary peaks are observed in the heat transfer distributions. This may be attributed to fluid translating from laminar to turbulent flow on the target plate. Heat transfer characteristics are explained based on the simplified flow assumptions and the pressure data obtained using Differential pressure transducer and static pressure probe. Semi-empirical correlation for the Nusselt number in the stagnation region is proposed.

  16. Experiment of Flow Regime Map and Local Condensing Heat Transfer Coefficients Inside Three Dimensional Inner Microfin Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangDu; MingDaoXin

    1999-01-01

    This paper developed a new type of three dimensional inner microfin tube,The experimental results of the flow patterns for the horizontal condensation inside these tubes are reported in the paper,The flow patterns for the hirizontal condensation inside the new made tubes are divided into annular flow stratified flow and intermittent flow within the test conditions.The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients for the different flow patterns have been systematically caried out ,The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients changing with the vapor dryness fraction have also been carried out.As compared with the heat transfer coefficients of the two dimensional inner microfin tubes,those of the three dimensional inner microfin tubes increase 47-127% for the annular flow region,38-183% for the stratified flow and 15-75%,for the intermittent flow,respectively.The enhancement factor of the local heat transfer coefficients is from 1\\8-6\\9 for the vapor dryness fraction from 0.05 to 1.

  17. Diamond electrophoretic microchips-Joule heating effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karczemska, Anna T., E-mail: anna.karczemska@p.lodz.pl [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Turbomachinery, 219/223 Wolczanska str., Lodz (Poland); Witkowski, Dariusz [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Turbomachinery, 219/223 Wolczanska str., Lodz (Poland); Ralchenko, Victor, E-mail: ralchenko@nsc.gpi.ru [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 38 Vavilov str., Moscow (Russian Federation); Bolshakov, Andrey; Sovyk, Dmitry [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 38 Vavilov str., Moscow (Russian Federation); Lysko, Jan M., E-mail: jmlysko@ite.waw.pl [Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Fijalkowski, Mateusz, E-mail: petr.louda@vslib.cz [Technical University of Liberec, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (Czech Republic); Bodzenta, Jerzy, E-mail: jerzy.bodzenta@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Physics, 2 Krzywoustego str., 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Hassard, John, E-mail: j.hassard@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Microchip electrophoresis (MCE) has become a mature separation technique in the recent years. In the presented research, a polycrystalline diamond electrophoretic microchip was manufactured with a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) method. A replica technique (mould method) was used to manufacture microstructures in diamond. A numerical analysis with CoventorWare{sup TM} was used to compare thermal properties during chip electrophoresis of diamond and glass microchips of the same geometries. Temperature distributions in microchips were demonstrated. Thermal, electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical parameters of the polycrystalline diamond layers are advantageous over traditionally used materials for microfluidic devices. Especially, a very high thermal conductivity coefficient gives a possibility of very efficient dissipation of Joule heat from the diamond electrophoretic microchip. This enables manufacturing of a new generation of microdevices.

  18. EFFECTIVE HEAT INSULATION OF COMPLICATED FORM FOR HEAT AGGREGATES OF METALLURGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Toropov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The matters of determination of rational parameters of isolation coverings for heat aggregates, functioning in metallurgical, machine-building and industrial complexes, are examined in the article. Recommendations on choice of geometrical parameters of isolation of complicated form, providing obtaining of energy saving effect at functioning of high-temperature aggregates, are offered.

  19. FLATTENING EFFECT ON HEAT TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF A SINTERED-WICK HEAT PIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeranut Intagun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pipe flattening on heat transfer characteristics and the internal phenomena of a sintered-wick heat pipe has been investigated by using three-dimensional Finite Element Method. The calculation domains were focused at three important regions, i.e., vapor core, wick and wall. The Cartesian coordinates and the three-dimensional tetrahedral elements were applied in this model. The selected total elements were 638,400 to ensure the accuracy. The original diameter and total length of heat pipe were 6 mm and 200 mm, respectively. The composite wick made from sintered copper powder and grooved copper pipe was applied with water as working fluid. The vapor flow was assumed to be laminar and incompressible. The predicted results from the program were validated with the experimental results conducted with all similar controlled parameters. It was found that the predicted wall temperature and thermal resistance agreed well with the experimental data with the standard deviations of ±5.95 and ±32.85%, respectively. Furthermore, the overall thermal resistances of the tubular heat pipes (original diameter of 6 mm, which were flattened into the final thickness of 4.0 and 3.0 mm, decreased from 0.91 to 0.83°C/W due to an increase of the contacted surface for heat transfer surface. However, the overall thermal resistance of a flattened heat pipe with the final thickness of 2.5 mm increased to 0.88°C/W, resulting from drastic increase of pressure drop in narrower vapor core. The pivotal final thickness of flattened heat pipe, which is the minimum thickness of pipe to be flattened, has been analysed to be 2.75 mm (about 45% from original diameter.

  20. Entropy Generation Due to Natural Convection in a Partially Heated Cavity by Local RBF-DQ Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimani, S.; Qajarjazi, A.; Bararnia, H.

    2011-01-01

    The Local Radial Basis Function-Differential Quadrature (RBF-DQ) method is applied to twodimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive form. Numerical results of heatlines and entropy generation due to heat transfer and fluid friction have been obtained for laminar natural...... convection. The variations of the entropy generation for different Rayleigh numbers are also investigated. Comparison between the present results and previous works demonstrated excellent agreements which verify the accuracy and flexibility of the method in simulating the fluid mechanics and heat transfer...

  1. The effects of water on heat-styling damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Paul; Winsey, Nigel; Whatmough, Marie; Cornwell, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Heated styling appliances, such as straightening irons, have grown in popularity in recent years, as have hair products such as heat-protection sprays. In this study we investigate whether the water in a heat-protection spray can affect the level of damage caused by heat styling. Tryptophan damage from heat styling was measured using fluorescence spectroscopy, and structural damage was investigated using light microscopy and single-fiber tensile testing. Hair samples were heat treated with straightening irons, following treatment with either a water-based, "wet," heat-protection spray or an ethanol-based, "dry," spray. Results showed that, as expected, tryptophan damage was reduced by repeated applications of both the "wet" and "dry" heat-protection sprays. However, no differences were seen between the "wet" versus the "dry" product. Light microscopy studies showed greater structural damage to hair treated with water and the "wet" spray. Tensile tests confirmed that there was greater damage to hair treated with the "wet" spray. Decreases in Young's modulus were greater in the presence of the "wet" spray. The results of this study suggest that the type of damage caused by heat treatments is different in wet versus dry hair. In dry hair, thermal treatments cause chemical damage and some structural damage. However, in wet hair, thermal treatments cause the same chemical damage, but considerably more structural damage, which causes significant changes in the physical properties of the hair. It is likely that the rapid evaporation of water from the hair is the main causal factor. Our experiments suggest that the effectiveness of commercial heat-protection sprays can be improved by the removal of water and by the use of volatile ingredients, such as ethanol, as base solvents.

  2. Effect of heat treatment on viability of Taenia hydatigena eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttar, Birpal S; Nelson, Mark L; Busboom, Jan R; Hancock, Dale D; Walsh, Douglas B; Jasmer, Douglas P

    2013-04-01

    Effects of heat treatments on activation and infectivity of Taenia hydatigena eggs were assessed. Eggs containing oncospheres were used for in vitro and in vivo studies to determine the response to 5min of heat treatment, ranging from room temperature (22°C) to 60°C. The study demonstrated 99.47% and 100% reduction in oncosphere activation or infectivity after 5min of heat treatment at 60°C and 57.38°C under in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively. Similar results between the two approaches indicted the appropriateness of the in vitro methods to identify oncosphericidal treatments of practical significance. Similar heat treatments may also be effective against Taenia saginata and help to reduce occurrence of beef cysticercosis.

  3. Joule heating effects on unsteady natural convection flow near a moving semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, Marneni; Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Nagarani, P.

    2016-11-01

    The unsteady MHD free convective boundary-layer flow along an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer have been investigated numerically. The effects of chemical reaction, thermal radiation and Joule heating are incorporated in the governing equations. Crank-Nicolson finite-difference method is used to solve the governing coupled non-linear partial differential equations. The influence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and Joule heating on flow characteristics are presented graphically and discussed in detailed. To validate the present numerical results, a comparison study has been performed with the previously published results and found that the results are in excellent agreement. It is found that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers decreases with the intensification of magnetic field and the local Sherwood number slightly decreases with the increase of radiation parameter.

  4. Sex- and limb-specific differences in the nitric oxide-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in response to local heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Greaney, Jody L; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-10-01

    Local heating of the skin is commonly used to assess cutaneous microvasculature function. Controversy exists as to whether there are limb or sex differences in the nitric oxide (NO)-dependent contribution to this vasodilation, as well as the NO synthase (NOS) isoform mediating the responses. We tested the hypotheses that 1) NO-dependent vasodilation would be greater in the calf compared with the forearm; 2) total NO-dependent dilation would not be different between sexes within limb; and 3) women would exhibit greater neuronal NOS (nNOS)-dependent vasodilation in the calf. Two microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of the ventral forearm and the calf of 19 (10 male and 9 female) young (23 ± 1 yr) adults for the local delivery of Ringer solution (control) or 5 mM N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine (NPLA; nNOS inhibition). Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) at each site, after which 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) was perfused for within-site assessment of NO-dependent vasodilation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximum (28 mM sodium nitroprusside, 43°C). Total NO-dependent vasodilation in the calf was lower compared with the forearm in both sexes (Ringer: 42 ± 5 vs. 62 ± 4%; P vasodilation was lower in the forearm for women (Ringer: 52 ± 6 vs. 71 ± 4%; P vasodilation across limbs in either sex (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the NO-dependent component of local heating-induced cutaneous vasodilation is lower in the calf compared with the forearm. Contrary to our original hypothesis, there was no contribution of nNOS to NO-dependent vasodilation in either limb during local heating.

  5. A study of the heated length to diameter effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Ho; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An analytical and experimental investigation has been performed on the heated length-to-diameter effect on critical heat flux exit conditions. A L/D correction factor is developed by applying artificial neural network and conventional regression techniques to the KAIST CHF data base. In addition, experiment is being performed to validate the developed L/D correction factor with independent data. Assessment shows that the developed correction factor is promising for practical applications. 6 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  6. Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Andreas, E. L., and E. C. Monahan, 1999: The role of whitecap bubbles in air- sea heat and moisture exchange. J. Phys. Oceanogr., in press. ...1 Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes Edgar L Andreas U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory 72 Lyme Road...www.crrel.usace.army.mil LONG-TERM GOAL The goal is to investigate, theoretically and through analyzing existing data, the role that sea spray plays in

  7. Optimization of a local district heating plant under fuel flexibility and performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; From, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Brovst is a small district in Denmark. Based on the case of Brovst, this paper analyses the role of district heating in future Renewable Energy Systems. The present use of fossil fuels in the Brovst DHP (district heating plant) represents an increasing environmental and climate-related load. So, ...

  8. Thermomagnetic behavior of magnetic susceptibility – heating rate and sample size effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eJordanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermomagnetic analysis of magnetic susceptibility k(T was carried out for a number of natural powder materials from soils, baked clay and anthropogenic dust samples using fast (11oC/min and slow (6.5oC/min heating rates available in the furnace of Kappabridge KLY2 (Agico. Based on the additional data for mineralogy, grain size and magnetic properties of the studied samples, behaviour of k(T cycles and the observed differences in the curves for fast and slow heating rate are interpreted in terms of mineralogical transformations and Curie temperatures (Tc. The effect of different sample size is also explored, using large volume and small volume of powder material. It is found that soil samples show enhanced information on mineralogical transformations and appearance of new strongly magnetic phases when using fast heating rate and large sample size. This approach moves the transformation at higher temperature, but enhances the amplitude of the signal of newly created phase. Large sample size gives prevalence of the local micro- environment, created by evolving gases, released during transformations. The example from archeological brick reveals the effect of different sample sizes on the observed Curie temperatures on heating and cooling curves, when the magnetic carrier is substituted magnetite (Mn0.2Fe2.70O4. Large sample size leads to bigger differences in Tcs on heating and cooling, while small sample size results in similar Tcs for both heating rates.

  9. Heating Effects on Structural and Electrical Properties of Polyetherimide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissaf Mzabi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Polyetherimide (PEI has several uses such as electrical insulation. It can undergo different constraints like heat or high voltage which influence its performances as insulator. In this study, the effects of heating on structural and electrical properties of polyetherimide (Ultem 1000 are studied. Approach: PEI samples were heated at different temperatures below the glass transition temperature (175, 190 and 205°C. Different complementary techniques were used to investigate structural alterations and dielectric relaxations. These are infrared (IR spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Thermally Stimulated Depolarisation Current (TSDC technique and Dielectric Spectroscopy (DS. Results: Physical ageing was revealed in heated samples by DSC analysis. DS and TSDC results have shown that dipolar relaxations are affected by heating. The amount of relaxing dipoles decreases when the material is heated at 190°C. Conclusion/Recommendations: The heating of polyetherimide at 190°C leads to a stabilisation of charges in deeper energetic levels which influences the insulating character of the material.

  10. Determination of local heat transfer coefficient on the surface of longitudinally finned tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobota, T.; Taler, J. [Cracow Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Process and Power Engineering

    2008-06-15

    The distribution of the heat transfer coefficient is calculated from temperature measurements at interior points of the solid, and the measured fluid temperature. The unknown parameters associated with the solution were selected to achieve the closest least squares agreement between the computed and measured temperatures using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. The nonlinear least - squares problem is parameterised by assuming the stair-case changes of the heat transfer coefficient on the boundary, or by expressing the space variations of the heat transfer coefficient in its functional form. The determination of the circumferential heat transfer coefficient distribution on the heated tube with two longitudinal fins in cross flow demonstrates the accuracy of the developed method. The actual experimental data were used. Experiments were performed with an array of vertical tubes arranged in staggered pattern. (orig.)

  11. Determination of Local Experimental Heat-Transfer Coefficients on Combustion Side of an Ammonia-Oxygen Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Ehlers, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    Local experimental heat-transfer coefficients were measured in the chamber and throat of a 2400-pound-thrust ammonia-oxygen rocket engine with a nominal chamber pressure of 600 pounds per square inch absolute. Three injector configurations were used. The rocket engine was run over a range of oxidant-fuel ratio and chamber pressure. The injector that achieved the best performance also produced the highest rates of heat flux at design conditions. The heat-transfer data from the best-performing injector agreed well with the simplified equation developed by Bartz at the throat region. A large spread of data was observed for the chamber. This spread was attributed generally to the variations of combustion processes. The spread was least evident, however, with the best-performing injector.

  12. Current heating induced spin Seebeck effect

    OpenAIRE

    Schreier, Michael; Roschewsky, Niklas; Dobler, Erich; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-01-01

    A new measurement technique for the spin Seebeck effect is presented, wherein the normal metal layer used for its detection is exploited simultaneously as a resistive heater and thermometer. We show how the various contributions to the measured total signal can be disentangled, allowing to extract the voltage signal solely caused by the spin Seebeck effect. To this end we performed measurements as a function of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation. We find that the effect ...

  13. Current heating induced spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreier, Michael, E-mail: michael.schreier@wmi.badw.de; Roschewsky, Niklas; Dobler, Erich; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2013-12-09

    A measurement technique for the spin Seebeck effect is presented, wherein the normal metal layer used for its detection is exploited simultaneously as a resistive heater and thermometer. We show how the various contributions to the measured total signal can be disentangled, allowing to extract the voltage signal solely caused by the spin Seebeck effect. To this end, we performed measurements as a function of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation. We find that the effect scales linearly with the induced rise in temperature, as expected for the spin Seebeck effect.

  14. An Improved Heat Budget Estimation Including Bottom Effects for General Ocean Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Kendall; Warrior, Hari; Otis, Daniel; Chen, R. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of the underwater light field on heat-budget calculations of general ocean circulation models for shallow waters. The presence of a bottom significantly alters the estimated heat budget in shallow waters, which affects the corresponding thermal stratification and hence modifies the circulation. Based on the data collected during the COBOP field experiment near the Bahamas, we have used a one-dimensional turbulence closure model to show the influence of the bottom reflection and absorption on the sea surface temperature field. The water depth has an almost one-to-one correlation with the temperature rise. Effects of varying the bottom albedo by replacing the sea grass bed with a coral sand bottom, also has an appreciable effect on the heat budget of the shallow regions. We believe that the differences in the heat budget for the shallow areas will have an influence on the local circulation processes and especially on the evaporative and long-wave heat losses for these areas. The ultimate effects on humidity and cloudiness of the region are expected to be significant as well.

  15. Heat Stress on Poultry: Metabolism, Effects and Efforts to Overcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasil Tamzil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Poultry industries in the tropics are challenged by high ambient temperatures and humidities which cause poultry suffer from heat stress. Heat stress contributes to the instability of certain compounds, such as enzymes. Consequently the enzymes function reduces. Affecting the physiological and hormonal conditions of the poultry. In such condition, the body will attempt to restore homeostasis to the state before it happened. When physiological failed to meet the condition, the body will use the genetic pathway by activating Heat Shock Protein (HSP genes to protect proteins which are sensitive to high temperatures. Heat stress in poultry triggers the emergence of various diseases and affects the growth of poultry and egg production. These negative effects on poultry can be minimized by selecting the type of chickens which are tolerant to high ambient temperature, modifying microclimates of cages and adding anti-stress compounds through feed and or drink.

  16. Computer implementation of the Passage Arrangement for Plate-Fin Heat Exchangers According to Local Balance Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    A two-step method for stacking arrangement of passages in multistream plate-fin heat exchanger is proposed.The first step (predict step)is to initialize the arrangement according to a local-balance principle,and the second step(correct step) is to re-adjust the arrangement according to the results of differential computation of the temperature distribution.The computer implementation process of the local balance principle is described in detail and three examples are illustrated to whos the feasibility of this principle.A subroutine program is provided to facilitate the reader to adopt this principle.

  17. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  18. The use of local concentrated heat versus topical acyclovir for a herpes labialis outbreak: results of a pilot study under real life conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohlrab J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Wohlrab,1 Franziska Voß,2 Christian Müller,2 Lars C Brenn21Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, 2Department of Medical Science and Operations, Riemser Pharma GmbH, Greifswald, GermanyBackground: Frequent outbreak of herpes labialis can affect quality of life by prodromes like burning, itching, and swelling. Topical applied preparations aim to shorten the duration of symptoms, inhibit the virus replication and/or accelerate the healing process. Local concentrated heat (LCH can reduce burning, itching, or swelling of the skin by influence of mechano-heat sensitive afferent neurons.Patients and methods: To examine the effectiveness of two different topical applications (LCH versus topical acyclovir [TACV] under real life conditions, we conducted a prospective, observational, reference-controlled cohort pilot study with 103 patients. Occurrence of prodromal burning, itching, swelling, and quality of life were assessed.Results: The LCH observation group (OG showed a significantly faster improvement in all symptoms after 1-day of application than the TACV OG. The burden and duration of disease was lower and shorter in the LCH OG than in the TACV OG.Conclusions: The prodromal symptoms in recurrent herpes labialis were attenuated more effectively by LCH than by TACV.Keywords: herpes labialis, local concentrated heat, acyclovir

  19. 2D-local existence and uniqueness of a transient state of a coupled radiative-conductive heat transfer problem

    OpenAIRE

    Ghattassi, Mohamed; Roche, Jean Rodolphe; Schmitt, Didier; Boutayeb, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with local existence and uniqueness results for a transient two-dimensional combined nonlinear radiative-conductive system. This system describes the heat transfer for a grey, semi-transparent and non-scattering medium with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions. We reformulate the full transient state system as a fixed-point problem. The existence and uniqueness proof rests upon the Banach fixed-point Theorem assuming the initial data T 0 is non-negative and sufficiently ...

  20. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  1. Converting the patterns of local heat flux via thermal illusion device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Q. Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the thermal conduction equation has form invariance under coordinate transformation, one can design thermal metamaterials with novel functions by tailoring materials’ thermal conductivities. In this work, we establish a different transformation theory, and propose a layered device with anisotropic thermal conductivities. The device is able to convert heat flux from parallel patterns into non-parallel patterns and vice versa. In the mean time, the heat flux pattern outside the device keeps undisturbed as if this device is absent. We perform finite-element simulations to confirm the converting behavior. This work paves a different way to manipulate the flow of heat at will.

  2. Gold nanorod-facilitated localized heating of droplets in microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Pan; Tong, Limin; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-14

    A gold nanorod-facilitated optical heating method for droplets in microfluidic chips is reported. Individual and stream nanoliter level droplets containing gold nanorods are heated by a low power 808-nm-wavelength laser. Owing to the high photothermal conversion efficiency of gold nanorods, a droplet temperature of 95 °C is achieved by employing a 13.6 mW laser with good reproducibility. The heating and cooling times are 200 and 800 ms, respectively, which are attributed to the fast thermal-transfer rates of the droplets. By controlling the irradiation laser power, the temperature cycles for polymerase chain reaction are also demonstrated.

  3. Relative-locality effects in Snyder spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignemi, S., E-mail: smignemi@unica.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Cagliari, viale Merello 92, 09123 Cagliari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato (Italy); Samsarov, A., E-mail: andjelo.samsarov@irb.hr [Rudjer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2017-05-18

    Most models of noncommutative geometry and doubly special relativity suggest that the principle of absolute locality should be replaced by the milder notion of relative locality. In particular, they predict the occurrence of a delay in the time of arrival of massless particle of different energies emitted by a distant observer. In this letter, we show that this is not the case with Snyder spacetime, essentially because the Lorentz invariance is not deformed in this case. Distant observers may however measure different times of flight for massive particles. - Highlights: • We discuss the dynamics of the Snyder model from the point of view of relative locality. • We show that no time delay is present for particles emitted by distant observers. • We ascribe this fact to the Lorentz invariance of the model. • Distant observers may however measure different times of flight for massive particle.

  4. Small-scale fluctuations in barium drifts at high latitudes and associated Joule heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, L. D.; Larsen, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Most previous estimates of Joule heating rates, especially the contribution of small-scale structure in the high-latitude ionosphere, have been based on incoherent scatter or coherent scatter radar measurements. An alternative estimate can be found from the plasma drifts obtained from ionized barium clouds released from sounding rockets. We have used barium drift data from three experiments to estimate Joule heating rates in the high-latitude E region for different magnetic activity levels. In particular, we are interested in the contribution of small-scale plasma drift fluctuations, corresponding to equivalent electric field fluctuations, to the local Joule heating rate on scales smaller than those typically resolved by radar or other measurements. Since Joule heating is a Lagrangian quantity, the inherently Lagrangian estimates provided by the chemical tracer measurements are a full description of the effects of electric field variance and neutral winds on the heating, differing from the Eulerian estimates of the type provided by ground-based measurements. Results suggest that the small-scale contributions to the heating can be more than a factor of 2 greater than the mean field contribution regardless of geomagnetic conditions, and at times the small-scale contribution is even larger. The high-resolution barium drift measurements, moreover, show that the fine structure in the electric field can be more variable than previous studies have reported for similar conditions. The neutral winds also affect the heating, altering the height-integrated Joule heating rates by as much as 12%, for the cases studied here, and modifying the height distribution of the heating profile as well.

  5. Relative-locality effects in Snyder spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignemi, S.; Samsarov, A.

    2017-05-01

    Most models of noncommutative geometry and doubly special relativity suggest that the principle of absolute locality should be replaced by the milder notion of relative locality. In particular, they predict the occurrence of a delay in the time of arrival of massless particle of different energies emitted by a distant observer. In this letter, we show that this is not the case with Snyder spacetime, essentially because the Lorentz invariance is not deformed in this case. Distant observers may however measure different times of flight for massive particles.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects including introduction and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the heat transfer rate through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20% to 50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15% to 20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: the effect of initial boundary layer thickness, the effect of freestream velocity, the effect of freestream acceleration, the effect of unheated starting length, and the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. An existing curvature prediction model was tested against this broad heat transfer data base to determine where it could appropriately be used for heat transfer predictions.

  7. Effect of low and high heating rates on reaction path of Ni(V)/Al multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Łukasz, E-mail: l.maj@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Morgiel, Jerzy; Szlezynger, Maciej [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Bała, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, 30 Kawiory St., 30-055 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-01

    The effect of heating rates of Ni(V)/Al NanoFoils{sup ®} was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Ni(V)/Al were subjected to heating by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ TEM or electric pulse. Local chemical analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Phase analysis was done with X-ray diffractions (XRD) and selected area electron diffractions (SAED). The experiments showed that slow heating in DSC results in development of separate exothermic effects at ∼230 °C, ∼280 °C and ∼390 °C, corresponding to precipitation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl phases, respectively, i.e. like in vanadium free Ni/Al multilayers. Further heating to 700 °C allowed to obtain a single phase NiAl foil. The average grain size (g.s.) of NiAl phase produced in the DSC heat treated foil was comparable with the Ni(V)/Al multilayer period (∼50 nm), whereas in the case of reaction initiated with electric pulse the g.s. was in the micrometer range. Upon slow heating vanadium tends to segregate to zones parallel to the original multilayer internal interfaces, while in SHS process vanadium-rich phases precipitates at grain boundaries of the NiAl phase. - Highlights: • Peaks in DSC heating of Ni(V)/Al were explained by in-situ TEM observations. • Nucleation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl at slow heating of Ni(V)/Al was documented. • Near surface NiAl obtained from NanoFoil show Ag precipitates at grain boundaries.

  8. On the effect of laterally varying boundary heat flux on rapidly rotating spherical shell convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swarandeep; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2017-08-01

    The onset of convection in a rotating spherical shell subject to laterally varying heat flux at the outer boundary is considered in this paper. The focus is on the geophysically relevant regime of rapid rotation (low Ekman number) where the natural length scale of convection is significantly smaller than the length scale imposed by the boundary heat flux pattern. Contrary to earlier studies at a higher Ekman number, we find a substantial reduction in the onset Rayleigh number Rac with increasing lateral variation. The decrease in Rac is shown to be closely correlated to the equatorial heat flux surplus in the steady, basic state solution. The consistency of such a correlation makes the estimation of Rac possible without solving the full stability problem. The steady baroclinic flow has a strong cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry in the kinetic helicity only for equatorially symmetric lateral variations, with possible implications for dynamo action. Equatorially antisymmetric variations, on the other hand, break the symmetry of the mean flow, in turn negating its helicity. Analysis of the perturbation solution reveals strongly localized clusters through which convection rolls drift in and out at a frequency higher than that for the reference case with homogeneous boundary heat flux. Large lateral variations produce a marked decrease in the azimuthal length scale of columns, which indicates that small-scale motions are essential to the transport of heat in rapidly rotating, localized convection. With an equatorially antisymmetric heat flux pattern, convection in individual clusters goes through an asynchronous wax-wane cycle whose frequency is much lower than the drift rate of the columns. These continual variations in convection intensity may in turn result in fluctuations in the magnetic field intensity, an effect that needs to be considered in dynamo models. Finally, there is a notable analogy between the role of a laterally varying boundary heat flux and the role of a

  9. Effect of turbulence models on predicting convective heat transfer to hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Zhi; Cheng Zeyuan; Zhu Jianqin; Li Haiwang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of turbulence models were used to perform numerical simulations of heat transfer for hydrocarbon fuel flowing upward and downward through uniformly heated vertical pipes at supercritical pressure. Inlet temperatures varied from 373 K to 663 K, with heat flux rang-ing from 300 kW/m2 to 550 kW/m2. Comparative analyses between predicted and experimental results were used to evaluate the ability of turbulence models to respond to variable thermophys-ical properties of hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure. It was found that the prediction per-formance of turbulence models is mainly determined by the damping function, which enables them to respond differently to local flow conditions. Although prediction accuracy for experimental results varied from condition to condition, the shear stress transport (SST) and launder and sharma models performed better than all other models used in the study. For very small buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration due to variations in density lead to the impairment of heat transfer occurring in the vicinity of pseudo-critical points, and heat transfer was enhanced at higher temperatures through the combined action of four thermophysical properties: density, viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat. For very large buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration effect was over predicted by the LS and AB models.

  10. Effect of turbulence models on predicting convective heat transfer to hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of turbulence models were used to perform numerical simulations of heat transfer for hydrocarbon fuel flowing upward and downward through uniformly heated vertical pipes at supercritical pressure. Inlet temperatures varied from 373 K to 663 K, with heat flux ranging from 300 kW/m2 to 550 kW/m2. Comparative analyses between predicted and experimental results were used to evaluate the ability of turbulence models to respond to variable thermophysical properties of hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure. It was found that the prediction performance of turbulence models is mainly determined by the damping function, which enables them to respond differently to local flow conditions. Although prediction accuracy for experimental results varied from condition to condition, the shear stress transport (SST and launder and sharma models performed better than all other models used in the study. For very small buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration due to variations in density lead to the impairment of heat transfer occurring in the vicinity of pseudo-critical points, and heat transfer was enhanced at higher temperatures through the combined action of four thermophysical properties: density, viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat. For very large buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration effect was over predicted by the LS and AB models.

  11. Effect of low pressure generator temperature on the performance of double effect vapour absorption heat transformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomri, Rabah [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Genie Climatique, University of Constantine (Algeria)], E-mail: rabahgomri@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Energy consumption in the industrial sector is high and a significant part of this energy is lost in the form of waste heat. Methods can be used to recover a part of this heat and to improve energetic efficiency, one of them being the absorption heat transformer. This technology uses waste heat, solar energy or geothermal energy to generate heat at a higher temperature than that of the fluid feeding it. The aim of this paper is to determine the exergy performance of a double-effect lithium bromide/water absorption heat transformer system. An exergy analysis was conducted on each of its components. Results showed that the exergy performance increases when the condenser temperature increases but that the absorber temperature interval for which the heat transformer can operate diminishes when the condenser temperature increases. This paper provided useful information on the exergy performance of a double-effect lithium bromide/water absorption heat transformer system.

  12. Effect of subcooling on critical heat flux during pool boiling on a horizontal heated wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Kawae, N.; Monde, M.

    Critical heat flux(CHF) is measured during pool boiling of water and R113 on a heated horizontal wire submerged in a subcooled liquid. Experiments are conducted over a pressure range from 0.1 to 3.0MPa and subcooling up to 220K. CHF data reveal that the CHF increases in a linear fashion with an increase in subcooling, and that the increment of the CHF with increasing subcooling becomes larger with increasing pressure. The characteristics of the CHF obtained differ from those of existing correlations at high pressures, although it is a similar tendency to them in that the CHF is proportional to the subcooling. A new correlation is derived by taking into account the effect of both the density ratio, ρL/ρV, and the Peclet number, Pe, and it succeeds in predicting the CHF data up to higher pressure and higher subcooling ranges, more effectively than previous studies using existing applicable ranges.

  13. The effect of flexible tube vibration on pressure drop and heat transfer in heat exchangers considering viscous dissipation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhmand, H.; Sangtarash, F.

    2008-04-01

    The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in tube bundle of shell and tube heat exchangers are investigated considering viscous dissipation effects. The governing equations are solved numerically. Because of temperature-dependent viscosity the equations should be solved simultaneously. The flexible tubes vibration is modeled in a quasi-static method by taking the first tube of the row to be in 20 asymmetric positions with respect to the rest of the tubes which are assumed to be fixed and time averaging the steady state solutions corresponding to each one of these positions .The results show that the eccentricity of the first tube increases pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients significantly comparing to the case of rigid tube bundles, symmetrically placed. In addition, these vibrations not only compensate the effect of viscous dissipations on heat transfer coefficient but also increase heat transfer coefficient. The constant viscosity results obtained from our numerical method have a good agreement with the available experimental data of constant viscosity for flexible tube heat exchangers.

  14. A finite volume approach to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element using local analytical solution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, A. [Atomic Energy Authority (AEA), Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Center

    2014-11-15

    In this paper we implement the local analytical solution technique to the problem of heat transfer in axisymmetric annulus geometry with internal heating element. This method has shown to be very accurate in estimating the temperature field for axisymmetric problems even for coarse mesh. It is shown that this method reduces to the analytical solution for unidirectional heat transfer in the radial direction in homogeneous media. The technique is based on finding an analytical expression for the temperature field in the radial direction within each grid cell. This means that the temperature field in each cell is allowed to change in a nonlinear fashion along the radial direction. We compare this technique with the traditional finite volume technique and show that; with only few cells in the radial direction, this technique arrives at the mesh-independent solution quite accurately whereas it required denser mesh to arrive closer to this solution using traditional techniques. This method is proposed to the 1D codes that are currently being used to simulate thermalhydraulic characteristics of reactor systems. Furthermore, we also implement the experimental temperature field algorithm in which the governing equations are approximated for each cell as it would without extra manipulation to the governing equations. This technique is very simple and separates the physics from the solving part.

  15. Expectation and Locality Effects in German Verb-final Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roger P; Keller, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Probabilistic expectations and memory limitations are central factors governing the real-time comprehension of natural language, but how the two factors interact remains poorly understood. One respect in which the two factors have come into theoretical conflict is the documentation of both locality effects, in which more dependents preceding a governing verb increase processing difficulty at the verb, and anti-locality effects, in which more preceding dependents facilitate processing at the verb. However, no controlled study has previously demonstrated both locality and anti-locality effects in the same type of dependency relation within the same language. Additionally, many previous demonstrations of anti-locality effects have been potentially confounded with lexical identity, plausibility, and sentence position. Here, we provide new evidence of both locality and anti-locality effects in the same type of dependency relation in a single language-verb-final constructions in German-while controlling for lexical identity, plausibility, and sentence position. In main clauses, we find clear anti-locality effects, with the presence of a preceding dative argument facilitating processing at the final verb; in subject-extracted relative clauses with identical linear ordering of verbal dependents, we find both anti-locality and locality effects, with processing facilitated when the verb is preceded by a dative argument alone, but hindered when the verb is preceded by both the dative argument and an adjunct. These results indicate that both expectations and memory limitations need to be accounted for in any complete theory of online syntactic comprehension.

  16. Effect of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of duplex coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghu Ram Mohan Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, duplex WC-Co/NiCrAlY coating is coated onto Ti6Al4V substrate and vacuum heat treatment is employed to investigate the corrosion behavior of heat treated samples as well as Ti6Al4V substrate for comparison. In this duplex coating system, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF process is used to deposit NiCrAlY interlayer with a constant thickness of 200 μm and WC-Co ceramic top layer with varying thickness of 250 μm, 350 μm and 450 μm deposited by Detonation Spray (DS process. Different heat treatment temperatures (600–1150 °C were employed for the coated samples to study the microstructure and the effect on corrosion resistance of the duplex coatings. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried to investigate the corrosion performance of duplex coated heat treated samples and the substrate in Ringer’s solution at 37 °C and prepared the pH to 5.7. The microstructure upon corrosion after heat treatment was characterized by SEM analysis to understand the corrosion behavior. The results disclosed that at all heat treatment temperatures, all the coated samples exhibited better corrosion resistance than the base substrate. However, during 950 °C and 1150 °C heat treatment temperatures, it was observed highest corrosion potential than 600 °C and 800 °C. The 350 μm thickness, coated sample exhibited highest corrosion resistance compared to other two coated samples and the substrate at all heat treatment temperatures.

  17. Effects of Solar Photovoltaic Panels on Roof Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Klessl, J.; Samady, M.; Luvall, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Building Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) is a major contributor to urban energy use. In single story buildings with large surface area such as warehouses most of the heat enters through the roof. A rooftop modification that has not been examined experimentally is solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays. In California alone, several GW in residential and commercial rooftop PV are approved or in the planning stages. With the PV solar conversion efficiency ranging from 5-20% and a typical installed PV solar reflectance of 16-27%, 53-79% of the solar energy heats the panel. Most of this heat is then either transferred to the atmosphere or the building underneath. Consequently solar PV has indirect effects on roof heat transfer. The effect of rooftop PV systems on the building roof and indoor energy balance as well as their economic impacts on building HVAC costs have not been investigated. Roof calculator models currently do not account for rooftop modifications such as PV arrays. In this study, we report extensive measurements of a building containing a flush mount and a tilted solar PV array as well as exposed reference roof. Exterior air and surface temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation were measured and thermal infrared (TIR) images of the interior ceiling were taken. We found that in daytime the ceiling surface temperature under the PV arrays was significantly cooler than under the exposed roof. The maximum difference of 2.5 C was observed at around 1800h, close to typical time of peak energy demand. Conversely at night, the ceiling temperature under the PV arrays was warmer, especially for the array mounted flat onto the roof. A one dimensional conductive heat flux model was used to calculate the temperature profile through the roof. The heat flux into the bottom layer was used as an estimate of the heat flux into the building. The mean daytime heat flux (1200-2000 PST) under the exposed roof in the model was 14.0 Watts per square meter larger than

  18. Nociceptive Effects of Locally Treated Metoprolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursima Cukadar

    2015-06-01

    Results: Metoprolol, an antagonist, significantly decreased the thermal latency and mechanical thresholds with dose and time dependent manner. However, dobutamine, an agonist, enhanced the latency and thresholds dose and time dependent. Conclusions: This results suggest that in contrast to dobutamine, locally treated metoprolol may cause hyperalgesic and allodynic actions. In addition, our results can demonstrate that peripheral beta-adrenergic receptors can play important roles in nociceptive process. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(2.000: 258-266

  19. THE EFFECTS OF SWIRL GENERATOR HAVING WINGS WITH HOLES ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN TUBE HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki ARGUNHAN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of turbulance creators on heat transfer and pressure drop used in concentric heat exchanger experimentaly. Heat exchanger has an inlet tube with 60 mm in diameter. The angle of swirl generators wings is 55º with each wing which has single, double, three and four holes. Swirl generators is designed to easily set to heat exchanger entrance. Air is passing through inner tube of heat exhanger as hot fluid and water is passing outer of inner tube as cool fluid.

  20. Effect of Combustion Air Pre-Heating In Carbon Monoxide Emission in Diesel Fired Heat Treatment Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E B Muhammed Shafi,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effect of combustion air pre- heating in Diesel fired heat Treatment Furnace. The main heat treatment processes are Normalizing, Tempering, Hardening, Annealing, Solution Annealing and Stress Relieving. The emission of carbon monoxide is measured with combustion air pre-heating and without preheating. The results are then compared and it is found that the emission of CO is reduced by 29.12%. With the Combustion air pre-heating a considerable reduction in Specific Furnace Fuel Consumption (SFFC is obtained. The test was caaried out at Peekay Steels Casting (P ltd, Nallalam, Calicut.

  1. Effects of heat acclimation on hand cooling efficacy following exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Elizabeth L; Vandermark, Lesley W; Pryor, J Luke; Pryor, Riana R; VanScoy, Rachel M; Denegar, Craig R; Huggins, Robert A; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the separate and combined effects of heat acclimation and hand cooling on post-exercise cooling rates following bouts of exercise in the heat. Seventeen non-heat acclimated (NHA) males (mean ± SE; age, 23 ± 1 y; mass, 75.30 ± 2.27 kg; maximal oxygen consumption [VO2 max], 54.1 ± 1.3 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) completed 2 heat stress tests (HST) when NHA, then 10 days of heat acclimation, then 2 HST once heat acclimated (HA) in an environmental chamber (40°C; 40%RH). HSTs were 2 60-min bouts of treadmill exercise (45% VO2 max; 2% grade) each followed by 10 min of hand cooling (C) or no cooling (NC). Heat acclimation sessions were 90-240 min of treadmill or stationary bike exercise (60-80% VO2 max). Repeated measures ANOVA with Fishers LSD post hoc (α < 0.05) identified differences. When NHA, C (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) had a greater cooling rate than NC (0.013 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) (mean difference [95%CI]; 0.007°C [0.001,0.013], P = 0.035). Once HA, C (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) was similar to NC (0.025 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) (0.004°C [-0.003,0.011], P = 0.216). Hand cooling when HA (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) was similar to when NHA (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) (P = 0.77). In conclusion, when NHA, C provided greater cooling rates than NC. Once HA, C and NC provided similar cooling rates.

  2. Monitoring the effects of land use/landcover changes on urban heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Ong K.; Sarker, Md Latifur Rahman

    2013-10-01

    Urban heat island effects are well known nowadays and observed in cities throughout the World. The main reason behind the effects of urban heat island (UHI) is the transformation of land use/ land cover, and this transformation is associated with UHI through different actions: i) removal of vegetated areas, ii) land reclamation from sea/river, iii) construction of new building as well as other concrete structures, and iv) industrial and domestic activity. In rapidly developing cities, urban heat island effects increases very hastily with the transformation of vegetated/ other types of areas into urban surface because of the increasing population as well as for economical activities. In this research the effect of land use/ land cover on urban heat island was investigated in two growing cities in Asia i.e. Singapore and Johor Bahru, (Malaysia) using 10 years data (from 1997 to 2010) from Landsat TM/ETM+. Multispectral visible band along with indices such as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Build Index (NDBI), and Normalized Difference Bareness Index (NDBaI) were used for the classification of major land use/land cover types using Maximum Likelihood Classifiers. On the other hand, land surface temperature (LST) was estimated from thermal image using Land Surface Temperature algorithm. Emissivity correction was applied to the LST map using the emissivity values from the major land use/ land cover types, and validation of the UHI map was carried out using in situ data. Results of this research indicate that there is a strong relationship between the land use/land cover changes and UHI. Over this 10 years period, significant percentage of non-urban surface was decreased but urban heat surface was increased because of the rapid urbanization. With the increase of UHI effect it is expected that local urban climate has been modified and some heat related health problem has been exposed, so appropriate measure should be taken in order to

  3. Numerical simulation of precessing vortex core dumping by localized nonstationary heat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfiriev, Denis; Gorbunova, Anastasiya; Zavershinsky, Igor; Sugak, Semen; Molevich, Nonna

    2016-10-01

    The precessing vortex core (PVC) is a crucial structure for many technical devices with the heat release. For this purpose, we performed the 3D numerical simulations of PVC in the swirling flow created in the open tube with the paraxial nonstationary heat source. Power of the source was modulated by sinusoidal law. We showed that three turbulence models give the qualitatively similar dependences of PVC frequency and amplitude on the heat-source power. The numerical simulation demonstrated that the obtained PVC is a left-handed co-rotated bending single-vortex structure. For considered values of the swirl and mass flow rate, we obtained that, for wide range of modulation frequencies, the growth of the heat-source power leads to gradual increase in the PVC frequency and slow change in the amplitude of vortex core oscillations. However, for specific modulation frequency, which depends on the tube geometry, dependencies of the PVC frequency and the amplitudes of oscillations have distinct maximum and minimum. Which means that, under specific conditions, flow pattern changes dramatically and precession is almost dumped at the relatively low values of heat power.

  4. The effect of passive heating and face cooling on perceived exertion during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada-da-Silva, P A S; Woods, J; Jones, D A

    2004-05-01

    Increased body temperature is thought to be an important component of the higher perception of exertion that is a feature of fatigue during exercise in the heat but a causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. We have investigated the effect of passive heating on the perception of exertion during a standard bout of exercise and also assessed the effect of cooling the head on compensating for the increased body temperature on the feelings of exertion. Ten male subjects performed a 14-min cycling exercise [average power approximately 63% of maximum power output ( W(max))] at an ambient temperature of 35 degrees C at resting rectal temperature [mean (SD): 37.49 (0.27) degrees C; control (CON) trial] on one occasion, and after sitting in a sauna to raise rectal temperature [mean (SD): 38.95(0.13) degrees C; sauna (SAU) trial]. During the exercise, subjects reported their ratings of overall perceived exertion (RPE), perceived exertion of the legs (RPE(legs)) and thermal comfort (TC). A blood sample was collected by the end of the exercise for determination of plasma glucose, lactate and prolactin and haematocrit. RPE values were significantly elevated after passive heating [mean (SE): 14.5 (0.7) units in CON and 17.2 (0.5) units in SAU, at the end of exercise; PFAN) and SAU(FAN)) that was achieved by combining face fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cooled water. Face cooling decreased RPE values after sauna to a point that no differences between the two conditions existed. RPE(legs) scores and heart rate, however, remained higher in SAU(FAN) compared with CON(FAN) ( P<0.05). We conclude that hyperthermia is a causative element of the increased perception of exertion during submaximal exercise in the heat and that the effect of increased core temperature on the feelings of exertion is modulated by face cooling.

  5. Paving the Way for Heat. Local Government Policies for Developing Bioenergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Johnsen Rygg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Local governments play dual roles in developing renewable energy projects. They are the targets of many goals concerning energy and climate, set by national and international actors, and they are important actors in energy planning, regulation setting, and the development of infrastructure and residential areas. In this paper, I study how local governments’ technology policies affect the actual outcome of project development based on experiences from 14 local governments. Technology policies are studied from the perspective of Sørensen’s [1] four areas of concern: direct support of innovation, infrastructure, regulation (protection and standards and public engagement. I find that local governments use policy instruments within all four areas, and that the way local governments involves in the process of bioenergy development are surprisingly similar despite differences in location and size of both the local government and the project.

  6. Effects of Freestream Turbulence on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Giel, Paul W.; Ames, Forrest E.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that moderate turbulence levels can nearly double turbine blade stagnation region heat transfer. Data have also shown that heat transfer is strongly affected by the scale of turbulence as well as its level. In addition to the stagnation region, turbulence is often seen to increase pressure surface heat transfer. This is especially evident at low to moderate Reynolds numbers. Vane and rotor stagnation region, and vane pressure surface heat transfer augmentation is often seen in a pre-transition environment. Accurate predictions of transition and relaminarization are critical to accurately predicting blade surface heat transfer. An approach is described which incorporates the effects of both turbulence level and scale into a CFD analysis. The model is derived from experimental data for cylindrical and elliptical leadng edges. Results using this model are compared to experimental data for both vane and rotor geometries. The comparisons are made to illustrate that using a model which includes the effects of turbulence length scale improves agreement with data, and to illustrate where improvements in the modeling are needed.

  7. Local dependence of ion temperature gradient on magnetic configuration, rotational shear and turbulent heat flux in MAST

    CERN Document Server

    Ghim, Y -c; Schekochihin, A A; Highcock, E G; Michael, C

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data from the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is used to show that the inverse gradient scale length of the ion temperature R/LTi (normalized to the major radius R) has its strongest local correlation with the rotational shear and the pitch angle of the magnetic field (or, equivalently, an inverse correlation with q/{\\epsilon}, the safety factor/the inverse aspect ratio). Furthermore, R/LTi is found to be inversely correlated with the gyro-Bohm-normalized local turbulent heat flux estimated from the density fluctuation level measured using a 2D Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic. These results can be explained in terms of the conjecture that the turbulent system adjusts to keep R/LTi close to a certain critical value (marginal for the excitation of turbulence) determined by local equilibrium parameters (although not necessarily by linear stability).

  8. A micro-integrated Peltier heat pump for localized on-chip temperature control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafai, C.; Brett, M.J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Peltier heat pumps are often used for the thermal regulation of small-sized sensors and electronics such as integrated circuits. Integrated Peltier devices would need less power and would provide better thermal compensation than exterior devices. A thin-film Peltier heat pump was designed and built using standard semiconductor patterning and etching techniques. Chrome-gold and bismuth telluride metallization formed the thermoelectric junctions. A maximum heat-pumping rate of -24 uW at a current of 0.89 mA was achieved when operating in the cooling mode. This pumping rate was proportional to the dimensions of the Peltier device and the thickness of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film. The performance can be optimized by choosing an appropriate geometry for the Peltier device. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Local heat treatment of high strength steels with zoom-optics and 10kW-diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Markus; Krause, Volker; Bergweiler, Georg; Flaischerowitz, Martin; Banik, Janko

    2012-03-01

    High strength steels enable new solutions for weight optimized car bodies without sacrificing crash safety. However, cold forming of these steels is limited due to the need of high press capacity, increased tool wear, and limitations in possible geometries. One can compensate for these drawbacks by local heat treatment of the blanks. In high-deformation areas the strength of the material is reduced and the plasticity is increased by diode laser irradiation. Local heat treatment with diode laser radiation could also yield key benefits for the applicability of press hardened parts. High strength is not desired all over the part. Joint areas or deformation zones for requested crash properties require locally reduced strength. In the research project "LOKWAB" funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), heat treatment of high strength steels was investigated in cooperation with Audi, BMW, Daimler, ThyssenKrupp, Fraunhofer- ILT, -IWU and others. A diode laser with an output power of 10 kW was set up to achieve acceptable process speed. Furthermore a homogenizing zoom-optics was developed, providing a rectangular focus with homogeneous power density. The spot size in x- and y-direction can be changed independently during operation. With pyrometer controlled laser power the surface temperature is kept constant, thus the laser treated zone can be flexibly adapted to the needs. Deep-drawing experiments show significant improvement in formability. With this technique, parts can be manufactured, which can conventionally only be made of steel with lower strength. Locally reduced strength of press hardened serial parts was demonstrated.

  10. Effect of heat on laterised concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe E. Ikponmwosa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of investigation of the effects of temperature variation on the compressive strength of laterised concrete. Cube specimens were cast, cured in water at ambient laboratory temperature and subjected to different temperature regimes before testing. A concrete mix ratio of 2:3:6 (cement: laterite/sand: granite with water/cement ratio of 0.65 was adopted for this investigation. The laterite content in the fine aggregate was varied from 0 to 100% at 25% interval. Specimens cured for 7 and 28 days were subjected to uniaxial compressive loading tests at room and elevated temperatures of 250, 500 and 750oC. The results show that normal concrete cannot withstand appreciable load above 250oC while laterised concrete with 25% laterite in the fine aggregate is able to resist higher load with increase in age and at temperature up to 500oC. It is also observed that there is no appreciable increase in strength at higher temperatures. The peak compressive strength value of 30.44 N/mm2 is recorded for the mix with 25% laterite-75% sand at 500oC. This is an indication that the strength of laterised concrete is generally sufficient for use at elevated temperature not exceeding 500oC.

  11. Relative-locality effects in Snyder spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Mignemi, S

    2016-01-01

    When applied to some models of noncommutative geometry, the formalism of relative locality predicts the occurrence of a delay in the time of arrival of massless particle of different energies emitted by a distant observer. In this letter, we show that this is not the case with Snyder spacetime, essentially because the Lorentz invariance is not deformed in this case. This conclusion is in accordance with the findings of doubly special relativity. Distant observers may however measure different times of flight for massive particle.

  12. Local spacetime effects on gyroscope systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wohlfarth, Mattias N R

    2012-01-01

    We give a precise theoretical description of initially aligned sets of orthogonal gyroscopes which are transported along different paths from some initial point to the same final point in spacetime. These gyroscope systems can be used to synchronize separated observers' spatial frames by free fall along timelike geodesics. We find that initially aligned gyroscope systems, or spatial frames, lose their synchronization due to the curvature of spacetime and their relative motion. On the basis of our results we propose a simple experiment which enables observers to determine locally whether their spacetime is described by a rotating Kerr or a non-rotating Schwarzschild metric.

  13. Local spacetime effects on gyroscope systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.; Pfeifer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We give a precise theoretical description of initially aligned sets of orthogonal gyroscopes which are transported along different paths from some initial point to the same final point in spacetime. These gyroscope systems can be used to synchronize separated observers’ spatial frames by free fall along timelike geodesics. We find that initially aligned gyroscope systems, or spatial frames, lose their synchronization due to the curvature of spacetime and their relative motion. On the basis of our results we propose a simple experiment that enables observers to determine locally whether their spacetime is described by a rotating Kerr or a nonrotating Schwarzschild metric.

  14. Effective disinfection of rough rice using infrared radiation heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) heating and tempering treatments on disinfection of Aspergillus flavus in freshly harvested rough rice and storage rice. Rice samples with initial moisture contents (IMCs) of 14.1 to 27.0% (wet basis) were infected with A. fl...

  15. A new method for uniform local heating deep in body using ultrasound phased-array system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chenxi; Bai Jingfeng; Chen Yazhu

    2008-01-01

    A new method for targeted heating of deep tissue was developed by using an ultrasound phased-array system which can generate various multiple foci patterns by electronically changing its amplitude or phase pattern. This method involves using a technique of combining switching and rotating of multiple foci patterns to create a uniform temperature over tissue volumes in various size. Using this method, the target tissue deep in the body can be heated to a specified temperature, which gives conditions for thermo-sensitive liposomes release. A simulation study for a 108-element, spherically sectioned array was performed to determine an optimal heating scheme from a set of multiple focus fields which were produced by inputting different combinations of phases and amplitudes. Comparisons of a static multiple foci field, the switched fields and the switched-rotated fields indicated that the technique of combining switching and rotating of multiple foci patterns has advantages of both lowering the peak temperature and evening the temperature distribution. The simulation results also show that the therapeutic heating zones in various size employing the combined method. These results offer significant data for designing thermotherapy equipment for tumor-specific drug release with thermo-sensitive liposomes.

  16. Gastric emptying during exercise: effects of heat stress and hypohydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufer, P D; Young, A J; Sawka, M N

    1989-01-01

    To determine the effects of acute heat stress, heat acclimation and hypohydration on the gastric emptying rate of water (W) during treadmill exercise, ten physically fit men ingested 400 ml of W before each of three 15 min bouts of exercise (treadmill, approximately 50% VO2max) on five separate occasions. Stomach contents were aspirated after each exercise bout. Before heat acclimation (ACC), experiments were performed in a neutral (18 degrees C), hot (49 degrees C) and warm (35 degrees C) environment. Subjects were euhydrated for all experiments before ACC. After ACC, the subjects completed two more experiments in the warm (35 degrees C) environment; one while euhydrated and a final one while hypohydrated (-5% of body weight). The volume of ingested water emptied into the intestines at the completion of each exercise bout was inversely correlated (P less than 0.01) with the rectal temperature (r = -0.76). The following new observations were made: 1) exercise in a hot (49 degrees C) environment impairs gastric emptying rate as compared with a neutral (18 degrees C) environment, 2) exercise in a warm (35 degrees C) environment does not significantly reduce gastric emptying before or after heat acclimation, but 3) exercise in a warm environment (35 degrees C) when hypohydrated reduces gastric emptying rate and stomach secretions. Reductions in gastric emptying appear to be related to the severity of the thermal strain induced by an exercise/heat stress.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on stainless steel orthodontic wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Aparecido Cuoghi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of heat treatment on CrNi stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Half of forty archwires of each thickness - 0.014" (0.35 mm, 0.016" (0.40 mm, 0.018" (0.45 mm and 0.020" (0.50 mm (totalling 160 archwires - were subjected to heat treatment while the remainder were not. All of the archwires had their individual thickness measured in the anterior and posterior regions using AutoCad 2000 software before and after compressive and tensile strength testing. The data was statistically analysed utilising multivariance ANOVA at a 5% significance level. All archwires without heat treatment that were subjected to tensile strength testing presented with anterior opening, which was more accentuated in the 0.020" archwires. In the posterior region, the opening produced by the tensile force was more accentuated in the archwires without heat treatment. There was greater stability in the thermally treated archwires, especially those subjected to tensile strength testing, which indicates that the heat treatment of orthodontic archwires establishes a favourable and indispensable condition to preserve the intercanine width.

  18. Experimental study of curvature effects on jet impingement heat transfer on concave surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the local and average heat transfer characteristics of a single round jet impinging on the concave surfaces was conducted in this work to gain in-depth knowledge of the curvature effects. The experiments were conducted by employing a piccolo tube with one single jet hole over a wide range of parameters: jet Reynolds number from 27000 to 130000, relative nozzle to surface distance from 3.3 to 30, and relative surface curvature from 0.005 to 0.030. Experimental results indicate that the surface curvature has opposite effects on heat transfer characteristics. On one hand, an increase of relative nozzle to surface distance (increasing jet diameter in fact enhances the average heat transfer around the surface for the same curved surface. On the other hand, the average Nusselt number decreases as relative nozzle to surface distance increases for a fixed jet diameter. Finally, experimental data-based correlations of the average Nusselt number over the curved surface were obtained with consideration of surface curvature effect. This work contributes to a better understanding of the curvature effects on heat transfer of a round jet impingement on concave surfaces, which is of high importance to the design of the aircraft anti-icing system.

  19. Effective disinfection of rough rice using infrared radiation heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Khir, Ragab; Pan, Zhongli; El-Mashad, Hamed; Atungulu, Griffiths G; Ma, Haile; McHugh, Tara H; Qu, Wenjuan; Wu, Bengang

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) heating and tempering treatments on disinfection of Aspergillus flavus in freshly harvested rough rice and storage rice. Rice samples with initial moisture contents (IMCs) of 14.1 to 27.0% (wet basis) were infected with A. flavus spores before the tests. The infected samples were heated by IR radiation to 60°C in less than 1 min, and then samples were tempered at 60°C for 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, or 120 min. High heating rates and corresponding high levels of moisture removal were achieved using IR heating. The highest total moisture removal was 5.3% for the fresh rice with an IMC of 27.0% after IR heating and then 120 min of tempering. IR heating followed by tempering for 120 min resulted in 2.5- and 8.3-log reductions of A. flavus spores in rough rice with the lowest and highest IMCs, respectively. To study the effect on disinfection of rewetting dried storage rice, the surface of the dry rice was rewetted to achieve IMCs of 14.7 to 19.4% (wet basis). The rewetting process for the dry rice had a significant effect on disinfection. IR heating followed by tempering for 60 min resulted in 7.2-log reductions in A. flavus on rewetted rough rice. The log-linear plus tail model was applied to estimate the tempering time needed to achieve a 5-log reduction of A. flavus in rice of different IMCs. At least 30 and 20 min of tempering were needed for fresh rice and rewetted rice, respectively, with the highest IMCs. The recommended conditions of simultaneous disinfection and drying for fresh rice was IR heating to 60°C followed by tempering for 120 min and natural cooling, resulting in a final MC of 16.5 to 22.0%, depending on the IMC. For the rewetted dry rice with an IMC of 19.4%, the recommended condition for disinfection and drying involved only 20 min of tempering. The final MC of the sample was 13.8%, which is a safe MC for storage rice.

  20. Effect of heat loss on laminar flamelet species concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccanera, Marco; Lentini, Diego

    2016-10-01

    The effects of heat loss on the structure of laminar flamelets, which are the constitutive elements of turbulent flames under the most common operating conditions, are investigated for typical aeronautical gas-turbine operating conditions at take-off. The magnitude of heat loss is quantified via the "enthalpy defect" measured with respect to an adiabatic flame. A procedure to generate laminar flamelets with an assigned enthalpy defect at the boundaries is devised and applied to nonpremixed propane/air flames, as propane reproduces the essential features of higher hydrocarbon combustion. It is found, contrary to commonly held beliefs, that the enthalpy defect has a significant effect on the concentration not only of minor species, but also of main reaction products. Such effects are found in general to be more pronounced for fuel-rich conditions. An impact is anticipated on the formation rate of nitric oxides. The effects of scalar dissipation rate are also discussed.

  1. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-20

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials-shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator-in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials.

  2. Tunable Multifunctional Thermal Metamaterials: Manipulation of Local Heat Flux via Assembly of Unit-Cell Thermal Shifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwanwoo; Kang, Sunggu; Lee, Howon; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-01-01

    Thermal metamaterials, designed by transformation thermodynamics are artificial structures that can actively control heat flux at a continuum scale. However, fabrication of them is very challenging because it requires a continuous change of thermal properties in materials, for one specific function. Herein, we introduce tunable thermal metamaterials that use the assembly of unit-cell thermal shifters for a remarkable enhancement in multifunctionality as well as manufacturability. Similar to the digitization of a two-dimensional image, designed thermal metamaterials by transformation thermodynamics are disassembled as unit-cells thermal shifters in tiny areas, representing discretized heat flux lines in local spots. The programmed-reassembly of thermal shifters inspired by LEGO enable the four significant functions of thermal metamaterials—shield, concentrator, diffuser, and rotator—in both simulation and experimental verification using finite element method and fabricated structures made from copper and PDMS. This work paves the way for overcoming the structural and functional limitations of thermal metamaterials. PMID:28106156

  3. Effects of local and global network connectivity on synergistic epidemics

    CERN Document Server

    Broder-Rodgers, David; Taraskin, Sergei N

    2015-01-01

    The effects of local and global connectivity on the spread of synergistic susceptible-infected-removed epidemics were studied in lattice models with infinite- and finite-range rewiring (small-world and small-world-like models). Several effects were found numerically and supported analytically within a simple model: (i) rewiring enhanced resilience to epidemics with strong constructive synergy on networks with high local connectivity; (ii) rewiring enhanced spread of epidemics with destructive or weak constructive synergy on networks with arbitrary local connectivity; (iii) rewiring enhanced spread of epidemics, independent of synergy, in networks with low local connectivity.

  4. The Effects of Fin Collar Form on Heat Transfer Performance of Cross Fin-tube Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubaki, Koutaro; Miyara, Akio; Nagai, Yuma; Sasaki, Naoe; Mizuta, Yoshihiko

    A numerical study has been conducted to investigate effects of fin collar form of cross fin-tube heat exchangers on heat transfer performance. Two adjacent fin collars and a copper tube form a triangular space during the making process. And also end of the fin collar protrudes into air-side. The protruded end and triangular space affect on air-side heat convection and thermal resistance between the tube and fin collars, respectively. The increase in triangular space increases non-contact surface area between tube and fin collar, which affects to decrease heat transfer rate. The protruded end disturbs air-side flow and expands the surface of the fin collar. As a result of these two effects, heat transfer rate from the heat transfer tube increases. However, protruded end increases pressure loss of air-side.

  5. Scattering effect in radiative heat transfer during selective laser sintering of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Boutaous, M'hamed; Xin, Shihe

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an accurate model to simulate the selective laser sintering (SLS) process, in order to understand the multiple phenomena occurring in the material and to study the influence of each parameter on the quality of the sintered parts. A numerical model, coupling radiative and conductive heat transfers in a polymer powder bed providing a local temperature field, is proposed. To simulate the polymer sintering by laser heating as in additive manufacturing, a double-lines scanning of a laser beam over a thin layer of polymer powder is studied. An effective volumetric heat source, using a modified Monte Carlo method, is estimated from laser radiation scattering and absorption in a semi-transparent polymer powder bed. In order to quantify the laser-polymer interaction, the heating and cooling of the material is modeled and simulated with different types heat sources by both finite elements method (FEM) and discrete elements method (DEM). To highlight the importance of introducing a semi-transparent behavior of such materials and in order to validate our model, the results are compared with works taken from the literature.

  6. Sex specific effects of heat induced hormesis in Hsf-deficient Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J G; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Kristensen, K V;

    2007-01-01

    In insects mild heat stress early in life has been reported to increase life span and heat resistance later in life, a phenomenon termed hormesis. Here, we test if the induction of the heat shock response by mild heat stress is mediating hormesis in longevity and heat resistance at older age....... To test this hypothesis we used two heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) mutant stocks. One stock harbours a mutation giving rise to a heat sensitive Hsf which inactivates the heat shock response at high temperature and the other is a rescued mutant giving rise to a wild-type phenotype. We measured...... longevity, heat resistance and expression level of a heat shock protein, Hsp70, in controls and mildly heat treated flies. We found a marked difference between males and females with males showing a beneficial effect of the early heat treatment on longevity and heat resistance later in life in the rescued...

  7. Effect of tube pitch on heat transfer in shell-and-tube heat exchangers—new simulation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karno, A.; Ajib, S.

    2006-02-01

    A new program for simulation and optimization of the shell-and-tube heat exchangers is prepared to obtain useful results by employment of the computing technology fast and accurately. As an application of this program, the effects of transverse and longitudinal tube pitch in the in-line and staggered tube arrangements on the Nusselt numbers, heat transfer coefficients and thermal performance of the heat exchangers were investigated. The obtained values of the tube pitch were compared with literature values.

  8. Heat Transport Effects in Rotating Gases and Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmes, Elijah; Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    In some contexts, rotating gases and plasmas exhibit heat transport effects that are substantially different from what would be found in the absence of rotation. For instance, a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a device which separates an input stream of (neutral) gas into hot and cold streams by setting up a rotating flow in a specially designed cylindrical chamber. One class of vortex tube models involves radial motion that carries gas up and down the pressure gradients set up by the centrifugal potential inside the tube and which results in adiabatic heating and cooling of the radially moving material. The approach of producing heat transport in a rotating flow using pressure gradients and motion along those gradients may have applications in plasma systems. We discuss possible applications for rotational heat transport effects in plasma systems, including Z-pinch configurations. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory; U.S. Defense Reduction Agency Grant No. HDTRA1-11-1-0037; and the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-NA0002948.

  9. Measurement of Local Si-Nanowire Growth Kinetics Using In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of Heated Cantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Christian; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Mølhave, Kristian;

    2010-01-01

    A technique to study nanowire growth processes on locally heated microcantilevers in situ in a transmission electron microscope has been developed. The in situ observations allow the characterization of the nucleation process of silicon wires, as well as the measurement of growth rates...... of individual nanowires and the ability to observe the formation of nanowire bridges between separate cantilevers to form a complete nanowire device. How well the nanowires can be nucleated controllably on typical cantilever sidewalls is examined, and the measurements of nanowire growth rates are used...

  10. Picard Successive Approximation Method for Solving Differential Equations Arising in Fractal Heat Transfer with Local Fractional Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Min Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fourier law of one-dimensional heat conduction equation in fractal media is investigated in this paper. An approximate solution to one-dimensional local fractional Volterra integral equation of the second kind, which is derived from the transformation of Fourier flux equation in discontinuous media, is considered. The Picard successive approximation method is applied to solve the temperature field based on the given Mittag-Leffler-type Fourier flux distribution in fractal media. The nondifferential approximate solutions are given to show the efficiency of the present method.

  11. Spacer grid effects on Post-CHF heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Shin, Byung Soo; Lee, Kwi Lim; Sohail; Jeon, Eun Ju; Jeong, Hye Dong; Park, Yu Sun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    An experimental studies were performed in the post-CHF condition using R-134a in uniformly heated vertical tube to investigate the effects of girds and hybrid mixing vanes in case of the one rod annular geometry. The experiments were conducted under outlet pressure of 11, 13, 16 and 20 bar and mass fluxes of 100-400 kg/m{sup 2}s. About 1000 of post-CHF data are obtained in the annular geometry. The grid test results show the negative effect by the break-up of the liquid film in high quality condition. The hybrid mixing vane tests are also performed, but that did not show the improved effects compared with the bare condition. The experimental data are compared with typical of the equilibrium correlations of Dougall-Rohsenow, Groeneveld 5.9, and Condie-Bengston. Douall-Rosenow correlation shows the reasonable predictions for the measured R-134a heat transfer coefficients.

  12. Effect of nanofluid on thermal performance of heat pipe with two evaporators; application to satellite equipment cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaei, P. R.; Shahryari, M.

    2015-06-01

    A study on the behavior of nanofluid in a cylindrical heat pipe with two heat sources is performed to analyze the nanofluid application in heat-dissipating satellite equipment cooling. Pure water, Al2O3-water and TiO2-water nanofluids are used as working fluids. An analytical modeling is presented to predict the wall temperature profile for the heat pipe assuming saturated vapor and conduction heat transfer for porous media and wall, respectively. The effects of particle concentration levels (φ=0 (distilled water), 2, 4, and 8%), particle diameters (dp=10, 20, and 40 nm) on the local wall temperature, heat transfer coefficient, thermal resistance, and the size of the heat pipe are investigated. It is observed that the better wall temperature uniformity can be achieved using nanofluid which results in lower temperature difference between evaporators and condenser sections. Results reveal that applying nanoparticle with smaller size and higher concentration level increases heat transfer coefficient remarkably by reducing thermal resistance of saturated porous media. It is also found that the presence of nanoparticles in water can lead to a reduction in weight of heat pipe, and thus satellite, under nearly identical condition. The findings of this paper prove the potential of nanofluid in satellite equipment cooling application.

  13. The effect of rowing headgear on forced convective heat loss and radiant heat gain on a thermal manikin headform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogerd, Cornelis P; Brühwiler, Paul A; Heus, Ronald

    2008-05-01

    Both radiant and forced convective heat flow were measured for a prototype rowing headgear and white and black cotton caps. The measurements were performed on a thermal manikin headform at a wind speed of 4.0 m . s(-1) (s = 0.1) in a climate chamber at 22.0 degrees C (s = 0.05), with and without radiant heat flow from a heat lamp, coming from either directly above (90 degrees ) or from above at an angle of 55 degrees . The effects of hair were studied by repeating selected measurements with a wig. All headgear reduced the radiant heat gain compared with the nude headform: about 80% for the caps and 95% for the prototype rowing headgear (P convective heat loss was reduced more by the caps (36%) than by the prototype rowing headgear (9%) (P heat gain contributed maximally 13% to the net heat transfer, with or without headgear, showing that forced convective heat loss is the dominant heat transfer parameter under the chosen conditions. The results of the headgear - wig combinations were qualitatively similar, with lower absolute heat transfer.

  14. Effect of heating system using a geothermal heat pump on the production performance and housing environment of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H C; Salim, H M; Akter, N; Na, J C; Kang, H K; Kim, M J; Kim, D W; Bang, H T; Chae, H S; Suh, O S

    2012-02-01

    A geothermal heat pump (GHP) is a potential heat source for the economic heating of broiler houses with optimum production performance. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of a heating system using a GHP on production performance and housing environment of broiler chickens. A comparative analysis was also performed between the GHP system and a conventional heating system that used diesel for fuel. In total, 34,000 one-day-old straight run broiler chicks were assigned to 2 broiler houses with 5 replicates in each (3,400 birds/replicate pen) for 35 d. Oxygen(,) CO(2), and NH(3) concentrations in the broiler house, energy consumption and cost of heating, and production performance of broilers were evaluated. Results showed that the final BW gain significantly (P heating system did not affect the mortality of chicks during the first 4 wk of the experimental period, but the mortality markedly increased in the conventional broiler house during the last wk of the experiment. Oxygen content in the broiler house during the experimental period was not affected by the heating system, but the CO(2) and NH(3) contents significantly increased (P heating the GHP house was significantly lower (P heating system for broiler chickens.

  15. Effect of heat processing on selected grain amaranth physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyonga, John H; Andabati, Brian; Ssepuuya, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Grain amaranth is a pseudocereal with unique agricultural, nutritional, and functional properties. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of different heat-processing methods on physicochemical and nutraceutical properties in two main grain amaranth species, of Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. and Amaranthus cruentus L. Grains were prepared by roasting and popping, milled and analyzed for changes in in vitro protein digestibility, gruel viscosity, pasting characteristics, antioxidant activity, flavonoids, and total phenolics. In vitro protein digestibility was determined using the pepsin-pancreatin enzyme system. Viscosity and pasting characteristics of samples were determined using a Brookfield Viscometer and a Rapid Visco Analyzer, respectively. The grain methanol extracts were analysed for phenolics using spectrophotometry while antioxidant activity was determined using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method. Heat treatment led to a reduction in protein digestibility, the effect being higher in popped than in roasted samples. Viscosities for roasted grain amaranth gruels were significantly higher than those obtained from raw and popped grain amaranth gruels. The results for pasting properties were consistent with the results for viscosity. In both A. hypochondriacus L. and A. cruentus L., the order of the viscosity values was roasted>raw>popped. The viscosities were also generally lower for A. cruentus L. compared to A. hypochondriacus L. Raw samples for both A. hypochondriacus L. and A. cruentus L. did not significantly differ in total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and total antioxidant activity values. Thermal processing led to an increase in TFC and antioxidant activity. However, TPC of heat-processed samples remained unchanged. From the results, it can be concluded that heat treatment enhances antioxidant activity of grain amaranth and causes rheological changes dependent on the nature of heat treatment.

  16. Evidence of Non-local Chemical, Thermal and Gravitational Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu H.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum entanglement is ubiquitous in the microscopic world and manifests itself macroscopically under some circumstances. But common belief is that it alone cannot be used to transmit information nor could it be used to produce macroscopic non- local effects. Yet we have recently found evidence of non-local effects of chemical substances on the brain produced through it. While our reported results are under independent verifications by other groups, we report here our experimental findings of non-local chemical, thermal and gravitational effects in simple physical systems such as reservoirs of water quantum-entangled with water being manipulated in a remote reservoir. With the aids of high-precision instruments, we have found that the pH value, temperature and gravity of water in the detecting reservoirs can be non-locally affected through manipulating water in the remote reservoir. In particular, the pH value changes in the same direction as that being manipulated; the temperature can change against that of local environment; and the gravity apparently can also change against local gravity. These non-local effects are all reproducible and can be used for non-local signalling and many other purposes. We suggest that they are mediated by quantum entanglement between nuclear and/or electron spins in treated water and discuss the implications of these results.

  17. Local and systemic effects of unpolymerised monomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulekha Siddharth Gosavi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl methacrylate (MMA, a widely used monomer in dentistry and medicine has been reported to cause abnormalities or lesions in several organs. Experimental and clinical studies have documented that monomers may cause a wide range of adverse health effects such as irritation to skin, eyes, and mucous membranes, allergic dermatitis, stomatitis, asthma, neuropathy, disturbances of the central nervous system, liver toxicity, and fertility disturbances.

  18. Locality effects on bifurcation paradigm of L-H transition in tokamak plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonyarit Chatthong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The locality effects on bifurcation paradigm of L-H transition phenomenon in magnetic confinement plasmas are investigated. One dimensional thermal transport equation with both neoclassical and anomalous transports effects included is considered, where a flow shear due to pressure gradient component is included as a transport suppression mechanism. Three different locally driven models for anomalous transport are considered, including a constant transport model, pressure gradient driven transport model, and critical pressure gradient threshold transport model. Local stability analysis shows that the transition occurs at a threshold flux with hysteresis nature only if ratio of anomalous strength over neoclassical transport exceeds a critical value. The depth of the hysteresis loop depends on both neoclassical and anomalous transports, as well as the suppression strength. The reduction of the heat flux required to maintain H-mode can be as low as a factor of two, which is similar to experimental evidence.

  19. Thermal grill conditioning: Effect on contact heat evoked potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzeler, Catherine R.; Warner, Freda M.; Wanek, Johann; Curt, Armin; Kramer, John L. K.

    2017-01-01

    The ‘thermal grill illusion’ (TGI) is a unique cutaneous sensation of unpleasantness, induced through the application of interlacing warm and cool stimuli. While previous studies have investigated optimal parameters and subject characteristics to evoke the illusion, our aim was to examine the modulating effect as a conditioning stimulus. A total of 28 healthy control individuals underwent three testing sessions on separate days. Briefly, 15 contact heat stimuli were delivered to the right hand dorsum, while the left palmar side of the hand was being conditioned with either neutral (32 °C), cool (20 °C), warm (40 °C), or TGI (20/40 °C). Rating of perception (numeric rating scale: 0–10) and evoked potentials (i.e., N1 and N2P2 potentials) to noxious contact heat stimuli were assessed. While cool and warm conditioning decreased cortical responses to noxious heat, TGI conditioning increased evoked potential amplitude (N1 and N2P2). In line with other modalities of unpleasant conditioning (e.g., sound, visual, and olfactory stimulation), cortical and possibly sub-cortical modulation may underlie the facilitation of contact heat evoked potentials. PMID:28079118

  20. Effects of heat treatment on properties of boron nitride fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Duan; ZHANG ChangRui; LI Bin; CAO Feng; WANG SiQing

    2012-01-01

    The boron nitride fibers were heated at the range of 600-1400°C in flowing nitrogen and air,respectively,and the effects of heat treatment on the structure,composition and morphology of BN fibers were studied.The results showed that BN fibers exhibited smooth surfaces,and that t-BN was the main phase with a little B2O3 included.After heat treatment at 1400°C in nitrogen atmosphere,the fibers displayed rough surfaces with little change in mass.Better crystallinity was obtained with the increasing temperature.During heat treatment in air,the fibers were oxidized severely as the temperature went up,especially at 1400°C.The volatilization of B2O3,HBO2 and H3BO3 led to the pores on the surfaces of the fibers,while the boron oxide glaze and nitrogen gas produced during the oxidation process protected the fibers from further oxidation.

  1. Effects of very high turbulence on convective heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, R. J.; Maciejewski, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of high-intensity, large-scale turbulence on turbulent boundary-layer heat transfer are studied. Flow fields were produced with turbulence intensities up to 40% and length scales up to several times the boundary layer thickness. In addition, three different types of turbulence will be compared to see whether they have the same effect on the boundary layer. The three are: the far field of a free jet, flow downstream of a grid, and flow downstream of a simulated gas turbine combustor. Each turbulence field will be characterized by several measures: intensity (by component), scale, and spectrum. Heat transfer will be measured on a 2.5 m long, 0.5 m wide flat plate using the energy-balance technique. The same plate will be used in each of the four flow fields; a low-turbulence tunnel for baseline data, and the three flow situations mentioned.

  2. Influence of local spin polarization to the Kondo effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huan; GUO Wei

    2007-01-01

    We use the spin non-degenerate single impurity Anderson model to investigate the influence of the local spin polarization to the Kondo effect. By using the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, we obtain a generalized s-d exchange Hamiltonian, which describes the interaction between a polarized local spin and conduction electrons. In this case, the singlet is no longer an eigenstate as shown by variational calculations where the splitting of the local energy △= εd↑ - εd↓ can be arbitrarily small. The local spin polarization generates the instability of the singlet ground state of the S = 1/2 s-d exchange model.

  3. Topology, locality, and Aharonov-Bohm effect with neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Peshkin, M; Peshkin, Murray; Lipkin, H J

    1995-01-01

    Recent neutron interferometry experiments have been interpreted as demonstrating a new topological phenomenon similar in principle to the usual Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect, but with the neutron's magnetic moment replacing the electron's charge. We show that the new phenomenon, called Scalar AB (SAB) effect, follows from an ordinary local interaction, contrary to the usual AB effect, and we argue that the SAB effect is not a topological effect by any useful definition. We find that SAB actually measures an apparently novel spin autocorrelation whose operator equations of motion contain the local torque in the magnetic field. We note that the same remarks apply to the Aharonov-Casher effect.

  4. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  5. Effects of Latent Heating on Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-02-01

    The growing number of observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) has provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these objects. Directly imaged planets share similar observations and can be viewed as low-gravity versions of BDs. Vigorous condensate cycles of chemical species in their atmospheres are inferred by observations and theoretical studies, and latent heating associated with condensation is expected to be important in shaping atmospheric circulation and influencing cloud patchiness. We present a qualitative description of the mechanisms by which condensational latent heating influences circulation, and then illustrate them using an idealized general circulation model that includes a condensation cycle of silicates with latent heating and molecular weight effect due to the rainout of the condensate. Simulations with conditions appropriate for typical T dwarfs exhibit the development of localized storms and east-west jets. The storms are spatially inhomogeneous, evolving on a timescale of hours to days and extending vertically from the condensation level to the tropopause. The fractional area of the BD covered by active storms is small. Based on a simple analytic model, we quantitatively explain the area fraction of moist plumes and show its dependence on the radiative timescale and convective available potential energy (CAPE). We predict that if latent heating dominates cloud formation processes, the fractional coverage area of clouds decreases as the spectral type goes through the L/T transition from high to lower effective temperature. This is a natural consequence of the variation of the radiative timescale and CAPE with the spectral type.

  6. Climatic impact of urbanization in Eastern China: modeling the combined urban heat island and aerosol effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Y.; Yang, B.; Zhao, C.; Leung, L. R.; Yan, H.; Fan, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we investigate the climatic impact of urbanization, including both Urban Heat Island (UHI) and aerosol effects, over the Yangtze-Delta metropolitan clusters region of Eastern China, based on a series of simulations with prescribed land use/land cover and emissions of aerosols and their precursors for the 2000s and 1970s , respectively. We conduct simulations for each land use/land cover and emission scenario from 2006-2010 using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, with online chemistry/aerosol and urban canopy models, at a 3-km grid spacing. Overall the model can reasonably capture the spatial pattern of temperature and precipitation as well as the phase of precipitation diurnal cycle in summer. Simulations results show a very clear UHI effect, i.e. expanded urban surface decreases surface latent heat flux, increases sensible heat flux and PBL height, and reduces surface wind over urban areas, with a more significant change in summer. Aerosol has much less obvious impact on local surface heat flux and temperature, but shows more remote impacts downwind due to dispersion and transport of pollutants and aerosol-cloud interaction. Aerosol also has a larger impact on precipitation amount and areal coverage than UHI. While UHI increases precipitation over urban regions during daytime especially when the southeasterly monsoonal flow prevails, aerosol remarkably suppresses precipitation, especially for light to moderate rain events, and increases the frequency of dry days in the entire model region.

  7. Effect of High Pressure and Heat on Bacterial Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Margosch

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the inactivation of microorganisms by high pressure treatment is a subject of intense investigations, the effect of high pressure on bacterial toxins has not been studied so far. In this study, the influence of combined pressure/temperature treatment (0.1 to 800 MPa and 5 to 121 °C on bacterial enterotoxins was determined. Therefore, heat-stable enterotoxin (STa of cholera toxin (CT from Vibrio cholerae, staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, haemolysin BL (HBL from Bacillus cereus, and Escherichia coli (STa were subjected to different treatment schemes. Structural alterations were monitored in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs. Cytotoxicity of the pressure treated supernatant of toxigenic B. cereus DSM 4384 was investigated with Vero cells. High pressure of 200 to 800 MPa at 5 °C leads to a slight increase of the reactivity of the STa of E. coli. However, reactivity decreased at 800 MPa and 80 °C to (66±21 % after 30 min and to (44±0.3 % after 128 min. At ambient pressure no decrease in EIA reactivity could be observed after 128 min. Pressurization (0.1 to 800 MPa of heat stable monomeric staphylococcal toxins at 5 and 20 °C showed no effect. A combined heat (80 °C and pressure (0.1 to 800 MPa treatment lead to a decrease in the immuno-reactivity to 20 % of its maximum. For cholera toxin a significant loss in latex agglutination was observable only at 80 °C and 800 MPa for holding times higher than 20 min. Interestingly, the immuno-reactivity of B. cereus HBL toxin increased with the increase of pressure (182 % at 800 MPa, 30 °C, and high pressure showed only minor effects on cytotoxicity to Vero cells. Our results indicate that pressurization can increase inactivation observed by heat treatment, and combined treatments may be effective at lower temperatures and/or shorter incubation time.

  8. Heat Capacity of PbS: Isotope Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Cardona, M.; Kremer, R. K.; Lauck, R.; Siegle, G.; Serrano, J.; Romero, A. H.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the availability of highly pure stable isotopes has made possible the investigation of the dependence of the physical properties of crystals, in particular semiconductors, on their isotopic composition. Following the investigation of the specific heat ($C_p$, $C_v$) of monatomic crystals such as diamond, silicon, and germanium, similar investigations have been undertaken for the tetrahedral diatomic systems ZnO and GaN (wurtzite structure), for which the effect of the mass of...

  9. Effect of Mantle Rheology on Viscous Heating induced during Ice Sheet Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pingping; Wu, Patrick; van der Wal, Wouter

    2017-04-01

    Hanyk et al. (2005) studied the viscous shear heating in the mantle induced by the surface loading and unloading of a parabolic-shaped Laurentide-size ice sheet. They found that for linear rheology, viscous heating is mainly concentrated below the ice sheet. The depth extent of the heating in the mantle is determined by the viscosity distribution. Also, the magnitude of viscous heating is significantly affected by the rate of ice thickness change. However, only one ice sheet has been considered in their work and the interactions between ice sheets and ocean loading have been neglected. Furthermore, only linear rheology has been considered, although they suggested that non-Newtonian rheology may have a stronger effect. Here we follow Hanyk et al. (2005) and computed the viscous dissipation for viscoelastic models using the finite element methodology of Wu (2004) and van der Wal et al. (2010). However, the global ICE6G model (Peltier et al. 2015) with realistic oceans is used here to provide the surface loading. In addition, viscous heating in non-linear rheology, composite rheology, in addition to linear rheology with uniform or VM5a profile are computed and compared. Our results for linear rheology mainly confirm the findings of Hanyk et al. (2005). For both non-linear and composite rheologies, viscous heating is also mainly distributed near and under the ice sheets, but, more concentrated; depending on the horizontal dimension of the ice sheet, it can extend into the lower mantle, but for some of the time, not as deep as that for linear rheology. For composite rheology, the viscous heating is dominated by the effect of non-linear relation between the stress and the strain. The ice history controls the time when the local maximum in viscous heating appears. However, the magnitude of the viscous heating is affected by mantle rheology as well as the ice loading. Due to viscosity stratification, the shape of the region with high viscous heating in model VM5a is a

  10. Effect of heat flux on differential rotation in turbulent convection

    CERN Document Server

    Kleeorin, N

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effect of the turbulent heat flux on the Reynolds stresses in a rotating turbulent convection. To this end we solved a coupled system of dynamical equations which includes the equations for the Reynolds stresses, the entropy fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux. We used a spectral $\\tau$ approximation in order to close the system of dynamical equations. We found that the ratio of the contributions to the Reynolds stresses caused by the turbulent heat flux and the anisotropic eddy viscosity is of the order of $\\sim 10 (L_\\rho / l_0)^2$, where $l_{0}$ is the maximum scale of turbulent motions and $L_\\rho$ is the fluid density variation scale. This effect is crucial for the formation of the differential rotation and should be taken into account in the theories of the differential rotation of the Sun, stars and planets. In particular, we demonstrated that this effect may cause the differential rotation which is comparable with the typical solar differential rotation.

  11. Responding to the Effects of Extreme Heat: Baltimore City's Code Red Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Heat response plans are becoming increasingly more common as US cities prepare for heat waves and other effects of climate change. Standard elements of heat response plans exist, but plans vary depending on geographic location and distribution of vulnerable populations. Because heat events vary over time and affect populations differently based on vulnerability, it is difficult to compare heat response plans and evaluate responses to heat events. This article provides an overview of the Baltimore City heat response plan, the Code Red program, and discusses the city's response to the 2012 Ohio Valley/Mid Atlantic Derecho, a complex heat event. Challenges with and strategies for evaluating the program are reviewed and shared.

  12. Effect of Heat Leak and Finite Thermal Capacity on the Optimal Configuration of a Two-Heat-Reservoir Heat Engine for Another Linear Heat Transfer Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Wu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Based on a model of a two-heat-reservoir heat engine with a finite high-temperature source and bypass heat leak, the optimal configuration of the cycle is found for the fixed cycle period with another linear heat transfer law . The finite thermal capacity source without heat leak makes the configuration of the cycle to a class of generalized Carnot cycle. The configuration of the cycle with heat leak and finite thermal capacity source is different from others.

  13. The effect of external boundary conditions on condensation heat transfer in rotating heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, T. C.; Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows the importance of external boundary conditions on the overall performance of a rotating heat pipe condenser. Data are presented for the boundary conditions of constant heat flux and constant wall temperature for rotating heat pipes containing either pure vapor or a mixture of vapor and noncondensable gas as working fluid.

  14. Protective effects of ectoine on heat-stressed Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Bownik; Zofia, Stępniewska; Tadeusz, Skowroński

    2014-12-01

    Ectoine (ECT) is an amino acid produced and accumulated by halophilic bacteria in stressful conditions in order to prevent the loss of water from the cell. There is a lack of knowledge on the effects of ECT in heat-stressed aquatic animals. The purpose of our study was to determine the influence of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress with two temperature gradients: 1 and 0.1 °C/min in the range of 23-42 °C. Time to immobilisation, survival during recovery, swimming performance, heart rate, thoracic limb movement and the levels of heat shock protein 70 kDa 1A (HSP70 1A), catalase (CAT) and nitric oxide species (NOx) were determined in ECT-exposed and unexposed daphnids; we showed protective effects of ECT on Daphnia magna subjected to heat stress. Time to immobilisation of daphnids exposed to ECT was longer when compared to the unexposed animals. Also, survival rate during the recovery of daphnids previously treated with ECT was higher. ECT significantly attenuated a rapid increase of mean swimming velocity which was elevated in the unexposed daphnids. Moreover, we observed elevation of thoracic limb movement and modulation of heart rate in ECT-exposed animals. HSP70 1A and CAT levels were reduced in the presence of ECT. On the other hand, NOx level was slightly elevated in both ECT-treated and unexposed daphnids, however slightly higher NOx level was found in ECT-treated animals. We conclude that the exposure to ectoine has thermoprotective effects on Daphnia magna, however their mechanisms are not associated with the induction of HSP70 1A.

  15. Mitigating the Urban Heat Island Effect in Megacity Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Sodoudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities demonstrate higher nocturnal temperatures than surrounding rural areas, which is called “urban heat island” (UHI effect. Climate change projections also indicate increase in the frequency and intensity of heat waves, which will intensify the UHI effect. As megacity Tehran is affected by severe heatwaves in summer, this study investigates its UHI characteristics and suggests some feasible mitigation strategies in order to reduce the air temperature and save energy. Temperature monitoring in Tehran shows clear evidence of the occurrence of the UHI effect, with a peak in July, where the urban area is circa 6 K warmer than the surrounding areas. The mobile measurements show a park cool island of 6-7 K in 2 central parks, which is also confirmed by satellite images. The effectiveness of three UHI mitigation strategies high albedo material (HAM, greenery on the surface and on the roofs (VEG, and a combination of them (HYBRID has been studied using simulation with the microscale model ENVI-met. All three strategies show higher cooling effect in the daytime. The average nocturnal cooling effect of VEG and HYBRID (0.92, 1.10 K is much higher than HAM (0.16 K, although high-density trees show a negative effect on nocturnal cooling.

  16. Influence of compression-expansion effect on oscillating-flow heat transfer in a finned heat exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke TANG; Juan YU; Tao JIN; Zhi-hua GAN

    2013-01-01

    Compression and expansion of a working gas due to the pressure oscillation of an oscillating flow can lead to a temperature variation of the working gas,which will affect the heat transfer in the oscillating flow.This study focuses on the impact of the compression-expansion effect,indicated by the pressure ratio,on the heat transfer in a finned heat exchanger under practical operating conditions of the ambient-temperature heat exchangers in Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerators.The experimental results summarized as the Nusselt number are presented for analysis.An increase in the pressure ratio can result in a marked rise in the Nussclt number,which indicates that the compression-expansion effect should be considered in characterizing the heat transfer of the oscillating flow,especially in the cases with a higher Valensi number and a lower maximum Reynolds number.

  17. Locality of the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Kicheon

    2014-01-01

    We address the question of the locality versus nonlocality in the Aharonov-Bohm and the Aharonov-Casher effects. For this purpose, we investigate all possible configurations of ideal shielding of the overlap between the electromagnetic fields generated by a charge and by a magnetic flux, and analyze their consequences on the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interference. In a classical treatment of shielding, the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher effect vanishes regardless of the geometry of shielding, when the local...

  18. Effects of the chemical reaction and heat generation or absorption on a mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical stretching sheet with nonuniform slot mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samyuktha, N.; Ravindran, R.; Ganapathirao, M.

    2017-01-01

    An analysis is performed to study the effects of the chemical reaction and heat generation or absorption on a steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical stretching sheet with nonuniform slot mass transfer. The governing boundary layer equations with boundary conditions are transformed into the dimensionless form by a group of nonsimilar transformations. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained numerically by solving the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations using the quasi-linearization technique combined with an implicit finite difference scheme. The numerical computations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters to display the distributions of the velocity, temperature, concentration, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, and local Sherwood number. The results obtained indicate that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers increase with nonuniform slot suction, but nonuniform slot injection produces the opposite effect. The local Nusselt number decreases with heat generation and increases with heat absorption.

  19. Governing Uncertainties in Sustainable Energy Transitions - Insights from Local Heat Supply in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Bornemann, Basil; Schmidt, Stephan; Schubert, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The governance of sustainable energy transitions (SET) is facing multiple technological, economic, societal and political uncertainties. In practice, these energy-related uncertainties play a role not only at the level of “major politics,” but also in the policymaking of local decision makers and planners. This paper seeks to attain a more differentiated understanding of how uncertainties concerning the energy transition play out and are dealt with in policymaking and planning “on the ground....

  20. Governing Uncertainties in Sustainable Energy Transitions—Insights from Local Heat Supply in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Basil Bornemann; Stephan Schmidt; Susanne Schubert

    2016-01-01

    The governance of sustainable energy transitions (SET) is facing multiple technological, economic, societal and political uncertainties. In practice, these energy-related uncertainties play a role not only at the level of “major politics,” but also in the policymaking of local decision makers and planners. This paper seeks to attain a more differentiated understanding of how uncertainties concerning the energy transition play out and are dealt with in policymaking and planning “on the ground....

  1. Effective zero index in locally resonant acoustic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xue-Feng, E-mail: ernestzhu.nju@gmail.com

    2013-10-30

    Here in locally resonant acoustic material, it is shown that effective zero refractive index can be constructed by the resonant unit-cells with coherent degenerate monopole–dipole momenta. Due to strong local resonances, the material layers with effective zero refractive index can function as a resonant cavity of high Q factor, where a subtle deviation from the resonant frequency may result in distinct increase of reflection. Full-wave simulations are performed to demonstrate some unusual wave transport properties such as invisibility cloaking, super-reflection, local field enhancement, and wavefronts rotation.

  2. Local Convective Heat Transfer from Small Heaters to Impinging Submerged Axisymmetric Jets of Seven Coolants with Prandtl Number Ranging from 0.7 to 348

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Sun; C.F.Ma; 等

    1997-01-01

    Using seven working fluids,a systematic experimental study was performed to investigate the local convective heat transfer from vertical heaters to impinging circular submerged jets in the range of Reynolds number between 1.17×102 and 3.69×104 with the emphasis placed on the examination of Prandtl number dependence.Heat transfer coefficients at the stagnation point were collected and correlated with the plate held within and beyond the potential core.Radial distribution of the local heat transfer coefficient was measured with five test liquids.Based on the measured profiles of the local heat transfer,a correlation was developed to cover the entire range of the adial distance.Basides the present data,the correlations developed in this work were also compared with a large quantity of available data of circular air jets.General agreement was observed between the air data and the correlations.

  3. Soret-Dufour Effects on Hydromagnetic Non-Darcy Convective-Radiative Heat and Mass Transfer over a Stretching Sheet in Porous Medium with Viscous Dissipation and Ohmic Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulal Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is devoted to investigate the effects of Soret and Dufour on the mixed convection flow, heat and mass transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of viscous dissipation, Ohmic heating, thermal radiation in porous medium. Numerical solutions for the coupled governing equations are obtained by using the fifth-order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method with shooting technique. Important features of flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics for different values of the physical parameters are analyzed and discussed. Numerical results reveal that the magnetic field and inertia coefficient reduce the skin friction but reverse effects are seen on local Nusselt number.

  4. The Effect of Restriction Shape On Laminar Natural Convection Heat Transfer InA Vertical Circular Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Ahmed Mohammed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated for laminar air flow in a vertical circular tube by using the boundary condition of constant wall heat flux in the ranges of (RaL from (1.1*109 to (4.7*109. The experimental set-up was designed for determining the effect of different types of restrictions placed at entry of heated tube in bottom position, on the surface temperature distribution and on the local and average heat transfer coefficients. The apparatus was made with an electrically heated cylinder of a length (900mm and diameter (30mm. The entry restrictions were included a circular tube of same diameter as the heated cylinder but with lengths of (60cm, 120cm, sharp-edge and bell-mouth. The surface temperature along the cylinder surface for same heat flux would be higher values for circular restriction with length of (120cm and would be smaller values for bell-mouth restriction. The results show that the local Nusselt number (Nux and average Nusselt number are higher for bell-mouth restriction and smaller values for (120cm restriction. For all entry shape restrictions, the results show that the Nusselt number values increases as the heat flux increases. From the present work an empirical correlations were obtained in a form of (Log versus (Log for each case investigated and obtained a general correlation for all cases which reveals the effect of restriction existence on the natural convection heat transfer process in a vertical circular tube.

  5. Ventilation effectiveness : health benefits of heat recovery ventilators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-08-15

    Studies have shown that the installation of a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) in homes in northern Canada could improve indoor air quality and the respiratory health of inhabitants. Low ventilation rates are common in many homes in the North because the climate is severe, homes are smaller and lack basements, and occupancies are higher, leading to unhealthy indoor air quality. Northern communities also have a high rate of respiratory infections. HRVs recover much of the energy used to ventilate, which is desirable in cold regions with high heating costs. For the study, the test sample was divided into two types of houses, notably houses with active HRVs and those with control HRVs that were installed and operated but that did not function. The study results showed that HRVs provided increased ventilation. Complaints by residents about HRV noise, discomfort, or low humidity were common but equally spread between those with active and placebo HRVs. The study showed that the system design needs to be improved to better suit the needs of Inuit families. The nature of northern housing presents installation and maintenance challenges. It is hard to retrofit HRV ducting inside small, existing houses, and building supplies arrive infrequently, so detailed planning and careful take-offs of all supplies and materials must be done well in advance of construction. In addition, contractors are hard to locate and have variable expertise, and there is little technical follow-up. Robust technical support by local contractors and housing authorities is therefore important. 2 refs.

  6. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz [I] relation: Bo(exp 1/2) = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambda(sub D) apart, where lambda(sub D) = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rho(sub l) - rho(sub v)](exp 1/2) = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo(exp -1/2) = square root of 3 lambda(sub c

  7. The effects of air leaks on solar air heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, R.; Cash, M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine the effects of leakages in collector and duct work on the system performance of a typical single-family residence solar air heating system. Positive (leakage out) and negative (leakage in) pressure systems were examined. Collector and duct leakage rates were varied from 10 to 30 percent of the system flow rate. Within the range of leakage rates investigated, solar contribution to heated space and domestic hot water loads was found to be reduced up to 30 percent from the no-leak system contribution with duct leakage equally divided between supply and return duct; with supply duct leakage greater than return leakage a reduction of up to 35 percent was noted. The negative pressure system exhibited a reduction in solar contribution somewhat larger than the positive pressure system for the same leakage rates.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure Characteristics of Laser Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yuanbin; Li, Yajiang; Yang, Qingqing; Liu, Yan; Ren, Guocheng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, effect of heat treatment on the microstructures and wear properties of laser alloying (LA) composites is investigated. LA of the T-Co50/FeSi/TiC/TiN/CeO2 mixed powders on substrate of 45 steel can form the hard composites, which increased the wear resistance of substrate greatly. Such LA composites were investigated by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The tempering promoted the growth of the block-shape hard phases, favoring an enhancement of the integrity of block-shape hard phases; and tempering also improved greatly the formation mechanism, guarantying the composites to have enough ability of intensity transfer. This research provided essential experiment and theoretical basis to promote the application of the laser and heat treatment technologies in the field of surface modification.

  9. Optofluidic microring flowmeter based on heat transfer effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuan; Zhang, Minglei; Gong, Chaoyang; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yunjiang; Fan, Xudong

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate an optofluidic flow rate sensor based on the heat transfer effect in a microfluidic channel for the lab-on-a-chip applications. By employing an optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR), the wavelength shift of the resonant dip of the whispering gallery mode is detected as a function of the flow rate when the flow is heated by a 1480 nm laser. A measurement range of 2 μL/min - 100 μL/min, a minimum detectable change of 30 nL/min for the flow rate detection are achieved. Experimental results indicate that the OFRR flow rate sensor has good repeatability and the inverse sensitivity is beneficial for detecting the low flow rate with high sensitivity.

  10. Effect of segmental baffles on the shell-and-tube heat exchanger effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukić Mića V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the results of the experimental investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer in laboratory experimental shell-and-tube heat exchanger are presented. Shell-and-tube heat exchanger is with one pass of warm water on the shell side and two passes of cool water in tube bundle. Shell-and-tube heat exchanger is with 24x2 tubes (U-tube in triangle layout. During each experimental run, the pressure drops and the fluid temperatures on shell side, along the shell-and-tube heat exchanger (at positions defined in advance have been measured. Special attention was made to the investigation of the segmental baffles number influence of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger effectiveness.

  11. The effect of Peltier heat during current activated densification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A.; Angst, S.; Schmitz, A.; Engenhorst, M.; Stoetzel, J.; Gautam, D.; Wiggers, H.; Wolf, D. E.; Schierning, G.; Schmechel, R.

    2012-07-01

    It is shown that current-activated pressure-assisted densification (CAPAD) is sensitive to the Peltier effect. Under CAPAD, the Peltier effect leads to a significant redistribution of heat within the sample during the densification. The densification of highly p-doped silicon nanoparticles during CAPAD and the properties of the obtained samples are investigated experimentally and by computer simulation. Both, simulation and experiments, indicate clearly a higher temperature on the cathode side and a decreasing temperature from the center to the outer shell. Furthermore, computer simulations provide additional insights into the temperature profile which explain the anisotropic properties of the measured sample.

  12. Radiation effect on viscous flow of a nanofluid and heat transfer over a nonlinearly stretching sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hady, Fekry M; Ibrahim, Fouad S; Abdel-Gaied, Sahar M; Eid, Mohamed R

    2012-04-22

    In this work, we study the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a viscous nanofluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet in the presence of thermal radiation, included in the energy equation, and variable wall temperature. A similarity transformation was used to transform the governing partial differential equations to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. An efficient numerical shooting technique with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme was used to obtain the solution of the boundary value problem. The variations of dimensionless surface temperature, as well as flow and heat-transfer characteristics with the governing dimensionless parameters of the problem, which include the nanoparticle volume fraction ϕ, the nonlinearly stretching sheet parameter n, the thermal radiation parameter NR, and the viscous dissipation parameter Ec, were graphed and tabulated. Excellent validation of the present numerical results has been achieved with the earlier nonlinearly stretching sheet problem of Cortell for local Nusselt number without taking the effect of nanoparticles.

  13. Effectiveness of exercise-heat acclimation for preventing heat illness in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumio

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of heat-related illness in the workplace is linked to whether or not workers have acclimated to a hot environment. Heat acclimation improves endurance work performance in the heat and thermal comfort at a given work rate. These improvements are achieved by increased sweating and skin blood flow responses, better fluid balance and cardiovascular stability. As a practical means of acclimatizing the body to heat stress, daily aerobic exercise training is recommended since thermoregulatory capacity and blood volume increase with physical fitness. In workers wearing personal protective suits in hot environments, however, little psychophysiological benefit is received from short-term exercise training and/or heat acclimation because of the ineffectiveness of sweating for heat dissipation and the aggravation of thermal discomfort with the accumulation of sweat within the suit. For a manual laborer who works under uncompensable heat stress, better management of the work rate, the work environment and health is required.

  14. Locality of the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kicheon

    2015-05-01

    We address the question of locality versus nonlocality in the Aharonov-Bohm and the Aharonov-Casher effects. For this purpose, we investigate all possible configurations of ideal shielding of the overlap between the electromagnetic fields generated by a charge and by a magnetic flux and analyze their consequences on the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interference. In a classical treatment of shielding, the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher effect vanishes regardless of the geometry of shielding when the local overlap of electromagnetic fields is completely eliminated. On the other hand, the result depends on the configuration of shielding if the charge quantization in the superconducting shield is taken into account. It is shown that our results are fully understood in terms of the fluctuating local-field interaction. Our analysis strongly supports the alternative view on the Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interference that the effects originate from the local action of electromagnetic fields.

  15. Effect of Heat (Arrhenius Effect) on Crude Hemolysin of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwatani, Toshio; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Sakurai, Jun; Yoshihara, Akiko; Taga, Sekiko

    1972-01-01

    Crude hemolysins prepared from various strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which give positive Kanagawa phenomenon, were partly inactivated by heating at 60 C, but not inactivated significantly by heating at 80 to 90 C. The similar phenomenon has been reported as the Arrhenius effect in staphylococcal alpha toxin. Images PMID:4638496

  16. Measurement of local convective heat transfer coefficients from a smooth and roughened NACA-0012 airfoil - Flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fossen, G. James; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Newton, James E.; Poinsatte, Phillip E.

    1988-01-01

    Wind tunnels typically have higher free stream turbulence levels than are found in flight. Turbulence intensity was measured to be 0.5 percent in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the cloud making sprays off and around 2 percent with cloud making equipment on. Turbulence intensity for flight conditions was found to be too low to make meaningful measurements for smooth air. This difference between free stream and wind tunnel conditions has raised questions as to the validity of results obtained in the IRT. One objective of these tests was to determine the effect of free stream turbulence on convective heat transfer for the NASA Lewis LEWICE ice growth prediction code. These tests provide in-flight heat transfer data for a NASA-0012 airfoil with a 533 cm chord. Future tests will measure heat transfer data from the same airfoil in the Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Roughness was obtained by the attachment of small, 2 mm diameter hemispheres of uniform size to the airfoil in three different patterns. Heat transfer measurements were recorded in flight on the NASA Lewis Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft. Measurements were taken for the smooth and roughened surfaces at various aircraft speeds and angles of attack up to four degrees. Results are presented as Frossling number versus position on the airfoil for various roughnesses and angles of attack.

  17. Measurement of local convective heat transfer coefficients from a smooth and roughened NACA-0012 airfoil: Flight test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, James E.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Phillip E.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Wind tunnels typically have higher free stream turbulence levels than are found in flight. Turbulence intensity was measured to be 0.5 percent in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the cloud making sprays off and around 2 percent with cloud making equipment on. Turbulence intensity for flight conditions was found to be too low to make meaningful measurements for smooth air. This difference between free stream and wing tunnel conditions has raised questions as to the validity of results obtained in the IRT. One objective of these tests was to determine the effect of free stream turbulence on convective heat transfer for the NASA Lewis LEWICE ice growth prediction code. These tests provide in-flight heat transfer data for a NASA-0012 airfoil with a 533 cm chord. Future tests will measure heat transfer data from the same airfoil in the Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Roughness was obtained by the attachment of small, 2 mm diameter hemispheres of uniform size to the airfoil in three different patterns. Heat transfer measurements were recorded in flight on the NASA Lewis Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft. Measurements were taken for the smooth and roughened surfaces at various aircraft speeds and angles of attack up to four degrees. Results are presented as Frossling number versus position on the airfoil for various roughnesses and angles of attack.

  18. Three-dimensional numerical analysis of convection and conduction cooling of spherical biocrystals with localized heating from synchrotron X-ray beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaisekar, Ashutosh; Kazmierczak, Michael J; Banerjee, Rupak

    2005-05-01

    The differential momentum and thermal energy equations for fluid flow and convective heat-transfer around the sample biocrystal, with coupled internal heat conduction, are solved using advanced computational fluid dynamics techniques. Average \\bar{h} as well as local h(theta) values of the convective heat-transfer coefficients are obtained from the fundamental equations. The results of these numerical solutions show the three-dimensional fluid flow field around the sample in conjunction with the detailed internal temperature distribution inside the crystal. The external temperature rise and maximum internal temperature increase are reported for various cases. The effect of the important system parameters, such as gas velocity and properties, crystal size and thermal conductivity and incident beam conditions (intensity and beam size), are all illustrated with comparative examples. For the reference case, an external temperature rise of 7 K and internal temperature increase of 0.5 K are calculated for a 200 microm-diameter cryocooled spherical biocrystal subjected to a 13 keV X-ray beam of 4 x 10(14) photons s(-1) mm(-2) flux density striking half the sample. For all the cases investigated, numerical analysis shows that the controlling thermal resistance is the rate of convective heat-transfer and not internal conduction. Thermal diffusion results in efficient thermal spreading of the deposited energy and this results in almost uniform internal crystal temperatures (DeltaT(internal) approximately 0.5 K), in spite of the non-uniform h(theta) with no more than 1.3 K internal temperature difference for the worst case of localized and focused beam heating. Rather, the major temperature variation occurs between the outer surface of the crystal/loop system and the gas stream, T(s) - T(gas), which itself is only about DeltaT(external) approximately 5-10 K, and depends on the thermal loading imposed by the X-ray beam, the rate of convection and the size of the loop

  19. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT.

  20. USE OF LOCAL NATURAL SILICEOUS RAW MATERIAL AND WASTES FOR PRODUCTION OF HEAT-INSULATING FOAMCONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. U. Matsapulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the resource base, reserves and the use of siliceous rocks, their economic feasibility of the use for production of building materials of new generation with low-energy and other costs. Presented are the results of laboratory research and testing technology of production of insulating foam from a composition based on an aqueous solution of sodium silicate obtained from the local siliceous rocks (diatomite and the liquid alkali component - soapstock, hardener from ferrochrome slag and waste carbonate rock able to harden at a low temperature processing ( 100-110 ° C.

  1. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  2. Leading edge film cooling effects on turbine blade heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of spanwise pitch of shower-head holes and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled turbine vane. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. It is found that with the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio fixed, reducing P, the spanwise pitch for shower-head holes, from 7.5 d to 3.0 d, where d is the hole diameter, increases the average effectiveness considerably over the blade surface. However, when P/d= 7.5, increasing the coolant mass flow increases the effectiveness on the pressure surface but reduces it on the suction surface due to coolant jet lift-off. For P/d = 4.5 or 3.0, such an anomaly does not occur within the range of coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios analyzed. In all cases, adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are highly three-dimensional.

  3. Large-scale flow and Reynolds numbers in the presence of boiling in locally heated turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefnagels, Paul B. J.; Wei, Ping; Narezo Guzman, Daniela; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Guenter

    2017-07-01

    We report on an experimental study of the large-scale flow (LSF) and Reynolds numbers in turbulent convection in a cylindrical sample with height equal to its diameter and heated locally around the center of its bottom plate (locally heated convection). The sample size and shape are the same as those of Narezo Guzman et al. [D. Narezo Guzman et al., J. Fluid Mech. 787, 331 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.701; D. Narezo Guzman et al., J. Fluid Mech. 795, 60 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.178]. Measurements are made at a nearly constant Rayleigh number as a function of the mean temperature, both in the presence of controlled boiling (two-phase flow) and for the superheated fluid (one-phase flow). Superheat values Tb-To n up to about 11 K (Tb is the bottom-plate temperature and To n is the lowest Tb at which boiling is observed) are used. The LSF is less organized than it is in (uniformly heated) Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), where it takes the form of a single convection roll. Large-scale-flow-induced sinusoidal azimuthal temperature variations (like those found for RBC) could be detected only in the lower portion of the sample, indicating a less organized flow in the upper portions. Reynolds numbers are determined using the elliptic model (EM) of He and Zhang [G.-W. He and J.-B. Zhang, Phys. Rev. E 73, 055303(R) (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.055303]. We found that for our system the EM is applicable over a wide range of space and time displacements, as long as these displacements are within the inertial range of the temporal and spatial spectrum. At three locations in the sample the results show that the vertical mean-flow velocity component is reduced while the fluctuation velocity is enhanced by the bubbles of the two-phase flow. Enhancements of velocity fluctuations up to about 60% are found at the largest superheat values. Local temperature measurements within the sample reveal temperature oscillations that also used to determine a Reynolds number. These results are

  4. Local description of the molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, Jonas; Larson, Asa

    2013-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is one of the most comprehensible examples of quantum non-locality. The so called molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect displays great similarities with the latter, but still, we show how this effect can be explained using arguments relying solely on locality, whereby we mean that the effect can be traced down to a force acting locally on the phase space distribution. Our method hinges on studying the system in its momentum representation, and introducing a "conjugate gauge potential" which render an everywhere non-zero synthetic magnetic field. The resulting Lorenz force induces a transverse current which can be attributed the equivalence of an intrinsic spin Hall effect. The idea is demonstrated for the linear Exe Jahn-Teller model and applied to the Li3 molecule, for which its corresponding Hamiltonian is obtained by diabatization of ab intio determined adiabatic potential energy surfaces.

  5. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal-insulator transition in VO2 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Hidefumi; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-06-01

    We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO2 nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal-insulator phase transition (MIT) of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO2 nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  6. Local Peltier-effect-induced reversible metal–insulator transition in VO2 nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidefumi Takami

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We report anomalous resistance leaps and drops in VO2 nanowires with operating current density and direction, showing reversible and nonvolatile switching. This event is associated with the metal–insulator phase transition (MIT of local nanodomains with coexistence states of metallic and insulating phases induced by thermoelectric cooling and heating effects. Because the interface of metal and insulator domains has much different Peltier coefficient, it is possible that a significant Peltier effect would be a source of the local MIT. This operation can be realized by one-dimensional domain configuration in VO2 nanowires because one straight current path through the electronic domain-interface enables theoretical control of thermoelectric effects. This result will open a new method of reversible control of electronic states in correlated electron materials.

  7. Effect of surface roughness on rarefied-gas heat transfer in microbearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming, E-mail: wenmingz@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Meng, Guang [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wei, Xue-Yong [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Peng, Zhi-Ke [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-01-30

    In this Letter, the rarefaction and roughness effects on the heat transfer process in gas microbearings are investigated. A heat transfer model is developed by introducing two-variable Weierstrass–Mandelbrot (W–M) function with fractal geometry. The heat transfer problem in the multiscale self-affine rough microbearings at slip flow regime is analyzed and discussed. The results show that rarefaction has more significant effect on heat transfer in rough microbearings with lower fractal dimension. The negative influence of roughness on heat transfer found to be the Nusselt number reduction. The heat transfer performance can be optimized with increasing fractal dimension of the rough surface. -- Highlights: ► A heat transfer model is described with fractal geometry. ► The rarefaction affects the heat transfer under lower fractal dimension. ► The negative influence of roughness on heat transfer is Nusselt number reduction. ► The heat transfer can be optimized with increasing fractal dimension.

  8. Different effects of microwaves and conventional heating on bacteriophage λ proliferation in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Biljana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of bacteriophage λ in E. coli was used as a model to compare the effects of microwaves and conventional heating on cell metabolism. Irradiation was carried out in a single-mode focused reactor at 2.45 GHz, under an absorption rate of 0.8±0.1 W/g and at constant temperature (33°C or 37°C. The kinetic curve of phage release from cells irradiated at 37°C was decreased as compared to the control, but significantly increased at 33°C. This was attributed to local overheating of cells by microwaves. Based on the conventional heating experiments, performed at 33°C, 37°C, 41°C and 45°C, we estimated that microwave-induced overheating inside cells was between 4°C and 8°C. However, this should have a limited effect on virus proliferation at 33°C, contrary to the obtained results. The increased expression of heat shock proteins (HSP was proposed to be responsible for the observed effect of microwaves on virus proliferation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172025 and 172058

  9. Effective Management for National or Local Policy Objectives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; Skou, Mette; Beer, Frederikke

    This research considers the role of local policies and management in affecting street-level bureaucrats’ actions in implementing national policy mandates. The focus on sanctioning behavior by social workers provides a strong test of these effects, given that the behaviors are both visible and have...... services, middle managers, and front-line workers. Key findings are that local politics matters in affecting how municipal policies fit with the national mandate. Management also matters. Greater application of the goal-directed management tools of clearly signaling managerial expectations and recruiting...... workers. Managers’ addressing adverse selection problems seems more effective than coping with moral hazard. The combination of local politicians’ influence on the formation of local policy goals and managers’ influence in getting workers to comply with those indicates a very important role for policy...

  10. Experimental Study of Effect of Air Duct Structures on Heat Dissipation of Heating-Only Fan Coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-zhou; ZHAO Jia-ning

    2009-01-01

    Heating-only fan coil(HFC) is one of the suited end users.which is not only compact but also highly efficient.And the major factors affecting the heat dissipation performance of HFC include leakage through coil bypass,distance between fan and coil,fan structure and air inlet type.Under natural air convection or forced,experimental studies were made on the effects of these factors upon the heat dissipation performance of HFC.The results show that:1)After reducing the leakage through coil bypass,the heat dissipation of HFC in-creases 16.9%under natural convection,and increases 8.3%under forced convection.2)After the distance be-tween fan and coil be raised from 23.2cm to 41.7cm.the heat dissipation of HFC decreases 21.3%under natu-ral convection,but increasesl2.8%under forced convection.3)After changing the fan structure,the heat dissi-pation of HFC increases 41.8%under natural convection.and the heat dissipation per motor power increases 96.1%under forced convection.4)The heat dissipations of HFC with round pass,slit and strip type of air inlet are different,whose proportion is about 100%,110%,136%under natural convection,and 100%,105%,116%under forced convection.

  11. Changes in the localization and levels of starch and lipids in cambium and phloem during cambial reactivation by artificial heating of main stems of Cryptomeria japonica trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Shahanara; Nakaba, Satoshi; Oribe, Yuichiro; Kubo, Takafumi; Funada, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Cambial reactivation in trees occurs from late winter to early spring when photosynthesis is minimal or almost non-existent. Reserve materials might be important for wood formation in trees. The localization and approximate levels of starch and lipids (as droplets) and number of starch granules in cambium and phloem were examined from cambial dormancy to the start of xylem differentiation in locally heated stems of Cryptomeria japonica trees in winter. Methods Electric heating tape was wrapped on one side of the stem of Cryptomeria japonica trees at breast height in winter. The localization and approximate levels of starch and lipids (as droplets) and number of starch granules were determined by image analysis of optical digital images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Key Results Localized heating induced earlier cambial reactivation and xylem differentiation in stems of Cryptomeria japonica, as compared with non-heated stems. There were clear changes in the respective localizations and levels of starch and lipids (as droplets) determined in terms of relative areas on images, from cambial dormancy to the start of xylem differentiation in heated stems. In heated stems, the levels and number of starch granules fell from cambial reactivation to the start of xylem differentiation. There was a significant decrease in the relative area occupied by lipid droplets in the cambium from cambial reactivation to the start of xylem differentiation in heated stems. Conclusions The results showed clearly that the levels and number of storage starch granules in cambium and phloem cells and levels of lipids (as droplets) in the cambium decreased from cambial reactivation to the start of xylem differentiation in heated stems during the winter. The observations suggest that starch and lipid droplets might be needed as sources of energy for the initiation of cambial cell division and the differentiation of xylem in Cryptomeria japonica. PMID:21037242

  12. Capillary layer structure effect upon heat transfer in flat heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinceana, Silviu; Mihai, Ioan; Beniuga, Marius; Suciu, Cornel

    2015-02-01

    The research presented in this paper aimed to determine the maximum heat transfer a heat pipe can achieve. To that purpose the structure of the capillary layer which can be deposited on the walls of the heat pipe was investigated. For the analysis of different materials that can produce capillarity, the present study takes into account the optimal thickness needed for this layer so that the accumulated fluid volume determines a maximum heat transfer. Two materials that could be used to create a capillary layer for the heat pipes, were investigated, one formed by sintered copper granules (the same material by which the heat pipe is formed) and a synthetic material (cellulose sponge) which has high absorbing proprieties. In order to experimentally measure and visualize the surface characteristics for the considered capillary layers, laser profilometry was employed.

  13. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory at INO, CNR, Pisa (Italy); Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel [Physics Department, University of York, York (United Kingdom); Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Evans, Roger G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D. [Physics Department, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory at INO, CNR, Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Levato, Tadzio [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory at INO, CNR, Pisa (Italy); University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Makita, Mikako; Riley, David [Physics Department, Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  14. Probing the local effects of magnetic impurities on superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A.; Jones, B.A.; Lutz, C.P. [Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-21

    The local effects of isolated magnetic adatoms on the electronic properties of the surface of a superconductor were studied with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. Tunneling spectra obtained near magnetic adsorbates reveal the presence of excitations within the superconductor`s energy gap that can be detected over a few atomic diameters around the impurity at the surface. These excitations are locally asymmetric with respect to tunneling of electrons and holes. A model calculation based on the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations can be used to understand the details of the local tunneling spectra. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Effects of deep heating provided by therapeutic ultrasound on demyelinating nerves

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physiotherapeutic heating agents are classified into two groups: superficial-heating agents and deep-heating agents. Therapeutic ultrasound is a deep-heating agent used to treat various musculosketal disorders. Numerous studies have attempted to determine the impact of ultrasound on healthy nerve conduction parameters. However, the instantaneous effects of deep heating via ultrasound on demyelinating nerves do not appear to have been described previously. The present study aimed to ...

  16. Heat engineering characteristics of the radiator for effective electronic equipment cooling systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudenko A. I.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of heat transfer charac-teristics research of the radiator on basis of a heat pipe for cooling of personal computer elements. It is determined that using acetone and ethanol as heat carriers under heat flow density q4·104 W/m2 is preferable. It is shown that the introduced radiators are considerably more effective than the radiators of conventional design with flat heat exchange surface with a rectangle plate fin.

  17. On-farm yield potential of local seed watermelon landraces under heat- and drought-prone conditions in Mali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nantoume, Aminata Dolo; Christiansen, Jørgen Lindskrog; Andersen, Sven Bode;

    2012-01-01

    On-farm yield experiments were carried out in the Tombouctou region of Mali in 2009/10 under heat- and drought-prone desert conditions with three local landraces of seed-type watermelons. The landraces, named Fombou, Kaneye and Musa Musa by the farmers, exhibited distinct characteristics for fruit...... morphology, but in particular for seed traits. On average, the three landraces produced a fruit yield of 11·6 t/ha and an estimated seed yield of 364 kg/ha, with no significant differences among landraces. Kaneye showed the highest stability of fruit number/ha in different field environments, suggesting...... this landrace is the best among the three for a poor growing environment, whereas Fombou and especially Musa Musa responded positively to more favourable environments. Seed weight revealed a different trend, with Fombou as the most responsive to favourable conditions, while Kaneye and Musa Musa were less...

  18. Finite Volume schemes on unstructured grids for non-local models: Application to the simulation of heat transport in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudon, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.goudon@inria.fr [Team COFFEE, INRIA Sophia Antipolis Mediterranee (France); Labo. J.A. Dieudonne CNRS and Univ. Nice-Sophia Antipolis (UMR 7351), Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 02 (France); Parisot, Martin, E-mail: martin.parisot@gmail.com [Project-Team SIMPAF, INRIA Lille Nord Europe, Park Plazza, 40 avenue Halley, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France)

    2012-10-15

    In the so-called Spitzer-Haerm regime, equations of plasma physics reduce to a nonlinear parabolic equation for the electronic temperature. Coming back to the derivation of this limiting equation through hydrodynamic regime arguments, one is led to construct a hierarchy of models where the heat fluxes are defined through a non-local relation which can be reinterpreted as well by introducing coupled diffusion equations. We address the question of designing numerical methods to simulate these equations. The basic requirement for the scheme is to be asymptotically consistent with the Spitzer-Haerm regime. Furthermore, the constraints of physically realistic simulations make the use of unstructured meshes unavoidable. We develop a Finite Volume scheme, based on Vertex-Based discretization, which reaches these objectives. We discuss on numerical grounds the efficiency of the method, and the ability of the generalized models in capturing relevant phenomena missed by the asymptotic problem.

  19. Non-local flow effects on bedform dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, J. Taylor; Kao, Justin; Myrow, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Bedform patterns are sensitive recorders of feedbacks among bed topography, fluid flow, and sediment transport. Some of the most important feedbacks are local. For example, evolution models based on simple flow parameterizations that only incorporate local bed height can reproduce some of the essential features of bedform evolution, including bedform growth and migration. However, non-local effects can also be critically important. For example, field and laboratory measurements have shown that the spacing of most sand ripples generated by wave-driven oscillatory flows is linearly proportional to the amplitude of the flow oscillation, implying that fluid stress and sediment transport at a given location depend on upstream features that perturb the flow. A model that fully captures the coupling of flow and bedform evolution must include such effects, but it is not clear how detailed the description of the flow must be to reproduce the most important aspects of bedform evolution. To account for the most significant non-local flow effects without resorting to a coupled hydrodynamic model, we propose an approximation in which the bed shear stress is expressed as a convolution of the bed topography with a kernel that includes both local effects, such as acceleration over bumps, and non-local effects, such as flow separation and re-attachment. Two-dimensional flow simulations demonstrate that a single, generic kernel gives a good approximation of shear stress over a wide range of bed profiles under oscillatory and some combined flows. Incorporating this approximation into a simple bedform evolution model, we show that non-local effects are required to reproduce the characteristic transient patterns that emerge as wave ripples respond to changes in the flow, which we have documented with time-lapse imagery of laboratory wave tank experiments. We then show how this result informs interpretations of two-dimensional wave ripple patterns preserved in the geologic record.

  20. Convection with local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This book is one of the first devoted to an account of theories of thermal convection which involve local thermal non-equilibrium effects, including a concentration on microfluidic effects. The text introduces convection with local thermal non-equilibrium effects in extraordinary detail, making it easy for readers newer to the subject area to understand. This book is unique in the fact that it addresses a large number of convection theories and provides many new results which are not available elsewhere. This book will be useful to researchers from engineering, fluid mechanics, and applied mathematics, particularly those interested in microfluidics and porous media.

  1. Effects of Surprisal and Locality on Danish Sentence Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Laura Winther; Kizach, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    An eye-tracking experiment in Danish investigates two dominant accounts of sentence processing: locality-based theories that predict a processing advantage for sentences where the distance between the major syntactic heads is minimized, and the surprisal theory which predicts that processing time...... constructions with two postverbal NP-objects. An eye-tracking experiment showed a clear advantage for local syntactic relations, with only a marginal effect of lexicalised surprisal and no effect of syntactic surprisal. We conclude that surprisal has a relatively marginal effect, which may be clearest for verbs...

  2. Nanoparticle heating: nanoscale to bulk effects of electromagnetically heated iron oxide and gold for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhenpeng; Etheridge, Michael; Bischof, John C.

    2011-03-01

    Biomedical applications of nanoparticle heating range in scale from molecular activation (i.e. molecular beacons, protein denaturation, lipid melting and drug release), cellular heating (i.e. nanophotolysis and membrane permeability control and rupture) to whole tumor heating (deep and superficial). This work will present a review on the heating of two classes of biologically compatible metallic nanoparticles: iron oxide and gold with particular focus on spatial and temporal scales of the heating event. The size range of nanoparticles under discussion will focus predominantly in the 10 - 200 nm diameter size range. Mechanisms of heating range from Néelian and Brownian relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility at 100s of kHz, optical absorption due to VIS and NIR lasers and "Joule" heating at higher frequency RF (13.56 MHz). The heat generation of individual nanoparticles and the thermal responses at nano-, micro-, and macroscales are presented. This review will also discuss how to estimate a specific absorption rate (SAR, W/g) based on individual nanoparticles heating in bulk samples. Experimental setups are designed to measure the SAR and the results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  3. Effective Heat Transfer Enhancement in Finned Tube Heat Exchanger with Different Fin Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    During cross flow in a heat exchanger, heat transfer in the front portion of the tube is more compared to back portion of the tube. This is due to less formation of vortices at the backside of the tube. For uniform heat transfer to take place throughout the tube, it is necessary to increase the vortex formation at the rear side of the tube. The aim of this study is to explore the possibilities of improving the flow structure and thereby increasing uniform heat transfer...

  4. Local adaptation constrains the distribution potential of heat-tolerant Symbiodinium from the Persian/Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Cecilia; Hume, Benjamin C C; Burt, John; Smith, Edward G; Achterberg, Eric P; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    The symbiotic association of corals and unicellular algae of the genus Symbiodinium in the southern Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG) display an exceptional heat tolerance, enduring summer peak temperatures of up to 36 °C. As yet, it is not clear whether this resilience is related to the presence of specific symbiont types that are exclusively found in this region. Therefore, we used molecular markers to identify the symbiotic algae of three Porites species along >1000 km of coastline in the PAG and the Gulf of Oman and found that a recently described species, Symbiodinium thermophilum, is integral to coral survival in the southern PAG, the world's hottest sea. Despite the geographic isolation of the PAG, we discovered that representatives of the S. thermophilum group can also be found in the adjacent Gulf of Oman providing a potential source of thermotolerant symbionts that might facilitate the adaptation of Indian Ocean populations to the higher water temperatures expected for the future. However, corals from the PAG associated with S. thermophilum show strong local adaptation not only to high temperatures but also to the exceptionally high salinity of their habitat. We show that their superior heat tolerance can be lost when these corals are exposed to reduced salinity levels common for oceanic environments elsewhere. Consequently, the salinity prevailing in most reefs outside the PAG might represent a distribution barrier for extreme temperature-tolerant coral/Symbiodinium associations from the PAG.

  5. Heat shock proteins: in vivo heat treatments reveal adipose tissue depot-specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert S; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Wheatley, Joshua L; Wright, David C; Geiger, Paige C

    2015-01-01

    Heat treatments (HT) and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) improve whole body and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity while decreasing white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. However, HSPs in WAT have been understudied. The purpose of the present study was to examine patterns of HSP expression in WAT depots, and to examine the effects of a single in vivo HT on WAT metabolism. Male Wistar rats received HT (41°C, 20 min) or sham treatment (37°C), and 24 h later subcutaneous, epididymal, and retroperitoneal WAT depots (SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT, respectively) were removed for ex vivo experiments and Western blotting. SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT from a subset of rats were also cultured separately and received a single in vitro HT or sham treatment. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was greatest in more metabolically active WAT depots (i.e., eWAT and rpWAT) compared with the SCAT. Following HT, HSP72 increased in all depots with the greatest induction occurring in the SCAT. In addition, HSP25 increased in the rpWAT and eWAT, while HSP60 increased in the rpWAT only in vivo. Free fatty acid (FFA) release from WAT explants was increased following HT in the rpWAT only, and fatty acid reesterification was decreased in the rpWAT but increased in the SCAT following HT. HT increased insulin responsiveness in eWAT, but not in SCAT or rpWAT. Differences in HSP expression and induction patterns following HT further support the growing body of literature differentiating distinct WAT depots in health and disease.

  6. Relaxing monotonicity in the identification of local average treatment effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Martin; Mellace, Giovanni

    In heterogeneous treatment effect models with endogeneity, the identification of the local average treatment effect (LATE) typically relies on an instrument that satisfies two conditions: (i) joint independence of the potential post-instrument variables and the instrument and (ii) monotonicity...

  7. Heat acclimation improves intermittent sprinting in the heat but additional pre-cooling offers no further ergogenic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Paul; Mackenzie, Richard W; Maxwell, Neil; Webborn, Anthony D J; Watt, Peter W

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 10 days of heat acclimation with and without pre-cooling on intermittent sprint exercise performance in the heat. Eight males completed three intermittent cycling sprint protocols before and after 10 days of heat acclimation. Before acclimation, one sprint protocol was conducted in control conditions (21.8 ± 2.2°C, 42.8 ± 6.7% relative humidity) and two sprint protocols in hot, humid conditions (33.3 ± 0.6°C, 52.2 ± 6.8% relative humidity) in a randomized order. One hot, humid condition was preceded by 20 min of thigh pre-cooling with ice packs (-16.2 ± 4.5°C). After heat acclimation, the two hot, humid sprint protocols were repeated. Before heat acclimation, peak power output declined in the heat (P < 0.05) but pre-cooling prevented this. Ten days of heat acclimation reduced resting rectal temperature from 37.8 ± 0.3°C to 37.4 ± 0.3°C (P < 0.01). When acclimated, peak power output increased by ∼2% (P < 0.05, main effect) and no reductions in individual sprint peak power output were observed. Additional pre-cooling offered no further ergogenic effect. Unacclimated athletes competing in the heat should pre-cool to prevent reductions in peak power output, but heat acclimate for an increased peak power output.

  8. Charging of heated colloidal particles using the electrolyte Seebeck effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majee, Arghya; Würger, Alois

    2012-03-16

    We propose a novel actuation mechanism for colloids, which is based on the Seebeck effect of the electrolyte solution: Laser heating of a nonionic particle accumulates in its vicinity a net charge Q, which is proportional to the excess temperature at the particle surface. The corresponding long-range thermoelectric field E is proportional to 1/r(2) provides a tool for controlled interactions with nearby beads or with additional molecular solutes. An external field E(ext) drags the thermocharged particle at a velocity that depends on its size and absorption properties; the latter point could be particularly relevant for separating carbon nanotubes according to their electronic band structure.

  9. Reliable electrophoretic mobilities free from Joule heating effects using CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, Christopher J; Hruska, Vlastimil; Guijt, Rosanne M; Macka, Miroslav; Gas, Bohuslav; Marriott, Philip J; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-10-01

    Ionic electrophoretic mobilities determined by means of CE experiments are sometimes different when compared to generally accepted values based on limiting ionic conductance measurements. While the effect of ionic strength on electrophoretic mobility has been long understood, the increase in the mobility that results from Joule heating (the resistive heating that occurs when a current passes through an electrolyte) has been largely overlooked. In this work, a simple method for obtaining reliable and reproducible values of electrophoretic mobility is described. The electrophoretic mobility is measured over a range of driving powers and the extrapolation to zero power dissipation is employed to eliminate the effect of Joule heating. These extrapolated values of electrophoretic mobility can then be used to calculate limiting ionic mobilities by making a correction for ionic strength; this somewhat complicated calculation is conveniently performed by using the freeware program PeakMaster 5. These straightforward procedures improve the agreement between experimentally determined and literature values of limiting ionic mobility by at least one order of magnitude. Using Tris-chromate BGE with a value of conductivity 0.34 S/m and ionic strength 59 mM at a modest dissipated power per unit length of 2.0 W/m, values of mobility for inorganic anions were increased by an average of 12.6% relative to their values free from the effects of Joule heating. These increases were accompanied by a reduction in mobilities due to the ionic strength effect, which was 11% for univalent and 28% for divalent inorganic ions compared to their limiting ionic mobilities. Additionally, it was possible to determine the limiting ionic mobility for a number of aromatic anions by using PeakMaster 5 to perform an ionic strength correction. A major significance of this work is in being able to use CE to obtain reliable and accurate values of electrophoretic mobilities with all its benefits, including

  10. Effects of mesh resolution on hypersonic heating prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Aeroheating prediction is a challenging and critical problem for the design and optimization of hypersonic vehicles.One challenge is that the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations strongly depends on the computational mesh.In this letter,the effect of mesh resolution on heat flux prediction is studied.It is found that mesh-independent solutions can be obtained using fine mesh,whose accuracy is confirmed by results from kinetic particle simulation.It is analyzed that mesh-induced numerical error comes m...

  11. Monitoring the Surface Heat Island (shi) Effects of Industrial Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şekertekin, A.; Kutoglu, Ş. H.; Kaya, S.; Marangoz, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present the effects of industrial enterprises on Land Surface Temperature (LST) and to retrieve Surface Heat Island (SHI) maps of these regions. SHI is one of the types of Urban Heat Island (UHI) and as the urban areas grow in a city, UHI effect becomes bigger. The city centre of Zonguldak was chosen as study area and Landsat 5 satellite data were used as materials. Zonguldak has important industrial enterprises like thermal power plants and iron and steel plant. ERDEMIR is the biggest iron and steel plant in Turkey and it is one of the biggest ones in Europe, as well. There are three operating thermal power plants in the region namely CATES, ZETES1 and ZETES2. In order to investigate these industrial regions, Landsat 5 satellite data were processed using mono-window algorithm to retrieve LST and they were acquired on 11.09.1987, 18.09.2007 and 29.09.2011, respectively. The obtained results revealed that from 1987 to 2011, spatial and temporal variability in LST in industrial enterprises became higher than the surroundings. Besides, the sizes of SHIs in 2011 are bigger than the ones in 1987. For the countries and governments, having industrial enterprises is crucial for the development and it is also important to present the community better conditions in life. Thus, decision makers should consider mitigating the effects of these regions on LST.

  12. MONITORING THE SURFACE HEAT ISLAND (SHI EFFECTS OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Şekertekin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present the effects of industrial enterprises on Land Surface Temperature (LST and to retrieve Surface Heat Island (SHI maps of these regions. SHI is one of the types of Urban Heat Island (UHI and as the urban areas grow in a city, UHI effect becomes bigger. The city centre of Zonguldak was chosen as study area and Landsat 5 satellite data were used as materials. Zonguldak has important industrial enterprises like thermal power plants and iron and steel plant. ERDEMIR is the biggest iron and steel plant in Turkey and it is one of the biggest ones in Europe, as well. There are three operating thermal power plants in the region namely CATES, ZETES1 and ZETES2. In order to investigate these industrial regions, Landsat 5 satellite data were processed using mono-window algorithm to retrieve LST and they were acquired on 11.09.1987, 18.09.2007 and 29.09.2011, respectively. The obtained results revealed that from 1987 to 2011, spatial and temporal variability in LST in industrial enterprises became higher than the surroundings. Besides, the sizes of SHIs in 2011 are bigger than the ones in 1987. For the countries and governments, having industrial enterprises is crucial for the development and it is also important to present the community better conditions in life. Thus, decision makers should consider mitigating the effects of these regions on LST.

  13. Inertial effects on heat transfer in superhydrophobic microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Adam; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie; Iverson, Brian; BYU Fluids Team

    2015-11-01

    This work numerically studies the effects of inertia on thermal transport in superhydrophbic microchannels. An infinite parallel plate channel comprised of structured superhydrophbic walls is considered. The structure of the superhydrophobic surfaces consists of square pillars organized in a square array aligned with the flow direction. Laminar, fully developed flow is explored. The flow is assumed to be non-wetting and have an idealized flat meniscus. A shear-free, adiabatic boundary condition is used at the liquid/gas interface, while a no-slip, constant heat flux condition is used at the liquid/solid interface. A wide range of Peclet numbers, relative channel spacing distances, and relative pillar sizes are considered. Results are presented in terms of Poiseuille number, Nusselt number, hydrodynamic slip length, and temperature jump length. Interestingly, the thermal transport is varied only slightly by inertial effects for a wide range of parameters explored and compares well with other analytical and numerical work that assumed Stokes flow. It is only for very small relative channel spacing and large Peclet number that inertial effects exert significant influence. Overall, the heat transfer is reduced for the superhydrophbic channels in comparison to classic smooth walled channels. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) - United States (Grant No. CBET-1235881).

  14. Electrically heated tube investigation of cooling channel geometry effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the combined effects of cooling channel aspect ratio and curvature for rocket engines are presented. Symmetrically heated tubes with average heat fluxes up to 1.7 MW/m(exp 2) were used. The coolant was gaseous nitrogen at an inlet temperature of 280 K (500 R) and inlet pressures up to 1.0 x 10(exp 7) N/m(exp 2) (1500 psia). Two different tube geometries were tested: a straight, circular cross-section tube, and an aspect-ratio 10 cross-section tube with a 45 deg bend. The circular tube results are compared to classical models from the literature as validation of the system. The curvature effect data from the curved aspect-ratio 10 tube compare favorably to the empirical equations available in the literature for low aspect ratio tubes. This latter results suggest that thermal stratification of the coolant due to diminished curvature effect mixing may not be an issue for high aspect-ratio cooling channels.

  15. Temporal effect of local hyperthermia on murine contact hypersensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lan; WANG Yi-ru; HONG Yu-xiao; XU Ya-qin; ZHANG Li; LI Xiao-dong; XIAO Ting

    2013-01-01

    Background The sensitization and elicitation phases are involved in the immunopathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity (CHS).Langerhans cells (LCs) are believed to play pivotal roles in the sensitization stage of CHS.Local hyperthermia on skin induces the migration as well as maturation of epidermal LCs.Although fever-range whole body hyperthermia and local hyperthermia at 43℃ prior to sensitization were reported to suppress CHS,the effects of different temperatures and the timing sequence of local hyperthermia on CHS have not been tackled.Methods Local hyperthermia was applied to murine dorsal skin 3 days prior to,concurrent with,or 2 days post sensitization with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in BALB/c mice.Local hyperthermia temperatures at 37℃,39℃,41℃ and 43℃ were applied to mouse dorsal skin and the severity of CHS was calculated by measuring the swelling response of the challenged ears.Results Local hyperthermia at 39℃,41℃ and 43℃ prior to sensitization reduced the severity of CHS,as compared with that at 37℃.The suppression of CHS was temperature dependant in that higher temperature had a stronger effect.On the contrary,the hyperthermia treatments,either concurrent with or post-sensitization,resulted in an enhanced temperature-dependant ear swelling response.Conclusions The severity of murine CHS could be influenced by local hyperthermia at the sensitization stage in a temperature dependant manner.The temporal effect of local hyperthermia suggested a novel factor in interpreting the severity of allergic contact dermatitis.

  16. Generation of mirage effect by heated carbon nanotube thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, L. H. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Lim, C. W., E-mail: bccwlim@cityu.edu.hk [USTC-CityU Joint Advanced Research Centre, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Li, Y. C. [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Chuanzeng; Quoc Bui, Tinh [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Str. 9-11, D-57076 Siegen (Germany)

    2014-06-28

    Mirage effect, a common phenomenon in nature, is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon in which lights are bent due to the gradient variation of refraction in the temperature gradient medium. The theoretical analysis of mirage effect generated by heated carbon nanotube thin film is presented both for gas and liquid. Excellent agreement is demonstrated through comparing the theoretical prediction with published experimental results. It is concluded from the theoretical prediction and experimental observation that the mirage effect is more likely to happen in liquid. The phase of deflected optical beam is also discussed and the method for measurement of thermal diffusivity of medium is theoretically verified. Furthermore, a method for measuring the refractive index of gas by detecting optical beam deflection is also presented in this paper.

  17. Local and long-distance district heating of buildings - on the advance or retreat?; Nah- und Fernwaermeversorgung von Gebaeuden. Aus- oder Rueckbau?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagnow, Kati [Hochschule Magdeburg (Germany); Wolff, Dieter [Ostfalia Hochschule Wolfenbuettel (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    If the climate protection goals in the federal government's energy concept for 2050 are to come true, then only with a large contribution from the building sector. Indirectly the energy concept banks on an expansion of local and long-distance heating networks for building heating, and in many cases this seems to make good sense from today's viewpoint. However, a look at the wider picture reveals the continued expansion of local and long-distance heating networks to be a step in the wrong direction. The present article uses a concrete example to show that when looking towards the future one must always consider electricity and heating systems together and in doing so take all specific loss ratios into account.

  18. Effect of calcium chelators on heat coagulation and heat-induced changes of concentrated micellar casein solutions: The role of calcium-ion activity and micellar integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, de E.J.P.; Minor, M.; Snoeren, T.A.L.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Linden, van der E.

    2012-01-01

    There is general consensus that calcium chelators enhance heat stability in milk. However, they increase the heat stability to considerably different extents. For this reason, the effect of various calcium chelators on heat coagulation and heat-induced changes of concentrated micellar casein

  19. Effect of calcium chelators on heat coagulation and heat-induced changes of concentrated micellar casein solutions: The role of calcium-ion activity and micellar integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, de E.J.P.; Minor, M.; Snoeren, T.A.L.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Linden, van der E.

    2012-01-01

    There is general consensus that calcium chelators enhance heat stability in milk. However, they increase the heat stability to considerably different extents. For this reason, the effect of various calcium chelators on heat coagulation and heat-induced changes of concentrated micellar casein solutio

  20. Effects of local and global network connectivity on synergistic epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder-Rodgers, David; Pérez-Reche, Francisco J.; Taraskin, Sergei N.

    2015-12-01

    Epidemics in networks can be affected by cooperation in transmission of infection and also connectivity between nodes. An interplay between these two properties and their influence on epidemic spread are addressed in the paper. A particular type of cooperative effects (called synergy effects) is considered, where the transmission rate between a pair of nodes depends on the number of infected neighbors. The connectivity effects are studied by constructing networks of different topology, starting with lattices with only local connectivity and then with networks that have both local and global connectivity obtained by random bond-rewiring to nodes within a certain distance. The susceptible-infected-removed epidemics were found to exhibit several interesting effects: (i) for epidemics with strong constructive synergy spreading in networks with high local connectivity, the bond rewiring has a negative role in epidemic spread, i.e., it reduces invasion probability; (ii) in contrast, for epidemics with destructive or weak constructive synergy spreading on networks of arbitrary local connectivity, rewiring helps epidemics to spread; (iii) and, finally, rewiring always enhances the spread of epidemics, independent of synergy, if the local connectivity is low.