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Sample records for local anesthetic injection

  1. Nocebo-induced hyperalgesia during local anesthetic injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelmann, Dirk; Pancaro, Carlo; Cappiello, Eric C; Camann, William R

    2010-03-01

    Common practice during local anesthetic injection is to warn the patient using words such as: "You will feel a big bee sting; this is the worst part." Our hypothesis was that using gentler words for administration of the local anesthetic improves pain perception and patient comfort. One hundred forty healthy women at term gestation requesting neuraxial analgesia were randomized to either a "placebo" ("We are going to give you a local anesthetic that will numb the area and you will be comfortable during the procedure") or "nocebo" ("You are going to feel a big bee sting; this is the worst part of the procedure") group. Pain was assessed immediately after the local anesthetic skin injection using verbal analog scale scores of 0 to 10. Median verbal analog scale pain scores were lower when reassuring words were used compared with the harsher nocebo words (3 [2-4] vs 5 [3-6]; P words improves the subjective experience during invasive procedures.

  2. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    Background. The authors used comprehensive national registry and clinical data to conduct a study of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in particular neurosensory disturbance (NSD), associated with local anesthetics used in dentistry. Methods. The study included data sets of annual sales of local...

  3. Intraosseous injection as an adjunct to conventional local anesthetic techniques: A clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Idris; Nasil Sakkir; Kishore Gopalakrishna Naik; Nandakishore Kunijal Jayaram

    2014-01-01

    Background: The achievement of successful local anesthesia is a continual challenge in dentistry. Adjunctive local anesthetic techniques and their armamentaria, such as intraosseous injection (the Stabident system and the X-tip system) have been proposed to be advantageous in cases where the conventional local anesthetic techniques have failed. Aim: A clinical study was undertaken using intraosseous injection system by name X-tip to evaluate its effectiveness in cases where inferior alve...

  4. Intraosseous injection as an adjunct to conventional local anesthetic techniques: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Mohamed; Sakkir, Nasil; Naik, Kishore Gopalakrishna; Jayaram, Nandakishore Kunijal

    2014-09-01

    The achievement of successful local anesthesia is a continual challenge in dentistry. Adjunctive local anesthetic techniques and their armamentaria, such as intraosseous injection (the Stabident system and the X-tip system) have been proposed to be advantageous in cases where the conventional local anesthetic techniques have failed. A clinical study was undertaken using intraosseous injection system by name X-tip to evaluate its effectiveness in cases where inferior alveolar nerve block has failed to provide pulpal anesthesia. Sixty adult patients selected were to undergo endodontic treatment for a mandibular molar tooth. Inferior alveolar nerve block was given using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Twenty-four patients (40%) had pain even after administration of IAN block; intraosseous injection was administered using 4% articaine containing 1:100,000 epinephrine, using the X-tip system. The success of X-tip intraosseous injection was defined as none or mild pain (Heft-Parker visual analog scale ratings ≤ 54 mm) on endodontic access or initial instrumentation. Intraosseous injection technique was successful in 21 out of 24 patients (87.5%), except three patients who had pain even after supplemental X-tip injection. Within the limits of this study, we can conclude that supplemental intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine has a statistically significant influence in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

  5. Intraosseous injection as an adjunct to conventional local anesthetic techniques: A clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Mohamed; Sakkir, Nasil; Naik, Kishore Gopalakrishna; Jayaram, Nandakishore Kunijal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The achievement of successful local anesthesia is a continual challenge in dentistry. Adjunctive local anesthetic techniques and their armamentaria, such as intraosseous injection (the Stabident system and the X-tip system) have been proposed to be advantageous in cases where the conventional local anesthetic techniques have failed. Aim: A clinical study was undertaken using intraosseous injection system by name X-tip to evaluate its effectiveness in cases where inferior alveolar nerve block has failed to provide pulpal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients selected were to undergo endodontic treatment for a mandibular molar tooth. Inferior alveolar nerve block was given using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Twenty-four patients (40%) had pain even after administration of IAN block; intraosseous injection was administered using 4% articaine containing 1:100,000 epinephrine, using the X-tip system. The success of X-tip intraosseous injection was defined as none or mild pain (Heft-Parker visual analog scale ratings ≤ 54 mm) on endodontic access or initial instrumentation. Results: Intraosseous injection technique was successful in 21 out of 24 patients (87.5%), except three patients who had pain even after supplemental X-tip injection. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, we can conclude that supplemental intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine has a statistically significant influence in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:25298642

  6. Usefulness of injecting local anesthetic before compression in stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Akiko; Urashima, Masaki; Nishihara, Reisuke

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is a useful method of breast biopsy. However, some patients feel unbearable breast pain due to compression. Breast pain due to compression caused the fact that the breast cannot be compressed sufficiently. Sufficient compression is important to fix the breast in this method. Breast pain during this procedure is problematic from the perspectives of both stress and fixing the breast. We performed biopsy in the original manner by injecting local anesthetic before compression, in order to relieve breast pain due to compression. This was only slightly different in order from the standard method, and there was no need for any special technique or device. This way allowed for even higher breast compression, and all of the most recent 30 cases were compressed at levels greater than 120N. This approach is useful not only for relieving pain, but also for fixing the breast. (author)

  7. The efficacy of an intraosseous injection system of delivering local anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, M S

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the clinical testing of a new system for the intraosseous delivery of local anesthesia. The author concluded that the system delivered local anesthetic very effectively (in some situations more effectively than the traditional delivery method), thus offering a great potential advantage to both dentists and patients.

  8. Trigeminal nerve injury associated with injection of local anesthetics: needle lesion or neurotoxicity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren; Jensen, Rigmor H; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors used comprehensive national registry and clinical data to conduct a study of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in particular neurosensory disturbance (NSD), associated with local anesthetics used in dentistry METHODS: The study included data sets of annual sales of local anes...

  9. Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections

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    Najla Dar-Odeh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Najla Dar-Odeh1, Soukaina Ryalat1, Mohammad Shayyab1, Osama Abu-Hammad21Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Oral Medicine and Periodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Jordan; 2Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, JordanObjectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients.Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period.Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term “LA used” was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection.Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure.Keywords: dental records, documentation, prescriptions, local anesthesia

  10. The Effect of 2 Injection Speeds on Local Anesthetic Discomfort During Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks.

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    de Souza Melo, Marcelo Rodrigo; Sabey, Mark Jon Santana; Lima, Carla Juliane; de Almeida Souza, Liane Maciel; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This randomized double-blind crossover trial investigated the discomfort associated with 2 injection speeds, low (60 seconds) and slow (100 seconds), during inferior alveolar nerve block by using 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Three phases were considered: (a) mucosa perforation, (b) needle insertion, and (c) solution injection. Thirty-two healthy adult volunteers needing bilateral inferior alveolar nerve blocks at least 1 week apart were enrolled in the present study. The anesthetic procedure discomfort was recorded by volunteers on a 10-cm visual analog scale in each phase for both injection speeds. Comparison between the 2 anesthesia speeds in each phase was performed by paired t test. Results showed no statistically significant difference between injection speeds regarding perforation (P = .1016), needle placement (P = .0584), or speed injection (P = .1806). The discomfort in all phases was considered low. We concluded that the 2 injection speeds tested did not affect the volunteers' pain perception during inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

  11. Severe Bradycardia Possibly due to a Local Anesthetic Oral Mucosal Injection during General Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Kenichi; Ohashi, Ayako; Kumagai, Miho; Hoshi, Hideki; Otaka, Kousei; Joh, Shigeharu

    2015-01-01

    Local anesthesia may induce systemic complications leading to parasympathetic activity leading to bradycardia and hypotension. We report a case of a 50-year-old man undergoing dental surgery under general anesthesia who experienced severe bradycardia and hypotension after local anesthesia infiltration. Concerns regarding the utilization of a relatively large lumen injection needle for local anesthesia during general anesthesia are discussed.

  12. Effects of single injection of local anesthetic agents on intervertebral disc degeneration: ex vivo and long-term in vivo experimental study.

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    Koji Iwasaki

    Full Text Available Analgesic discography (discoblock can be used to diagnose or treat discogenic low back pain by injecting a small amount of local anesthetics. However, recent in vitro studies have revealed cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on intervertebral disc (IVD cells. Here we aimed to investigate the deteriorative effects of lidocaine and bupivacaine on rabbit IVDs using an organotypic culture model and an in vivo long-term follow-up model.For the organotypic culture model, rabbit IVDs were harvested and cultured for 3 or 7 days after intradiscal injection of local anesthetics (1% lidocaine or 0.5% bupivacaine. Nucleus pulposus (NP cell death was measured using confocal microscopy. Histological and TUNEL assays were performed. For in vivo study, each local anesthetic was injected into rabbit lumbar IVDs under a fluoroscope. Six or 12 months after the injection, each IVD was prepared for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histological analysis.In the organotypic culture model, both anesthetic agents induced time-dependent NP cell death; when compared with injected saline solution, significant effects were detected within 7 days. Compared with the saline group, TUNEL-positive NP cells were significantly increased in the bupivacaine group. In the in vivo study, MRI analysis did not show any significant difference. Histological analysis revealed that IVD degeneration occurred to a significantly level in the saline- and local anesthetics-injected groups compared with the untreated control or puncture-only groups. However, there was no significant difference between the saline and anesthetic agents groups.In the in vivo model using healthy IVDs, there was no strong evidence to suggest that discoblock with local anesthetics has the potential of inducing IVD degeneration other than the initial mechanical damage of the pressurized injection. Further studies should be performed to investigate the deteriorative effects of the local injection of analgesic agents

  13. Development of a local anesthetic lidocaine-loaded redox-active injectable gel for postoperative pain management.

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    Nagasaki, Yukio; Mizukoshi, Yutaro; Gao, Zhenyu; Feliciano, Chitho P; Chang, Kyungho; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-15

    Although local anesthesia is commonly applied for pain relief, there are several issues such as its short duration of action and low effectiveness at the areas of inflammation due to the acidic pH. The presence of excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to induce inflammation and aggravate pain. To resolve these issues, we developed a redox-active injectable gel (RIG) with ROS-scavenging activity. RIG was prepared by mixing polyamine-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polyamine with nitroxide radical moieties as side chains on the polyamine segments (PMNT-b-PEG-b-PMNT) with a polyanion, which formed a flower-type micelle via electrostatic complexation. Lidocaine could be stably incorporated in its core. When the temperature of the solution was increased to 37°C, the PIC-type flower micelle transformed to gel. The continuous release of lidocaine from the gel was observed for more than three days, without remarkable initial burst, which is probably owing to the stable entrapment of lidocaine in the PIC core of the gel. We evaluated the analgesic effect of RIG in carrageenan-induced arthritis mouse model. Results showed that lidocaine-loaded RIG has stronger and longer analgesic effect when administered in inflamed areas. In contrast, while the use of non-complexed lidocaine did not show analgesic effect one day after its administration. Note that no effect was observed when PIC-type flower micelle without ROS-scavenging ability was used. These findings suggest that local anesthetic-loaded RIG can effectively reduce the number of injection times and limit the side effects associated with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management. 1. We have been working on nanomaterials, which effectively eliminate ROS, avoiding dysfunction of mitochondria in healthy cells. 2. We designed redox injectable gel using polyion complexed flower type micelle, which can eliminates ROS locally. 3. We could prepare local anesthesia-loaded redox injectable

  14. Inadvertent injection of formalin mistaken for local anesthetic agent: report of a case.

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    Arakeri, Gururaj; Brennan, Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Chemical facial cellulitis, while commonly seen in domestic accidents or attempted suicide, is uncommon in the dental office and hence rarely addressed in the dental literature. We present an unusual case of chemical facial cellulitis caused by inadvertent injection of formalin into the soft tissues of the oral cavity, which was mistaken for local anesthesia solution. This report comprises the immediate symptoms, possible root cause, and management of the difficult situation. We also provide some guidelines to avoid such unfortunate events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Subdural spread of injected local anesthetic in a selective transforaminal cervical nerve root block: a case report

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    Tofuku Katsuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although uncommon, selective cervical nerve root blocks can have serious complications. The most serious complications that have been reported include cerebral infarction, spinal cord infarction, transient quadriplegia and death. Case presentation A 40-year-old Japanese woman with a history of severe right-sided cervical radicular pain was scheduled to undergo a right-sided C6 selective cervical nerve root block using a transforaminal approach under fluoroscopic guidance. An anterior oblique view of the C5-C6 intervertebral foramen was obtained, and a 23-gauge spinal needle, connected to the normal extension tube with a syringe filled with contrast medium, was introduced into the posterior-caudal aspect of the C5-C6 intervertebral foramen on the right side. In the anteroposterior view, the placement of the needle was considered satisfactory when it was placed no more medial than halfway across the width of the articular pillar. Although the spread of the contrast medium along the C6 nerve root was observed with right-sided C6 radiculography, the subdural flow of the contrast medium was not observed with real-time fluoroscopy. The extension tube used for the radiculography was removed from the spinal needle and a normal extension tube with a syringe filled with lidocaine connected in its place. We performed a negative aspiration test and then injected 1.5 mL of 1.0% lidocaine slowly around the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the injection of the local anesthetic, our patient developed acute flaccid paralysis, complained of breathing difficulties and became unresponsive; her respiratory pattern was uncoordinated. After 20 minutes, she regained consciousness and became alert, and her muscle strength in all four limbs returned to normal without any sensory deficits after receiving emergent cardiorespiratory support. Conclusions We believe that confirming maintenance of the appropriate needle position in the anteroposterior

  16. Oral Mucosal Injection of a Local Anesthetic Solution Containing Epinephrine Enhances Muscle Relaxant Effects of Rocuronium

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    Ninomiya, Asako; Terakawa, Yui; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how submucosal injection of a clinically relevant dose of a lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing epinephrine affects the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide. Sixteen patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery participated in this study. All patients were induced with fentanyl citrate, a target-controlled infusion of propofol and rocuronium bromide. Anesthesia was maintained by total intravenous anesthesia. After nasotracheal intubation, an infusion of rocuronium bromide was started at 7 µg/kg/min, and the infusion rate was then adjusted to maintain a train of four (TOF) ratio at 10 to 15%. The TOF ratio just prior to oral mucosal injection of a 1% lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing 10 µg/mL epinephrine (LE) was taken as the baseline. TOF ratio was observed for 20 minutes, with 1-minute intervals following the start of injection. Mean epinephrine dose was 85.6 ± 18.6 µg and mean infusion rate of rocuronium bromide was 6.3 ± 1.6 µg/kg/min. TOF ratio began to decrease 2 minutes after the injection of LE, reached the minimum value at 3.1 ± 3.6% 12 minutes after the injection, and then began to recover. We conclude that oral mucosal injection of LE enhances the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide. PMID:22428970

  17. Comparative evaluation of effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during scaling and root planing – A split-mouth clinical trial

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    Kalyan Chintala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Pain control is an important outcome measure for successful periodontal therapy. Injected local anesthesia has been used to secure anesthesia for scaling and root planing (SRP and continues to be the anesthetic of choice for pain control. Alternatively, intra-pocket anesthetic gel has been used as an anesthetic during SRP. Hence, this clinical trial was done to compare the effectiveness of intra-pocket anesthetic gel and injected local anesthesia during SRP and also to assess the influence of intra-pocket anesthetic gel on treatment outcomes in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: Fifteen systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients were recruited. The dental quadrants on right side received either intra-pocket 20% benzocaine gel (Gel group or infiltration/block by 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 adrenaline (injection group. Quadrants on the left side received the alternative. Pain perception and patients preference for the type of anesthesia was recorded. Clinical parameters: plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Results: No difference was observed in visual analog scale (P > 0.05 and verbal rating scale (P > 0.05 pain perception between gel group and injection group. A slightly increased preference to gel as anesthesia (53% vs. 47% was observed. The treatment outcome after SRP did not show a significant difference between gel and injection group (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Intra-pocket administration of 20% benzocaine gel may be effective for pain control during SRP and may offer an alternative to conventional injection anesthesia.

  18. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk

  19. Hemodynamic response after injection of local anesthetics with or without adrenaline in adult Nigerian subjects undergoing simple tooth extraction

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    Olutayo James

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to determine the changes in the blood pressure (BP and the pulse rate (PR of normotensive patients having dental extraction under the administration of 2% lignocaine local anesthetic with or without adrenaline. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out on 325 consecutive normotensive patients who presented at the exodontia clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH, Lagos, Yoruba State, Nigeria from December 2004 to August 2005 for simple tooth extraction. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups according to the type of anesthetic solution employed. Group A had tooth extraction done under the administration of 2% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:80,000 while group B had tooth extraction done under the administration of 2% lignocaine local anesthetic without vasoconstrictor (plain lignocaine. Each patient had single tooth extracted. The following parameters were monitored in each of the surgical interventions: systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and PR. Measurements were taken in the waiting room before surgery, during the surgery after local anesthesia, during tooth extraction, and 15 min after tooth extraction. Results: The sample consisted of 176 females and 149 males. Age range of the patients was 18-89 years with the mean age of 35.08 ± 15.60 years. The hemodynamic responses to lignocaine with adrenaline (1:80,000 and plain lignocaine essentially follow the same pattern in the study. There was no statistically significant difference between the measured parameters in the two groups after the administration of local anesthetics. Conclusion: This study, therefore, shows that there was no difference in the hemodynamic changes observed with the use of lignocaine with adrenaline or plain lignocaine during a simple tooth extraction in healthy adults.

  20. Does pain relief by CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids predict pain relief after decompression surgery for cervical nerve root compression?

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    Antoniadis, Alexander; Dietrich, Tobias J; Farshad, Mazda

    2016-10-01

    The relationship of pain relief from a recently presented CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids to surgical decompression as a treatment for single-level cervical radiculopathy is not clear. This retrospective study aimed to compare the immediate and 6-week post-injection effects to the short- and long-term outcomes after surgical decompression, specifically in regard to pain relief. Patients (n = 39, age 47 ± 10 years) who had undergone CT-guided indirect injection with local anesthetics and steroids as an initial treatment for single cervical nerve root radiculopathy and who subsequently needed surgical decompression were included retrospectively. Pain levels (VAS scores) were monitored before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after injection (n = 34), as well as 6 weeks (n = 38) and a mean of 25 months (SD ± 12) after surgical decompression (n = 36). Correlation analysis was performed to find potential associations of pain relief after injection and after surgery to investigate the predictive value of post-injection pain relief. There was no correlation between immediate pain relief after injection (-32 ± 27 %) and 6 weeks later (-7 ± 19 %), (r = -0.023, p = 0.900). There was an association by tendency between immediate pain relief after injection and post-surgical pain relief at 6 weeks (-82 ± 27 %), (r = 0.28, p = 0.08). Pain relief at follow-up remained high at -70 ± 21 % and was correlated with the immediate pain amelioration effect of the injection (r = 0.37, p = 0.032). Five out of seven patients who reported no pain relief from injection had a pain relief from surgery in excess of 50 %. The amount of immediate radiculopathic pain relief after indirect cervical nerve root injection is associated with the amount of pain relief achieved at long-term follow-up after surgical decompression of single-level cervical radiculopathy

  1. Children's behavioral pain reactions during local anesthetic injection using cotton-roll vibration method compared with routine topical anesthesia: A randomized controlled trial.

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    Bagherian, Ali; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Topical anesthesia has been widely advocated as an important component of atraumatic administration of intraoral local anesthesia. The aim of this study was to use direct observation of children's behavioral pain reactions during local anesthetic injection using cotton-roll vibration method compared with routine topical anesthesia. Forty-eight children participated in this randomized controlled clinical trial. They received two separate inferior alveolar nerve block or primary maxillary molar infiltration injections on contralateral sides of the jaws by both cotton-roll vibration (a combination of topical anesthesia gel, cotton roll, and vibration for physical distraction) and control (routine topical anesthesia) methods. Behavioral pain reactions of children were measured according to the author-developed face, head, foot, hand, trunk, and cry (FHFHTC) scale, resulting in total scores between 0 and 18. The total scores on the FHFHTC scale ranged between 0-5 and 0-10 in the cotton-roll vibration and control methods, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation values of total scores on FHFHTC scale were lower in the cotton-roll vibration method (1.21 ± 1.38) than in control method (2.44 ± 2.18), and this was statistically significant (P anesthesia in reducing behavioral pain reactions in children during local anesthesia administration.

  2. Warmed local anesthetic reduces pain of infiltration.

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    Fialkov, J A; McDougall, E P

    1996-01-01

    The effect of warming local anesthetic on the amount of pain experienced during local infiltration was tested by comparing equal volumes of 40 degrees C- and 21 degrees C-infiltrates in each of 26 subjects. Six subjects were patients undergoing excision of two benign asymptomatic nevi in separate locations, and 20 subjects were healthy adult volunteers who were injected in bilateral antebrachial sites. The warmed and room temperature solutions were randomized to each side, so that each subject received both temperature injections in random order. All subjects and the injector were blinded. The rate of injection was time-controlled (0.05 ml/sec). Following both injections, subjects were asked to rate the pain experienced at each site. In addition, the subject was asked if there was no difference, a slight difference, or a substantial difference between the two sites. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to analyze the mean difference in pain scores for all subjects. Paired analysis of the pain scores for each subject eliminated intersubject variance of pain tolerance. The mean difference in pain score between the room temperature and warmed solutions was +1.5 (p < 0.0001). Of the 21 subjects (81%) who found the warmed solution less painful, 11 (52%) found the difference to be significant, while 10 (48%) found the difference to be slight. Two subjects (8%) found no difference between the two, while 3 subjects (11%) found the colder solution slightly less painful. We conclude that warming local anesthetic to 40 degrees C prior to subcutaneous injection is a simple, inexpensive means of reducing the pain of local infiltration.

  3. Hemodynamic changes following injection of local anesthetics with different concentrations of epinephrine during simple tooth extraction: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

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    Abu-Mostafa, Nedal; Al-Showaikhat, Fatimah; Al-Shubbar, Fatimah; Al-Zawad, Kawther; Al-Zawad, Fatimah

    2015-10-01

    Presence of epinephrine in local anesthetic cartridge increases the duration of local anesthesia (LA), decreases the risk of toxicity, and provides hemostasis. However, the unfavorable effects are increasing heart rate (HR) and raising blood pressure (BP). The aim was to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the BP, HR, and oxygen saturation (SpO2) of normal patients undergoing tooth extraction using LA with various epinephrine concentrations. A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted on 120 patients who were divided randomly into 3 parallel groups according to the LA received. Group 1: lidocaine 2% with epinephrine 1:80,000 (L80). Group 2: articaine 4% with epinephrine 1:100,000 (A100). Group 3: articaine 4% with epinephrine 1:200,000 (A200). normal patients whose BP extraction. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) significantly increased after injection of L80 and continued after extraction to be significant than pre-injection. SBP significantly increased after injection of A100 then decreased after extraction. In the group of A200, SBP insignificantly decreased after injection then increased after extraction. The increasing of SBP between time point 1and 2 was significantly higher in G1 than G3 (p=0.014). Diastolic blood pressure decreased after LA in the 3 groups; however it was significant only with L80, then increased after extraction for all. The changings of DBP, HR and SpO2 after anesthesia and extraction showed no significant difference among the three groups. However, A200 had significant lesser effect on SBP than L80 and the least effect on other parameters. Therefore, A200 is considered safer than L80 and A100 and is recommended for LA before teeth extraction in normal patient. Local anesthesia, lidocaine, epinephrine 1:80,000, articaine, epinephrine 1:100,000, epinephrine 1:200,000, tooth extraction.

  4. Effectiveness of injection of local anesthetic into the retrobulbar space for postoperative analgesia following eye enucleation in dogs.

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    Myrna, Kathern E; Bentley, Ellison; Smith, Lesley J

    2010-07-15

    To assess the efficacy of a retrobulbar bupivacaine nerve block for postoperative analgesia following eye enucleation in dogs. Randomized controlled trial. 22 dogs. Client-owned dogs admitted to the hospital for routine eye enucleation were enrolled with owner consent and randomly assigned to a treatment (bupivacaine hydrochloride) or control (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) group. Baseline subjective pain scores were recorded. Anesthesia consisted of hydromorphone and midazolam preoperatively, thiopental or propofol for induction, and isoflurane in oxygen for maintenance. An inferior-temporal palpebral retrobulbar injection of either saline solution or bupivacaine was administered. Transpalpebral eye enucleation was performed. Pain scores were recorded at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours after extubation (time 0) by observers masked to treatment groups. Dogs were given hydromorphone (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb], IM or IV) as a rescue analgesic if the subjective pain score totaled >or= 9 (out of a maximum total score of 18) or >or= 3 in any 1 category. 9 of 11 control dogs required a rescue dose of hydromorphone, but only 2 of 11 dogs in the bupivacaine treatment group required rescue analgesia. Mean time to treatment failure (ie, administration of rescue analgesia following extubation) was 0.56 hours (95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 1.095 hours) for the 11 dogs that received hydromorphone. Retrobulbar administration of bupivacaine in dogs in conjunction with traditional premedication prior to eye enucleation was an effective form of adjunctive analgesia and reduced the need for additional postoperative analgesics.

  5. Local Anesthetics: Review of Pharmacological Considerations

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    Becker, Daniel E; Reed, Kenneth L

    2012-01-01

    Local anesthetics have an impressive history of efficacy and safety in medical and dental practice. Their use is so routine, and adverse effects are so infrequent, that providers may understandably overlook many of their pharmacotherapeutic principles. The purpose of this continuing education article is to provide a review and update of essential pharmacology for the various local anesthetic formulations in current use. Technical considerations will be addressed in a subsequent article. PMID:22822998

  6. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

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    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  7. Periodontal ligament and intraosseous anesthetic injection techniques: alternatives to mandibular nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul A; Cuddy, Michael A; Cooke, Matthew R; Sokolowski, Chester J

    2011-09-01

    and Overview. The provision of mandibular anesthesia traditionally has relied on nerve block anesthetic techniques such as the Halsted, the Gow-Gates and the Akinosi-Vazirani methods. The authors present two alternative techniques to provide local anesthesia in mandibular teeth: the periodontal ligament (PDL) injection and the intraosseous (IO) injection. The authors also present indications for and complications associated with these techniques. The PDL injection and the IO injection are effective anesthetic techniques for managing nerve block failures and for providing localized anesthesia in the mandible. Dentists may find these techniques to be useful alternatives to nerve block anesthesia.

  8. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  9. Comparison between newer local anesthetics for myofascial pain syndrome management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaralidou, A Th; Amaniti, E N; Maidatsi, P G; Gorgias, N K; Vasilakos, D F

    2007-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndromes are characterized by the presence of painful loci within muscles, tendons or ligaments, called trigger points. Infiltration of these points with local anesthetics is often used as a treatment modality. The aim of the study was to comparatively evaluate 0.25% levobupivacaine and 0.25% ropivacaine for trigger point injection regarding pain on injection, treatment efficacy and duration of symptoms remission. Sixty-eight patients, suffering from myofascial pain syndromes, were randomly assigned to two groups to receive either levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for trigger-point injection. After completion of the procedure, patients were asked to rate pain during injection and efficacy of the treatment, based on immediate relief. Two weeks later, they were asked about the duration of this relief. Statistical analysis did not reveal significant differences between groups with respect to pain during injection, efficacy of the treatment and duration of pain relief. The two local anesthetics seem to be equally effective for trigger point infiltration. (c) 2007 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of a New Local Anesthetic Buffering Device on Pain Reduction During Nerve Block lnjections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-10

    the anticipation of pain associated with dental care is a significant deterrent in seeking treatment. With the advent of modern local anesthesia ...eliminate pain from dental injection to include: application of topical anesthesia , tissue pressure/vibration, cold application, and buffering of the local ...anesthetic solution. In dentistry , the effect of buffering local anesthetic solutions was first studied by Gros and Laewen in 1910 and then by

  11. Local anesthetics and nuclear medical bone images of the equine fore limb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaughan, E.M.; Wallace, R.J.; Kallfelz, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of two local anesthetic agents on the diagnostic quality of nuclear medical bone images (NMBIs) of distal parts of the equine fore limb were investigated. Local effects on bone uptake of technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) 4 and 24 hours after perineural and intraarticular injection of mepivacaine hydrochloride and bupivacaine hydrochloride were evaluated in the carpal and metacarpophalangeal regions of 12 horses and ponies. Neither mepivacaine hydrochloride nor bupivacaine hydrochloride significantly altered the diagnostic quality of the NMBIs. The injection and subsequent action of local anesthetics do not appear to influence local bone uptake of 99mTc-MDP significantly

  12. Buffered lidocaine and bupivacaine mixture - the ideal local anesthetic solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Corliss A; Best, Alyssa A; Best, Timothy J; Hamilton, Danielle A

    2015-01-01

    The use of injectable local anesthetic solutions to facilitate pain-free surgery is an integral component of many procedures performed by the plastic surgeon. In many instances, a solution that has both rapid onset and prolonged duration of analgesia is optimal. A combination of lidocaine and bupivacaine, plain or with epinephrine, is readily available in most Canadian health care settings where such procedures are performed, and fulfills these criteria. However, commercially available solutions of both medications are acidic and cause a burning sensation on injection. Buffering to neutral pH with sodium bicarbonate is a practical method to mitigate the burning sensation, and has the added benefit of increasing the fraction of nonionized lipid soluble drug available. The authors report on the proportions of the three drugs to yield a neutral pH, and the results of an initial survey regarding the use of the combined solution with epinephrine in hand surgery.

  13. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of an aqueous extract of Cinchona officinalis (C. officinalis) in experimental animal models. Methods: Various doses of the aqueous extract was tested for its local anesthetic activity in guinea pigs and frogs using intracutaneous and plexus anesthesia, ...

  14. THE EFFECT OF LOCAL ANESTHETICS ON TEAR PRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that local anesthetics measure only basic secretion thus reducing normal tear production/secretion, which is both reflex and basic. This could be attributed to the fact that local anesthetics have an adrenergic potentiating effects and because lacrimal fluid receive a preganglionic parasympathetic supply from lacrimal muscles ...

  15. Children′s behavioral pain reactions during local anesthetic injection using cotton-roll vibration method compared with routine topical anesthesia: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bagherian

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It may be concluded that the cotton-roll vibration method can be more helpful than the routine topical anesthesia in reducing behavioral pain reactions in children during local anesthesia administration.

  16. Intrathecal opioids versus epidural local anesthetics for labor analgesia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Brenda A; Chestnut, David H; Hawkins, Joy L

    2002-01-01

    Some anesthesiologists contend that intrathecal opioid administration has advantages over conventional epidural techniques during labor. Randomized clinical trials comparing analgesia and obstetric outcome using single-injection intrathecal opioids versus epidural local anesthetics suggest that intrathecal opioids provide comparable analgesia with few serious side effects. This meta-analysis compared the analgesic efficacy, side effects, and obstetric outcome of single-injection intrathecal opioid techniques versus epidural local anesthetics in laboring women. Relevant clinical studies were identified using electronic and manual searches of the literature covering the period from 1989 to 2000. Searches used the following descriptors: intrathecal analgesia, spinal opioids, epidural analgesia, epidural local anesthetics, and analgesia for labor. Data were extracted from 7 randomized clinical trials comparing analgesic measures, incidence of motor block, pruritus, nausea, hypotension, mode of delivery, and/or Apgar scores. Combined test results indicated comparable analgesic efficacy 15 to 20 minutes after injection with single-injection intrathecal opioid administration. Intrathecal opioid injections were associated with a greater incidence of pruritus (odds ratio, 14.01; 99% confidence interval, 6.9 to 28.3), but there was no difference in the incidence of nausea or in the method of delivery. Published studies suggest that intrathecal opioids provide comparable early labor analgesia when compared with epidural local anesthetics. Intrathecal opioid administration results in a greater incidence of pruritus. The choice of technique does not appear to affect the method of delivery.

  17. Modification of GABA-mediated inhibition by various injectable anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Walby, W F; Joy, R M

    1992-09-01

    Increasing doses of the injectable anesthetics etomidate, Saffan, thiopental, ketamine, and xylazine and the vehicles saline and propylene glycol were administered to urethane-anesthetized rats. Their effects in vivo on perforant pathway-evoked field excitatory post-synaptic potentials and population spikes in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were determined. The primary purpose was to ascertain whether these compounds affect hippocampal excitability in a manner consistent with their proposed mechanisms of action. Compared with their respective vehicles, thiopental, etomidate, and xylazine reduced the amplitude of population spikes to single perforant pathway stimulation by 20-30% at the highest doses tested. Xylazine also increased the latency to onset of the population spike. No other effects were observed. Using paired pulse paradigms, it was determined that etomidate produced a dramatic, prolonged reduction in granule cell excitability at interpulse intervals of 10-100 ms. The magnitude of the effect was dose related and was reversible with the discontinuance of administration of the drug. Similar changes occurred with Saffan (althesin) and thiopental. Ketamine produced a small but significant depression in granule cell excitability during intervals of 10-200 ms. Xylazine had no effect. These data corroborate the importance of a prolongation of gamma-aminobutyric acid A-mediated inhibition to the mechanism of actions of etomidate, thiopental, and Saffan at relevant exposure concentrations in vivo.

  18. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  19. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: Current perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); M. Klimek (Markus)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThis review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local

  20. Local anesthetics: New insights into risks and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional local anesthetics in contemporary use block the voltage-gated sodium channel by binding to a specific site on the inner facet of the channel pore. Only little fractions of local anaesthetic are thought to participate in nerve blockade, the rest is absorbed into surrounding tissues or

  1. Behavioral response and pain perception to computer controlled local anesthetic delivery system and cartridge syringe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T D Yogesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study evaluated and compared the pain perception, behavioral response, physiological parameters, and the role of topical anesthetic administration during local anesthetic administration with cartridge syringe and computer controlled local anesthetic delivery system (CCLAD. Design: A randomized controlled crossover study was carried out with 120 children aged 7-11 years. They were randomly divided into Group A: Receiving injection with CCLAD during first visit; Group B: Receiving injection with cartridge syringe during first visit. They were further subdivided into three subgroups based on the topical application used: (a 20% benzocaine; (b pressure with cotton applicator; (c no topical application. Pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded before and during injection procedure. Objective evaluation of disruptive behavior and subjective evaluation of pain were done using face legs activity cry consolability scale and modified facial image scale, respectively. The washout period between the two visits was 1-week. Results: Injections with CCLAD produced significantly lesser pain response, disruptive behavior (P < 0.001, and pulse rate (P < 0.05 when compared to cartridge syringe injections. Application of benzocaine produced lesser pain response and disruptive behavior when compared to the other two subgroups, although the result was not significant. Conclusion: Usage of techniques which enhance behavioral response in children like injections with CCLAD can be considered as a possible step toward achieving a pain-free pediatric dental practice.

  2. Anesthetic efficacy of a repeated intraosseous injection following a primary intraosseous injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joanne; Nusstein, John; Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of a repeated intraosseous injection given 30 minutes after a primary intraosseous injection. Using a crossover design, 55 subjects randomly received a primary X-tip intraosseous injection (Dentsply Inc, York, PA) of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine (using the Wand; Milestone Scientific, Deerfield, IL) and a repeated intraosseous or mock injection at 30 minutes in two appointments. The first molar and adjacent teeth were pulp tested every 2 minutes for a total of 120 minutes. Success was defined as obtaining two consecutive 80 readings with the electric pulp tester. Success of the initial intraosseous injection was 100% for the first molar. The repeated intraosseous injection mimicked the initial intraosseous injection in terms of pulpal anesthesia and statistically provided another 15 minutes of pulpal anesthesia. In conclusion, using the methodology presented, repeating the intraosseous injection 30 minutes after an initial intraosseous injection will provide an additional 15 minutes of pulpal anesthesia.

  3. A novel local anesthetic system: transcriptional transactivator peptide-decorated nanocarriers for skin delivery of ropivacaine

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    Chen CY

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chuanyu Chen, Peijun You Department of Anesthesiology, Shandong Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Jining, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Barrier properties of the skin and physicochemical properties of drugs are the main factors for the delivery of local anesthetic molecules. The present work evaluates the anesthetic efficacy of drug-loaded nanocarrier (NC systems for the delivery of local anesthetic drug, ropivacaine (RVC. Methods: In this study, transcriptional transactivator peptide (TAT-decorated RVC-loaded NCs (TAT-RVC/NCs were successfully fabricated. Physicochemical properties of NCs were determined in terms of particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug-loading capacity, stability, and in vitro drug release. The skin permeation of NCs was examined using a Franz diffusion cell mounted with depilated mouse skin in vitro, and in vivo anesthetic effect was evaluated in mice. Results: The results showed that TAT-RVC/NCs have a mean diameter of 133.2 nm and high drug-loading capacity of 81.7%. From the in vitro skin permeation results, it was observed that transdermal flux of TAT-RVC/NCs was higher than that of RVC-loaded NCs (RVC/NCs and RVC injection. The evaluation of in vivo anesthetic effect illustrated that TAT-RVC/NCs can enhance the transdermal delivery of RVC by reducing the pain threshold in mice. Conclusion: These results indicate that TAT-decorated NCs systems are useful for overcoming the barrier function of the skin, decreasing the dosage of RVC and enhancing the anesthetic effect. Therefore, TAT-decorated NCs can be used as an effective transdermal delivery system for local anesthesia. Keywords: local anesthetic system, ropivacaine, transcriptional transactivator peptide, nanocarriers, skin delivery

  4. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Manoel G. Carstens

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Results: Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. Conclusions: The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value.

  5. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... ingredient: (a) Benzocaine 5 to 20 percent. (b) Benzyl alcohol 1 to 4 percent. (c) Dibucaine 0.25 to 1...

  6. Local anesthetics for brain tumor resection: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potters JW

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Jan-Willem Potters, Markus Klimek Department of Anesthesiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Abstract: This review summarizes the added value of local anesthetics in patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor resection, which is a procedure that is carried out frequently in neurosurgical practice. The procedure can be carried out under general anesthesia, sedation with local anesthesia or under local anesthesia only. Literature shows a large variation in the postoperative pain intensity ranging from no postoperative analgesia requirement in two-thirds of the patients up to a rate of 96% of the patients suffering from severe postoperative pain. The only identified causative factor predicting higher postoperative pain scores is infratentorial surgery. Postoperative analgesia can be achieved with multimodal pain management where local anesthesia is associated with lower postoperative pain intensity, reduction in opioid requirement and prevention of development of chronic pain. In awake craniotomy patients, sufficient local anesthesia is a cornerstone of the procedure. An awake craniotomy and brain tumor resection can be carried out completely under local anesthesia only. However, the use of sedative drugs is common to improve patient comfort during craniotomy and closure. Local anesthesia for craniotomy can be performed by directly blocking the six different nerves that provide the sensory innervation of the scalp, or by local infiltration of the surgical site and the placement of the pins of the Mayfield clamp. Direct nerve block has potential complications and pitfalls and is technically more challenging, but mostly requires lower total doses of the local anesthetics than the doses required in surgical-site infiltration. Due to a lack of comparative studies, there is no evidence showing superiority of one technique versus the other. Besides the use of other local anesthetics for analgesia, intravenous lidocaine administration has

  7. Interaction of Local Anesthetics with Biomembranes Consisting of Phospholipids and Cholesterol: Mechanistic and Clinical Implications for Anesthetic and Cardiotoxic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Tsuchiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a long history in medical and dental application, the molecular mechanism and precise site of action are still arguable for local anesthetics. Their effects are considered to be induced by acting on functional proteins, on membrane lipids, or on both. Local anesthetics primarily interact with sodium channels embedded in cell membranes to reduce the excitability of nerve cells and cardiomyocytes or produce a malfunction of the cardiovascular system. However, the membrane protein-interacting theory cannot explain all of the pharmacological and toxicological features of local anesthetics. The administered drug molecules must diffuse through the lipid barriers of nerve sheaths and penetrate into or across the lipid bilayers of cell membranes to reach the acting site on transmembrane proteins. Amphiphilic local anesthetics interact hydrophobically and electrostatically with lipid bilayers and modify their physicochemical property, with the direct inhibition of membrane functions, and with the resultant alteration of the membrane lipid environments surrounding transmembrane proteins and the subsequent protein conformational change, leading to the inhibition of channel functions. We review recent studies on the interaction of local anesthetics with biomembranes consisting of phospholipids and cholesterol. Understanding the membrane interactivity of local anesthetics would provide novel insights into their anesthetic and cardiotoxic effects.

  8. Development of lidocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Cho, Cheong-Weon; Yang, Kyu-Ho

    2004-12-09

    In relieving local pains, lidocaine, one of ester type local anesthetics, has been used. To develop the lidocaine gels of enhanced local anesthetic effects, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) based bioadhesive polymer gel containing an enhancer was formulated. As the drug concentration in the gels increased up to 3%, the permeation rate of drug linearly increased, thereafter reaching a plateau. As the temperature of surrounding solutions increased, the permeation of drug increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 3.29 kcal/mol for lidocaine. The permeation rate of drug through skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants, and bile salts. Among the enhancers studied, diethylene glycol showed the greatest enhancing effects on drug permeation through skin. The analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. In the area under the efficacy curve (AUEC) of the rat-tail flick tests, lidocaine gel containing diethylene glycol showed about 3.89-fold increase in analgesic activity compared with the control. The addition of vasoconstrictor in the gels prolonged the analgesic effects. The result of this study supports that the bioadhesive gel with efficient anesthetic effect could be developed using HPMC with combination of enhancer and vasoconstrictor.

  9. Methylparaben concentration in commercial Brazilian local anesthetics solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Rodriguez da Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To detect the presence and concentration of methylparaben in cartridges of commercial Brazilian local anesthetics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twelve commercial brands (4 in glass and 8 in plastic cartridges of local anesthetic solutions for use in dentistry were purchased from the Brazilian market and analyzed. Different lots of the commercial brands were obtained in different Brazilian cities (Piracicaba, Campinas and São Paulo. Separation was performed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with UV-Vis detector. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile:water (75:25 - v/v, pH 4.5, adjusted with acetic acid at a flow rate of 1.0 ml.min-1. RESULTS: When detected in the solutions, the methylparaben concentration ranged from 0.01% (m/v to 0.16% (m/v. One glass and all plastic cartridges presented methylparaben. CONCLUSION: 1. Methylparaben concentration varied among solutions from different manufacturers, and it was not indicated in the drug package inserts; 2. Since the presence of methylparaben in dental anesthetics is not regulated by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA and this substance could cause allergic reactions, it is important to alert dentists about its possible presence.

  10. Under Utilization of Local Anesthetics in Infant Lumbar Punctures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorchynski, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar Puncture (LP is an invasive procedure frequently used to diagnose meningitis among the pediatric population. Neonates and infants have not routinely received local anesthesia prior to LP. Study Objective: To determine whether emergency medicine physicians and pediatricians use local analgesics on neonates and infants prior to performing an LP and to identify which local anesthetics, if any, were used. Methods: Prospective, cohort study of all infants, six months of age or less, that received an LP in the emergency department (ED or inpatient pediatric units for suspected meningitis during a period of year at a university tertiary care hospital. Results: A total sample population of 111 infants that received an LP within the study period. A control population of 42 adults received an LP. Only 40.4% (45/111 of the infants received local analgesia prior to LP: either 1% lidocaine, EMLA or a combination of the two. Infants were less likely to receive lidocaine or EMLA prior to LP compared to adult subjects (OR= 0.27; 95% CI0.12 to 0.62. No neonates that were less than one month of age received local procedural anesthesia by emergency medicine or pediatric physicians. ED physicians’ use of local anesthesia prior to LP increased with increasing age of the infant. The pediatricians in this study used local anesthesia prior to LP when the infant was at least five months of age. Discussion: The data objectively support recent literature regarding the under use or lack of use of analgesia prior to LP among neonates and infants. Local anesthetics should be used routinely without exception prior to performing an LP in the pediatric population.

  11. Vasoconstriction Potency Induced by Aminoamide Local Anesthetics Correlates with Lipid Solubility

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    Hui-Jin Sung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoamide local anesthetics induce vasoconstriction in vivo and in vitro. The goals of this in vitro study were to investigate the potency of local anesthetic-induced vasoconstriction and to identify the physicochemical property (octanol/buffer partition coefficient, pKa, molecular weight, or potency of local anesthetics that determines their potency in inducing isolated rat aortic ring contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves to local anesthetics (levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine were obtained from isolated rat aorta. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the reported physicochemical properties of local anesthetics and the local anesthetic concentration that produced 50% (ED50 of the local anesthetic-induced maximum vasoconstriction. We determined the order of potency (ED50 of vasoconstriction among local anesthetics to be levobupivacaine > ropivacaine > lidocaine > mepivacaine. The relative importance of the independent variables that affect the vasoconstriction potency is octanol/buffer partition coefficient > potency > pKa > molecular weight. The ED50 in endothelium-denuded aorta negatively correlated with the octanol/buffer partition coefficient of local anesthetics (r2=0.9563; P<0.001. The potency of the vasoconstriction in the endothelium-denuded aorta induced by local anesthetics is determined primarily by lipid solubility and, in part, by other physicochemical properties including potency and pKa.

  12. Does Immediate Pain Relief After an Injection into the Sacroiliac Joint with Anesthetic and Corticosteroid Predict Subsequent Pain Relief?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Byron J; Huynh, Lisa; Levin, Josh; Rinkaekan, Pranathip; Kordi, Ramin; Kennedy, David J

    2018-02-01

    To determine if immediate pain response following an injection with local anesthetic and corticosteroid predicts subsequent relief. Prospective observational cohort. An institutional review board-approved prospective study from a single academic medical center. Patients with clinical diagnosis of sacroiliac (SIJ) pain and referred for SIJ injection were enrolled; 1 cc of 2% lidocaine and 1 cc of triamcinolone 40 mg/mL were injected into the SIJ. Pain score on 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS) during provocation maneuvers was recorded immediately before injection, immediately after injection, and at two and four weeks of follow-up. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was also recorded. Various cutoffs were identified to establish positive anesthetic response and successful outcomes at follow-up. These were used to calculated likelihood ratios. Of those with 100% anesthetic response, six of 11 (54.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]+/-29.4%, +LR 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1-5.9) demonstrated 50% or greater pain relief at follow-up, and four of 11 (36.5%, 95% CI+/-28.4%, +LR 3.00, 95% CI = 1.4-5.1) had 100% relief at two to four weeks. Fourteen of 14 (100%, 95% CI+/-21.5%, -LR 0.0, 95% CI = 0.0-2.1) with an initial negative block failed to achieve 100% relief at follow-up. Patients who fail to achieve initial relief after SIJ injection with anesthetic and steroid are very unlikely to achieve significant pain relief at follow-up; negative likelihood ratios (LR) in this study, based on how success is defined, range between 0 and 0.9. Clinically significant positive likelihood ratios of anesthetic response to SIJ injection are more limited and less robust, but are valuable in predicting 50% relief or 100% relief at two to four weeks. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  14. [Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500μM was determined by Live/Dead assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacaineC effectively improved the reduced chondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative effects of vitamin C on the effects of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine, and lidocaine on human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Intra-articular injections of local anesthetics are commonly used to enhance post-operative analgesia following orthopedic surgery as arthroscopic surgeries. Nevertheless, recent reports of severe complications due to the use of intra-articular local anesthetic have raised concerns. The study aims to assess use of vitamin C in reducing adverse effects of the most commonly employed anesthetics - ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine - on human chondrocytes. The chondrocyte viability following exposure to 0.5% bupivacaine or 0.75% ropivacaine or 1.0% lidocaine and/or vitamin C at doses 125, 250 and 500 μM was determined by LIVE/DEAD assay and annexin V staining. Expression levels of caspases 3 and 9 were assessed using antibodies by Western blotting. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the generation of reactive oxygen species. On exposure to the local anesthetics, chondrotoxicity was found in the order ropivacaineC effectively improved the reduced chondrocyte viability and decreased the raised apoptosis levels following exposure to anesthesia. At higher doses, vitamin C was found efficient in reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species and as well down-regulate the expressions of caspases 3 and 9. Vitamin C was observed to effectively protect chondrocytes against the toxic insult of local anesthetics ropivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of lipid emulsion therapy in local anesthetic overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Karcioglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE therapy as antidote in systemic toxicity of certain agents has gained widespread support. There are increasing data suggesting use of ILE in reversing from local anesthetic-induced systemic toxicity severe, life-threatening cardiotoxicity, although findings are contradictory. Efficiency of ILE was demonstrated in animal studies in the treatment of severe impairment of cardiac functions, via a mechanism for trapping lipophilic drugs in an expanded plasma lipid compartment (“lipid sink”. In patients with hemodynamic compromise and/or cardiovascular collapse due to lipid-soluble agents, ILE may be considered for resuscitation in the acute setting by emergency physicians. The most common adverse effects from standard ILE include hypertriglyceridemia, fat embolism, infection, vein irritation, pancreatitis, electrolyte disturbances and allergic reactions. The advantages of ILE include an apparent wide margin of safety, relatively low cost, long shelf-life, and ease of administration.

  17. Binding of long-lasting local anesthetics to lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazoit, Jean-Xavier; Le Guen, Régine; Beloeil, Hélène; Benhamou, Dan

    2009-02-01

    Rapid infusion of lipid emulsion has been proposed to treat local anesthetic toxicity. The authors wanted to test the buffering properties of two commercially available emulsions made of long- and of long- and medium-chain triglycerides. Using the shake-flask method, the authors measured the solubility and binding of racemic bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine to diluted Intralipid (Fresenius Kabi, Paris, France) and Medialipide (B-Braun, Boulogne, France). The apparent distribution coefficient expressed as the ratio of mole fraction was 823 +/- 198 and 320 +/- 65 for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively, at 500 mg in the Medialipide/buffer emulsion; and 1,870 +/- 92 and 1,240 +/- 14 for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively, in the Intralipid/buffer emulsion. Decreasing the pH from 7.40 to 7.00 of the Medialipide/buffer emulsion led to a decrease in ratio of molar concentration from 121 +/- 3.8 to 46 +/- 2.8 for bupivacaine, and to a lesser extent from 51 +/- 4.0 to 31 +/- 1.6 for ropivacaine. The capacity of the 1% emulsions was 871 and 2,200 microM for the 1% Medialipide and Intralipid emulsions, respectively. The dissociation constant was 818 and 2,120 microM for racemic bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine, respectively. Increasing the temperature from 20 to 37 degrees C led to a greater increase in affinity for ropivacaine (55%) than for bupivacaine (27%). When the pH of the buffer was decreased from 7.40 to 7.00, the affinity was decreased by a factor of 1.68, similar for both anesthetics. The solubility of long-acting local anesthetics in lipid emulsions and the high capacity of binding of these emulsions most probably explain their clinical efficacy in case of toxicity. The long-chain triglyceride emulsion Intralipid appears to be about 2.5 times more efficacious than the 50/50 medium-chain/long-chain Medialipide emulsion. Also, because of their higher hydrophobicity

  18. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  19. Local anesthetics disrupt energetic coupling between the voltage-sensing segments of a sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko; Chanda, Baron

    2009-01-01

    Local anesthetics block sodium channels in a state-dependent fashion, binding with higher affinity to open and/or inactivated states. Gating current measurements show that local anesthetics immobilize a fraction of the gating charge, suggesting that the movement of voltage sensors is modified when a local anesthetic binds to the pore of the sodium channel. Here, using voltage clamp fluorescence measurements, we provide a quantitative description of the effect of local anesthetics on the steady-state behavior of the voltage-sensing segments of a sodium channel. Lidocaine and QX-314 shifted the midpoints of the fluorescence-voltage (F-V) curves of S4 domain III in the hyperpolarizing direction by 57 and 65 mV, respectively. A single mutation in the S6 of domain IV (F1579A), a site critical for local anesthetic block, abolished the effect of QX-314 on the voltage sensor of domain III. Both local anesthetics modestly shifted the F-V relationships of S4 domain IV toward hyperpolarized potentials. In contrast, the F-V curve of the S4 domain I was shifted by 11 mV in the depolarizing direction upon QX-314 binding. These antagonistic effects of the local anesthetic indicate that the drug modifies the coupling between the voltage-sensing domains of the sodium channel. Our findings suggest a novel role of local anesthetics in modulating the gating apparatus of the sodium channel.

  20. Comparison of O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate following injection of vasoconstrictor containing anesthetic (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor anesthetic (Mepivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayat M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Along with higher usage of dental local anesthesia with risks to people health together with their positive role, the important goal of dentistry, patients’ health, has been stressed repeatedly nowadays. This study was conducted to compare O2 saturation, respiratory rate and heart rate of patients following injection of anesthetic containing vasoconstrictor (lidocaine 2% and without vasoconstrictor (Mepivacaine. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 32 healthy humans (16 females and 16 males with 25-50 years age range and no history of drug usage. Cases were classified into two matched groups. O2 saturation, heart and respiratory rate were recorded before extraction of a mandibular posterior tooth. In the first group, 3.6 ml lidocaine 2% with 1:80,000 epinephrine and in the second group Mepivacaine 3% was injected, using inferior alveolar dental nerve block with aspiration. Variables were measured and recorded. Tooth extraction was performed and the mentioned variables were recorded again. Data were analyzed with SPSS software using t and Paired t-test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: After injection of lidocaine, the heart rate was increased (12.25±1.75 bpm, and the time to reach the maximum rate was 64.75±11.26 seconds. After extraction of tooth, heart rate in both groups was increased not considering the type of injection. Conclusion: The study showed that the injection of lidocaine (containing epinephrine in patients without contraindication has no risk. Also, possible increase in heart rate is not risky and is not associated with O2 saturation decrease and respiratory interruption.

  1. Distribution and absorption of local anesthetics in inferior alveolar nerve block: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Sinan; Küçük, Dervisşhan; Gümüş, Cesur; Kara, M Isa

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution and absorption of local anesthetic solutions in inferior alveolar nerve block using magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers were divided into 4 groups and injected with 1.5 mL for inferior alveolar nerve block and 0.3 mL for lingual nerve block. The solutions used for the different groups were 2% lidocaine, 2% lidocaine with 0.125 mg/mL epinephrine, 4% articaine with 0.006 mg/mL epinephrine, and 4% articaine with 0.012 mg/mL epinephrine. All subjects had axial T2-weighted and fat-suppressed images at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after injection. The localization, area, and intensity (signal characteristics) of the solutions were analyzed and onset and duration times of the anesthesia were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the intensity and area of the solutions at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after injection, but differences were found within each group. No between-group differences were found on magnetic resonance imaging in the distribution and absorption of lidocaine with or without epinephrine and articaine with 0.006 and 0.012 mg/mL epinephrine. All solutions were noticeably absorbed at 120 minutes after injection. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prolonged local anesthetic action through slow release from poly (lactic acid co castor oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Golovanevski, Ludmila; Domb, Abraham J; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate a new formulation of bupivacaine loaded in an injectable fatty acid based biodegradable polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) in prolonging motor and sensory block when injected locally. The polyesters were synthesized from DL: -lactic acid and castor oil with feed ratio of 4:6 and 3:7 w/w. Bupivacaine was dispersed in poly(fatty ester) liquid and tested for drug release in vitro. The polymer p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 loaded with 10% bupivacaine was injected through a 22G needle close to the sciatic nerve of ICR mice and the duration of sensory and motor nerve blockade was measured. The DL: -lactic acid co castor oil p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 released 65% of the incorporated bupivacaine during 1 week in vitro. Single injection of 10% bupivacaine loaded into this polymer caused motor block that lasted 24 h and sensory block that lasted 48 h. Previously we developed a ricinoleic acid based polymer with incorporated bupivacaine which prolonged anesthesia to 30 h. The new polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 provides slow release of effective doses of the incorporated local anesthetic agent and prolongs anesthesia to 48 h.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of locally administered amitriptyline gel as adjunct to local anesthetics in irreversible pulpitis pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moghadamnia A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amitriptyline is one of the most common tricyclic antidepressants, which binds to pain sensory nerve fibers close to the sodium channel; hence, it could interact to some degree with receptors of local anesthetics. This study was designed to assess the additional analgesic effects of 2% Amitriptyline local gel administration in irreversible pulpitis pain of the molars. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, double-blind clinical trial that was performed on 56 consented adult patients who did not receive enough analgesia after a lidocaine nerve block for their tooth pulpitis pain. Patients were treated with 0.2 ml of either 2% amitriptyline or placebo, which was directly injected into their mandibular molar pulp chamber after they had received two routine lidocaine injections. Patients were asked to score their pain as a mark on a 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at different timepoints: 0 (just before gel administration, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 minutes after the treatments. Results: There was a 92.5% decrease in VAS scores of patients 9 minutes after amitriptyline administration compared to Time 0, while in the placebo group this difference was only 13.5%. Further, in the amitriptyline group, the VAS score at all timepoints was statistically different from Time 0 ( P < 0.01. The overall pain reduction and its trend was significantly higher in the amitriptyline group compared with the placebo group ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Inter-pulp space administration of amitriptyline 2% gel for completing analgesia in irreversible pulpitis pain could be effective and useful as a conjunctive therapy to injections of local anesthetics.

  4. The efficacy of local anesthetics in reducing post operative pain after appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Baghaee vaji

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Reducing post operative pain is a common issue in surgeries. This study was to evaluate the efficacy of wound infiltration with local anesthetics in reducing postoperative pain after appendectomy. This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial on 40 patients with non-complicated acute appendicitis. Cases received a combination of lidocaine hydrochloride and bupivacaine hydrochloride after appendectomy and before closing the wound. Controls received the same volume of saline solution. Injections were done both under the fascia of external oblique muscle and intradermal. Pain assessment was done by two pain measuring scales, VAS and NRS, in 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after the operation. Cases and controls were the same in age, sex, and history of opium addiction. Pain peaked in the 8th hour after operation in both groups and reduced afterwards. Pain assessments showed the same pattern using the NRS and VAS measuring scales. T-test showed the pain to be significantly less in cases comparing with the controls in all time points. No significant difference was seen in the time of receiving the first analgesic after the operation but the frequency of analgesic consumption was significantly lower in controls. This study showed local anesthetic infiltration to be effective in reducing the postoperative pain in patients undergoing appendectomy which is in contrast with the previous studies. This may be due to a different infiltration technique or pain assessment in the first 24 hours after the operation.

  5. Extended release local anesthetic agents in a postoperative arthritic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickowicz, Diana E; Golovanevski, Ludmila; Haze, Amir; Domb, Abraham J; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics play an important role in postoperative pain management in orthopedic joint procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an intraoperative extra-articular injection of poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil 3:7), p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 loaded with 15% bupivacaine, for postoperative analgesia following knee arthroplasty. Prolonged release local anesthetic formulation was synthesized by mixing p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 with bupivacaine base. Under anesthesia, the knee joint of Sprague-Dawley rats was exposed, a hole drilled in the femoral trochlea. 0.2 mL of either 15% polymer-bupivacaine formulation or plain bupivacaine (control) was injected locally and compared with a nonsurgery control group. Mechanical hyperalgesia was determined by counting the vocalizations and leg withdrawal after joint squeezing. Behavioral assessments over a day postoperative period revealed a reduction in rearing and ambulation in an open-field apparatus in animals of both experimental groups compared with the nonsurgery control. The vocalizations during the hyperalgesia test increased compared with the control at 24 h. At 48 h, 3.667 ± 0.5138, p = 0.0076 vocalizations were recorded for the plain bupivacaine group versus 1.417 ± 0.5138, p < 0.0001 in the 15% polymer-bupivacaine formulation. Bupivacaine encapsulated in p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 extended the duration of the analgesia compared with plain drug in rats and could represent effective postoperative analgesic in orthopedic joint procedures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  6. Application of a three-microneedle device for the delivery of local anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kayoko Ishikawa,1 Hidekazu Fukamizu,1 Tetsuya Takiguchi,1 Yusuke Ohta,1 Yoshiki Tokura2 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan; 2Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan Purpose: We investigated the effectiveness of a newly developed device for the delivery of local anesthetics in the treatment of axillary osmidrosis and hyperhidrosis. We developed a device with three fine, stainless steel needles fabricated with a bevel angle facing outside (“three-microneedle device” [TMD] to release a drug broadly and homogeneously into tissue in the horizontal plane. Use of this device could reduce the risk of complications when transcutaneous injections are undertaken.Patients and methods: Sixteen Japanese patients were enrolled. The mean volume of lidocaine hydrochloride per unit area needed to elicit anesthesia when using a TMD was compared with that the volume required when using a conventional 27-gauge needle. The visual analog scale (VAS score of needlestick pain and injection-associated pain was also compared.Results: The mean volume of lidocaine hydrochloride per unit area to elicit anesthesia using the TMD was significantly lower than that the volume required when using the conventional 27-gauge needle. The VAS score of needlestick pain for the TMD was significantly lower than that the VAS score for the 27-gauge needle.Conclusion: These data suggest that the TMD could be useful for the delivery of local anesthetics in terms of clinical efficacy and avoidance of adverse effects. Keywords: three-microneedle device, transcutaneous drug delivery, local anesthesia, lidocaine, pain

  7. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorzetto L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura Zorzetto,1 Paola Brambilla,1 Elena Marcello,1 Nora Bloise,2 Manuela De Gregori,3 Lorenzo Cobianchi,4,5 Andrea Peloso,4,5 Massimo Allegri,6 Livia Visai,2,7 Paola Petrini1 1Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering ‘G. Natta’, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Health Technologies (CHT, INSTM UdR of Pavia, University of Pavia, 3Pain Therapy Service, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo Pavia, Pavia, 4General Surgery Department, IRCCS Foundation Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, 5Departments of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, 6Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, 7Department of Occupational Medicine, Toxicology and Environmental Risks, S. Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Lab of Nanotechnology, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured

  8. Local anesthetic-induced inhibition of human neutrophil priming: the influence of structure, lipophilicity, and charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picardi, Susanne; Cartellieri, Sibylle; Groves, Danja; Hahnenekamp, Klaus; Gerner, Peter; Durieux, Marcel E.; Stevens, Markus F.; Lirk, Philipp; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2013-01-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) are widely known for inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels underlying their antiarrhythmic and antinociceptive effects. However, LAs have significant immunomodulatory properties and were shown to affect human neutrophil functions independent of sodium-channel blockade.

  9. The Effect of Local Anesthetic Volume Within the Adductor Canal on Quadriceps Femoris Function Evaluated by Electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grevstad, Ulrik; Jæger, Pia; Kløvgaard, Johan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-injection adductor canal block (ACB) provides analgesia after knee surgery. Which nerves that are blocked by an ACB and what influence-if any-local anesthetic volume has on the effects remain undetermined. We hypothesized that effects on the nerve to the vastus medialis muscle......, they received a femoral nerve block and a placebo ACB. The effect on the vastus medialis (primary endpoint) and the vastus lateralis was evaluated using noninvasive electromyography (EMG). Quadriceps femoris muscle strength was evaluated using a dynamometer. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant......L was used (P = 0.0001). No statistically significant differences were found between volume and effect on the vastus lateralis (P = 0.81) or in muscle strength (P = 0.15). CONCLUSIONS: For ACB, there is a positive correlation between local anesthetic volume and effect on the vastus medialis muscle. Despite...

  10. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  11. The Third American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity: Executive Summary 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Joseph M; Barrington, Michael J; Fettiplace, Michael R; Gitman, Marina; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Mörwald, Eva E; Rubin, Daniel S; Weinberg, Guy

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine's Third Practice Advisory on local anesthetic systemic toxicity is an interim update from its 2010 advisory. The advisory focuses on new information regarding the mechanisms of lipid resuscitation, updated frequency estimates, the preventative role of ultrasound guidance, changes to case presentation patterns, and limited information related to local infiltration anesthesia and liposomal bupivacaine. In addition to emerging information, the advisory updates recommendations pertaining to prevention, recognition, and treatment of local anesthetic systemic toxicity. WHAT'S NEW IN THIS UPDATE?: This interim update summarizes recent scientific findings that have enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms that lead to lipid emulsion reversal of LAST, including rapid partitioning, direct inotropy, and post-conditioning. Since the previous practice advisory, epidemiological data have emerged that suggest a lower frequency of LAST as reported by single institutions and some registries, nevertheless a considerable number of events still occur within the general community. Contemporary case reports suggest a trend toward delayed presentation, which may mirror the increased use of ultrasound guidance (fewer intravascular injections), local infiltration techniques (slower systemic uptake), and continuous local anesthetic infusions. Small patient size and sarcopenia are additional factors that increase potential risk for LAST. An increasing number of reported events occur outside of the traditional hospital setting and involve non-anesthesiologists.

  12. Occurrence of paresthesia after dental local anesthetic administration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garisto, Gabriella A; Gaffen, Andrew S; Lawrence, Herenia P; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Haas, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    Several studies have suggested that the likelihood of paresthesia may depend on the local anesthetic used. The purpose of this study was to determine if the type of local anesthetic administered had any effect on reports of paresthesia in dentistry in the United States. The authors obtained reports of paresthesia involving dental local anesthetics during the period from November 1997 through August 2008 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. They used chi(2) analysis to compare expected frequencies, on the basis of U.S. local anesthetic sales data, with observed reports of oral paresthesia. During the study period, 248 cases of paresthesia occurring after dental procedures were reported. Most cases (94.5 percent) involved mandibular nerve block. The lingual nerve was affected in 89.0 percent of cases. Reports involving 4 percent prilocaine and 4 percent articaine were 7.3 and 3.6 times, respectively, greater than expected (chi(2), P paresthesia occurs more commonly after use of 4 percent local anesthetic formulations. These findings are consistent with those reported in a number of studies from other countries. Until further research indicates otherwise, dentists should consider these results when assessing the risks and benefits of using 4 percent local anesthetics for mandibular block anesthesia.

  13. Ketamine changes the local resting-state functional properties of anesthetized-monkey brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jia-Sheng; Liu, Zuxiang; Zhao, Can; Wei, Rui-Han; Zhao, Wen; Tian, Peng-Yu; Zhou, Xia; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2017-11-01

    Ketamine is a well-known anesthetic. 'Recreational' use of ketamine common induces psychosis-like symptoms and cognitive impairments. The acute and chronic effects of ketamine on relevant brain circuits have been studied, but the effects of single-dose ketamine administration on the local resting-state functional properties of the brain remain unknown. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of single-dose ketamine administration on the brain local intrinsic properties. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to explore the ketamine-induced alterations of brain intrinsic properties. Seven adult rhesus monkeys were imaged with rs-fMRI to examine the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) in the brain before and after ketamine injection. Paired comparisons were used to detect the significantly altered regions. Results showed that the fALFF of the prefrontal cortex (p=0.046), caudate nucleus (left side, p=0.018; right side, p=0.025), and putamen (p=0.020) in post-injection stage significantly increased compared with those in pre-injection period. The ReHo of nucleus accumbens (p=0.049), caudate nucleus (p=0.037), and hippocampus (p=0.025) increased after ketamine injection, but that of prefrontal cortex decreased (pketamine administration can change the regional intensity and synchronism of brain activity, thereby providing evidence of ketamine-induced abnormal resting-state functional properties in primates. This evidence may help further elucidate the effects of ketamine on the cerebral resting status. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Axillary local anesthetic spread after the thoracic interfacial ultrasound block – a cadaveric and radiological evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alfaro de la Torre

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral opioid analgesics have been used for management of peri- and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing axillary dissection. The axillary region is a difficult zone to block and does not have a specific regional anesthesia technique published that offers its adequate blockade. Methods: After institutional review board approval, anatomic and radiological studies were conducted to determine the deposition and spread of methylene blue and local anesthetic injected respectively into the axilla via the thoracic inter-fascial plane. Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies were then conducted in 15 of 34 patients scheduled for unilateral breast surgery that entailed any of the following: axillary clearance, sentinel node biopsy, axillary node biopsy, or supernumerary breasts, to ascertain the deposition and time course of spread of solution within the thoracic interfascial plane in vivo. Results: Radiological and cadaveric studies showed that the injection of local anesthetic and methylene blue via the thoracic inter-fascial plane, using ultrasound guide technique, results in reliable deposition into the axilla. In patients, the injection of the local anesthetic produced a reliable axillary sensory block. This finding was supported by Magnetic Resonance Imaging studies that showed hyper-intense signals in the axillary region. Conclusions: These findings define the anatomic characteristics of the thoracic interfascial plane nerve block in the axillary region, and underline the clinical potential of this novel nerve block. Resumo: Justificativa: Os analgésicos orais à base de opioides têm sido usados para o manejo da analgesia nos períodos peri e pós-operatório de pacientes submetidos à linfadenectomia axilar. A região axilar é uma zona difícil de bloquear e não há registro de uma técnica de anestesia regional específica que ofereça o seu bloqueio adequado. Métodos: Após a aprovação do Conselho de Ética institucional

  15. Modifying the baricity of local anesthetics for spinal anesthesia by temperature adjustment: model calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Axel R; Zimmermann, Katrin; Seele, Kristin; Rössel, Thomas; Koch, Thea; Litz, Rainer J

    2006-08-01

    Although local anesthetics (LAs) are hyperbaric at room temperature, density drops within minutes after administration into the subarachnoid space. LAs become hypobaric and therefore may cranially ascend during spinal anesthesia in an uncontrolled manner. The authors hypothesized that temperature and density of LA solutions have a nonlinear relation that may be described by a polynomial equation, and that conversion of this equation may provide the temperature at which individual LAs are isobaric. Density of cerebrospinal fluid was measured using a vibrating tube densitometer. Temperature-dependent density data were obtained from all LAs commonly used for spinal anesthesia, at least in triplicate at 5 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees, and 37 degrees C. The hypothesis was tested by fitting the obtained data into polynomial mathematical models allowing calculations of substance-specific isobaric temperatures. Cerebrospinal fluid at 37 degrees C had a density of 1.000646 +/- 0.000086 g/ml. Three groups of local anesthetics with similar temperature (T, degrees C)-dependent density (rho) characteristics were identified: articaine and mepivacaine, rho1(T) = 1.008-5.36 E-06 T2 (heavy LAs, isobaric at body temperature); L-bupivacaine, rho2(T) = 1.007-5.46 E-06 T2 (intermediate LA, less hypobaric than saline); bupivacaine, ropivacaine, prilocaine, and lidocaine, rho3(T) = 1.0063-5.0 E-06 T (light LAs, more hypobaric than saline). Isobaric temperatures (degrees C) were as follows: 5 mg/ml bupivacaine, 35.1; 5 mg/ml L-bupivacaine, 37.0; 5 mg/ml ropivacaine, 35.1; 20 mg/ml articaine, 39.4. Sophisticated measurements and mathematic models now allow calculation of the ideal injection temperature of LAs and, thus, even better control of LA distribution within the cerebrospinal fluid. The given formulae allow the adaptation on subpopulations with varying cerebrospinal fluid density.

  16. Assessment of the densities of local anesthetics and their combination with adjuvants: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Moreira, Adriano Dias; Gaspar, Flávia Cunha; Gouveia, Marildo A; Cordeiro, José Antônio

    2009-01-01

    The relative density of a local anesthetic in relation to that of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at 37 degrees C is one of the most important physical properties that affect the level of analgesia obtained after the subarachnoid administration of the drug. The objective of this study was to determine the density of local anesthetic solutions, with and without glucose, and the combination of the local anesthetic with adjuvants at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C. The density (g.mL(-1)) was determined by using a DMA 450 densimeter with a sensitivity of +/- 0.00001 g.mL(-1). The densities, and variations, according to the temperature were obtained for all local anesthetics and their combination with opioids at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C. The solution is hyperbaric if its density exceeds 1.00099, hypobaric when its density is lower than 1.00019, and isobaric when its density is greater than 1.00019 and lower than 1.00099. The densities of both local anesthetics and adjuvants decrease with the increase in temperature. At 37 degrees C, all glucose-containing solutions are hyperbaric. In the absence of glucose, all solutions are hypobaric. At 37 degrees C, morphine, fentanyl, sufentanil, and clonidine are hypobaric. The densities of local anesthetics and adjuvants decrease with the increase in temperature and increase when glucose is added. The knowledge of the relative density helps select the most adequate local anesthetic to be administered in the subarachnoid space.

  17. Uses and Doses of Local Anesthetics in Fish, Amphibians, and Reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatigny, Frederic; Kamunde, Collins; Creighton, Catherine M; Stevens, E Don

    2017-05-01

    Local anesthetics are an integral part of routine pain management in mammals, yet their use is relatively limited in fish, amphibians and reptiles. These animals frequently undergo potentially painful surgical procedures and therefore could possibly benefit from those drugs. Some recommendations are currently available in the literature concerning analgesic use in these animals. However the pharmacological properties, safety and often efficacy of local anesthetic drugs have not been investigated yet in fish, amphibians, or reptiles. This review compiled current information concerning the use of those agents in fish, reptiles and amphibians to help clinicians make an informed decision as to which dose and drug to use. The resulting literature search showed that the literature concerning use of local analgesics in fish and amphibians is very limited while the literature for reptiles is more extensive. We found few experimental studies evaluating the efficacy of local anesthetics. Further studies would provide additional information for developing guidelines to improve the welfare of fish, amphibians and reptiles.

  18. Local anesthetics after total knee arthroplasty: intraarticular or extraarticular administration? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.O.; Kristensen, B.B.; Husted, H.

    2008-01-01

    evaluated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 32 patients undergoing total knee replacement with high-volume (170 mL) 0.2% ropivacaine infiltration analgesia were randomized to receive injection of 20 mL ropivacaine (0.2%) intraarticularly plus 30 mL saline in the extraarticular wound space 24 hours postoperatively...... or to receive 20 mL ropivacaine (0.2%) intraarticularly plus 30 mL ropivacaine (0.2%) in the extraarticular wound space 24 hours postoperatively. Pain intensity at rest and with mobilization was recorded for 4 hours after administration of additional local anesthetics. RESULTS: Intensity of pain at rest, during...

  19. Anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental X-tip intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in patients with irreversible pulpitis: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Atool Chandra; Latha, Satheesh Sasidharan; Jain, Shefali; Kataki, Rubi

    2014-11-01

    Pain management remains the utmost important qualifying criteria in minimizing patient agony and establishing a strong dentist-patient rapport. Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is a painful condition necessitating immediate attention and supplemental anesthetic techniques are often resorted to in addition to conventional inferior alveolar nerve block. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, in mandibular posterior teeth, using 4% Articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline as local anesthetic, when the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block proved ineffective. X-tip system was used to administer 1.7 ml of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in 30 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth with moderate to severe pain on endodontic access after administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block. The results of the study showed that 25 X-tip injections (83.33%) were successful and 5 X-tip injections (16.66%) were unsuccessful. When the inferior alveolar nerve block fails to provide adequate pulpal anesthesia, X-tip system using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline was successful in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

  20. Anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental X-tip intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in patients with irreversible pulpitis: An in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Atool Chandra; Latha, Satheesh Sasidharan; Jain, Shefali; Kataki, Rubi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain management remains the utmost important qualifying criteria in minimizing patient agony and establishing a strong dentist–patient rapport. Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is a painful condition necessitating immediate attention and supplemental anesthetic techniques are often resorted to in addition to conventional inferior alveolar nerve block. Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, in mandibular posterior teeth, using 4% Articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline as local anesthetic, when the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block proved ineffective. Materials and Methods: X-tip system was used to administer 1.7 ml of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in 30 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth with moderate to severe pain on endodontic access after administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block. Results: The results of the study showed that 25 X-tip injections (83.33%) were successful and 5 X-tip injections (16.66%) were unsuccessful. Conclusion: When the inferior alveolar nerve block fails to provide adequate pulpal anesthesia, X-tip system using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline was successful in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:25506137

  1. Minimum effective local anesthetic dose of intrathecal hyperbaric ropivacaine and bupivacaine for cesarean section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Zhi-yu; WANG Dong-xin; WU Xin-min

    2011-01-01

    Background Intrathecal anesthesia is commonly used for cesarean section. Bupivacaine and ropivacaine have all been used as intrathecal drugs. The minimum effective local anesthetic dose (MLAD) of intrathecal ropivacaine for nonobstetric patients has been reported. However, few data are available on the MLAD of hyperbaric ropivacine for obstetric patients and the relative potency to bupivacaine has not been fully determined. In this study, we sought to determine the MLAD of intrathecal ropivacaine and bupivacaine for elective cesarean section and to define their relative potency ratio.Methods We enrolled forty parturients undergoing elective cesarean section under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia and randomized them to one of two groups to receive intrathecal 0.5% hyperbaric ropivacaine or bupivacaine.The initial dose was 10 mg, and was increased in increments of 1 mg, using the technique of up-down sequential allocation. Efficacy was accepted if adequate sensory dermatomal anesthesia to pin prick to T7 or higher was attained within 20 minutes after intrathecal injection, and required no supplementary epidural injection for procedure until at least 50 minutes after the intrathecal injection.Results The intrathecal MLAD was 9.45 mg (95%confidence interval (CI), 8.45-10.56 mg) for ropivacaine and 7.53 mg (95%CI, 7.00-8.10 mg) for bupivacaine. The relative potency ratio was 0.80 (95% Cl, 0.74-0.85) for ropivacaine/bupivacaine when given intrathecally in cesarean section.Conclusion Ropivacaine is 20% less potent than bupivacaine during intrathecal anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

  2. Survey of Navy Dental Clinics: Materiel Complaints Regarding Carbide Burs and Local Anesthetics,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    second topic was the ineffective anesthesia reported for one particular brand of injectable lidocaine hydrochloride with epinephrine. Descriptive...reporting a bur breakage problem, premature failure may account for 2.5 to 8% of total bur usage. Significant Navy-wide problems with ineffective ...the dentists reporting ineffective anesthesia episodes were able to achieve adequate anesthesia by switching to other containers of the same anesthetic

  3. Comparison of Local Anesthetic Effect of Bupivacaine versus Bupivacaine plus Dexamethasone in Nasal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhosein Ma’somi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Adequate pain control is an important consideration in the post-surgical management of patients. Local nerve blockade added to general anesthesia can provide excellent pain control during and after most nasal surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the combined effect of local anesthetic drugs with corticosteroids in nasal surgery. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical study, 60 patients who underwent different nasal surgical procedures were matched and divided into two equal groups. Bilateral local nerve blockade was used in both groups. Bupivacaine or bupivacaine plus dexamethasone was administered by injection (groups B and B+D, respectively. Postoperative visual analog scale (VAS pain values and the need for oral/intramuscular analgesic treatment in the first 24 h were recorded in all patients. Results: Thirty-eight male (63.3% and 22 female (36.7% patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 28.3 ± 8.2 years. At 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 h post surgery, VAS pain values were significantly lower in the B+D group than in the B group. The analgesic requirement was significantly lower in the B+D group compared with the B group. No relevant complications were seen during surgery or postoperative hospitalization. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the positive effect of a combination of a dexamethasone with a bupivacaine in reducing pain and the need for analgesic drugs after different nasal surgeries. No acute or short-term post-surgical complications were observed in this study.   

  4. In Vitro Determination of Bicarbonate Dosage to Alkalinize Local Anesthetics to Physiologic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Lofgren’s contributions extend beyond the initial synthesis of Lidocaine ; his systematic study of an extensive assortment of compounds laid the foundation...maximizing time to precipitation formation. This descriptive study investigated the alkalinization of four local anesthetic solutions ( Lidocaine ... Lidocaine with epinephrine solutions for epidural administration (1986). While the benefits of alkalinization appear to be well established, the formation

  5. Probing the dynamics of complexed local anesthetics via neutron scattering spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Eckert, Juergen; Jacobsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Since potential changes in the dynamics and mobility of drugs upon complexation for delivery may affect their ultimate efficacy, we have investigated the dynamics of two local anesthetic molecules, bupivacaine (BVC, C18H28N2O) and ropivacaine (RVC, C17H26N2O), in both their crystalline forms...

  6. Local anesthetic-induced myotoxicity as a cause of severe trismus after inferior alveolar nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Wenko; Knoesel, Thomas; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich

    2018-01-01

    A case of a 60-year-old man with severe trismus after inferior alveolar nerve block is presented. MRI scans as well as histologic examination revealed muscle fibrosis and degeneration of the medial part of the left temporal muscle due to myotoxicity of a local anesthetic agent.

  7. Wound infiltration with local anesthetic after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Z.; Ahmad, R.; Haider, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out to compare the effect of analgesia with local wound infiltration with 20ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in post operative wounds with the control group having no infiltration. Patients were mobilized much earlier than in the control group while the demand of analgesics was considerably delayed in the study group. No any complications was noticed during local infiltration of wounds after abdominal surgery and is, therefore, applicable in routine surgery. (author)

  8. Memory-impairing effects of local anesthetics in an elevated plus-maze test in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Blatt

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-training intracerebroventricular administration of procaine (20 µg/µl and dimethocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, local anesthetics of the ester class, prolonged the latency (s in the retention test of male and female 3-month-old Swiss albino mice (25-35 g body weight; N = 140 in the elevated plus-maze (mean ± SEM for 10 male mice: control = 41.2 ± 8.1; procaine = 78.5 ± 10.3; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 58.7 ± 12.3; 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 109.6 ± 5.73; for 10 female mice: control = 34.8 ± 5.8; procaine = 55.3 ± 13.4; 10 µg/µl dimethocaine = 59.9 ± 12.3 and 20 µg/µl dimethocaine = 61.3 ± 11.1. However, lidocaine (10 or 20 µg/µl, an amide class type of local anesthetic, failed to influence this parameter. Local anesthetics at the dose range used did not affect the motor coordination of mice exposed to the rota-rod test. These results suggest that procaine and dimethocaine impair some memory process(es in the plus-maze test. These findings are interpreted in terms of non-anesthetic mechanisms of action of these drugs on memory impairment and also confirm the validity of the elevated plus-maze for the evaluation of drugs affecting learning and memory in mice

  9. New procedure to synthesize silver nanoparticles and their interaction with local anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocanu A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora Mocanu,1 Roxana Diana Pasca,1 Gheorghe Tomoaia,2 Corina Garbo,1 Petre T Frangopol,1 Ossi Horovitz,1 Maria Tomoaia-Cotisel11Chemical Engineering Department, Babes-Bolyai University, 2Orthopedic Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, RomaniaAbstract: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were prepared in aqueous colloid dispersions by the reduction of Ag+ with glucose in alkaline medium. Tetraethyl orthosilicate and l-asparagine were added as stabilizers of NPs. The AgNPs were characterized, and their interaction with three local anesthetics (procaine, dibucaine, or tetracaine was investigated. Optical spectra show the characteristic absorption band of AgNPs, due to surface plasmon resonance. Modifications in the position and shape of this band reflect the self-assembly of metal NPs mediated by anesthetic molecules and the progress in time of the aggregation process. Zeta-potential measuring was applied in order to characterize the electrostatic stability of the NPs. The size and shape of the AgNPs, as well as the features of the assemblies formed by their association in the presence of anesthetics, were evidenced by transmission electron microscopy images. Atomic force microscopy images showed the characteristics of the films of AgNPs deposited on glass support. The effect of the anesthetics could be described in terms of electrostatic forces between the negatively charged AgNPs and the anesthetic molecules, existing also in their cationic form at the working pH. But also hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions between the coated nanoparticles and anesthetics molecular species should be considered.Keywords: self-assembled nanostructures, UV-vis spectra, TEM, AFM, zeta potential

  10. Effectiveness of new vibration delivery system on pain associated with injection of local anesthesia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangalampally Shilpapriya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Pain is highly subjective and it is neurologically proven that stimulation of larger diameter fibers - e.g., using appropriate coldness, warmth, rubbing, pressure or vibration - can close the neural "gate" so that the central perception of itch and pain is reduced. This fact is based upon "gate control" theory of Melzack and Wall. The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of vibration stimuli on pain experienced during local anesthetic injections. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients aged 6-12 years old of both the genders with Frankel′s behavior rating scale as positive and definitely positive requiring bilateral local anesthesia injections for dental treatment were included in the split-mouth cross over design. Universal pain assessment tool was used to assess the pain with and without vibration during the administration of local anesthesia and the results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: Local anesthetic administration with vibration resulted in significantly less pain (P = 0.001 compared to the injections without the use of vibe. Conclusion: The results suggest that vibration can be used as an effective method to decrease pain during dental local anesthetic administration.

  11. Effectiveness of new vibration delivery system on pain associated with injection of local anesthesia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpapriya, Mangalampally; Jayanthi, Mungara; Reddy, Venumbaka Nilaya; Sakthivel, Rajendran; Selvaraju, Girija; Vijayakumar, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    Pain is highly subjective and it is neurologically proven that stimulation of larger diameter fibers - e.g., using appropriate coldness, warmth, rubbing, pressure or vibration - can close the neural "gate" so that the central perception of itch and pain is reduced. This fact is based upon "gate control" theory of Melzack and Wall. The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of vibration stimuli on pain experienced during local anesthetic injections. Thirty patients aged 6-12 years old of both the genders with Frankel's behavior rating scale as positive and definitely positive requiring bilateral local anesthesia injections for dental treatment were included in the split-mouth cross over design. Universal pain assessment tool was used to assess the pain with and without vibration during the administration of local anesthesia and the results obtained were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Local anesthetic administration with vibration resulted in significantly less pain (P = 0.001) compared to the injections without the use of vibe. The results suggest that vibration can be used as an effective method to decrease pain during dental local anesthetic administration.

  12. Comparison of local anesthetic effects of lidocaine versus tramadol and effect of child anxiety on pain level in circumcision procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Fazli; Tuncel, Altug; Balci, Melih; Aslan, Yilmaz; Sacan, Ozlem; Kisa, Cebrail; Kayali, Mustafa; Atan, Ali

    2013-10-01

    To compare the local anesthetic effects of tramadol hydrochloride with those of lidocaine in circumcision procedures. We also investigated the effect of child anxiety on pain level. A total of 70 children were included in this study. The children were randomized into 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 26) received lidocaine hydrochloride + epinephrine and they underwent circumcision using Ali's clamp(®). Group 2 (n = 35) received lidocaine hydrochloride + epinephrine and group 3 (n = 12) 5% tramadol. The last two groups underwent conventional circumcision. The mean anxiety score was 22.6. We did not find significant differences in terms of anxiety score among the groups (p = 0.761). When the pain scores of the groups during injection were compared, it was found that there were no significant differences. However, the pain score of the third group was significantly high when it was compared with the first and second group 2 and 10 min after injection. In the correlation analysis, we found a positive correlation between children's anxiety scores and the pain degree during injection (r = 0.373, p = 0.001). Tramadol may not provide effective local anesthesia in male circumcision. The child's anxiety before the circumcision seems to have a negative effect on pain level. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Physics of the current injection process during localized helicity injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Edward Thomas

    An impedance model has been developed for the arc-plasma cathode electron current source used in localized helicity injection tokamak startup. According to this model, a potential double layer (DL) is established between the high-density arc plasma (narc ˜ 1021 m-3) in the electron source, and the less-dense external tokamak edge plasma (nedge ˜ 10 18 m-3) into which current is injected. The DL launches an electron beam at the applied voltage with cross-sectional area close to that of the source aperture: Ainj ≈ 2 cm 2. The injected current, Iinj, increases with applied voltage, Vinj, according to the standard DL scaling, Iinj ˜ V(3/2/ inj), until the more restrictive of two limits to beam density nb arises, producing Iinj ˜ V(1/2/inj), a scaling with beam drift velocity. For low external tokamak edge density nedge, space-charge neutralization of the intense electron beam restricts the injected beam density to nb ˜ nedge. At high Jinj and sufficient edge density, the injected current is limited by expansion of the DL sheath, which leads to nb ˜ narc. Measurements of narc, Iinj , nedge, Vinj, support these predicted scalings, and suggest narc as a viable control actuator for the source impedance. Magnetic probe signals ≈ 300 degrees toroidally from the injection location are consistent with expectations for a gyrating, coherent electron beam with a compact areal cross-section. Technological development of the source has allowed an extension of the favorable Iinj ˜ V(1/2/inj) to higher power without electrical breakdown.

  14. Topical anesthesia with eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream in vasectomy: 2 randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Krogh, J; Rye, B

    1992-01-01

    Two paired randomized trials testing topical anesthesia with a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream*) in vasectomy were performed. In 1 trial EMLA cream was applied on 1 side of the scrotum, while infiltration anesthesia into the skin and subcutaneous tissue with mepivacaine was used...... on the contralateral side. All but 1 of the 13 patients (p less than 0.05) preferred infiltration anesthesia because of pain as the incision reached the subcutaneous tissue. In the other trial 29 patients received EMLA cream on 1 side of the scrotum before bilateral mepivacaine infiltration. There was significantly...... less pain on the sides with the anesthetic cream (p less than 0.001). Many patients would pay the price of the cream. In conclusion, EMLA cream cannot replace but it can supplement infiltration anesthesia during vasectomy....

  15. Rocuronium versus dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to local anesthetics in peribulbar block: A double blind randomized placebo controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwa Hamdi Bakr

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Adding 5 mg rocuronium to local anesthetic mixture provides more rapid onset of corneal and globe akinesia than 50 μg dexmedetomidine. Adding dexmedetomidine decreases IOP and provides sedation.

  16. Lake destratification induced by local air injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical and physical modelling makes possible quantitative predictions regarding the destratification process brought about by the local injection of air at the bottom of a thermally stratified lake or reservoir. The mathematical model developed distinguishes between a near field and a far

  17. Ultrasound guided local steroid injection versus extracorporeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nayera Saber

    2011-12-17

    Dec 17, 2011 ... Results: There was a statistically significant reduction in plantar fascia .... Several previous studies evaluate the effects of either local ... The choice of ultrasound guided technique of steroid injection was related to the accuracy of application and supe- ..... chronic proximal plantar fasciitis: a meta analysis.

  18. Allergy to local and general anesthetics and to other drugs during surgical procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, María Claudia; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; López, Santiago; Hospital Infantil Los Ángeles; Morato, Fabio F.; Hospital de Clínicas, São Paulo, Brasil; Kase Tanno, Luciana; Hospital de Clínicas, São Paulo, Brasil; Ensina, Luis Felipe C.; Hospital de Clínicas, São Paulo, Brasil

    2010-01-01

    Shock and hypersensitivity reactions to local and general anesthetics and to other drugs used during surgical procedures continue being a challenge in clinical practice. Allergic hypersensitivity can vary in presentation and intensity and might manifest itself from mild cutaneous symptoms to death. Las reacciones de choque e hipersensibilidad a los anestésicos locales y generales y a otros medicamentos utilizados durante los procedimientos quirúrgicos, continúan siendo un reto en la prácti...

  19. Local anesthetics inhibit induction of ornithine decarboxylase by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate.

    OpenAIRE

    Yuspa, S H; Lichti, U; Ben, T

    1980-01-01

    The induction of ornithine decarboxylase (L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) activity in mouse epidermal cells in vivo and in vitro occurs rapidly after exposure to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). This induction has characteristics of a cell surface receptor-mediated process. Local anesthetics modify a variety of cellular responses mediated by membrane receptors. When cultured mouse epidermal cells were exposed to the local anesthetics lidocaine, tetracaine...

  20. The effect of local tramadol injection in post appendectomy pain

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Khazaei; Farshid Arbabi-Kalati; Soheil Borumand; Reza Rooshanravan

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that tramadol, asemisynthetic opioid, is an effective analgesic with systemic (central) and local (peripheral) anesthetic effects. The aim of this study was to compare the post-operative anesthetic effect of subcutaneous wound infiltration of tramadol with normal saline as placebo in the incision wounds after appendectomy and measuring the average need to petidine during the next 24 hours after the appendectomy. Materials and Method: This double blind stud...

  1. Local anesthetic effects of Lidocaine cream: randomized controlled trial using a standardized prick pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberger, Katharina; Krause, Karoline; Maier, Kristina; Zschocke, Ina; Radtke, Marc; Augustin, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    ELA-max (4% lidocaine) and EMLA cream (lidocaine-prilocaine 2.5%) are topicals used for superficial anesthesia. Only few studies have been published on their comparative effectiveness in close-to-practice pain models. (1) To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of lidocaine cream compared with lidocaine-prilocaine cream and placebo. (2) To assess the safety and tolerability. Randomized, three-arm, double-blind trial in 40 healthy volunteers comparing the anesthetic effects of Lidocaine and lidocaine-prilocaine cream to placebo at various time points (0-120 min). A standardized pain was induced by lancet pricks and measured by a visual analogue scale. Intra-individual comparison between the test areas was performed in a cross-over design. Lidocaine showed significantly reduced pain compared to placebo at all assessment points. Pain reduction was achieved significantly earlier using lidocaine occlusively (30 min). No significant differences were found concerning the anesthetic efficacy of lidocaine and lidocaine-prilocaine cream. There were no relevant adverse events. This study confirms that a topical preparation with 4% lidocaine is an effective and safe treatment option for superficial anesthesia. It supports the claim that an occlusive application is more rapid in action. 4% lidocaine is of value as a rapidly-acting local anesthetic for the treatment of minor surgical procedures.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of bioadhesive benzocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Chul; Lee, Jin-Woo; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Lee, Chi H

    2003-07-09

    This study was performed to develop new enhanced anesthetic benzocaine gels with a suitable bioadhesive property for local anesthetic effects. As the concentration of benzocaine in the HPMC gels increased up to 15%, the permeation of drug increased, thereafter slightly increased. The activation energy of drug permeation was 11.29 kcal/mol. Bioadhesive forces were also measured. The permeation rate of drug through the skin was studied using various enhancers, such as glycols, non-ionic surfactants or fatty acids. Among the enhancers used, diethylene glycol showed the most enhancing effects. Analgesic activity was examined using a tail-flick analgesimeter. According to the rat tail-flick test, the value of AUEC (0 - 360min) of 15% benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol was 4662 +/- 200 s min, while that of gels without diethylene glycol was 3353 +/- 132 s min, showing about 1.39-fold increase in analgesic activity. Fifteen percentage of benzocaine gels containing diethylene glycol showed the most enhanced, prolonged analgesic effects, showing the maximum anesthetic effects at 240 min, while the gels without diethylene glycol showed maximum effect at 180 min.

  3. Local anesthesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a study comparing eutetic mixture of local anesthetics cream and lidocaine infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens de Lichtenberg, M; Miskowiak, J; Mogensen, P

    1992-01-01

    A study of the anesthetic efficacy of a eutetic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA cream) versus lidocaine infiltration in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was done. A total of 46 patients had 30 gm. of EMLA cream applied to the skin over the kidney and 45 had subcutaneous infiltration...... anesthesia with 20 ml. 1% lidocaine with epinephrine. All patients received an intravenous dose of morphine just before ESWL. The patients were comparable with regard to age, sex, weight, morphine dosage, number of shock waves given and duration of treatment. Median pain score and the amount of supplementary...... analgesics were not significantly different between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to post-ESWL skin changes. Therefore, EMLA cream can be recommended for ESWL provided it is applied correctly....

  4. Local anesthetic effect of docosahexaenoic acid on the nociceptive jaw-opening reflex in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitome, Kazuki; Takehana, Shiori; Oshima, Katsuo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Takeda, Mamoru

    2018-02-23

    Although docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) administration suppresses sodium channels in primary afferent sensory neurons, the acute local effect of DHA on the trigeminal nociceptive reflex remains to be elucidated, in vivo. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether local administration of DHA attenuates the nociceptive jaw-opening reflex (JOR) in vivo in the rat. The JOR evoked by electrical stimulation of the tongue was recorded by a digastric muscle electromyogram (dEMG) in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. The amplitude of the dEMG response was significantly increased in proportion to the electrical stimulation intensity (1-5 x threshold). At 3 x threshold, local administration of DHA (0.1, 10 and 25 mM) dose-dependently inhibited the dEMG response, and lasted 40 min. Maximum inhibition of the dEMG signal amplitude was seen within approximately 10 min. The mean magnitude of inhibition of the dEMG signal amplitude by DHA (25 mM) was almost equal to the local anesthetic, 1% lidocaine (37 mM), a sodium channel blocker. These findings suggest that DHA attenuates the nociceptive JOR via possibly blocking sodium channels, and strongly support the idea that DHA is a potential therapeutic agent and complementary alternative medicine for the prevention of acute trigeminal nociception. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Tennis elbow: role of local steroid injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Gulzar Saeed; Ali, Muhammad; Trago, Imtiaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Tennis elbow is a condition, characterised by pain and tenderness over the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, and pain on resisted dorsiflexion of the wrist, middle finger, or both. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the short term efficacy of local steroid injection compared with oral and topical NSAIDs. Sixty patients (45 male and 15 female) were included in the study. The mean age was 42 years for men and 40 years for women. They were placed in group A and B (30 cases each). Group A received local steroid injection (triamcinolone 20 mg mixed with lignocaine 2% 1 cc) and topical NSAID cream application (diclofenac diethylammonium) twice a day, tab. diclofenac sodium 50 mg twice a day for 3 weeks. Group B received tab diclofenac 50 mg twice a day and, topical NSAID cream application twice a day for 3 weeks. Assessment of patients was made 3 times; first at the start of the study, 2nd time after 6 weeks, and 3rd time after 12 weeks. A blinded assessor rated the elbow complaints of the patients at resisted dorsiflexion of wrist using VAS (0 = no severity, 1-3 mild, 4-6 moderate, 7-9 sever, 10 = maximum severity). At six weeks, 22 (73.33%) patient in group A had no pain as compared to 7 (23.33%) patients in group B who were pain free (p < 0.0001, chi2 = 38.75). At 12 weeks 27 (90%) patients in group A were pain free compared to group B in which 7 (23.33%) patients were pain free (p < 0.0001, chi2 = 27.56). In patients with tennis elbow, the use of local steroid injection in combination with topical and oral NSAIDs is superior to the use of combination of topical and oral NSAIDs. Better results with combination therapy using local steroid injection may be limited to the short term.

  6. Anesthetic duration of lidocaine with 10% dextran is comparable to lidocaine with 1:160 000 epinephrine after intraosseous injection in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Emiko; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Aida, Hidetaka; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2007-09-01

    To compare the effects of 10% dextran and epinephrine on intraosseous injection with lidocaine in rabbits. Twenty male Japanese white rabbits were used. The effect of intraosseous injection was evaluated using an electromyogram (EMG) of the digastric muscle after electrical pulp stimulation. Two percent lidocaine alone (L), 2% lidocaine containing 1:80000 epinephrine (LE8), 2% lidocaine containing 1:160 000 epinephrine (LE16), and 2% lidocaine containing 10% dextran (LD) were tested. Electromyogram recordings were repeated before and 30 seconds, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, and 20 minutes after the intraosseous injection. Thereafter, recordings were repeated every 5 minutes until the EMG recovered to the control value. There was no difference in the onset time between the 4 groups. The order of the duration of maximum effect was LE8 >LE16 = LD >or=L. The order of the duration of anesthesia was LE8 >LE16 = LD >L. Ten percent dextran potentiates local anesthetic effects of 2% lidocaine in intraosseous injection. The potency of 10% dextran is comparable to 1:160 000 epinephrine.

  7. Anesthetic efficacy of a repeated intraosseous injection given 30 min following an inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection.

    OpenAIRE

    Reitz, J.; Reader, A.; Nist, R.; Beck, M.; Meyers, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether a repeated intraosseous (IO) injection would increase or prolong pulpal anesthesia, we measured the degree of anesthesia obtained by a repeated IO injection given 30 min following a combination inferior alveolar nerve block/intraosseous injection (IAN/IO) in mandibular second premolars and in first and second molars. Using a repeated-measures design, we randomly assigned 38 subjects to receive two combinations of injections at two separate appointments. The combinations w...

  8. The reasoning of the selection of local anesthetic for patients with systemic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasman Nur Alim

    2016-06-01

    upon the patient’s medical conditions. Aspiration is critical to prevent intravascular injection. Discipline in carrying out the operational standards is very important to reduce the risk unwanted things, due to local anesthesia and vasoconstrictor used.

  9. Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ueno

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Ueno1, Hironori Tsuchiya2, Maki Mizogami1, Ko Takakura11Department of Anesthesiology, Asahi University School of Dentistry, Mizuho, Gifu, Japan; 2Department of Dental Basic Education, Asahi University School of Dentistry, Mizuho, Gifu, JapanAbstract: The presence of inflammation decreases local anesthetic efficacy, especially in dental anesthesia. Although inflammatory acidosis is most frequently cited as the cause of such clinical phenomena, this has not been experimentally proved. We verified the acidosis mechanism by studying the drug and membrane lipid interaction under acidic conditions together with proposing an alternative hypothesis. Liposomes and nerve cell model membranes consisting of phospholipids and cholesterol were treated at different pH with lidocaine, prilocaine and bupivacaine (0.05%–0.2%, w/v. Their membrane-interactive potencies were compared by the induced-changes in membrane fluidity. Local anesthetics fluidized phosphatidylcholine membranes with the potency being significantly lower at pH 6.4 than at pH 7.4 (p < 0.01, supporting the acidosis theory. However, they greatly fluidized nerve cell model membranes even at pH 6.4 corresponding to inflamed tissues, challenging the conventional mechanism. Local anesthetics acted on phosphatidylserine liposomes, as well as nerve cell model membranes, at pH 6.4 with almost the same potency as that at pH 7.4, but not on phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin liposomes. Since the positively charged anesthetic molecules are able to interact with nerve cell membranes by ion-paring with anionic components like phosphatidylserine, tissue acidosis is not essentially responsible for the local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation. The effects of local anesthetics on nerve cell model membranes were inhibited by treating with peroxynitrite (50 μM, suggesting that inflammatory cells producing peroxynitrite may affect local anesthesia

  10. Reduction in sodium content of local anesthetics for peripheral nerve blocks: a comparative evaluation of saline with 5% dextrose--a randomized controlled double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Shalini; Tureanu, Luminita; Bouzari, Amir; Masood, Amna; Francispragasam, Mario; Ganapathy, Sugantha

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available local anesthetic drugs when diluted with normal saline have high sodium content. High perineural sodium concentration has been implicated in antagonizing the analgesic effects of local anesthetics by preventing and/or delaying neural blockade. Five percent dextrose is not known to cause any short- or long-term injury when injected around neural tissue. In this study, we prospectively compared and evaluated block characteristics when local anesthetic drug was diluted with these 2 different agents. Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomly assigned to receive axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine (1% diluted with either 5% dextrose or normal saline). Motor and sensory block were tested every 5 minutes for 30 minutes. Postoperatively, a telephone interview was conducted after 24 hours and 7 days along with surgical follow-up at days 3, 10, and/or 14 to 28 days to document side effects, patient satisfaction, and time for block resolution. Any nerve deficits were followed until resolution. The primary outcome was time to onset of sensory nerve block. Five hundred fifty patients were recruited for this study. The mean time to complete sensory block was 18.3 ± 6.1 minutes in the dextrose group and 22.5 ± 6.4 minutes in the saline group (P dextrose provides earlier onset of axillary brachial plexus block with ropivacaine.

  11. The effect of local tramadol injection in post appendectomy pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Khazaei

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been demonstrated that tramadol, asemisynthetic opioid, is an effective analgesic with systemic (central and local (peripheral anesthetic effects. The aim of this study was to compare the post-operative anesthetic effect of subcutaneous wound infiltration of tramadol with normal saline as placebo in the incision wounds after appendectomy and measuring the average need to petidine during the next 24 hours after the appendectomy. Materials and Method: This double blind study was carried out on 60 patients over 15 years old. Patients were randomly divided in two equal groups. At the end of procedure after repairing fascia 100mg of tramadol that was diluted with water for injection up to 10 cc in one syringe or 10 cc of normal saline in another syringe was infiltrated subcutaneously by surgeon before suturing the skin. The intensity of pain (NRS was recorded in the recovery room, after 6 and 24 hours post-operation as well as total amount of administered petidine in the same period. At the end of study the intensity of pain in the mentioned times and the average use of petidine compared in two groups. Results: A significant difference was noted in the severity of pain between two groups in recovery time, 6 and 24 hours afetr operation that was lower in tramadol group (p<0.0001. Also the average use of petidine was significantly lower in tramadol group in 24 hours (p<0.05. The average severity of pain by NRS in recovery was 5.36 for control (N and 3.08 for tramadol (T groups; and after 6 hours it was 5.36 for (N and 3.36 for (T and after 24 hours reached to 3.08 for (N and 2.08 for (T and the average number of injected 25mg ampoules of petidine was 1.56 in (N and 0.76 in (T.Conclusion: Local wound infiltration of tramadol is a good choice for reduction of post appendectomy pain and decreasing need for high potent opioid analgesics

  12. Treatment of acute sciatica with transforaminal epidural corticosteroids and local anesthetic: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; Maas, Esther T; Vyas, Amrita; van der Vegt, Marinus; de Priester, Koo; de Boer, Michiel R; van Tulder, Maurits W; Weinstein, Henry C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2017-05-25

    Transforaminal epidural injections with steroids (TESI) are used increasingly for patients with sciatica. However there is much debate about their safety and effectiveness. It is important to identify patients that benefit most from TESI and only few trials have yet evaluated the effects in patients with acute sciatica. We describe a prospective, randomized controlled trial (RCT), with the aim to evaluate the hypothesis that TESI plus Levobupivacaine (TESI-plus) added to oral pain medication is more effective compared to pain medication alone or compared to transforaminal injection with a local anesthetic of short duration among patients with acute sciatica. We will recruit a total of 264 patients with sciatica (sciatica should be recommended TESI-plus within the first few weeks rather than being treated with pain medication alone in order to relieve pain and improve their functioning. In case of a negative result (no relevant differences in outcome between the three study arms), pain medication will remain the mainstay of treatment in the acute stages of sciatica. Dutch National trial register: NTR4457 (March, 6th, 2014).

  13. Femoral nerve blockade using various concentrations of local anesthetic for knee arthroscopy in the pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneziano G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Veneziano,1,2 Jennifer Tripi,1 Dmitry Tumin,1 Mumin Hakim,1 David Martin,1,2 Ralph Beltran,1,2 Kevin Klingele,3,4 Tarun Bhalla,1,2 Joseph D Tobias1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: Femoral nerve blockade (FNB provides effective postoperative analgesia in children undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery as evidenced by their opioid-sparing effects and decreased postoperative pain scores. Increasing the local anesthetic concentration in peripheral nerve blockade for adults undergoing orthopedic surgery has been shown to be beneficial, increasing block success rate, and providing a longer duration of analgesia. The effect of increasing the concentration of local anesthetic in extremity blocks in children remains largely unexplored.Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of FNB using three concentrations of local anesthetic (ropivacaine 0.2%, bupivacaine 0.25%, and ropivacaine 0.5% in children and adolescents undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. The primary outcome evaluated was postoperative opioid consumption before discharge. Secondary outcomes included post-anesthesia care unit (PACU and hospital discharge times, first pain score in PACU, and the incidence of adverse events.Results: Two hundred and sixty-nine children and adolescents who received a FNB for arthroscopic knee surgery from January 2010 to December 2013 were included for analysis. Local anesthetic used in FNB was ropivacaine 0.2% in 116 (43% cases, ropivacaine 0.5% in 75 (28% cases, and bupivacaine 0.25% in 78 (29% cases. Median postoperative opioid consumption (mg/kg intravenous morphine equivalents in the ropivacaine 0.5% group was 0

  14. Effects of apomorphine upon local cerebral glucose utilization in conscious rats and in rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grome, J.J.; McCulloch, J.

    1983-02-01

    The effects of the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine upon local cerebral glucose utilization in 43 anatomically discrete regions of the CNS were examined in conscious, lightly restrained rats and in rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate by means of the quantitative autoradiographic (/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose technique. In animals anesthetized with chloral hydrate, glucose utilization was reduced throughout all regions of the CNS from the levels observed in conscious animals. With chloral hydrate anesthesia, the proportionately most marked reductions in glucose use were noted in primary auditory nuclei, thalmaic relay nuclei, and neocortex, and the least pronounced reductions in glucose use (by 15-25% from conscious levels) were observed in limbic areas, some motor relay nuclei, and white matter. In conscious, lightly restrained rats, the administration of apomorphine effected significant increases in glucose utilization in 15 regions of the CNS, and significant reductions in glucose utilization in two regions of the CNS. In rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate, the effects of apomorphine upon local glucose utilization were less widespread and less marked than in conscious animals. The profound effects of chloral hydrate anesthesia upon local cerebral glucose use, and the modification by this anesthetic regime of the local metabolic responses to apomorphine, emphasize the difficulties which exists in the extrapolation of data from anesthetized animals to the conditions which prevail in the conscious animal.

  15. Topical amethocaine (Ametop) is superior to EMLA for intravenous cannulation. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: A eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) is commonly used to provide topical anesthesia for intravenous (i.v.) cannulation. One of its side effects is vasoconstriction, which may render cannulation more difficult. A gel formulation of amethocaine (Ametop) is now commercially available. The aim of this study was to compare EMLA and Ametop with regard to the degree of topical anesthesia afforded, the incidence of vasoconstriction and the ease of i.v. cannulation. METHODS: Thirty two ASA I adult volunteers had a #16 gauge i.v. cannula inserted on two separate occasions using EMLA and Ametop applied in a double blind fashion for topical anesthesia. Parameters that were recorded after each cannulation included visual analogue pain scores (VAPS), the presence of vasoconstriction and the ease of cannulation, graded as: 1 = easy, 2 = moderately difficult, 3 = difficult and 4 = failed. RESULTS: The mean VAPS +\\/- SD after cannulation with Ametop M was 12+\\/-9.9 and with EMLA was 25.3+\\/-16.6 (P = 0.002). Vasoconstriction occurred after EMLA application on 17 occasions and twice after Ametop (P = 0.001). The grade of difficulty of cannulation was 1.44+\\/-0.88 following EMLA and 1.06+\\/-0.25 with Ametop (P = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous cannulation was less painful following application of Ametop than EMLA. In addition, Ametop caused less vasoconstriction and facilitated easier cannulation. Its use as a topical anesthetic agent is recommended, especially when i.v. access may be problematic.

  16. Update on emerging regional techniques and novel local anesthetics in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szafran MJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Martin J Szafran, Eldhose Abrahams, Tong Joo Gan Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA Abstract: New regional anesthetic techniques have been incorporated into the multimodal approach to postoperative analgesia. Blocks such as the transversus abdominis plane block, adductor canal block, and pectoral nerves blocks all show promise as potential tools used in opioid-sparing techniques, but at the same time have significant limitations to their utility. Novel long-acting formulations of local anesthetics further add to the possible benefit of these blocks, but their application to peripheral nerve blocks is currently being investigated and is not well defined. This review focuses on evaluating the relevant anatomy, technique, and indications of several newer peripheral nerve blocks, the emerging evidence supporting the use of liposomal bupivacaine and SABER®-Bupivacaine, and the application of both in ambulatory anesthesia. Keywords: transversus abdominis plane (TAP block, adductor canal block, pectoral nerves block, regional anesthesia, liposomal bupivacaine, SABER®-Bupivacaine

  17. The Diagnostic Utility of Midcarpal Anesthetic Injection in the Evaluation of Chronic Wrist Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, S. Josh; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Moran, Steven L.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of chronic wrist pain can be a diagnostic dilemma. Lidocaine injections combined with corticosteroids are often used for both diagnosis and therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine if a midcarpal injection of lidocaine could serve as a diagnostic tool in patients with chronic wrist pain. Specifically, the relationship of pain relief from the injection and improvement of grip strength were compared to the presence of intracarpal pathology as confirmed by wrist arthros...

  18. Pregnancy outcome after in utero exposure to local anesthetics as part of dental treatment: A prospective comparative cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagai, Aharon; Diav-Citrin, Orna; Shechtman, Svetlana; Ornoy, Asher

    2015-08-01

    Dental treatment and use of local anesthetics during pregnancy generally are considered harmless because of lack of evidence of adverse pregnancy effects. Data on the safety of dental treatment and local anesthetics during pregnancy are scant. Dental care is often a reason for concern both among women and their health care providers. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of major anomalies after exposure to local anesthetics as part of dental care during pregnancy. The authors performed a prospective, comparative observational study at the Israeli Teratology Information Services between 1999 and 2005. The authors followed 210 pregnancies exposed to dental local anesthetics (112 [53%] in the first trimester) and compared them with 794 pregnancies not exposed to teratogens. The rate of major anomalies was not significantly different between the groups (4.8% versus 3.3%, P = .300). There was no difference in the rate of miscarriages, gestational age at delivery, or birth weight. The most common types of dental treatment were endodontic treatment (43%), tooth extraction (31%), and tooth restoration (21%). Most women (63%) were not exposed to additional medications. Approximately one-half (51%) of the women were not exposed to dental radiography, and 44% were exposed to radiation, mostly bite-wing radiography. This study's results suggest that use of dental local anesthetics, as well as dental treatment during pregnancy, do not represent a major teratogenic risk. There seems to be no reason to prevent pregnant women from receiving dental treatment and local anesthetics during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interactions of the local anesthetic tetracaine with membranes containing phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol: a 2H NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, M.; Jarrell, H.C.; Smith, I.C.P.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions of local anesthetic tetracaine with multilamellar dispersions of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and cholesterol have been investigated by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance of specifically deuteriated tetracaines, DMPC and cholesterol. Experiments were performed at pH 5.5, when the anesthetic is primarily charged, and at pH 9.5, when it is primarily uncharged. The partition coefficients of the anesthetic in the membrane have been measured at both pH values for phosphatidylcholine bilayers with and without cholesterol. The higher partition coefficients obtained at pH 9.5 reflect the hydrophobic interactions between the uncharged form of the anesthetic and the hydrocarbon region of the bilayer. The lower partition coefficients for the DMPC/cholesterol system at both pH values suggest that cholesterol, which increases the order of the lipid chains, decreases the solubility of tetracaine into the bilayer. For phosphatidylcholine bilayers, it has been proposed that the charged tetracaine at low pH is located mostly at the phospholipid headgroup level while the uncharged tetracaine intercalates more deeply into the bilayer. The present study suggests that the location of tetracaine in the cholesterol-containing system is different from that in pure phosphatidylcholine bilayers: the anesthetic sits higher in the membrane. An increase in temperature results in a deeper penetration of the anesthetic into the bilayer. Moreover, the incorporation of the anesthetic into DMPC bilayers with or without cholesterol results in a reduction of the lipid order parameters both in the plateau and in the tail regions of the acyl chains, this effect being greater with the charged form of the anesthetic

  20. Systematic review of the effect of intravenous lipid emulsion therapy for local anesthetic toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Bania, Theodore C; Lavergne, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following national and regional recommendations, intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) has become established in clinical practice as a treatment for acute local anesthetic (LA) toxicity, although evidence of efficacy is limited to animal studies and human case reports. A collaborative lipid......-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Pre-treatment experiments, pharmacokinetic studies not involving toxicity and studies that did not address antidotal use of ILE were excluded. RESULTS: We included 113 studies and reports. Of these, 76 were human and 38 animal studies. One publication included both a human...... case report and an animal study. Human studies included one randomized controlled crossover trial involving 16 healthy volunteers. The subclinical LA toxicity design did not show a difference in the effects of ILE versus saline. There was one case series and 73 case reports of ILE use in the context...

  1. Impact of local anaesthetics and needle calibres used for painless PRP injections on platelet functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausset, Olivier; Magalon, Jeremy; Giraudo, Laurent; Louis, Marie-Laure; Serratrice, Nicolas; Frere, Corrine; Magalon, Guy; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous biotherapy commonly used for its healing properties. Once activated, platelets released a real "cocktail" of growth factor and cytokines implied in numerous regenerative processes. However the impact of medical practices associated to PRP therapeutic use on platelets functionality remains poorly known. we evaluated the in vitro effects of two commonly used local anesthetics (Xylocaine(*) and Naropin(*)) on PRP functionality. We also investigated the quantity and quality of PRP that passed through the smallest gauge needle commercialized. PRP from 9 healthy volunteers were prepared using our previously described home made purification protocol. Platelet aggregation capacity was evaluated by aggregometry assays and the growth factor release was determined by ELISA after platelet activation. We also evaluated the platelet activation status, reactivity and stability of platelets by flow cytometry using the P-selectin expression marker. the association of local anaesthetics with PRP injections resulted in a significant decrease of platelets functionality, assessed by their capacity of aggregating. Local anaesthetics did not interfere with the growth factor release. The different needle sizes and calibres tested for PRP injections did not influence the platelet functionality. the use of local anaesthetics to prevent pain during PRP injections could compromise the therapeutic potential of PRP. These results suggest using carefully local anaesthetics or limiting their use as often is possible. To minimize injection pain, we recommend using 30 G needles. These data will lead to clinical recommendations for painless and controlled PRP injections.

  2. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with 53 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Rune D; Ovesen, Ole; Lindholm, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine) for postop......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine...... subjects received intraoperative infiltration followed by 5 postoperative injections in 10-hour intervals through a multi-holed catheter placed at the surgical site. 26 patients received ropivacaine and 27 received saline. The intervention period was 2 days and the observational period was 4 days. All...... subjects received patient-controlled opioid analgesia without any restrictions on the total daily dose. Pain was assessed at specific postoperative time points and the daily opioid usage was registered. RESULTS: Infiltration with 75 mL (150 mg) of ropivacaine did not reduce postoperative pain or opioid...

  3. Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic injections for painful shoulder conditions: comparisons among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and physical medicine and primary-care physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Skedros John G; Hunt Kenneth J; Pitts Todd C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic doses for injecting shoulder conditions were examined among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and primary-care sports medicine (PCSMs) and physical medicine and rehabilitation (PMRs) physicians to provide data needed for documenting inter-group differences for establishing uniform injection guidelines. Methods 264 surveys, sent to these physicians in our tri-state area of the western United States, addressed corticosteroid/anest...

  4. Local anesthetic inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor signaling by interference with Galpha(q) protein function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollmann, M. W.; Wieczorek, K. S.; Berger, A.; Durieux, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Although local anesthetics are considered primarily Na(+) channel blockers, previous studies suggest a common intracellular site of action on different G protein-coupled receptors. In the present study, we characterized this site for the LPA, m1 muscarinic, and trypsin receptor. Xenopus laevis

  5. Differential effects of gaseous versus injectable anesthetics on changes in regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism induced by l-DOPA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpisidis, Zisis; Öberg, Carl M; Maslava, Natallia; Cenci, M Angela; Lundblad, Cornelia

    2017-06-01

    Preclinical imaging of brain activity requires the use of anesthesia. In this study, we have compared the effects of two widely used anesthetics, inhaled isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine cocktail, on cerebral blood flow and metabolism in a rat model of Parkinson's disease and l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Specific tracers were used to estimate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF - [ 14 C]-iodoantipyrine) and regional cerebral metabolic rate (rCMR - [ 14 C]-2-deoxyglucose) with a highly sensitive autoradiographic method. The two types of anesthetics had quite distinct effects on l-DOPA-induced changes in rCBF and rCMR. Isoflurane did not affect either the absolute rCBF values or the increases in rCBF in the basal ganglia after l-DOPA administration. On the contrary, rats anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine showed lower absolute rCBF values, and the rCBF increases induced by l-DOPA were masked. We developed a novel improved model to calculate rCMR, and found lower metabolic activities in rats anesthetized with isoflurane compared to animals anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Both anesthetics prevented changes in rCMR upon l-DOPA administration. Pharmacological challenges in isoflurane-anesthetized rats indicated that drugs mimicking the actions of ketamine/xylazine on adrenergic or glutamate receptors reproduced distinct effects of the injectable anesthetics on rCBF and rCMR. Our results highlight the importance of anesthesia in studies of cerebral flow and metabolism, and provide novel insights into mechanisms mediating abnormal neurovascular responses to l-DOPA in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of continuous interscalene block and subacromial infusion of local anesthetic for postoperative analgesia after open shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Semih; Cankaya, Deniz; Unal, Hidayet; Yoldas, Burak; Taspinar, Vildan; Deveci, Alper; Tabak, Yalcin; Baydar, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of continuous interscalene block (CISB) and subacromial infusion of local anesthetic (CSIA) for postoperative analgesia after open shoulder surgery. This randomized, prospective, double-blinded, single-center study included 40 adult patients undergoing open shoulder surgery. All patients received a standardized general anesthetic. The patients were separated into group CISB and group CSIA. A loading dose of 40 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was administered and patient-controlled analgesia was applied by catheter with 0.1% bupivacaine 5 mL/h throughout 24 h basal infusion, 2 mL bolus dose, and 20 min knocked time in both groups postoperatively. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, additional analgesia need, local anesthetic consumption, complications, and side effects were recorded during the first 24 h postoperatively. The range of motion (ROM) score was recorded preoperatively and in the first and third weeks postoperatively. A statistically significant difference was determined between the groups in respect of consumption of local anesthetic, VAS scores, additional analgesia consumption, complications, and side effects, with lower values recorded in the CISB group. There were no significant differences in ROM scoring in the preoperative and postoperative third week between the two groups but there were significant differences in ROM scoring in the postoperative first week, with higher ROM scoring values in the group CISB patients. The results of this study have shown that continuous interscalene infusion of bupivacaine is an effective and safe method of postoperative analgesia after open shoulder surgery.

  7. Can we use lower volume of local anesthetic for infraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block under ultrasound guidance in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Ilker; Aksoy, Mehmet; Dostbil, Aysenur; Tuncer, Kutsi

    2017-09-01

    To determine if the infraclavicular brachial plexus block can be applied with lower volume of local anesthetic. Randomised, double-blinded clinical trial. 60 patients aged 5-15years with ASA I-II who underwent emergent or elective arm, forearm or hand operations were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups randomly; standard volume local anesthetic administered group (Group S, n=30) and low volume anesthetic administered group (Group L, n=30). Postoperative pain scores, sensory and motor block durations were noted. Pain scores (Wong-Baker Face Scale) were evaluated and the results were detected to be similar at all times (30min, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24h). Durations of motor block were 168(±16) minutes and 268(±15) minutes in Group L and Group S respectively and the difference was statistically significant (pblock were 385(±26) and 402(±39) in Group L and Group S respectively and no statistically significant difference was detected (p=0.064). Similar block success, postoperative sensory block durations and pain scores could be obtained during infraclavicular brachial plexus in pediatric patients with lower local anesthetic volumes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CT-guided cervical nerve root injections: comparing the immediate post-injection anesthetic-related effects of the transforaminal injection with a new indirect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Peterson, Cynthia K.; Zanetti, Marco; Hodler, Juerg

    2011-01-01

    To describe an ''indirect'' cervical nerve root injection technique with a dorsal approach that should carry less inherent risk than the ''direct'' cervical transforaminal injection approach, and to compare the immediate post-injection results of the two procedures. The indirect and direct cervical nerve root injection procedures are described in detail. Fifty-three consecutive patients receiving the indirect nerve root injections during 2009-2010 were age- and gender-matched to 53 patients who underwent direct transforaminal nerve root injections performed in 2006. Pain level data were collected immediately before and 20-30 min after each procedure. The percentages of pain change in the two groups were compared using the unpaired Student's t test. Fifty-two men (mean age 49) and 54 women (mean age 55) were included. The mean percentage of pain reduction for patients receiving indirect nerve root injections was 38.4% and for those undergoing the direct nerve root injections approach it was 43.2%. This was not significantly different (P = 0.455). No immediate or late adverse effects were reported after either injection procedure. The indirect cervical nerve root injection procedure is a potentially safer alternative to direct cervical transforaminal nerve root injections. The short-term pain reduction is similar using the two injection methods. (orig.)

  9. Effect of warming anesthetic on pain perception during dental injection: a split-mouth randomized clinical trial

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    Aravena PC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pedro Christian Aravena,1,2 Camila Barrientos,1 Catalina Troncoso,1 Cesar Coronado,3 Pamela Sotelo-Hitschfeld4 1Department of Dentistry, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile; 2Department of Dental Implant Surgery, São Leopoldo Mandic School and Dental Institute, Campinas, SP, Brazil; 3Faculty of Health Science, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Santiago, Chile; 4Department of Center for Interdisciplinary Studies on Nervous System (CISNe, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile Background: The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of warming anesthesia on the control of the pain produced during the administration of dental anesthesia injection and to analyze the role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 nociceptor channels in this effect.Patients and methods: A double-blind, split-mouth randomized clinical trial was designed. Seventy-two volunteer students (22.1±2.45 years old; 51 men from the School of Dentistry at the Universidad Austral de Chile (Valdivia, Chile participated. They were each administered 0.9 mL of lidocaine HCl 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000 (Alphacaine® using two injections in the buccal vestibule at the level of the upper lateral incisor teeth. Anesthesia was administered in a hemiarch at 42°C (107.6°F and after 1 week, anesthesia was administered by randomized sequence on the contralateral side at room temperature (21°C–69.8°F at a standardized speed. The intensity of pain perceived during the injection was compared using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS; Wilcoxon test p<0.05.Results: The use of anesthesia at room temperature produced an average VAS for pain of 35.3±16.71 mm and anesthesia at 42°C produced VAS for pain of 15±14.67 mm (p<0.001.Conclusion: The use of anesthesia at 42°C significantly reduced the pain during the injection of anesthesia compared to its use at room temperature during maxillary injections. The physiological mechanism of the

  10. Local anesthetic effects of bupivacaine loaded lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pengju; Li, Ting; Xing, Huaixin; Wang, Suzhen; Sun, Yingui; Sheng, Xiugui; Wang, Kaiguo

    2017-05-01

    There is a compelling need for prolonged local anesthetic that would be used for analgesia with a single administration. However, due to the low molecular weight of local anesthetics (LA) (lidocaine, bupivacaine, procaine, dibucaine, etc), they present fast systemic absorption. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate bupivacaine lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (BVC LPNs), and compared with BVC loaded PLGA nanoparticles (BVC NPs). Their morphology, particle size, zeta potential and drug loading capacity were evaluated. In vitro release study, stability and cytotoxicity were studied. In vivo evaluation of anesthetic effects was performed on animal models. A facile nanoprecipitation and self-assembly method was optimized to obtain BVC LPNs, composed of PLGA, lecithin and DSPE-PEG 2000 , of ∼175nm particle size. Compared to BVC NPs, BVC LPNs exhibited prolonged in vitro release in phosphate-buffered saline (pH=7.4). Further, BVC LPNs displayed enhanced in vitro stability in 10% FBS and lower cytotoxicity (the concentration of BVC ranging from 1.0μM to 20μM). In addition, BVC LPNs exhibited significantly prolonged analgesic duration. These results demonstrate that the LPNs could function as promising drug delivery system for overcoming the drawbacks of poor stability and rapid drug leakage, and prolonging the anesthetic effect with slight toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid Vortex Fluidics: Continuous Flow Synthesis of Amides and Local Anesthetic Lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Joshua; Chalker, Justin M; Raston, Colin L

    2015-07-20

    Thin film flow chemistry using a vortex fluidic device (VFD) is effective in the scalable acylation of amines under shear, with the yields of the amides dramatically enhanced relative to traditional batch techniques. The optimized monophasic flow conditions are effective in ≤80 seconds at room temperature, enabling access to structurally diverse amides, functionalized amino acids and substituted ureas on multigram scales. Amide synthesis under flow was also extended to a total synthesis of local anesthetic lidocaine, with sequential reactions carried out in two serially linked VFD units. The synthesis could also be executed in a single VFD, in which the tandem reactions involve reagent delivery at different positions along the rapidly rotating tube with in situ solvent replacement, as a molecular assembly line process. This further highlights the versatility of the VFD in organic synthesis, as does the finding of a remarkably efficient debenzylation of p-methoxybenzyl amines. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hong Jin; Hasan, Mohd Shahnaz; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-01-01

    A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5min for 60min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6±12.9min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2±13.9min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanism of sodium channel block by local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2017-04-03

    Local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants include both charged and electroneutral compounds that block voltage-gated sodium channels. Prior studies have revealed a common drug-binding region within the pore, but details about the binding sites and mechanism of block remain unclear. Here, we use the x-ray structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel, NavMs, to model a eukaryotic channel and dock representative ligands. These include lidocaine, QX-314, cocaine, quinidine, lamotrigine, carbamazepine (CMZ), phenytoin, lacosamide, sipatrigine, and bisphenol A. Preliminary calculations demonstrated that a sodium ion near the selectivity filter attracts electroneutral CMZ but repels cationic lidocaine. Therefore, we further docked electroneutral and cationic drugs with and without a sodium ion, respectively. In our models, all the drugs interact with a phenylalanine in helix IVS6. Electroneutral drugs trap a sodium ion in the proximity of the selectivity filter, and this same site attracts the charged group of cationic ligands. At this position, even small drugs can block the permeation pathway by an electrostatic or steric mechanism. Our study proposes a common pharmacophore for these diverse drugs. It includes a cationic moiety and an aromatic moiety, which are usually linked by four bonds. © 2017 Tikhonov and Zhorov.

  14. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin Lim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5 min for 60 min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Results: Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6 ± 12.9 min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2 ± 13.9 min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. Conclusion: We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

  15. Actions of Bupivacaine, a Widely Used Local Anesthetic, on NMDA Receptor Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Meaghan A.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in brain and spinal cord and play a pivotal role in the neurological disease state of chronic pain, which is caused by central sensitization. Bupivacaine is the indicated local anesthetic in caudal, epidural, and spinal anesthesia and is widely used clinically to manage acute and chronic pain. In addition to blocking Na+ channels, bupivacaine affects the activity of many other channels, including NMDA receptors. Importantly, bupivacaine inhibits NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an area critically involved in central sensitization. We used recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in HEK293 cells and found that increasing concentrations of bupivacaine decreased channel open probability in GluN2 subunit- and pH-independent manner by increasing the mean duration of closures and decreasing the mean duration of openings. Using kinetic modeling of one-channel currents, we attributed the observed current decrease to two main mechanisms: a voltage-dependent “foot-in-the-door” pore block and an allosteric gating effect. Further, the inhibition was state-independent because it occurred to the same degree whether the drug was applied before or after glutamate stimulation and was mediated by extracellular and intracellular inhibitory sites, via hydrophilic and hydrophobic pathways. These results predict that clinical doses of bupivacaine would decrease the peak and accelerate the decay of synaptic NMDA receptor currents during normal synaptic transmission. These quantitative predictions inform possible applications of bupivacaine as preventative and therapeutic approaches in chronic pain. PMID:25589775

  16. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charton, Antoine; Péronnet, François; Doutreleau, Stephane; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Klein, Alexis; Jimenez, Liliana; Geny, Bernard; Diemunsch, Pierre; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2) supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach). Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2), skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2) were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in the three groups, but when compared to the control group, the values remained significantly higher in animals that received the water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. In this protocol, water enriched in O2 by electrolysis lessened the decline of peripheral tissue oxygenation. This observation is compatible with the claim that the electrolytic process generates water clathrates which trap O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along pressure gradients. Potential applications of O2-enriched water include an alternate method of oxygen supply.

  17. Neurotoxicity of a Novel Local Anesthetic Agent, Ropivacaine: The Possible Roles of Bursts of Potential and Cytoplasmic Second Messenger

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    Pei-Lin Lin

    2007-10-01

    Conclusion: Ropivacaine reversibly elicited bursts of potential in the central snail neuron. The ropivacaine-elicited bursts of potential were associated with phospholipase C activity in the RP4 snail neuron. Our results suggest that ropivacaine-induced neurotoxicity is highly associated with phospholipase C activity and phospholipase C inhibitor may offer a novel therapeutic approach for managing local anesthetic-induced convulsion or other transient neurologic toxicity.

  18. Evaluation of local anesthetic effects of Lidocaine-Ibuprofen ionic liquid stabilized silver nanoparticles in Male Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiliang; Yu, Shashuang; Li, Xingwang; Ma, Chuangen; Li, Aixiang

    2018-01-01

    A simple approach for the synthesis of Lidocaine-Ibuprofen ionic liquid stabilized silver nanoparticles (IL-AgNPs) was reported in this work. The shape, size and surface morphology of the Lidocaine-Ibuprofen ionic liquid stabilized AgNPs were characterized by using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques such as Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analysis showed the formation of 20-30nm size of IL-AgNPs with very clear lattice fringes. SAED pattern confirmed the highly crystalline nature of fabricated IL stabilized AgNPs. EDS results confirmed the formation of nanosilver. The fabricated IL-AgNPs were studied for their local anesthetic effect in rats. The results of local anesthetic effect showed that the time for onset of action by IL-AgNPs is 10min, which is significantly higher than that for EMLA. Further, tactile test results confirmed the stronger and faster local anesthetic effect of IL-AgNPs when compared to that of EMLA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Prevalence of hypersensitivity to dental local anesthetic drugs in patients referred to Tehran Allergy clinic (2005-2007

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    Akhlaghi F.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: According to controversies in the prevalence of hypersensitivity to dental local anesthetic drugs and patients who claim hypersensitivity to these drugs, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypersensitivity to dental amide local anesthetic drugs in patients referred to Tehran Allergy Clinic in 2005-2007. "nMaterials and Methods: In this Study (Review of existing data, records of 130 patients who were referred to "Tehran allergy Clinic" (2005-2007 were studied. "nResults: The average age of patients was 29.5±18.8 years. 34% of cases showed positive skin reactions to at least one of the tested Lidocain concentrations and 10% of cases showed positive skin reactions to at least one of the tested Prilocain concentrations. There was a statistically significant difference in hypersensitivity to Lidocain 0.01 and 0.001 (p=0.017 and also between Lidocain 0.001 and 0.0001 (p<0.01. There was no statistically significant difference between other tested drug concentrations (p>0.05. "nConclusion: Many patients with history of hypersensitivity, show positive reaction to local dental anesthetic drugs. Prilocain hypersensitivity reactions are less than Lidocain. So application of Prilocain accompanies with less risk but its application should not be considered completely safe.

  20. Oxidative stress, metabolomics profiling, and mechanism of local anesthetic induced cell death in yeast

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    Cory H.T. Boone

    2017-08-01

    glutathione to combat the oxidative cellular environment, glycolytic to PPP cycling of carbon generating NADPH, obstruction of carbon flow through the TCA cycle, decreased ATP generation, and metacaspase dependent apoptotic cell death. Keywords: Local anesthetic toxicity, Oxidative stress, Metabolomics profiling, Apoptotic cell death pathways, Flow cytometry, Mass spectrometry

  1. Reduction of Environmental Temperature Mitigates Local Anesthetic Cytotoxicity in Bovine Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Onur, Alexis Dang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess whether reducing environmental temperature will lead to increased chondrocyte viability following injury from a single-dose of local anesthetic treatment. Bovine articular chondrocytes from weight bearing portions of femoral condyles were harvested and cultured. 96-well plates were seeded with 15,000 chondrocytes per well. Chondrocytes were treated with one of the following conditions: ITS Media, 1x PBS, 2% lidocaine, 0.5% bupivacaine, or 0.5% ropivacaine. Each plate was then incubated at 37°C, 23°C, or 4°C for one hour and then returned to media at 37°C. Chondrocyte viability was assessed 24 hours after treatment. Chondrocyte viability is presented as a ratio of the fluorescence of the treatment group over the average of the media group at that temperature (ratio ± SEM. At 37°C, lidocaine (0.35 ± 0.04 and bupivacaine (0.30 ± 0.05 treated chondrocytes show low cell viability when compared to the media (1.00 ± 0.03 control group (p < 0.001. Lidocaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 23°C (0.84 ± 0.08 and 4°C (0.86±0.085 than at 37°C (p < 0.001. Bupivacaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 4°C (0.660 ± 0.073 than at 37°C or 23°C (0.330 ± 0.069 (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002 respectively. Reducing the temperature from 37°C to 23°C during treatment with lidocaine increases chondrocyte viability following injury. Chondrocytes treated with bupivacaine can be rescued by reducing the temperature to 4°C.

  2. Development of bupivacaine decorated reduced graphene oxide and its local anesthetic effect-In vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Xin; Li, Aixiang; Ma, Chuangen

    2018-03-01

    The present works aims to develop bupivacaine modified reduced graphene oxide (BPV/RGO), and comparative evaluation of their anesthetic effect with free bupivacaine (BPV). The prepared BPV/RGO was studied by using various spectroscopic and microscopic characterization studies. In vitro drug release from BPV/RGO was studied using HPLC analysis. The cytotoxicity of BPV/RGO was studied against fibroblast (3T3) cells. In vivo evaluation of anesthetic effects was performed on animal models. BPV/RGO showed a prolonged in vitro release and lower cytotoxicity when compared to free BPV. Also, BPV/RGO showed a significantly prolonged analgesic effect when compared to free BPV. Further, the prepared BPV/RGO drug delivery system demonstrated to function as gifted to overcome the drawbacks of free BPV and other available drug delivery systems by prolonging the anesthetic effect with poor cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Local Anesthetic Activity from Extracts, Fractions and Pure Compounds from the Roots of Ottonia anisum Spreng. (Piperaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Kelvin S E; Marques, André M; Moreira, Davyson DE L; Velozo, Leosvaldo S; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Guimarães, Elsie F; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora C

    2016-01-01

    Piperaceae species can be found worldwide in tropical and subtropical areas and many of them have been used for centuries in traditional folk medicine and in culinary. In Brazil, species of Piperaceae are commonly used in some communities as local anesthetic and analgesic. Countrified communities have known some species of the genus Ottonia as "anestesia" and it is a common habit of chewing leaves and roots of Ottonia species to relief toothache. The purpose of this study is to report our findings on new molecules entities obtained from the roots of Ottonia anisum Spreng, in which local anesthetic activity (sensory blockage) is demonstrated for the first time in vivo guinea pig model. Phytochemical investigation led to the isolation of three amides (pipercallosidine, piperine and valeramide) and in an enriched mixture of seven amides (valeramide, 4,5-dihydropiperlonguminine, N-isobutil-6-piperonil-2-hexenamide, piperovatine, dihydropipercallosidine, pipercallosidine and pipercallpsine). Our findings demonstrated the anesthetic potential for the methanolic extract from roots, its n-hexane partition and amides from O. anisum and it is in agreement with ethnobotanical survey.

  4. Local anesthetics: interaction with human erythrocyte membranes as studied by 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Paula, Eneida de

    2004-01-01

    The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA). We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC) and benzocaine (BZC) bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipids acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form) and hydrophobic (neutral form) interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na + -channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia. (author)

  5. Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic injections for painful shoulder conditions: comparisons among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and physical medicine and primary-care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedros, John G; Hunt, Kenneth J; Pitts, Todd C

    2007-07-06

    Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic doses for injecting shoulder conditions were examined among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and primary-care sports medicine (PCSMs) and physical medicine and rehabilitation (PMRs) physicians to provide data needed for documenting inter-group differences for establishing uniform injection guidelines. 264 surveys, sent to these physicians in our tri-state area of the western United States, addressed corticosteroid/anesthetic doses and types used for subacromial impingement, degenerative glenohumeral and acromioclavicular arthritis, biceps tendinitis, and peri-scapular trigger points. They were asked about preferences regarding: 1) fluorinated vs. non-fluorinated corticosteroids, 2) acetate vs. phosphate types, 3) patient age, and 4) adjustments for special considerations including young athletes and diabetics. 169 (64% response rate, RR) surveys were returned: 105/163 orthopaedic surgeons (64%RR), 44/77 PCSMs/PMRs (57%RR), 20/24 rheumatologists (83%RR). Although corticosteroid doses do not differ significantly between specialties (p > 0.3), anesthetic volumes show broad variations, with surgeons using larger volumes. Although 29% of PCSMs/PMRs, 44% rheumatologists, and 41% surgeons exceed "recommended" doses for the acromioclavicular joint, >98% were within recommendations for the subacromial bursa and glenohumeral joint. Depo-Medrol(R) (methylprednisolone acetate) and Kenalog(R) (triamcinolone acetonide) are most commonly used. More rheumatologists (80%) were aware that there are acetate and phosphate types of corticosteroids as compared to PCSMs/PMRs (76%) and orthopaedists (60%). However, relatively fewer rheumatologists (25%) than PCSMs/PMRs (32%) or orthopaedists (32%) knew that phosphate types are more soluble. Fluorinated corticosteroids, which can be deleterious to soft tissues, were used with these frequencies for the biceps sheath: 17% rheumatologists, 8% PCSMs/PMRs, 37% orthopaedists. Nearly 85% use the same

  6. Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic injections for painful shoulder conditions: comparisons among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and physical medicine and primary-care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skedros John G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic doses for injecting shoulder conditions were examined among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and primary-care sports medicine (PCSMs and physical medicine and rehabilitation (PMRs physicians to provide data needed for documenting inter-group differences for establishing uniform injection guidelines. Methods 264 surveys, sent to these physicians in our tri-state area of the western United States, addressed corticosteroid/anesthetic doses and types used for subacromial impingement, degenerative glenohumeral and acromioclavicular arthritis, biceps tendinitis, and peri-scapular trigger points. They were asked about preferences regarding: 1 fluorinated vs. non-fluorinated corticosteroids, 2 acetate vs. phosphate types, 3 patient age, and 4 adjustments for special considerations including young athletes and diabetics. Results 169 (64% response rate, RR surveys were returned: 105/163 orthopaedic surgeons (64%RR, 44/77 PCSMs/PMRs (57%RR, 20/24 rheumatologists (83%RR. Although corticosteroid doses do not differ significantly between specialties (p > 0.3, anesthetic volumes show broad variations, with surgeons using larger volumes. Although 29% of PCSMs/PMRs, 44% rheumatologists, and 41% surgeons exceed "recommended" doses for the acromioclavicular joint, >98% were within recommendations for the subacromial bursa and glenohumeral joint. Depo-Medrol® (methylprednisolone acetate and Kenalog® (triamcinolone acetonide are most commonly used. More rheumatologists (80% were aware that there are acetate and phosphate types of corticosteroids as compared to PCSMs/PMRs (76% and orthopaedists (60%. However, relatively fewer rheumatologists (25% than PCSMs/PMRs (32% or orthopaedists (32% knew that phosphate types are more soluble. Fluorinated corticosteroids, which can be deleterious to soft tissues, were used with these frequencies for the biceps sheath: 17% rheumatologists, 8% PCSMs/PMRs, 37

  7. 389 Allergic Reactions to Local Anesthetics: Detection by Skin Tests and Subcutaneous Provocation. Analysis of 160 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcanjo, Luiz; Gonçalves Tavares, Tania Maria; Delcourt, Nathalia; Baroni, Juliana; Rios, João; Rios, José Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Adverse reactions to local anesthetics (LA) are frequent and often referred to as allergic. Although immune-mediated reactions are rare, it should be investigated for suspected cases. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of positive skin test to these drugs in patients with a suspected history of allergic reactions and describe the main socio-demographic characteristics of these individuals. Methods Retrospective study of medical records of patients attended at Policlínica Geral do Rio de Janeiro Allergic Clinic, between 2008 and 2011. The parameters evaluated were the test indication and the patient ages and gender. The drug tested was that the patient had a history of suspicion. Patients underwent skin prick and intradermal tests and subcutaneous provocation. Descriptive statistical analysis of the data was performed. Results It was performed 160 tests (125 female). Three of this total was excluded due to inconclusive results. In women, the highest proportion of tests was in the age group from 41 to 60 years (43%), while in males the higher concentration was at a youngest age group: 21 to 40 years (41%). The most common indication (103 cases, 65%) for the tests was a previous suspected anaphylactic reaction by LA. Seven of 157 tests had a positive result (4.4%), 6 of them occurred in women (4.8%). Only one test resulted in a type of anaphylactic reaction response (0.67%). All patients who presented positive response to the test had a history of per-anesthetic reaction that suggested an immune-mediated mechanism. Conclusions In patients with a history of previous reaction to local anesthetics, the skin tests with these drugs have a key role in the prevention of anaphylaxis, and on guidance for adequate anesthetic procedures.

  8. Modern technologies of local injection anesthesia in dental practice

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    Sohov S.Т.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the importance of using the new system Quick Sleeper for local anesthesia, to highlight benefits of quick and comfortable anesthesia. Material and Methods. The examination of effectiveness, convenience of this kind of anesthesia has been carried out. Results. All patients, taking part in this examination, confirmed more comfortable condition after this anesthesia than conductor and infiltration methods of anesthesia. The effect of anesthesia is better than after conductor anesthesia. Conclusion. This technology guarantees equal introduction and spread of anesthetic, independently of tissue density, eliminating the risk of carpule breakage.

  9. Articaine (4%) with epinephrine (1:100,000 or 1:200,000) in intraosseous injections in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars: anesthetic efficacy and cardiovascular effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Leandro Augusto Pinto; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Bergamaschi, Cristiane de Cássia; Meechan, John Gerard; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes; Ranali, José

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cardiovascular effects and the anesthetic efficacy of intraosseous injections of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (EPI100) or 4% articaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (EPI200). In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 0.9 mL EPI100 and EPI200 solutions were administered for endodontic treatment of mandibular molars with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis in 60 patients. The anesthetic success and pain during anesthesia were evaluated by visual analog scale. The cardiovascular parameters evaluated were heart rate, diastolic/systolic blood pressure, pulse oximetry, and electrocardiogram changes. Both solutions provided high anesthetic efficacy (96.8% and 93.1% for EPI100 and EPI200, respectively; P > .05), and the cardiovascular parameters showed minimal incidences of significant differences throughout the clinical procedure. The epinephrine concentration did not affect the efficacy of 4% articaine, and both solutions produced a high success level of pulpal anesthesia. Intraosseous delivery by slow speed of injection did not induce significant clinical changes in cardiovascular parameters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection using 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine in patients with irreversible pulpitis after inferior alveolar nerve block: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pushpendra Kumar; Srivastava, Ruchi; Ramesh, Kumar M

    2013-03-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve block (IAN) is the most frequently used mandibular injection technique for achieving local anesthesia in endodontics. Supplemental injections are essential to overcome failure of IAN block in patients with irreversible pulpitis. To evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine) in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth when conventional IAN block failed. Thirty emergency patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in a mandibular posterior tooth received an IAN block and experienced moderate to severe pain on endodontic access or initial instrumentation. The X-tip system was used to administer 1.8 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. The success of X-tip intraosseous injection was defined as none or mild pain (Heft-Parker visual analogue scale ratings intraosseous injection using 2% lignocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine has a statistically significant influence in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

  11. Anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection using 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine in patients with irreversible pulpitis after inferior alveolar nerve block: A clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pushpendra Kumar; Srivastava, Ruchi; Ramesh, Kumar M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The inferior alveolar nerve block (IAN) is the most frequently used mandibular injection technique for achieving local anesthesia in endodontics. Supplemental injections are essential to overcome failure of IAN block in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Aim: To evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine) in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth when conventional IAN block failed. Materials and Methods: Thirty emergency patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in a mandibular posterior tooth received an IAN block and experienced moderate to severe pain on endodontic access or initial instrumentation. The X-tip system was used to administer 1.8 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. The success of X-tip intraosseous injection was defined as none or mild pain (Heft-Parker visual analogue scale ratings intraosseous injection using 2% lignocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine has a statistically significant influence in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:23716971

  12. Should we add clonidine to local anesthetic for peripheral nerve blockade? A qualitative systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Colin J L; Duggan, Edel; Apatu, Emma

    2007-01-01

    Although clonidine has been shown to prolong analgesia in central neuraxial blocks, its use in peripheral nerve blocks remains controversial. We performed a systematic review of the current literature to determine the benefit of adding clonidine to peripheral nerve blocks. A systematic, qualitative review of double-blind randomized controlled trials on the benefit of clonidine as an adjunct to peripheral nerve block was performed. Studies were identified by searching PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez) and EMBASE (www.embase.com) databases (July 1991 to October 2006) for terms related to clonidine as an adjunct to peripheral nerve blocks. Studies were classified as supportive if the use of clonidine demonstrated reduced pain and total analgesic consumption, or prolonged block duration versus negative if no difference was found. Twenty-seven studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Five studies included a systemic control group. The total number of patients reviewed was 1,385. The dose of clonidine varied from 30 to 300 mug. Overall 15 studies supported the use of clonidine as an adjunct to peripheral nerve blocks with 12 studies failing to show a benefit. Based on qualitative analysis, clonidine appeared to prolong analgesia when added to intermediate-acting local anesthetics for axillary and peribulbar blocks. Clonidine improves duration of analgesia and anesthesia when used as an adjunct to intermediate-acting local anesthetics for some peripheral nerve blocks. Side-effects appear to be limited at doses up to 150 mug. Evidence is lacking for the use of clonidine as an adjunct to local anesthetics for continuous catheter techniques. Further research is required to examine the peripheral analgesic mechanism of clonidine.

  13. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  14. USING OF FIRST GENERATION OF Hl ANTIHISTAMINES As ALTERNATIVE OF LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN ODONTOLOGIC USE IN ANESTHESIA INFILTRATIVE TECHNICS. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Victor; Varas Hilario, Roberto; López Bellido, Roger; Chuquihuaccha Granda, Vilma; Zegarra Cuya, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The presence of adverse drug reactions with local anesthetics takes us to the search of effective alternatives to this drugs. 60 albino rabbits divided into 6 groups were submifted to infiltrative anesthetic technique in the maxilla with lidocaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, chlorpheniramine and dimenhidrinate, in front of sodium chloride 0,9%. The pain threshold belzavior was evaluated with electrical stimulation from Ruhnkorff s bobbin behind the drllg application and comparison between grou...

  15. Local corticosteroid injections: Rational use in common orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of local corticosteroid injections in orthopaedic practice is common due to their anti- inflammatory and analgesic effect. However, the use may result in local or systemic complications. Moreover, the conflicting reports on their benefits versus side effects, throws the average user in confusion or fear. This review ...

  16. Local measurement of transport parameters for laser injected trace impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannella, R; Lauro-Taroni, L [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    A procedure has been developed that determines local measurements of transport parameters`s profiles for injected impurities. The measured profiles extend from the plasma centre up to a certain radial position (usually {rho} = 0.6-0.7). In the outer region of the plasma the procedure supplies ``most suitable extensions`` up to the plasma edge of the measured transport profiles. The procedure intrinsically assures consistency and excellent agreement between the simulated and experimental data of local broad band soft X-ray emissivity and intensities of individual emission lines from different ion states of the injected impurities. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Effects of Two Different Anesthetic Solutions on Injection Pain, Efficacy, and Duration of Soft-Tissue Anesthesia with Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block for Primary Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbay, Ülkü Şermet; Elbay, Mesut; Kaya, Emine; Yıldırım, Sinem

    The purpose of the study was to compare the efficacy, injection pain, duration of soft tissue anesthesia, and postoperative complications of two different anesthetics (2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine and 3% plain mepivacaine) in pediatric patients in inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) administered by a computer-controlled delivery system (CCDS). The study was conducted as a randomized, controlled-crossover, double-blind clinical trial with 60 children requiring bilateral pulpotomy or extraction of primary mandibular molars. A CCDS was used to deliver 3% mepivacaine to 1 primary tooth and 2% lidocaine to the contralateral tooth with an IANB technique. Severity of pain and efficacy of anesthesia were evaluated using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability Scale, and comfort and side effects were assessed using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon t, and Fisher exact tests. Patients receiving 2% lidocaine experienced significantly less pain during injection than those receiving 3% mepivacaine, and no significant differences were found in the pain scores during treatments or in postoperative complications between the two anesthetics. The mean durations of anesthesia for 3% mepivacaine and 2% lidocaine were 139.68 minutes and 149.10 minutes, respectively. Plain mepivacaine and 2% lidocaine were similarly effective in pulpotomy and the extraction of primary mandibular molars. Although the use of 3% mepivacaine provided a shorter duration of anesthesia than 2% lidocaine, both solutions showed similar results in terms of postoperative complications.

  18. The effects of apomorphine upon local cerebral glucose utilization in conscious rats and in rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grome, J J; McCulloch, J

    1983-02-01

    The effects of the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine (1 mg . kg-1 i.v.) upon local cerebral glucose utilization in 43 anatomically discrete regions of the CNS were examined in conscious, lightly restrained rats and in rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate by means of the quantitative autoradiographic (/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose technique. In animals anesthetized with chloral hydrate, glucose utilization was reduced throughout all regions of the CNS from the levels observed in conscious animals, although the magnitude of the reductions in glucose use displayed considerable regional heterogeneity. With chloral hydrate anesthesia, the proportionately most marked reductions in glucose use (by 40-60% from conscious levels) were noted in primary auditory nuclei, thalmaic relay nuclei, and neocortex, and the least pronounced reductions in glucose use (by 15-25% from conscious levels) were observed in limbic areas, some motor relay nuclei, and white matter. In conscious, lightly restrained rats, the administration of apomorphine (1 mg . kg-1) effected significant increased in glucose utilization in 15 regions of the CNS (e.g., subthalamic nucleus, ventral thalamic nucleus, rostral neocortex, substantia nigra, pars reticulata), and significant reductions in glucose utilization in two regions of the CNS (lateral habenular nucleus and anterior cingulate cortex).

  19. Acute effects of anesthetic lumbar spine injections on temporal spatial parameters of gait in individuals with chronic low back pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Carl L; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Vincent, Heather K

    2017-10-01

    This study examined whether epidural injection-induced anesthesia acutely and positively affected temporal spatial parameters of gait in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Twenty-five patients (61.7±13.6years) who were obtaining lumbar epidural injections for stenosis-related LBP participated. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, Medical Outcomes Short Form (SF-36) scores, 11-point Numerical pain rating (NRS pain ) scores, and temporal spatial parameters of walking gait were obtained prior to, and 11-point Numerical pain rating (NRS pain ) scores, and temporal spatial parameters of walking gait were obtained after the injection. Gait parameters were measured using an instrumented gait mat. Patients received transforaminal epidural injections in the L1-S1 vertebral range (1% lidocaine, corticosteroid) under fluoroscopic guidance. Patients with post-injection NRS pain ratings of "0" or values greater than "0" were stratified into two groups: 1) full pain relief, or 2) partial pain relief, respectively. Post-injection, 48% (N=12) of patients reported full pain relief. ODI scores were higher in patients with full pain relief (55.3±21.4 versus 33.7 12.8; p=0.008). Post-injection, stride length and step length variability were significantly improved in the patients with full pain relief compared to those with partial pain relief. Effect sizes between full and partial pain relief for walking velocity, step length, swing time, stride and step length variability were medium to large (Cohen's d>0.50). Patients with LBP can gain immediate gait improvements from complete pain relief from transforaminal epidural anesthetic injections for LBP, which could translate to better stability and lower fall risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation and physico-chemical characterization of inclusion complexes between local anesthetics and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Carolina Morales; Abrami, Priscila; Goncalves, Marcos Moises; Andreo Filho, Newton; Fernandes, Sergio Antonio; Paula, Eneida de; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    S(-) Bupivacaine (S(-)BVC) and Lidocaine (LDC) are widely used local anesthetics (LA). Hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) is used as a drug-carrier system. The aim of this work was to characterize inclusion complexes between LA and HP-β-CD. The affinity constants determined at different pHs show favourable complexation. The release kinetics experiments showed that S(-)BVC and LDC changed the released profiles in the presence of HP-β-CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments gave information about the interaction between LA and the cyclodextrin cavity. This study focused on the physicochemical characterization of drug-delivery formulations that come out as potentially new therapeutic options for pain treatment. (author)

  1. Effects of local anesthetics on cholinergic agonist binding affinity of central nervous system. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukas, R.L.; Bennett, E.L.

    1979-12-01

    In general, pharmacological effects of local anesthetics may be attributed to their ability to reversibly block the propagation of nerve and muscle action potentials. At physiologically potent concentrations, local anesthetics (LA) also act as noncompetitive antagonists of the physiological response of post-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) to cholinergic agonists, and increase agonist binding affinities of nAChR from electric organ. It is postulated that the primary site of LA action on nAChR function is at the receptor-coupled ionophore. Furthermore, LA-nAChR ionophore interactions are thought to accelerate physiological desensitization of nAChR, manifest biochemically as increased affinity of nAChR for agonist. Specific receptors for ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin (..cap alpha..-Bgt), a potent competitive antagonist at nAChR sites in the periphery, have been detected in rat central nervous system membrane preparations. The affinity of these central ..cap alpha..-Bgt receptors (..cap alpha..-BgtR) for cholinergic agonists is found to increase on exposure to agonist. Nevertheless, on the basis of inconsistent pharmacological and physiological results, uncertainty remains regarding the relationship between ..cap alpha..-BgtR and authentic nAChR in the CNS, despite a wide body of biochemical and histological evidence consistent with their identity. Reasoning that if CNS ..cap alpha..-BgtR are true in nAChR, coupled to functional ion channels, LA might be expected to cause biochemically measurable increases in ..cap alpha..-BgtR affinity for cholinergic agonists, we have undertaken a study of the effects of LA on the ability of acetylcholine (ACh) to inhibit interaction of ..cap alpha..-BgtR with /sup 3/H-labeled ..cap alpha..-Bgt.

  2. Ultrasound-guided continuous interscalene block: the influence of local anesthetic background delivery method on postoperative analgesia after shoulder surgery: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Mehdi; Chassot, Olivier; Fournier, Roxane

    2014-01-01

    Automated bolus delivery has recently been shown to reduce local anesthetic consumption and improve analgesia, compared with continuous infusion, in continuous sciatic and epidural block. However, there are few data on the influence of local anesthetic delivery method on local anesthetic consumption following interscalene blockade. This randomized, double-blind trial was designed to determine whether hourly automated perineural boluses (4 mL) of local anesthesia delivered with patient-controlled pro re nata (PRN, on demand) boluses would result in a reduction in total local anesthesia consumption during continuous interscalene blockade after shoulder surgery compared with continuous perineural infusion (4 mL/h) plus patient-controlled PRN boluses. One hundred one patients undergoing major shoulder surgery under general anesthesia with ultrasound-guided continuous interscalene block were randomly assigned to receive 0.2% ropivacaine via interscalene end-hole catheter either by continuous infusion 4 mL/h (n = 50) or as automated bolus 4 mL/h (n = 51). Both delivery methods were combined with 5 mL PRN boluses of 0.2% ropivacaine with a lockout time of 30 minutes. Postoperative number of PRN boluses, 24- and 48-hour local anesthetic consumption, pain scores, rescue analgesia (morphine), and adverse events were recorded. There were no significant differences in either the number of PRN ropivacaine boluses or total 48 hour local anesthetic consumption between the groups (18.5 [11-25.2] PRN boluses in the continuous infusion group vs 17 [8.5-29] PRN boluses in the automated bolus group). Postoperative pain was similar in both groups; on day 2, the median average pain score was 4 (2-6) in the continuous infusion group versus 3 (2-5) in the automated bolus group (P = 0.54). Nor were any statistically significant intergroup differences observed with respect to morphine rescue, incidence of adverse events, or patient satisfaction. In continuous interscalene blockade under

  3. [Pharmacology of local anesthetics and clinical aspects of segmental blocking. II. Spinal anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, S P; Svetlov, V A; Luk'ianov, M V

    1998-01-01

    Clinical picture of development of segmental blocking after subarachnoidal injection of hyperbaric solutions of 0.75% bupivacaine, 5% ultracaine, and isobaric 0.5% bupivacaine is studied. A total of 152 patients operated on the lower part of the body and the lower limbs were examined under conditions of single, prolonged subarachnoidal, and combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Ultracaine and bupivacaine in different concentrations with different barism provided anesthesia equivalent by the efficacy, depth, and dissemination of sensory block. Segmental blocking with 5% ultracaine was characterized by the shortest latent period (3.14 +/- 0.16 min, p anesthesia in comparison with a single injection, and combined spinal epidural anesthesia shortened the latent period of segmental blocking and ensured intraoperative anesthesia and postoperative analgesia at the expense of the epidural component.

  4. A local anesthetic, ropivacaine, suppresses activated microglia via a nerve growth factor-dependent mechanism and astrocytes via a nerve growth factor-independent mechanism in neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Atsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local anesthetics alleviate neuropathic pain in some cases in clinical practice, and exhibit longer durations of action than those predicted on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of their blocking effects on voltage-dependent sodium channels. Therefore, local anesthetics may contribute to additional mechanisms for reversal of the sensitization of nociceptive pathways that occurs in the neuropathic pain state. In recent years, spinal glial cells, microglia and astrocytes, have been shown to play critical roles in neuropathic pain, but their participation in the analgesic effects of local anesthetics remains largely unknown. Results Repetitive epidural administration of ropivacaine reduced the hyperalgesia induced by chronic constrictive injury of the sciatic nerve. Concomitantly with this analgesia, ropivacaine suppressed the increases in the immunoreactivities of CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the dorsal spinal cord, as markers of activated microglia and astrocytes, respectively. In addition, epidural administration of a TrkA-IgG fusion protein that blocks the action of nerve growth factor (NGF, which was upregulated by ropivacaine in the dorsal root ganglion, prevented the inhibitory effect of ropivacaine on microglia, but not astrocytes. The blockade of NGF action also abolished the analgesic effect of ropivacaine on neuropathic pain. Conclusions Ropivacaine provides prolonged analgesia possibly by suppressing microglial activation in an NGF-dependent manner and astrocyte activation in an NGF-independent manner in the dorsal spinal cord. Local anesthetics, including ropivacaine, may represent a new approach for glial cell inhibition and, therefore, therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain.

  5. Effects of Various Antiepileptics Used to Alleviate Neuropathic Pain on Compound Action Potential in Frog Sciatic Nerves: Comparison with Those of Local Anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Uemura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiepileptics used for treating neuropathic pain have various actions including voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels, glutamate-receptor inhibition, and GABAA-receptor activation, while local anesthetics are also used to alleviate the pain. It has not been fully examined yet how nerve conduction inhibitions by local anesthetics differ in extent from those by antiepileptics. Fast-conducting compound action potentials (CAPs were recorded from frog sciatic nerve fibers by using the air-gap method. Antiepileptics (lamotrigine and carbamazepine concentration dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP (IC50=0.44 and 0.50 mM, resp.. Carbamazepine analog oxcarbazepine exhibited an inhibition smaller than that of carbamazepine. Antiepileptic phenytoin (0.1 mM reduced CAP amplitude by 15%. On the other hand, other antiepileptics (gabapentin, sodium valproate, and topiramate at 10 mM had no effect on CAPs. The CAPs were inhibited by local anesthetic levobupivacaine (IC50=0.23 mM. These results indicate that there is a difference in the extent of nerve conduction inhibition among antiepileptics and that some antiepileptics inhibit nerve conduction with an efficacy similar to that of levobupivacaine or to those of other local anesthetics (lidocaine, ropivacaine, and cocaine as reported previously. This may serve to know a contribution of nerve conduction inhibition in the antinociception by antiepileptics.

  6. DETERMINATION OF THE STABILITY OF A LOCAL ANESTHETIC BROMOKAIN TRANSDERMAL THERAPEUTIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ryzhikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the stability of biocompatible microemulsion composition-based bromokain transdermal therapeutic systems (TTS in order to confi rm the original shelf life and to identify the most appropriate TTS composition for storage.Materials and methods. The stability test using accelerated aging method was performed on the samples of TTS containing 50 and 100 mg of bromokain. Physicochemical properties of TTS were analyzed at the end of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 6th month of storage. The physical confi guration of the dosage form, the content of bromokain in TTS, and drug release were evaluated at each stage of the study. The content of bromokain in the samples was recorded using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. As a control for each method, the newly manufactured TTS forms were used.Results. Unlike the samples containing 50 mg of bromokain, TTS with 100 mg of the anesthetic demonstrated changes in the physical confi guration and deterioration of the functional properties after the 6th month of storage. The quantitative content of the substance in TTS containing 50 and 100 mg of bromokain met the requirements of regulatory documentation (RD at allphases of the experiment and was within 50,0 ± 5,0 mg and 100,0 ± 10,0 mg, respectively. The release profi le of TTS with 50 mg of bromokain has remained unchanged during storage and complies with the RD. TTS with 100 mg of bromokain after the 3rd month of storage had a deviation from the release profi le indicated in the RD.Conclusion. The shelf life of 2 years at t = 25 °C preset by us for samples of TTS containing 50 mg of bromokain has been confi rmed. According to the test results, samples of TTS with the content of bromokain of 100 mg were declared unstable and unfi t for storage under the selected storage conditions.

  7. A brief review on the efficacy of different possible and nonpharmacological techniques in eliminating discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Amin; Rismanchian, Mansour; Akhavan, Ali; Nosouhian, Saeid; Bajoghli, Farshad; Haghighat, Abbas; Arbabzadeh, Farahnaz; Samimi, Pouran; Fiez, Atiyeh; Shadmehr, Elham; Tabari, Kasra; Jahadi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety and fear of needle injection is one of the most common problems encountered by dental practitioners, especially in the pediatric patient. In consequences, it might affect the patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to lower the discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures. Desensitization of injection site is one of the recommended strategies. Among chemical anesthetic topical agents that are effective but might have allergic side effects, using some nonpharmacological and safe techniques might be useful. This study aimed to overview the efficacy of using cooling techniques, mostly by ice or popsicles, warming or pH buffering of drug, and using modern devices to diminish the discomfort of local anesthesia injection during dental procedures. PMID:26957683

  8. COMPARISON OF GLYCEMIC EFFECT OF ADRENALIN CONTAINING LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN DIABETIC AND NON-DIABETIC PATIENTS UNDERGOING MINOR ORAL SURGICAL PROCEDURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM To compare the changes in blood glucose level associated with administration of adrenaline containing local anesthetic in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures. METHODS AND MATERIAL The study included 150 well controlled diabetic patients and 150 non-diabetic healthy patients in age group of 40-60 years who underwent minor oral surgical procedures (trans alveolar extractions, alveoplasty and flap surgeries. Patients in both the group were administered 1.8ml of local anesthetic agent containing 1:100,000 adrenaline for inferior alveolar nerve block and 0.2 ml of anesthetic agent for long buccal nerve block. Blood glucose levels were assessed and compared during pre-operative and one hour post-operative period. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS The comparison of the random blood sugar levels preop and postop in both the groups were compared using paired t test and RBS levels between two groups were analysed using unpaired t test. P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS No statistically significant change in post-operative blood glucose level was noted between the diabetic and non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION The study concluded that it is safe to administer local anesthetic containing 1:100,000 adrenaline in smaller volumes to well controlled diabetic patients.

  9. Intravenous regional anesthesia: a review of common local anesthetic options and the use of opioids and muscle relaxants as adjuncts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flamer D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available David Flamer, Philip WH PengDepartment of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaPurpose: To provide a review of local anesthetic (LA agents and adjuncts, opioids and muscle relaxants, and their intraoperative effects and postoperative outcomes in intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA.Source: A search for prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trials evaluating LA agents, opioids and muscle relaxants as adjuvants for IVRA, was conducted (MEDLINE®, Embase. Intraoperative benefits (onset/recovery of sensory and motor block, intraoperative analgesia, tourniquet pain, postoperative benefits (pain score, analgesic consumption, time to first analgesia, and side effects were recorded. A conclusion for overall benefit was made based on statistical significance and clinical relevance.Findings: Thirty-one studies were evaluated, with data collected on 1523 subjects. LA agents evaluated were lidocaine, ropivacaine, and prilocaine. Adjuncts evaluated were opioids (morphine, fentanyl, meperidine, sufentanil, tramadol and muscle relaxants (pancuronium, atracurium, mivacurium, cisatacurium. There was good evidence that ropivacaine provided effective IVRA and improved postoperative analgesia. Lidocaine and prilocaine were effective LA agents, however they lacked postoperative benefits. Morphine, fentanyl, and meperidine as sole adjuncts did not demonstrate clinically significant benefits or result in an increased risk of side effects. Sufentanil data was limited, but appeared to provide faster onset of sensory block. Tramadol provided faster onset of sensory block and tourniquet tolerance, however postoperative benefits were not consistent and the risk of minor side effects increased. Muscle relaxants improved the quality of motor block, but at the expense of delayed motor recovery. The combination of fentanyl and muscle relaxants can achieve an equivalent quality of IVRA with 50

  10. The Knowledge of Eye Physicians on Local Anesthetic Toxicity and Intravenous Lipid Treatment: Questionnaire Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Urfalıoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the knowledge of ophthalmologists regarding local anesthesia toxicity syndrome (LATS and intravenous lipid emulsion used in treatment, and to raise awareness of this issue. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire comprising 14 questions about demographics, local anesthesia (LA use, toxicity, and treatment methods was administered to ophthalmologists at different hospitals. Results: The study included 104 ophthalmologists (25% residents, 67.3% specialists, 7.7% faculty members with a mean age of 35.71±6.53 years. The highest number of participants was from state hospitals (65.4%, and 34.6% of the physicians had been working in ophthalmology for more than 10 years. Seventy-six percent of the participants reported using LA every day or more than twice a week, but 56.7% had received no specific training on this subject. No statistically significant difference was observed between different education levels and the rates of training (p=0.419. Bupivacaine was the most preferred LA and the majority of respondents (97.1% did not use a test dose. Allergy (76% and hypotension (68.3% were the most common responses for early findings of LATS, while cardiac arrest (57.4% and hepatotoxicity (56.4% were given for late findings. The most common responses concerning the prevention of LATS included monitorization (72.4% and use of appropriate doses (58.2%. Symptomatic treatment was selected by 72.4% of respondents and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and antihistamine treatment by 58.8%. Of the ophthalmologists in the study, 62.5% had never encountered LATS. The use of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion therapy for toxicity was known by 65% of the physicians, but only 1 participant stated having used it previously. Conclusion: The importance of using 20% lipid emulsion in LATS treatment and having it available where LA is administered must be emphasized, and there should be compulsory training programs for ophthalmologists on this subject.

  11. Enhanced Control for Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierren, C.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Perry, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Local helicity injection (LHI) experiments on Pegasus rely upon programmable control of a 250 MVA modular power supply system that drives the electromagnets and helicity injection systems. Precise control of the central solenoid is critical to experimental campaigns that test the LHI Taylor relaxation limit and the coupling efficiency of LHI-produced plasmas to Ohmic current drive. Enhancement and expansion of the present control system is underway using field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology for digital logic and control, coupled to new 10 MHz optical-to-digital transceivers for semiconductor level device communication. The system accepts optical command signals from existing analog feedback controllers, transmits them to multiple devices in parallel H-bridges, and aggregates their status signals for fault detection. Present device-level multiplexing/de-multiplexing and protection logic is extended to include bridge-level protections with the FPGA. An input command filter protects against erroneous and/or spurious noise generated commands that could otherwise cause device failures. Fault registration and response times with the FPGA system are 25 ns. Initial system testing indicates an increased immunity to power supply induced noise, enabling plasma operations at higher working capacitor bank voltage. This can increase the applied helicity injection drive voltage, enable longer pulse lengths and improve Ohmic loop voltage control. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  12. Use of wound soaker catheters for the administration of local anesthetic for post-operative analgesia: 56 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Amanda L; McCobb, Emily C; Shaw, Scott; Armitage-Chan, Elizabeth; Wetmore, Lois A; Karas, Alicia Z; Blaze, Cheryl

    2009-11-01

    To describe the administration of local anesthetic through wound soaker catheters for post-operative veterinary patients and to characterize complications. Retrospective study of hospital records. Records of patients in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively between November 1, 2004 and July 1, 2006 at a veterinary teaching hospital. Records in which a limb amputation was performed between January 1, 2002 and August 1, 2007 and in which a wound soaker catheter was not placed were reviewed for historic control. A total of 56 cases were identified in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively including 52 dogs, 2 cats, and 2 goats. Twenty canine cases were identified in which limb amputation was performed and no wound soaker catheter was placed. The majority of surgical procedures for which a wound soaker catheter was placed included thoracic limb amputation (46.4%) and pelvic limb amputation (35.7%). Wound soaker catheters remained in place for an average of 1.6 +/- 0.5 days. Feline and caprine patients received intermittent bupivacaine boluses every 6 hours. Canine patients received continuous lidocaine infusions. Complications included disconnection of the catheter from the infusion (7.7%), one seroma, and one suspected lidocaine neurotoxicity. Incisional infections were noted in 3/56 (5.3%) limb amputations with wound soaker catheters placed which was not higher than the incisional infection rate found in the historic control cases 3/20 (15%). Use of the wound soaker catheter was a viable means of providing local analgesia in post-operative veterinary patients. Studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of pain management, and to further investigate techniques for catheter placement and maintenance which may help to optimize the analgesia achieved using this technique.

  13. Comparison of interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular local anesthetic administration on postoperative pain management in arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, the aim was to compare postoperative analgesia effects of the administration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular bupivacaine carried out with bupivacaine. METHODS: In the first group of patients 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine and ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISPB were applied, while 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was given via intra-articular (IA administration to the second group patients after surgery. Patients in the third group were considered the control group and no block was performed. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA with morphine was used in all three groups for postoperative analgesia. RESULTS: In the ISPB group, morphine consumption in the periods between 0-4, 6-12 and 12-24 postoperative hours and total consumption within 24 h was lower than in the other two groups. Morphine consumption in the IA group was lower than in the control group in the period from 0 to 6 h and the same was true for total morphine consumption in 24 h. Postoperative VASr scores in the ISPB group were lower than both of the other groups in the first 2 h and lower than the control group in the 4th and 6th hours (p < 0.05. In the IA group, VASr and VASm scores in the 2nd, 4th and 6th hours were lower than in the control group (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Interscalene brachial plexus block was found to be more effective than intra-articular local anesthetic injection for postoperative analgesia.

  14. β–Cyclodextrin–Propyl Sulfonic Acid Catalysed One-Pot Synthesis of 1,2,4,5-Tetrasubstituted Imidazoles as Local Anesthetic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ran

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Some functionalized 1,2,4,5-tetrasubstituted imidazole derivatives were synthesized using a one-pot, four component reaction involving 1,2-diketones, aryl aldehydes, ammonium acetate and substituted aromatic amines. The synthesis has been efficiently carried out in a solvent free medium using β-cyclodextrin-propyl sulfonic acid as a catalyst to afford the target compounds in excellent yields. The local anesthetic effect of these derivatives was assessed in comparison to lidocaine as a standard using a rabbit corneal and mouse tail anesthesia model. The three most potent promising compounds were subjected to a rat sciatic nerve block assay where they showed considerable local anesthetic activity, along with minimal toxicity. Among the tested analogues, 4-(1-benzyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl-N,N-dimethylaniline (5g was identified as most potent analogue with minimal toxicity. It was further characterized by a more favourable therapeutic index than the standard.

  15. Local anesthetic interaction with human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels: role of aromatic amino acids Y652 and F656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Schmitt, Nicole; Friederich, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    was to determine the effect of the mutations Y652A and F656A in the putative drug binding region of HERG on the inhibition by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. METHODS: The authors examined the inhibition of wild-type and mutant HERG channels, transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells...... by bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed at room temperature. RESULTS: Inhibition of HERG wild-type and mutant channels by the different local anesthetics was concentration dependent, stereoselective, and reversible. The sensitivity decreased in the order...... bupivacaine > ropivacaine > mepivacaine for wild-type and mutant channels. The mutant channels were approximately 4-30 times less sensitive to the inhibitory action of the different local anesthetics than the wild-type channel. The concentration-response data were described by Hill functions (bupivacaine...

  16. Comparative evaluation of endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe in obturation of primary teeth: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Hiremath, Mallayya C.; Srivastava, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare four methods of root canal obturation in primary teeth using conventional radiography. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 root canals of primary molars were prepared and obturated with zinc oxide eugenol. Obturation methods compared were endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe. The root canal obturations were evaluated by conventional radiography for the length of obturation and presenc...

  17. Comparative evaluation of endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe in obturation of primary teeth: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Mallayya C; Srivastava, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare four methods of root canal obturation in primary teeth using conventional radiography. A total of 96 root canals of primary molars were prepared and obturated with zinc oxide eugenol. Obturation methods compared were endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe. The root canal obturations were evaluated by conventional radiography for the length of obturation and presence of voids. The obtained data were analyzed using Chi-square test. The results showed significant differences between the four groups for the length of obturation (P tube showed the poor results (37.5% optimal fillings) for the length of obturation. The insulin syringe (79.2% optimal fillings) and local anesthetic syringe (66.7% optimal fillings) showed acceptable results for the length of root canal obturation. However, minor voids were present in all the four techniques used. Endodontic pressure syringe produced the best results in terms of length of obturation and controlling paste extrusion from the apical foramen. However, insulin syringe and local anesthetic syringe can be used as effective alternative methods.

  18. The effect of verapamil as an adjuvant agent with local anesthetic on sensory block level, hemodynamic and postoperative pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabaeizavareh, M.H.; Omranifard, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Coadministration of verapamil with local anesthetics could potentiate the sensory block of peripheral nerve, increase the duration of sensory nerve block and reduce postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of verapamil as an adjuvant with bupivacaine on level of sensory block, post-operative pain and analgesic consumption among patients undergone elective surgery in Isfahan. Methodology: In this prospective randomized interventional clinical double-blind study ASA physical status I or II male patients referred for elective lower abdominal surgery were enrolled. They randomized in group A (20 cc of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 5 mg verapamil) and B(20 cc of 0.5% bupivacaine plus 2 cc normal saline). The sensory level block, postoperative pain, opioid consumption and vomiting and nausa and hemodynamic state was recorded and compared in two groups. Results: Sixty two patients were studied. Mean of the sensory level block 20 minutes after stating epidural anesthesia and immediately after surgery, postoperative pain score, opioid consumption and nausea and vomiting and fluid intake was not significantly different in two groups (P>0.05). Mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate changes was not significantly different in two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Verapamil as an adjuvant with bupivacaine could not significantly increase the level of sensory block and attenuate post-operative pain and analgesic consumption and hemodynamic condition of the patients. For more accurate results it is recommended to determine the effect of different dose of verapamil in larger sample size of the patients. Studying the effect of other Ca channel blockers would be favorable in this regard. (author)

  19. Diagnostic lumbosacral segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics: a prospective double-blind study on the variability and interpretation of segmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, A P; Groen, G J; Crul, B J

    2001-01-01

    Selective spinal nerve infiltration blocks are used diagnostically in patients with chronic low back pain radiating into the leg. Generally, a segmental nerve block is considered successful if the pain is reduced substantially. Hypesthesia and elicited paresthesias coinciding with the presumed segmental level are used as controls. The interpretation depends on a standard dermatomal map. However, it is not clear if this interpretation is reliable enough, because standard dermatomal maps do not show the overlap of neighboring dermatomes. The goal of the present study is to establish if dissimilarities exist between areas of hypesthesia, spontaneous pain reported by the patient, pain reduction by local anesthetics, and paresthesias elicited by sensory electrostimulation. A secondary goal is to determine to what extent the interpretation is improved when the overlaps of neighboring dermatomes are taken into account. Patients suffering from chronic low back pain with pain radiating into the leg underwent lumbosacral segmental nerve root blocks at subsequent levels on separate days. Lidocaine (2%, 0.5 mL) mixed with radiopaque fluid (0.25 mL) was injected after verifying the target location using sensory and motor electrostimulation. Sensory changes (pinprick method), paresthesias (reported by the patient), and pain reduction (Numeric Rating Scale) were reported. Hypesthesia and paresthesias were registered in a standard dermatomal map and in an adapted map which included overlap of neighboring dermatomes. The relationships between spinal level of injection, extent of hypesthesia, location of paresthesias, and corresponding dermatome were assessed quantitatively. Comparison of the results between both dermatomal maps was done by paired t-tests. After inclusion, data were processed for 40 segmental nerve blocks (L2-S1) performed in 29 patients. Pain reduction was achieved in 43%. Hypesthetic areas showed a large variability in size and location, and also in comparison to

  20. Effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to local anesthetics for brachial plexus block: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Shin

    Full Text Available Tramadol, a 4-phenyl-piperidine analog of codeine, has a unique action in that it has a central opioidergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic analgesic, and peripheral local anesthetic (LA effect. Many studies have reported contradictory findings regarding the peripheral analgesic effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to LA in brachial plexus block (BPB. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effects of tramadol as an adjunct to LA in BPB during shoulder or upper extremity surgery.We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, KoreaMed databases, and Google Scholar for eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared BPB with LA alone and BPB with LA and tramadol. Primary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia. Secondary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on time to onset of sensory block and motor block and on adverse effects. We performed the meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.3 software.We identified 16 RCTs with 751 patients. BPB with tramadol prolonged the duration of sensory block (mean difference [MD], -61.5 min; 95% CI, -95.5 to -27.6; P = 0.0004, motor block (MD, -65.6 min; 95% CI, -101.5 to -29.7; P = 0.0003, and analgesia (MD, -125.5 min; 95% CI, -175.8 to -75.3; P < 0.0001 compared with BPB without tramadol. Tramadol also shortened the time to onset of sensory block (MD, 2.1 min; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.1; P < 0.0001 and motor block (MD, 1.2 min; 95% CI, 0.2 to 2.1; P = 0.010. In subgroup analysis, the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia was prolonged for BPB with tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.05 but not for BPB with tramadol 50 mg. The quality of evidence was high for duration of analgesia according to the GRADE system. Adverse effects were comparable between the studies.In upper extremity surgery performed under BPB, use of tramadol 100 mg as an adjuvant to LA appears to prolong the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia, and

  1. Dexmedetomidine Dose Dependently Enhances the Local Anesthetic Action of Lidocaine in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block: A Randomized Double-Blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kentaro; Sugiyama, Kazuna

    2016-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine (DEX) dose dependently enhances the local anesthetic action of lidocaine in rats. We hypothesized that the effect might also be dose dependent in humans. We evaluated the effect of various concentrations of DEX with a local anesthetic in humans. Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomly assigned by a computer to receive 1.8 mL of 1 of 4 drug combinations: (1) 1% lidocaine with 2.5 ppm (parts per million) (4.5 μg) DEX, (2) lidocaine with 5.0 ppm (9.0 μg) DEX, (3) lidocaine with 7.5 ppm (13.5μg) DEX, or (4) lidocaine with 1:80,000 (22.5 μg) adrenaline (AD), to produce inferior alveolar nerve block. Pulp latency and lower lip numbness (for assessing onset and duration of anesthesia) were tested, and sedation level, blood pressure, and heart rate were recorded every 5 minutes for 20 minutes, and every 10 minutes from 20 to 60 minutes. Pulp latency of each tooth increased compared with baseline, from 5 to 15 minutes until 60 minutes. There were no significant intergroup differences at any time point. Anesthesia onset was not different between groups. Anesthesia duration was different between groups (that with DEX 7.5 ppm was significantly longer than that with DEX 2.5 ppm and AD; there was no difference between DEX 2.5 ppm and AD). Blood pressure decreased from baseline in the 5.0 and 7.5 ppm DEX groups at 30 to 60 minutes, although there was no hypotension; moreover, heart rate did not change in any group. Sedation score did not indicate deep sedation in any of the groups. Dexmedetomidine dose dependently enhances the local anesthetic action of lidocaine in humans. Dexmedetomidine at 2.5 ppm produces similar enhancement of local anesthesia effect as addition of 1:80,000 AD.

  2. Does the combination of 3% mepivacaine plain plus 2% lidocaine with epinephrine improve anesthesia and reduce the pain of anesthetic injection for the inferior alveolar nerve block? A prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Emily; Nusstein, John; Reader, Al; Drum, Melissa; Beck, Mike; Fowler, Sara

    2014-09-01

    In theory, using 3% mepivacaine initially for an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block would decrease the pain of injection, provide faster onset, and increase anesthetic success. The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the degree of pulpal anesthesia obtained with a combination of 3% mepivacaine/2% lidocaine (1:100,000 epinephrine) versus a combination of 2% lidocaine (1:100,000 epinephrine)/2% lidocaine (1:100,000 epinephrine) in IAN blocks. Injection pain was also studied. One hundred asymptomatic subjects were randomly given a combination of a 1-cartridge volume of 3% mepivacaine plus a 1-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and a combination of a 1-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine plus a 1-cartridge volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for the IAN block at 2 separate appointments. Subjects rated the pain of injection. The molars, premolars, and incisors were tested with an electric pulp tester in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes. Anesthetic success was defined as the subject achieving 2 consecutive 80 readings within 15 minutes after completion of the IAN blocks and sustaining the 80 reading for 60 minutes. Success was not significantly different (P > .05) between the 2 combinations. No statistical differences in injection pain or onset times were found. The combination of 3% mepivacaine plus 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was equivalent to the combination of 2 cartridges of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in terms of injection pain, onset time, and pulpal anesthetic success for the IAN block. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing the permeability of the rat sciatic nerve epineural sheath against compounds with local anesthetic activity: an ex vivo electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiava, Alexia; Theophilidis, George

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Studies have shown that the sciatic nerve epineural sheath acts as a barrier and has a delaying effect on the diffusion of local anesthetics into the nerve fibers and endoneurium. The purpose of this work is to assess and to quantify the permeability of the epineural sheath. For this purpose, we isolated the rat sciatic nerve in a three-chamber recording bath that allowed us to monitor the constant in amplitude evoked nerve compound action potential (nCAP) for over 24 h. For nerves exposed to the compounds under investigation, we estimated the IT50 the time required to inhibit the nCAP to 50% of its initial value. For desheathed nerves, the half-vitality time was denoted as IT50(-) and for the ensheath normal nerves as IT50(+). There was no significant difference between the IT50 of desheathed and ensheathed nerves exposed to normal saline. The IT50(-) for nerves exposed to 40 mM lidocaine was 12.1 ± 0.95 s (n=14) and the IT50(+) was 341.4 ± 2.49 s (n=6). The permeability (P) coefficient of the epineural sheath was defined as the ratio IT50(+)/IT50(-). The P coefficient for 40 mM lidocaine and linalool was 28.2 and 3.48, correspondingly, and for 30 mM 2-heptanone was 4.87. This is an indication that the epineural sheath provided a stronger barrier against lidocaine, compared to natural local anesthetics, linalool and 2-heptanone. The methodology presented here is a useful tool for studying epineural sheath permeability to compounds with local anesthetic properties.

  4. Risk of Immediate-Type Allergy to Local Anesthetics is Overestimated-Results from 5 Years of Provocation Testing in a Danish Allergy Clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisselgaard, Ask D; Mosbech, Holger F; Fransson, Sara

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Local anesthetics (LAs) are used in many health care settings and exposure during a lifetime is almost inevitable. Immediate-type allergy to LAs is considered rare among allergy experts but is commonly suspected by health care workers from other specialties, and by patients. OBJECTIVE...... of 164 patients (123 women/41 men; median age, 56 years; range, 7-89 years) who had 189 provocations with LAs were included over the 5-year period 2010 to 2014. All 164 patients had negative subcutaneous provocations to all 189 tests with LAs (95% CI, 0%-1.83%). Another allergen was identified in 10% (n...

  5. Evaluation of new injection and cavity preparation model in local anesthesia teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yekta, S.S.; Lampert, F.; Kazemi, S.; Kazemi, R.; Brand, H.S.; Baart, J.A.; Mazandarani, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a recently developed preclinical injection and cavity preparation model in local anesthesia. Thirty-three dental students administered an inferior alveolar nerve block injection in the model, followed by preparation on a tooth. The injection was evaluated by

  6. Autologous platelet lysate local injections for the treatment of refractory lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xun-xiang; Ju, Hai-yang; Yan, Wei; Jiang, Hong-jiang; Su, Jin-ping; Dong, Hua-jun; Wang, Ling-shuang; Zou, De-bao

    2016-01-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of autologous platelet lysate (APL) local injections in reducing pain and improving function in patients with refractory lateral epicondylitis. A total of 56 patients with refractory lateral epicondylitis were enrolled in this study. All the patients received three injections in one course of treatment. Subjective assessments include visual analog scale (VAS) pain score and Mayo elbow score before injection (baseline) and at 1, 6, and 12 months after injection. Significant differences were observed in VAS and Mayo scores at baseline and at 1, 6, and 12 months after injection. Overall, the injections of APL improved local symptoms and all the patients recovered to normal elbow function with 12 months follow-up. Local injections of APL resulted in favorable clinical outcomes for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. APL could be clinically effective in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

  7. Adjuncts to local anesthesia: separating fact from fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J K

    2001-01-01

    Adjunctive local anesthetic techniques and their armamentaria, such as intraosseous injection, computer-controlled delivery systems, periodontal ligament injection and needleless jet injection, have been proposed to hold particular advantages over conventional means of achieving local anesthesia. This article describes the use of each technique and proprietary armamentarium and reviews the literature appraising their use.

  8. Transversus abdominis plane block using a short-acting local anesthetic for postoperative pain after laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Lee, Se-Jun; Do, Sang-Hwan; Song, In-Ae

    2018-02-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block using a short-acting local anesthetic as part of multimodal analgesia is efficient in various abdominal surgeries, including laparoscopic surgery. However, information regarding its use in laparoscopic colorectal surgery is still limited and sometimes controversial. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine whether TAP block using a short-acting anesthetic has a positive postoperative analgesic outcome in patients who have undergone laparoscopic colorectal surgery. We searched for studies comparing the postoperative pain outcome after laparoscopic colorectal surgery between patients who received TAP block and a control group (placebo or no treatment). Outcome measures were early pain at rest (numeric rating scale [NRS] score at 0-2 h postoperatively), late pain at movement (NRS score at 24 h postoperatively), late pain at rest (NRS score at 24 h postoperatively), and postoperative opioid consumption (up to 24 h postoperatively). We used a random-effects model for the meta-analysis and Egger's regression test to detect publication bias. We included six studies involving 452 patients (224 in the TAP block group, 228 in the control group). Early and late pain scores at movement were significantly different between the TAP block and control groups (standardized mean difference: - 0.695, P consumption (P = 0.257). The TAP block using a short-acting anesthetic had a significant effect on the postoperative pain outcome in the early (0-2 h) and late (24 h) period at movement. However, it did not have a significant effect on the postoperative pain outcome in the early (0-2 h) and late (24 h) periods at rest after laparoscopic surgery.

  9. Accidental epidural injection of Atropine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayan Bakshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal injection of drugs for anesthesia, regional analgesia, and chronic pain management are common practice now. Local anesthetic, adjuvants, and opioids are in common use. Human error in the Operation Theater and the Intensive Care Unit setup is also known and reported, due to stress and overwork. A case of unintentional atropine injection intrathecally, which was closely observed for any untoward effects, is reported here.

  10. Treatment of metastasis localizations by intratumoral injection of radionuclide microsphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuo Peiyu; Pang Yan; Zhu Dianqing; Chang Keli; Zhu Yanjia

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of radionuclide-labeled microsphere by intratumoral injection into 18 patients with superficial metastasis tumor for treatment. Methods: 18 patients with superficial metastasis were treated with radionuclide-labeled microsphere ( 90 Y-GTMS and 32 P-GTMS) by multi-point intratumoral injection. Each injection dose was 11.1-18.5 MBq/g (tumor). Results: 1 patient was relieved completely, 9 were relieved partly, 5 were improved and 3 kept stable. The total rate of relief and virtual value were 55.6% and 83.3% respectively. Conclusion: Topical treatment by using radionuclide may help diminish the tumor, control its progress and ease the symptoms. Thus it can be used as a supplement of routine treatment of tumors and it should do some work in therapy of malignant tumors in late stages

  11. Effectiveness of various formulations of local anesthetics and additives for topical anesthesia – a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilbach C

    2017-05-01

    , the addition of trometamol (Tris/THAM accelerated the onset of the effect compared to the native formulation (at 0.4 and 0.8 N. In all of the adult subjects of this study, the minimum exposure time was 60 min for any of the tested topical anesthetic creams.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that a cream containing 20% lidocaine, 38% trometamol and 10% propylene glycol may be used as an alternative to lidocaine/prilocaine with a comparable effect and without the need to extend exposure time. Keywords: local anesthetics, topical anesthesia, EMLA®, topical anesthetic cream, lidocaine, prilocaine 

  12. Studies concerning the interaction between local anesthetics and lipid membrane by phosphorus-31, deuterium and proton NMR; Estudo da interacao entre anestesicos locais e membranas lipidicas por ressonancia magnetica de fosforo ({sup 31} P), deuterio ({sup 2} H) e proton ({sup 1} H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica; Jarrell, Harold C. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Biological Sciences; Schreier, Shirley [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1993-12-31

    Local anesthetics block the conduction of nervous stimulus by impeding the entrance of sodium ion and the consequently depolarization of the nervous membrane. The action mechanism of local anesthetics, however, is not fully understood yet. In the present work the interaction between local anesthetics and membranes are studied by the perspective of lipid phase perturbation using NMR to elucidate the mechanism. Results are presented and discussed 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Treatment of lateral epicondilitis using three different local injection modalities: a randomized prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, Yunus; Kalaci, Aydiner; Savaş, Nazan; Duman, I Gokhan; Yanat, A Nedim

    2009-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of three different local injection modalities in the treatment of lateral epicondilitis. In a prospective randomized study on lateral epicondilitis, 75 patients were divided into three equal groups A, B and C (n = 25) and were treated using three different method of local injection. The patients in group A were treated with local injection of a steroid (1 mL triamcinolone) combined with local anaesthetic (1 mL lidocaine), those in group B were treated with injection of local anaesthetic (1 mL lidocaine) combined with peppering technique and those in group C with local injection of a steroid (1 mL triamcinolone) combined with local anaesthetic (1 mL lidocaine) and peppering technique. The outcome was defined by measuring the elbow pain during the activity using a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) and satisfaction with the treatment using a scoring system based on the criteria of the Verhaar et al. at 3 weeks and 6 months after the injection and compared with the pre-treatment condition. There were significant (P = 0.006) differences in the successful outcomes between the three groups at 6 months. In group C in which local steroid + peppering injection technique were used; excellent results were obtained in 84% of patients comparing to 36% and 48% for patients in groups A and B, respectively. The successful outcomes were statistically higher in group C comparing to group A (P = 0.002) and group B (P = 0.011). In all groups, there was a significantly lower pain (VAS) at the 3-week and 6-month follow-ups comparing to the pre-treatment condition. VAS measured at 6-month follow-up were significantly lower in group C comparing to other groups (P = 0.002). In the treatment of lateral epicondilitis, combination of corticosteroid injections with peppering is more effective than corticosteroid injections or peppering injections alone and produces better clinical results.

  14. Continuous positive airway pressure breathing increases the spread of sensory blockade after low-thoracic epidural injection of lidocaine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Giele, J.L.P.

    2006-01-01

    Factors affecting the distribution of sensory blockade after epidural injection of local anesthetics remain incompletely clarified. To evaluate if increasing intrathoracic pressure affects the spread of thoracic epidural anesthesia, we randomized 20 patients who received an epidural catheter at the

  15. Injectable bulking agents for urinary incontinence after radical prostaectomy, mimicking local recurrence: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Je Hong; Ahn, Sung Eun; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Sun Ju [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Periurethral bulking agent injection (or transurethral submucosal injection) is a comparatively less invasive procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in patients who develop incontinence after radical prostatectomy, and who are more frequently being treated with transurethral submucosal injection. However, as the radiologic findings of bulking agents are not very well known, they can be mistaken for local recurrence in prostate cancer patients who have undergone prostatectomy. Unlike some of the literatures, in which the radiologic features of collagen injections have been reported, the radiologic findings of silicone injections are yet to be determined. Thus, it is our intention to report this case along with the literature review as the authors have experienced an actual case of a silicone injection mistaken as local recurrence.

  16. Influência de vasoconstritores associados a anestésicos locais sobre a pressão arterial de ratos hipertensos e normotensos Influence of vasoconstrictors associated with local anesthetics on the arterial pressure of hypertensive and normotensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apparecido Neri Daniel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de anestésicos locais associados a vasoconstritores em pacientes hipertensos é controversa. Neste estudo, verificamos a influência desta associação sobre a pressão arterial caudal (PA em ratos hipertensos DOCA-sal. Após ligeira anestesia com éter, os anestésicos GRUPO I - lidocaína 2% sem vasoconstritor, GRUPO II - lidocaína com fenilefrina, GRUPO III - lidocaína a 2% com noradrenalina, GRUPO IV - prilocaína 3% com felipressina, GRUPO V - mepivacaína 2% com adrenalina e GRUPO VI - mepivacaína com noradrenalina foram injetados na submucosa da boca (anestesia infiltrativa, em ratos DOCA-sal e controles. A PA foi determinada 5 e 15 minutos após a primeira dose do anestésico e também 5 e 15 minutos após a segunda dose. Os dados obtidos indicaram que: a a PA dos ratos DOCA-sal (193,05 ± 4,25 mmHg; n = 43 foi significativamente superior àquela observada nos animais controles (115,64 ± 2,47 mmHg; n = 43 e, b não houve variação significativa nas PA observadas em animais DOCA-sal e controles pela administração dos anestésicos locais testados. Assim, nossos dados experimentais sugerem que a presença de agentes vasoconstritores associados à lidocaína 2%, à prilocaína 3% e à mepivacaína 2% não interferem na PA desses animais, neste modelo experimental de hipertensão.The utilization of local anesthetics associated with vasoconstrictors in hypertensive patients is controversial. The purpose of this investigation was to verify the influence of this association on the arterial pressure (AP in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. After light ether anesthesia, the anesthetics (Group I - lidocaine 2% without vasoconstrictor; Group II - lidocaine 2% with phenylephrine, Group III - lidocaine 2% with noradrenaline- Group IV - prylocaine 3% with felypressin; Group V - mepivacaine 2% with epinephrine, and Group VI - mepivacaine 2% with norepinephrine were injected into mucobuccal fold (infiltration anesthesia, in DOCA

  17. Lumbar segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics, pain relief, and motor function: a prospective double-blind study between lidocaine and ropivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, André P; Wilder Smith, Oliver H G; Crul, Ben J P; van de Heijden, Marc P; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2004-08-01

    Selective segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics are applied for diagnostic purposes in patients with chronic back pain to determine the segmental level of the pain. We performed this study to establish myotomal motor effects after L4 spinal nerve blocks by lidocaine and ropivacaine and to evaluate the relationship with pain. Therefore, 20 patients, of which 19 finished the complete protocol, with chronic lumbosacral radicular pain without neurological deficits underwent segmental nerve blocks at L4 with both lidocaine and ropivacaine. Pain intensity scores (verbal numeric rating scale; VNRS) and the maximum voluntary muscle force (MVMF; using a dynamometer expressed in newtons) of the tibialis anterior and quadriceps femoris muscles were measured on the painful side and on the control side. The median VNRS decrease was 4.0 (P segmental nerve (L4) block is associated with increased quadriceps femoris and tibialis anterior MVMF, without differences for lidocaine and ropivacaine.

  18. Bioluminescence imaging in a medium-sized animal by local injection of d-luciferin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Kim, Sung Mi; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Suk Jung; Kang, Han Saem; Kim, Kwang Yoon [ECOBIO INC., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ho [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Luciferase is one of the most commonly used reporter enzymes in the field of molecular imaging. D-luciferin is known as the substrate for luciferase enzyme and its cost is very expensive. Therefore, the bioluminescence molecular imaging study has been allowed in small animals such as mice and rats. In this current study, we validated local injection of D-luciferin in articular capsule for bioluminescence imaging in rabbits. Chondrocytes were cultured and infected by replication-defective adenoviral vector encoding firefly luciferase. And then was performed different method of chondrocyte cell injection and transplantation into the knee of rabbits. The rabbits underwent imaging by cooled CCD camera after local injection of D-luciferin (3mg) into experimental knee joint as well as contralateral normal knee joint on days 1, 5, 7, 9. We sought whether optimal imaging signal was acquired by using cooled CCD camera after local injection of D-luciferin. We successfully visualized injected or transplanted cells in knee joint by local injection of D-luciferin. Total photon flux (7.86E+08 p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr) from the knee joint transplanted with cells approximately increased 10-fold more than (9.43E+07p/s/cm{sup 2}/sr) that from injected knee joints until 7 day. Imaging signal was observed in transplanted joints until day 9 after surgery while signal from injected knee was observed by day 7 after injection. We successfully carried out bioluminescence imaging study with medium sized animal by local injection of small amount of D-luciferin. Survival of chondrocytes were prolonged when surgically transplanted in joints than when directly injected in joint space.

  19. DOES THE ADDITION OF DEXAMETHASON TO LOCAL ANESTHETIC PROLONG THE ANALGESIA OF INTERSCALEN PLEXUS BRACHIALIS BLOCK IN PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER SURGERY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancheva Jasminka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Peripherial nerve blocks is a suitable alternative to general anesthesia especially for one-day case surgery. Interscalene approach of plexus brachialis block as much as supraclavicular and infraclavicular provide reliable, safe, effective, low cost and most complete anesthesia with satisfactory postoperative analgesia for upper limb surgery. Postoperative analgesia of plexus brachialis blocks can be prolonged by using different drugs as adjuvants with local anesthetics. Dexamethasone has been shown to prolong the duration of postoperative analgesia when given as an adjunct for peripheral nerve blocks. The investigation was randomized, prospective, double blinded and controlled study. Objective: The study was designed to compare the effects of dexamethasone administered as an adjunct to bupivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block on the onset, duration and postoperative analgesia in patients under the shoulder surgery. Methods: A prospective, double-blind study was undertaken in patients scheduled for shoulder surgeries under the interscalene brachial plexus block. We enrolled 60 patients, ASA I-II both sexes, aged 19-65 years, weighing 54-89 kg, divided to two groups G1 and G2. The brachial plexus block was performed by interscalene approach and mixture of 2% lidocaine (12ml and 0.5% bupivacaine (22 ml either alone or combined with dexamethasone (4 mg. The block was performed by using double technique neurostimulator/ultrasound technique. Results: In our investigation we found a significant increase in onset and duration of motor and sensory block in Group G2 (with dexamethasone as compared to Group G1 patients (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic drugs in interscalene plexus brachialis block, significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia and motor block in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. Moreover, it is a remarkably safe and costeffective method of providing

  20. New perineal injection technique for pudendal nerve infiltration in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinschenk, Stefan; Hollmann, Markus W.; Strowitzki, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Pudendal nerve injection is used as a diagnostic procedure in the vulvar region and for therapeutic purposes, such as in vulvodynia. Here, we provide a new, easy-to-perform perineal injection technique. We analyzed 105 perineal injections into the pudendal nerve with a local anesthetic (LA),

  1. When pharmacologic anesthesia is precluded: the value of hypnosis as a sole anesthetic agent in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhauz, M; Eli, I

    1993-01-01

    Occasionally, a dental patient presents his/her dentist with a history of hypersensitivity to local anesthetic agents. The symptoms may include immediate reactions to the injection procedure (dizziness, shortness of breath, tachycardia, etc), or delayed reactions to the anesthetic (swelling, urticaria, etc). Although the true incidence of local anesthetic allergy is low, such a history often involves the patient's anxiety regarding the use of the drug in question, and the dentist's apprehension to treat the "problematic" patient. In such cases, hypnosis can play a major role in controlling pain and the associated distress. In the present article, the method concerning the implementation of hypnosis to induce local anesthesia is described and illustrated through case demonstrations.

  2. Innovative evaluation of local injective gel of curcumin on the orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Asefi

    2018-01-01

    Materials and Methods: Forty rats were used as follows in each group: (1 negative control: Did not receive any appliance or injection; (2 positive control: received 0.03 cc normal saline and appliance; (3 gelatin plus curcumin (G: Received 0.03 cc hydrogel and appliance; and (4 chitosan plus curcumin (Ch: Received 0.03 cc hydrogel and appliance. They were anesthetized and closed nickel-titanium coil springs were installed between the first molars and central incisors unilaterally as the orthodontic appliance. After 21 days, the rats were decapitated, and the distance between the first and second molars was measured by a leaf gauge. Howship's lacunae, blood vessels, osteoclast-like cells, and root resorption lacunae were evaluated in the histological analysis. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, and t-test (P 0.05.

  3. Topical anesthetic versus lidocaine infiltration in arteriovenous fistula cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: End stage renal disease (ESRD patients on maintenance hemodialysis undergo arterio-venous fistula (AVF cannulation prior to each hemodialysis session for blood access. Prior to cannulation lidocaine infiltration is done, which is often perceived as painful. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA has been found to significantly reduce pain associated with radial artery cannulation compared with lidocaine infiltration. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of EMLA compared to infiltration of lidocaine in hemodialysis patients for AVF cannulation. Materials and Methods: A single-centre, crossover study of patients with an AVF on regular maintenance hemodialysis was performed in the dialysis unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. The site of AVF, number of attempts for AVF cannulation and cannula insertion time were recorded. The patients were asked about the acceptability of application of the anesthetic, delay between anesthetic and cannulation and to score the pain on cannulation. Results: Fifty patients were included in the study. With the visual analog scale, pain score on infiltration was 4.8. Pain score on cannulation after topical application was 2.9 and after infiltration, 2.0. The number of attempts for cannulation and the cannula insertion time were similar. Anesthesia was more stressful in the injectable group rather than the topical group (P < 0.001. Delay between anesthetic and cannulation was unacceptable in the topical group (P < 0.001. Patient compliance was better during infiltration compared to topical (P < 0.005. Mean pain score during infiltration of anesthetic was significantly higher than cannulation pain after either anesthetic, although pain on cannulation was higher in the topical group (P < 0.001. Conclusions: EMLA offers a suitable alternative to lidocaine infiltration for patients using AVF for blood access.

  4. Cost analysis of injection laryngoplasty performed under local anaesthesia versus general anaesthesia: an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, D; Woods, C M; Schar, M; Ma, N; Ooi, E H; Athanasiadis, T

    2018-02-01

    To conduct a cost analysis of injection laryngoplasty performed in the operating theatre under local anaesthesia and general anaesthesia. The retrospective study included patients who had undergone injection laryngoplasty as day cases between July 2013 and March 2016. Cost data were obtained, along with patient demographics, anaesthetic details, type of injectant, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, length of stay, total operating theatre time and surgeon procedure time. A total of 20 cases (general anaesthesia = 6, local anaesthesia = 14) were included in the cost analysis. The mean total cost under general anaesthesia (AU$2865.96 ± 756.29) was significantly higher than that under local anaesthesia (AU$1731.61 ± 290.29) (p costs. Procedures performed under local anaesthesia in the operating theatre are associated with shorter operating theatre time and length of stay in the hospital, and provide significant cost savings. Further savings could be achieved if local anaesthesia procedures were performed in the office setting.

  5. Thermal quantitative sensory testing to assess the sensory effects of three local anesthetic solutions in a randomized trial of interscalene blockade for shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermeus, Luc A; Hans, Guy H; Schepens, Tom; Bosserez, Nathalie M-L; Breebaart, Margaretha B; Smitz, Carine J; Vercauteren, Marcel P

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether quantitative sensory testing (QST) with thermal stimulations can quantitatively measure the characteristics of an ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (US-ISB). This was a prospective randomized trial in patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia and US-ISB. Participants and observers were blinded for the study. We assigned the study participants to one of three groups: 0.5% levobupivacaine 15 mL, 0.5% levobupivacaine 15 mL with 1:200,000 epinephrine, and 0.75% ropivacaine 15 mL. We performed thermal QST within dermatomes C4, C5, C6, and C7 before infiltration and 30 min, six hours, ten hours, and 24 hr after performing the US-ISB. In addition, we used QST, a semi-objective quantitative testing method, to measure the onset, intensity, duration, extent, and functional recovery of the sensory block. We also measured detection thresholds for cold/warm sensations and cold/heat pain. Detection thresholds for all thermal sensations within the ipsilateral C4, C5, C6, and C7 dermatomes increased rapidly (indicating the development of a hypoesthetic state) and reached a steady state after 30 min. This lasted for approximately ten hours and returned to normal detection thresholds by 24 hr. There were no differences detected between the three groups at 24 hr when we compared warm sensation thresholds on one dermatome. Visual inspection of the pooled results per dermatome suggests the ability of QST to detect clinically relevant differences in block intensity per dermatome. Quantitative sensory testing can be useful as a method for detecting the presence and characteristics of regional anesthesia-induced sensory block and may be used for the evaluation of clinical protocols. The three local anesthetic solutions exhibited a similar anesthetic effect. The results support the use of QST to assess block characteristics quantitatively under clinical research conditions. This trial was registered at

  6. Anesthetic efficacy of articaine for inferior alveolar nerve blocks in patients with symptomatic versus asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argueta-Figueroa, Liliana; Arzate-Sosa, Gabriel; Mendieta-Zeron, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to determine the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth and if individual patient factors, pulpal disease characteristics, and previous medication are correlated to local anesthetic success. A second objective was to determine the specificity and sensibility of a cold test for prediction of anesthetic success prior to endodontic treatment. Seventy patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth received 1.6 mL of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) using a metal guide. The anesthetic solution was injected with a computer-preprogrammed delivery system for local anesthesia. Endodontic access was begun 15 minutes after solution deposition; later, patients rated their discomfort using the visual analog scale (VAS). The success rate for the IA NB using articaine was 64.2% in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and 86.9% in patients with asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Cold test prior to root canal treatment had a specificity and sensibility of 12.5% and 87.1%, respectively. The anesthetic efficacy of articaine in irreversible pulpitis is moderately acceptable, and anesthetic success increases when the patient has been premedicated with NSAIDs. The cold test appears to be a favorable indicator for predicting anesthetic success.

  7. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; Winters, Jan C.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Meyboom-deJong, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Background: De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trail Comparing the Efficacy of 0.5% Centbucridine to 2% Lignocaine as Local Anesthetics in Dental Extractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Mansuri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of local anesthesia in dentistry has marked the beginning of a new era in terms of pain control. Lignocaine is the most commonly used local anesthetic (LA agent even though it has a vasodilative effect and needs to be combined with adrenaline. Centbucridine is a non-ester, non amide group LA and has not been comprehensively studied in the dental setting and the objective was to compare it to Lignocaine. This was a randomized study comparing the onset time, duration, depth and cardiovascular parameters between Centbucridine (0.5% and Lignocaine (2%. The study was conducted in the dental outpatient department at the Government Dental College in India on patients attending for the extraction of lower molars. A total of 198 patients were included and there were no significant differences between the LAs except those who received Centbucridine reported a significantly longer duration of anesthesia compared to those who received Lignocaine. None of the patients reported any side effects. Centbucridine was well tolerated and its substantial duration of anesthesia could be attributed to its chemical compound. Centbucridine can be used for dental procedures and can confidently be used in patients who cannot tolerate Lignocaine or where adrenaline is contraindicated.

  9. Three cases of unresectable locally advanced breast cancer treated with local injection of the new radiosensitization (KORTUC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Taijyu; Yosikawa, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshida, Ken; Uesugi, Yasuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Inomata, Taisuke

    2013-01-01

    New radiosensitization therapy named Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectabe carcinomas (KORTUC) using a new agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate is the world first treatment developed in Japan. The agent was injected into tumor two times per week under ultrasonographic guidance. Unresectable locally advanced breast cancer is radiation resistance. The local control is difficult in a conventional radiation therapy. In 3 cases, KORTUC was enforced safety, and remarkable effects was admitted. (author)

  10. Local Injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide: A Forgotten Aetiology of Cushing’s Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhumthammarat, Weera; Putthapiban, Prapaipan; Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn

    2017-01-01

    Many different non systemic corticosteroid administrations can cause iatrogenic Cushing’s Syndrome (CS). We herein report a case series of iatrogenic CS from keloid scars treatment and aesthetic regimen called mesotherapy. Our first patient developed CS after having exceeded recommended dose of intralesional injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide (TAC). Second case presented with CS followed by unidentified mesotherapy treatment for local fat reduction. Subcutaneous injections of dexamethasone ...

  11. Pulsioxymetry monitorization during lower third molar extraction. A comparative study of three local anesthetics with epinephrine 1:100.000

    OpenAIRE

    Mestre Aspa, Regina; Carrera Grañó, Imma; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2001-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la frecuencia cardíaca y la saturación de oxígeno bajo el efecto de tres anestésicos locales diferentes, con la misma concentración de epinefrina, durante la extracción de un tercer molar inferior en pacientes sanos. Los anestésicos locales utilizados fueron articaína al 4%, lidocaína al 2% y mepivacaína al 2%, los tres con una concentración de epinefrina de 1:100.000. Se diseñó un estudio de doble ciego, paralelo y no aleatorizado. Los pacientes fuero...

  12. Therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic muscles after local injection of fragmented fibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyan; Wan, Huiying; Xia, Tian; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Yun; Luo, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis remains the most effective method to re-establish a proper blood flow in ischemic tissues. There is a great clinical need to identify an injectable format to achieve a well accumulation following local administration and a sustained delivery of biological factors at the ischemic sites. In the current study, fragmented nanofibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicines, astragaloside IV (AT), the main active ingredient of astragalus, and ferulic acid (FA), the main ingredient of angelica, were proposed to promote the microvessel formation after intramuscular injection into ischemic hindlimbs. Fragmented fibers with average lengths of 5 (FF-5), 20 (FF-20) and 80 μm (FF-80) were constructed by the cryocutting of aligned electrospun fibers. Their dispersion in sodium alginate solution (0.2%) indicated good injectability. After injection into the quadriceps muscles of the hindlimbs, FF-20 and FF-80 fiber fragments showed higher tissue retentions than FF-5, and around 90% of the injected doses were determined after 7 days. On a hindlimb ischemia model established by ligating the femoral arteries, intramuscular injection of the mixtures of FA-loaded and AT-loaded FF-20 fiber fragments substantially reduced the muscle degeneration with minimal fibrosis formation, significantly enhanced the neovessel formation and hindlimb perfusion in the ischemic tissues, and efficiently promoted the limb salvage with few limb losses. Along with the easy manipulation and lower invasiveness for in vivo administration, fragmented fibers should become potential drug carriers for disease treatment, wound recovery and tissue repair after local injection.

  13. Transmicrocatheter local injection of ethanol to treat hepatocellular carcinoma with high flow arteriovenous shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Shouhai; Shan Hong; Jiang Zaibo; Huang Mingsheng; Zhu Kangshun; Li Zhengran; Meng Xiaochun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical effect of embolization therapy in treating the high flow hepatic arteriovenous shunts in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by locally injected ethanol through microcatheter. Methods: Forty-one branches of arteriovenous shunts were treated by local ethanol infusion through microcatheter in 29 patients suffered with HCC. Angiography was performed to observe the embolization effect and influence to non-targeted vessels. Result: Forty-one branches of arteriovenous shunts in 29 patients were injected with ethanol locally. Each single shunt was infused 1-6 times. The dose of ethanol was 2-3 ml per time, and the total dose of ethanol was 2-12 ml. All shunting tracts were embolized, and all non-target vessels were protected fluently. Iodine-oil deposition was well in continued TACE. Their syndromes were improved or disappeared. Conclusion: Transmicrocatheter injection of ethanol could safely and effectively treat the hepatic arteriovenous shunts and make advantages to TACE in HCC

  14. Local injection of high-molecular hyaluronan promotes wound healing in old rats by increasing angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Luying; Wang, Yi; Liu, Hua; Huang, Jianhua

    2018-02-02

    Impaired angiogenesis contributes to delayed wound healing in aging. Hyaluronan (HA) has a close relationship with angiogenesis and wound healing. However, HA content decreases with age. In this study, we used high molecular weight HA (HMW-HA) (1650 kDa), and investigated its effects on wound healing in old rats by local injection. We found that HMW-HA significantly increases proliferation, migration and tube formation in endothelial cells, and protects endothelial cells against apoptosis. Local injection of HMW-HA promotes wound healing by increasing angiogenesis in old rats. HMW-HA increases the phosphorylation of Src, ERK and AKT, leading to increased angiogenesis, suggesting that local injection of HMW-HA promotes wound healing in elderly patients.

  15. Local Anesthesia Part 2: Technical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Kenneth L.; Malamed, Stanley F.; Fonner, Andrea M.

    2012-01-01

    An earlier paper by Becker and Reed provided an in-depth review of the pharmacology of local anesthetics. This continuing education article will discuss the importance to the safe and effective delivery of these drugs, including needle gauge, traditional and alternative injection techniques, and methods to make injections more comfortable to patients. PMID:23050753

  16. Analgesic and Sensory Effects of the Pecs Local Anesthetic Block in Patients with Persistent Pain after Breast Cancer Surgery: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Nelun; Andersen, Kenneth G; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-02-01

    Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) develops in 15% to 25% of patients, sometimes years after surgery. Approximately 50% of PPBCS patients have neuropathic pain in the breast, which may be due to dysfunction of the pectoral nerves. The Pecs local anesthetic block proposes to block these nerves and has provided pain relief for patients undergoing breast cancer surgery, but has yet to be evaluated in patients with PPBCS. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of the Pecs block on summed pain intensity (SPI) and sensory function (through quantitative sensory testing [QST]) in eight patients with PPBCS. SPI and QST measurements were recorded before and 30 minutes after administration of the Pecs block (20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine). Pain intensity and sleep interference were measured daily before and after the block for 7 days. Patients experienced analgesia (P = 0.008) and reduced hypoesthesia areas to cold (P = 0.004) and warmth (P = 0.01) after 30 minutes. The reported pain relief (P = 0.02) and reduced sleep interference (P = 0.01) persisted for 7 days after the block. This pilot study suggests that the pectoral nerves play a role in the maintenance of pain in the breast area in PPBCS and begs for further research. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Application of Local Injection of Botulinum Toxin A in Cosmetic Patients with Congenital Drooping Mouth Corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei; Zhang, Yan-Kun; Lv, Wei; Hou, Ying; Cao, Qian; Fan, Ju-Feng

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical application and efficacy of local injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) at the depressor anguli oris in patients with congenital drooping mouth corner. From September 2013 to March 2015, 36 cosmetic patients received local injections of botulinum toxin A at the depressor anguli oris, with 1-3 injection sites in the moving region of the depressor anguli oris on each side. At each injection site, 2-4 U of BTX-A was injected, and the total dose for any unilateral treatment did not exceed 8 U. The change in the degree of drooping of the mouth corner before and after the injection was analyzed using statistical methods. The clinical efficacy, preservation time, and adverse reactions were observed. The degree of drooping of the mouth corners of the cosmetic patients before the treatment was compared with that at 1 month after using a paired t test, and the difference was statistically significant, with P injection. The local injection of BTX-A at the depressor anguli oris can effectively lift a drooping mouth corner, thereby improving the depressed, stern, and aged appearance of the face. The performance of this treatment is simple, safe, and easy to perform in clinical applications. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  18. The Amide Local Anesthetic Lidocaine in Cancer Surgery—Potential Antimetastatic Effects and Preservation of Immune Cell Function? A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiên-Nga Chamaraux-Tran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgical removal of the primary tumor in solid cancer is an essential component of the treatment. However, the perioperative period can paradoxically lead to an increased risk of cancer recurrence. A bimodal dynamics for early-stage breast cancer recurrence suggests a tumor dormancy-based model with a mastectomy-driven acceleration of the metastatic process and a crucial role of the immunosuppressive state during the perioperative period. Recent evidence suggests that anesthesia could also influence the progress of the disease. Local anesthetics (LAs have long been used for their properties to block nociceptive input. They also exert anti-inflammatory capacities by modulating the liberation or signal propagation of inflammatory mediators. Interestingly, LAs can reduce viability and proliferation of many cancer cells in vitro as well. Additionally, retrospective clinical trials have suggested that regional anesthesia for cancer surgery (either with or without general anesthesia might reduce the risk of recurrence. Lidocaine, a LA, which can be administered intravenously, is widely used in clinical practice for multimodal analgesia. It is associated with a morphine-sparing effect, reduced pain scores, and in major surgery probably also with a reduced incidence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay. Systemic delivery might therefore be efficient to target residual disease or reach cells able to form micrometastasis. Moreover, an in vitro study has shown that lidocaine could enhance the activity of natural killer (NK cells. Due to their ability to recognize and kill tumor cells without the requirement of prior antigen exposure, NKs are the main actor of the innate immune system. However, several perioperative factors can reduce NK activity, such as stress, pain, opioids, or general anesthetics. Intravenous lidocaine as part of the perioperative anesthesia regimen would be of major interest for clinicians, as it might bear the potential

  19. Local Helicity Injection Systems for Non-solenoidal Startup in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Lewicki, B. T.; Redd, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Local helicity injection is being developed in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment for non-solenoidal startup in spherical tokamaks. The effective loop voltage due to helicity injection scales with the area of the injectors, requiring the development of electron current injectors with areas much larger than the 2 cm2 plasma arc injectors used to date. Solid and gas-effused metallic electrodes were found to be unusable due to reduced injector area utilization from localized cathode spots and narrow operational regimes. An integrated array of 8 compact plasma arc sources is thus being developed for high current startup. It employs two monolithic power systems, for the plasma arc sources and the bias current extraction system. The array effectively eliminates impurity fueling from plasma-material interaction by incorporating a local scraper-limiter and conical-frustum bias electrodes to mitigate the effects of cathode spots. An energy balance model of helicity injection indicates that the resulting 20 cm2 of total injection area should provide sufficient current drive to reach 0.3 MA. At that level, helicity injection drive exceeds that from poloidal induction, which is the relevant operational regime for large-scale spherical tokamaks. Future placement of the injector array near an expanded boundary divertor region will test simultaneous optimization of helicity drive and the Taylor relaxation current limit. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  20. Tissue localization and fate in mice of injected multipotential colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, D.; Nicola, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The hemopoietic regulator multipotential colony-stimulating factor [Multi-CSF (interleukin 3)] has proliferative effects on a wide range of hemopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo. Native or recombination Multi-CSF injected intravenoulsy into adult mice had an initial half-life of 3-5 min and a second phase of 50 min. Clear labeling of hemopoietic cells was observed in the bone marrow and spleen of mice injected intravenously with recombinant 125 I-labeled Multi-CSF showing that injected Multi-CSF can obtain access to such cells in situ. A high proportion of injected 125 I-labeled Multi-CSF of both types became localized in the liver and in the kidney (in cells of the Bowman's capsule and proximal renal tubules). The kidney appeared to be an active site of degradation of Multi-CSF with the early appearance of low molecular weight labeled material in the urine

  1. Local corticosteroid injection versus Cyriax-type physiotherapy for tennis elbow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); G.H.I.M. Walenkamp; H. van Mameren; A.D.M. Kester; A.J. van der Linden

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a prospective, randomised trial on 106 patients to compare the effects of local corticosteroid injections with physiotherapy as advocated by Cyriax in the treatment of tennis elbow. The main outcome measures were the severity of pain, pain provoked by resisted dorsiflexion

  2. To what extent can charge localization influence electron injection efficiency at graphene-porphyrin interfaces?

    KAUST Repository

    Parida, Manas R.

    2015-04-28

    Controlling the electron transfer process at donor- acceptor interfaces is a research direction that has not yet seen much progress. Here, with careful control of the charge localization on the porphyrin macrocycle using β -Cyclodextrin as an external cage, we are able to improve the electron injection efficiency from cationic porphyrin to graphene carboxylate by 120% . The detailed reaction mechanism is also discussed.

  3. Anesthetic salts used in dentistry: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Klein Parise

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetics allow a better and suitable control of pain in patients that submit to dental treatments. The pharmacology of local anesthetics is too complex, therefore it is important to know how to select the correct drug to each procedure to be accomplished. Thus, it is concluded that the production of a literary review material is of great relevance in order to gather current and important information about the local anesthetics most used in dentistry.

  4. Innovative evaluation of local injective gel of curcumin on the orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Seifi, Massoud; Fard, Ghazal Hatami; Lotfi, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Background: Curcumin is the most active compound in turmeric. It can suppress the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway and prevent the osteoclastogenesis procedure. This study aimed to be the first to evaluate the effect of curcumin on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Materials and Methods: Forty rats were used as follows in each group: (1) negative control: Did not receive any appliance or injection; (2) positive control: received 0.03 cc normal saline and appliance; (3) gelatin plus curcumin (G): Received 0.03 cc hydrogel and appliance; and (4) chitosan plus curcumin (Ch): Received 0.03 cc hydrogel and appliance. They were anesthetized and closed nickel-titanium coil springs were installed between the first molars and central incisors unilaterally as the orthodontic appliance. After 21 days, the rats were decapitated, and the distance between the first and second molars was measured by a leaf gauge. Howship's lacunae, blood vessels, osteoclast-like cells, and root resorption lacunae were evaluated in the histological analysis. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, and t-test (P orthodontic forces. Curcumin inhibited root and bone resorption, osteoclastic recruitment, and angiogenesis significantly. Conclusion: Curcumin had no significant inhibitory effect on OTM. While it had a significant role on decreasing bone or root resorption (P > 0.05). PMID:29497446

  5. Autologous blood versus corticosteroid local injection for treatment of Lateral Epicondylosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Singh,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present single blinded prospective randomized control trial was assessment of efficacy of autologous blood injection versus local steroid injection in treatment of lateral epicondylosis of elbow. Methodology: Using a pre-post experimental design, a total of sixty patients of previously untreated lateral epicondylosis were selected; Group 1 (n=30 was administered single injection of autologous blood and Group 2 (n=30 single local corticosteroid injection. Assessment was done at baseline, 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 12 weeks using PRTEE (Patient Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation score. Results: Pre injection parameters showed no difference between groups (chi square test, p > 0.005. Analysis between groups showed significant decrease in steroid group at very short term - 2 weeks (unpaired t test, p < 0.005.There was no difference between groups at 6 weeks. There was a significant improvement in blood group at medium term -12 weeks (unpaired t test, p < 0.05. Conclusion: Both the interventions were effective in reducing pain and improving functional status of patients in short term, but autologous blood was more effective in longer run.

  6. Thrust Vectoring of a Continuous Rotating Detonation Engine by Changing the Local Injection Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shi-Jie; Lin Zhi-Yong; Sun Ming-Bo; Liu Wei-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The thrust vectoring ability of a continuous rotating detonation engine is numerically investigated, which is realized via increasing local injection stagnation pressure of half of the simulation domain compared to the other half. Under the homogeneous injection condition, both the flow-field structure and the detonation wave propagation process are analyzed. Due to the same injection condition along the inlet boundary, the outlines of fresh gas zones at different moments are similar to each other. The main flow-field features under thrust vectoring cases are similar to that under the baseline condition. However, due to the heterogeneous injection system, both the height of the fresh gas zone and the pressure value of the fresh gas in the high injection pressure zone are larger than that in the low injection pressure zone. Thus the average pressure in half of the engine is larger than that in the other half and the thrust vectoring adjustment is realized. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  7. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenier Klaas H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis provided by general practitioners was assessed. Methods Participants with de Quervain's tenosynovitis were recruited by general practitioners. Short-term outcomes (one week after injections were assessed in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Long-term effectiveness was evaluated in an open prospective cohort-study of steroid responders during a follow-up period of 12 months. Participants were randomised to one or two local injections of 1 ml of triamcinolonacetonide (TCA or 1 ml of NaCl 0.9% (placebo. Non-responders to NaCl were treated with additional TCA injections. Main outcomes were immediate treatment response, severity of pain, improvement as perceived by participant and functional disability using sub items hand and finger function of the Dutch Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (Dutch AIMS-2-HFF. Results 11 general practitioners included 21 wrists in 21 patients. The TCA-group had better results for short-term outcomes treatment response (78% vs. 25%; p = 0.015, perceived improvement (78% vs. 33%; p = 0.047 and severity of pain (4.27 vs. 1.33; p = 0.031 but not for the Dutch-AIMS-HFF (2.71 vs. 1.92; p = 0.112. Absolute risk reduction for the main outcome short-term treatment response was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.76 with a number needed to treat of 2 (95% CI: 1, 3. In the cohort of steroid responders (n = 12 the beneficial effects of steroid injections were sustained during the follow-up of 12 months regarding severity of pain (p = 0.67 and scores of Dutch AIMS-2-HFF (p = 0.36, but not for patient perceived improvement (p = 0.02. No adverse events were observed during the 12

  8. Comparative efficacy and safety of local and systemic methotrexate injection in cesarean scar pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ping Peng,1 Ting Gui,1 Xinyan Liu,1 Weilin Chen,1 Zhenzhen Liu2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Department of Ultrasonography, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the efficacy of methotrexate (MTX injection in treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP. Method: A randomized controlled study was performed in 104 CSP patients receiving either local or systemic MTX injection at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital from the year 2008 to 2013. Results: Complete cure was defined as regression of ultrasonographic findings and normalization of serum β-hCG within 60 days. It was regarded as delayed cure if additional dilation and curettage (D&C was needed. The overall cure rate (complete cure plus delayed cure was 69.2% versus 67.3% for local injection versus systemic administration (P>0.05. The median time for serum β-hCG remission and uterine mass disappearance after systemic administration (42 [21–69] days and 40 [20–67] days were significantly lower than those receiving local injection (56 [24–92] days and 53 [23–88] days, with P=0.029 and 0.046, respectively. The mean pretreatment serum β-hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin level and lesion size in cured group (21,941±18,351 mIU/mL and 2.9±1.3 cm, respectively were significantly lower than those in the failed group (37,047±30,864 mIU/mL and 3.6±1.3 with P=0.038 and 0.044, respectively. Conclusion: MTX injection is effective in CSP treatment. Systemic administration shows similar overall cure rate compared to local injection, but requires shorter time for serum β-hCG remission and uterine mass disappearance. Keywords: cesarean scar pregnancy, methotrexate injection, local, systemic

  9. Study on the efficacy of ELA-Max (4% liposomal lidocaine) compared with EMLA cream (eutectic mixture of local anesthetics) using thermosensory threshold analysis in adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M B Y; Goon, A T J; Goh, C L

    2004-04-01

    ELA-Max and EMLA cream are topical anesthetics that have been shown to have similar anesthetic efficacy in previous studies. To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ELA-Max in comparison with EMLA cream using a novel method of thermosensory threshold analysis. A thermosensory analyzer was used to assess warmth- and heat-induced pain thresholds. No statistically significant difference was found in pain thresholds using either formulation. However, EMLA cream increased the heat-induced pain threshold to a greater extent than ELA-Max. Thermosensory measurement and analysis was well tolerated and no adverse events were encountered. EMLA cream may be superior to ELA-Max for heat-induced pain. This study suggests that thermosensory measurement may be another suitable tool for future topical anesthetic efficacy studies.

  10. Continuous Transversus Abdominis Plane Nerve Blocks: Does Varying Local Anesthetic Delivery Method-Automatic Repeated Bolus Versus Continuous Basal Infusion-Influence the Extent of Sensation to Cold?: A Randomized, Triple-Masked, Crossover Study in Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Bahareh; Said, Engy T; Sztain, Jacklynn F; Monahan, Amanda M; Gabriel, Rodney A; Furnish, Timothy J; Tran, Johnathan T; Donohue, Michael C; Ilfeld, Brian M

    2017-04-01

    It remains unknown whether continuous or scheduled intermittent bolus local anesthetic administration is preferable for transversus abdominis plane (TAP) catheters. We therefore tested the hypothesis that when using TAP catheters, providing local anesthetic in repeated bolus doses increases the cephalad-caudad cutaneous effects compared with a basal-only infusion. Bilateral TAP catheters (posterior approach) were inserted in 24 healthy volunteers followed by ropivacaine 2 mg/mL administration for a total of 6 hours. The right side was randomly assigned to either a basal infusion (8 mL/h) or bolus doses (24 mL administered every 3 hours for a total of 2 bolus doses) in a double-masked manner. The left side received the alternate treatment. The primary end point was the extent of sensory deficit as measured by cool roller along the axillary line at hour 6 (6 hours after the local anesthetic administration was initiated). Secondary end points included the extent of sensory deficit as measured by cool roller and Von Frey filaments along the axillary line and along a transverse line at the level of the anterior superior iliac spine at hours 0 to 6. Although there were statistically significant differences between treatments within the earlier part of the administration period, by hour 6 the difference in extent of sensory deficit to cold failed to reach statistical significance along the axillary line (mean = 0.9 cm; SD = 6.8; 95% confidence interval -2.0 to 3.8; P = .515) and transverse line (mean = 2.5 cm; SD = 10.1; 95% confidence interval -1.8 to 6.8; P = .244). Although the difference between treatments was statistically significant at various early time points for the horizontal, vertical, and estimated area measurements of both cold and mechanical pressure sensory deficits, no comparison remained statistically significant by hour 6. No evidence was found in this study involving healthy volunteers to support the hypothesis that changing the local anesthetic

  11. Study of local currents in low dimension materials using complex injecting potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shenglai; Covington, Cody; Varga, Kálmán

    2018-04-01

    A complex potential is constructed to inject electrons into the conduction band, mimicking electron currents in nanoscale systems. The injected electrons are time propagated until a steady state is reached. The local current density can then be calculated to show the path of the conducting electrons on an atomistic level. The method allows for the calculation of the current density vectors within the medium as a function of energy of the conducting electron. Using this method, we investigate the electron pathway of graphene nanoribbons in various structures, molecular junctions, and black phosphorus nanoribbons. By analyzing the current flow through the structures, we find strong dependence on the structural geometry and the energy of the injected electrons. This method may be of general use in the study of nano-electronic materials and interfaces.

  12. Advanced techniques and armamentarium for dental local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taylor M; Yagiela, John A

    2010-10-01

    Computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery (C-CLAD) devices and systems for intraosseous (IO) injection are important additions to the dental anesthesia armamentarium. C-CLAD using slow infusion rates can significantly reduce the discomfort of local anesthetic infusion, especially in palatal tissues, and facilitate palatal approaches to pulpal nerve block that find special use in cosmetic dentistry, periodontal therapy, and pediatric dentistry. Anesthesia of single teeth can be obtained using either C-CLAD intraligamentary injections or IO injections. Supplementary IO anesthesia is particularly suited for providing effective pain control of teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of cervical pregnancy with ultrasound-guided local methotrexate injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, M; Honda, R; Erdenebaatar, C; Monsur, M; Honda, T; Sakaguchi, I; Okamura, Y; Ohba, T; Katabuchi, H

    2017-12-01

    Cervical pregnancy (CP) is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy. While methotrexate (MTX) is generally the first-line method of choice for clinically stable women, there is still no consensus on the most appropriate treatment for this abnormal pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a single local MTX injection under transvaginal ultrasound guidance for the initial treatment of CP and to assess post-treatment fertility. We reviewed retrospectively 15 patients with CP treated with local MTX injection under transvaginal ultrasound guidance. In all patients, the serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels were monitored and the gestational sac was evaluated using ultrasonography after treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed as necessary. We evaluated the patients' clinical characteristics and clinical course after treatment, the efficacy of the treatment and the post-treatment fertility in patients desiring subsequent pregnancy. The median estimated gestational age at the time of MTX injection was 6 + 2 (range, 5 + 2 to 11 + 0) weeks. All 15 patients were treated successfully, without the need for blood transfusion or surgical procedures; however, three patients required an additional local MTX injection due to a poor decline in serum hCG level following the initial injection, while one patient required uterine artery embolization due to persistent vaginal bleeding and an enlarging gestational sac with blood vessels visible on contrast-enhanced MRI. The mean time following initial MTX injection for hCG normalization was 43.8 (95% CI, 33.3-54.3) days and for resumption of menses was 68.4 (95% CI, 51.9-84.9) days. Seven of the 10 women desiring subsequent pregnancy following treatment had uneventful pregnancy, one became pregnant but miscarried spontaneously at 8 weeks of gestation, one was treated by laparoscopic surgery after diagnosis of a tubal pregnancy and one did not conceive. A single, ultrasound

  14. Impact of hyaluronidase on anesthetic distribution in retrobulbar region following sub-Tenon anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šurbatović Maja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Sub-Tenon's block is nowadays commonly used in ophthalmic surgery because of its safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of the anesthetic solution with different amounts of hyaluronidase in the retrobulbar space, following an injection into the Sub-Tenon's space. Methods. In this experimental study, 40 pig cadaver heads were used (80 eyeballs. The material was divided into four groups (of 20 eyeballs each. Each group was administered 4.5 ml of a mixture of 2% lignocaine, 0.5% bupivacaine, and 0.5 ml of Indian ink, with different amounts of hyaluronidase - 15 IU/ml, 75 IU/ml, 150 IU/ml, except the control one. Samples of retrobulbar tissue were analyzed using the standard histopathological procedure. After that, they were also analyzed using the Adobe Photoshop program® (Windows, USA. The retrobulbar space was divided into eight zones by four perpendicular lines, which crossed in the centre of the optic nerve. The presence of ink in fat and muscle tissues and in the sheath of the optic nerve was observed. Results. The presence of the local anesthetic solution was significantly higher in inferonasal and superonasal quadrants of the fat and muscle tissues (p < 0.01. The distribution in optic nerve sheath is similar in each quadrant. Distribution of local anesthetic in each zone of the muscle tissue (I-VIII was strongly influenced by the amount of hyaluronidase added. In the fat tissue, the distribution of local anesthetic under the influence of hyaluronidase was significantly higher (p < 0.05 in the areas which were distant from the place of injection (I-IV. The distribution in the optic nerve sheath is significantly higher (p < 0.01 in the group with 150 IU/ml of hyaluronidase. Conclusions. Following a sub-Tenon block local anesthetic was present in the retrobulbar space in a high percentage of the cases. The presence of local anesthetic solution in retrobulbar space depends on the amount of

  15. Local myogenic pulp-derived cell injection enhances craniofacial muscle regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, J E; Song, M J; Shin, S; Choi, Y J; Kim, K H; Chung, C J

    2017-02-01

    To enhance myogenic differentiation in pulp cells isolated from extracted premolars by epigenetic modification using a DNA demethylation agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza), and to evaluate the potent stimulatory effect of 5-Aza-treated pulp cell injection for craniofacial muscle regeneration in vivo. Pulp cells were isolated from premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes from four adults (age range, 18-22.1 years). Levels of myogenic differentiation and functional contraction response in vitro were compared between pulp cells with or without pre-treatment of 5-Aza. Changes in muscle regeneration in response to green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled myogenic pulp cell injection in vivo were evaluated using a cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury model of the gastrocnemius as well as the masseter muscle in mice. Pre-treatment of 5-Aza in pulp cells stimulated myotube formation, myogenic differentiation in terms of desmin and myogenin expression, and the level of collagen gel contraction. The local injection of 5-Aza pre-treated myogenic pulp cells was engrafted into the host tissue and indicated signs of enhanced muscle regeneration in both the gastrocnemius and the masseter muscles. The epigenetic modification of pulp cells from extracted premolars and the local injection of myogenic pulp cells may stimulate craniofacial muscles regeneration in vivo. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparison of Two Local Anesthesia Injection Methods During a Transrectal Ultrasonography-guided Prostate Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Song Ee; Oh, Young Taik [Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    To compare the effectiveness of 2 injection methods of lidocaine during a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy for pain control and complication rates. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent a TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from March 2005 to March 2006. One hundred patients were categorized into two groups based on injection method. For group 1, 10 mL of 1% lidocaine was injected bilaterally at the junction of the seminal vesicle and prostate and for group 2, into Denonvilliers' fascia. Pain scores using a visual analog scale (VAS) as well as immediate and delayed complication rates were evaluated. The mean VAS score showed no significant differences between the groups (group 1, 3.4{+-}1.78: group 2, 2.8{+-}1.3: p = 0.062). The difference in delayed complication rates and incidence of hematuria, hemospermia, and blood via the rectum was not significant between groups. However, two patients in group 1 complained of symptoms immediately after local anesthesia: one of tinnitus and the other of mild dizziness. There were no significant differences between pain control and complication rates between the 2 lidocaine injection methods. However, injection into Denonvilliers' fascia is thought to have less potential risk

  17. Comparison of Two Local Anesthesia Injection Methods During a Transrectal Ultrasonography-guided Prostate Biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Song Ee; Oh, Young Taik; Kim, Jang Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul

    2010-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of 2 injection methods of lidocaine during a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy for pain control and complication rates. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent a TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from March 2005 to March 2006. One hundred patients were categorized into two groups based on injection method. For group 1, 10 mL of 1% lidocaine was injected bilaterally at the junction of the seminal vesicle and prostate and for group 2, into Denonvilliers' fascia. Pain scores using a visual analog scale (VAS) as well as immediate and delayed complication rates were evaluated. The mean VAS score showed no significant differences between the groups (group 1, 3.4±1.78: group 2, 2.8±1.3: p = 0.062). The difference in delayed complication rates and incidence of hematuria, hemospermia, and blood via the rectum was not significant between groups. However, two patients in group 1 complained of symptoms immediately after local anesthesia: one of tinnitus and the other of mild dizziness. There were no significant differences between pain control and complication rates between the 2 lidocaine injection methods. However, injection into Denonvilliers' fascia is thought to have less potential risk

  18. Comparison of Two Local Anesthesia Injection Methods During a Transrectal Ultrasonography-guided Prostate Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Song Ee; Oh, Young Taik [Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang Hwan; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    To compare the effectiveness of 2 injection methods of lidocaine during a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy for pain control and complication rates. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent a TRUS-guided prostate biopsy from March 2005 to March 2006. One hundred patients were categorized into two groups based on injection method. For group 1, 10 mL of 1% lidocaine was injected bilaterally at the junction of the seminal vesicle and prostate and for group 2, into Denonvilliers' fascia. Pain scores using a visual analog scale (VAS) as well as immediate and delayed complication rates were evaluated. The mean VAS score showed no significant differences between the groups (group 1, 3.4{+-}1.78: group 2, 2.8{+-}1.3: p = 0.062). The difference in delayed complication rates and incidence of hematuria, hemospermia, and blood via the rectum was not significant between groups. However, two patients in group 1 complained of symptoms immediately after local anesthesia: one of tinnitus and the other of mild dizziness. There were no significant differences between pain control and complication rates between the 2 lidocaine injection methods. However, injection into Denonvilliers' fascia is thought to have less potential risk

  19. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tok, Chung Hong; Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202–211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202–211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  20. Guidelines for administration of local anesthesia for dermatosurgery and cosmetic dermatology procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysore Venkataram

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Dermatosurgery and Cosmetic dermatology procedures are being performed by increasing number of dermatologists. Most dermatosurgeries are performed in an outpatient setting and as day care surgeries, under local anesthesia. Hence, it is important to improve patient comfort during all procedures. These guidelines seek to lay down directives in the use of local anesthesia, outline the different local anesthetics, the mode of administration, complications arising out of such procedure and management of the same. Facility for administration of local anesthesia: Local anesthesia is usually administered in the dermatologist′s procedure room. The room should be equipped to deal with any emergencies arising from administration of local anesthesia. Qualifications of local anesthesia administrator: Local anesthesia administrator is a person who applies or injects local anesthetic agent for causing analgesia. Procedures done under local anesthesia are classified as Level I office procedures and require the administrator to have completed a course in Basic Cardiac Life Support (BCLS. Evaluation of patients for topical or infiltrative anesthesia: Details of patient′s past medical history and history of medications should be noted. Allergy to any medications should be specifically enquired and documented. Patients for tumescent anesthesia need additional precautions to be observed as described in these guidelines. Methods of administration of local anesthesia: Different methods include topical anesthesia, field block, ring block, local infiltration and nerve block. Also, it includes use of local anesthetics for anesthetizing oral and genital mucosa. Tumescent anesthesia is a special form of local anesthesia used in liposuction and certain selected procedures. Local anesthetic agents: Different local anesthetics are available such as lignocaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine. The dermatologist should be aware of the

  1. Sonoanatomy and injection technique of the iliolumbar ligament.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The iliolumbar ligament plays an important biomechanic role in anchoring the spine to the pelvic ring and stabilizing the sacroiliac joint. Iliolumbar syndrome is a back pain condition caused by pathology of the iliolumbar ligament. History and physical examination are important in the assessment of back pain, but they lack sufficient specificity. Injection of small volumes of local anesthetic into the structure considered to be the source of the pain (i.e. the iliolumbar ligament) increases the specificity of the diagnostic workup. OBJECTIVE: To describe an ultrasound - guided technique for injecting the iliolumbar ligament. STUDY DESIGN: Case report based on knowledge of topographic anatomy and sonoanatomy. SETTING: Outpatient clinic. METHODS: A patient with a clinical picture suggestive of iliolumbar syndrome was selected. An ultrasound-guided injection of the iliolumbar ligament with local anesthetic was performed. We recorded the patient\\'s subjective assessment of pain and the change in range of movement and pain scores during provocative tests. RESULTS: Following the injection, the patient\\'s pain score decreased, provocation tests became negative, and the range of movement increased. LIMITATIONS: Case report. Target specificity and dispersion of local anesthetic spread not confirmed with an independent technique (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging). CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound guidance allows the selective deposition of small volumes of local anesthetic into structures believed to cause soft tissue back pain and thus to confirm or exclude the working diagnosis. Further studies are needed to confirm our conclusions and to prove the clinical feasibility of this technique.

  2. Non-local electrical spin injection and detection in germanium at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rortais, F.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Vila, L.; Attané, J.-P.; Widiez, J.; Zucchetti, C.; Bottegoni, F.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J.-M.; Jamet, M.

    2017-10-01

    Non-local carrier injection/detection schemes lie at the very foundation of information manipulation in integrated systems. This paradigm consists in controlling with an external signal the channel where charge carriers flow between a "source" and a well separated "drain." The next generation electronics may operate on the spin of carriers in addition to their charge and germanium appears as the best hosting material to develop such a platform for its compatibility with mainstream silicon technology and the predicted long electron spin lifetime at room temperature. In this letter, we demonstrate injection of pure spin currents (i.e., with no associated transport of electric charges) in germanium, combined with non-local spin detection at 10 K and room temperature. For this purpose, we used a lateral spin valve with epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions as spin injector and spin detector. The non-local magnetoresistance signal is clearly visible and reaches ≈15 mΩ at room temperature. The electron spin lifetime and diffusion length are 500 ps and 1 μm, respectively, the spin injection efficiency being as high as 27%. This result paves the way for the realization of full germanium spintronic devices at room temperature.

  3. Evaluation of Efficacy of Bone Scan With SPECT/CT in the Management of Low Back Pain: A Study Supported by Differential Diagnostic Local Anesthetic Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anuj; Jain, Suruchi; Agarwal, Anil; Gambhir, Sanjay; Shamshery, Chetna; Agarwal, Amita

    2015-12-01

    Conventional radiologic modalities provide details only about the anatomic aspect of the various structures of the spine. Frequently the structures that show abnormal morphology may not be the cause of low back pain (LBP). Functional imaging in the form of bone scan along with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) may be helpful in identifying structures causing pain, whether morphologically normal or not. The objective of this study is to evaluate the role of bone scan with SPECT/CT in management of patients with LBP. This is randomized double-blinded controlled study performed on 80 patients with LBP aged 20 to 80 years, ASA physical status I to III. Patients were randomized into bone scan and control groups consisting of 40 patients each. On the basis of the clinical features and radiologic findings a clinical diagnosis was made. After making a clinical diagnosis, the patients in bone scan group were subjected to bone scan with SPECT/CT. On the basis of the finding of the bone scan and SPECT/CT, a new working diagnosis was made and intervention was performed according to the new working diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks in the control group were given based on clinical diagnosis. Controlled comparative diagnostic blocks were performed with local anesthetic. The pain score just after the diagnostic block and at the time of discharge (approximately 4 h later) was recorded; the pain relief was recorded in percentage. In both the groups, sacroilitis was the most common diagnosis followed by facet joint arthropathy. The number of patients obtaining pain relief of >50% was significantly higher in the bone scan-positive group as compared with the control group. Three new clinical conditions were identified in the bone scan group. These conditions were multiple myeloma, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and ankylosing spondylitis. Bone scan with SPECT/CT was found to complement the clinical workup of patients with LBP. Inclusion of bone scan with

  4. Early response of local steroid injection versus mini incision technique in treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, A.S.; Khan, A.; Afridi, S.A.; Khan, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the commonest peripheral neuropathies which effects mainly middle aged women. Different techniques are being tried to decrease the post-operative pain in patients operated for CTS. The objective of this study was to compare effectiveness of local injection of steroid and mini incision technique in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted at department of Orthopedics and department of Neurosurgery, Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Aug 2011 to Feb 2013. A total of 116 patients of CTS were randomly allocated to either of the two groups. Fifty-eight Patient in Group A were subjected to local steroid injection and the same number of patient in Group B underwent mini incision technique. All patients of were advised to report to the OPD after one month to determine intervention effectiveness in terms of improvement in at least one grade of pain. Results: In this study mean age of the patients was 32.8 ± 5.1 years. Female gender was in dominance with 99 (86.3%) cases. In this study we compared the effectiveness of local steroid injection and mini incision technique in the treatment of carpel tunnel syndrome. We found out that the steroid injection was effective in 69.0% cases while mini incision technique was effective in 56.9% cases. The difference being statistically insignificant with a p-value of 0.17. Conclusion: The difference in pain after 1 month of the intervention was not statistically significant. (author)

  5. Effect of the Local Heat on the Pain of Vitamin K Injection in the Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Zahed Pasha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe absence of pain relief in infants can lead to harmful effects; so, this study aimed to investigate the effect of local heat on the pain of vitamin K injection in the infants.Materials and MethodsThis randomized clinical trial was conducted on 80 healthy infants. For the control group, 1 mg vitamin K was injected into the vastus lateralis muscle by a nurse. In the 3 intervention groups, respectively 5, 10 and 15 minutes before the injection, hot-water bag at 37 °C was placed on the quadriceps muscle and then injection was done with the same condition as in the control group. Immediately after the injection, the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS was completed. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 21.0 software.Results41(51.25% girls and 39 (48.75% boys were participated. First-minute Apgar of all samples were 8.64±0.557. Birth weight was 3335.37±339.51 grams and the minimum gestational age 36.37±1.01 weeks. The mean pain score in the first minute in the control group was 3.6± 2.136, which was 3.3± 1.976 in the 5-minute warm-up group, and this amount was reached to 1.6± 1.569 in 10-minute warm up group, and 0.6± 0.821 in 15 minute warm-up group (P=0.008. The mean pain scores in the control group for the second minute was 1.0±1.835, which was reduced to 0.25± 0.716 in the 10-minute and 15-minute warm-up group (P=0.023.ConclusionLocal heating before the injection procedure can be effective in reducing pain in infants and the pain will reduce by increasing the local heating time (15 minutes.

  6. Non-solenoidal Startup with High-Field-Side Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Pierren, C.; Richner, N. J.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Weberski, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    Local Helicity Injection (LHI) is a non-solenoidal startup technique utilizing electron current injectors at the plasma edge to initiate a tokamak-like plasma at high Ip . Recent experiments on Pegasus explore the inherent tradeoffs between high-field-side (HFS) injection in the lower divertor region and low-field-side (LFS) injection at the outboard midplane. Trade-offs include the relative current drive contributions of HI and poloidal induction, and the magnetic geometry required for relaxation to a tokamak-like state. HFS injection using a set of two increased-area injectors (Ainj = 4 cm2, Vinj 1.5 kV, and Iinj 8 kA) in the lower divertor is demonstrated over the full range of toroidal field available on Pegasus (BT 0 = 10) attainable with LHI and the favorable stability of the ultra-low aspect ratio, low-li LHI-driven plasmas allow access to high βt-up to 100 % , as indicated by kinetically-constrained equilibrium reconstructions. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  7. Antibody against progesterone in local rabbit following low dose of progesterone injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyadi Suyadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Antibody against progesgerone was produced from serum of local rabbit following low dose of progesterone injection: While a control group (Control; n=5 was injected with Freund's adjuvant solution in aquadest, the treatment groups were either firstly injected with progesterone conjugated to Freund's Adjuvant (P--CFA, 150 p.l : 150 pl or progesterone conjugated to Freund's Adjuvant and bovine serum albumin (P-CFA-BSA; 135 p;l : 150 tt1 : 15 gl. Twice boostering injections were adminstered using incomplete Freund's Adjuvant on day 14 and 52 after first immunization. Weekly bleeding for serum collection were done from 1 week following first booster immunization to week 10, Using ELISA technique it was shown that the antibody titer to progesterone after first and second booster immunization in the P-CFA groug was higher than Control- and P-CFA-BSA groups. The antibody titer in the P-CFA-BSA remained low similar in the Control group: Key words: antibody; progesterone; rabbit

  8. Prompt triggering of edge localized modes through lithium granule injection on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Robert; Sun, Z.; Hu, J. S.; Xu, W.; Zuo, G. Z.; Gong, X. Z.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Huang, M.; Maingi, R.; Diallo, A.; Tritz, K.; the EAST Team

    2017-10-01

    We report successful triggering of edge localized mode (ELMs) in EAST with Lithium (Li) micropellets, and the observed dependence of ELM triggering efficiency on granule size. ELM control is essential for successful ITER operation throughout the entire campaign, relying on magnetic perturbations for ELM suppression and ELM frequency enhancement via pellet injection. To separate the task of fueling from ELM pacing, we initiate the prompt generation of ELMs via impurity granule injection. Lithium granules ranging in size from 200 - 1000 microns are mechanically injected into upper-single null EAST long pulse H-mode discharges. The injections are monitored for their effect on high Z impurity accumulation and to assess the pressure perturbation required for reliable ELM triggering. We have determined that granules of diameter larger than 600 microns (corresponding to 5.2 x 1018 Li atoms) are successful at triggering ELMs more than 90% of the time. The triggering efficiency drops precipitously to less than 40% as the granule size is reduced to 400 microns (1.5 x 1018 Li atoms), indicating a triggering threshold has been crossed. Using this information an optimal impurity granule size which will regularly trigger a prompt ELM in these EAST discharges is determined. Coupling these results with alternate discharge scenarios on EAST and similar experiments performed on DIII-D provides the possibility of extrapolation to future devices.

  9. Acceleration of Medpor implant fibrovascularization with local vascular endothelial growth-factor injections: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Demirel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medpor is a biocompatible, high-density porous polyethylene implant that is used for multiple indications in plastic surgery. The most frequent complications associated with the Medpor implant are infection and implant exposure. The primary cause of these complications is poor fibrovascularization of the Medpor implant and poor nourishment of the overlying skin. The present experimental study aimed to determine whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF could accelerate and increase Medpor implant fibrovascularization in vivo, and thereby improve local nourishment and prevent complications. Materials and Methods: The Medpor implant was inserted under the dorsal skin area in 40 Sprague-Dawley rats. 20 rats receiving local VEGF injections comprised the study group. The control group received saline injections. Fibrovascularization of the Medpor implants was compared. Results: In the rats injected with VEGF, the Medpor implant fibrovascularized faster, and there were more newly formed blood vessels, as compared with those in the control group. Conclusion: These findings have led to our use of VEGF-like agents that the accelerate angiogenesis in the Medpor implant as a means to reduce the incidence of such complications as infection and implant exposure. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 196-201

  10. Local Injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide: A Forgotten Aetiology of Cushing’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhumthammarat, Weera; Putthapiban, Prapaipan

    2017-01-01

    Many different non systemic corticosteroid administrations can cause iatrogenic Cushing’s Syndrome (CS). We herein report a case series of iatrogenic CS from keloid scars treatment and aesthetic regimen called mesotherapy. Our first patient developed CS after having exceeded recommended dose of intralesional injection of Triamcinolone Acetonide (TAC). Second case presented with CS followed by unidentified mesotherapy treatment for local fat reduction. Subcutaneous injections of dexamethasone were found to be the part of mesotherapy regimen in one case. Physicians should be insightful in prescribing TAC especially in those patients who have high predisposing factors for developing CS. In the same way, off-label mesotherapy combine with corticosteroid can lead to iatrogenic CS and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis suppression. Currently, there are no standard guidelines for mesotherapy treatment. Therefore, further clinical trials on dosage, duration and effective combination of mesotherapy regimens are needed to increase safety uses. PMID:28764237

  11. Treatment of frozen shoulder with subcutaneous TNF-alpha blockade compared with local glucocorticoid injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schydlowsky, Pierre; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of subcutaneous adalimumab injections with intraarticular glucocorticoid injections on frozen shoulder of 18 patients with unilateral joint involvement. Ten patients were randomised to subcutaneous injections with adalimumab and eight to intraarticular glucocorticoid inject...

  12. Addition of lacal anesthetics to contrast media. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Almen, T.; Golman, K.; Jonsson, K.; Nyman, U.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1988-01-01

    The acute intravenous toxicity (i.v. LD 50 ) of solutions of the ratio 1.5 contrast media metrizoate or diatrizoate and the ratio 3.0 contrast medium metrizamide was determined in mice with and without the addition of local anesthetics to the solutions. The two local anesthetics mepivacaine or lidocaine were added to final concentrations up to 2.0 mg/ml of the contrast medium solutions. This corresponds to clinically used concentrations. All additions of local anesthetics to the solutions increased the mortalities caused by the contrast medium solutions. Addition of local anesthetics to a final concentration of 2 mg/ml approximately doubled the acute intravenous toxicity of the contrast media. The ratio 3 contrast media produce less hypertonic solutions than the ratio 1.5 contrast media and should be preferred for angiography because they cause less pain and do not require the addition of local anesthetics which increase the acute toxicity of the solutions. (orig.)

  13. Mapping of local argon impingement on a virtual surface: an insight for gas injection during FEBID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanzenboeck, H.D.; Hochleitner, G.; Mika, J.; Shawrav, M.M.; Gavagnin, M.; Bertagnolli, E. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Solid State Electronics, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    During the last decades, focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) has become a successful approach for direct-write fabrication of nanodevices. Such a deposition technique relies on the precursor supply to the sample surface which is typically accomplished by a gas injection system using a tube-shaped injector nozzle. This precursor injection strategy implies a position-dependent concentration gradient on the surface, which affects the geometry and chemistry of the final nanodeposit. Although simulations already proposed the local distribution of nozzle-borne gas molecules impinging on the surface, this isolated step in the FEBID process has never been experimentally measured yet. This work experimentally investigates the local distribution of impinging gas molecules on the sample plane, isolating the direct impingement component from surface diffusion or precursor depletion by deposition. The experimental setup used in this work maps and quantifies the local impinging rate of argon gas over the sample plane. This setup simulates the identical conditions for a precursor molecule during FEBID. Argon gas was locally collected with a sniffer tube, which is directly connected to a residual gas analyzer for quantification. The measured distribution of impinging gas molecules showed a strong position dependence. Indeed, a 300-μm shift of the deposition area to a position further away from the impingement center spot resulted in a 50 % decrease in the precursor impinging rate on the surface area. With the same parameters, the precursor distribution was also simulated by a Monte Carlo software by Friedli and Utke and showed a good correlation between the empirical and the simulated precursor distribution. The results hereby presented underline the importance of controlling the local precursor flux conditions in order to obtain reproducible and comparable deposition results in FEBID. (orig.)

  14. Mapping of local argon impingement on a virtual surface: an insight for gas injection during FEBID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanzenboeck, H.D.; Hochleitner, G.; Mika, J.; Shawrav, M.M.; Gavagnin, M.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) has become a successful approach for direct-write fabrication of nanodevices. Such a deposition technique relies on the precursor supply to the sample surface which is typically accomplished by a gas injection system using a tube-shaped injector nozzle. This precursor injection strategy implies a position-dependent concentration gradient on the surface, which affects the geometry and chemistry of the final nanodeposit. Although simulations already proposed the local distribution of nozzle-borne gas molecules impinging on the surface, this isolated step in the FEBID process has never been experimentally measured yet. This work experimentally investigates the local distribution of impinging gas molecules on the sample plane, isolating the direct impingement component from surface diffusion or precursor depletion by deposition. The experimental setup used in this work maps and quantifies the local impinging rate of argon gas over the sample plane. This setup simulates the identical conditions for a precursor molecule during FEBID. Argon gas was locally collected with a sniffer tube, which is directly connected to a residual gas analyzer for quantification. The measured distribution of impinging gas molecules showed a strong position dependence. Indeed, a 300-μm shift of the deposition area to a position further away from the impingement center spot resulted in a 50 % decrease in the precursor impinging rate on the surface area. With the same parameters, the precursor distribution was also simulated by a Monte Carlo software by Friedli and Utke and showed a good correlation between the empirical and the simulated precursor distribution. The results hereby presented underline the importance of controlling the local precursor flux conditions in order to obtain reproducible and comparable deposition results in FEBID. (orig.)

  15. Mapping of local argon impingement on a virtual surface: an insight for gas injection during FEBID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzenboeck, H. D.; Hochleitner, G.; Mika, J.; Shawrav, M. M.; Gavagnin, M.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) has become a successful approach for direct-write fabrication of nanodevices. Such a deposition technique relies on the precursor supply to the sample surface which is typically accomplished by a gas injection system using a tube-shaped injector nozzle. This precursor injection strategy implies a position-dependent concentration gradient on the surface, which affects the geometry and chemistry of the final nanodeposit. Although simulations already proposed the local distribution of nozzle-borne gas molecules impinging on the surface, this isolated step in the FEBID process has never been experimentally measured yet. This work experimentally investigates the local distribution of impinging gas molecules on the sample plane, isolating the direct impingement component from surface diffusion or precursor depletion by deposition. The experimental setup used in this work maps and quantifies the local impinging rate of argon gas over the sample plane. This setup simulates the identical conditions for a precursor molecule during FEBID. Argon gas was locally collected with a sniffer tube, which is directly connected to a residual gas analyzer for quantification. The measured distribution of impinging gas molecules showed a strong position dependence. Indeed, a 300-µm shift of the deposition area to a position further away from the impingement center spot resulted in a 50 % decrease in the precursor impinging rate on the surface area. With the same parameters, the precursor distribution was also simulated by a Monte Carlo software by Friedli and Utke and showed a good correlation between the empirical and the simulated precursor distribution. The results hereby presented underline the importance of controlling the local precursor flux conditions in order to obtain reproducible and comparable deposition results in FEBID.

  16. [Types of rabies vaccines which were locally injected to the subjects bitten by animals abroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, N

    1997-08-01

    In recent years there have been a number of subjects who were bitten by supposed rabid animals in foreign rabies-epizootic countries and visited our hospital to received post-exposure therapy after their return to Japan. WHO recommends immediate washing of the wound with soap and water, application of human anti-rabies immunoglobulin and administration of tissue-culture rabies vaccine at 0, 3, 7, 14, 30, and 90 days after exposure. However, tissue-culture vaccines, are expensive and they are not always used in all parts of the world. The author checked whether the victims of animal bite were injected with rabies vaccines abroad or not and investigated the type of rabies vaccine when they were vaccinated. About a half of the consulted victims were locally injected with rabies vaccine. By mean of certificates of inoculation or empty boxes of vaccine, types of rabies vaccines were proved in 40 subjects of which 38 received tissue-culture vaccines. Sample-type vaccine was administered to one subject and suckling mouse vaccine was done to another one. When post-exposure prophylaxis was continued after return to Japan, it is important to know the sort of rabies vaccine injected abroad, because brain-tissue vaccines are less effective in inducing antibody than tissue-culture vaccines. Consequently both physicians and travelers should keep in mind that even now brain-tissue vaccines are used in some areas of the world.

  17. Local corticosteroid versus autologous blood injections in lateral epicondylitis: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirico, Felice; Ricca, Flavia; DI Meglio, Franca; Nurzynska, Daria; Castaldo, Clotilde; Spera, Rocco; Montagnani, Stefania

    2017-06-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a common painful elbow disorder. Several approaches to treatment have been proposed, with a local injection of corticosteroids being the most frequently used. Recent insights into the pathophysiology encouraged the introduction of autologous blood injections as an alternative treatment method. The aim of this meta-analysis is to summarize quantitatively the evidence regarding the efficacy of corticosteroids and autologous blood injections for treatment of pain in lateral epicondylitis. Studies were considered eligible based on the following inclusion criteria: adult human, diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis, randomized controlled trials comparing corticosteroids versus autologous blood injections, pain assessment. Exclusion criteria were previous surgery for lateral epicondylitis or for other elbow disorders, concurrent treatment with drugs or physiotherapy, diagnosis of musculoskeletal systemic disorder. A systematic search of literature was performed according to the PRISMA statement. Effect size of each included study was calculated and analyzed in a random-effects model. Four studies, enrolling total of 218 patients (139 females and 79 males), were included in quantitative analysis. At 2 weeks, there was a trend towards a reduction of VAS score in the corticosteroid group (WMD=2.12 [95% CI: 4.38 to 0.14], P=0.07). No significant differences were recorded in the medium-term (4-12 weeks; WMD=0.85 [95% CI: -0.44 to 2.15], P=0.19) and long-term (24 weeks; WMD=0.63 [95% CI: -2.40 to 3.66], P=0.68) follow-up. Few high-quality trials compare the efficacy of corticosteroid and autologous blood injections in the control of pain related to lateral epicondylitis. Available data indicate that corticosteroids tend to reduce VAS score in short-term follow-up, although these data are not statistically significant. No differences were recorded in the medium and long term. Contrary to popular opinion among medical professionals, and despite

  18. Direct Injection of Blood Products Versus Gelatin Sponge as a Technique for Local Hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaga, John [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Rahim, Shiraz, E-mail: Shiraz.rahim@uhhospitals.org

    2017-02-15

    PurposeTo provide a method of reducing risk of minimally invasive procedures on patients with abnormal hemostasis and evaluate efficacy of direct fresh frozen plasma injection through a procedure needle tract compared to Gelfoam (gelatin sponge) administration.Materials and MethodsEighty patients with elevated international standardized ratio (INR) undergoing minimally invasive procedures using imaging guidance were selected retrospectively. Forty patients had received Gelfoam as a means of tract embolization during the procedure. The other 40 received local fresh frozen plasma (FFP) through the needle tract. The number of complications and clinically significant bleeding events were recorded. A threshold of 30 cc of blood loss after a procedure was used to identify excess bleeding.ResultsNo patients experienced clinically significant bleeding after administration of FFP. Five patients experienced postoperative drops in hemoglobin or hematomas after administration of Gelfoam.ConclusionLocal injection of blood products can reduce postprocedure bleeding in patients undergoing minimally invasive procedures and provides a safe alternative to the use of synthetic fibrin plugs.

  19. Ion Heating During Local Helicity Injection Plasma Startup in the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. G.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas in the Pegasus ST are initiated either through standard, MHD stable, inductive current drive or non-solenoidal local helicity injection (LHI) current drive with strong reconnection activity, providing a rich environment to study ion dynamics. During LHI discharges, a large amount of impurity ion heating has been observed, with the passively measured impurity Ti as high as 800 eV compared to Ti ~ 60 eV and Te ~ 175 eV during standard inductive current drive discharges. In addition, non-thermal ion velocity distributions are observed and appear to be strongest near the helicity injectors. The ion heating is hypothesized to be a result of large-scale magnetic reconnection activity, as the amount of heating scales with increasing fluctuation amplitude of the dominant, edge localized, n =1 MHD mode. An approximate temporal scaling of the heating with the amplitude of higher frequency magnetic fluctuations has also been observed, with large amounts of power spectral density present at several impurity ion cyclotron frequencies. Recent experiments have focused on investigating the impurity ion heating scaling with the ion charge to mass ratio as well as the reconnecting field strength. The ion charge to mass ratio was modified by observing different impurity charge states in similar LHI plasmas while the reconnecting field strength was modified by changing the amount of injected edge current. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  20. Automatic and remote controlled ictal SPECT injection for seizure focus localization by use of a commercial contrast agent application pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, Michael; Eder, Hans; Holl, Alexander; Körner, Eva; Zmugg, Gerda; Aigner, Reingard; Fazekas, Franz; Ott, Erwin

    2007-07-01

    In the presurgical evaluation of patients with partial epilepsy, the ictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool for seizure focus localization. To achieve optimal SPECT scan quality, ictal tracer injection should be carried out as quickly as possible after the seizure onset and under highest safety conditions possible. Compared to the commonly used manual injection, an automatic administration of the radioactive tracer may provide higher quality standards for this procedure. In this study, therefore, we retrospectively analyzed efficiency and safety of an automatic injection system for ictal SPECT tracer application. Over a 31-month period, 26 patients underwent ictal SPECT by use of an automatic remote-controlled injection pump originally designed for CT-contrast agent application. Various factors were reviewed, including latency of ictal injection, radiation safety parameters, and ictal seizure onset localizing value. Times between seizure onset and tracer injection ranged between 3 and 48 s. In 21 of 26 patients ictal SPECT supported the localization of the epileptogenic focus in the course of the presurgical evaluation. In all cases ictal SPECT tracer injection was performed with a high degree of safety to patients and staff. Ictal SPECT by use of a remote-controlled CT-contrast agent injection system provides a high scan quality and is a safe and confirmatory presurgical evaluation technique in the epilepsy-monitoring unit.

  1. Local mechanical properties of LFT injection molded parts: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplentere, F.; Soete, K.; Bonte, H.; Debrabandere, E.

    2014-05-01

    In predictive engineering for polymer processes, the proper prediction of material microstructure from known processing conditions and constituent material properties is a critical step forward properly predicting bulk properties in the finished composite. Operating within the context of long-fiber thermoplastics (LFT, length Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight 2014 software has been used. In this software, a fiber breakage algorithm for the polymer flow inside the mold is available. Using well known micro mechanic formulas allow to combine the local fiber length with the local orientation into local mechanical properties. Different experiments were performed using a commercially available glass fiber filled compound to compare the measured data with the numerical simulation results. In this investigation, tensile tests and 3 point bending tests are considered. To characterize the fiber length distribution of the polymer melt entering the mold (necessary for the numerical simulations), air shots were performed. For those air shots, similar homogenization conditions were used as during the injection molding tests. The fiber length distribution is characterized using automated optical method on samples for which the matrix material is burned away. Using the appropriate settings for the different experiments, good predictions of the local mechanical properties are obtained.

  2. [The effect of locally injected betamethasone on collagen deposition in benign central airway stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y F; Xu, D F; Zeng, Y M; Zhang, H P; Yang, D Y; Chen, X Y; Zhang, J

    2016-08-01

    To assess the effects of locally injected betamethasone on cicatricial tissue hyperplasia in patients with benign central airway stenosis. A prospective study was conducted with 2 treatment modalities: conventional interventional(CI)therapy, and CI combined with local betamethasone injection(LBI). The average optical density value of TGF-β1 and collagen density in the local airway tissues were compared before therapy and 7 d after the CI treatment and the LBI treatment, respectively. Six patients were recruited in this study from May 2013 to June 2015.The results showed significant statistical differences by paired t-test in TGF-β1: 92±38 vs 164±47(t=-7.984, P=0.000)before and after the CI treatment, respectively; 128±45 vs 78±40 (t=10.055, P=0.000)before and after the LBI treatment, respectively. The collagen density was 91 932±59 520 vs 150 252±76 673(t=-8.105, P=0.000) before and after the CI treatment, respectively; 107 024±54 880 vs 114 038±50 772(t=-0.621, P=0.54) before and after the LBI treatment, respectively.Trend comparisons made before and after the treatments showed significant statistical differences in TGF-β1(F=712.139, P=0.000) and in the collagen density (F=261.256, P=0.000)between the CI treatment and the LBI treatment groups. The CI treatment was shown to stimulate the production of TGF-β1 and the deposition of collagen, while the LBI treatment was shown to reduce the production of TGF-β1 and alleviate the deposition of collagen from the stimulation of the CI treatment.

  3. Ocular complications associated with local anesthesia administration in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean G; Echeverria, Zydnia; Abdulwahab, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    The most widely used method for controlling pain during dental procedures is the intraoral administration of local anesthetics in close proximity to a specific nerve or fiber to obtund nerve conduction. The most commonly anesthetized nerves in dentistry are branches or nerve trunks associated with the maxillary and mandibular divisions of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V). However, other nerves may be inadvertently affected by intraoral local anesthesia injections, resulting in anesthetic complications of structures far from the oral cavity. Practitioners should be aware of potential ocular complications following intraoral injections in dentistry. These complications include oculomotor paralysis and vision loss. The knowledge of these conditions and their potential cause should alert the dentist to the importance of appropriate injection techniques and an understanding of management protocol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Local inflammation, lethality and cytokine release in mice injected with Bothrops atrox venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Barros

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We have provided evidence that: (a lethality of mice to crude Bothrops venom varies according the isogenic strain (A/J > C57Bl/6 > A/Sn > BALB/c > C3H/ HePas > DBA/2 > C3H/He; (bBALB/c mice (LD50=100.0 μg were injected i.p. with 50 μg of venom produced IL-6, IL-10, INF-γ, TNF-α and NO in the serum. In vitro the cells from the mice injected and challenged with the venom only released IL-10 while peritoneal macrophages released IL-10, INF-γ and less amounts of IL-6; (c establishment of local inflammation and necrosis induced by the venom, coincides with the peaks of TNF-α, IFN-γ and NO and the damage was neutralized when the venom was incubated with a monoclonal antibody against a 60 kDa haemorrhagic factor. These results suggest that susceptibility to Bothrops a trox venom is genetically dependent but MHC independent; that IL-6, IL10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and NO can be involved in the mediation of tissue damage; and that the major venom component inducers of the lesions are haemorrhagins.

  5. A prospective randomized trial of different supplementary local anesthetic techniques after failure of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaa, Mohammad D; Whitworth, John M; Meechan, John Gerard

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of supplementary repeat inferior alveolar nerve block with 2% lidocaine and epinephrine, buccal infiltration with 4% articaine with epinephrine, intraligamentary injection, or intraosseous injection (both with 2% lidocaine with epinephrine) after failed inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for securing pain-free treatment in patients experiencing irreversible pulpitis in mandibular permanent teeth. This randomized clinical trial included 182 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular teeth. Patients received 2.0 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine as an IANB injection. Patients who did not experience pain-free treatment received randomly 1 of 4 supplementary techniques, namely repeat lidocaine IANB (rIANB), articaine buccal infiltration (ABI), lidocaine intraligamentary injection (PDL), or lidocaine intraosseous injection (IO). Successful pulp anesthesia was considered to have occurred when no response was obtained to the maximum stimulation (80 reading) of the pulp tester, at which time treatment commenced. Treatment was regarded as being successfully completed when it was associated with no pain. Data were analyzed by χ(2) and Fisher exact tests. Of the 182 patients, 122 achieved successful pulpal anesthesia within 10 minutes after initial IANB injection; 82 experienced pain-free treatment. ABI and IO allowed more successful (pain-free) treatment (84% and 68%, respectively) than rIANB or PDL supplementary techniques (32% and 48%, respectively); this was statistically significant (P = .001). IANB injection alone does not always allow pain-free treatment for mandibular teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Supplementary buccal infiltration with 4% articaine with epinephrine and intraosseous injection with 2% lidocaine with epinephrine are more likely to allow pain-free treatment than intraligamentary and repeat IANB injections with 2% lidocaine with epinephrine for patients experiencing

  6. Influence of local anesthetics with or without epinephrine 1/80000 on blood pressure and heart rate: A randomized double-blind experimental clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ketabi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The rise in BP and HR following injection of lidocaine plus epinephrine was statistically significant compared with baseline in both INF and IANB, but this was not clinically and numerically considerable.

  7. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    drugs. This has important implications on how to estimate the optimal drug dose. This article offers a review of the literature on definition, prevalence and the pathophysiology of childhood obesity and provides suggestions on preanesthetic evaluation, airway management and dosage of the anesthetic...... drugs in these patients. The authors highlight the need of supplemental studies on various areas of the subject....

  8. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Geller Palti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 13-29% of cases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side, and the second following the oclusal plane (left side, a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. RESULTS: The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. CONCLUSION: This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry.

  9. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  10. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliopoulos, S.; Katsanos, K.; Diamantopoulos, A.; Karnabatidis, D.; Siablis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Results: Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63 ± 12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6 ± 1.6 versus 4.6 ± 1.9, p < 0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16 ± 2.7 versus 19 ± 0.8 ml, p < 0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4 ± 1.3 versus 4.5 ± 1.3 min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation.

  11. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliopoulos, S., E-mail: stavspiliop@upatras.g [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Patras (Greece); Katsanos, K.; Diamantopoulos, A.; Karnabatidis, D.; Siablis, D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Patras (Greece)

    2011-05-15

    Aim: To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Results: Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63 {+-} 12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6 {+-} 1.6 versus 4.6 {+-} 1.9, p < 0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16 {+-} 2.7 versus 19 {+-} 0.8 ml, p < 0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4 {+-} 1.3 versus 4.5 {+-} 1.3 min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation.

  12. Preparation and physico-chemical characterization of inclusion complexes between local anesthetics and hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin; Preparacao e caracterizacao fisico-quimica de complexos de inclusao entre anestesicos locais e hidroxipropil-{beta}-ciclodextrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Carolina Morales; Abrami, Priscila; Goncalves, Marcos Moises; Andreo Filho, Newton [Universidade de Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Sergio Antonio; Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Bioquimica; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes [UNESP, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Ambiental]. E-mail: leonardo@sorocaba.unesp.br

    2007-07-15

    S(-) Bupivacaine (S(-)BVC) and Lidocaine (LDC) are widely used local anesthetics (LA). Hydroxypropyl {beta}-cyclodextrin (HP-{beta}-CD) is used as a drug-carrier system. The aim of this work was to characterize inclusion complexes between LA and HP-{beta}-CD. The affinity constants determined at different pHs show favourable complexation. The release kinetics experiments showed that S(-)BVC and LDC changed the released profiles in the presence of HP-{beta}-CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments gave information about the interaction between LA and the cyclodextrin cavity. This study focused on the physicochemical characterization of drug-delivery formulations that come out as potentially new therapeutic options for pain treatment. (author)

  13. Initial Thomson Scattering Survey of Local Helicity Injection and Ohmic Plasmas at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    A multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been installed on the Pegasus ST. The system utilizes a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (λ0 ~ 532 nm), spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings, and a gated, intensified CCD camera. It provides measurements of Te and ne at 8 spatial locations for each spectrometer once per discharge. A new multiple aperture and beam dump system has been implemented to mitigate interference from stray light. This system has provided initial measurements in the core region of plasmas initiated by local helicity injection (LHI), as well as conventional Ohmic L- and H-mode discharges. Multi-shot averages of low-density (ne ~ 3 ×1018 m-3) , Ip ~ 0 . 1 MA LHI discharges show central Te ~ 75 eV at the end of the helicity injection phase. Ip ~ 0 . 13 MA Ohmic plasmas at moderate densities (ne ~ 2 ×1019 m-3) have core Te ~ 150 eV in L-mode. Generally, these plasmas do not reach transport equilibrium in the short 25 ms pulse length available. After an L-H transition, strong spectral broadening indicates increasing Te, to values above the range of the present spectrometer system with a high-dispersion VPH grating. Near-term system upgrades will focus on deploying a second spectrometer, with a lower-dispersion grating capable of measuring the 0.1-1.0 keV range. The second spectrometer system will also increase the available number of spatial channels, enabling study of H-mode pedestal structure. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  14. Power Balance Modeling of Local Helicity Injection for Non-Solenoidal ST Startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberski, J. D.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    A zero-dimensional power balance model for predicting Ip(t) for Local Helicity Injection (LHI) discharges has been used to interpret experimental results from recent experimental campaigns using high-field-side (HFS) helicity injection. This model quantifies LHI's effective drive (Veff) through helicity balance while enforcing the Taylor relaxation current limit and tracking inductive effects to determine Ip(t) . Recent analysis of HFS LHI discharges indicate LHI is the dominant source of drive and provides Veff up to 1.3 V while geometric effects and inductive drive provide < 0.1 V throughout much of the discharge. In contrast to previous analysis of low-field-side (LFS) LHI discharges, which were driven by Veff = 0.3 V and 2.0 V from geometric effects and inductive drive. A significant remaining uncertainty in the model is the resistive dissipation of LHI discharges. This requires greater understanding of LHI confinement scaling and impurity content, which are currently under investigation. However, the model and experimental Ip(t) exhibit good agreement for parameters consistent with previous experimental findings. Extrapolation of plasma parameters and shaping from recent experiments allow for the model to project the performance of LHI systems. These projections indicate Ip 0.3 MA can be accessed on Pegasus via HFS LHI through changes to injector geometry to provide more Veff. This regime can be accessed via a LFS system by increasing the Taylor relaxation current limit early in the discharge. Work supported by US DOE Grants DE-FG02-96ER54375 and DE-SC0006928.

  15. Increased localized delivery of piroxicam by cationic nanoparticles after intra-articular injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SR

    2016-11-01

    , polymeric nanoparticles, electrostatic interaction, intra-articular injection, local delivery, hyaluronic acid

  16. The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy/American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine Recommendations on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Santhanam; Ecoffey, Claude; Bosenberg, Adrian; Lonnqvist, Per-Anne; de Oliveira, Gildasio S; de Leon Casasola, Oscar; de Andrés, José; Ivani, Giorgio

    2018-02-01

    Dosage of local anesthetics (LAs) used for regional anesthesia in children is not well determined. In order to evaluate and come to a consensus regarding some of these controversial topics, The European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) and the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) developed a Joint Committee Practice Advisory on Local Anesthetics and Adjuvants Dosage in Pediatric Regional Anesthesia. Representatives from both ASRA and ESRA composed the joint committee practice advisory. Evidence-based recommendations were based on a systematic search of the literature. In cases where no literature was available, expert opinion was elicited. Spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine can be performed with a dose of 1 mg/kg for newborn and/or infant and a dose of 0.5 mg/kg in older children (>1 year of age). Tetracaine 0.5% is recommended for spinal anesthesia (dose, 0.07-0.13 mL/kg). Ultrasound-guided upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (eg, axillary, infraclavicular, interscalene, supraclavicular) in children can be performed successfully and safely using a recommended LA dose of bupivacaine or ropivacaine of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/kg. Dexmedetomidine can be used as an adjunct to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks in children. High-level evidence is not yet available to guide dosage of LA used in regional blocks in children. The ASRA/ESRA recommendations intend to provide guidance in order to reduce the large variability of LA dosage currently observed in clinical practice.

  17. Increasing topical anesthetic efficacy with microneedle application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhsem, Ömer; Aksoy, Alper; Kececi, Yavuz; Sir, Emin; Güngör, Melike

    2016-10-01

    Since topical anesthetics alone seldom provide adequate analgesia for laser resurfacing procedures, injectable forms of anesthesia are often required. However, their application is uncomfortable for the patient. In this study, it is investigated whether microneedle application would enhance the efficacy of topical anesthetics. Forty-seven patients participated in the study. Topical anesthetic agent EMLA was applied to the whole face of the patients. Microneedle treatment was applied to one side of the face with a roller-type device. Whole-face carbon dioxide laser resurfacing therapy was carried out then. The pain that patients experienced was assessed by using visual analog scale (VAS) method. VAS scores of two sides of the face were compared by using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The mean of VAS score of the microneedle treated side was 2.1 ± 1.1 while that of the untreated side was 5.9 ± 0.9 and this difference was statistically significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the Z-value is - 5.9683 and the p-value is < 0.001). This study revealed that microneedle application, with a roller-type device, is a safe and easy procedure in providing sufficient anesthesia for facial laser resurfacing without the need for supplementary nerve blocks or injections.

  18. Effect of liposomes on rheological and syringeability properties of hyaluronic acid hydrogels intended for local injection of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kechai, Naila; Bochot, Amélie; Huang, Nicolas; Nguyen, Yann; Ferrary, Evelyne; Agnely, Florence

    2015-06-20

    The aim of this work was to thoroughly study the effect of liposomes on the rheological and the syringeability properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels intended for the local administration of drugs by injection. Whatever the characteristics of the liposomes added (neutral, positively or negatively charged, with a corona of polyethylene glycol chains, size), the viscosity and the elasticity of HA gels increased in a lipid concentration-dependent manner. Indeed, liposomes strengthened the network formed by HA chains due to their interactions with this polymer. The nature and the resulting effects of these interactions depended on liposome composition and concentration. The highest viscosity and elasticity were observed with liposomes covered by polyethylene glycol chains while neutral liposomes displayed the lowest effect. Despite their high viscosity at rest, all the formulations remained easily injectable through needles commonly used for local injections thanks to the shear-thinning behavior of HA gels. The present study demonstrates that rheological and syringeability tests are both necessary to elucidate the behavior of such systems during and post injection. In conclusion, HA liposomal gels appear to be a promising and versatile formulation platform for a wide range of applications in local drug delivery when an injection is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of local high-frequency perturbation on a turbulent boundary layer by synthetic jet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hao; Huang, Qian-Min; Liu, Pei-qing; Qu, Qiu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to investigate the local high-frequency perturbation effects of a synthetic jet injection on a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. Parameters of the synthetic jet are designed to force a high-frequency perturbation from a thin spanwise slot in the wall. In the test locations downstream of the slot, it is found that skin-friction is reduced by the perturbation, which is languishingly evolved downstream of the slot with corresponding influence on the near-wall regeneration mechanism of turbulent structures. The downstream slot region is divided into two regions due to the influence strength of the movement of spanwise vortices generated by the high-frequency perturbation. Interestingly, the variable interval time average technique is found to be disturbed by the existence of the spanwise vortices’ motion, especially in the region close to the slot. Similar results are obtained from the analysis of the probability density functions of the velocity fluctuation time derivatives, which is another indirect technique for detecting the enhancement or attenuation of streamwise vortices. However, both methods have shown consistent results with the skin-friction reduction mechanism in the far-away slot region. The main purpose of this paper is to remind researchers to be aware of the probable influence of spanwise vortices’ motion in wall-bounded turbulence control. (paper)

  20. The Physics of Local Helicity Injection Non-Solenoidal Tokamak Startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, A. J.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Jardin, S.

    2013-10-01

    Non-solenoidal startup via Local Helicity Injection (LHI) uses compact current injectors to produce toroidal plasma current Ip up to 170 kA in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment, driven by 4-8 kA injector current on timescales of 5-20 milliseconds. Increasing the Ip buildup duration enables experimental demonstration of plasma position control on timescales relevant for high-current startup. LHI-driven discharges exhibit bursty MHD activity, apparently line-tied kinking of LHI-driven field lines, with the bursts correlating with rapid equilibrium changes, sharp Ip rises, and sharp drops in the injector impedance. Preliminary NIMROD results suggest that helical LHI-driven current channels remain coherent, with Ip increases due to reconnection between adjacent helical turns forming axisymmetric plasmoids, and corresponding sharp drops in the bias circuit impedance. The DC injector impedance is consistent with a space charge limit at low bias current and a magnetic limit at high bias current. Internal measurements show the current density profile starts strongly hollow and rapidly fills in during Ip buildup. Simulations of LHI discharges using the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) will provide insight into the detailed current drive mechanism and guide experiments on PEFASUS and NSTX-U. Work supported by US DOE Grants DE-FG02-96ER54375 and DE-SC0006928.

  1. Seizure After Local Anesthesia for Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Jing Tsai

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a young male patient who experienced seizure after local injection of 3 mL 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:200,000 around a recurrent nasal angiofibroma. After receiving 100% oxygen via mask and thiamylal sodium, the patient had no residual neurologic sequelae. Seizure immediately following the injection of local anesthetics in the nasal cavity is probably due to injection into venous or arterial circulation with retrograde flow to the brain circulation. Further imaging study or angiography should be done before head and neck surgeries, especially in such highly vascular neoplasm.

  2. PET imaging of TSPO in a rat model of local neuroinflammation induced by intracerebral injection of lipopolysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ory, Dieter; Planas, Anna; Dresselaers, Tom; Gsell, Willy; Postnov, Andrey; Celen, Sofie; Casteels, Cindy; Himmelreich, Uwe; Debyser, Zeger; Van Laere, Koen; Verbruggen, Alfons; Bormans, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to measure functional and structural aspects of local neuroinflammation induced by intracerebral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats using TSPO microPET imaging with [ 18 F]DPA-714, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in vitro autoradiography and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in order to characterize a small animal model for screening of new PET tracers targeting neuroinflammation. Methods: Rats were injected stereotactically with LPS (50 μg) in the right striatum and with saline in the left striatum. [ 18 F]DPA-714 microPET, MRI, in vitro autoradiography and IHC studies were performed at different time points after LPS injection for 1 month. Results: Analysis of the microPET data demonstrated high uptake of the tracer in the LPS injected site with an affected-to-non-affected side-binding potential ratio (BP right-to-left ) of 3.0 at 3 days after LPS injection. This BP ratio decreased gradually over time to 0.9 at 30 days after LPS injection. In vitro autoradiography ([ 18 F]DPA-714) and IHC (CD68, GFAP and TSPO) confirmed local neuroinflammation in this model. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI demonstrated BBB breakdown near the LPS injection site at day 1, which gradually resolved over time and was absent at 1 month after LPS injection. Conclusion: The LPS model is useful for first screening of newly developed tracers because of the easy design and the robust, unilateral inflammatory reaction allowing the use of the contralateral region as control. Additionally, this model can be used to test and follow up the benefits of anti-inflammatory therapies by non-invasive imaging

  3. A clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of ELA-Max (4% liposomal lidocaine) as compared with eutectic mixture of local anesthetics cream for pain reduction of venipuncture in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Funk, Ann; Fallon-Friedlander, Sheila; Cunningham, Bari B

    2002-06-01

    A double-randomized, blinded crossover trial was performed to assess the efficacy of ELA-Max (4% liposomal lidocaine) as compared with eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) for pain relief during pediatric venipuncture procedures. Safety was assessed by evaluation for topical or systemic effects and measurement of serum lidocaine concentrations. A total of 120 children who were scheduled for repeat venipuncture for non-study-related reasons at 2 sites participated in the study. Patients were doubly randomized to treatment regimen (study medication application time of either 30 or 60 minutes) and to the order of application of the topical anesthetics for each venipuncture. The primary outcome measures were the child's rating of pain immediately after the venipuncture procedures using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) tool and the parent's and blinded research observer's Observed Behavioral Distress scores. Both ELA-Max and EMLA seemed to alleviate venipuncture pain. There was no clinically or statistically significant difference in the patient VAS scores within the 30-minute or 60-minute treatment groups, and there was no clinical or statistical difference in VAS scores between the 30-minute ELA-Max treatment without occlusion and the 60-minute EMLA treatment with occlusion. There were no clinically or statistically significant differences between treatment with ELA-Max and EMLA in parental or blinded researcher Observed Behavioral Distress scores, the most frequent response at any observation time being "no distress." This study demonstrates that a 30-minute application of ELA-Max without occlusion is as safe and as effective for ameliorating pain associated with venipuncture as a 60-minute application of the prescription product EMLA requiring occlusion.

  4. Prospective Randomized Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy and Local Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Canyilmaz, Fatih; Aynaci, Ozlem; Colak, Fatma; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Aynaci, Osman; Yoney, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for plantar fasciitis and to compare radiation therapy with local steroid injections. Methods and Materials: Between March 2013 and April 2014, 128 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive radiation therapy (total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy three times a week) or local corticosteroid injections a 1 ml injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone and 0.5 ml 1% lidocaine under the guidance of palpation. The results were measured using a visual analog scale, a modified von Pannewitz scale, and a 5-level function score. The fundamental phase of the study was 3 months, with a follow-up period of up to 6 months. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 12.5 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). For the radiation therapy patients, the median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 6.5-18.5 months), whereas in the palpation-guided (PG) steroid injection arm, it was 12.1 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). After 3 months, results in the radiation therapy arm were significantly superior to those in the PG steroid injection arm (visual analog scale, P<.001; modified von Pannewitz scale, P<.001; 5-level function score, P<.001). Requirements for a second treatment did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, but the time interval for the second treatment was significantly shorter in the PG steroid injection group (P=.045). Conclusion: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy compared to mean PG steroid injection on plantar fasciitis for at least 6 months after treatment

  5. Prospective Randomized Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy and Local Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyilmaz, Emine, E-mail: dremocan@ktu.edu.tr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Canyilmaz, Fatih [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Yavuz Selim Bone Disease and Rehabilitation Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Ozlem; Colak, Fatma; Serdar, Lasif [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Uslu, Gonca Hanedan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanuni Research and Education Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Osman [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Yoney, Adnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for plantar fasciitis and to compare radiation therapy with local steroid injections. Methods and Materials: Between March 2013 and April 2014, 128 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive radiation therapy (total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy three times a week) or local corticosteroid injections a 1 ml injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone and 0.5 ml 1% lidocaine under the guidance of palpation. The results were measured using a visual analog scale, a modified von Pannewitz scale, and a 5-level function score. The fundamental phase of the study was 3 months, with a follow-up period of up to 6 months. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 12.5 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). For the radiation therapy patients, the median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 6.5-18.5 months), whereas in the palpation-guided (PG) steroid injection arm, it was 12.1 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). After 3 months, results in the radiation therapy arm were significantly superior to those in the PG steroid injection arm (visual analog scale, P<.001; modified von Pannewitz scale, P<.001; 5-level function score, P<.001). Requirements for a second treatment did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, but the time interval for the second treatment was significantly shorter in the PG steroid injection group (P=.045). Conclusion: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy compared to mean PG steroid injection on plantar fasciitis for at least 6 months after treatment.

  6. Epidural injections with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hai Meng, Qi Fei, Bingqiang Wang, Yong Yang, Dong Li, Jinjun Li, Nan Su Department of Orthopedics, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Epidural injections of anesthetic with or without steroids are widely used for treating lumbar spinal stenosis, a common cause of chronic low back pain, but there is a lack of rigorous data comparing the effectiveness of epidural injections of anesthetic with and without steroids. This meta-analysis presents a current, comprehensive picture of how epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids compare with those using local anesthetic alone.Methods: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception through February 5, 2015. Weight mean difference, risk ratio, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A random effects model or fixed effects model was used to pool the estimates, according to the heterogeneity between the included studies.Results: We included 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 1,465 patients. Significant pain relief (≥50% was demonstrated in 53.7% of patients administered with epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids (group 1 and in 56.4% of those administered with local anesthetic alone (group 2. Patients showed a reduction in numeric rating scale pain score of 3.7 and 3.6 in the two groups, respectively. Significant functional improvement was achieved in 65.2% of patients in group 1 and 63.1% of patients in group 2, with Oswestry Disability Index reductions of 13.8 and 14.5 points, respectively. The overall number of injections per year was 3.2±1.3 and 3.4±1.2 with average total relief per year of 29.3±19.7 and 33.8±19.3 weeks, respectively. The opioid intakes decreased from baseline by 12.4 and 7.8 mg, respectively. Among the outcomes listed, only total relief time differed significantly between the two groups.Conclusion: Both epidural injections with

  7. Epidural Steroid Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confirm that the medication is traveling into the desired area. Often, local anesthetic is added along with ... several days and can be accompanied by a feeling of warmth or even a low grade increase ...

  8. Intrathecal Spread of Injectate Following an Ultrasound-Guided Selective C5 Nerve Root Injection in a Human Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falyar, Christian R; Abercrombie, Caroline; Becker, Robert; Biddle, Chuck

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root blocks have been described in several case reports as a safe and effective means to anesthetize the distal clavicle while maintaining innervation of the upper extremity and preserving diaphragmatic function. In this study, cadavers were injected with 5 mL of 0.5% methylene blue dye under ultrasound guidance to investigate possible proximal and distal spread of injectate along the brachial plexus, if any. Following the injections, the specimens were dissected and examined to determine the distribution of dye and the structures affected. One injection revealed dye extended proximally into the epidural space, which penetrated the dura mater and was present on the spinal cord and brainstem. Dye was noted distally to the divisions in 3 injections. The anterior scalene muscle and phrenic nerve were stained in all 4 injections. It appears unlikely that local anesthetic spread is limited to the nerve root following an ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root injection. Under certain conditions, intrathecal spread also appears possible, which has major patient safety implications. Additional safety measures, such as injection pressure monitoring, should be incorporated into this block, or approaches that are more distal should be considered for the acute pain management of distal clavicle fractures.

  9. The effect of local injection of the human growth hormone on the mandibular condyle growth in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Feizbakhsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of local injection of human growth hormone (GH in stimulating cartilage and bone formation in a rabbit model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Materials and Methods: In an experimental animal study, 16 male Albino New Zealand white rabbits aged 12 weeks were divided into two groups: In the first group (7 rabbits 2 mg/kg/1 ml human GH and in the control group (9 rabbits 1 ml normal saline was administered locally in both mandibular condyles. Injections were employed under sedation and by single experienced person. Injections were made for 6 times with 3 injections a week in the all test and control samples. Rabbits were sacrified at the 20th day from the beginning of study and TMJs were histologically examined. ANOVA (two-sided with Dunnett post hoc test was used to compare data of bone and cartridge thickness while chi-square test was used to analyze hyperplasia and disk deformity data. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Cartilage layer thickness was greater in the GH-treated (0.413 ± 0.132 than the control group (0.287 ± 0.098 (P value = 0.02. Although bone thickness and condylar cartilage hyperplasia were greater in the GH-treated group, these differences were not statistically significant (P value = 0.189 and 0.083, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding the disc deformity (P value = 0.46. Conclusion: Local injection of human GH in the TMJ is able to accelerate growth activity of condylar cartilage in rabbit.

  10. Short-term muscle atrophy caused by botulinum toxin-A local injection impairs fracture healing in the rat femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yongqiang; Ma, Yongcheng; Wang, Xuepeng; Jin, Fangchun; Ge, Shengfang

    2012-04-01

    Damaged bone is sensitive to mechanical stimulation throughout the remodeling phase of bone healing. Muscle damage and muscular atrophy associated with open fractures and subsequent fixation are not beneficial to maintaining optimum conditions for mechanical stability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether local muscle atrophy and dysfunction affect fracture healing in a rat femur fracture model. We combined the rat model of a short period atrophy of the quadriceps with femur fracture. Forty-four-month-old male Wistar rats were adopted for this study. Two units of botulinum toxin-A (BXTA) were administered locally into the right side of the quadriceps of each rat, while the same dose of saline was injected into the contralateral quadriceps. After BXTA had been fully absorbed by the quadriceps, osteotomy was performed in both femurs with intramedullary fixation. Gross observation and weighing of muscle tissue, X-ray analysis, callus histology, and bone biomechanical testing were performed at different time points up to 8 weeks post-surgery. Local injection of BXTA led to a significant decrease in the volume and weight of the quadriceps compared to the control side. At the eighth week, the left side femurs of the saline-injected quadriceps almost reached bony union, and fibrous calluses were completely calcified into woven bone. However, a gap was still visible in the BXTA-treated side on X-ray images. As showed by bone histology, there were no mature osseous calluses or woven bone on the BXTA-treated side, but a resorption pattern was evident. Biomechanical testing indicated that the femurs of the BXTA-treated side exhibited inferior mechanical properties compared with the control side. The inferior outcome following BXTA injection, compared with saline injection, in terms of callus resistance may be the consequence of unexpected load and mechanical unsteadiness caused by muscle atrophy and dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. The Efficacy of Local Injection of Methylprednisolone and Lidocaine with and Without Splint, in Treating Patients with De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Suffering from de Quervain's tenosynovitis due to repetitive and routine activities leads to considerable referrals to orthopedic clinics and increasing health care costs and wasting of patients' time. The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of local injection of methylprednisolone with and without splint for treatment of patients suffering from de Quervain's tenosynovitis. Methods: In a clinical trial study, 72 patients with de Quervain's tenosynovitis were selected in 2010 and were randomly divided into two groups. Therapeutic intervention in the first group was injection of 40 mg methylprednisone and 1 ml lidocaine with splint, and in the second group it was injection 40 mg methylprednisone and 1ml lidocaine without splint. Both groups followed this treatment for three periods(21 day. The related data were collected by visual analogue scale. Then data was analyzed by SPSS (ver. 16 using Fisher exact test and t test. Results: The findings of this study revealed that after the 3-week period of treatment the mean reduced pain intensity and improvement in the first group was significantly lower than the second group(p<0/05. Conclusion: Therefore, local injection of methylprednisone and lidocaine with splint is an effective method in the treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis.

  12. Cell shape changes induced by cationic anesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The effects of local anesthetics on cultivated macrophages were studied in living preparations and recorded in still pictures and time-lapse cine-micrographs. Exposure to 12mM lidocaine or 1.5 mM tetracaine resulted in rounding in 10-15 min. Rounding was characterized by cell contraction, marked increase in retraction fibrils, withdrawal of cell processes, and, in late stages, pulsation-like activity and zeiosis. Cells showed appreciable membrane activity as they rounded. Respreading was complete within 15 min of perfusion in drug-free medium and entailed a marked increase in surface motility over control periods. As many as eight successive cycles of rounding and spreading were obtained with lidocaine without evidence of cell damage. The effects of anesthetics were similar to those observed with EDTA, but ethylene- glycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N'-tetraacetic acid-Mg was ineffective. Rounding was also induced by benzocaine, an anesthetic nearly uncharged at pH 7.0. Quaternary (nondischargeable) compounds were of low activity, presumably because they are slow permeants. Lidocaine induced rounding at 10 degrees C and above but was less effective at 5 degrees C and ineffective at 0 degrees C. Rounding by the anesthetic was also obtained in media depleted or Na or enriched with 10 mM Ca or Mg. The latter finding, together with the failure of tetrodotoxin to induce rounding, suggests that the anesthetic effect is unrelated to inhibition of sodium conductance. It is possible that the drugs influence divalent ion fluxes or some component of the contractile cells' machinery, but a metabolic target of action cannot yet be excluded. PMID:814194

  13. Comparison of the effectiveness of local corticosteroid injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyazal, Münevver Serdaroğlu; Devrimsel, Gül

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine and compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy and local corticosteroid injection in patients with lateral epicondylitis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty-four patients with lateral epicondylitis were randomly divided into extracorporeal shock wave therapy and steroid injection groups. Patients were evaluated using hand grip strength, visual analog scale, and short-form McGill pain questionnaire at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks post-treatment. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant increase in hand grip strength and decreases on the visual analog scale and short form McGill pain questionnaire overtime. There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of improvement in hand grip strength and on the short-form McGill pain questionnaire between groups at 4 weeks post-treatment, whereas the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group showed better results on the visual analog scale. The percentages of improvements in all 3 parameters were higher in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group than in the injection group at 12 weeks post-treatment. [Conclusion] Both the extracorporeal shock wave therapy and steroid injection were safe and effective in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. However, extracorporeal shock wave therapy demonstrated better outcomes than steroid injection at the long-term follow-up.

  14. Development and experimental basis of local subretinal technique of xenogenic’s injection stem cells labelled by magnetic perticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: is to develop a technique for local subretinal injection of xenogeneic stem cells labeled with magnetic particles and to prove experimentally its effectiveness.Material and methods: We used a line of stem cells HEK-293 GFP,labeled with magnetic particles. The study was made on 84 eyes of 42 chinchilla rabbits 6 months of age, the weight were from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. All right eyes were experimental (42 eyes and all left eyes (42 eyes were the control group. In the experimental group we used original complex of polymer elastic magnetic implant (PEMI with laser probe and fixed it to the sclera, then we made a median vitrectomy and injected HEK-293 GFP under the retina using a specially designed dispenser. In the control group PEMI was not fixed. We examined animals using biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound scanning, optical coherence tomography  OCT, computer tomography (CT, morphological study (cryohistological sections in 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 day and 1 month after surgery.Results: According the results of biomicroscopy in observation periods up to 3 days the vascular injection was visualized in the area operation. According the results of ophthalmoscopy and ultrasound scanning in 1 day the local retinal detachment was visualized in the area of local injection of the stem cells, which was not visualized in terms of further observations. CT helped us to confirm the local place of PEMI fixation. The morphological study results showed that cells were located in the subretinal space up to 14 days in the experimental group, and only up 3 days in the control group.Conclusion: The suggested surgical technique enables to control the injection of cells into the subretinal space, reduces the risk of tissue damage and exit cells in the vitreous space. The suggested methodology allows the fixing of the cellular material in the local place of the injection and enables to predict cells`s movement.

  15. Multi-regional local anesthetic infiltration during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients receiving prophylactic multi-modal analgesia: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Klarskov, B; Kristiansen, V B

    1999-01-01

    undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In addition, all patients received multi-modal prophylactic analgesic treatment. Fifty-eight patients were randomized to receive a total of 286 mg (66 mL) ropivacaine or 66 mL saline via periportal and intraperitoneal infiltration. During the first 3...... postoperative h, the use of morphine and antiemetics was registered, and pain and nausea were rated hourly. Daily pain intensity, pain localization, and supplemental analgesic consumption were registered the first postoperative week. Ropivacaine reduced overall pain the first two hours and incisional pain...... for the first three postoperative hours (P ropivacaine group (P

  16. Compressed air injection technique to standardize block injection pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ban C H; Li, Lisa X Y; Pillay, Jennifer J

    2006-11-01

    Presently, no standardized technique exists to monitor injection pressures during peripheral nerve blocks. Our objective was to determine if a compressed air injection technique, using an in vitro model based on Boyle's law and typical regional anesthesia equipment, could consistently maintain injection pressures below a 1293 mmHg level associated with clinically significant nerve injury. Injection pressures for 20 and 30 mL syringes with various needle sizes (18G, 20G, 21G, 22G, and 24G) were measured in a closed system. A set volume of air was aspirated into a saline-filled syringe and then compressed and maintained at various percentages while pressure was measured. The needle was inserted into the injection port of a pressure sensor, which had attached extension tubing with an injection plug clamped "off". Using linear regression with all data points, the pressure value and 99% confidence interval (CI) at 50% air compression was estimated. The linearity of Boyle's law was demonstrated with a high correlation, r = 0.99, and a slope of 0.984 (99% CI: 0.967-1.001). The net pressure generated at 50% compression was estimated as 744.8 mmHg, with the 99% CI between 729.6 and 760.0 mmHg. The various syringe/needle combinations had similar results. By creating and maintaining syringe air compression at 50% or less, injection pressures will be substantially below the 1293 mmHg threshold considered to be an associated risk factor for clinically significant nerve injury. This technique may allow simple, real-time and objective monitoring during local anesthetic injections while inherently reducing injection speed.

  17. Radiation Dosimetry of Intratumoral Injection of Radionuclides into Human Breast Cancer. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    products will be eliminated by nuclear decay in storage behind lead bricks for at least 4 weeks. The synthesis and testing procedures typically last 80...to be sensitive to T2*. Injection may be preceded with surface or subcutaneous local anesthesia (1cc of 4% lidocaine , if the patient has no...history of allergy or adverse reactions to lidocaine ; otherwise, an alternative local anesthetics will be used) at the needle entrance through the surface

  18. Treatment of recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by local injection of thiamphenicol into prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.A.; Baert, L.; Maes, R.A.

    Twenty-nine patients were treated for recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by an injection of 2 Gm. thiamphenicol glycinate via the perineal route directly into the prostate. Escherichia coli was identified as the pathogen responsible for this infection in 83 per cent of the cases. Using this

  19. [Local reactions after diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccines in mice; changes in histopathology at the injection site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Chiharu; Katsuta, Tomohiro; Honjo, Ayako; Tateyama, Satoshi; Tokutake, Tadaomi; Arimoto, Yutaka; Nakajima, Natsuki; Goshima, Toshiro; Kato, Tatsuo

    2006-03-01

    Diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP) developed in Japan is now widely used worldwide. DTaP is safer than the diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis vaccine (DTwP) and has fewer severe side effects, but local reactions such as redness, swelling, and induration are still reported. The pathophysiological mechanism of these reactions is controversial. To clarify the cause of local reactions, we conducted studies using the mouse model. After administering either one or two abdominal subcutaneous DTaP inoculations, we observed changes in histopathology at the injection site at 24h, 48h, and 7 days. The control group, inoculated with physiologic saline, showed no significant changes either pathologically or with the naked eye. All mice after DTaP vaccination showed indurations at the injection site. Pathologically, we watched leukocyte invasion into or around the site, especially neutrophils and eosinophils. After the first vaccination, the extent of the invasion was strong 24h and 7 days later. At 24h following the second vaccination, a dramatic leukocyte invasion seen persisted at 7days. At 7 days after the first vaccination, peripheral fibrosis had begun, and when a second vaccination was administered, it began even earlier at the second site. These histopathological changes show that local reactions are caused by both inflammatory and allergic responses. Because this mouse study resulted in the same pattern of reactions observed in humans, this method will be useful for studies focusing on local reactions.

  20. Effects of levothyroxine on visual evoked potential impairment following local injections of lysolecithin into the rat optic chiasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobra Payghani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which has no any known definitive treatment. Studies have shown that thyroid hormones (THs in addition to their roles in the development of the nervous system and the production of myelin have important roles in the adult's brain function. Since the only way to treat MS is the restoration of myelin, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of levothyroxine on visual evoked potential (VEP impairment following local injections of lysolecithin into the rat optic chiasm. Methods: To induce demyelination, lysolecithin was injected into the optic chiasm of male Wistar rats. VEP recording was used to evaluate demyelination and remyelination before and 10, 17, and 24 days after the lysolecithin injection. The rats received an intraperitoneal injection of levothyroxine with doses 20, 50, and 100 μg/kg in different experimental groups. Results: VEP latency and amplitude showed demyelination at 10 and 17 days after an induced lesion in MS group which was reversed at day 24. Levothyroxine prevented these impairments, especially in high doses. Conclusions: According to the results, lysolecithin-induced demyelination at optic chiasm and VEP impairments can be restored by administration of levothyroxine. Therefore, THs probably have positive effects in demyelinating diseases.

  1. Local and distant chemical burns due to cetrimide injection in a massive dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kumar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty ml of 20% cetrimide shampoo solution was injected subcutaneously around the left elbow by a drug addict to commit suicide. Edema, blisters with skip areas and, cellulitis were noted within 6 hours, not only around the site of the injection but also upto the wrist and the pectoral region. Muscles were protected by the tough deep fascia. There was no systemic toxidcity despite receiving at least 4 times the reported fatal dose. The patient was treated with multiple fasciotomies, broad spectrum antibiotics, an atory drugs, iunb elevation and daily dressings, followed by secondary suturing of fasciotomy wounds when the limb edema regressed. The cutaneous bums healed without needing skin grafts.

  2. Maximization of ICRF power by SOL density tailoring with local gas injection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jacquet, P.; Goniche, M.; Bobkov, V.; Lerche, E.; Pinsker, R.I.; Pitts, R.A.; Zhang, W.; Colas, L.; Hosea, J.; Moriyama, S.; Wang, S.-J.; Wukitch, S.; Zhang, X.; Bilato, R.; Bufferand, H.; Guimarais, L.; Faugel, H.; Hanson, G.R.; Kocan, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petržílka, Václav; Shaw, A.; Stepanov, I.; Sips, A.C.C.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2016), s. 046001 ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ICRF power * antenna loading * gas injection * SOL density Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/56/4/046001

  3. Anesthetic services in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Due to the development of knowledge and technology our world is becoming a global city where rapidly occur changes in political and economic milieu, such as the introduction of corporate capitalism in the economic crisis, contemporary migrations etc. Health care as a public good on one hand and as the highest individual value of each individual on the other hand, changes and suffers changes. Health care system policy insists on partnership relation of the individual with medical service providers. This refers to the a secure and accessible modern treatment of each individual and to the state as to rationalize and reduce medical costs with effective methods of treatment. Topic position in scientific/professional public: Anesthesiology is evolving along with the surgical disciplines. Highly sophisticated with organized service, anesthesiology is equally important because of the multiplicity of anesthetic services in the surgical treatment of the disease in terms of teamwork and multidisciplinary treatment of the disease. The intention is to provide a description of work, education and our results in the economic, geopolitical and cultural context of the Serbian health system policy as well as to improve safe performance, availability and cost rationalization in anesthesia. The health care system is territorially organized in Serbia. In hospitals, Serbia employs 940 anesthesiologists (1:7,575 inhabitants. According to data from the Regional Medical Chamber of Belgrade,382 anesthesiologists were registered in Belgrade out of total. Anesthesia department network is well organized in all surgical hospitals. Anesthesia services are available depending on the place of residence, type of surgical illness or injury, and the distance to the nearest clinic. Sub-specializations in the field of anesthesiology have not been introduced although pediatric, neurosurgery and cardiosurgical anesthesia have spontaniously singled, as well as

  4. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and local tolerance at injection site of marbofloxacin administered by regional intravenous limb perfusion in standing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, Elodie; Trencart, Pierre; Tahier, Carine; Dron, Frederic; Paulin, Angelique; Tessier, Caroline

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic variables and local tolerance at injection-site of marbofloxacin administered via regional intravenous limb perfusion (RIVLP) in standing horses. Adult horses (n = 6). RIVLP were performed with rubber tourniquets applied to the forelimbs of standing sedated horses. Marbofloxacin (0.67 mg/kg) was randomly injected in 1 forelimb, with the contralateral limb serving as a control (0.9% NaCl solution). Samples of jugular blood and synovial fluid from the radiocarpal joint of the marbofloxacin-perfused limb were collected before and at intervals after RIVLP for determination of drug concentrations. All injection sites were evaluated before, 24 and 48 hours after RIVLP by means of ultrasonographic examination, circumferential measurements and subjective visible inflammation scores by veterinarians unaware of treatment received. No adverse effects associated with the technique or antibiotic were observed. High marbofloxacin concentrations were obtained in the synovial fluid, AUCINF was significantly higher in synovial fluid than in plasma (78.64 ± 49.41 and 2.85 ± 0.60 µg h/mL respectively, P = .028). The efficacy indices, AUC0-24 /MIC90 and Cmaxobs/MIC90 , predicted a favorable outcome in the treatment of synovial fluid infections caused by enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus. After RIVLP, there was no statistically significant difference between marbofloxacin-injected and control limbs for lameness, visual inflammation score, limb circumference, and ultrasonographic appearance of the veins. Marbofloxacin injected limbs had a significantly greater subcutaneous thickness, compared with control limbs. These data suggest that RIVLP of marbofloxacin (0.67 mg/kg) could be a safe and effective method for treatment of infections of the distal portion of the limb for susceptible organisms. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  5. A Fast pH-Switchable and Self-Healing Supramolecular Hydrogel Carrier for Guided, Local Catheter Injection in the Infarcted Myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Bastings, Maartje M. C.; Koudstaal, Stefan; Kieltyka, Roxanne E.; Nakano, Yoko; Pape, A. C. H.; Feyen, Dries A. M.; van Slochteren, Frebus J.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Meijer, E. W.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive intervention strategies after myocardial infarction use state-of-the-art catheter systems that are able to combine mapping of the infarcted area with precise, local injection of drugs. To this end, catheter delivery of drugs that are not immediately pumped out of the heart is still challenging, and requires a carrier matrix that in the solution state can be injected through a long catheter, and instantaneously gelates at the site of injection. To address this unmet need, a ...

  6. EFFICACY OF LOCAL INFILTRATION OF AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD VERSUS LOCAL CORTICOSTEROID INJECTION- THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC TENNIS ELBOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar Roy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic painful tendon disorders are common in both sport persons and common individuals. 1,2 Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow is relatively more common among active individuals in the general population. 3 Typical signs and symptoms include pain and tenderness over the lateral epicondyle, exacerbated by resisted wrist extension and passive wrist flexion and impaired grip strength. The aim of the study is to find whether autologous blood provides comparable functional outcome over local steroids and hence whether it can replace steroids in treatment of tennis elbow. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients with nontraumatic elbow pain attending the Orthopaedics Outpatient Department of Nalanda Medical College Hospital from January 2016 to August 2016. The participating subjects were randomly grouped into two groups (steroid (Group A and autologous blood (Group B. Pain in the subject’s affected elbow was measured using Visual Analogue Score (VAS. RESULTS Initially, both the groups had comparable initial VAS scores. At 1 month follow up, steroid group showed a significantly greater improvement in mean VAS scores when compared to autologous blood group. However, at 6 months follow up, steroid group showed no statistically significant difference in mean VAS scores when compared to autologous blood group. CONCLUSION From the current study, we concluded that both local corticosteroid and autologous blood were equally efficacious in the treatment of chronic lateral epicondylitis of elbow.

  7. Injectable iodine-125 labeled tissue marker for radioactive localization of non-palpable breast lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaarup-Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Andreas Ingemann; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2018-01-01

    to be spatially well-defined and stable over a seven day period with excellent CT contrast (>1500 HU), enabling fluoroscopic visualization of markers during placement. The radioactivity remains strongly associated with the marker during the implantation period, which limits exposure to healthy tissue....... The surgical guidance marker is based on derivatives of the biomaterial sucrose acetate isobutyrate and unlike currently used markers it is injectable in the tissue using thin needles, reducing the discomfort to the patients significantly. The marker confers CT contrast and has radioactive properties, meaning...

  8. The use of compound topical anesthetics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Neal D

    2007-10-01

    The author reviewed the history of, federal regulations regarding, risks of and adverse drug reactions of five compound topical anesthetics: tetracaine, adrenaline/epinephrine and cocaine (TAC); lidocaine, adrenaline/epinephrine and tetracaine (LET); lidocaine, tetracaine and phenylephrine (TAC 20 percent Alternate); lidocaine, prilocaine and tetracaine (Profound); and lidocaine, prilocaine, tetracaine and phenylephrine with thickeners (Profound PET). The author reviewed clinical trials, case reports, descriptive articles, and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations and recent public advisory warnings regarding the federal approval of and risks associated with the use of compound topical anesthetics. Compound topical anesthetics are neither FDA-regulated nor -unregulated. Some compounding pharmacies bypass the new FDA drug approval process, which is based on reliable scientific data and ensures that a marketed drug is safe, effective, properly manufactured and accurately labeled. Two deaths have been attributed to the lay use of compound topical anesthetics. In response, the FDA has announced the strengthening of its efforts against unapproved drug products. Compound topical anesthetics may be an effective alternative to local infiltration for some minimally invasive dental procedures; however, legitimate concerns exist in regard to their safety. Until they become federally regulated, compound topical anesthetics remain unapproved drug products whose benefits may not outweigh their risks for dental patients.

  9. A novel vehicle for local protein delivery to the inner ear: injectable and biodegradable thermosensitive hydrogel loaded with PLGA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Juan; Long, Wei; Liang, Zhongping; Wen, Lu; Yang, Fan; Chen, Gang

    2018-01-01

    Delivery of biomacromolecular drugs into the inner ear is challenging, mainly because of their inherent instability as well as physiological and anatomical barriers. Therefore, protein-friendly, hydrogel-based delivery systems following local administration are being developed for inner ear therapy. Herein, biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) containing interferon α-2 b (IFN α-2 b) were loaded in chitosan/glycerophosphate (CS/GP)-based thermosensitive hydrogel for IFN delivery by intratympanic injection. The injectable hydrogel possessed a physiological pH and formed semi-solid gel at 37 °C, with good swelling and deswelling properties. The CS/GP hydrogel could slowly degrade as visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of NPs in CS/GP gel largely influenced in vitro drug release. In the guinea pig cochlea, a 1.5- to 3-fold increase in the drug exposure time of NPs-CS/GP was found than those of the solution, NPs and IFN-loaded hydrogel. Most importantly, a prolonged residence time was attained without obvious histological changes in the inner ear. This biodegradable, injectable, and thermosensitive NPs-CS/GP system may allow longer delivery of protein drugs to the inner ear, thus may be a potential novel vehicle for inner ear therapy.

  10. Comparison of Local Injection of Platelet Rich Plasma and Corticosteroids in the Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis of Humerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Raman; Kothari, S Y; Borah, Diganta

    2015-07-01

    Lateral epicondylitis or Tennis Elbow is one of the most common causes of upper extremity pain with various treatment options. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) offers a new option for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. This study was conducted with an aim to compare the efficacy of PRP versus methyl-prednisolone local injection in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Sixty five patients with lateral epicondylitis were included in the study and randomized into two groups. Group A was treated with single injection of 1ml PRP with absolute platelet count of at least 1 million platelets/ mm(3). Group B was treated with single injection of 1ml (40mg) methyl-prednisolone. Pain, grip strength and functional improvements were assessed using visual analogue scale, dynamometer and quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scale respectively at baseline, 15 days, 1 month and 3 months. Sixty patients completed the follow up. All assessment parameters improved significantly in both the Groups at each follow up compared to baseline. At the end of three months group A showed significantly better improvement as compared to Group B. PRP and methyl-prenisolone both are effective in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. However, PRP is a superior treatment option for longer duration efficacy.

  11. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchikanti L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Laxmaiah Manchikanti,1,2 Kimberly A Cash,1 Carla D McManus,1 Vidyasagar Pampati,1 Ramsin Benyamin3,41Pain Management Center of Paducah, Paducah, KY; 2University of Louisville, Louisville, KY; 3Millennium Pain Center, Bloomington, IL; 4University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USAAbstract: Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures, the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management

  12. Acrylic injectable and self-curing formulations for the local release of bisphosphonates in bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L M; Fernández, M; Parra, J; Vázquez, B; López-Bravo, A; Román, J San

    2007-11-01

    Two bisphosphonates (BPs), namely 1-hydroxy-2-[4-aminophenyl]ethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (APBP) and 1-hydroxy-2-[3-indolyl]ethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (IBP), have been synthesized and incorporated to acrylic injectable and self-curing formulations. Alendronic acid monosodium trihydrated salt (ALN) containing cement was formulated as control. These systems have potential applications in low density hard tissues affected by ailments characterized by a high osteoclastic resorption, i.e. osteoporosis and osteolysis. Values of curing parameters of APBP and IBP were acceptable to obtain pastes with enough fluency to be injected through a biopsy needle into the bone cavity. Working times ranged between 8 and 15 min and maximum temperature was around 50 degrees C. Cured systems stored for a month in synthetic body fluid had compressive strengths between 90 and 96 MPa and modulus between 1.2 and 1.3 GPa, which suggest mechanical stabilization after setting and in the short time. BPs were released in PBS at an initial rate depending on the corresponding chemical structure in the order ALN > APBP > IBP to give final concentrations in PBS of 2.21, 0.44, and 0.19 mol/mL for ALN, APBP, and IBP, respectively. Cytotoxicities of bisphosphonates were evaluated, IC(50) values being in the order APBP > ALN > IBP. Absence of cytotoxicity coming from leachables of the cured systems was observed in all cases independently of the BP. An improved cell growth and proliferation for the systems loaded with APBP and IBP compared with that loaded with ALN was observed, as assessed by measuring cell adhesion and proliferation, and total DNA content.

  13. Increased localized delivery of piroxicam by cationic nanoparticles after intra-articular injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Rae; Ho, Myoung Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Ha Ra; Kim, Han Sol; Choi, Yong Seok; Choi, Young Wook; Kang, Myung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Piroxicam (PRX), a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is prescribed to relieve postoperative and/or chronic joint pain. However, its oral administration often results in serious gastrointestinal adverse effects including duodenal ulceration. Thus, a novel cationic nanoparticle (NP) was explored to minimize the systemic exposure and increase the retention time of PRX in the joint after intra-articular (IA) injection, by forming micrometer-sized electrostatic clusters with endogenous hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial cavity. PRX-loaded NPs consisting of poly(lactic- co -glycolic acid), Eudragit RL, and polyvinyl alcohol were constructed with the following characteristics: particle size of 220 nm, zeta potential of 11.5 mV in phosphate-buffered saline, and loading amount of 4.0% (w/w) of PRX. In optical and hyperspectral observations, the cationic NPs formed more than 50 μm-sized aggregates with HA, which was larger than the intercellular gaps between synoviocytes. In an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats, area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC 0-24 h ) and maximum plasma concentration ( C max ) of PRX after IA injection of the cationic NPs were <70% ( P <0.05) and 60% ( P <0.05), respectively, compared to those obtained from drug solution. Moreover, the drug concentration in joint tissue 24 h after dosing with the cationic NPs was 3.2-fold ( P <0.05) and 1.8-fold ( P <0.05) higher than that from drug solution and neutrally charged NPs, respectively. Therefore, we recommend the IA cationic NP therapy as an effective alternative to traditional oral therapy with PRX, as it increases drug retention selectively in the joint.

  14. Use of Pre-Injection Diffusion of Local Anaesthetic as a Means of Reducing Needle Penetration Discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuket Sandalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine if pre-injection diffusion of local anaesthetic solution influences the discomfort of needle penetration in the palate. Methods: A placebo-controlled, randomised, doubleblind split-mouth investigation was conducted. 25 healthy adult volunteers were recruited and each received two needle penetrations in a random order during one visit. The penetration sites were 1 cm from the gingival margin of the first maxillary premolars on each side of the mouth. 30 gauge-13 mm needles which were attached to syringes that contained either 2% lidocaine with 0.125mg/ml epinephrine or physiological saline were used. For each penetration an operator encouraged a drop of solution to appear at the end of the needle and placed this drop with the bevel of the needle flat on the palate for 20 seconds. The discomfort was noted on a 100 mm visual analogue scale with end points marked “No pain” and “Unbearable pain”. Results: There was no significant difference in penetration discomfort between solutions, (mean VAS = 26.80±19.36mm for lidocaine and 26.20±18.39mm for saline however the 2nd penetration was significantly more uncomfortable than the first (mean VAS = 31.00±19.84 mm and 22.00±16.65 mm respectively. Conclusion: Pre-injection diffusion of local anaesthetic solution did not influence the discomfort of needle penetration in the palate.

  15. Local anesthetics: interaction with human erythrocyte membranes as studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance; Anestesicos locais: interacao com membranas de eritrocitos de sangue humano, estudada por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de {sup 1}H e {sup 31}P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Bioquimica]. E-mail: depaula@unicamp.br

    2004-02-01

    The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA). We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC) and benzocaine (BZC) bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipids acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form) and hydrophobic (neutral form) interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na{sup +}-channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia. (author)

  16. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  17. Anestésicos locais: interação com membranas biológicas e com o canal de sódio voltagem-dependente Local anesthetics: interaction with biological membranes and with the voltage-gated sodium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ribeiro de Araujo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA are described in the literature. Two types of theories can be distinguished: those that focus on the direct effects of LA on their target protein in the axon membranes, i.e. the voltage-gated sodium channel and the ones that take into account the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase for the reversible nerve blockage. Since there is a direct correlation between LA hydrophobicity and potency, it is crucial to take this physico-chemical property into account to understand the mechanism of action of LA, be it on the sodium channel protein, lipid(s, or on the whole membrane phase.

  18. Anesthetic Care in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Camila B; Merchant, Amina I; Schwalbach, Teresa; Pinto, Emilia F V; Jeque, Emilia C; McQueen, K A Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The World Bank and Lancet Commission in 2015 have prioritized surgery in Low-Income Countries (LIC) and Lower-Middle Income Countries (LMICs). This is consistent with the shift in the global burden of disease from communicable to noncommunicable diseases over the past 20 years. Essential surgery must be performed safely, with adequate anesthesia monitoring and intervention. Unfortunately, a huge barrier to providing safe surgery includes the paucity of an anesthesia workforce. In this study, we qualitatively evaluated the anesthesia capacity of Mozambique, a LIC in Africa with limited access to anesthesia and safe surgical care. Country-based solutions are suggested that can expand to other LIC and LMICs. A comprehensive review of the Mozambique anesthesia system was conducted through interviews with personnel in the Ministry of Health (MOH), a school of medicine, a public central referral hospital, a general first referral hospital, a private care hospital, and leaders in the physician anesthesia community. Personnel databases were acquired from the MOH and Maputo Central Hospital. Quantitative results reveal minimal anesthesia capacity (290 anesthesia providers for a population of >25 million or 0.01:10,000). The majority of physician anesthesiologists practice in urban settings, and many work in the private sector. There is minimal capacity for growth given only 1 Mozambique anesthesia residency with inadequate resources. The most commonly perceived barriers to safe anesthesia in this critical shortage are lack of teachers, lack of medical student interest in and exposure to anesthesia, need for more schools, low allocation to anesthesia from the list of available specialist prospects by MOH, and low public payments to anesthesiologists. Qualitative results show assets of a good health system design, a supportive environment for learning in the residency, improvement in anesthetic care in past decades, and a desire for more educational opportunities and teachers

  19. Randomized clinical trial of prevention of seroma formation after mastectomy by local methylprednisolone injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvamme, G; Axelsson, C. K.; Lanng, C

    2015-01-01

    : This was a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled intervention study of a single dose of 80 mg methylprednisolone versus saline on seroma formation after mastectomy. Patients were further classified according to the surgical axillary procedure: mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy (M + SLNB) or mastectomy......BACKGROUND: Seroma formation, the most prevalent postoperative complication after mastectomy, is an inflammatory process that is potentially preventable via local steroid administration. This study investigated the effect of local steroid administration on seroma formation. METHODS...... with level I-II axillary lymph node dissection (M + ALND). Treatments were administered into the wound cavity via the drain orifice following removal of the drain on the first day after surgery. The primary endpoint was seroma formation; secondary endpoints included the frequency of side...

  20. Day-surgery patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain than those anesthetized with sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, Terry

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been recent studies suggesting that patients anesthetized with propofol have less postoperative pain compared with patients anesthetized with volatile anesthetics. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind study, 80 patients undergoing day-case diagnostic laparoscopic gynecological surgery were either anesthetized with IV propofol or sevoflurane. The primary outcome measured was pain on a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Patients anesthetized with propofol had less pain compared with patients anesthetized with sevoflurane (P = 0.01). There was no difference in any of the other measured clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The patients anesthetized with propofol appeared to have less pain than patients anesthetized with sevoflurane.

  1. The Incidence of Intravascular Needle Entrance during Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi Zenouz, Ali; Ebrahimi, Hooman; Mahdipour, Masoumeh; Pourshahidi, Sara; Amini, Parisa; Vatankhah, Mahdi

    2008-01-01

    Dentists administer thousands of local anesthetic injections every day. Injection to a highly vascular area such as pterygomandibular space during an inferior alveolar nerve block has a high risk of intravascular needle entrance. Accidental intravascular injection of local anesthetic agent with vasoconstrictor may result in cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity, as well as tachycardia and hypertension. There are reports that indicate aspiration is not performed in every injection. The aim of the present study was to assess the incidence of intravascular needle entrance in inferior alveolar nerve block injections. Three experienced oral and maxillofacial surgeons performed 359 inferior alveolar nerve block injections using direct or indirect techniques, and reported the results of aspiration. Aspirable syringes and 27 gauge long needles were used, and the method of aspiration was similar in all cases. Data were analyzed using t-test. 15.3% of inferior alveolar nerve block injections were aspiration positive. Intravascular needle entrance was seen in 14.2% of cases using direct and 23.3% of cases using indirect block injection techniques. Of all injections, 15.8% were intravascular on the right side and 14.8% were intravascular on the left. There were no statistically significant differences between direct or indirect block injection techniques (P = 0.127) and between right and left injection sites (P = 0.778). According to our findings, the incidence of intravascular needle entrance during inferior alveolar nerve block injection was relatively high. It seems that technique and maneuver of injection have no considerable effect in incidence of intravascular needle entrance.

  2. The Incidence of Intravascular Needle Entrance during Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pourshahidi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Dentists administer thousands of local anesthetic injections every day. Injection to a highly vascular area such as pterygomandibular space during an inferior alveolar nerve block has a high risk of intravascular needle entrance. Accidental intravascular injection of local anesthetic agent with vasoconstrictor may result in cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity, as well as tachycardia and hypertension. There are reports that indicate aspiration is not performed in every injection. The aim of the present study was to assess the incidence of intravascular needle entrance in inferior alveolar nerve block injections.

    Materials and methods. Three experienced oral and maxillofacial surgeons performed 359 inferior alveolar nerve block injections using direct or indirect techniques, and reported the results of aspiration. Aspirable syringes and 27 gauge long needles were used, and the method of aspiration was similar in all cases. Data were analyzed using t-test.

    Results. 15.3% of inferior alveolar nerve block injections were aspiration positive. Intravascular needle entrance was seen in 14.2% of cases using direct and 23.3% of cases using indirect block injection techniques. Of all injections, 15.8% were intravascular on the right side and 14.8% were intravascular on the left. There were no statistically significant differences between direct or indirect block injection techniques (P = 0.127 and between right and left injection sites (P = 0.778.

    Conclusion. According to our findings, the incidence of intravascular needle entrance during inferior alveolar nerve block injection was relatively high. It seems that technique and maneuver of injection have no considerable effect in incidence of intravascular needle entrance.

  3. Dissociative anesthetic combination reduces intraocular pressure (IOP in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewaldo de Mattos-Junior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of three anesthetic combinations, ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine and tiletamine-zolazepam, on IOP in rabbits. In a experimental, blind, randomized, crossover study, six rabbits were anesthetized with each of 3 treatments in random order. Groups KM (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + midazolam, 1 mg/kg; KX (ketamine, 30 mg/kg + xylazine, 3 mg/kg; and TZ (tiletamine + zolazepam, 20 mg/kg. The drugs were mixed in the same syringe injected intramuscularly (IM into the quadriceps muscle. IOP was measured before drug administration (baseline and at 5-minute intervals for 30 minutes. The data were analyzed by a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by Bonferroni test. All groups had significant decreases in IOP compared to baseline (p 0.05. Administration of either ketamine-midazolam, ketamine-xylazine, or tiletamine-zolazepam similarly decrease IOP in rabbits within 30 minutes of injection.

  4. Hydrogel injection reduces rectal toxicity after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Berneking, Vanessa; Koenig, Liane; Frank, Dilini; Bretgeld, Marilou; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Injection of a hydrogel spacer before prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) is known to reduce the dose to the rectal wall. Clinical results from the patient's perspective are needed to better assess a possible benefit. A group of 167 consecutive patients who received prostate RT during the years 2010 to 2013 with 2-Gy fractions up to 76 Gy (without hydrogel, n = 66) or 76-80 Gy (with hydrogel, n = 101) were included. The numbers of interventions resulting from bowel problems during the first 2 years after RT were compared. Patients were surveyed prospectively before RT, at the last day of RT, and at a median of 2 and 17 months after RT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Baseline patient characteristics were well balanced. Treatment for bowel symptoms (0 vs. 11 %; p < 0.01) and endoscopic examinations (3 vs. 19 %; p < 0.01) were performed less frequently with a spacer. Mean bowel function scores did not change for patients with a spacer in contrast to patients without a spacer (mean decrease of 5 points) >1 year after RT in comparison to baseline, with 0 vs. 12 % reporting a new moderate/big problem with passing stools (p < 0.01). Statistically significant differences were found for the items ''loose stools'', ''bloody stools'', ''painful bowel movements'' and ''frequency of bowel movements''. Spacer injection is associated with a significant benefit for patients after prostate cancer RT. (orig.) [German] Bei der Radiotherapie (RT) des Prostatakarzinoms kann die Dosis an der Rektumwand durch die Injektion eines Hydrogelabstandhalters gesenkt werden. Klinische Ergebnisse aus der Sicht des Patienten sind zur Einschaetzung eines moeglichen Vorteils erforderlich. Eine Gruppe von 167 konsekutiven Patienten, die in den Jahren 2010-2013 eine Prostata-RT mit Einzeldosen von 2 bis 76 Gy (ohne Hydrogel, n = 66) bzw. 76-80 Gy (mit Hydrogel, n = 101

  5. Umbilical cord mesenchyme stem cell local intramuscular injection for treatment of uterine niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dazhi; Wu, Shuzhen; Ye, Shaoxin; Wang, Wen; Guo, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhengping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Uterine niche is defined as a triangular anechoic structure at the site of the scar or a gap in the myometrium at the site of a previous caesarean section. The main clinical manifestations are postmenstrual spotting and intrauterine infection, which may seriously affect the daily life of nonpregnant women. Trials have shown an excellent safety and efficacy for the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a therapeutic option for scar reconstruction. Therefore, this study is designed to investigate the safety and efficacy of using MSCs in the treatment for the uterine niche. Methods/design: This phase II clinical trial is a single-center, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled with 2 arms. One hundred twenty primiparous participants will be randomly (1:1 ratio) assigned to receive direct intramuscular injection of MSCs (a dose of 1∗107 cells in 1 mL of 0.9% saline) (MSCs group) or an identical-appearing 1 mL of 0.9% saline (placebo-controlled group) near the uterine incision. The primary outcome of this trial is to evaluate the proportion of participants at 6 months who is found uterine niche in the uterus by transvaginal utrasonography. Adverse events will be documented in a case report form. The study will be conducted at the Department of Obstetric of Southern Medical University Affiliated Maternal & Child Health Hospital of Foshan. Discussion: This trial is the first investigation of the potential for therapeutic use of MSCs for the management of uterine niche after cesarean delivery. Conclusion: This protocol will help to determine the efficacy and safety of MSCs treatment in uterine niche and bridge the gap with regards to the current preclinical and clinical evidence. Trial registration number: NCT02968459 (Clinical Trials.gov: http://clinicaltrials.gov/). PMID:29095305

  6. An Injectable System for Local and Sustained Release of Antimicrobial Agents in the Periodontal Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Laura; Cappelluti, Martino Alfredo; Ricotti, Leonardo; Lenardi, Cristina; Gerges, Irini

    2017-08-01

    Periodontitis treatments usually require local administration of antimicrobial drugs with the aim to reduce the bacterial load inside the periodontal pocket. Effective pharmaceutical treatments may require sustained local drug release for several days in the site of interest. Currently available solutions are still not able to fulfill the clinical need for high-quality treatments, mainly in terms of release profiles and patients' comfort. This work aims to fill this gap through the development of an in situ gelling system, capable to achieve controlled and sustained release of antimicrobial agents for medium-to-long-term treatments. The system is composed of micrometer-sized β-cyclodextrin-based hydrogel (bCD-Jef-MPs), featured by a strong hydrophilic character, suspended in a synthetic block-co-polymer solution (Poloxamer 407), which is capable to undergo rapid thermally induced sol-gel phase transition at body temperature. The chemical structure of bCD-Jef-MPs was confirmed by cross-correlating data from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, swelling test, and degradation kinetics. The thermally induced sol-gel phase transition is demonstrated by rheometric tests. The effectiveness of the described system to achieve sustained release of antimicrobial agents is demonstrated in vitro, using chlorhexidine digluconate as a drug model. The results achieved in this work disclose the potential of the mentioned system in effectively treating periodontitis lesions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Evaluation of two different dosages of local anesthetic solution used for ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block for pain relief and positioning for central neuraxial block in patients of fracture neck of the femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit A Karmarkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical management of the fracture femur is preferred so as to prevent complications associated with prolonged immobilization. Central neuraxial blockade (CNB is an attractive option for these patients, and an optimal positioning of the patient is a definite requirement. Owing to the pain associated with movement of the fractured limb, it becomes difficult for the patients to give suitable positioning. Femoral nerve block (FNB features as a rescue analgesia so as to provide adequate analgesia for facilitation of satisfactory positioning. Aim: This study aims to compare analgesic effect of two different dosages of local anesthetic (LA solution administered for ultrasonography (USG-guided FNB given to facilitate optimal positioning for conduct of CNB. Materials and Methods: After taking permission from the institutional review board, eighty patients were enrolled in the study to find out the efficacy of dosage of LA solution for FNB in providing pain relief caused by movement of fractured limb during conduct of regional anesthesia. Informed consent was taken. All patients were given USG-guided FNB. Patients were randomized using a computer-generated random number table, into two groups of forty patients each. Group A patients received USG-guided 12 ml of LA solution containing 10 ml lignocaine solution without preservative (2% plus 2 ml normal saline (NS, while Group B patients received USG-guided 15 ml of LA solution containing 13 ml lignocaine solution without preservative (2% plus 2 ml NS for positioning before combined spinal epidural. Results: A total of eighty patients, divided randomly into two groups, were enrolled in the study. Demographics (age, sex, weight, and American Society of Anesthesiologists grades were similar in both groups. No statistical significance was found in the numeric rating scale scores at baseline, zero minutes, 5, and 15 min in both the groups. Conclusion: USG-guided FNB with 12 ml of LA solution was

  8. Local injection of Lenti-Olig2 at lesion site promotes functional recovery of spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bo-Tao; Jiang, Long; Liu, Li; Yin, Ying; Luo, Ze-Ru-Xin; Long, Zai-Yun; Li, Sen; Yu, Le-Hua; Wu, Ya-Min; Liu, Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Olig2 is one of the most critical factors during CNS development, which belongs to b-HLH transcription factor family. Previous reports have shown that Olig2 regulates the remyelination processes in CNS demyelination diseases models. However, the role of Olig2 in contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) and the possible therapeutic effects remain obscure. This study aims to investigate the effects of overexpression Olig2 by lentivirus on adult spinal cord injury rats. Lenti-Olig2 expression and control Lenti-eGFP vectors were prepared, and virus in a total of 5 μL (10 8 TU/mL) was locally injected into the injured spinal cord 1.5 mm rostral and caudal near the epicenter. Immunostaining, Western blot, electron microscopy, and CatWalk analyzes were employed to investigate the effects of Olig2 on spinal cord tissue repair and functional recovery. Injection of Lenti-Olig2 significantly increased the number of oligodendrocytes lineage cells and enhanced myelination after SCI. More importantly, the introduction of Olig2 greatly improved hindlimb locomotor performances. Other oligodendrocyte-related transcription factors, which were downregulated or upregulated after injury, were reversed by Olig2 induction. Our findings provided the evidence that overexpression Olig2 promotes myelination and locomotor recovery of contusion SCI, which gives us more understanding of Olig2 on spinal cord injury treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Systemic and local immune response in pigs intradermally and intramuscularly injected with inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, P; Saleri, R; Cavalli, V; De Angelis, E; Ferrari, L; Benetti, M; Ferrarini, G; Merialdi, G; Borghetti, P

    2014-01-31

    The systemic and respiratory local immune response induced by the intradermal administration of a commercial inactivated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae whole-cell vaccine (Porcilis(®) MHYO ID ONCE - MSD AH) in comparison with two commercial vaccines administered via the intramuscular route and a negative control (adjuvant only) was investigated. Forty conventional M. hyopneumoniae-free pigs were randomly assigned to four groups (ten animals each): Group A=intradermal administration of the test vaccine by using the needle-less IDAL(®) vaccinator at a dose of 0.2 ml; Group B=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine B); Group C=intramuscular administration of the adjuvant only (2 ml of X-solve adjuvant); Group D=intramuscular administration of a commercially available vaccine (vaccine D). Pigs were vaccinated at 28 days of age. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples were collected at vaccination (blood only), 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. Serum and BAL fluid were tested for the presence of antibodies by ELISA test. Peripheral blood monomorphonuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated to quantify the number of IFN-γ secreting cells by ELISpot. Moreover, cytokine gene expression from the BAL fluid was performed. Total antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae and specific IgG were detected in serum of intradermally and intramuscularly (vaccine B only) vaccinated pigs at 4 and 8 weeks post-vaccination. M. hyopneumoniae specific IgA were detected in BAL fluid from vaccinated animals (Groups A and B) but not from controls and animals vaccinated with the bacterin D (padministration of an adjuvanted bacterin induces both systemic and mucosal immune responses. Moreover, the intramuscularly administered commercial vaccines each had a different ability to stimulate the immune response both systemically and locally. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. EMC3-EIRENE modeling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lore, J.D., E-mail: lorejd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reinke, M.L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); LaBombard, B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Churchill, R.M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Feng, Y. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ∼50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modeling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  11. Urinary bladder blood flow. I. Comparison of clearance of locally injected 99mtechnetium pertechnate and radioactive microsphere technique in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøyer, Kristian; Bülow, J; Nielsen, S L

    1990-01-01

    The blood flow of the dog urinary bladder measured by radioactive microsphere technique was compared to the clearance of locally injected 99mTechnetium pertechnate (99mTc) in the bladder wall. In semilogarithmic plots the 99mTc washout curves showed a multiexponential course. From the initial...... slopes (median 5.7 min) the bladder blood flow was calculated to be only 30-62% of the results obtained from the radioactive microsphere technique (blood flow in the muscular layer 21.7-44.8 ml/100 g/min). These lower values imply that the rate of removal of the hydrophilic tracer 99mTc at these flow...... blood flow....

  12. Local gas injection as a scrape-off layer diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonski, D.F.

    1996-05-01

    A capillary puffing array has been installed on Alcator C-Mod which allows localized introduction of gaseous species in the scrape-off layer. This system has been utilized in experiments to elucidate both global and local properties of edge transport. Deuterium fueling and recycling impurity screening are observed to be characterized by non-dimensional screening efficiencies which are independent of the location of introduction. In contrast, the behavior of non-recycling impurities is seen to be characterized by a screening time which is dependent on puff location. The work of this thesis has focused on the use of the capillary array with a camera system which can view impurity line emission plumes formed in the region of an injection location. The ionic plumes observed extend along the magnetic field line with a comet-like asymmetry, indicative of background plasma ion flow. The flow is observed to be towards the nearest strike-point, independent of x-point location, magnetic field direction, and other plasma parameters. While the axes of the plumes are generally along the field line, deviations are seen which indicate cross-field ion drifts. A quasi-two dimensional fluid model has been constructed to use the plume shapes of the first charge state impurity ions to extract information about the local background plasma, specifically the temperature, parallel flow velocity, and radial electric field. Through comparisons of model results with those of a three dimensional Monte Carlo code, and comparisons of plume extracted parameters with scanning probe measurements, the efficacy of the model is demonstrated. Plume analysis not only leads to understandings of local edge impurity transport, but also presents a novel diagnostic technique

  13. Local gas injection as a scrape-off layer diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, David F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A capillary puffing array has been installed on Alcator C-Mod which allows localized introduction of gaseous species in the scrape-off layer. This system has been utilized in experiments to elucidate both global and local properties of edge transport. Deuterium fueling and recycling impurity screening are observed to be characterized by non-dimensional screening efficiencies which are independent of the location of introduction. In contrast, the behavior of non-recycling impurities is seen to be characterized by a screening time which is dependent on puff location. The work of this thesis has focused on the use of the capillary array with a camera system which can view impurity line emission plumes formed in the region of an injection location. The ionic plumes observed extend along the magnetic field line with a comet-like asymmetry, indicative of background plasma ion flow. The flow is observed to be towards the nearest strike-point, independent of x-point location, magnetic field direction, and other plasma parameters. While the axes of the plumes are generally along the field line, deviations are seen which indicate cross-field ion drifts. A quasi-two dimensional fluid model has been constructed to use the plume shapes of the first charge state impurity ions to extract information about the local background plasma, specifically the temperature, parallel flow velocity, and radial electric field. Through comparisons of model results with those of a three dimensional Monte Carlo code, and comparisons of plume extracted parameters with scanning probe measurements, the efficacy of the model is demonstrated. Plume analysis not only leads to understandings of local edge impurity transport, but also presents a novel diagnostic technique.

  14. The Thermodynamics of General and Local Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Sasse-Middelhoff, Henrike; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    General anesthetics are known to cause depression of the freezing point of transitions in biomembranes. This is a consequence of ideal mixing of the anesthetic drugs in the membrane fluid phase and exclusion from the solid phase. Such a generic law provides physical justification of the famous Meyer-Overton rule. We show here that general anesthetics, barbiturates and local anesthetics all display the same effect on melting transitions. Their effect is reversed by hydrostatic pressure. Thus, the thermodynamic behavior of local anesthetics is very similar to that of general anesthetics. We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of heat capacity profiles of membranes in the presence of anesthetics. This analysis is able to describe experimentally observed calorimetric profiles and permits prediction of the anesthetic features of arbitrary molecules. In addition, we discuss the thermodynamic origin of the cutoff-effect of long-chain alcohols and the additivity of the effect of general and local anesthetics.

  15. A novel approach to scavenging anesthetic gases in rodent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jeffrey C; Krageschmidt, Dale A; Blanco, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory animal procedures using gas anesthetics may amass elevated waste gas concentrations in operating rooms if controls are not implemented for capturing and removing the vapors. Area sampling using an infrared analyzer indicated isoflurane concentrations likely to exceed occupational exposure guidelines. Our study showed environmental concentrations of oxygen as high as 40% and isoflurane concentrations >100 ppm when no controls or merely passive controls were utilized. These extraneous isoflurane emissions were determined to be originating from the pre-procedural induction process as well as the gas delivery nose cone. A novel waste gas collection cylinder was designed to enclose the gas delivery nose cone and animal head during the administration of anesthetic gases. The vented cylinder utilized a house vacuum to remove the waste anesthetic gases from the surgical field. A commercially available induction chamber designed to be actively and externally exhausted was used to lower concentrations during the induction process. With implementation of local exhaust ventilation controls, waste anesthetic gas concentrations decreased to below recommended occupational exposure levels. In vitro (sham) testing compared favorably to in vivo measurements validating the reduction capability of active ventilation during rodent anesthetic administration. In vivo isoflurane reductions for the induction chamber emissions, the operating room, and the surgeon's breathing zone were 95%, 60%, and 53%, respectively. The same measurements for an in vitro procedure were 98%, 84%, and 87%, respectively.

  16. When local anesthesia becomes universal: Pronounced systemic effects of subcutaneous lidocaine in bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Catherine; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2017-01-01

    Sodium channel blockers are commonly injected local anesthetics but are also routinely used for general immersion anesthesia in fish and amphibians. Here we report the effects of subcutaneous injection of lidocaine (5 or 50mgkg-1) in the hind limb of bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) on reflexes...... regained over 4h. Systemic sedative effects were not coupled to local anti-nociception, as a forceps pinch test at the site of injection provoked movement at the height of the systemic effect (tested at 81±4min). Amphibians are routinely subject to general anesthesia via exposure to sodium channel blockers...

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Pain Scores during Periodontal Probing with or without Anesthetic Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashank; Priyanka, Mandapathi; Pradeep, Koppolu; Reddy Pathakota, Krishnajaneya

    2016-01-01

    Context. The initial periodontal examination which includes full-mouth periodontal probing is one of the discomforting procedures for a patient. Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of two local anesthetic gels in the reduction of pain during periodontal probing using Florida probe in CGP patients in comparison with manual probing. Materials and Methods. Ninety systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe CGP patients were recruited. In each patient, the quadrants were randomly assigned to manual probing with UNC-15 probe, probing with Florida probe, and Florida probing with lidocaine 10% gel and with benzocaine 20% gel. In the quadrants undergoing probing with anesthetic gels, the sites were isolated and the gel was injected using syringe and a blunt-end cannula. Pain was measured using 10 mm horizontal VAS. Statistical Analysis. The analysis was carried out using SPSS version 18. The comparison of mean VAS scores was done using repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni test. Results. Mean VAS for manual probing was significantly more than Florida probing. Further, the mean VAS score for Florida probing was higher than the two gels. Conclusion. It is suggested that the gels might be useful in reducing pain experienced during full-mouth periodontal probing in patients with CGP.

  18. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 522.1704 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... general anesthetic in dogs and cats. Although it may be used as a general surgical anesthetic for horses... local anesthetic. It may also be used in dogs for the symptomatic treatment of strychnine poisoning. (ii...

  19. Formulações de anestésicos locais de liberação controlada: aplicações terapêuticas Formulaciones de anestésicos locales de liberación controlada: aplicaciones terapéuticas Drug-delivery systems for local anesthetics: therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Ribeiro de Araújo

    2003-09-01

    ésicos locales indican una nueva dirección en el desarrollo de formulaciones anestésicas más eficaces y seguras.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Many researchers in the last four decades have been devoted to the development of drug-delivery systems. Since its first application in the pharmaceutical industry, many results have been obtained especially in the molecular manipulation of carriers and their interaction with encapsulated drugs. These new carriers have the advantage of bypassing encapsulated drugs restraining physicochemical properties (such as water or membrane solubility, thus improving pharmacodynamics (therapeutic effect potentiation, pharmacokinetics (control of tissue absorption and distribution and toxic effects (lower local and systemic toxicity. Liposomes and cyclodextrins are among the most important carriers which have shown to be quite advantageous in the development of drug-delivery systems for local anesthetics. This study aimed at reviewing the interaction of local anesthetics with liposomes and cyclodextrins, the development of basic and applied research on the field, in addition to therapeutic applicability of these formulations. CONTENTS: Liposomes have the ability to control drug delivery to target tissues, fractionating drug release in its site of action. Cyclodextrins, on the other hand, change intensity and duration of effects due to low systemic drug absorption. Basic and clinical studies have pointed out that the administration of local anesthetics in liposome or cyclodextrin formulations induces slow release of the drugs, prolonging the anesthetic action and decreasing cardiac and nervous systems toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Although studies are still in progress, drug-delivery systems are flagging a new direction for the development of safer and more effective local anesthetic formulations.

  20. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Snoeck, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Marc SnoeckDepartment of Anaesthesia, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects wer...

  1. A novel segmentation method for uneven lighting image with noise injection based on non-local spatial information and intuitionistic fuzzy entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyan; Fan, Jiulun

    2017-12-01

    Local thresholding methods for uneven lighting image segmentation always have the limitations that they are very sensitive to noise injection and that the performance relies largely upon the choice of the initial window size. This paper proposes a novel algorithm for segmenting uneven lighting images with strong noise injection based on non-local spatial information and intuitionistic fuzzy theory. We regard an image as a gray wave in three-dimensional space, which is composed of many peaks and troughs, and these peaks and troughs can divide the image into many local sub-regions in different directions. Our algorithm computes the relative characteristic of each pixel located in the corresponding sub-region based on fuzzy membership function and uses it to replace its absolute characteristic (its gray level) to reduce the influence of uneven light on image segmentation. At the same time, the non-local adaptive spatial constraints of pixels are introduced to avoid noise interference with the search of local sub-regions and the computation of local characteristics. Moreover, edge information is also taken into account to avoid false peak and trough labeling. Finally, a global method based on intuitionistic fuzzy entropy is employed on the wave transformation image to obtain the segmented result. Experiments on several test images show that the proposed method has excellent capability of decreasing the influence of uneven illumination on images and noise injection and behaves more robustly than several classical global and local thresholding methods.

  2. Hydrogen-1 NMR relaxation time studies in membrane: anesthetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, L.M.A.; Fraceto, L.; Paula, E. de; Franzoni, L.; Spisni, A.

    1997-01-01

    The study of local anesthetics'(LA) interaction with model phospholipid membranes is justified by the direct correlation between anesthetic's hydrophobicity and its potency/toxicity. By the same reason, uncharged LA species seems to play a crucial role in anesthesia. Most clinically used LA are small amphiphilics with a protonated amine group (pKa around 8). Although both charged (protonated) and uncharged forms can coexist at physiological pH, it has been shown (Lee, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 514:95, 1978; Screier et al. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 769:231, 1984) that the real anesthetic pka can be down-shifted, due to differential partition into membranes, increasing the ratio of uncharged species at pH 7.4. We have measured 1 H-NMR longitudinal relaxation times (T 1 ) for phospholipid and three local anesthetics (tetracaine, lidocaine, benzocaine), in sonicated vesicles at a 3:1 molar ratio. All the LA protons have shown smaller T 1 in this system than in isotropic phases, reflecting LA immobilization caused by insertion in the membrane. T 1 values for the lipid protons in the presence of LA were analyzed, in an attempt to identify specific LA:lipid contact regions. (author)

  3. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlassakov KV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kamen V Vlassakov, Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific, representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index; index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000 biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009–2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0, only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1. Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009–2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100 and a high index of expectations (25.0, reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress. Keywords: anesthetics, anesthetic adjuvants, mortality, safety margins, therapeutic indices

  4. Two-year follow-up results of fluoroscopic cervical epidural injections in chronic axial or discogenic neck pain: a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Malla, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial. To assess the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for the management of axial or discogenic pain in patients without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain. Cervical discogenic pain without disc herniation is a common cause of suffering and disability in the adult population. Once conservative management has failed and facet joint pain has been excluded, cervical epidural injections may be considered as a management tool. Despite a paucity of evidence, cervical epidural injections are one of the most commonly performed nonsurgical interventions in the management of chronic axial or disc-related neck pain. One hundred and twenty patients without disc herniation or radiculitis and negative for facet joint pain as determined by means of controlled diagnostic medial branch blocks were randomly assigned to one of the 2 treatment groups. Group I patients received cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic (lidocaine 0.5%, 5 mL), whereas Group II patients received 0.5% lidocaine, 4 mL, mixed with 1 mL or 6 mg of nonparticulate betamethasone. The primary outcome measure was ≥ 50% improvement in pain and function. Outcome assessments included numeric rating scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), opioid intake, employment, and changes in weight. Significant pain relief and functional improvement (≥ 50%) was present at the end of 2 years in 73% of patients receiving local anesthetic only and 70% receiving local anesthetic with steroids. In the successful group of patients, however, defined as consistent relief with 2 initial injections of at least 3 weeks, significant improvement was illustrated in 78% in the local anesthetic group and 75% in the local anesthetic with steroid group at the end of 2 years. The results reported at the one-year follow-up were sustained at the 2-year follow-up. Cervical interlaminar epidural

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Versus Landmark-Guided Local Corticosteroid Injection for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Forogh, Bijan; Moeini-Taba, Seyed-Mohammad; Abedini, Amin; Kadkhodaie, Mona; Jahanjoo, Fateme; Eftekharsadat, Bina

    2018-04-01

    To review the literature and assess the comparative effectiveness of ultrasound-guided versus landmark-guided local corticosteroid injections in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase (Ovid), and Web of Science (from inception to February 1, 2017). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ultrasound-guided injection with landmark-guided injection in patients with CTS were included. Two authors independently screened abstracts and full texts. The outcomes of interest were Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) scores of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and 4 electrodiagnostic parameters, including compound muscle action potential (CMAP), sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), distal motor latency (DML), and distal sensory latency (DSL). Overall, 569 abstracts were retrieved and checked for eligibility; finally, 3 RCTs were included (181 injected hands). Pooled analysis showed that ultrasound-guided injection was more effective in SSS improvement (mean difference [MD], -.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.59 to -.32; P.99), DML (MD, .05; 95% CI, -.30 to .39; P=.80), or DSL (MD, .00; 95% CI, -.65 to .65; P>.99). This review suggested that ultrasound-guided injection was more effective than landmark-guided injection in symptom severity improvement in patients with CTS; however, no significant differences were observed in functional status or electrodiagnostic improvements between the 2 methods. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative study of the novel and conventional injection approach for inferior alveolar nerve block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsiriseth, K; Sirintawat, N; Arunakul, K; Wongsirichat, N

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of anesthesia obtained with a novel injection approach for inferior alveolar nerve block compared with the conventional injection approach. 40 patients in good health, randomly received each of two injection approaches of local anesthetic on each side of the mandible at two separate appointments. A sharp probe and an electric pulp tester were used to test anesthesia before injection, after injection when the patients' sensation changed, and 5 min after injection. This study comprised positive aspiration and intravascular injection 5% and neurovascular bundle injection 7.5% in the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block, but without occurrence in the novel injection approach. A visual analog scale (VAS) pain assessment was used during injection and surgery. The significance level used in the statistical analysis was pinferior alveolar nerve block by the novel injection approach provided adequate anesthesia and caused less pain and greater safety during injection. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of anesthetic efficacy of 2 and 4 % articaine in inferior alveolar nerve block for tooth extraction-a double-blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämmerer, P W; Schneider, D; Palarie, V; Schiegnitz, E; Daubländer, M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 % articaine and 4 % articaine in inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia for extraction of mandibular teeth. In 95 patients, 105 lower molar and premolar teeth were extracted after intraoral inferior alveolar nerve block. In 53 cases, 2 % articaine (group I) and, in 52 cases, 4 % articaine (group II) was administered. The primary objective was to analyze the differences of anesthetic effects between the two groups (complete/sufficient vs. insufficient/none). Furthermore, differences in pulpal anesthesia (onset and depth, examined with pulp vitality tester (min)), as well as in length of soft tissue anesthesia (min), were evaluated. Additionally, the need of a second injection, pain while injecting (numeric rating scale (NRS)), pain during treatment (NRS), pain after treatment (NRS), and other possible complications (excessive pain, bleeding events, prolonged deafness) were analyzed. Anesthesia was sufficient for dental extractions in both groups without significant differences (p = 0.201). The onset of anesthesia did not differ significantly (p = 0.297). A significantly shorter duration of soft tissue anesthesia was seen in group I (2.9 vs. 4 h; p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the need for a second injection (p = 0.359), in injection pain (p = 0.386), as well as in pain during (p = 0.287) or after treatment (p = 0.121). In both groups, no complications were seen. The local anesthetic effect of the 4 % articaine solution is not significantly better when compared to 2 % articaine. For mandibular tooth extraction, articaine 2 % may be used as alternative as well.

  8. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  9. Anesthetic Efficacy of Bupivacaine Solutions in Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Maria Cristina; Ranali, José; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; de Oliveira, Patrícia Cristine; Ambrosano, Glaúcia Maria Bovi; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 2 bupivacaine solutions. Twenty-two volunteers randomly received in a crossover, double-blinded manner 2 inferior alveolar nerve blocks with 1.8 mL of racemic bupivacaine and a mixture of 75% levobupivacaine and 25% dextrobupivacaine, both 0.5% and with 1 : 200,000 epinephrine. Before and after the injection, the first mandibular pre-molar was evaluated every 2 minutes until no response to the maximal output (80 reading) of the pulp tester and then again every 20 minutes. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon paired test and the paired t test. No differences were found between the solutions for onset and duration of pulpal anesthesia and duration of soft tissue anesthesia (P > .05). It was concluded that the solutions have similar anesthetic efficacy. PMID:16596912

  10. The safety of peri-articular local anaesthetic injection for patients undergoing total knee replacement with autologous blood transfusion: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D F; Emmett, S R; Kang, K K; Chahal, G S; Hiskens, R; Balasubramanian, S; McGuinness, K; Parsons, H; Achten, J; Costa, M L

    2012-12-01

    Intra-operative, peri-articular injection of local anaesthesia is an increasingly popular way of controlling pain following total knee replacement. At the same time, the problems associated with allogenic blood transfusion have led to interest in alternative methods for managing blood loss after total knee replacement, including the use of auto-transfusion of fluid from the patient's surgical drain. It is safe to combine peri-articular infiltration with auto-transfusion from the drain. We performed a randomised clinical trial to compare the concentration of local anaesthetic in the blood and in the fluid collected in the knee drain in patients having either a peri-articular injection or a femoral nerve block. Clinically relevant concentrations of local anaesthetic were found in the fluid from the drains of patients having peri-articular injections (4.92 μg/ml (sd 3.151)). However, none of the patients having femoral nerve blockade had detectable levels. None of the patients in either group had clinically relevant concentrations of local anaesthetic in their blood after re-transfusion. The evidence from this study suggests that it is safe to use peri-articular injection in combination with auto-transfusion of blood from peri-articular drains during knee replacement surgery.

  11. Diagnostic value of lumbar facet joint injection: a prospective triple cross-over study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Schütz

    Full Text Available The diagnosis "lumbar facet syndrome" is common and often indicates severe lumbar spine surgery procedures. It is doubtful whether a painful facet joint (FJ can be identified by a single FJ block. The aim of this study was to clarify the validity of a single and placebo controlled bilateral FJ blocks using local anesthetics. A prospective single blinded triple cross-over study was performed. 60 patients (31 f, 29 m, mean age 53.2 yrs (22-73 with chronic low back pain (mean pain persistance 31 months, 6 months of conservative treatment without success admitted to a local orthopaedic department for surgical or conservative therapy of chronic LBP, were included in the study. Effect on pain reduction (10 point rating scale was measured. The 60 subjects were divided into six groups with three defined sequences of fluoroscopically guided bilateral monosegmental lumbar FJ test injections in "oblique needle" technique: verum-(local anaesthetic-, placebo-(sodium chloride- and sham-injection. Carry-over and periodic effects were evaluated and a descriptive and statistical analysis regarding the effectiveness, difference and equality of the FJ injections and the different responses was performed. The results show a high rate of non-response, which documents the lack of reliable and valid predictors for a positive response towards FJ blocks. There was a high rate of placebo reactions noted, including subjects who previously or later reacted positively to verum injections. Equivalence was shown among verum vs. placebo and partly vs. sham also. With regard to test validity criteria, a single intraarticular FJ block with local anesthetics is not useful to detect the pain-responsible FJ and therefore is no valid and reliable diagostic tool to specify indication of lumbar spine surgery. Comparative FJ blocks with local anesthetics and placebo-controls have to be interpretated carefully also, because they solely give no proper diagnosis on FJ being main pain

  12. Effectiveness of lidocaine Denti patch ® system versus lidocaine gel as topical anesthetic agent in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Anwar Shehab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: New methods have been introduced to facilitate dental procedures, but the administration of local anesthesia is still necessary to perform pain control during several dental procedures. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of the lidocaine Denti-patch ® system versus the lidocaine topical anesthetic gel in children concerning pain reaction during injection. Materials and Methods: One hundred 9-12-year-old cooperative children weighing more than 29 kg in need of bilateral dental treatment requiring maxillary and mandibular injection and not suffering from acute pain as a result of pulpits on the day of treatment were selected. The children were then divided into two groups: Group 1 comprising of 50 children in need of bilateral maxillary treatment and Group 2 compromising of 50 children requiring bilateral mandibular treatment. These groups were further subdivided into subgroups A and B; those receiving Denti-patch ® on one side and lidocaine gel on the contralateral side, respectively. Pain or comfort was evaluated during injection using sound, eye, motor (SEM scale (objective method while, using faces pain rating scale (FPS scale (subjective method after injection by a trained assistant blinded to the procedure. Statistical Analysis Used: Comparison of the results was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed-ranks test for SEM and FPS score. Result: There was a statistically significant difference between the patch and the gel group for maxilla (P < 0.0001, as well as mandible (P = 0.01 with respect to SEM score given by the children. Similarly, with FPS scale, there was a statistically significant difference between the patch and the gel groups in both maxilla and mandible (P < 0.0001. However, there was no statistical difference between the patch Groups 1A and IIA or the gel Groups 1B and II B. Conclusion: The Denti-patch ® system can significantly reduce the needle injection pain more than the gel.

  13. The ultrasound-guided retrolaminar block: volume-dependent injectate distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanovska M

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Marija Damjanovska,1 Tatjana Stopar Pintaric,1,2 Erika Cvetko,2 Kamen Vlassakov3 1Clinical Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; 2Institute of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: The ultrasound-guided retrolaminar block is one of the newer and simpler alternatives to the traditional, often technically challenging, paravertebral (PV block. Its feasibility, safety, and efficacy have already been clinically demonstrated in patients with multiple rib fractures using higher volumes of local anesthetic, when compared with the traditional approach. The primary aim of this observational anatomical study was to assess the spread of local anesthetic from the retrolaminar injection point to the PV space and its volume dependence. Second, we assessed the incidence of epidural and contralateral PV spread in the both groups.Methods: Ten fresh porcine cadavers were randomized into 2 groups (n=5 each to receive ultrasound-guided retrolaminar injections at Th4-Th5 level with either 10 mL (low-volume group or 30 mL (high-volume group of 2% lidocaine and methylene blue mixture. After the procedure, the cadavers were dissected and frozen. Cross-section cuts (~1 cm thick were performed to evaluate the injectate spread.Results: In the high-volume group, injectate spread from the retrolaminar to the PV space was observed in all specimens (5 out of 5; 100%, while in the low-volume group, no apparent spread to the PV space was found (0 out of 5; 0%. No epidural or contralateral PV spread was observed in any of the specimens.Conclusion: Following ultrasound-guided retrolaminar injections in fresh porcine cadavers, injectate spread from the retrolaminar tissue plane to the PV space is strongly volume dependent

  14. Effectiveness of cervical epidural injections in the management of chronic neck and upper extremity pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Sudhir; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Bryce, David A; Geffert, Stephanie; Hameed, Haroon; Sharma, Manohar Lal; Abdi, Salahadin; Falco, Frank J E

    2012-01-01

    , psychological status, return to work, and reduction in opioid intake. For this systematic review, 34 studies were identified. Of these, 24 studies were excluded and a total of 9 randomized trials, with 2 duplicate studies, met inclusion criteria for methodological quality assessment. For cervical disc herniation, the evidence is good for cervical epidural with local anesthetic and steroids; whereas, it was fair with local anesthetic only. For axial or discogenic pain, the evidence is fair for local anesthetic, with or without steroids. For spinal stenosis, the evidence is fair for local anesthetic, with or without steroids. For postsurgery syndrome, the evidence is fair for local anesthetic, with or without steroids. The limitations of this systematic review continue to be the paucity of literature. The evidence is good for radiculitis secondary to disc herniation with local anesthetics and steroids, fair with local anesthetic only; whereas, it is fair for local anesthetics with or without steroids, for axial or discogenic pain, pain of central spinal stenosis, and pain of post surgery syndrome.

  15. Pain Perception: Computerized versus Traditional Local Anesthesia in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, M; Kumar, A; Srivastava, D; Sharma, P; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    Local anesthetic injection is one of the most anxiety- provoking procedure for both children and adult patients in dentistry. A computerized system for slow delivery of local anesthetic has been developed as a possible solution to reduce the pain related to the local anesthetic injection. The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare pain perception rates in pediatric patients with computerized system and traditional methods, both objectively and subjectively. It was a randomized controlled study in one hundred children aged 8-12 years in healthy physical and mental state, assessed as being cooperative, requiring extraction of maxillary primary molars. Children were divided into two groups by random sampling - Group A received buccal and palatal infiltration injection using Wand, while Group B received buccal and palatal infiltration using traditional syringe. Visual Analog scale (VAS) was used for subjective evaluation of pain perception by patient. Sound, Eye, Motor (SEM) scale was used as an objective method where sound, eye and motor reactions of patient were observed and heart rate measurement using pulse oximeter was used as the physiological parameter for objective evaluation. Patients experienced significantly less pain of injection with the computerized method during palatal infiltration, while less pain was not statistically significant during buccal infiltration. Heart rate increased during both buccal and palatal infiltration in traditional and computerized local anesthesia, but difference between traditional and computerized method was not statistically significant. It was concluded that pain perception was significantly more during traditional palatal infiltration injection as compared to computerized palatal infiltration, while there was no difference in pain perception during buccal infiltration in both the groups.

  16. A comparative trial of ice application versus EMLA cream in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsantali A

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Adel Alsantali Department of Dermatology, King Fahd Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Background: Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis, but the associated pain from injections limits the usefulness of this method of treatment. Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA cream versus ice application in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis. Methods: In this prospective study, 23 patients underwent palm Botox injections to treat their excessive sweating. In each patient, EMLA cream was applied to one palm and ice was applied directly before the injections in the other palm. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale. Results: Statistically, there was a significant difference in pain control between EMLA cream group and ice application group (p<0.05. The average pain score on the hands where EMLA cream was applied was 8.9 (SD=0.81, whereas it was 4.8 (±0.9 in the ice group. Conclusion: In this study, the successful use of ice application in reducing pain by 40% in comparison to EMLA cream during Botox toxin injection for palmar hyperhidrosis is demonstrated.Keywords: ice, local anesthetics, EMLA, palmar hyperhidrosis, Botox injection, pain reduction

  17. Anesthetic drugs accelerate the progression of postoperative metastases of mouse tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, J; Jersky, J; Katzav, S; Feldman, M; Segal, S

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were made to investigate the effect of four anesthetic drugs that are commonly used in surgical practice on the postoperative growth of mouse tumors in syngeneic recipients. These experiments revealed that some of the anesthetics when applied for surgical excision of the local tumor, strongly accelerated postoperative progression of spontaneous lung metastases produced by the 3LL Lewis lung carcinoma and by the B16 melanoma. Some of the drugs caused the appearance of metastases in...

  18. Extraction of mandibular premolars and molars: comparison between local infiltration via pressure syringe and inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Daniel G E; Schnaith, Florian; Van Aken, Caroline M E; Köntges, Anne; Kumar, Vinay V; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Kämmerer, Peer W

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficiency of local infiltration anesthesia administered with a pressure syringe (P-INF) via a special technique versus direct block anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve (IANB) for tooth extraction in the posterior mandible. In a prospective randomized study, 101 teeth in 101 patients were extracted in the posterior mandible under local anesthesia whereby two different administration techniques were used (P-INF n = 48; IANB n = 53). Primary objectives were comparisons of anesthetic success rate (yes/no) and efficacy (full/sufficient vs. insufficient). Secondary objectives were patients' pain perception during treatment, pain of injection (numerical rating scale), need for second injections (always IANB), time until onset of anesthetic action (min), and duration of local numbness (min). IANB was successful in all cases, whereas initial P-INF achieved 35% of success only. Furthermore, IANB reached significant higher values of anesthetic efficacy compared to P-INF (P block anesthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve (IANB) turned out to be more proficient to local infiltration via special delivering system with a special technique. Infiltration, even when performed with 4% articaine and a pressure syringe system, is not a suitable method of anesthesia in the posterior mandible.

  19. Reinforcement of spinal anesthesia by epidural injection of saline: a comparison of hyperbaric and isobaric tetracaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y; Mimura, M; Hazama, K; Namiki, A

    2000-04-25

    An epidural injection of saline was reported to extend spinal anesthesia because of a volume effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the baricity of spinal local anesthetics upon the extension of spinal anesthesia by epidural injection of saline. Forty patients undergoing elective lower-limb surgery were randomly allocated to four groups of 10 patients each. Group A received no epidural injection after the spinal administration of hyperbaric tetracaine (dissolved in 10% glucose). Group B received an epidural injection of 8 ml of physiological saline 20 min after spinal hyperbaric tetracaine. Group C received no epidural injection after spinal isobaric tetracaine (dissolved in physiological saline). Group D received an epidural injection of 8 ml of saline 20 min after spinal isobaric tetracaine. The level of analgesia was examined by the pinprick method at 5-min intervals. The levels of analgesia 20 min after spinal anesthesia were significantly higher in hyperbaric groups than in isobaric groups [T5 (T2-L2) vs. T7 (T3-12)]. After epidural injection of saline, the levels of analgesia in groups B and D were significantly higher than in groups A and C. The segmental increases after epidural saline injection were 2 (0-3) in group B and 2 (1-7) in group D. Sensation in the sacral area remained 20 min after spinal block in one patient in group D; however, it disappeared after epidural saline injection. In this study, 8 ml of epidural saline extended spinal analgesia. However, there was no difference between the augmenting effect in isobaric and hyperbaric spinal anesthesia. We conclude that the reinforcement of spinal anesthesia by epidural injection of saline is not affected by the baricity of the spinal anesthetic solution used.

  20. Repeated dose intramuscular injection of the CIMAvax-EGF vaccine in Sprague Dawley rats induces local and systemic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancebo, A; Casacó, A; González, B; Ledón, N; Sorlozabal, J; León, A; Gómez, D; González, Y; Bada, A M; González, C; Arteaga, M E; Ramírez, H; Fuentes, D

    2012-05-09

    CIMAvax-EGF consists of a human recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF), coupled to P64k, a recombinant carrier protein from N. meningitis, and Montanide ISA 51 as adjuvant. The vaccine immunization induces a specific antibody production, inhibiting the EGF/EGF-R interaction through EGF deprivation. The objective of this study was to assess the CIMAvax-EGF toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats after intramuscular administration of repeated doses (6 months) and at the same time to determine if rat is a relevant species for studying CIMAvax-EGF vaccine. Rats were randomly distributed into four groups: control, Montanide ISA 51, treated with 1× and 15× of human total dose of the antigen. Animals were immunized weekly during 9 weeks, plus 9 immunizations every 14 days. Rats were inspected daily for clinical signs. Body weight, food consumption, and rectal temperature were measured during the administration of doses. Blood samples were collected for hematological, serum biochemical determinations and EGF titles at the beginning, three months and at the end of experimentation. Gross necropsy and histological examination of tissues were performed on animals at the end of the assay. Vaccine provoked the apparition of antibodies against EGF in the rats, demonstrating rat species relevance in these studies. Body weight gain, food and water consumption were not affected. CIMAvax-EGF and Montanide ISA 51 produced local damage at the administration site, showing multiple cysts and granulomas. Both vaccine-treated groups showed neutrophil elevation, besides an AST increase probably related to the damage at the administration site. Rectal temperature was found to be significantly higher in 15× treated group after immunizations, probably induced by the inflammatory process at the injection site. In summary, the clinical pathology findings together with the body temperature results, appear to be caused by the inflammatory reaction at the administration site of the vaccine, mainly

  1. Intra-articular hip injection: does pain relief correlate with radiographic severity of osteoarthritis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshmukh, Ajit J.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Panagopoulos, Georgia; Alizadeh, Ahmadreza; Klein, Devon A.

    2011-01-01

    Intra-articular injection is being used widely for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in the hip. However, its efficacy is not always predictable in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to determine whether the degree of radiographic severity of OA was predictive of the response to intra-articular injection of local anesthetic with corticosteroid and to determine the relationship between immediate pain relief resulting from the anesthetic and delayed pain relief resulting from corticosteroid administration. This retrospective study included 217 patients (220 injections) with diagnosis of hip OA who underwent a fluoroscopically guided therapeutic hip injection of local anesthetic and corticosteroid. Hip radiographs were scored using the Kellgren-Lawrence scale. Immediate and delayed pain relief was documented using a visual analog scale. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate whether age, gender or radiographic severity of OA were independent predictors of pain relief. Degree of agreement between immediate and delayed response was assessed with the kappa coefficient. Immediate pain relief was reported in 68.2% of hips and delayed relief in 71.4% of hips. A high level of agreement was observed between immediate and delayed pain relief (kappa = 0.80, p < 0.001). 94% of patients reporting immediate relief also reported relief 2 weeks later. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that neither gender nor age was related to immediate or delayed pain relief. Only severity of OA (based on radiographic analysis) was observed to be predictive of pain relief. Pain relief following intra-articular hip injection correlated with radiographic severity of OA. This intervention may be of therapeutic and prognostic value in patients awaiting hip arthroplasty. (orig.)

  2. Anesthetic action of volatile anesthetics by using Paramecium as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Xia, Huimin; Xu, Younian; Xin, Naixing; Liu, Jiao; Zhang, Shihai

    2012-06-01

    Although empirically well understood in their clinical administration, volatile anesthetics are not yet well comprehended in their mechanism studies. A major conundrum emerging from these studies is that there is no validated model to assess the presumed candidate sites of the anesthetics. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized and served as a model organism in the study of anesthetics. We assessed the motion of Paramecium cells with Expert Vision system and the chemoresponse of Paramecium cells with T-maze assays in the presence of four different volatile anesthetics, including isoflurane, sevoflurane, enflurane and ether. Each of those volatiles was dissolved in buffers to give drug concentrations equal to 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 EC50, respectively, in clinical practice. We could see that after application of volatile anesthetics, the swimming of the Paramecium cells was accelerated and then suppressed, or even stopped eventually, and the index of the chemoresponse of the Paramecium cells (denoted as I ( che )) was decreased. All of the above impacts were found in a concentration-dependent fashion. The biphasic effects of the clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics on Paramecium simulated the situation of high species in anesthesia, and the inhibition of the chemoresponse also indicated anesthetized. In conclusion, the findings in our studies suggested that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized with clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics and therefore be utilized as a model organism to study the mechanisms of volatile anesthetics.

  3. A Case of Sublingual Ranula That Responded Successfully to Localized Injection Treatment with OK-432 after Healing from Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yoshizawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A ranula is a mucus retention cyst or pseudocyst caused by leakage of mucus from the sublingual gland and generally occurs in the oral floor. In addition, drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS is a rare but well-recognized serious adverse effect characterized by fever, skin rashes, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, and hepatosplenomegaly and oral stomatitis. This paper presents the first case of successfully treated sublingual ranula with localized injection of OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome, which has previously been unreported in the literature. We present the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with sublingual ranula that responded successfully to localized injection treatment with OK-432 after healing from drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome. She was affected with cutaneous myositis and interstitial lung disease when she was 26 years old. At the age 34 years, she received additional oral treatment of diaminodiphenyl-sulfone due to deterioration of the cutaneous myositis, which resulted in drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS with severe oral stomatitis. Local injection of OK-432 to the ranula may be a very safe and useful treatment method even if the patient has a history of drug allergy and has connective tissue disease such as cutaneous myositis.

  4. The concept of "compartment allergy": prilocaine injected into different skin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wobser Marion

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We herein present a patient with delayed-type allergic hypersensitivity against prilocaine leading to spreading eczematous dermatitis after subcutaneous injections for local anesthesia with prilocaine. Prilocaine allergy was proven by positive skin testing and subcutaneous provocation, whereas the evaluation of other local anesthetics - among them lidocaine, articaine and mepivacaine - did not exhibit any evidence for cross-reactivity. Interestingly, our patient repeatedly tolerated strictly deep subcutaneous injection of prilocaine in provocation testing while patch and superficial subcutaneous application mounted strong allergic responses. We hypothesize, that lower DC density in deeper cutaneous compartments and/or different DC subsets exhibiting distinct functional immunomodulatory properties in the various layers of the skin may confer to the observed absence of clinical reactivity against prilocaine after deep subcutaneous injection. The term compartment allergy indicates that the route of allergen administration together with the targeted immunologic environment orchestrates on the immunologic outcome: overt T-cell mediated allergy or clinical tolerance.

  5. Sodium channels as targets for volatile anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl F. Herold

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of modern inhaled anesthetics although widely used in clinical settings are still poorly understood. Considerable evidence supports effects on membrane proteins such as ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels of excitable cells. Na+ channels are crucial to action potential initiation and propagation, and represent potential targets for volatile anesthetics. Inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels leads to reduced neurotransmitter release at the synapse and could therefore contribute to the mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics produce their characteristic effects: amnesia, unconsciousness, and immobility. Early studies on crayfish and squid giant axon showed inhibition of Na+ currents by volatile anesthetics. Subsequent studies using native neuronal preparations and heterologous expression systems with various mammalian Na+ channel isoforms implicated inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels in anesthetic actions. Volatile anesthetics reduce peak Na+ current and shift the voltage of half-maximal steady-state inactivation towards more negative potentials, thus stabilizing the fast-inactivated state. Furthermore recovery from fast-inactivation is slowed together with an enhanced use-dependent block during pulse train protocols. These effects can reduce neurotransmitter release by depressing presynaptic excitability, depolarization and Ca entry, and ultimately transmitter release. This reduction in transmitter release is more portent for glutamatergic vs. GABAergic terminals. Involvement of Na+ channel inhibition in mediating the immobility caused by volatile anesthetics has been demonstrated in animal studies, in which intrathecal infusion of the Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin increases volatile anesthetic potency, whereas infusion of the Na+ channels agonist veratridine reduces anesthetic potency. These studies indicate that inhibition of presynaptic Na+ channels by volatile anesthetics is involved in mediating some of

  6. Avaliação da Densidade dos anestésicos locais e da combinação com adjuvantes: estudo em laboratório Evaluación de la densidad de los anestésicos locales y de la combinación con adyuvantes: estudio en laboratorio Assessment of the densities of local anesthetics and their combination with adjuvants: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2009-04-01

    adyuvantes a 20ºC, 25ºC y 37ºC en evaluación laboratorial. MÉTODO: La densidad (g.mL-1 se midió con la ayuda de un densímetro DMA 450 sensible a ± 0.00001 g.mL-1. La densidad y sus variaciones con la temperatura se obtuvieron de todos los anestésicos locales y de sus combinaciones con opioides a 20°C, 25°C y 37°C. La solución es hiperbárica si su densidad excede a 1.00099, la solución es hipobárica cuando la densidad está por debajo de 1,00019 y es isobárica cuando la densidad es mayor que 0,00019 y menor que 1,00099. RESULTADOS: Ambos anestésicos locales y los adyuvantes, arrojan una reducción de la densidad cuando se aumenta la temperatura. A 37°C, todas las soluciones que contienen glucosa son hiperbáricas. Con la falta de glucosa, todas las soluciones son hipobáricas. A 37°C, morfina, fentanil, sufentanil y clonidina son hipobáricas. CONCLUSIONES: La densidad de los anestésicos locales y adyuvantes se reduce con el aumento de la temperatura y aumenta con la adición de glucosa. El conocimiento de la baricidad, densidad relativa, ayuda a la selección del anestésico local más adecuado y de los adyuvantes para uso subaracnoideo.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The relative density of a local anesthetic in relation to that of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF at 37° C is one of the most important physical properties that affect the level of analgesia obtained after the subarachnoid administration of the drug. The objective of this study was to determine the density of local anesthetic solutions, with and without glucose, and the combination of the local anesthetic with adjuvants at 20° C, 25° C, and 37° C. METHODS: The density (g.mL-1 was determined by using a DMA 450 densimeter with a sensitivity of ± 0.00001 g.mL-1. The densities, and variations, according to the temperature were obtained for all local anesthetics and their combination with opioids at 20ºC, 25°C, and 37°C. The solution is hyperbaric if its density exceeds 1.00099, hypobaric when

  7. [Case-control study on local injection of autoallergic platelet rich plasma or whole blood for the treatment of tennis elbow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Lai; Tong, Pei-Jian; Xiao, Lu-Wei; Zhu, Qiu-Liang; Xu, Bin; Yan, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-01

    To compare therapeutic effects of local injection with autoallergic platelet rich plasma (PRP) or autoallergic whole blood (AWB) for the treatment of chronic tennis elbow. From January 2011 to January 2014, 40 patients with chronic tennis elbow were divided into 2 groups, 20 cases in each group: PRP group and AWB group. There were 20 patients in PRP group treated with local injection of autoallergic platelet rich plasma, including 5 males and 15 females, with an average age of (47.50 ± 9.86) years old; and the average course of disease was (4.67 ± 3.27) months. Among the 20 patients in AWB group treated with local injection of autoallergic whole blood, 3 patients were male and 17 patients were female, with an average age of (46.50 ± 9.96) years old;and the average course of disease was (4.53 ± 2.27) months. The elbow joint was fixed with elastic stockings after injection. All the patients were guided to do strengthening and extension exercises during the follow-up period. Visual analog scale (VAS), Mayo scores for elbow and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were used to evaluate clinical effects after injection immediately and 4,8 weeks after treatment. Results:All the patients were followed up,there were no infections and swelling occurred. The VAS, Mayo and PPT scores of patients in PRP group were improved from pre-therapy 7.22 ± 1.32, 56.71 ± 10.90 and 17.47 ± 4.62 to 2.73 ± 1.00, 91.59 ± 6.95 and 21.35 ± 4.80 respectively 8 weeks after treatment. The VAS, Mayo and PPT scores of patients in AWB group were improved from pre-therapy 7.16 ±1.27, 54.72 ± 8.36 and 17.06 ± 4.83 to 3.81 ± 1.36, 82.06 ± 7.89 and 20.12 ± 4.97 respectively 8 weeks after treatment. All the pain and functional variables including VAS, PPT, and Mayo scores were improved significantly in both groups 4 weeks after injection. On the 4th week after injection, there was no statistically significant difference in PPT between two groups; while the VAS and Mayo score of AWB group were

  8. Cardiovascular responses to microinjections of GABA or anesthetics into the rostral ventrolateral medulla of conscious and anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacerda J.E.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM contains neurons involved in tonic and reflex control of arterial pressure. We describe the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and anesthetics injected into the RVLM of conscious and urethane (1.2 g/kg, iv anesthetized Wistar rats (300-350 g. In conscious rats, bilateral microinjection of GABA (50 nmol/200 nl induced a small but significant decrease in blood pressure (from 130 ± 3.6 to 110 ± 5.6 mmHg, N = 7. A similar response was observed with sodium pentobarbital microinjection (24 nmol/200 nl. However, in the same animals, the fall in blood pressure induced by GABA (from 121 ± 8.9 to 76 ± 8.8 mmHg, N = 7 or pentobarbital (from 118 ± 4.5 to 57 ± 11.3 mmHg, N = 6 was significantly increased after urethane anesthesia. In contrast, there was no difference between conscious (from 117 ± 4.1 to 92 ± 5.9 mmHg, N = 7 and anesthetized rats (from 123 ± 6.9 to 87 ± 8.7 mmHg, N = 7 when lidocaine (34 nmol/200 nl was microinjected into the RVLM. The heart rate variations were not consistent and only eventually reached significance in conscious or anesthetized rats. The right position of pipettes was confirmed by histology and glutamate microinjection into the RVLM. These findings suggest that in conscious animals the RVLM, in association with the other sympathetic premotor neurons, is responsible for the maintenance of sympathetic vasomotor tone during bilateral RVLM inhibition. Activity of one or more of these premotor neurons outside the RVLM can compensate for the effects of RVLM inhibition. In addition, the effects of lidocaine suggest that fibers passing through the RVLM are involved in the maintenance of blood pressure in conscious animals during RVLM inhibition.

  9. A miniature silicon diode matrix detector for in vivo measurement of 133Xe disappearance following local tissue injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, K; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Rasmussen, H B

    1992-01-01

    have the capability of measuring the lowest energies (25-40 keV) of gamma and x-ray emitters with sufficient efficiency when applied on the skin surface and close to the indicator depot. The purpose of the present study was firstly to evaluate a portable Si photodiode matrix detector system, composed...... and sensitivity within the range 20-38 degrees C and calibrated to +/- 1% between diodes. The in vivo investigations comprised two SC injections on humans with four measuring periods for comparison, and four SC and five SM injections on dogs, resulting in eight and five measuring periods for comparison. Only when...

  10. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Andrea; Baroni, Stefano; Marudi, Andrea; Valzania, Franco; Feletti, Alberto; Benuzzi, Francesca; Bertellini, Elisabetta; Pavesi, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients' neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic-sedative medication is increasing. Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC) protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management. The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure. In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used.

  11. Comparison of Sedation With Local Anesthesia and Regional Anesthesia in Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Aghamohammadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP is usually performed under regional or general anesthesia. An alternative to conventional anesthesia is performing of TURP under local anesthetic infiltration with sedation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and complication of sedoanalgesia in TURP. Material & Methods: In a prospective clinical trial from September 2006 to December 2007, 60 patients (30 in each group with prostate hypertrophy, candidate for TURP, were randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group, standard spinal anesthesia was done. In the second group, five minutes before the operation, 25 mgs of diazepam plus 25-50 mgs of pethedine was intravenously administered followed by injection of 10 ml lidocaine 2% gel in the urethra and the skin in the suprapubic area was anesthetized with 2 ml of 1% lidocaine. Using a 22 gauge nephrostomy needle, the suprapubic skin was punctured and the needle was directed toward prostate apex and 10-20ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at the serosal aspect of the rectal wall. For dorsal nerve block, 5-10ml of 1% lidocaine was injected at penopubic junction, and then a standard TURP was performed. Patients were switched to another anesthetic technique if the selected technique failed. Severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale. Results: The average prostate size was 25 grs (range10-50grs in the local anesthetic group (group 1 and 27.5 grs (range 10-50 grs in the spinal group (group2. In the local anesthetic group, 82.3% had no or mild pain while moderate to severe pain was reported in 16, 7% of the patients. In the group with spinal anesthesia, these were 93.1% and 6.9% respectively. Intolerable pain was observed in 23.3% and 13.8% of groups 1 and 2 respectively (p>0.05. Two patients in spinal group and 5 in local anesthetic group (3 due to severe pain and 2 for unsatisfaction required conversion to general anesthesia or receiving

  12. 99mTc-HDP SPECT-CT Aids Localization of Joint Injections in Degenerative Joint Disease of the Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthipun, Arum; Moser, Joanna; Mok, Wing; Paramithas, Anton; Hamilton, Paul; Sott, Andrea Helene

    2015-08-01

    Pain relating to degenerative joint disease within the foot and ankle can be difficult to localize with clinical examination alone due to the complex anatomy of the joints. The aim of this study was to determine whether single-photon emission computed tomography combined with conventional computed tomography (SPECT-CT) could be used to localize the site of degenerative joint disease for intra-articular injection and thereby improve the clinical success of the procedure. A prospective study was performed involving 203 patients who had undergone triple-phase (99m)Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate bone scans with SPECT-CT of the foot and ankle for degenerative joint disease. Fifty-two patients went on to have joint injections for degenerative joint disease, with clinical follow-up. Correlation with the clinical diagnosis and the outcome of intra-articular injections with 0.5% bupivacaine and 80 mg of Depo-Medrone was performed. A successful outcome was determined by an improvement in the visual analog pain score of at least 50%. In 19 (37%) patients, the site of degenerative joint disease determined by SPECT-CT differed from the initial clinical assessment and resulted in a change in management. Overall, 46 (88%) patients showed an improvement in symptoms. The study demonstrated a high clinical success rate for SPECT-CT-guided joint injections. The technique was useful in localizing degenerative joint disease of the ankle, hindfoot, and midfoot as an adjunct to clinical examination. Level IV, case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. A Prodrug Approach Involving In Situ Depot Formation to Achieve Localized and Sustained Action of Diclofenac After Joint Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Mette; Agårdh, Li; Larsen, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Long-acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug formulations for intra-articular injection might be effective in the management of joint pain and inflammation associated sports injuries and osteoarthritis. In this study, a prodrug-based delivery system was evaluated. The synthesized diclofenac...

  14. Spinal CT-guided injections. Clinical applications-limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatakis, V.; Vlachou, I.; Petrocheilou, G.; Safarika, V.; Geroukis, I.; Petinelli, A.; Stathopoulou, S.; Kokkinis, C.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Chronic spinal pain is an important health issue with serious social and financial consequences. Thus, application of minimal invasive procedures is a popular technique for immediate relief of pain. Objectives and tasks: Our purpose is to present CT guided intraspinal injection of pharmaceutical agents for the relief of persistent pain. Material and methods: Chronic localized or radicular spinal pain may be treated safely and efficiently with injection of various pharmaceutical agents (local anesthetic, opioid analgesic and steroids or combination of these). The possible sites of infiltration include: a) intervertebral joints (facets), b) sacroiliac joints, c)perineural infiltration of the affected nerve roots and d) the epidural space. We will mention the patients choice criteria (combination of clinical symptoms and specific pain evaluation questionnaire) as they are reported in the international bibliography. Finally, we will discuss the repeatability criteria of the method as well as its limitations. Results: CT-guided pharmaceutical agents injection for the relief of persistent spinal pain have an advantage against other methods because of the precision and safety that they offer to the localization and diagnosis of the pain cause. Conclusion: Small complications percentage and satisfactory results have made CT-guided spinal injections a popular technique for chronic back pain relief. In order to apply these techniques the good knowledge of the method, its possibilities and limitations is necessary

  15. General anesthetics in children: neurotoxic or neuroprotective?

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    Jéssica Farias Rebouças

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: general anesthetics are involved in neuroprotection in adults after ischemic events and cognitive impairment, thus, they also may be associated with learning disorders in children exposed to them before three years of age. Objective: Describe about the neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics in experimental animals and children. Method: This is a systematic review, performed from search in databases and on PubMed using the keywords "neurotoxicity" and "general anesthetics," and "general anesthetics," "neurotoxicity", "children", "young child "and" pediatric ". Results: The search resulted in 185 articles. Out of these, 78 met our inclusion criteria. We found that there was a significant evidence of neurotoxicity induced by general anesthetics in experimental animals that were just born, resulting in late and permanent cognitive deficits. This effect was associated with multiple exposures, exposure length of time and combination of drugs. However, some studies found cognitive impairment after a single exposure to anesthetic. Conclusion: There is insufficient evidence to state that general anesthetics are neurotoxic and have the potential to trigger learning and behavior disabilities in children. However, we suggest caution in indicating surgery in children under three years old, analyzing risk-benefit and inserting the family in the decision process.   Keywords: Neurotoxicity; Neuroprotection; Cognitive Impairment; Children; General Anesthesics

  16. The newer aspect of dexmedetomidine use in dentistry: As an additive to local anesthesia, initial experience, and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Thepra, Manju; Bhagol, Amrish; Priya, Kannu; Singh, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of a wide variety of pharmacological agents in the field of anesthesia, there has always been a continuous search for newer local anesthetic agents with improved efficacy, potency, and better handling properties. Dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, is an emerging agent for provision of additive local anesthetic effect if used with conventional local anesthetics, which can be implicated in dentistry for performing many minor oral surgical procedures. The present paper reports a pilot study comparing clinical efficacy and potency of this newer emerging drug in combination with lignocaine. Ten patients undergoing orthodontic extraction for correction of malocclusion and other dentofacial deformities requiring orthodontic treatment were locally infiltrated with 2% lignocaine plus dexmedetomidine 1μ/ml and 2% lignocaine plus adrenaline in 1:200,000 dilution at two different appointments. The onset of action, duration of action, and pain threshold were assessed. Onset of action was found to be faster with longer duration of action with the newer drug dexmedetomidine and lignocaine combination when compared with combination of lignocaine and adrenaline. The study demonstrated that the combination of dexmedetomidine with lignocaine enhances the local anesthetic potency of lignocaine without significant systemic effects when locally injected into oral mucosa.

  17. Exchange Sex Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in the New York Metropolitan Area: The Importance of Local Context, Gender and Sexual Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Suzan M; Rivera, Alexis V; Reilly, Kathleen H; Anderson, Bridget J; Bolden, Barbara; Wogayehu, Afework; Neaigus, Alan; Braunstein, Sarah

    2018-02-21

    Exchanging sex for money or drugs is known to increase risk for HIV among persons who inject drugs (PWID). To better understand determinants of exchange sex among PWID we examined factors associated with exchange sex in the New York metropolitan area-defined as New York City (NYC), NY; Newark, NJ; and Long Island, NY-using data from the 2012 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system cycle on injection drug use. Of the 1160 PWID in this analysis, 24% reported exchange sex, with differences in gender and sexual identity by location. In multivariable analysis gay/bisexual men, heterosexual women, and lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) women were more likely to exchange sex compared to heterosexual men. Exchange sex was also associated with race/ethnicity, homelessness, incarceration, location, and non-injection crack and cocaine use. We find that heterosexual women and LGB women who injected drugs residing in Newark were more likely to report exchange sex compared to NYC. This study highlights how local conditions impact exchange sex.

  18. Combined Use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheet Transplantation and Local Injection of SDF-1 for Bone Repair in a Rat Nonunion Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangnan; Fang, Tingting; Qi, Yiying; Yin, Xiaofan; Di, Tuoyu; Feng, Gang; Lei, Zhong; Zhang, Yuxiang; Huang, Zhongming

    2016-10-01

    Bone nonunion treatments pose a challenge in orthopedics. This study investigated the joint effects of using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets with local injection of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) on bone formation. In vitro, we found that migration of MSCs was mediated by SDF-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, stimulation with SDF-1 had no direct effect on the proliferation or osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, the results indicated elevated expression levels of bone morphogenetic protein 2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and vascular endothelial growth factor in MSC sheets compared with MSCs cultured in medium. New bone formation in fractures was evaluated by X-ray, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, Safranin-O staining, and immunohistochemistry in vivo. In the rat bone fracture model, the MSC sheets transplanted into the injured site along with injection of SDF-1 showed significantly more new bone formation within the gap. Moreover, at 8 weeks, complete bone union was obtained in this group. In contrast, the control group showed nonunion of the bone. Our study suggests a new strategy involving the use of MSC sheets with a local injection of SDF-1 for hard tissue reconstruction, such as the healing of nonunions and bone defects.

  19. Effects of lidocaine injections into the lateral parabrachial nucleus on dipsogenic and pressor response to central angiotensin 2 in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menani, Jose Vanderlei; Beltz, Terry G.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the local anesthetic, lidocaine, into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on the dipsogenic and pressor responses induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of angiotensin 2 (ANG 2). Centrally injected ANG 2 (50 ng/1 microliter) induced water intake ( IO.2 +/- 0.8 ml/h) and pressor responses (22 +/- 1 mmHg). Prior bilateral injection of 10% lidocaine (200 nl) into the LPBN increased the water intake (14.2 +/- 1.4 ml/h), but did not change the pressor response (17 +/- 1 mmHg) to i.c.v. ANG 2. Lidocaine alone injected into the LPBN also induced a pressor response (23 +/- 3 mmHg). These results showing that bilateral LPBN injection of lidocaine increase water intake induced bv i.c.v. ANG 2 are consistent with electrolytic and neurotoxic lesion studies and suggest that the LPBN is associated with inhibitory mechanisms controlling water intake induced by ANG 2. These results also provide evidence that it is feasible to reversibly anesthetize this brain area to facilitate fluid-related ingestive behavior.

  20. The Effect of Progesterone on Lipid Peroxidation and in Rat Alzheimer Model by Local Injection of Streptozotocin

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    M Mozafari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most prevalent brain neurodegenerative diseases and the most common cognitive deficits are memory dysfunction and spatial perception impairment. Progesterone has a neorostroid action in hippocampal neurogenesis, synaptic stability and spatial learning and memory and has antioxidant effect. Since oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and conflicting results were reported about the effects of progesterone on therefore in Alzheimer’s, the present study investigated the effect of microinjection of three doses of progesterone on the process of spatial memory and lipid peroxidation and total peroxidation in the hippocampus in the experimental model of AD. Methods: 42 adult male Wistar rats weighting 250±50 g were randomly divided into six main groups (n=7: control group, sham group, Alzheimer’s model (intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, Alzheimer model + progesterone (0.5, 1.5, 2µg/kg. 2 weeks after injection of streptozotocin (3 mg/kg, Alzheimer's was induced then progesterone injected in different doses. After termination of behavioral testing days, the hippocampus was removed to measure the levels of oxidative stress parameter to measure levels of oxidative stress parameters. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Results showed that intraventricular injection of STZ decreased spatial memory in comparison to control group (P<0.001. Administration progesterone significantly improved spatial memory in experimental models of Alzheimer's rats (P<0.001. MDA and SOD in all doses of progesterone showed a significant reduction compared to the AD animals (P<0.001. Conclusion: Progesterone can prevent a decrease in spatial learning and memory by reducing oxidative stress in the hippocampus of rats with Alzheimer's.

  1. Elevated Hemoglobin A1C Levels Correlate with Blood Glucose Elevation in Diabetic Patients following Local Corticosteroid Injection in the Hand: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nayoung; Schroeder, Jake; Hoffler, C Edward; Matzon, Jonas L; Lutsky, Kevin F; Beredjiklian, Pedro K

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic patients develop hand conditions that are managed with local corticosteroid injections. Injections can result in a transient elevation in serum glucose in diabetic patients. Hemoglobin A1c is the accepted measure of long-term plasma glucose control in diabetics (levels ≥7 percent reflect poor blood glucose control). The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between hemoglobin A1c levels and increased blood glucose levels after corticosteroid injections. Twenty-five diabetic patients were evaluated prospectively. One milliliter containing 10 mg of triamcinolone acetonide was used. The most recent hemoglobin A1c level and normal average blood glucose levels were obtained. Glucose levels were obtained from patient recall of their daily blood glucose self- monitoring on the day of the injection. Postinjection blood glucose levels were recorded until levels returned to preinjection baseline. Twenty patients (80 percent) had elevation of their blood glucose level from baseline. No patient had elevated blood glucose levels after 5 days. Patients with hemoglobin A1c levels greater than or equal to 7 percent had a higher blood glucose elevation and maintained this for longer than those who had a lower hemoglobin A1c level. Patients in the higher hemoglobin A1c group also had a higher number of hyperglycemic events. There was a strong or moderate correlation between hemoglobin A1c and elevated blood glucose levels during days 1 to 4. Patients with hemoglobin A1c levels greater than or equal to 7 percent have elevations in blood glucose that are higher and last longer than patients with lower levels. Hemoglobin A1c levels can be used to roughly predict the degree of blood glucose elevation after corticosteroid injections into the hands of diabetic patients.

  2. Evaluating the Effects of local Injections of Bupivacaine and Triamcinolone Acetate on Shoulder Joint Pain and Restricted Range of Motion Following Cerebrovascular Accidents

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    Asadollah Saadat Niaki M.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder pain is a common complication of cerebrovascular accidents. This study was conducted to assess the effects of local injections of bupivacaine and triamcinolone acetate on shoulder joint pain and on restricted range of motion following brain events. Methods: This single-blind clinical trial study included 35 patients with chronic shoulder pain (the controls and 35 patients with chronic shoulder pain due to brain events (the case group. The study was done at Imam Hossein Hospital & Gandhi Day Clinic during the year 2008-2010. The patients in the two groups received bupivacaine and triamcinolone acetate for subacromial bursa injection and suprascapular nerve block by following the protocol described by Dangoisse et al. The patients were followed up for 12 weeks and they were evaluated for pain and range of motion 1, 6, and 12 weeks after the injections.Results: The mean age of the patients was 60.9±9.07 years. Statistically significant improvements in pain score (P=0.001 and shoulder joint range of motion (P=0.001 were observed in patients with chronic shoulder pain versus patients with brain events 12 weeks after suprascapulare nerve block and subacromial bours injections by bupivacaine and triamcinolone acetate.Conclusion: Suprascapular nerve block and subacromial bursa injections of bupivacaine and triamcinolone acetate is a safe and efficacious treatment for the treatment of chronic shoulder pain and restricted range of motion but it is not efficacious or of significant value for the treatment of shoulder pain in patients with brain events.

  3. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  4. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Simpson, Colleen; Roof, James; Arthurs, Sandy; Korssjoen, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  5. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Titration calorimetry of anesthetic-protein interaction: negative enthalpy of binding and anesthetic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, I; Yamanaka, M

    1997-04-01

    Anesthetic potency increases at lower temperatures. In contrast, the transfer enthalpy of volatile anesthetics from water to macromolecules is usually positive. The transfer decreases at lower temperature. It was proposed that a few selective proteins bind volatile anesthetics with negative delta H, and these proteins are involved in signal transduction. There has been no report on direct estimation of binding delta H of anesthetics to proteins. This study used isothermal titration calorimetry to analyze chloroform binding to bovine serum albumin. The calorimetrically measured delta H cal was -10.37 kJ.mol-1. Thus the negative delta H of anesthetic binding is not limited to signal transduction proteins. The binding was saturable following Fermi-Dirac statistics and is characterized by the Langmuir adsorption isotherms, which is interfacial. The high-affinity association constant, K, was 2150 +/- 132 M-1 (KD = 0.47 mM) with the maximum binding number, Bmax = 3.7 +/- 0.2. The low-affinity K was 189 +/- 3.8 M-1 (KD = 5.29 mM), with a Bmax of 13.2 +/- 0.3. Anesthetic potency is a function of the activity of anesthetic molecules, not the concentration. Because the sign of delta H determines the temperature dependence of distribution of anesthetic molecules, it is irrelevant to the temperature dependence of anesthetic potency.

  7. Inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit in anesthetized rats by a Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin

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    L.E.A. Troncon

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a fraction (T1 of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom prepared by gel filtration on gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in male Wistar rats. Fasted animals were anesthetized with urethane, submitted to tracheal intubation and right jugular vein cannulation. Scorpion toxin (250 µg/kg or saline was injected iv and 1 h later a bolus of saline (1.0 ml/100 g labeled with 99m technetium-phytate (10 MBq was administered by gavage. After 15 min, animals were sacrificed and the radioactivity remaining in the stomach was determined. Intestinal transit was evaluated by instillation of a technetium-labeled saline bolus (1.0 ml through a cannula previously implanted in the duodenum. After 60 min, the progression of the marker throughout 7 consecutive gut segments was estimated by the geometric center method. Gastric retention of the liquid test meal in rats injected with scorpion toxin (median: 88%; range: 52-95% was significantly higher (P<0.02 than in controls (54%; 21-76%, an effect which was not modified by gastric secretion blockade with ranitidine. The progression of the isotope marker throughout the small intestine was significantly slower (P<0.05 in rats treated with toxin (1.2; 1.0-2.5 than in control animals (2.3; 1.0-3.2. Inhibition of both gastric emptying and intestinal transit in rats injected with scorpion toxin suggests an increased resistance to aboral flow, which might be caused by abnormal neurotransmitter release or by the local effects of venom on smooth muscle cells.

  8. Local injection of the 90Y-labelled peptidic vector DOTATOC to control gliomas of WHO grades II and III: an extended pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, T.; Mueller-Brand, J.; Hofer, S.; Wasner, M.; Zimmerer, S.; Gratzl, O.; Merlo, A.; Eichhorn, K.; Freitag, P.; Probst, A.; Reubi, J.-C.; Maecke, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously presented preliminary observations on targeting somatostatin receptor-positive malignant gliomas of all grades by local injection of the radiolabelled peptidic vector 90 Y-DOTATOC. We now report on our more thorough clinical experience with this novel compound, focussing on low-grade and anaplastic gliomas. Small peptidic vectors have the potential to target invisible infiltrative disease within normal surrounding brain tissue, thereby opening a window of opportunity for early intervention. Five progressive gliomas of WHO grades II and III and five extensively debulked low-grade gliomas were treated with varying fractions of 90 Y-DOTATOC. The vectors were locally injected into the resection cavity or into solid tumour. The activity per single injection ranged from 555 to 1,875 MBq, and the cumulative activity from 555 to 7,030 MBq, according to tumour volumes and eloquence of the affected brain area, yielding dose estimates from 76±15 to 312±62 Gy. Response was assessed by the clinical status, by steroid dependence and, every 4-6 months, by magnetic resonance imaging and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. In the five progressive gliomas, lasting responses were obtained for at least 13-45 months without the need for steroids. Radiopeptide brachytherapy had been the only modality applied to counter tumour progression. Interestingly, we observed the slow transformation of a solid, primarily inoperable anaplastic astrocytoma into a resectable multi-cystic lesion 2 years after radiopeptide brachytherapy. Based on these observations, we also assessed the feasibility of local radiotherapy following extensive debulking, which was well tolerated. Targeted beta-particle irradiation based on diffusible small peptidic vectors appears to be a promising modality for the treatment of malignant gliomas. (orig.)

  9. Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in the Dorsal Periaqueductal Gray Unmasks the Antinociceptive Effect of Local Injections of Anandamide in Mice

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    Diego C. Mascarenhas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Divergent results in pain management account for the growing number of studies aiming at elucidating the pharmacology of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid anandamide (AEA within several pain-related brain structures. For instance, the stimulation of both Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptors led to paradoxical effects on nociception. Here, we attempted to propose a clear and reproducible methodology to achieve the antinociceptive effect of exogenous AEA within the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG of mice exposed to the tail-flick test. Accordingly, male Swiss mice received intra-dPAG injection of AEA (CB1/TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist, WIN (CB1 agonist, AM251 (CB1 antagonist, and 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin (6-IODO (TRPV1 selective antagonist and their nociceptive response was assessed with the tail-flick test. In order to assess AEA effects on nociception specifically at vanilloid or cannabinoid (CB substrates into the dPAG, mice underwent an intrinsically inactive dose of AM251 or 6-IODO followed by local AEA injections and were subjected to the same test. While intra-dPAG AEA did not change acute pain, local injections of capsaicin or WIN induced a marked TRPV1- and CB1-dependent antinociceptive effect, respectively. Regarding the role of AEA specifically at CB/vanilloid substrates, while the blockade of TRPV1 did not change the lack of effects of intra-dPAG AEA on nociception, local pre-treatment of AM251, a CB1 antagonist, led to a clear AEA-induced antinociception. It seems that the exogenous AEA-induced antinociception is unmasked when it selectively binds to vanilloid substrates, which might be useful to address acute pain in basic and perhaps clinical trials.

  10. Drug interactions: volatile anesthetics and opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, P S; Gan, T J; Howell, S; Ginsberg, B

    1997-09-01

    Multiple drugs are used to provide anesthesia. Volatile anesthetics are commonly combined with opioids. Several studies have demonstrated that small doses of opioid (i.e., within the analgesic range) result in a marked reduction in minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of the volatile anesthetic that will prevent purposeful movement in 50% of patients at skin incision). Further increases in opioid dose provide only a further small reduction in MAC. Thus, a ceiling effect of the opioid is observed at a MAC value of the volatile anesthetic equal to its MAC awake. Recovery from anesthesia when an opioid is combined with a volatile anesthetic is dependent on the rate of decrease of both drugs to their respective concentrations that are associated with adequate spontaneous ventilation and awakening. Through an understanding of the pharmacodynamic interaction of volatile anesthetics with opioids and the pharmacokinetic processes responsible for the recovery from drug effect, optimal dosing schemes can thus be developed. A review of these pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic principles that will allow clinicians to administer drugs to provide a more optimal anesthetic is provided.

  11. Methodical bias for comparison of periodontal ligament injection and local infiltration anesthesia for routine extractions in the maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kämmerer PW

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Peer W Kämmerer, Monika Daubländer Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, University Medical Centre Mainz, Mainz, GermanyWe read the article by Al-Shayyab1 with great interest, though we think that there is a methodical bias. Usage of standard dental syringes with 27-gauge needles is not recommended for periodontal ligament (PDL injections as they are very unlikely to achieve the correct pressure needed for successful single tooth anesthesia. In accordance with this, specialized syringes with short 30-gauge needles are commonly used all over the literature.2 The author addresses this in the “Discussion” section and writes that “a standard conventional dental syringe was used in the present study, not a special PDL syringe, since the former is readily available in the clinic and proves equally successful when a standard 27-gauge short needle was used,” citing Malamed from 1982 (a time during which the modern PDL syringes were not developed yet3 and Madan et al who write that “intraligamentary injection technique is equally effective when a standard 27-gauge needle is used”.4 The second assumption refers to the needle only, not the syringe. In addition, this needle issue is not proven by any reference or study. Therefore, one might come to the conclusion that PDL was not carried out correctly. Also, the authors did not evaluate pulp or tissue anesthesia and started the extraction procedure after a latency period of 5 minutes in all cases. In accordance with this, the success rates of the PDL injection cannot be given, but would be of interest.View the original paper by Al-Shayyab and colleagues.

  12. Outcomes After Diagnostic Hip Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T Sean; Steinhaus, Michael E; Popkin, Charles A; Ahmad, Christopher S; Rosneck, James

    2016-08-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of outcomes associated with local anesthetic (LA) or LA and corticosteroid (CS) diagnostic hip injections, and how well response predicts subsequent operative success. A systematic review from database (PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Embase) inception to January 2015 for English-language articles reporting primary patient outcomes data was performed, excluding studies with >50% underlying osteoarthritis. Studies were assessed by 2 reviewers who collected pertinent data. Seven studies were included, reporting on a total 337 patients undergoing diagnostic hip injection. The mean age was 34.4 years, with 5 studies reporting 94 (35.2%) males and 173 (64.8%) females. One study examined the rate of pain relief with LA (92.5%); 2 CS studies reported relief on a scale from 0% to 100% (no to complete relief), ranging from 61% to 82.3%; and 3 studies used 10-point pain scales, with a CS study noting a pain score of 1.0, an LA study with a score of 3.03, and 1 study using either CS or LA scores of 3 to 5.6. Duration of pain relief was 9.8 (CS) and 2.35 days (LA). By pathology, greatest relief was achieved in acetabular chondral injury (93.3%) and least in cam impingement (81.6%), with clinical and imaging findings being unreliable predictors of relief. One study showed nonresponse to be a strong predictor of negative surgical outcome for femoroacetabular impingement. Diagnostic hip injections provide substantial pain relief for patients with various hip pathologies, with limited data to suggest greatest relief for those with chondral injury. Clinical and imaging findings are unreliable predictors of injection response, and nonresponse to injection is a strong negative predictor of surgical outcome. Future research should focus on elucidating differences by underlying pathology and predicting future operative success. Level IV, systematic review. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, J Bart; de Bie, Rob; de Vet, Henrica Cw; Hildebrandt, Jan; Nelemans, Patty

    2008-07-16

    The effectiveness of injection therapy for low-back pain is still debatable. Heterogeneity of target tissue, pharmacological agent and dosage generally found in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) points to the need for clinically valid comparisons in a literature synthesis. To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low-back pain. We updated the search of the earlier systematic review and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from January 1999 to March 2007 for relevant trials reported in English, French, German, Dutch and Nordic languages. We also screened references from trials identified. RCTs on the effects of injection therapy involving epidural, facet or local sites for subacute or chronic low-back pain were included. Studies which compared the effects of intradiscal injections, prolotherapy or Ozone therapy with other treatments, were excluded unless injection therapy with another pharmaceutical agent (no placebo treatment) was part of one of the treatment arms. Studies about injections in sacroiliac joints and studies evaluating the effects of epidural steroids for radicular pain were also excluded. Two review authors independently assessed the quality of the trials. If study data were clinically and statistically too heterogeneous to perform a meta-analysis, we used a best evidence synthesis to summarize the results. The evidence was classified into five levels (strong, moderate, limited, conflicting or no evidence), taking into account the methodological quality of the studies. 18 trials (1179 participants) were included in this updated review. The injection sites varied from epidural sites and facet joints (i.e. intra-articular injections, peri-articular injections and nerve blocks) to local sites (i.e. tender- and trigger points). The drugs that were studied consisted of corticosteroids, local anesthetics and a variety of

  14. Acute Neuroinflammatory Response in the Substantia Nigra Pars Compacta of Rats after a Local Injection of Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmin M. Flores-Martinez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Models of Parkinson’s disease with neurotoxins have shown that microglial activation does not evoke a typical inflammatory response in the substantia nigra, questioning whether neuroinflammation leads to neurodegeneration. To address this issue, the archetypal inflammatory stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, was injected into the rat substantia nigra. LPS induced fever, sickness behavior, and microglial activation (OX42 immunoreactivity, followed by astrocyte activation and leukocyte infiltration (GFAP and CD45 immunoreactivities. During the acute phase of neuroinflammation, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10 responded differentially at mRNA and protein level. Increased NO production and lipid peroxidation occurred at 168 h after LPS injection. At this time, evidence of neurodegeneration could be seen, entailing decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunoreactivity, irregular body contour, and prolongation discontinuity of TH+ cells, as well as apparent phagocytosis of TH+ cells by OX42+ cells. Altogether, these results show that LPS evokes a typical inflammatory response in the substantia nigra that is followed by dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  15. A prodrug approach involving in situ depot formation to achieve localized and sustained action of diclofenac after joint injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thing, Mette; Ågårdh, Li; Larsen, Susan; Rasmussen, Rune; Pallesen, Jakob; Mertz, Nina; Kristensen, Jesper; Hansen, Martin; Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Claus Selch

    2014-12-01

    Long-acting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug formulations for intra-articular injection might be effective in the management of joint pain and inflammation associated sports injuries and osteoarthritis. In this study, a prodrug-based delivery system was evaluated. The synthesized diclofenac ester prodrug, a weak base (pKa 7.52), has relatively high solubility at low pH (6.5 mg mL(-1) at pH 4) and much lower solubility at physiological pH (4.5 μg mL(-1) at pH 7.4) at 37°C. In biological media including 80% (v/v) human synovial fluid (SF), the prodrug was cleaved to diclofenac mediated by esterases. In situ precipitation of the prodrug was observed upon addition of a concentrated slightly acidic prodrug solution to phosphate buffer or SF at pH 7.4. The degree of supersaturation accompanying the precipitation process was more pronounced in SF than in phosphate buffer. In the rotating dialysis cell model, a slightly acidic prodrug solution was added to the donor cell containing 80% SF resulting in a continuous appearance of diclofenac in the acceptor phase for more than 43 h after an initial lag period of 8 h. Detectable amounts of prodrug were found in the rat joint up to 8 days after knee injection of the acidic prodrug solution. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Acute Neuroinflammatory Response in the Substantia Nigra Pars Compacta of Rats after a Local Injection of Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Barrios, Juan A.; Gutierrez-Castillo, Maria E.

    2018-01-01

    Models of Parkinson's disease with neurotoxins have shown that microglial activation does not evoke a typical inflammatory response in the substantia nigra, questioning whether neuroinflammation leads to neurodegeneration. To address this issue, the archetypal inflammatory stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was injected into the rat substantia nigra. LPS induced fever, sickness behavior, and microglial activation (OX42 immunoreactivity), followed by astrocyte activation and leukocyte infiltration (GFAP and CD45 immunoreactivities). During the acute phase of neuroinflammation, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-4, and IL-10) responded differentially at mRNA and protein level. Increased NO production and lipid peroxidation occurred at 168 h after LPS injection. At this time, evidence of neurodegeneration could be seen, entailing decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity, irregular body contour, and prolongation discontinuity of TH+ cells, as well as apparent phagocytosis of TH+ cells by OX42+ cells. Altogether, these results show that LPS evokes a typical inflammatory response in the substantia nigra that is followed by dopaminergic neurodegeneration. PMID:29854828

  17. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeck, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects were not generally significantly different from those of other short-acting local anesthetics like lidocaine, prilocaine, and chloroprocaine, and there is no conclusive evidence demonstrating above-average neurotoxicity. Articaine proved to be suitable and safe for procedures requiring a short duration of action in which a fast onset of anesthesia is desired, eg, dental procedures and ambulatory spinal anesthesia, in normal and in special populations. PMID:22915899

  18. Articaine: a review of its use for local and regional anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snoeck M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Marc SnoeckDepartment of Anaesthesia, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: Articaine is an intermediate-potency, short-acting amide local anesthetic with a fast metabolism due to an ester group in its structure. It is effective with local infiltration or peripheral nerve block in dentistry, when administered as a spinal, epidural, ocular, or regional nerve block, or when injected intravenously for regional anesthesia. In comparative trials, its clinical effects were not generally significantly different from those of other short-acting local anesthetics like lidocaine, prilocaine, and chloroprocaine, and there is no conclusive evidence demonstrating above-average neurotoxicity. Articaine proved to be suitable and safe for procedures requiring a short duration of action in which a fast onset of anesthesia is desired, eg, dental procedures and ambulatory spinal anesthesia, in normal and in special populations.Keywords: articaine, regional anesthesia, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use, tolerability, neurotoxicity

  19. Accidental intraoral formalin injection: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dandriyal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Formalin is a hazardous chemical that needs cautious handling and special storage. Owing to its disinfectant and fixative (i.e. for preserving pathologic tissue specimens in histopathology properties, it is widely used in dentistry. Although, the terms formaldehyde and formalin are often confused as being identical, these are different as to the concentrations of the primary component i.e. formaldehyde. In fact, the common fixative available as 10% neutral buffered formalin is actually a 4% solution of formaldehyde (i.e., a 10% solution made from a 37-40% commercially pure formaldehyde solution. This case report describes an unfortunate case of accidental injection instead of local anesthetic, of formalin into the pterygomandibular space in a 35-year old woman during inferior alveolar nerve block for surgical removal of impacted lower right third molar and its successful management by cautious debridement (under both local and general anesthesia and empirical drug therapy (utilizing analgesics and antibiotics.

  20. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized divertor impurity injection on Alcator C-Mod using the edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J. D.; Reinke, M. L.; Lipschultz, B.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in Alcator C-Mod to assess the level of toroidal asymmetry in divertor conditions resulting from poloidally and toroidally localized extrinsic impurity gas seeding show a weak toroidal peaking (∼1.1) in divertor electron temperatures for high-power enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas. This is in contrast to similar experiments in Ohmically heated L-mode plasmas, which showed a clear toroidal modulation in the divertor electron temperature. Modeling of these experiments using the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE [Y. Feng et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 241, 930 (1997)] qualitatively reproduces these trends, and indicates that the different response in the simulations is due to the ionization location of the injected nitrogen. Low electron temperatures in the private flux region (PFR) in L-mode result in a PFR plasma that is nearly transparent to neutral nitrogen, while in H-mode the impurities are ionized in close proximity to the injection location, with this latter case yielding a largely axisymmetric radiation pattern in the scrape-off-layer. The consequences for the ITER gas injection system are discussed. Quantitative agreement with the experiment is lacking in some areas, suggesting potential areas for improving the physics model in EMC3-EIRENE

  1. Phase I/II study of radiotherapy in combination with local injection of H2O2 (KORTUC II) for advanced or relapsed cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashihara, Kenichi; Honda, Chikara; Yamashita, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Between January 2009 and June 2011, 29 patients with advanced or relapsed cancer were treated with radiotherapy and local injection of H 2 O 2 as a radiation sensitizer (KORTUC II) in our Clinic. They included head and neck cancer (n=8), breast cancer (n=7), GI tract cancer (n=6) and others (n=8). The 10/29 patients had a history of local irradiation at the previous hospitals. The 4/29 patients stopped during the treatment, 3 of them were due to the poor general conditions not due to this treatment, and only one was due to local pain. This therapy was tolerable for almost patients. We analysed the local response of twelve patients irradiated more than BED2.050 Gy. One patient with breast DCIS had stable disease at 1 month after the therapy. The local effectiveness of 11/12 patients was PR. Radiotherapy with KORTUG II is safe and effective, it may become a main treatment for radio-resistant tumor. (author)

  2. A comparison of two intraosseous anesthetic techniques in mandibular posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallatin, Juliane; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel

    2003-11-01

    A number of studies have evaluated the Stabident (Fairfax Dental, Miami) intraosseous anesthesia technique. A second intraosseous technique--the X-tip system (X-tip Technologies, Lakewood, N.J.)--has been introduced, but no scientific studies have yet compared its effectiveness to that of the Stabident system. The authors undertook a study to compare the two systems' anesthetic outcomes in primary intraosseous injections in mandibular posterior teeth. The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered a primary Stabident intraosseous injection and a primary X-tip intraosseous injection, at two separate appointments, to 41 subjects. Subjects were asked if they perceived an increase in heart rate with the intraosseous injections. The research team blind-tested each subject's first molar, second molar and second premolar with a pulp tester at two-minute cycles for 60 minutes after the injection. Anesthesia was considered successful when two consecutive pulp tester readings of 80 were obtained. Anesthetic success rates for the Stabident technique and the X-tip technique, respectively, were 93 percent and 93 percent for the first molar; 95 percent and 95 percent for the second molar; and 81 percent and 83 percent for the second premolar, with no significant differences (P > .05) between the two techniques. For both intraosseous techniques, onset of pulpal anesthesia occurred within the first two minutes, but the duration of anesthesia declined steadily over the 60 minutes. Eighty-five percent of the subjects had a perceived increase in heart rate with the Stabident injection and 93 percent with the X-tip injection, with no significant differences (P > .05) between the techniques. The two primary intraosseous injection techniques were similar regarding anesthetic success, onset, duration and perceived heart rate increases.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of glucocorticosteriod binding sites in rat brain after in vivo injection of [3H]RU 28362

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrieau, Alain; Dussaillant, Monique; Rostene, William

    1988-01-01

    The autoradiographic distribution of glucocorticosteriod binding sites in the brain of adrenalectomized rats was studied following in vivo injection of a potent synthetic glucocorticosteriod agonist [ 3 H]RU 28362. Analysis of the autoradiograms revealed a specific and dense labelling in the pyramidal cell layer of the Ammon's horn and in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the hypothalmus, the labelling was particularly high in the paraventricular nucleus (site of CRF synthesis), the arcuate, periventricular and the supraoptic nuclei as well as in the median eminence. Autoradiograms also revealed the presence of[ 3 H]RU 28362 binding sites in several brain regions including the amygdala, the pineal gland, the entorhinal cortex, the interpeduncular, interfascicular and dorsal raphe nuclei, the central grey and the substantia nigra suggesting possible effects of glucocorticosteriods in these structures (author)

  4. How Much Volume of Local Anesthesia and How Long Should You Wait After Injection for an Effective Wrist Median Nerve Block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Lyndsay M; Chishti, Yasmin Z; Woodland, Jennifer L; Lalonde, Donald H

    2018-05-01

    Many surgeons and emergentologists use non-ultrasound-guided wrist nerve blocks. There is little evidence to guide the ideal volume of local anesthesia or how long we should wait after injection before performing pain-free procedures. This pilot study examined time to maximal anesthesia to painful needle stick in 14 volunteer participants receiving bilateral wrist blocks of 6 versus 11 mL of local. One surgeon performed all 14 bilateral wrist median nerve blocks in participants who remained blinded until after bandages were applied to their wrist. No one could see which wrist received the larger 11-mL volume injection versus the 6-mL block. Blinded sensory assessors then measured perceived maximal numbness time and numbness to needle stick pain in the fingertips of the median nerve distribution. Failure to get a complete median nerve block occurred in seven of fourteen 6-mL wrist blocks versus failure in only one of fourteen 11-mL blocks. Perceived maximal numbness occurred at roughly 40 minutes after injection, but actual numbness to painful needle stick took around 100 minutes. Incomplete median nerve numbness occurred with both 6- and 11-mL non-ultrasound-guided blocks at the wrist. In those with complete blocks, it took a surprisingly long time of 100 minutes for maximal anesthesia to occur to painful needle stick stimuli to the fingertips of the median nerve distribution. Non-ultrasound-guided median nerve blocks at the wrist as described in this article lack reliability and take too long to work.

  5. The modifying effect of anesthetic technique on the metabolic and endocrine responses to anesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1988-01-01

    and the widespread use of the term "stress free anesthesia" in surgery is therefore not valid. However, continuous administration of local anesthetic agents in the epidural space is the most effective technique in so far as reduction of the stress response is concerned. The clinical implication of a variable...... reduction in the stress response to surgery by different anesthetic techniques remains largely unsettled, since only few controlled studies have been published on the clinical effects of pain relief and general anesthesia. However, a vast amount of data exist from controlled studies comparing regional...... anesthesia with local anesthetics and general anesthesia. The cumulative experience from these studies have demonstrated an advantageous effect on postoperative morbidity parameters such as blood loss, postoperative thromboembolic complications, pulmonary infective complications, gastrointestinal motility...

  6. An injectable and biodegradable hydrogel based on poly(α,β-aspartic acid) derivatives for localized drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Caicai; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wu, Guolin; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Yinong; Gao, Hui; Ma, Jianbiao

    2014-03-01

    An injectable hydrogel via hydrazone cross-linking was prepared under mild conditions without addition of cross-linker or catalyst. Hydrazine and aldehyde modified poly(aspartic acid)s were used as two gel precursors. Both of them are water-soluble and biodegradable polymers with a protein-like structure, and obtained by aminolysis reaction of polysuccinimide. The latter can be prepared by thermal polycondensation of aspartic acid. Hydrogels were prepared in PBS solution and characterized by different methods including gel content and swelling, Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy, and in vitro degradation experiment. A scanning electron microscope viewed the interior morphology of the obtained hydrogels, which showed porous three-dimensional structures. Different porous sizes were present, which could be well controlled by the degree of aldehyde substitution in precursor poly(aspartic acid) derivatives. The doxorubicin-loaded hydrogels were prepared and showed a pH-sensitive release profile. The release rate can be accelerated by decreasing the environmental pH from a physiological to a weak acidic condition. Moreover, the cell adhesion and growth behaviors on the hydrogel were studied and the polymeric hydrogel showed good biocompatibility. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Spike timing rigidity is maintained in bursting neurons under pentobarbital-induced anesthetic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risako Kato

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABAA receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits in vivo. To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT, which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (> 5 Hz and bursting were classified as HFB neurons (n = 10, and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (< 10 Hz and without bursting were classified as non-HFB neurons (n = 48. Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval. Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABAA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch

  8. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-09-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam.

  9. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam

  10. Departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium in argon plasmas sustained in a Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincón, R.; Muñoz, J.; Calzada, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma torches are suitable plasma sources for a wide range of applications. The capability of these discharges to produce processes like sample excitation or decomposition of molecules inside them depends on the density of the plasma species and their energies (temperatures). The relation between these parameters determines the specific state of thermodynamic equilibrium in the discharge. Thus, the understanding of plasma possibilities for application purposes is related to the knowledge of the plasma thermodynamic equilibrium degree. In this paper a discussion about the equilibrium state for Ar plasmas generated by using a Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes, TIAGO device, is presented. Emission spectroscopy techniques were used to measure gas temperature and electron density at the exit of the nozzle torch and along the dart. Boltzmann-plots as well as b p parameters were calculated to characterize the type and degree of departure from partial Local Saha Equilibrium (pLSE). This study indicates that the closer situation to Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) of the plasma corresponds to larger Ar flows which highlights the importance of the nitrogen (atmosphere surrounding the plasma) in the kinetics of Ar-TIAGO discharges. - Highlights: • Discharges sustained in Ar using a TIAGO Torch show a significant departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium. • Nitrogen entrance from surrounding air highly influences Thermodynamic Equilibrium. • Departure from LTE has been studied by means of Boltzmann plots and b p parameters. • The discharge is ionizing at the nozzle exit plasma, while along the dart it becomes recombining

  11. Therapeutic application of injectable thermosensitive hydrogel in preventing local breast cancer recurrence and improving incision wound healing in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Na; Gong, Changyang; Qian, Zhiyong; Luo, Feng; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Helan; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-08-01

    Many drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been investigated for local targeting of malignant disease with the intention of increasing anti-tumor activity and minimizing systemic toxicity. An injectable thermosensitive hydrogel was applied to prevent locoregional recurrence of 4T1 breast cancer in a mouse model. The presented hydrogel, which is based on poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE), flows freely at normal temperature, forms a gel within seconds in situ at body temperature, and eventually releases the drug in a consistent and sustained fashion as it gradually biodegrades. Locoregional recurrence after primary tumor removal was significantly inhibited in mice treated with the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PECE hydrogel subcutaneously (9.1%) administered, compared with the blank hydrogel (80.0%), systemic (77.8%) and locally (75.0%) administered PTX, and the control group (100%) (P 0.05), in agreement with histopathological examinations. This novel DDSs represents a promising approach for local adjuvant therapy in malignant disease.

  12. Local intra-articular injection of resveratrol delays cartilage degeneration in C57BL/6 mice by inducing autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Na; Wei, Liwei; Li, Wuyin; Yang, Wei; Cai, Litao; Qian, Zhuang; Wu, Shufang

    2017-07-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular homeostasis mechanism that was found to be compromised in aging and osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage. Previous studies showed that resveratrol can effectively regulate autophagy in other cells. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the chondroprotective effect of resveratrol was related to chondrocyte autophagy and to elucidate underlying mechanisms. OA model was induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) in 10-week-old male mice. OA mice were treated with resveratrol with/without 3-MA for 8 weeks beginning 4 weeks after surgery. The local intra-articular injection of resveratrol delayed articular cartilage degradation in DMM-induced OA by OARSI scoring systems and Safranin O-fast green. Resveratrol treatment increased Unc-51-like kinase1, Beclin1, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, hypoxia inducible factor-1α, phosphorylated AMPK, collagen-2A1, Aggrecan expressions, but decreased hypoxia inducible factor-2α, phosphorylated mTOR, matrix metalloproteinases13 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 expressions. The effects of resveratrol were obviously blunted by 3-MA except HIF and AMPK. These findings indicate that resveratrol intra-articular injection delayed articular cartilage degeneration and promoted chondrocyte autophagy in an experimental model of surgical DMM-induced OA, in part via balancing HIF-1α and HIF-2α expressions and thereby regulating AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Molecular Mechanisms of Anesthetic Action: Updates and Cutting Edge Developments from the Field of Molecular Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Bertaccini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available For over 160 years, general anesthetics have been given for the relief of pain and suffering. While many theories of anesthetic action have been purported, it has become increasingly apparent that a significant molecular focus of anesthetic action lies within the family of ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC’s. These protein channels have a transmembrane region that is composed of a pentamer of four helix bundles, symmetrically arranged around a central pore for ion passage. While initial and some current models suggest a possible cavity for binding within this four helix bundle, newer calculations postulate that the actual cavity for anesthetic binding may exist between four helix bundles. In either scenario, these cavities have a transmembrane mode of access and may be partially bordered by lipid moieties. Their physicochemical nature is amphiphilic. Anesthetic binding may alter the overall motion of a ligand-gated ion channel by a “foot-in-door” motif, resulting in the higher likelihood of and greater time spent in a specific channel state. The overall gating motion of these channels is consistent with that shown in normal mode analyses carried out both in vacuo as well as in explicitly hydrated lipid bilayer models. Molecular docking and large scale molecular dynamics calculations may now begin to show a more exact mode by which anesthetic molecules actually localize themselves and bind to specific protein sites within LGIC’s, making the design of future improvements to anesthetic ligands a more realizable possibility.

  14. Driving reaction times in patients with foot and ankle pathology before and after image-guided injection: pain relief without improved function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talusan, Paul G; Miller, Christopher P; Save, Ameya V; Reach, John S

    2015-04-01

    Foot and ankle pathology is common in the driving population. Local anesthetic steroid injections are frequent ambulatory treatments. Brake reaction time (BRT) has validated importance in motor vehicle safety. There are no prior studies examining the effect of foot and ankle pathology and injection treatment on the safe operation of motor vehicles. We studied BRT in patients with foot and ankle musculoskeletal disease before and after image-guided injection treatment. A total of 37 participants were enrolled. Image-guided injections of local anesthetic and steroid were placed into the pathological anatomical location of the right or left foot and ankles. A driving reaction timer was used to measure BRTs before and after injection. Patients suffering right "driving" and left "nondriving" pathology as well as a healthy control group were studied. All patients reported >90% pain relief postinjection. All injections were confirmed to be accurate by imaging. Post hoc Bonferonni analysis demonstrated significant difference between the healthy group and the right-sided injection group (P = .008). Mean BRT for healthy controls was 0.57 ± 0.11 s. Patients suffering right foot and ankle disease displayed surprisingly high BRTs (0.80 ± 0.23 s preinjection and 0.78 ± 0.16 s postinjection, P > .99). Left nondriving foot and ankle pathology presented a driving hazard as well (BRT of 0.75 ± 0.12 s preinjection and 0.77 ± 0.12 s postinjection, P > .99). Injections relieved pain but did not significantly alter BRT (P > .99 for all). Patients suffering chronic foot and ankle pathology involving either the driving or nondriving side have impaired BRTs. This preexisting driving impairment has not previously been reported and exceeds recommended cutoff safety values in the United States. Despite symptom improvement, there was no statistically significant change in BRT following image-guided injection in either foot and ankle. Therapeutic, Level II: Prospective Comparative Study.

  15. Spectral dependence efficiency and localization of non-inductive current-drive via helicity injection by global Alfven waves in Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoshvili, K.; Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.

    1996-01-01

    The non-inductive current drive via helicity injection by Global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) waves is studied. For illustration, the first radial mode of the discrete resonant GAE spectrum is considered. The following aspects are given special attention: spectral analysis, radial dependence and efficiency - all these as functions of the characteristics of the waves launched by an external, concentric antenna (i.e, wave frequency and poloidal and toroidal wave numbers). The results reveal the following conclusions. Generation of GAE waves. In the range of poloidal wave numbers -3 0 for m = -l, -2, -3 and -20 10; I-BAR < 0 for m = +1, +2, +3 and n < 10. (iv) The efficiency of the current drive, η = absolute I-BAR/absolute P-BAR, increases in the cases m = -1, -2, -3 with absolute m and absolute 1/n. (v) Detailed information on the relative direction and radial (core) localization of the current drive is obtained. (authors)

  16. Ensaio mecânico da resistência ao impacto do cimento ósseo puro e associado a duas drogas anestésicas locais Mechanical essay of impact resistance of acrylic bone cement used singly or the cement in combination with two local anesthetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    2007-07-01

    resistência entre os cimentos Simplex® e Biomecânica® para as medicações lidocaína (p = 0,13 e bupivacaína (p = 0,63. No cimento Simplex®, a associação com a bupivacaína apresentou resistência significativamente maior do que com a lidocaína e o polímero puro (p = 0,001 e p = 0,012, respectivamente. Não existe diferença significativa na resistência entre a lidocaína e o polímero puro para o cimento Simplex® (p = 0,39. No cimento Biomecânica®, a associação com a bupivacaína apresentou resistência significativamente maior do que com a lidocaína e o polímero puro (p = 0,0001 e p = 0,0001, respectivamente. Não existe diferença significativa na resistência entre a lidocaína e o polímero puro para o cimento Biomecânica® (p = 0,37. CONCLUSÃO: Nas condições estudadas, não há redução significativa da resistência ao impacto na combinação de cimento ortopédico com anestésicos locais.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the mechanical behavior of cement-local anesthetic combinations in vitro. METHODS: Two bone cements were tested (Simplex® and Biomecânica® with two anesthetic drugs (lidocaine and bupivacaine. Anesthetic drugs were added in powder form. The authors compared six groups based on the association between the cement and the drugs. Two grams of anesthetic were mixed with 40 g of acrylic cement powder. 60 prismatic molds were made, measuring 5 x 120 x 30 mm (n = 30 and 5 x 60 x 30 mm (n = 30. The molds were tested on a pendulum impact resistance apparatus. Statistical analysis was performed to verify the effect of bone cement (Simplex® and Biomecânica® and the medication (lidocaine, bupivacaine, and no combination on the strength of the molds, with a level of significance alpha = 5%. RESULTS: Statistical comparison showed a significant influence of the medication on bone strength (p = 0.0001. Tukey multiple comparison test demonstrated better strength with bupivacaine. CONCLUSION: Cement-bone combination does not harm the strength

  17. Advances in dental local anesthesia techniques and devices: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Newaskar, Vilas; Chandra, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Although local anesthesia remains the backbone of pain control in dentistry, researches are going to seek new and better means of managing the pain. Most of the researches are focused on improvement in the area of anesthetic agents, delivery devices and technique involved. Newer technologies have been developed that can assist the dentist in providing enhanced pain relief with reduced injection pain and fewer adverse effects. This overview will enlighten the practicing dentists regarding newer devices and methods of rendering pain control comparing these with the earlier used ones on the basis of research and clinical studies available. PMID:24163548

  18. Advances in dental local anesthesia techniques and devices: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh K; Newaskar, Vilas; Chandra, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Although local anesthesia remains the backbone of pain control in dentistry, researches are going to seek new and better means of managing the pain. Most of the researches are focused on improvement in the area of anesthetic agents, delivery devices and technique involved. Newer technologies have been developed that can assist the dentist in providing enhanced pain relief with reduced injection pain and fewer adverse effects. This overview will enlighten the practicing dentists regarding newer devices and methods of rendering pain control comparing these with the earlier used ones on the basis of research and clinical studies available.

  19. Exploring microsolvation of the anesthetic propofol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon, I.; Cocinero, E. J.; Millan, J.; Jaeqx, S.; Rijs, A. M.; Lesarri, A.; Castano, F.; Fernandez, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a broadly used general anesthetic. By combining spectroscopic techniques such as 1- and 2-color REMPI, UV/UV hole burning, infrared ion-dip spectroscopy (IRIDS) obtained under cooled and isolated conditions with high-level ab initio calculations, detailed

  20. Administration and monitoring of intravenous anesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The importance of accuracy in controlling the dose-response relation for intravenous anesthetics is directly related to the importance of optimizing the efficacy and quality of anesthesia while minimizing adverse drug effects. Therefore, it is important to measure and control all

  1. Anesthetic management for Cesarean delivery in parturients with a diagnosis of dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Elizabeth M S; Toledo, Paloma; Stariha, Jillian; Nixon, Heather C

    2016-08-01

    The literature on the anesthetic management of parturients with dwarfism is sparse and limited to isolated case reports. Pregnancy complications associated with dwarfism include an increased risk of respiratory compromise, an increased risk of Cesarean delivery, and an unpredictable degree of anesthesia with neuraxial techniques. Therefore, we conducted this retrospective review to evaluate the anesthetic management of parturients with a diagnosis of dwarfism. We used a query of billing data to identify short statured women who underwent a Cesarean delivery during May 1, 2008 to May 1, 2013. We then hand searched the electronic medical record for qualifying patients with heights diagnosis of dwarfism. The extracted data included patient demographics and obstetric and anesthetic information. We identified 13 women with dwarfism who had 15 Cesarean deliveries in total. Twelve of the women had disproportionate dwarfism, and ten of the 15 Cesarean deliveries were due to cephalopelvic disproportion. Neuraxial anesthesia was attempted in 93% of deliveries. The dose chosen for initiation of neuraxial anesthesia was lower than the typical doses used in parturients of normal stature. Neuraxial anesthetic complications included difficult neuraxial placement (64%), high spinal (7%), inadequate surgical level (13%), and unrecognized intrathecal catheter (7%). The data collected suggest that females with a diagnosis of dwarfism may have difficult neuraxial placement and potentially require lower dosages of local anesthetic for both spinal and epidural anesthesia to achieve adequate surgical blockade.

  2. Anesthetic equipment, facilities and services available for pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-09

    Apr 9, 2011 ... standards and increased use of disposable anesthetic equipment. An audit of equipment and facilities for anesthetic care in pediatric patients is important and should be carried out periodically to appraise the situation for upgrading of essential anesthetic facilities and equipment. Appendix A. 18th March, ...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over a...

  4. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  5. Testosterone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection works by supplying synthetic testosterone to replace the testosterone that is normally ... as a pellet to be injected under the skin.Testosterone injection may control your symptoms but will ...

  6. The short- and medium-term effectiveness of CT-guided selective cervical nerve root injection for pain and disability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Amidevi; Saha, Shouvik; Sharma, Naveen; Huckerby, Lauren; Houghton, Russell [Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospitals, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    CT-guided cervical nerve root injection with corticosteroid and/or local anesthetic is a recognized technique in the evaluation and treatment of cervical radiculopathy. There are few prospective studies on the efficacy of the various techniques employed in cervical nerve root injection. We present our results from a 1-year prospective series using a CT-guided anterolateral transforaminal approach for cervical nerve root injection of bupivacaine and dexamethasone. Pain using a numeric rating scale was assessed at pre-injection, 15 min post-injection, 1 month, and 3 months. Disability was assessed using the Oswestry Neck Disability Index (NDI) questionnaire at pre-injection, 1 month post-injection, and 3 months. In total, 50 patients were followed for 3 months. The mean reductions in pain were: 15 min (77 %), 1 month (39 %), and 3 months (33 %). The mean reductions in NDI were: 1 month (26 %) and 3 months (also 26 %). Results were statistically significant. CT-guided selective cervical nerve root injection in the treatment of cervical radicular pain and related disability produces statistically significant reductions in pain and disability to at least 3 months post-procedure. (orig.)

  7. The short- and medium-term effectiveness of CT-guided selective cervical nerve root injection for pain and disability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Amidevi; Saha, Shouvik; Sharma, Naveen; Huckerby, Lauren; Houghton, Russell

    2014-01-01

    CT-guided cervical nerve root injection with corticosteroid and/or local anesthetic is a recognized technique in the evaluation and treatment of cervical radiculopathy. There are few prospective studies on the efficacy of the various techniques employed in cervical nerve root injection. We present our results from a 1-year prospective series using a CT-guided anterolateral transforaminal approach for cervical nerve root injection of bupivacaine and dexamethasone. Pain using a numeric rating scale was assessed at pre-injection, 15 min post-injection, 1 month, and 3 months. Disability was assessed using the Oswestry Neck Disability Index (NDI) questionnaire at pre-injection, 1 month post-injection, and 3 months. In total, 50 patients were followed for 3 months. The mean reductions in pain were: 15 min (77 %), 1 month (39 %), and 3 months (33 %). The mean reductions in NDI were: 1 month (26 %) and 3 months (also 26 %). Results were statistically significant. CT-guided selective cervical nerve root injection in the treatment of cervical radicular pain and related disability produces statistically significant reductions in pain and disability to at least 3 months post-procedure. (orig.)

  8. Clinical application of thoracic paravertebral anesthetic block in breast surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Socorro Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Optimum treatment for postoperative pain has been of fundamental importance in surgical patient care. Among the analgesic techniques aimed at this group of patients, thoracic paravertebral block combined with general anesthesia stands out for the good results and favorable risk-benefit ratio. Many local anesthetics and other adjuvant drugs are being investigated for use in this technique, in order to improve the quality of analgesia and reduce adverse effects. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness and safety of paravertebral block compared to other analgesic and anesthetic regimens in women undergoing breast cancer surgeries. METHODS: Integrative literature review from 1966 to 2012, using specific terms in computerized databases of articles investigating the clinical characteristics, adverse effects, and beneficial effects of thoracic paravertebral block. RESULTS: On the selected date, 16 randomized studies that met the selection criteria established for this literature review were identified. Thoracic paravertebral block showed a significant reduction of postoperative pain, as well as decreased pain during arm movement after surgery. CONCLUSION: Thoracic paravertebral block reduced postoperative analgesic requirement compared to placebo group, markedly within the first 24 h. The use of this technique could ensure postoperative analgesia of clinical relevance. Further studies with larger populations are necessary, as paravertebral block seems to be promising for preemptive analgesia in breast cancer surgery.

  9. Awake craniotomy anesthetic management using dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prontera A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Prontera,1 Stefano Baroni,2 Andrea Marudi,2 Franco Valzania,3 Alberto Feletti,1 Francesca Benuzzi,4 Elisabetta Bertellini,2 Giacomo Pavesi1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Nuovo Ospedale Civile SAgostino-Estense, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Nuovo Ospedale Civile SAgostino-Estense, 3Department of Neurology, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S Agostino-Estense, 4Department of Neuroscience, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy Introduction: Awake craniotomy allows continuous monitoring of patients’ neurological functions during open surgery. Anesthesiologists have to sedate patients in a way so that they are compliant throughout the whole surgical procedure, nevertheless maintaining adequate analgesia and anxiolysis. Currently, the use of α2-receptor agonist dexmedetomidine as the primary hypnotic–sedative medication is increasing.Methods: Nine patients undergoing awake craniotomy were treated with refined monitored anesthesia care (MAC protocol consisting of a combination of local anesthesia without scalp block, low-dose infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and remifentanil, without the need of airways management.Results: The anesthetic protocol applied in our study has the advantage of decreasing the dose of each drug and thus reducing the occurrence of side effects. All patients had smooth and rapid awakenings. The brain remained relaxed during the entire procedure.Conclusion: In our experience, this protocol is safe and effective during awake brain surgery. Nevertheless, prospective randomized trials are necessary to confirm the optimal anesthetic technique to be used. Keywords: dexmedetomidine, awake surgery, anesthesia

  10. Injection Pressure as a Marker of Intraneural Injection in Procedures of Peripheral Nerves Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilvana Vučković

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The blockade of peripheral nerves carries a certain risk of unwanted complications, which can follow after unintentional intraneural injection of a local anesthetic. Up till today, the research of measuring injection pressure has been based on animal models, even though the histological structure of periphery nerve is different for animal and human population, so the application pressure which presages intraneural injection in human population is still unknown. As material in performing this study there have been used 12 Wistar rats and 12 delivered stillborns. After bilateral access to the median nerve, we applied 3 ml of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine, with the help of automatic syringe charger. The needle was at first placed perineural on one side, and then intraneural on the other side of both examination groups. During every application the pressure values were monitored using the manometer, and then they were analyzed by special software program BioBench. All perineural injections resulted with the pressure < or = 27.92 kPa, while the majority of intraneural injections were combined with the injectionpressure > or = 69.8 kPa. The difference between intraneural and perineural injection pressures for the two different examination groups (rats and delivered stillborns was not statistically significant (P>0.05. As prevention from intraneural injections today are in use two methods: the method of causing paresthesia or the method of using the peripheral nerve stimulator. However the nerve injury can still occur, independent from the technique used. If our results are used in clinical practice on human population, than the high injection pressure could be the markerof intraneural lodging of a needle.

  11. Effect of local injection of Zolena, zoledronic acid made in Iran, on orthodontic tooth movement and root and bone resorption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Massoud; Asefi, Sohrab; Hatamifard, Ghazal; Lotfi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background. Anchorage control is an essential part of orthodontic treatment planning, especially in adult patients who demand a more convenient treatment. Zoledronic acid (ZA) is an effective choice to address this problem. It is the most potent member of the bisphosphonates family that has an inhibitory effect on bone resorption by suppressing osteoclast function. Therefore, ZA might be a good option for orthodontic anchorage control. The current study evaluated the effect of local administration of Zolena (ZA made in Iran) on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) and root and bone resorption. Methods. The experimental group consisted of 30 rats in 3 subgroups (n=10). Anesthesia was induced, and one closed NiTi coil spring was installed between the first molar and central incisor unilaterally, except for the negative control group. The positive control group received vestibular injection of 0.01 mL of saline next to the maxillary first molar, and 0.01 mL of the solution was injected at the same site in the ZA group. After 21 days, the rats were sacrificed and the distance between the first and second molars was measured with a leaf gauge. Histological analysis was conducted by a blind pathologist for the number of Howship's lacunae, blood vessels, osteoclast-like cells and root resorption lacunae. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey test and t-test. Results. There were no significant differences in OTM between the force-applied groups. ZA significantly inhibited bone/root resorption and angiogenesis compared to the positive control group. Conclusion. Zolena did not decrease OTM but significantly inhibited bone and root resorption. Zolena might be less potent than its foreign counterparts.

  12. Vasoconstrictors in local anesthesia for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    Addition of a vasoconstrictor to a local anesthetic may have several beneficial effects: a decrease in the peak plasma concentration of the local anesthetic agent, increase in the duration and the quality of anesthesia, reduction of the minimum concentration of anesthetic needed for nerve block, and decrease of blood loss during surgical procedures. The addition of a vasoconstrictor to a local anesthetic may also have detrimental effects. A review of the literature indicates that vasoconstrictor concentrations in local anesthetics marketed for dental use in the United States are not always optimal to achieve the purposes for which they are added. In most cases, a reduced concentration of vasoconstrictor could achieve the same goal as the marketed higher concentration, with less side-effect liability. PMID:8250339

  13. Current trends in needle-free jet injection: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barolet D

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Barolet,1,2 Antranik Benohanian3 1RoseLab Skin Optics Research Laboratory, Laval, QC, Canada; 2MUHC Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3CHUM Service de Dermatologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Background: Jet injection can be defined as a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers a drug. Despite 75 years of existence, it never reached its full potential as a strategic tool to deliver medications through the skin. Objective: The aim of this review was to evaluate and summarize the evolution of jet injection intradermal drug delivery method including technological advancements and new indications for use. Methods: A review of the literature was performed with no limits placed on publication date. Results: Needleless injectors not only reduce pain during drug delivery but also confine the drug more evenly in the dermis. Understanding skin properties of the injection site is a key factor to obtain optimal results as well as setting the right parameters of the jet injector. Until the advent of disposable jet injectors/cartridges, autoclaving of the injector remains the only reliable method to eliminate the risk of infection. Needle-free intradermal injection using corticosteroids and/or local anesthetics is well documented with promising indications being developed. Limitations: Limitations of the review include low-quality evidence, small sample sizes, varying treatment parameters, and publication bias. Conclusion: New developments may help reconsider the use of jet injection technology. Future studies should focus on measurable optimized parameters to insure a safe and effective outcome. Keywords: needle free, injector, jet injection, xylocaine, triamcinolone, PDT

  14. Anesthetic management of external cephalic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalifoux, Laurie A; Sullivan, John T

    2013-09-01

    Breech presentation is common at term and its reduction through external cephalic version represents a noninvasive opportunity to avoid cesarean delivery and the associated maternal morbidity. In addition to uterine relaxants, neuraxial anesthesia is associated with increased success of version procedures when surgical anesthetic dosing is used. The intervention is likely cost effective given the effect size and the avoided high costs of cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does Reducing the Concentration of Bupivacaine When Performing Therapeutic Shoulder Joint Injections Impact the Clinical Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael G; Patrie, James T

    2016-04-01

    Mixtures of local anesthetics and steroids are routinely injected intraarticularly to temporarily relieve joint pain, even though local anesthetics have been reported to cause chondrocyte death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This study aimed to determine if intraarticular injections of bupivacaine 0.5% and bupivacaine 0.25% would provide similar pain relief. All fluoroscopically guided glenohumeral joint injections performed using 2.5 mL of bupivacaine and 0.5 mL (20 mg) of triamcinolone acetonide over a 42-month period were included if a pain score was recorded before, 5-10 minutes after, and 1 week after injection. Pain reduction of more than 2 points was considered much improved clinically with pain reduction of more than 1 point considered the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold. Statistically significant and much improved pain reduction was achieved using both bupivacaine 0.5% and 0.25% 5-10 minutes (-3.7 points; 95% CI, -3.4 to -4.0 points; p ≤ 0.001; and -3.3 points; 95% CI, -3.0 to -3.5 points; p ≤ 0.001) and 1 week (-2.5 points; 95% CI, -2.2 to -2.9 points; p ≤ 0.001; and -2.1 points; 95% CI, -1.8 to -2.3 points; p ≤ 0.001) after injection, respectively. Adjusting for age, sex, pain score before injection, and indication, the mean decrease in pain was greater in the bupivacaine 0.5% group by 0.30 points 5-10 minutes after injection (95% CI, -0.03 to 0.63 points; p = 0.08) and 0.46 points 1 week after injection (95% CI, 0.13-0.77 points; p = 0.01). Both bupivacaine 0.5% and bupivacaine 0.25% provide statistically significant and much improved pain relief 5-10 minutes and 1 week after intraarticular glenohumeral injections. Bupivacaine 0.5% provided greater pain relief than bupivacaine 0.25%, but the difference was less than 0.5 points and therefore did not meet the MCID threshold.

  16. Distribution of local anesthetics between aqueous and liposome phases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruokonen, S. K.; Duša, Filip; Rantamäki, A. H.; Robciuc, A.; Holma, P.; Holopainen, J. M.; Abdel-Rehim, M.; Wiedmer, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1479, JAN (2017), s. 194-203 ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : liposome electrokinetic chromatography * distribution constants * EOF markers Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 3.981, year: 2016

  17. Combined low dose local anesthetics and opioids versus single use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-24

    Sep 24, 2014 ... patients undergoing transurethral surgery could reduce block duration and ... There was no evidence of higher risk of analgesic failure in the combination group. ... tumor (TURBT) are elderly people who have coexisting.

  18. Effect of hydralazine on duration of soft tissue local anesthesia following dental treatment: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakheran Esfahani, Omid; Pouraboutaleb, Mohammad Fazel; Khorami, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged numbness following routine dental treatments can cause difficulties in speaking and swallowing and may result in inadvertent biting of soft tissues. Local injection of vasodilator agents may represent a solution to this problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal injection of hydralazine hydrochloride (HCl) on the duration of oral soft tissue anesthesia after routine dental treatment. This randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial included 50 patients who received inferior alveolar nerve block (2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine) for simple restorative treatment. Upon completion of the dental treatment, patients randomly received a hydralazine HCl or sham injection in the same site as the local anesthetic injection. The reversal time to normal sensation of soft tissues (lips, tongue, and perioral skin) was evaluated and reported every 5 minutes by the patients, who followed an assessment protocol that they were taught in advance of treatment. Median recovery times in the hydralazine group and the sham group were 81.4 (SD, 3.6) and 221.8 (SD, 6.3) minutes, respectively. Based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the duration of soft tissue anesthesia in the 2 groups was significantly different (P local anesthetic-induced soft tissue numbness and the related functional problems.

  19. Anesthetic success of supplemental infiltration in mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To systematically review the anesthetic success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) injection technique alone with that of combination of IANB and supplemental infiltration (SI) technique when used for pulpal anesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis during endodontic treatment. Settings and Design: The study follows a longitudinal study design involving original research. Materials and Methods: Electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled clinical studies. Studies were selected by predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Statistical Analysis Used and Result: The statistical analysis used was based on the results of the original research. All the included studies showed that there is the difference in the values comparing the two techniques, but the data are not statistically significantly different. Conclusion: Based on this review, the better anesthetic efficacy of the SI was observed. PMID:26069400

  20. Updates of Topical and Local Anesthesia Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Ricardo A; Kirpalani, Tarun; Mohan, Naveen

    2016-04-01

    As described in this article, there are many advances in topical and local anesthesia. Topical and local anesthetics have played a great role in dentistry in alleviating the fears of patients, eliminating pain, and providing pain control. Many invasive procedures would not be performed without the use and advances of topical/local anesthetics. The modern-day dentist has the responsibility of knowing the variety of products on the market and should have at least references to access before, during, and after treatment. This practice ensures proper care with topical and local anesthetics for the masses of patients entering dental offices worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Anesthetic efficacy of ketamine-diazepam, ketamine-xylazine, and ketamine-acepromazine in Caspian Pond turtles (Mauremys caspica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, Milad; Sadegh, Amin Bigham; Arizza, Vincenzo; Abbasi, Hossein; Inguglia, Luigi; Saravi, Hasan Nasrollahzadeh

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of different anesthetic drug combinations on the Caspian Pond turtles ( Mauremys caspica ). Three groups of the Caspian Pond turtles ( n = 6) were anesthetized with three different drug combinations. Initially, a pilot study was conducted to determine the best drug doses for the anesthetization of the turtles, and according to these results, ketamine-diazepam (120 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride [5%] and 2 mg/kg diazepam [5%]), ketamine-acepromazine (120 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride [5%] and 1 mg/kg acepromazine [1%]), and ketamine-xylazine (120 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride [5%] and 1 mg/kg xylazine [2%]) were injected intramuscularly. The onset times of anesthetization and the recovery time were measured. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using one-way analysis of variance followed by t -tests, and P turtles, respectively, compared to that obtained with the ketamine-acepromazine combination and 64% (male turtles) and 50% (female turtles) shorter than that obtained with the ketamine-xylazine combination. Further, the recovery time, in male turtles, was 17% shorter in animals treated with the first drug combination than those treated with the ketamine-acepromazine combination and 37% shorter than those treated with the ketamine-xylazine combination. The recovery time, in female turtles, did not seem to be significantly different among treatments. The study showed that the ketamine-diazepam drug combination is the anesthetic combination with the fastest onset time and shortest recovery time.

  2. Anesthetic Efficacy of a Combination of 4% Prilocaine/2% Lidocaine with Epinephrine for the Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Olivia; Nusstein, John; Drum, Melissa; Fowler, Sara; Reader, Al; Draper, John

    2018-05-01

    Prilocaine plain has a high pH and concentration (4%), which could decrease the pain of injection and increase success. The purpose of this study was to compare pain associated with anesthetic solution deposition and the degree of pulpal anesthesia obtained with the combination of prilocaine and lidocaine versus a lidocaine and lidocaine combination when used for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs). One hundred eighteen asymptomatic subjects were randomly given a combination of 1 cartridge of 4% prilocaine plain plus 1 cartridge of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or a combination of 2 cartridges of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for the IANB at 2 separate appointments. Subjects rated the pain associated with anesthetic solution deposition of injection. Mandibular teeth were tested with an electric pulp tester every 4 minutes for 57 minutes. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive 80 readings were obtained within 17 minutes and the 80 reading was continuously sustained for 57 minutes. Comparisons for anesthetic success were analyzed using the exact McNemar test, and pain ratings associated with anesthetic solution deposition were analyzed using multiple Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank tests; both were adjusted using the step-down Bonferroni method of Holm. Four percent prilocaine plain was significantly less painful upon anesthetic solution deposition. Pulpal anesthetic success was not significantly different between the 2 combinations. The combination of 4% prilocaine plain plus 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine did not increase pulpal anesthetic success for IANBs compared with a combination of 2 cartridges of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Pain associated with anesthetic solution deposition from the first cartridge of 4% prilocaine plain was significantly less when compared with the first cartridge of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published

  3. Neuropathic Pain Following Poly-L-Lactic Acid (Sculptra) Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrcek, Ivan; El-Sawy, Tarek; Chou, Eva; Allen, Theresa; Nakra, Tanuj

    Injectable fillers have become a prevalent means of facial rejuvenation and volume expansion. While typically well tolerated, serious complications have been reported. The authors present a case in which an otherwise healthy female with a history of multiple filler injections including poly-L-lactic acid, developed 3 weeks of neuropathic pain in the left temporal fossa following injection. To the best of the authors knowledge, neuropathic pain has not been reported as a complication following poly-L-lactic acid injection. The patient was treated with an injection of steroid and long-acting anesthetic with resolution of symptoms.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of inhaled anesthetics in green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Barter, Linda S; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2006-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that differences in anesthetic uptake and elimination in iguanas would counter the pharmacokinetic effects of blood:gas solubility and thus serve to minimize kinetic differences among inhaled agents. 6 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Iguanas were anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane in a Latin-square design. Intervals from initial administration of an anesthetic agent to specific induction events and from cessation of administration of an anesthetic agent to specific recovery events were recorded. End-expired gas concentrations were measured during anesthetic washout. Significant differences were not detected for any induction or recovery events for any inhalation agent in iguanas. Washout curves best fit a 2-compartment model, but slopes for both compartments did not differ significantly among the 3 anesthetics. Differences in blood:gas solubility for isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane did not significantly influence differences in pharmacokinetics for the inhalation agents in iguanas.

  5. Granisetron Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granisetron immediate-release injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy and to ... nausea and vomiting that may occur after surgery. Granisetron extended-release (long-acting) injection is used with ...

  6. Edaravone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edaravone injection is used to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease; a condition in which ... die, causing the muscles to shrink and weaken). Edaravone injection is in a class of medications called ...

  7. Meropenem Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as meropenem injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking ...

  8. Chloramphenicol Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking ...

  9. Colistimethate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as colistimethate injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Using ...

  10. Defibrotide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defibrotide injection is used to treat adults and children with hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD; blocked blood ... the body and then returned to the body). Defibrotide injection is in a class of medications called ...

  11. Nalbuphine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called opioid agonist-antagonists. It works by changing the way ... suddenly stop using nalbuphine injection, you may experience withdrawal symptoms including restlessness; teary eyes; runny nose; yawning; ...

  12. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low back pain: an updated Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, J Bart; de Bie, Rob A; de Vet, Henrica C W; Hildebrandt, Jan; Nelemans, Patty

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. The effectiveness of injection therapy for low back pain is still debatable. Heterogeneity of target tissue, pharmacological agent, and dosage, generally found in RCTs, point to the need for clinically valid comparisons in a literature synthesis. We updated the search of the earlier systematic review and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases up to March 2007 for relevant trials reported in English, French, German, Dutch, and Nordic languages. We also screened references from trials identified. RCTs on the effects of injection therapy involving epidural, facet, or local sites for subacute or chronic low back pain were included. Studies that compared the effects of intradiscal injections, prolotherapy, or ozone therapy with other treatments were excluded unless injection therapy with another pharmaceutical agent (no placebo treatment) was part of one of the treatment arms. Studies about injections in sacroiliac joints and studies evaluating the effects of epidural steroids for radicular pain were also excluded. Eighteen trials (1179 participants) were included in this review. The injection sites varied from epidural sites and facet joints (i.e. intra-articular injections, peri-articular injections and nerve blocks) to local sites (i.e. tender-and trigger points). The drugs that were studied consisted of corticosteroids, local anesthetics, and a variety of other drugs. The methodologic quality of the trials was limited with 10 of 18 trials rated as having a high methodologic quality. Statistical pooling was not possible because of clinical heterogeneity in the trials. Overall, the results indicated that there is no strong evidence for or against the use of any type of injection therapy. There is insufficient evidence to

  13. Gestational trophoblastic disease with hyperthyroidism: Anesthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of hyperthyroidism with gestational trophoblastic disease is a known albeit rare clinical condition. We herein report the successful anesthetic management of such a case in our institute. There are only few case reports in literature of this association. Often, the diagnosis of hyperthyroid state is retrospective one, as it can be missed in the emergency scenario of patient requiring molar evacuation. This case report highlights the perioperative management and optimization of hyperthyroid state prior to surgical evacuation of the invasive hydatidiform mole.

  14. Spectral dependence, efficiency and localization of non-inductive current drive via helicity injection by global Alfven waves in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komoshvili, K.; Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences

    1997-04-01

    A systematic study of non-inductive current drive via helicity injection by global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) waves is carried out. For illustration, the first radial mode of the discrete resonant GAE spectrum is considered. The following aspects are given special attention: spectral analysis, radial dependence and efficiency - all of these functions of the characteristics of the waves launched by an external, concentric antenna (i.e. wave frequency and poloidal and toroidal wavenumbers). The tokamak plasma is simulated by a current-carrying cylindrical plasma column surrounded by a helical sheet current and situated inside a perfectly conducting shell, with incorporation of equilibrium (simulated) toroidal field, magnetic shear and a relatively large poloidal magnetic field component. Within the framework of low-{beta} MHD model equations and for typical tokamak physical parameters, the following basic results are obtained: (1) in the range of poloidal wavenumbers -3{<=} m {<=} 3 and toroidal wavenumbers -20{<=} n {<=}20, resonant GAE peaks below the Alfven continuum are found; (2) the power absorption (P), current drive (I) and corresponding frequency of the GAE modes depend strongly on the sets of (m,n) values considered; (3) the `net` current drive is positive (i.e. flows in the direction of the equilibrium current j{sub 0z} for m = -1, -2, -3 and -20 {<=} n {<=} -1 as well as for m +1, +2, +3 and n > 10); (4) in the cases m = -1, -2, -3, the efficiency of current drive, I/P, increases with /m/ and I/n/; (5) the radial localization of the current drive in each of the cases considered is determined and tabulated. (Author).

  15. Spectral dependence, efficiency and localization of non-inductive current drive via helicity injection by global Alfven waves in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoshvili, K.; Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic study of non-inductive current drive via helicity injection by global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) waves is carried out. For illustration, the first radial mode of the discrete resonant GAE spectrum is considered. The following aspects are given special attention: spectral analysis, radial dependence and efficiency - all of these functions of the characteristics of the waves launched by an external, concentric antenna (i.e. wave frequency and poloidal and toroidal wavenumbers). The tokamak plasma is simulated by a current-carrying cylindrical plasma column surrounded by a helical sheet current and situated inside a perfectly conducting shell, with incorporation of equilibrium (simulated) toroidal field, magnetic shear and a relatively large poloidal magnetic field component. Within the framework of low-β MHD model equations and for typical tokamak physical parameters, the following basic results are obtained: (1) in the range of poloidal wavenumbers -3≤ m ≤ 3 and toroidal wavenumbers -20≤ n ≤20, resonant GAE peaks below the Alfven continuum are found; (2) the power absorption (P), current drive (I) and corresponding frequency of the GAE modes depend strongly on the sets of (m,n) values considered; (3) the 'net' current drive is positive (i.e. flows in the direction of the equilibrium current j 0z for m = -1, -2, -3 and -20 ≤ n ≤ -1 as well as for m +1, +2, +3 and n > 10; (4) in the cases m = -1, -2, -3, the efficiency of current drive, I/P, increases with /m/ and I/n/; (5) the radial localization of the current drive in each of the cases considered is determined and tabulated. (Author)

  16. Pharmacoeconomics of inhaled anesthetic agents: considerations for the pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, Eric L

    2004-10-15

    Types of economic analyses used for inhaled anesthetic agents, factors to consider in calculating the cost of inhaled anesthetics, limitations of pharmacoeconomic studies of these agents, and strategies for controlling inhaled anesthetic costs are discussed. Inhaled anesthetic agents comprise a substantial component of drug budgets. Calculation of the cost of administering an inhaled anesthetic should take into consideration the cost per mL, potency, waste, concentration and duration of gas delivery, fresh gas flow rate, molecular weight, and density. The use of newer inhaled anesthetic agents with low solubility in blood and tissue provides a more rapid recovery from anesthesia than older, more soluble agents, and also provides the same level of control of depth of anesthesia at a lower fresh gas flow rate and possibly a lower cost than older agents at a higher fresh gas flow rate. A more rapid recovery may facilitate fast-track recovery and yield cost savings if it allows the completion of additional surgical cases or allows a reduction in personnel overtime expenses. Interpretation of pharmacoeconomic studies of inhaled anesthetics requires an appreciation of the limitations in methodology and ability to extrapolate results from one setting to another. Pharmacists' efforts to reduce anesthetic waste and collaborate with anesthesiologists to improve the use of these agents can help contain costs, but improving scheduling and efficiency in the operating room has a greater potential to reduce operating room costs. Much can be done to control costs of anesthetic agents without compromising availability of these agents and patient care.

  17. Reversal of soft-tissue local anesthesia with phentolamine mesylate in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Elliot V; Moore, Paul A; Papas, Athena S; Goodson, J Max; Navalta, Laura A; Rogy, Siegfried; Rutherford, Bruce; Yagiela, John A

    2008-08-01

    The authors conducted two multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, controlled Phase III clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of phentolamine mesylate (PM) in shortening the duration and burden of soft-tissue anesthesia. The study involved 484 subjects who received one of four commercially available local anesthetic solutions containing vasoconstrictors for restorative or scaling procedures. On completion of the dental procedure, subjects randomly received a PM or a sham injection (an injection in which a needle does not penetrate the soft tissue) in the same site as the local anesthetic injection. The investigators measured the duration of soft-tissue anesthesia by using standardized lip- and tongue-tapping procedures every five minutes for five hours. They also evaluated functional measures and subject-perceived altered function, sensation, appearance and safety. Median recovery times in the lower lip and tongue for subjects in the PM group were 70 minutes and 60 minutes, respectively. Median recovery times in the lower lip and tongue for subjects in the sham group were 155 minutes and 125 minutes, respectively. Upper lip median recovery times were 50 minutes for subjects in the PM group and 133 minutes for subjects in the sham group. These differences were significant (P < .0001). Recovery from actual functional deficits and subject-perceived altered function, sensation and appearance also showed significant differences between the PM and the sham groups. PM was efficacious and safe in reducing the duration of local anesthetic- induced soft-tissue numbness and its associated functional deficits. Clinicians can use PM to accelerate reversal of soft-tissue anesthesia and the associated functional deficits.

  18. Evaluation of Surface anesthetic action of Aqueous Extract of Piper Betel leaf On Rabbit Cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.T.Jayasree; Dr.Shaikh Ubedulla; Dr.Harini K; Dr.Shankar.J

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Piper betel Linn. (Piperaceae) commonly known as betel leaf and the habit of betel chewing is widely prevalent in most parts of India. It is claimed to have aphrodisiac, laxative, antimicrobial, mucolytic, antiinflammatory and euphoric properties and proven antimutagenic and anti-carcinogenic effect. It is commonly observed that chewing of betel leaf produces numbness in the mouth, suggesting a possible local anesthetic effect. This observation prompted us to take this study . The aim...

  19. Usefulness of K-Point Injection for the Nonspecific Neck Pain in So-Called K-Point Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong Jae; Ahn, Myun Whan; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Lee, Sung Jun; Lee, Dong Yeol

    2016-12-01

    Shoichi Kokubun introduced his successful experience with local anesthetic injection at the occipital insertion of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in K-point syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term effectiveness of K-point injection and investigate factors affecting treatment results. K-point injection was performed in 58 patients with K-point syndrome at Yeungnam University Medical Center. The syndrome was associated with cervical whiplash injury in 10 patients and was of nonspecific origin in the rest. One milliliter of 2% lidocaine mixed with 1 milliliter of dexamethasone was injected in 50 patients and 2 milliliters of 1% lidocaine alone in the rest. Initially, the severity of local tenderness at the K-point and other tender points was examined and the degree of immediate pain relief effect was assessed within 1 hour after injection. Early effect within 1 month after the injection and current effect were evaluated in 27 patients using a modified Kim's questionnaire with regard to the duration of improvement, degree of improvement in pain and daily living activities, and satisfaction. Of the total 58 patients, 44 (75.8%) apparently had immediate pain relief after K-point injection. The only factor associated with successful immediate pain relief was the whiplash injury associated with traffic accident (TA). The early pain control effect was associated with the immediate effect. The current effect was associated with the early effect alone. Satisfaction with the K-point injection was related to early successful pain relief. K-point injection would be useful for early pain relief in nonspecific neck pain syndrome so called K-point syndrome, but not for current pain relief. Especially, it was very effective for early pain control in the whiplash injury associated with TA.

  20. Methods to produce calibration mixtures for anesthetic gas monitors and how to perform volumetric calculations on anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, P L; Nielsen, J; Kann, T

    1992-10-01

    A simple procedure for making calibration mixtures of oxygen and the anesthetic gases isoflurane, enflurane, and halothane is described. One to ten grams of the anesthetic substance is evaporated in a closed, 11,361-cc glass bottle filled with oxygen gas at atmospheric pressure. The carefully mixed gas is used to calibrate anesthetic gas monitors. By comparison of calculated and measured volumetric results it is shown that at atmospheric conditions the volumetric behavior of anesthetic gas mixtures can be described with reasonable accuracy using the ideal gas law. A procedure is described for calculating the deviation from ideal gas behavior in cases in which this is needed.

  1. Reducing intraocular-pressure spike after intravitreal-bevacizumab injection with ocular decompression using a sterile cotton swab soaked in proparacaine 0.5%: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Naveed A; Mansoor, Hassan; Ahmad, Sabihuddin; Zafar, Sarah; Asif, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of preinjection ocular decompression by a cotton swab soaked in local anesthetic on the immediate postinjection rise in intraocular pressure (IOP) after intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB). A nonrandomized, quasi-experimental interventional study was conducted at Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Pakistan, from August 1, 2013 to July 31, 2014. One hundred ( n = 100) patients receiving 0.05-mL IVB injection for the first time were assigned to two preinjection anesthetic methods: one with ocular decompression using a sterile cotton swab soaked in proparacaine 0.5%, and the other without ocular decompression using proparacaine 0.5% eyedrops. The IOP was recorded in the eye receiving IVB at three time intervals: Time 1 (preinjection), Time 2 (immediately after injection), and Time 3 (30 minutes after injection). There was a significant difference in the mean IOP change (between Time 1 and Time 2) for the group injected with ocular decompression [ M = 1.00, standard deviation (SD) = 1.47] and the group injected without ocular decompression ( M = 5.00, SD = 2.38; t (68) = 9.761, p 0.5% experience significantly lower postinjection IOP spike, and that too for a considerably shorter duration as compared to those receiving IVB without ocular decompression.

  2. Thrombotic stroke in the anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta): characterization by MRI - A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauberti, Maxime; Gakuba, Clement; Orset, Cyrille; Obiang, Pauline; Guedin, Pierre; Balossier, Anne; Diependaele, Anne-Sophie; Young, Alan R.; Agin, Veronique; Chazalviel, Laurent; Vivien, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The lack of a relevant stroke model in large nonhuman primates hinders the development of innovative diagnostic/therapeutic approaches concerned with this cerebrovascular disease. Our objective was to develop a novel and clinically relevant model of embolic stroke in the anesthetized monkey that incorporates readily available clinical imaging techniques and that would allow the possibility of drug delivery including strategies of reperfusion. Thrombin was injected into the lumen of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in 12 anesthetized (sevoflurane) male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Sequential MRI studies (including angiography, FLAIR, PWI, DWI, and gadolinium-enhanced T1W imaging) were performed in a 3 T clinical MRI. Physiological and biochemical parameters were monitored throughout the investigations. Once standardized, the surgical procedure induced transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in all operated animals. All animals studied showed spontaneous reperfusion, which occurred some time between 2 h and 7 days post-ictus. Eighty percent of the studied animals showed diffusion/perfusion mismatch. The ischemic lesions at 24 h spared both superficial and profound territories of the MCA. Some animals presented hemorrhagic transformation at 7 days post-ictus. In this study, we developed a pre-clinically relevant model of embolic stroke in the anesthetized nonhuman primate. (authors)

  3. Computed tomography-guided bupivacaine and corticosteroid injection for the treatment of symptomatic calcification in the great toe tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatoprak O

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Omer Karatoprak,1 Sinan Karaca,2 Mehmet Nuri Erdem,3 Ozgur Karaman,2 Azmi Hamzaoglu41Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital Atasehir, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Kolan International Hospital Sisli, Istanbul, Turkey; 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Istanbul Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul TurkeyBackground: Calcification in the great toe tendon is a rare disorder that is characterized by the deposition of calcium on degenerative collagen fibrils.Case presentations: In this report, we present two cases of calcific tendonitis: one in the adductor hallucis and the other in the flexor hallucis longus tendon. We preferred computed tomography-guided steroid injection in our cases because of pain unresponsive to conservative treatment. Patients were free of symptoms at the follow-up visit, 4 weeks after injection.Conclusion: Calcification of the hallux tendons is a rare disorder. Treatment of tendonitis consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Local anesthetic and steroid injection may be considered in cases unresponsive to conservative treatment. Because of the anatomic location of tendons, injection could be difficult. Computed tomography guidance may improve the success rate of injections.Keywords: bupivacaine, calcification, great toe tendons, corticosteroid injection

  4. Anesthetic equipment, facilities and services available for pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Facilities and equipment are known to contribute to improved patient care and outcome. Hospitals for sub‑specialized pediatric anesthetic service are routinely available worldwide. In Nigeria, such hospitals now exist. It is therefore relevant to study the facilities and equipment available for pediatric anesthetic ...

  5. [Anesthetic management of four patients with Fournier syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Rui; Tomioka, Toshiya; Orii, Ryo; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2008-03-01

    We experienced anesthetic managements of four patients with Fournier syndrome. In the anesthetic management of the patients with Fournier syndrome the following three points should be kept in mind; (a) the necessity of careful preoperative examination, (b) the better anesthesia, and (c) the careful postoperative care.

  6. Tolerance to acute isovolemic hemodilution. Effect of anesthetic depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Philippe; de Hert, Stefan; Mathieu, Nathalie; Degroote, Françoise; Schmartz, Denis; Zhang, Haibo; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acceptance of a lower transfusion trigger in the perioperative period requires study of the effects of anesthetic depth on the tolerance to acute isovolemic anemia. Anesthetic agents with negative effects on the cardiovascular system may exert proportionately greater depressant effects

  7. Anesthetic Efficacy of Articaine and Ketamine for Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block in Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis: A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaeimanesh, Vahid; Khazaei, Saber; Kaviani, Naser; Saatchi, Masoud; Shafiei, Maryam; Khademi, Abbasali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to investigate the effect of articaine combined with ketamine on the success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) in posterior mandible teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Methods and Materials: Forty two adult patients with diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth were selected. The patients received two cartridges of either containing 3.2 mL 4% articaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 0.4 mL 50 mg/mL ketamine hydrochloride (A-ketamine group) or 3.2 mL 4% articaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 0.4 mL normal saline (A-saline group) using conventional IANB injections. Access cavity preparation started 15 min after injection. Lip numbness was required for all the patients. Success was considered as no or mild pain on the basis of Heft-Parker visual analog scale recordings upon access cavity preparation or initial instrumentation. Data were analyzed by independent student t, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests. Results: The success rates were 55% and 42.9% for A-ketamine and A-saline group, respectively, with no significant differences betw