WorldWideScience

Sample records for lobed radio quasars

  1. Double Lobed Radio Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W H; Becker, R H; White, R L

    2005-11-10

    We have combined a sample of 44 984 quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3, with the FIRST radio survey. Using a novel technique where the optical quasar position is matched to the complete radio environment within 450'', we are able to characterize the radio morphological make-up of what is essentially an optically selected quasar sample, regardless of whether the quasar (nucleus) itself has been detected in the radio. About 10% of the quasar population have radio cores brighter than 0.75 mJy at 1.4 GHz, and 1.7% have double lobed FR2-like radio morphologies. About 75% of the FR2 sources have a radio core (> 0.75mJy). A significant fraction ({approx}40%) of the FR2 quasars are bent by more than 10 degrees, indicating either interactions of the radio plasma with the ICM or IGM. We found no evidence for correlations with redshift among our FR2 quasars: radio lobe flux densities and radio source diameters of the quasars have similar distributions at low (mean 0.77) and high (mean 2.09) redshifts. Using a smaller high reliability FR2 sample of 422 quasars and two comparison samples of radio-quiet and non-FR2 radio-loud quasars, matched in their redshift distributions, we constructed composite optical spectra from the SDSS spectroscopic data. Based on these spectra we can conclude that the FR2 quasars have stronger high-ionization emission lines compared to both the radio quiet and non-FR2 radio loud sources. This is consistent with the notion that the emission lines are brightened by ongoing shock ionization of ambient gas in the quasar host as the radio source expands.

  2. An X-Ray Study of Lobe-Dominated Radio-Loud Quasars with XMM-Newton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We report on our results of X-ray spectral analysis for a sample of radio-loud quasars covering a wide range of the radio core-dominance parameter, R, from core-dominated to lobe-dominated objects, using data obtained mostly with the XMM-Newton Observatory. We find that the spectral shape of the underlying power-law continuum is flat even for the lobe-dominated objects (average photon index ~ 1.5), indistinguishable from that of core-dominated quasars. For lobe-dominated objects, contribution of X-rays from the jets is expected to be very small based on previous unification schemes, more than one order of magnitude lower than the observed X-ray luminosities. Assuming that radio-loud quasars follow the same X-ray-UV/optical luminosity relation for the disk-corona emission as found for radio-quiet quasars, we estimate the X-ray flux contributed by the disk-corona component from the optical/UV continuum. We find that neither the luminosity, nor the spectral shape, of the disk-corona X-ray emission can account for the bulk of the observed X-ray properties. Thus in lobe-dominated quasars, either the disk-corona X-ray emission is much enhanced in strength and flatter in spectral shape (photon index~1.5) compared to normal radio-quiet quasars, or their jet X-ray emission is much enhanced compared to their weak radio core-jet emission. If the latter is the case, our result may imply that the jet emission in X-rays is less Doppler beamed than that in the radio. As a demonstrating example, we test this hypothesis by using a specific model in which the X-ray jet has a larger opening angle than the radio jet.

  3. Radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars: one population, different epochs of observation

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    I bring together evidence for the rapidity with which quasars' radio synchrotron lobe emission fades and for the intermittency with which jet plasma is ejected from individual quasars and radio galaxies and affirm the picture presented by Nipoti et al (2005) that the radio-loudness of quasars is a function of the epoch at which they are observed. I briefly illustrate this account with examples of successive episodes of jet activity where the axis along which jet plasma is launched appears to have precessed. A new model for the weak core radio emission from radio-quiet quasars, that is not any kind of jet ejecta, is also briefly described.

  4. What sparks the radio-loud phase of nearby quasars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coziol, Roger; Andernach, Heinz; Torres-Papaqui, Juan Pablo; Ortega-Minakata, René Alberto; Moreno del Rio, Froylan

    2017-04-01

    To better constrain the hypotheses proposed to explain why only a few quasars are radio loud (RL), we compare the characteristics of 1958 nearby (z ≤ 0.3) SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) quasars, covered by the FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-centimeters) and NVSS (NRAO VLA Sky Survey) radio surveys. Only 22 per cent are RL with log (L1.4 GHz) ≥ 22.5 W Hz-1, the majority being compact (C), weak radio sources (WRS), with log (L1.4 GHz) radio morphologies: 3 per cent have a core and a jet (J), 2 per cent have a core with one lobe (L), and 10 per cent have a core with two lobes (T), the majority being powerful radio sources (PRS), with log (L1.4 GHz) ≥ 24.5 W Hz-1. In general, RL quasars have higher bolometric luminosities and ionization powers than radio-quiet (RQ) quasars. The WRS have comparable black hole (BH) masses as the RQ quasars, but higher accretion rates or radiative efficiencies. The PRS have higher BH masses than the WRS, but comparable accretion rates or radiative efficiencies. The WRS also have higher FWHM_{[O iii]} than the PRS, consistent with a coupling of the spectral characteristics of the quasars with their radio morphologies. Inspecting the SDSS images and applying a neighbour search algorithm reveal no difference between the RQ and RL quasars of their host galaxies, environments, and interaction. Our results prompt the conjecture that the phenomenon that sparks the RL phase in quasars is transient, intrinsic to the active galactic nuclei, and stochastic, due to the chaotic nature of the accretion process of matter on to the BHs.

  5. Sensitive Radio Survey of Obscured Quasar Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael M; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars over a range of redshifts to understand the role of radio activity in accretion using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 6.0GHz and 1.4GHz. Our z~2.5 sample consists of optically-selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of $\

  6. The jet-disk symbiosis; 2, interpreting the radio/uv correlations in quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Falcke, H; Biermann, P L; Falcke, Heino; Malkan, Matthew A; Biermann, Peter L

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the correlation between the accretion disk (UV) luminosity and the radio core emission of a quasar sample. In a radio/L_{\\rm disk} plot we find the quasars to be separated into four classes: core dominated quasars (CDQ), lobe dominated quasars (LDQ), radio-intermediate quasars (RIQ) and radio weak quasars. In general the radio core emission scales with the disk luminosity, especially in the radio weak quasars. This shows that radio and UV emission have a common energy source and that the difference between radio loud and radio weak is established already on the parsec scale. We investigate the possibility that radio jets are responsible for the radio core emission in radio loud and radio weak quasars. Comparing our data with a simple jet emission model that takes the limits imposed by energy and mass conservation in a coupled jet-disk system into account, we find that radio loud jets carry a total power Q_{\\rm jet} that is at least 1/3 of the observed disk luminosity L_{\\rm disk}. For the elect...

  7. 3C 57 as an Atypical Radio-Loud Quasar: Implications for the Radio-Loud/Radio-Quiet Dichotomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sulentic, J W; Marziani, P; del Olmo, A; Stirpe, G M; Zamfir, S; Plauchu-Frayn, I

    2015-01-01

    Lobe-dominated radio-loud (LD RL) quasars occupy a restricted domain in the 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) parameter space which implies restricted geometry/physics/kinematics for this subclass compared to the radio-quiet (RQ) majority of quasars. We discuss how this restricted domain for the LD RL parent population supports the notion for a RQ-RL dichotomy among Type 1 sources. 3C 57 is an atypical RL quasar that shows both uncertain radio morphology and falls in a region of 4DE1 space where RL quasars are rare. We present new radio flux and optical spectroscopic measures designed to verify its atypical optical/UV spectroscopic behaviour and clarify its radio structure. The former data confirms that 3C 57 falls off the 4DE1 quasar "main sequence" with both extreme optical FeII emission (R_{FeII} ~ 1) and a large CIV 1549 profile blueshift (~ -1500 km/s). These parameter values are typical of extreme Population A sources which are almost always RQ. New radio measures show no evidence for flux change over a 50+ year ...

  8. Star formation in quasar hosts and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Petric, Andreea; Dicken, Daniel; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Hickox, Ryan C; Ho, Luis C; Krolik, Julian H; Nesvadba, Nicole P H; Strauss, Michael A; Geach, James E; Oguri, Masamune; Strateva, Iskra V

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from radio-quiet quasars may be due to star formation in the quasar host galaxy, to a jet launched by the supermassive black hole, or to relativistic particles accelerated in a wide-angle radiatively-driven outflow. In this paper we examine whether radio emission from radio-quiet quasars is a byproduct of star formation in their hosts. To this end we use infrared spectroscopy and photometry from Spitzer and Herschel to estimate or place upper limits on star formation rates in hosts of ~300 obscured and unobscured quasars at z<1. We find that low-ionization forbidden emission lines such as [NeII] and [NeIII] are likely dominated by quasar ionization and do not provide reliable star formation diagnostics in quasar hosts, while PAH emission features may be suppressed due to the destruction of PAH molecules by the quasar radiation field. While the bolometric luminosities of our sources are dominated by the quasars, the 160 micron fluxes are likely dominated by star formation, but they too should...

  9. 3C 57 as an atypical radio-loud quasar: implications for the radio-loud/radio-quiet dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.; Marziani, P.; del Olmo, A.; Stirpe, G. M.; Zamfir, S.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Lobe-dominated radio-loud (LD RL) quasars occupy a restricted domain in the 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) parameter space which implies restricted geometry/physics/kinematics for this subclass compared to the radio-quiet (RQ) majority of quasars. We discuss how this restricted domain for the LD RL parent population supports the notion for a RQ-RL dichotomy among type 1 sources. 3C 57 is an atypical RL quasar that shows both uncertain radio morphology and falls in a region of 4DE1 space where RL quasars are rare. We present new radio flux and optical spectroscopic measures designed to verify its atypical optical/UV spectroscopic behaviour and clarify its radio structure. The former data confirms that 3C 57 falls off the 4DE1 quasar `main sequence' with both extreme optical Fe II emission (R_{Fe II} ˜ 1) and a large C IV λ1549 profile blueshift (˜-1500 km s-1). These parameter values are typical of extreme Population A sources which are almost always RQ. New radio measures show no evidence for flux change over a 50+ year time-scale consistent with compact steep-spectrum (or young LD) over core-dominated morphology. In the 4DE1 context where LD RL are usually low L/LEdd quasars, we suggest that 3C 57 is an evolved RL quasar (i.e. large blackhole mass) undergoing a major accretion event leading to a rejuvenation reflected by strong Fe II emission, perhaps indicating significant heavy metal enrichment, high bolometric luminosity for a low-redshift source and resultant unusually high Eddington ratio giving rise to the atypical C IV λ1549.

  10. Spectral Variability in Radio-Loud Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minfeng Gu

    2014-09-01

    The spectral variability of a sample of 44 Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) and 18 Steep-Spectrum Radio Quasars (SSRQs) in SDSS stripe 82 region is investigated. Twenty-five of 44 FSRQs show a bluer-when-brighter trend (BWB), while only one FSRQ shows a redder-when-brighter trend, which is in contrast to our previous results. Eight of 18 SSRQs display a BWB. We found an anticorrelation between the Eddington ratio and the variability amplitude in the band for SSRQs, which is similar to that in radio-quiet AGNs. This implies that the thermal emission from the accretion disk may be responsible for the variability in SSRQs. The spectral variability from SDSS multi-epoch spectroscopy also shows BWB for several SSRQs, which is consistent with that from photometry.

  11. Parsec-scale radio structures in Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, G.; Paragi, Z.; Gurvits, L.

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) con su nueva extensión para el radio telescopio orbital, VSOP/HALCA, ofrece una incomparable resolución angular alcanzando escalas de milisegundos y submilisegundos de arco a longitudes de onda de centímetros. En este trabajo presentamos observaciones y análisis de estructuras en radio, en escalas de parsec, para 3 radio fuentes extragalácticas de la muestra de VSOP Survey y 1 quasar, 1442+101, del proyecto `VSOP High Redshift'.

  12. Sensitive radio survey of obscured quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars in samples at both low (z ˜ 0.5) and high (z ˜ 2.5) redshift to understand the role of radio activity in accretion, using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 6.0 GHz and 1.4 GHz. Our z ˜ 2.5 sample consists of optically selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of νLν[1.4 GHz] ≲ 1040 erg s-1. Only a single source is individually detected in our deep (rms˜10 μJy) exposures. This population would not be identified by radio-based selection methods used for distinguishing dusty star-forming galaxies and obscured active nuclei. In our pilot A-array study of z ˜ 0.5 radio-quiet quasars, we spatially resolve four of five objects on scales ˜5 kpc and find they have steep spectral indices with an average value of α = -0.75. Therefore, radio emission in these sources could be due to jet-driven or radiatively driven bubbles interacting with interstellar material on the scale of the host galaxy. Finally, we also study the additional population of ˜200 faint ( ˜ 40 μJy-40 mJy) field radio sources observed over ˜120 arcmin2 of our data. 60 per cent of these detections (excluding our original targets) are matched in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and are, in roughly equal shares, active galactic nuclei (AGN) at a broad range of redshifts, passive galaxies with no other signs of nuclear activity and infrared-bright but optically faint sources. Spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed star-forming galaxies constitute only a small minority of the matches. Such sensitive radio surveys allow us to address important questions of AGN evolution and evaluate the AGN contribution to the radio-quiet sky.

  13. Broad Absorption Line Variability in Radio-Loud Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Welling, C A; Brandt, W N; Capellupo, D M; Gibson, R R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate C IV broad absorption line (BAL) variability within a sample of 46 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), selected from SDSS/FIRST data to include both core-dominated (39) and lobe-dominated (7) objects. The sample consists primarily of high-ionization BAL quasars, and a substantial fraction have large BAL velocities or equivalent widths; their radio luminosities and radio-loudness values span ~2.5 orders of magnitude. We have obtained 34 new Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectra of 28 BAL RLQs to compare to earlier SDSS data, and we also incorporate archival coverage (primarily dual-epoch SDSS) for a total set of 78 pairs of equivalent width measurements for 46 BAL RLQs, probing rest-frame timescales of ~80-6000 d (median 500 d). In general, only modest changes in the depths of segments of absorption troughs are observed, akin to those seen in prior studies of BAL RQQs. Also similar to previous findings for RQQs, the RLQs studied here are more likely to display BAL variability on longer rest-frame timescal...

  14. Fornax A's Western Radio Lobe Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jason J.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Kraft, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the western radio lobe of Fornax A based on an XMM-Newton observation. We find little evidence for the inverse-Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background as reported previously. The spectra in the energy range of 0.5-5 keV are well fitted by a thermal plus power law model for every spectral region we extracted. With a fixed photon index of 1.68, the X-ray flux density at 1 keV from the power law fit was measured to be cool gas extends from the central galaxy in the direction of the radio lobe of Fornax A. Spectral fits give a temperature of kT=0.76 keV over the radio lobe and kT=0.32 keV for the cool filament. The thermal emission from the radio lobe region is best explained as emission from a thin shell of shocked gas swept up by the rapidly expanding lobe. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  15. Black Hole Mass Estimates of Radio Selected Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Oshlack, Alicia; Webster, Rachel; Whiting, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The black hole (BH) mass in the centre of AGN has been estimated for a sample of radio-selected flat-spectrum quasars to investigate the relationship between BH mass and radio properties of quasars. We have used the virial assumption with measurements of the H$\\beta$ FWHM and luminosity to estimate the central BH mass. In contrast to previous studies we find no correlation between BH mass and radio power in these AGN. We find a range in BH mass similar to that seen in radio-quiet quasars from...

  16. Nature and evolution of powerful radio galaxies and their link with the quasar luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Koerding, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Current wide-area radio surveys are dominated by active galactic nuclei, yet many of these sources have no identified optical counterparts. Here we investigate whether one can constrain the nature and properties of these sources, using Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio galaxies as probes. These sources are easy to identify since the angular separation of their lobes remains almost constant at some tens of arcseconds for z>1. Using a simple algorithm applied to the FIRST survey, we obtain the largest FRII sample to date, containing over ten thousand double-lobed sources. A subset of 459 sources is matched to SDSS quasars. This sample yields a statistically meaningful description of the fraction of quasars with lobes as a function of redshift and luminosity. This relation is combined with the bolometric quasar luminosity function, as derived from surveys at IR to hard X-ray frequencies, and a disc-lobe correlation to obtain a robust prediction for the density of FRIIs on the radio sky. We find that the observ...

  17. Correlation between radio and broad-line emissions in radio-loud quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, X; Cao, Xinwu

    1999-01-01

    Radio emission is a good indicator of the jet power of radio-loud quasars, while the emission in broad-line can well represent the accretion disc radiation in quasars. We compile a sample of all sources of which the broad-line fluxes are available from 1 Jy, S4 and S5 radio source catalogues. A correlation between radio and broad-line emission for this sample of radio-loud quasars is presented, which is in favour of a close link between the accretion processes and the relativistic jets. The BL Lac objects seem to follow the statistical behaviour of the quasars, but with fainter broad-line emission.

  18. Evidence for the alignment of quasar radio polarizations with large quasar group axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrims, V.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been presented for the polarization vectors from quasars to preferentially align with the axes of the large quasar groups (LQG) to which they belong. This report was based on observations made at optical wavelengths for two LQGs at redshift ~1.3. The correlation suggests that the spin axes of quasars preferentially align with their surrounding large-scale structure that is assumed to be traced by the LQGs. Here, we consider a large sample of LQGs built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalogue in the redshift range 1.0-1.8. For quasars embedded in this sample, we collected radio polarization measurements with the goal to study possible correlations between quasar polarization vectors and the major axis of their host LQGs. Assuming the radio polarization vector is perpendicular to the quasar spin axis, we found that the quasar spin axis is preferentially parallel to the LQG major axis inside LQGs that have at least 20 members. This result independently supports the observations at optical wavelengths. We additionally found that when the richness of an LQG decreases, the quasar spin axis becomes preferentially perpendicular to the LQG major axis and that no correlation is detected for quasar groups with fewer than 10 members.

  19. Radio imaging of core-dominated high redshift quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Peter D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Lonsdale, Colin J.

    1999-01-01

    VLA imaging at kiloparsec-scale resolution of sixteen core-dominated radio-loud QSOs is presented. Many objects appear to display variable radio emission and their radio morphologies are significantly smaller than those of steep-spectrum quasars, consistent with these objects being observed...

  20. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  1. On the selection effect of radio quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Zhou, Hongyan; Wu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    We identified a large sample of radio quasars, including those with complex radio morphology, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Faint Images of Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST). Using this sample, we inspect previous radio quasar samples for selection effects resulting from complex radio morphologies and adopting positional coincidence between radio and optical sources alone. We find that 13.0% and 8.1% radio quasars do not show a radio core within 1.2 and 2 arcsecs of their optical position, and thus are missed in such samples. Radio flux is under-estimated by a factor of more than 2 for an additional 8.7% radio quasars. These missing radio extended quasars are more radio loud with a typical radio-to-optical flux ratio namely radio loudness RL >100, and radio power P >10^{25} W/Hz. They account for more than one third of all quasars with RL>100. The color of radio extended quasars tends to be bluer than the radio compact quasars. This suggests that radio extended quasars are more radio powerful ...

  2. On Asymmetries in Powerful Radio Sources and the Quasar/Galaxy Unification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. I. Onah; A. A. Ubachukwu; F. C. Odo

    2014-12-01

    We utilize the distributions of fractional separation difference () as asymmetry parameter, linear size () and core-to lobe luminosity ratio () as orientation indicators, to investigate a consequence of radio source orientation and relativistic beaming effects in a sample of powerful non-symmetric extragalactic radio sources. In this scenario, radio sources viewed at small orientation angles to the line-of-sight are expected to show a high degree of asymmetry in observed radio structures due to relativistic beaming, with foreshortened projected linear sizes. A simple consequence of this is the - anti-correlation. Results show a tight correlation ( > 0.8) between the total and core radio luminosities and a clear - anti-correlation ( ∼ -0.5). The observed - anti-correlation is consistent with average orientation angle ≈ 48° and a maximum Lorentz factor ∼ 2 for the sample, with minimum angular separation of 26° between radio galaxies and quasars. However, there is no clear - correlation. While the results are consistent with quasar/galaxy unification via orientation, intrinsic asymmetry also seems to play a major role.

  3. MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2012-09-10

    We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

  4. 3C 84 Expanding Radio Lobe Revealed by VSOP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, K.; Kameno, S.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Shinji, H.; Gabuzda, D. C.; Inoue, M.

    2009-08-01

    We report the detection of the expansion and inner proper motions of a young radio lobe associated with the bright radio source 3C 84 in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 using multi-epoch VSOP observation. The observed inner proper motions are consistent with the evolution scenario of classical double radio sources. The apparent expansion velocity is 0.50 ± 0.09 c, and the age of radio lobe is estimated to be 45.7 ± 8.9 years in 2001. The total flux density at 5 GHz increased at the end of the 1950's, with several peaks in the middle of the 1980's, and is in a decay phase now. The decay of total flux density can be naturally explained by an adiabatic cooling due to the expansion of the radio lobe, and previously measured spectral indices suggest that the emission comes from the surface of the radio lobe.

  5. Evolution of a Powerful Radio Loud Quasar 3C186 and its Impact on the Cluster Environment at z=1

    CERN Document Server

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Burke, Doug; Bechtold, Jill; Cheung, C C; LaMassa, Stephanie; Worrall, Diana M

    2007-01-01

    X-ray cluster emission has been observed mainly in clusters with "inactive" cD galaxies (L_bol ~1E40-1E43erg/sec), which do not show signs of accretion onto a SMBH. Our recent Chandra discovery of ~100kpc scale diffuse X-ray emission revealed the presence of an X-ray cluster associated with the radio loud quasar 3C186 at redshift z=1.1 and suggests interactions between the quasar and the cluster. In contrast to the majority of X-ray clusters the 3C186 cluster contains a quasar in the center whose radiative power alone exceeds that which would be needed to quench the cluster cooling. We present the Chandra X-ray data and new deep radio and optical images of this cluster. The 3C186 quasar is a powerful Compact Steep Spectrum radio source expanding into the cluster medium. The 2arcsec radio jet is unresolved in the Chandra observation, but its direction is orthogonal to the elliptical surface brightness of the cluster. The radio data show the possible presence of old radio lobes on 10 arcsec scale in the directi...

  6. Relativistic Flows at the Hotspots of Radio Galaxies and Quasars?

    CERN Document Server

    Georganopoulos, M; Georganopoulos, Markos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2003-01-01

    We review the broad band properties of X-ray detected hotspots in radio galaxies and quasars. We show that their collective properties can be unified in a framework involving frequency dependent relativistic beaming and varying orientations to the observer's line of sight. The simplest dynamic model consistent with this picture is a slowing-down relativistic flow downstream from the hotspot shock, suggesting that the jet flow remains relativistic to the hotspot distances.

  7. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  8. The radio luminosity function and redshift evolution of radio-mode and quasar-mode AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracy, Mike

    2016-08-01

    The properties of the AGN population indicate that there are two fundamentally different accretion modes operating. In the quasar-mode, material is accreted onto the supermassive black hole via a small, thin, optically luminous accretion disc. Accretion in this mode is recognisable by emission lines in the optical spectrum. However, there is a population of AGN observable only by their radio emission and without optical emission lines. These radio-mode AGN are likely powered by radiatively inefficient accretion from a hot gas halo. I will describe the cosmic evolution of these two populations via radio luminosity functions. The radio luminosity functions are constructed from a new survey of over 4000 radio galaxies out to z=1, all with confirmed redshifts and their accretion mode classified from their optical spectra. This is 20 times larger than the only other survey used to make such a measurement. The radio-mode AGN population displays no statistically significant evolution in space density out to redshift z=1. In contrast the quasar mode AGN exhibits rapid evolution in space density, increasing by a factor of 8 over the same redshift range. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power for the quasar-mode AGN in comparison to the radio-mode AGN and we demonstrate this is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes. The radio luminosity function is used to estimate the total amount of mechanical energy available for radio mode feedback as a function of redshift, and is found to be in good agreement with cosmological models and previous measurements. Again, by separating by accretion mode, the previously estimated increase in available mechanical energy per unit volume out to z=1 (approximately a factor of 2) can be attributed to the rapid evolution of the quasar-mode AGN, while for the classical radio-mode AGN the total mechanical energy output remains roughly

  9. DISCOVERY OF γ-RAY EMISSION FROM THE STRONGLY LOBE-DOMINATED QUASAR 3C 275.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Neng-Hui; Xin, Yu-Liang; Li, Shang; Jiang, Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Fan, Yi-Zhong [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Chen, Liang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Bai, Jin-Ming, E-mail: liaonh@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2015-07-20

    We systematically analyze the 6 year Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) data on lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs) in the complete LDQ sample from the Revised third Cambridge Catalogue of Radio Sources (3CRR) survey and report the discovery of high-energy γ-ray emission from 3C 275.1. The γ-ray emission of 3C 207 is confirmed and significant variability of the light curve is identified. We do not find statistically significant γ-ray emission from other LDQs. 3C 275.1 is the known γ-ray quasar with the lowest core dominance parameter (i.e., R = 0.11). We also show that both the northern radio hotspot and parsec jet models can reasonably reproduce the γ-ray data. The parsec jet model, however, is favored by the potential γ-ray variability on a timescale of months. We suggest that some dimmer γ-ray LDQs will be detected in the future and LDQs could contribute non-ignorably to the extragalactic γ-ray background.

  10. Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet BAL Quasars: A Detailed Ultraviolet Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Rochais, Thomas B; Myers, Adam D; Brotherton, Michael S; Runnoe, Jessie C; Hall, Shannon W

    2014-01-01

    Studies of radio-loud (RL) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars indicate that popular orientation-based BAL models fail to account for all observations. Are these results extendable to radio-quiet (RQ) BAL quasars? Comparisons of RL and RQ BAL quasars show that many of their properties are quite similar. Here we extend these analyses to the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectral properties, using a sample of 73 RL and 473 RQ BAL quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each RQ quasar is individually matched to a RL quasar in both redshift (over the range $1.5 < z < 3.5$) and continuum luminosity. We compare several continuum, emission line, and absorption line properties, as well as physical properties derived from these measurements. Most properties in the samples are statistically identical, though we find slight differences in the velocity structure of the BALs that cause apparent differences in CIV emission line properties. Differences in the velocities may indicate an interaction bet...

  11. Broadband nuclear emission in two radio-loud BAL quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Janiuk, A

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray weakness of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars in comparison to non-BAL objects is possibly caused by the absorption of X-ray emission by the shielding material near the equatorial plane. On the other hand, the radio-loud BALQSOs are more X-ray loud than the radio-quiet ones. This suggests that part of the X-ray emission may arise from the radio jet. To investigate this possibility, we modelled the nuclear spectra of two radio-loud BALQSOs. We focus on the emission from the very centres of these two objects. The source of emission was approximated by a single, homogeneous component that produces synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. The simplicity of the model allowed us to estimate the basic physical parameters of the emitting regions, using a universal analytic approach. Such methods have already been used in blazars. For the first time we propose this solution for quasars. In addition, we modelled the radiation spectra of the accretion disk and its corona to compare them with the jets'...

  12. Radio and X-ray emission from disc winds in radio-quiet quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Steenbrugge, K C; Kuncic, Z; Blundell, K M

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that the radio spectra of radio-quiet quasars is produced by free-free emission in the optically thin part of an accretion disc wind. An important observational constraint on this model is the observed X-ray luminosity. We investigate this constraint using a sample of PG radio-quiet quasars for which XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are available. Comparing the predicted and measured luminosities for 0.5, 2 and 5 keV, we conclude that all of the studied PG quasars require a large hydrogen column density absorber, requiring these quasars to be close to or Compton-thick. Such a large column density can be directly excluded for PG 0050+124, for which a high-resolution RGS spectrum exists. Further constraint on the column density for a further 19 out of the 21 studied PG quasars comes from the EPIC spectrum characteristics such as hard X-ray power-law photon index and the equivalent width of the Fe Kalpha line; and the small equivalent width of the C IV absorber present in UV spectra. For 2 sources: P...

  13. The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectra of Low Redshift Radio Loud Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian; Marziani, Paola; O'Dea, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrum of three low redshift ($z \\sim 0.6$) radio loud quasars, 3C 95, 3C 57 and PKS 0405-123. The spectra were obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) of the Hubble Space Telescope. The bolometric thermal emission, $L_{bol}$, associated with the accretion flow is a large fraction of the Eddington limit for all of these sources. We estimate the long term time averaged jet power, $\\overline{Q}$, for the three sources. $\\overline{Q}/L_{bol}$, is shown to lie along the correlation of $\\overline{Q}/L_{bol}$ and $\\alpha_{EUV}$ found in previous studies of the EUV continuum of intermediate and high redshift quasars, where the EUV continuum flux density between 1100 \\AA\\, and 700 \\AA\\, is defined by $F_{\

  14. VLBI observations of four radio quasars at z > 4: blazars or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H. M.; Frey, S.; Gabányi, K. É.; Paragi, Z.; Yang, J.; Cseh, D.; Hong, X.-Y.; An, T.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are active galactic nuclei (AGN) whose relativistic jets point nearly to the line of sight. Their compact radio structure can be imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) on parsec scales. Blazars at extremely high redshifts provide a unique insight into the AGN phenomena in the early Universe. We observed four radio sources at redshift z > 4 with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.7 and 5 GHz. These objects were previously classified as blazar candidates based on X-ray observations. One of them, J2134-0419 is firmly confirmed as a blazar with our VLBI observations, due to its relativistically beamed radio emission. Its radio jet extended to ˜10 milli-arcsec scale makes this source a promising target for follow-up VLBI observations to reveal any apparent proper motion. Another target, J0839+5112 shows a compact radio structure typical of quasars. There is evidence for flux density variability and its radio "core" has a flat spectrum. However, the EVN data suggest that its emission is not Doppler-boosted. The remaining two blazar candidates (J1420+1205 and J2220+0025) show radio properties totally unexpected from radio AGN with small-inclination jet. Their emission extends to arcsec scales and the Doppler factors of the central components are well below 1. Their structures resemble that of double-lobed radio AGN with large inclination to the line of sight. This is in contrast with the blazar-type modeling of their multi-band spectral energy distributions. Our work underlines the importance of high-resolution VLBI imaging in confirming the blazar nature of high-redshift radio sources.

  15. B1524-136 A CSS quasar with two-sided radio jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovani, F; Bondi, M; Junor, W; Salter, C J; Ricci, R

    2002-01-01

    We present MERLIN, global VLBI and VLBA observations of the high-luminosity, compact steep-spectrum quasar B1524$-$136 at cm wavelengths. These observations reveal well-defined radio jets on both sides of the active nucleus, a situation which is almost unique amongst high-luminosity radio quasars. However, the radio jets on opposite sides are very dissimilar, and the overall radio structure appears highly distorted. We discuss possible implications of these observations.

  16. The optical-UV emissivity of quasars: dependence on black hole mass and radio loudness

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco; Knigge, Christian; Matthews, James; Buckland, Rachel; Hryniewicz, Krzysztof; Sivakoff, Gregory; Dai, Xinyu; Richardson, Kayleigh; Riley, Jack; Gray, James; La Franca, Fabio; Altamirano, Diego; Croston, Judith; Gandhi, Poshak; Hoenig, Sebastian F; McHardy, Ian; Middleton, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed a large sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasar spectra at redshift 1.0 < z < 1.2 to compare the inferred underlying quasar continuum slopes (after removal of the host galaxy contribution) with accretion disk models. The latter predict redder (decreasing) alpha_3000 continuum slopes (L_\

  17. Estimation of Black Hole Masses from Steep Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ye Chen; Zhi-Fu Chen; Yi-Ping Qin; You-Bing Li

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we employ a sample of 185 steep-spectrum radio quasars (SSRQs) to estimate their black hole masses from broad emission lines. Our black hole masses are compared with the virial black hole masses estimated by Shen (2010). We find that there is a large deviation between the two kinds of values if the black hole masses are estimated from broad emission line of CIV. However, both values are in agreement if the black hole masses are estimated from broad emission line of MgII or H.

  18. Measurement of Black Hole Mass Radio-Loud Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng-Yue Su; Z.-F. Chen; R.-L. He; C.-H. Zhang; T.-T. Wang

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we construct a sample of 1585 radio-loud quasars to measure their black hole masses using broad emission lines. We compare our black hole masses with the virial black hole masses measured by Shen et al. (2010).We find that there is a large deviation between them if our black hole mass is measured from the CIV broad emission line. Whereas, if our black hole mass is measured from broad emission line of Mg II or H, both the values are consistent.

  19. Radio recombination lines from obscured quasars with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Manti, Serena; Ferrara, Andrea; Feruglio, Chiara; Graziani, Luca; Bernardi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of detecting hydrogen radio recombination lines from 0 < z < 10 quasars. We compute the expected Hnalpha flux densities as a function of absolute magnitude and redshift by considering (i) the range of observed AGN spectral indices from UV to X-ray bands, (ii) secondary ionizations from X-ray photons, and (iii) stimulated emission due to nonthermal radiation. All these effects are important to determine the line fluxes. We find that the combination of slopes: alpha_X,hard = -1.11, alpha_X,soft = -0.7, alpha_EUV = -1.3, alpha_UV = -1.7, maximizes the expected flux, f_Hnalpha = 10 microJy for z = 7 quasars with M_AB = -27 in the n = 50 lines; allowed SED variations produce variations by a factor of 3 around this value. Secondaries boost the line intensity by a factor of 2 to 4, while stimulated emission in high-z quasars with M_AB = -26 provides an extra boost to RRL flux observed at nu = 1 GHz if recombinations arise in HII regions with T_e = 10^3-5 K, n_e = 10^3-5 cm^-3. We com...

  20. Mean and Extreme Radio Properties of Quasars and the Origin of Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kratzer, Rachael M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio-loudness of quasars. We consider how these values evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high-redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars which are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing luminosity and decreasing redshift while the mean radio-loudness evolves in the exact oppos...

  1. The double quasar 0957+561: a radio study at 6-centimeters wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D H; Greenfield, P E; Burke, B F

    1979-08-31

    The optical double quasar 0957+561 has been interpreted as the gravitational double image of a single object. A radio map made with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory shows unresolved sources coincident With the optical images as well as a complex of related extended emission. Although the results cannot rule out the gravitational lens hypothesis, the complex radio structure is more easily interpreted as two separate quasars. The optical and radio properties of the two quasars are so similar that the two must have been formed at the same time with similar initial conditions.

  2. The transition from quasar radio-loud to radio-quiet state in the framework of the black hole scalability hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    Marecki, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    There are several lines of evidence that active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be regarded as scaled-up X-ray binaries (XRB). The timescales of the evolutionary phenomena in these two classes are proportional to the black hole (BH) masses. Consequently, unlike in the case of XRBs, the evolution of AGNs is too slow to be followed directly. What could be done, however, is to assign particular types of active galaxies to different evolutionary stages observable in XRBs. We studied such an assignment for three quasars with clear signatures of a recent transition from the radio-loud to the radio-quiet state. The quasars we investigated have large-scale radio lobes that are clearly asymmetric -- one lobe is of Fanaroff-Riley II type, while the other one is a diffuse relic devoid of a hotspot. We suggest that the prime cause of the asymmetry of these radio sources is that the nuclei of their host galaxies currently produce no jets. To prove that, we observed them with milliarcsecond resolution to check if they are simila...

  3. On the origin of Fanaroff-Riley classification of radio galaxies: Deceleration of supersonic radio lobes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawakatu, Nozomu; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the origin of "FRI/FRI{-.1em}I dichotomy" -- the division between Fanaroff-Riley class I (FRI) with subsonic lobes and class I{-.1em}I (FRI{-.1em}I) radio sources with supersonic lobes is sharp in the radio-optical luminosity plane (Owen-White diagram) -- can be explained by the deceleration of advancing radio lobes. The deceleration is caused by the growth of the effective cross-sectional area of radio lobes. We derive the condition in which an initially supersonic lobe turns into a subsonic lobe, combining the ram-pressure equilibrium between the hot spots and the ambient medium with the relation between "the hot spot radius" and "the linear size of radio sources" obtained from the radio observations. We find that the dividing line between the supersonic lobes and subsonic ones is determined by the ratio of the jet power $L_{\\rm j}$ to the number density of the ambient matter at the core radius of the host galaxy $\\bar{n}_{\\rm a}$. It is also found that there exists the maximal ratio of $(L_{\\...

  4. On the Origin of Fanaroff-Riley Classification of Radio Galaxies: Deceleration of Supersonic Radio Lobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    We argue that the origin of "FRI/FRII dichotomy"—the division between Fanaroff-Riley class I (FRI) with subsonic lobes and class II (FRII) radio sources with supersonic lobes is sharp in the radio-optical luminosity plane (Owen-White diagram)—can be explained by the deceleration of advancing radio lobes. The deceleration is caused by the growth of the effective cross-sectional area of radio lobes. We derive the condition in which an initially supersonic lobe turns into a subsonic lobe, combining the ram pressure equilibrium between the hot spots and the ambient medium with the relation between "the hot spot radius" and "the linear size of radio sources" obtained from the radio observations. We find that the dividing line between the supersonic lobes and subsonic ones is determined by the ratio of the jet power L j to the number density of the ambient matter at the core radius of the host galaxy \\bar{n}_a. It is also found that the maximal ratio of (L_j/\\bar{n}_a) exists and its value resides in (L_j/\\bar{n}_a)_max≈ 10^{44-47} erg s^{-1} cm^{3}, taking into account considerable uncertainties. This suggests that the maximal value (L_j/\\bar{n}_a)_max separates between FRIs and FRIIs.

  5. Discovery of Universal Elliptical Outflow Structures in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Lovegrove, Justin; Leiter, Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-nine quasars in the background of the Magellanic Clouds had brightness records monitored by the MACHO project during the years 1992 - 99. Because the circumpolar fields of these quasars had no seasonal sampling defects, their observation produced data sets well suited to further careful analysis. Following a preliminary report wherein we showed the existence of reverberation in the data for one of the radio-quiet quasars in this group, we now show that similar reverberations have been seen in all of the 55 radio-quiet quasars with adequate data, making possible the determination of the quasar inclination to the observer's line of sight. The reverberation signatures indicate the presence of large-scale elliptical outflow structures similar to that predicted by the Elvis (2000) and "dusty torus" models of quasars, whose characteristic sizes vary within a surprisingly narrow range of scales. More importantly the observed opening angle relative to the polar axis of the universal elliptical outflow structure...

  6. Swift observations of high-redshift radio-loud quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Sambruna, R M; Ghisellini, G; Donato, D; Holland, S T; Markwardt, C B; Tüller, J; Mushotzky, R F

    2007-01-01

    We report on Swift observations of four z>2 radio-loud quasars (0212+735, 0537-286, 0836+710, and 2149-307), classified as blazars. The sources, well-known emitters at soft-medium X-rays, were detected at >5sigma with the BAT experiment in 15-150 keV. No flux variability was detected within the XRT and BAT exposures, with the exception of 0836+710 which shows an increase of a factor 4 of the 15-150 keV flux on a timescale of one month. The 0.3-10 keV spectra are well fitted by power law models, with rather hard continua (photon indices Gamma_XRT ~1.3-1.5); similarly, the 15-150 keV spectra are described by power laws with Gamma_BAT ~1.3-1.8. The XRT data exhibit spectral curvature, which can be modeled either in terms of excess absorption along the line of sight, or a downward-curved broken power law. In the former case, if the excess N_H is at the rest-frame of the source, columns of N_H^z=(0.3-6)x10^22 cm^-2 are measured. Modeling of the SEDs of the four quasars shows that the emission at the higher frequen...

  7. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the Jet, Lobes and Core of the Quasar PKS 2101-490

    CERN Document Server

    Godfrey, L E H; Lovell, J E J; Jauncey, D L; Gelbord, J; Schwartz, D A; Perlman, E S; Marshall, H L; Birkinshaw, M; Worrall, D M; Georganopoulos, M; Murphy, D W

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the X-ray, optical and radio emission from the jet, lobes and core of the quasar PKS 2101-490 as revealed by new Chandra, HST and ATCA images. We extract the radio to X-ray spectral energy distributions from seven regions of the 13 arcsecond jet, and model the jet X-ray emission in terms of Doppler beamed inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB) for a jet in a state of equipartition between particle and magnetic field energy densities. This model implies that the jet remains highly relativistic hundreds of kpc from the nucleus, with a bulk Lorentz factor Gamma ~ 6 and magnetic field of order 30 microGauss. We detect an apparent radiative cooling break in the synchrotron spectrum of one of the jet knots, and are able to interpret this in terms of a standard one-zone continuous injection model, based on jet parameters derived from the IC/CMB model. However, we note apparent substructure in the bright optical knot in one of the HST bands. We confront t...

  8. Investigating the radio-loud phase of BAL quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Pedani, M; Benn, C R; Mack, K -H; Holt, J; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Jiménez-Luján, F

    2014-01-01

    Broad Absorption Lines (BALs) are present in the spectra of ~20% of quasars (QSOs), indicating the presence of fast outflows (up to 0.2c) intercepting the observer's line of sight. Radio-Loud (RL) BAL QSOs are even more rare, being four times less common than Radio-Quiet (RQ) BAL QSOs. The reason for that is still not clear, leaving open questions about the nature of the BAL-producing outflows and their connection with the radio jet. We explored the spectroscopic characteristics of RL and RQ BAL QSOs, aiming at finding a possible explanation for the rarity of the former. We identified two samples of genuine BAL QSOs from SDSS optical spectra, one RL and one RQ, in a suitable redshift interval (2.5< z <3.5) that allowed us to observe the Mg II and H$\\beta$ emission lines in the adjacent Near-Infrared (NIR) band. We collected NIR spectra of the two samples using the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, Canary Islands). Using relations known in the literature, we could estimate black hole mass, broad line re...

  9. The Scale Invariant Synchrotron Jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L. M. Du; J. M. Bai; Z. H. Xie; T. F. Yi; Y. B. Xu; R. Xue; X. H. Wang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the scale invariance of the synchrotron jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars has been studied using a sample of combined sources from FKM04 and from SDSS DR3 catalogue. Since the research of scale invariance has been focused on sub-Eddington cases that can be fitted onto the fundamental plane, while near-Eddington sources such as FSRQs have not been explicitly studied. The extracted physical properties of synchrotron jet of FSRQs have been shown to be scale invariant using our sample. The results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations of Heinz & Sunyaev (2003). Therefore, the jet synchrotron is shown to be scale independent, regardless of the accretion modes. Results in this article thus lend support to the scale invariant model of the jet synchrotron throughout the mass scale of black hole systems.

  10. The Distribution of Quasars and Galaxies in Radio Color-Color and Morphology Diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Steinhardt, W; Jagoda, A S; Knapp, G R; Lupton, R H; Schlegel, D J; Hall, P B; Richards, G T; Gunn, J E; Strauss, M A; Juric, M; Wiita, P J; Gacesa, M; Smolcic, V

    2004-01-01

    We positionally match the 6 cm GB6, 20 cm FIRST and NVSS, and 92 cm WENSS radio catalogs and find 16,500 matches in ~3,000 deg2 of sky. Using this unified radio database, we construct radio "color-magnitude-morphology" diagrams and find that they display a clear structure, rather than a random scatter. We propose a simple, yet powerful, method for morphological classification of radio sources based on FIRST and NVSS measurements. For a subset of matched sources, we find optical identifications using the SDSS Data Release 1 catalogs, and separate them into quasars and galaxies. Compact radio sources with flat radio spectra are dominated by quasars, while compact sources with steep spectra, and resolved radio sources, contain substantial numbers of both quasars and galaxies.

  11. On The Depolarization Asymmetry Seen in Giant Radio Lobes

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, M B

    2012-01-01

    The depolarization asymmetry seen in double-lobed radio sources, referred to as the Laing-Garrington (L-G) effect where more rapid depolarization is seen in the lobe with no visible jet as the wavelength increases, can be explained either by internal differences between the two lobes, or by an external Faraday screen that lies in front of only the depolarized lobe. If the jet one-sidedness is due to relativistic beaming the depolarization asymmetry must be due to an intervening Faraday screen. If it is intrinsic the depolarization asymmetry must be related to internal differences in the lobes. We assume in this paper that the speed in the outer jet of several Fanaroff-Riley Class 1 (FRI) sources exhibiting the L-G effect is close to the 0.1c reported by several other investigators. For these sources we find that the jet one-sidedness cannot be explained by beaming and therefore must be intrinsic. In these FRI sources the L-G effect must be due to differences that originate inside the lobes themselves. Althoug...

  12. Radio Luminosity,Black Hole Mass and Eddington Ratio for Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hao Bian; Yan-Mei Chen; Chen Hu; Kai Huang; Yan Xu

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the MBH-O'.relation for radio-loud quasars with redshift z<0.83 in Data Release 3 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).The sample consists of 3772 quasars with better models of the H/~ and [O III] lines and available radio luminosity,including 306 radio-loud quasars,3466 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity or upper-limit of radio luminosity (181 radio-quiet quasars with measured radio luminosity).The virial supermassive black hole mass (MBH) is calculated from the broad H/line,and the host stellar velocity dispersion (σ*) is traced by the core [O III] gaseous velocity dispersion.The radio luminosity and radio loudness are derived from the FIRST catalog.Our results are as follows:(1) For radio-quiet quasars,we confirm that there is no obvious deviation from the MBH-O".relation defined for inactive galaxies when the uncertainties in MBH and the luminosity bias are concerned.(2) We find that the radio-loud quasars deviate more from the MBH-σ.relation than do the radio-quiet quasars.This deviation is only partly due to a possible cosmological evolution of the MBH-σ* relation and the luminosity bias.(3) The radioluminosity is proportional to M128+0.23-0.16 BH(LBol/LEdd)1.29+0.31-0.24 for radio-quiet quasars and to M3.10+0.6.-0.70(LBol.LEdd)4.18+1.40-1.10 for radio-loud quasars.The weaker dependence of the radio luminosity on the mass and the Eddington ratio for radio-loud quasars shows that other physical effects would account for their radio luminosities,such as the spin of the black hole.

  13. Disclosing the Radio Loudness Distribution Dichotomy in Quasars: An Unbiased Monte Carlo Approach Applied to the SDSS-FIRST Quasar Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Balokovic, Mislav; Ivezic, Zeljko; Zamorani, Gianni; Schinnerer, Eva; Kelly, Brandon C

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modelling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8,300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with 12+/-1 % of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for it...

  14. Recent Seven Years of Radio and Optical Variabilities of Quasar 1156+295

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baorong Liu; Xiang Liu

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed the radio (4.8, 8.0 and 14.5 GHz) light curves from UMRAO database and the optical data of quasar 1156+295 and found that the quasar exhibited remarkable quasi-periodic long-term flux variations in both radio and optical bands with a similar variability timescale of 1.2 ± 0.3 yr. In addition, when a cross correlation analysis was adopted to the radio and optical light curves, we found that the optical variations may precede those of the radio e.g., at 14.5 GHz by ∼ 200 days.

  15. DISCOVERY OF GIANT RELIC RADIO LOBES STRADDLING THE CLASSICAL DOUBLE RADIO GALAXY 3C452

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirothia, S. K.; Gopal-Krishna [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Post Bag No. 3, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Wiita, Paul J., E-mail: sirothia@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: wiitap@tcnj.edu [Department of Physics, College of New Jersey, P.O. Box 7718, Ewing, NJ 08628 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of a pair of megaparsec size radio lobes of extremely steep spectrum straddling the well-known classical double radio source 3C452. The existence of such fossil lobes was unexpected since for the past several decades this powerful radio galaxy has been regarded as a textbook example of an edge-brightened double radio source of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II), which we now show to be a bona fide ''double-double'' radio galaxy (DDRG). Thus, 3C452 presents a uniquely robust example of recurrent nuclear activity in which the restarted jets are expanding non-relativistically within the relic synchrotron plasma from an earlier active phase and hence the inner double fed by them has evolved into a perfectly normal FR II radio source. This situation contrasts markedly with the strikingly narrow inner doubles observed in a few other DDRGs that have been interpreted in terms of compression of the synchrotron plasma of the relic outer lobes at the relativistic bow-shocks driven by the near ballistic propagation of the two inner jets through the relic plasma. A key ramification of this finding is that it cautions against the currently widespread use of FR II classical double radio sources for testing cosmological models and unification schemes for active galactic nuclei.

  16. Radio Monitoring Campaigns of Six Strongly Lensed Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Rumbaugh, N; McKean, J P; Koopmans, L V E; Auger, M W; Suyu, S H

    2014-01-01

    We observed six strongly lensed, radio-loud quasars (MG 0414+0534, CLASS B0712+472, JVAS B1030+074, CLASS B1127+385, CLASS B1152+199, and JVAS B1938+666) in order to identify systems suitable for measuring cosmological parameters using time delays between their multiple images. These systems are in standard two and four image configurations, with B1938 having a faint secondary pair of images. Two separate monitoring campaigns were carried out using the VLA and upgraded JVLA. Lightcurves were extracted for each individual lensed image and analyzed for signs of intrinsic variability. While it was not possible to measure time delays from these data, $\\chi^2$-based and structure function tests found evidence for variability in a majority of the lightcurves. B0712 and B1030 had particularly strong variations, exhibiting linear flux trends. These results show that most of these systems should be targeted with followup monitoring campaigns, especially B0712 and B1030.

  17. Magnetic Field Amplification and Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuhui; Zhang, Haocheng; Pohl, Martin; Fossati, Giovanni; Boettcher, Markus; Bailyn, Charles D; Bonning, Erin W; Buxton, Michelle; Coppi, Paolo; Isler, Jedidah; Maraschi, Laura; Urry, Meg

    2014-01-01

    We perform time-dependent, spatially-resolved simulations of blazar emission to evaluate several flaring scenarios related to magnetic-field amplification and enhanced particle acceleration. The code explicitly accounts for light-travel-time effects and is applied to flares observed in the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) PKS 0208-512, which show optical/{\\gamma}-ray correlation at some times, but orphan optical flares at other times. Changes in both the magnetic field and the particle acceleration efficiency are explored as causes of flares. Generally, external Compton emission appears to describe the available data better than a synchrotron self-Compton scenario, and in particular orphan optical flares are difficult to produce in the SSC framework. X-ray soft-excesses, {\\gamma}-ray spectral hardening, and the detections at very high energies of certain FSRQs during flares find natural explanations in the EC scenario with particle acceleration change. Likewise, optical flares with/without {\\gamma}-ray count...

  18. A giant radio jet of very unusual polarization in a single-lobed radio galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Joydeep; Krause, Marita; Konar, Chiranjib; Joshi, Santosh

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of a very unusual, predominantly one-sided radio galaxy CGCG049-033. Its radio jet, the largest detected so far, emits strongly polarized synchrotron radiation and can be traced all the way from the galactic nucleus to the hot spot located ~440 kpc away. This jet emanates from an extremely massive black-hole (mass > 10^9 times solar mass) and forms a strikingly compact radio lobe. To a surface brightness contrast of at least 20 no radio lobe is detected on the side of the counter-jet, which is similar to the main jet in brightness upto the scale of tens of kpc. Thus, contrary to the nearly universal trend, the brightness asymmetry in this radio galaxy increases with distance from the nucleus. With several unusual properties, including a predominantly toroidal magnetic field, this Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR-II) mega-jet is an exceptionally useful laboratory for testing the role of magnetic field in jet stabilization and radio lobe formation.

  19. On the Correlation between Radio Properties and Black Hole Mass of Quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Guang Zhang; Ting-Gui Wang; You-Jun Lu

    2003-01-01

    The question whether the radio properties of quasars are related tothe mass of the central black hole or the accretion rate is important for our un-derstanding of the formation of relativistic jets, but no consensus has been reachedfrom statistical analyses. Using two large quasar samples, one radio-selected, oneoptical-selected, we re-examined these relations and find that previous differencesbetween radio- and optical- selected samples can be ascribed, at least partly, to theeffect of the narrow line component. All previous claimed correlations are muchweaker, if exist at all.

  20. Probing the Radio Loud/Quiet AGN dichotomy with quasar clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Retana-Montenegro, E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the clustering properties of 45441 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 3493 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) drawn from a joint use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm (FIRST) surveys in the range $0.3quasar sample allow us to investigate the clustering signal dependence on radio-loudness and black hole (BH) virial mass. We find that RLQs are clustered more strongly than RQQs in all the redshift bins considered. We find a real-space correlation length of $r_{0}=6.59_{-0.24}^{+0.33}\\,h^{-1}\\,\\textrm{Mpc}$ and $r_{0}=10.95_{-1.58}^{+1.22}\\,h^{-1}\\,\\textrm{Mpc}$ {\

  1. CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE REDSHIFT 1.53 RADIO-LOUD QUASAR 3C 270.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Lal, Dharam V.; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Haas, Martin; Chini, Rolf [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-University, Bochum (Germany); Antonucci, Robert [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Avara, Mark [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Barthel, Peter [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hardcastle, Martin [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Lawrence, Charles [JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Leipski, Christian [MPIA, Heidelberg (Germany); Ogle, Patrick [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schulz, Bernhard [IPAC, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Chandra X-ray observations of the high redshift (z = 1.532) radio-loud quasar 3C 270.1 in 2008 February show the nucleus to have a power-law spectrum, {Gamma} = 1.66 {+-} 0.08, typical of a radio-loud quasar, and a marginally detected Fe K{alpha} emission line. The data also reveal extended X-ray emission, about half of which is associated with the radio emission from this source. The southern emission is co-spatial with the radio lobe and peaks at the position of the double radio hot spot. Modeling this hot spot, including Spitzer upper limits, rules out synchrotron emission from a single power-law population of electrons, favoring inverse Compton emission with a field of {approx}11 nT, roughly a third of the equipartition value. The northern emission is concentrated close to the location of a 40 Degree-Sign bend where the radio jet is presumed to encounter an external medium. It can be explained by inverse Compton emission involving cosmic microwave background photons with a field of {approx}3 nT, a factor of 7-10 below the equipartition value. The remaining, more diffuse X-ray emission is harder (HR = -0.09 {+-} 0.22). With only 22.8 {+-} 5.6 counts, the spectral form cannot be constrained. Assuming thermal emission with a temperature of 4 keV yields an estimate for the luminosity of 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}, consistent with the luminosity-temperature relation of lower-redshift clusters. However, deeper Chandra X-ray observations are required to delineate the spatial distribution and better constrain the spectrum of the diffuse emission to verify that we have detected X-ray emission from a high-redshift cluster.

  2. Restarting radio activity and dust emission in radio-loud broad absorption line quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Brienza, M; González-Serrano, J I

    2015-01-01

    Broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) are objects showing absorption from relativistic outflows, with velocities up to 0.2c. These manifest, in about 15% of quasars, as absorption troughs on the blue side of UV emission lines, such as C iv and Mg ii. In this work, we complement the information collected in the cm band for our previously presented sample of radio loud BAL QSOs with new observations at m and mm bands. Our aim is to verify the presence of old, extended radio components in the MHz range, and probe the emission of dust (linked to star formation) in the mm domain. We observed 5 sources from our sample, already presenting hints of low-frequency emission, with the GMRT at 235 and 610 MHz. Other 17 sources (more than half the sample) were observed with bolometer cameras at IRAM-30m and APEX. All sources observed with the GMRT present extended emission at a scale of tens of kpc. In some cases these measurements allow us to identify a second component in the SED, at frequencies below 1.4 GHz, beyond ...

  3. The non-thermal emission of extended radio galaxy lobes with curved electron spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The existing theoretical framework for the energies stored in the synchrotron-emitting lobes of radio galaxies and quasars doesn't properly account for the curved spectral shape that many of them exhibit. We characterise these spectra using parameters that are straightforwardly observable in the era of high-resolution, low-frequency radio astronomy: the spectral curvature and the turnover in the frequency spectrum. This characterisation gives the Lorentz factor at the turnover in the energy distribution (we point out that this is distinctly different from the Lorentz factor corresponding to the turnover frequency in a way that depends on the amount of curvature in the spectrum) and readily gives the equipartition magnetic field strength and the total energy of the radiating plasma obviating the need for any assumed values of the cutoff frequencies to calculate these important physical quantities. This framework readily yields the form of the X-ray emission due to inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of Cosmic Micr...

  4. Correlation between the Flux Density and Polarization for Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fei-Peng Pi; Yong-Xiang Wang; Jing Pan

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, using the preliminary database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO) at the radio frequencies, we calculated the weighted polarization at 8 GHz and investigated the correlation between the polarization and the flux density for 92 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). We found that the two observations are closely and positively correlated for FSRQs. This is perhaps from a relativistic beaming effect.

  5. Probing the radio loud/quiet AGN dichotomy with quasar clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retana-Montenegro, E.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the clustering properties of 45 441 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 3493 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) drawn from a joint use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm (FIRST) surveys in the range 0.3 radio-loudness and black hole (BH) virial mass. We find that RLQs are clustered more strongly than RQQs in all the redshift bins considered. We find a real-space correlation length of and for RQQs and RLQs, respectively, for the full redshift range. This implies that RLQs are found in more massive host haloes than RQQs in our samples, with mean host halo masses of 4.9 × 1013h-1M⊙ and 1.9 × 1012h-1M⊙, respectively. Comparison with clustering studies of different radio source samples indicates that this mass scale of ≳ 1 × 1013h-1M⊙ is characteristic for the bright radio-population, which corresponds to the typical mass of galaxy groups and galaxy clusters. The similarity we find in correlation lengths and host halo masses for RLQs, radio galaxies and flat-spectrum radio quasars agrees with orientation-driven unification models. Additionally, the clustering signal shows a dependence on BH mass, with the quasars powered by the most massive BHs clustering more strongly than quasars having less massive BHs. We suggest that the current virial BH mass estimates may be a valid BH proxies for studying quasar clustering. We compare our results to a previous theoretical model that assumes that quasar activity is driven by cold accretion via mergers of gas-rich galaxies. While the model can explain the bias and halo masses for RQQs, it cannot reproduce the higher bias and host halo masses for RLQs. We argue that other BH properties such as BH spin, environment, magnetic field configuration, and accretion physics must be considered to fully understand the origin of radio-emission in quasars and its relation to the higher clustering.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet spectroscopy of 14 low-redshift quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, R.; Kaastra, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low-redshift quasars observed with the Hubble Space Telescope STIS as part of a Snapshot project to understand the relationship between quasar outflows and luminosity. The quasar is radio-loud but has a steep spectral index and a lobe-dominated

  7. Detection of X-ray Emission from the Eastern Radio Lobe of PICTOR A

    CERN Document Server

    Grandi, P; Maraschi, L; Morganti, R; Fusco-Femiano, R; Fiocchi, M; Ballo, L; Tavecchio, F; Grandi, Paola; Guainazzi, Matteo; Maraschi, Laura; Morganti, Raffaella; Fusco-Femiano, Roberto; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Ballo, Lucia; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2003-01-01

    The XMM-Newton satellite has revealed extended X-ray emission from the eastern radio lobe of the Fanaroff-Riley II Radio Galaxy Pictor A. The X-ray spectrum, accumulated on a region covering about half the entire radio lobe, is well described by both a thermal model and a power law. The X-ray emission could be thermal and produced by circum-galactic gas shocked by the expanding radio lobe or, alternatively, by Inverse Compton (IC) of cosmic microwave background photons by relativistic electrons in the lobe. The latter possibility seems to be supported by the good agreement between the lobe-average synchrotron radio index and the X-ray energy slope. However, if this is the case, the magnetic field, as deduced from the comparison of the IC X-ray and radio fluxes, is more than a factor 2 below the equipartition value estimated in the same X-ray region.

  8. Intranight optical variability of radio-loud broad absorption line quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of an optical photometric monitoring program of 10 extremely radio loud broad absorption line quasars (RL-BALQSOs) with radio-loudness parameter, R, greater than 100 and magnitude g_i < 19. Over an observing run of about 3.5-6.5 hour we found a clear detection of variability for one of our 10 radio-loud BALQSOs with the INOV duty cycle of 5.1 per cent, while on including the probable variable cases, a higher duty cycle of 35.1 per cent is found; which are very similar to the duty cycle of radio quiet broad absorption line quasars (RQ-BALQSOs). This low duty cycle of clear variability per cent in radio-loud sub-class of BALQSOs can be understood under the premise where BALs outflow may arise from large variety of viewing angles from the jet axis or perhaps being closer to the disc plane.

  9. Radio Through X-ray Spectral Energy Distributions of 38 Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Brandt, W N; Egami, E; Hines, D C; Priddey, R S

    2007-01-01

    We have compiled the largest sample of multiwavelength spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars to date, from the radio to the X-ray. We present new Spitzer MIPS (24, 70, and 160 micron) observations of 38 BAL quasars in addition to data from the literature and public archives. In general, the mid-infrared properties of BAL quasars are consistent with those of non-BAL quasars of comparable luminosity. In particular, the optical-to-mid-infrared luminosity ratios of the two populations are indistinguishable. We also measure or place upper limits on the contribution of star formation to the far-infrared power. Of 22 (57%) upper limits, seven quasars have sufficiently sensitive constraints to conclude that star formation likely contributes little (<20%) to their far-infrared power. The 17 BAL quasars (45%) with detected excess far-infrared emission likely host hyperluminous starbursts with L_fir,SF=10^{13-14} L_sun. Mid-infrared through X-ray composite BAL quasar SEDs are pre...

  10. BL Lacertae objects and radio-loud quasars within an evolutionary unified scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnetti, F.; Cavaliere, A.; Giallongo, E. (Roma II Universita, Rome (Italy) Roma Osservatorio Astronomico, Rome (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    On the basis of a joint radio-optical analysis, different amounts of cosmological luminosity evolution in the optical band for flat- and steep-spectrum radio-loud quasars are found. Specifically, a slower evolution for the flat-spectrum quasars, evidence of a sluggish beamed component in the optical band additional to the canonical isotropic continuum is shown. The persistence of the beamed component in terms of a spectral evolution with the Doppler factor increasing somewhat in cosmic time is interpreted. The BL Lacertae objects are placed into this framework and an evolutionary unified scheme is proposed maintaining spectral and statistical continuity of BL Lacs with flat-spectrum quasars. Supportive observational evidence, and clues for the parent population, are discussed. 57 refs.

  11. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M. [Institut d' Investigació per a la Gestió Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Universitat Politècnica de València, C/ Paranimf 1, Gandia, 46730 Spain (Spain); Albert, A. [GRPHE - Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit BP 50568, Colmar, 68008 France (France); André, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Rambla Exposició, Vilanova i la Geltrú, Barcelona, 08800 Spain (Spain); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, Erlangen, 91058 Germany (Germany); Aubert, J.-J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille, 13288 France (France); Baret, B. [APC, AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/Irfu, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, Paris Cedex 13, F-75205 France (France); Barrios-Martí, J. [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificios Investigación de Paterna, CSIC - Universitat de València, Apdo de Correos 22085, Valencia, 46071 Spain (Spain); Basa, S. [LAM - Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Pôle de l' Étoile Site de Château-Gombert, rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie 38, Marseille Cedex 13, 13388 France (France); Biagi, S. [INFN - Sezione di Bologna, Viale Berti-Pichat 6/2, Bologna, 40127 Italy (Italy); Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Bruijn, R. [Nikhef, Science Park 105, Amsterdam, 1098XG The Netherlands (Netherlands); Capone, A. [INFN -Sezione di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 2, Roma, 00185 Italy (Italy); Caramete, L., E-mail: antares.spokesperson@in2p3.fr [Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest, Măgurele, R-77125 Romania (Romania); and others

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazar populations. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars. The magnification factor is estimated for each system assuming a singular isothermal profile for the lens. Based on data collected from 2007 to 2012 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope, the strongest constraint is obtained from the lensed quasar B0218+357, providing a limit on the total neutrino luminosity of this source of 1.08× 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. This limit is about one order of magnitude lower than those previously obtained in the ANTARES standard point source searches with non-lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars.

  12. The unification of powerful quasars and radio galaxies and their relation to other massive galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Podigachoski, P; Haas, M; Leipski, C; Wilkes, B

    2015-01-01

    The unification model for powerful radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars postulates that these objects are intrinsically the same but viewed along different angles. Herschel Space Observatory data permit the assessment of that model in the far-infrared spectral window. We analyze photometry from Spitzer and Herschel for the distant 3CR hosts, and find that radio galaxies and quasars have different mid-infrared, but indistinguishable far-infrared colors. Both these properties, the former being orientation dependent and the latter orientation invariant, are in line with expectations from the unification model. Adding powerful radio-quiet active galaxies and typical massive star-forming galaxies to the analysis, we demonstrate that infrared colors not only provide an orientation indicator, but can also distinguish active from star-forming galaxies.

  13. Radio and Gamma-Ray Monitoring of Strongly Lensed Quasars and Blazars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rumbaugh, Nick; Fassnacht, Chris; McKean, John; Koopmans, Leon; Auger, Matthew; Suyu, Sherry; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    We observed six strongly lensed, radio-loud quasars (MG 0414+0534, CLASS B0712+472, JVAS B1030+074, CLASS B1127+385, CLASS B1152+199, and JVAS B1938+666) in order to identify systems suitable for measuring cosmological parameters using time delays between their multiple images. Two separate monitori

  14. Radio and Gamma-Ray Monitoring of Strongly Lensed Quasars and Blazars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rumbaugh, Nick; Fassnacht, Chris; McKean, John; Koopmans, Leon; Auger, Matthew; Suyu, Sherry; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    We observed six strongly lensed, radio-loud quasars (MG 0414+0534, CLASS B0712+472, JVAS B1030+074, CLASS B1127+385, CLASS B1152+199, and JVAS B1938+666) in order to identify systems suitable for measuring cosmological parameters using time delays between their multiple images. Two separate monitori

  15. The New Generation Atlas of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions from Radio to X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Zhaohui; Wills, Beverley J; Wills, Derek; Cales, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A; Green, Richard F; Runnoe, Jessie; Nemmen, Rodrigo S; Gallagher, Sarah; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C; Kelly, Benjamin; Kriss, Gerard A; Li, Jun; Tang, Baitian; Xie, Yanxia

    2011-01-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. (1994) by using high-quality data obtained with several space and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared IRS spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite spectral energy distributions for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar...

  16. VLBI Detections of Parsec-Scale Nonthermal Jets in Radio-Loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Akihiro; Kono, Yusuke; Oyama, Tomoaki; Fujisawa, Kenta; Takaba, Hiroshi; Sudou, Hiroshi; Wakamatsu, Ken-ichi; Yamauchi, Aya; Murata, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Nanako; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Nagayama, Takumi; Nakai, Naomasa; Sorai, Kazuo; Kawai, Eiji; Sekido, Mamoru; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Asano, Shoichiro; Uose, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    We conducted radio detection observations at 8.4 GHz for 22 radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Third Data Release, by a very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique. The VLBI instrument we used was developed by the Optically ConnecTed Array for VLBI Exploration project (OCTAVE), which is operated as a subarray of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN). We aimed at selecting BAL quasars with nonthermal jets suitable for measuring their orientation angles and ages by subsequent detailed VLBI imaging studies to evaluate two controversial issues of whether BAL quasars are viewed nearly edge-on, and of whether BAL quasars are in a short-lived evolutionary phase of quasar population. We detected 20 out of 22 sources using the OCTAVE baselines, implying brightness temperatures greater than 10^5 K, which presumably come from nonthermal jets. Hence, BAL outflows and nonthermal jets can be generated simultaneously in these central engines. We also found four...

  17. Multi-frequency radio observations of BAL quasar 1045+352

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Marecki, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Multi-frequency 1.7, 5 and 8.4-GHz VLBA observations of a radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasar 1045+352 are presented. It is a young compact steep spectrum (CSS) object and its asymmetric, two-sided morphology on a scale of several hundred parsecs, extending in two different directions, may suggest intermittent activity. The young age and unusual morphology of 1045+352 are arguments in favour of an evolution scenario for BAL quasars, in which the BAL features appear at a very early stage of their evolution.

  18. THE UNIFICATION OF POWERFUL QUASARS AND RADIO GALAXIES AND THEIR RELATION TO OTHER MASSIVE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podigachoski, Pece; Barthel, Peter [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Haas, Martin [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr Universität, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Leipski, Christian [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wilkes, Belinda, E-mail: podigachoski@astro.rug.nl [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    The unification model for powerful radio galaxies (RGs) and radio-loud quasars postulates that these objects are intrinsically the same but viewed along different angles. Herschel Space Observatory data permit the assessment of that model in the far-infrared spectral window. We analyze photometry from Spitzer and Herschel for the distant 3CR hosts, and find that RGs and quasars have different mid-infrared, but indistinguishable far-infrared colors. Both these properties, the former being orientation dependent and the latter orientation invariant, are in line with expectations from the unification model. Adding powerful radio-quiet active galaxies and typical massive star-forming (SF) galaxies to the analysis, we demonstrate that infrared colors not only provide an orientation indicator, but can also distinguish active from SF galaxies.

  19. THE COMPACT RADIO STRUCTURE OF THE HIGH REDSHIFT QUASARS 0642+449, 1402+044, 1614+051

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GURVITS, LI; KARDASHEV, NS; POPOV, MV; SCHILIZZI, RT; BARTHEL, PD; PAULINYTOTH, IIK; KELLERMANN, KI

    1992-01-01

    In the first stage of an investigation of possible cosmological evolution effects in the compact radio structure of quasars, we have used a combined European and US VLBI network to image the milliarcsec scale morphology of three quasars with redshifts greater than 3. The sources 0642 + 449 (z = 3.40

  20. The radio loud narrow-line quasar SDSSJ172206.03+565451.6

    CERN Document Server

    Komossa, S; Adorf, H M; Xu, D; Mathur, S; Anderson, S F

    2006-01-01

    We report identification of the radio loud narrow-line quasar SDSS J172206.03+565451.6 which we found in the course of a search for radio loud narrow-line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). SDSSJ172206.03+565451.6 is only the ~4th securely identified radio loud narrow-line quasar and the second-most radio loudest with a radio index R_1.4 ~ 100-700. Its black hole mass, M_BH = (2-3) 10^7 M_sun, is unusually small given its radio loudness, and the combination of mass and radio index puts SDSSJ172206.03+565451.6 in a scarcely populated region of M_BH-R diagrams. SDSSJ172206.03+565451.6 is a classical Narrow-Line Seyfert1-type object with FWHM_Hbeta = 1490 km/s, an intensity ratio of [OIII]/Hbeta = 0.7 and FeII emission complexes with FeII4570/Hbeta = 0.7. The ionization parameter of its narrow-line region, estimated from the line ratio [OII]/[OIII], is similar to Seyferts and its high ratio of [NeV]/[NeIII] indicates a strong EUV to soft-X-ray excess. We advertise the combined usage of [OII]/[OIII] and [NeV]/[NeIII] ...

  1. How many radio-loud quasars can be detected by the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope?

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xinwu

    2007-01-01

    In the unification scheme, radio quasars and FR II radio galaxies come from the same parent population, but viewed at different angles. Based on the Comptonization models for the gamma-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we estimate the number of radio quasars and FR II radio galaxies to be detected by the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) using the luminosity function (LF) of their parent population derived from the flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) LF. We find that ~1200 radio quasars will be detected by GLAST, if the soft seed photons for Comptonization come from the regions outside the jets. We also consider the synchrotron self-Comptonization (SSC) model, and find it unlikely to be responsible for gamma-ray emission from radio quasars. We find that no FR II radio galaxies will be detected by GLAST. Our results show that most radio AGNs to be detected by GLAST will be FSRQs (~99 % for the external Comptonization model, EC model), while the remainder (~1 %) will be steep-spectrum ra...

  2. Near-infrared imaging of the host galaxies of intermediate redshift steep spectrum radio quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kotilainen, J K

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of near-infrared H-band (1.65 microns) imaging of 19 steep spectrum radio quasars (SSRQ) in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.0. This sample of SSRQs is matched with our previously studied complete sample of 20 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) with respect to redshift and optical and radio luminosity. We are able to clearly detect the host galaxy in 10 (53 %) SSRQs and marginally in 6 (32 %) others, while the host remains unresolved in 3 (16 %) SSRQs. The galaxies hosting the SSRQs are large (average bulge scale-length R(e) = 9.0+-1.7 kpc) and luminous (average M(H) = -27.2+-1.1). They are, therefore, about 2 mag more luminous than the typical galaxy luminosity L* (M*(H) = -25.0+-0.2), and about 1 mag more luminous than the brightest cluster galaxies (M(H) = -26.3+-0.3). The SSRQ hosts appear to have similar luminosity to those of the FSRQ hosts (M(H) = -27), and they fall between the luminosities of lower redshift (M(H) = -26) and higher redshift (M(H) = -29) radio-loud quasars. T...

  3. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Redshift 1.53 Radio-loud Quasar 3C 270.1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Lal, Dharam V.; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Haas, Martin; Willner, S. P.; Antonucci, Robert; Ashby, M. L. N.; Avara, Mark; Barthel, Peter; Chini, Rolf; Fazio, G. G.; Hardcastle, Martin; Lawrence, Charles; Leipski, Christian; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    Chandra X-ray observations of the high redshift (z = 1.532) radio-loud quasar 3C 270.1 in 2008 February show the nucleus to have a power-law spectrum, Γ = 1.66 ± 0.08, typical of a radio-loud quasar, and a marginally detected Fe Kα emission line. The data also reveal extended X-ray emission, about

  4. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Redshift 1.53 Radio-loud Quasar 3C 270.1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Lal, Dharam V.; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Haas, Martin; Willner, S. P.; Antonucci, Robert; Ashby, M. L. N.; Avara, Mark; Barthel, Peter; Chini, Rolf; Fazio, G. G.; Hardcastle, Martin; Lawrence, Charles; Leipski, Christian; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Chandra X-ray observations of the high redshift (z = 1.532) radio-loud quasar 3C 270.1 in 2008 February show the nucleus to have a power-law spectrum, Γ = 1.66 ± 0.08, typical of a radio-loud quasar, and a marginally detected Fe Kα emission line. The data also reveal extended X-ray emission, about

  5. The Extreme Ultraviolet Deficit and Magnetically Arrested Accretion in Radio Loud Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope composite quasar spectra presented in Telfer et al. show a significant deficit of emission in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) for the radio loud component of the quasar population (RLQs), compared to the radio quiet component of the quasar population (RQQs). The composite quasar continuum emission between 1100 \\AA\\, and $\\sim$580 \\AA\\, is generally considered to be associated with the innermost regions of the accretion flow onto the central black hole. The deficit between 1100 \\AA\\, and 580 \\AA\\, in RLQs has a straightforward interpretation as a missing or a suppressed innermost region of local energy dissipation in the accretion flow. It is proposed that this can be the result of islands of large scale magnetic flux in RLQs that are located close to the central black hole that remove energy from the accretion flow as Poynting flux (sometimes called magnetically arrested accretion). These magnetic islands are natural sites for launching relativistic jets. Based on the Telfer et al. da...

  6. Storm in a "Teacup": a radio-quiet quasar with ~10kpc radio-emitting bubbles and extreme gas kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, C M; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Edge, A C; Hogan, M T; Mullaney, J R; Swinbank, A M

    2014-01-01

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) VLA data, combined with VIMOS IFU data and HST imaging, of a z=0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L(1.4GHz)~5e23 W/Hz and L(AGN)~2e45 erg/s). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the Teacup AGN in the literature. We identify "bubbles" of radio emission that are extended ~10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the Teacup AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ~0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v=-760 km/s. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on >~10...

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio properties of z < 0.3 quasars (Coziol+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coziol, R.; Andernach, H.; Torres-Papaqui, J. P.; Ortega-Minakata, R. A.; Moreno Del Rio, F.

    2017-03-01

    From the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog (CDS Cat. VII/260) we selected those with redshift zgri composite SDSS images. Images from the 1.4-GHz radio surveys NVSS and FIRST, centered on the QSOs and corresponding to at least 1Mpc in size (at the QSO redshift) were inspected, and the radio morphology and 1.4-GHz flux densities recorded, accepting radio detections within 2-arcsec of the QSO down to a minimum flux density of 1.0mJy in NVSS and 0.5mJy in FIRST (approximately the 3-sigma levels in these surveys, and two times lower than the lower flux limits of the NVSS and FIRST source catalogues). From the integrated flux density we derived the 1.4-GHz radio luminosity, and for extended radio sources we catalogued the largest linear size (LLS). Three new giant radio quasars larger than 1Mpc in projected size were found, including the largest such example presently known, with an LLS of 4.45Mpc (H0=67.7, Ωm=0.309, ΩΛ=0.691). (1 data file).

  8. Near-infrared imaging of the host galaxies of three radio-loud quasars at z = 1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Falomo, R; Treves, A; Falomo, Renato; Kotilainen, Jari; Treves, Aldo

    2000-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution near-infrared H-band (1.65 microns) images, taken with ISAAC on UT1 of ESO VLT, of three radio-loud quasars at z = 1.5, as a pilot study for imaging of a larger sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars in the redshift range 1 < z < 2. We are able to clearly detect the host galaxy in two quasars (PKS 0000-177 and PKS 0348-120) and marginally in the third (PKS 0402-362). The host galaxies appear compact (average bulge scale-length R(e) = 4 kpc) and luminous (average M(H) = -27.6+-0.1). They are 2.5 mag more luminous than the typical galaxy luminosity (M*(H) = -25.0+-0.2), and are comparable to the hosts of low redshift radio-loud quasars (M(H) = -26), taking into account passive stellar evolution. Their luminosities are also similar to those of high redshift radio galaxies. All three quasars have at least one close companion galaxy at a projected distance < 50 kpc from the quasar, assuming they are at the same redshift.

  9. Observations of radio-quiet quasars at 10mas resolution by use of gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Neal; Roberts, Carl; Sluse, Dominique; Stacey, Hannah; Vives-Arias, Hector; Wucknitz, Olaf; Volino, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    We present VLA detections of radio emission in four four-image gravitational lens systems with quasar sources: HS0810+2554, RXJ0911+0511, HE0435$-$1223 and SDSSJ0924+0219, and e-MERLIN observations of two of the systems. The first three are detected at a high level of significance, and SDSS J0924+0219 is detected. HS0810+2554 is resolved, allowing us for the first time to achieve 10-mas resolution of the source frame in the structure of a radio quiet quasar. The others are unresolved or marginally resolved. All four objects are among the faintest radio sources yet detected, with intrinsic flux densities in the range 1-5$\\mu$Jy; such radio objects, if unlensed, will only be observable routinely with the Square Kilometre Array. The observations of HS0810+2554, which is also detected with e-MERLIN, strongly suggest the presence of a mini-AGN, with a radio core and milliarcsecond scale jet. The flux densities of the lensed images in all but HE0435-1223 are consistent with smooth galaxy lens models without the req...

  10. The Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2012-12-28

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  11. The environments of luminous radio galaxies and type-2 quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos Almeida, C.; Bessiere, P. S.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Inskip, K. J.; Morganti, R.; Dicken, D.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Holt, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a comparison between the environments of (1) a complete sample of 46 southern 2-Jy radio galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.05 gq) derived from deep optical imaging data. Based on these comparisons, we discuss the role of the environment in the triggering of powerful rad

  12. Strong Variability of Overlapping Iron Broad Absorption Lines in five Radio-selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Shi, Xiheng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Wenjuan; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Shufen

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a variability study of broad absorption lines (BALs) in a uniformly radio-selected sample of 28 BAL quasars using the archival data from the first bright quasar survey (FBQS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), as well as those obtained by ourselves, covering time scales $\\sim 1-10$ years in the quasar's rest-frame. The variable absorption troughs are detected in 12 BAL quasars. Among them, five cases showed strong spectral variations and are all belong to a special subclass of overlapping iron low ionization BALs (OFeLoBALs). The absorbers of \\ion{Fe}{2} are estimated to be formed by a relative dense (\\mbox{$n\\rm _{e} > 10^6~cm^{-3}$}) gas at a distance from the subparsec scale to the dozens of parsec-scale from the continuum source. They differ from those of invariable non-overlapping FeLoBALs (non-OFeLoBALs), which are the low-density gas and locate at the distance of hundreds to thousands parsecs. OFeLoBALs and non-OFeLoBALs, i.e., FeLoBALs with/without strong BAL variations...

  13. Rapid radio polarization variability in the quasar 0917 + 624

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirrenbach, A.; Witzel, A.; Qian, S.J.; Krichbaum, T.; Hummel, C.A.; Alberdi, A. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Bonn 1 (DE))

    1989-12-01

    We have made measurements of the total flux density and the polarization of the quasar 0917+624 with a sampling of {approx} 1 hour using the 100 m telescope of the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie (MPIfR) at 6 and 11 cm wavelength. The total flux density showed variations with an amplitude of {approx} 25% and a typical time scale of {approx} 1 day at both wavelengths. The polarized flux density P showed even more dramatic variations with an amplitude of a factor {approx} 3, correlated with the variability of the total flux density S, P being high whenever S was low and vice versa. At 6 cm wavelength a swing of the polarization position angle {chi} of 180{sup 0} wasobserved at a time when the total flux density showed a maximum. These findings make any extrinsic explanations of the effect (e.g. scattering in the interstellar medium) very unlikely. We discuss a model which gives an explanation of the observed variability in terms of shocks propagating in a magnetized jet.

  14. AGN JET KINETIC POWER AND THE ENERGY BUDGET OF RADIO GALAXY LOBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, L. E. H. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6102 (Australia); Shabala, S. S., E-mail: L.Godfrey@curtin.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2013-04-10

    Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FR I radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FR II radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FR II radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation to that obtained for FR I radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relations determined separately for FR I and FR II radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FR I and FR II radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral aging and strong shocks driven by powerful FR II radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FR Is and counteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q{sub jet}-L{sub radio} relation determined for low power FR I radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.

  15. The X-Ray Reflection Spectrum of the Radio-loud Quasar 4C 74.26

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohfink, Anne M.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ballantyne, David R.

    2017-01-01

    of the supermassive black hole, the presumed jet launching point, are potentially particularly valuable in illuminating the jet formation process. Here, we present the hard X-ray NuSTAR observations of the radio-loud quasar 4C 74.26 in a joint analysis with quasi-simultaneous, soft X-ray Swift observations. Our...... the three months covered by our NuSTAR campaign. This lack of variation could mean that the jet formation in this radio-loud quasar differs from what is observed in broad-line radio galaxies....

  16. Observations of Feedback from Radio-Quiet Quasars: I. Extents and Morphologies of Ionized Gas Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Guilin; Greene, Jenny E; Nesvadba, Nicole P H; Liu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Black hole feedback -- the strong interaction between the energy output of supermassive black holes and their surrounding environments -- is routinely invoked to explain the absence of overly luminous galaxies, the black hole vs. bulge correlations and the similarity of black hole accretion and star formation histories. Yet direct probes of this process in action are scarce and limited to small samples of active nuclei. We present Gemini IFU observations of the distribution of ionized gas around luminous, obscured, radio-quiet (RQ) quasars at z~0.5. We detect extended ionized gas nebulae via [O III]5007 emission in every case, with a mean diameter of 28 kpc. These nebulae are nearly perfectly round. The regular morphologies of nebulae around RQ quasars are in striking contrast with lumpy or elongated nebulae seen around radio galaxies at low and high redshifts. We present the uniformly measured size-luminosity relationship of [O III] nebulae around Seyfert 2 galaxies and type 2 quasars spanning 6 orders of ma...

  17. Sco X-1 The Evolution and Nature of the Twin Compact Radio Lobes

    CERN Document Server

    Fomalont, E B; Bradshaw, C F

    2001-01-01

    The radio components associated with the LMXB Sco X-1 have been monitored with extensive VLBI imaging at 1.7 and 5.0 GHz over four years, including a 56-hour continuous VLBI observation in 1999 June. We often detected one strong and one weak compact radio component, moving in opposite directions from the radio core. We suggest that the moving components are radio lobes generated by the disruption of energy flow in a twin-beam from the binary system. The average lifetime of a lobe-pair, the space motion of the lobes and the measured energy flow in the beam are discussed in Astro-ph/0104325. The lobe has a flux density that is variable over a time-scale of one hour, a measured minimum size of 1 mas (2.8 au), and is extended perpendicular to its motion. This short electron radiative lifetime may be caused by synchrotron losses if the lobe magnetic field is 300 G, or by adiabatic expansion of the electrons as soon as they are produced at the working surface. The lobes also show periods of slow expansion and a ste...

  18. The Radio-Loud Narrow-Line Quasar SDSS J172206.03+565451.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, Stefanie; Voges, Wolfgang; Adorf, Hans-Martin; Xu, Dawei; Mathur, Smita; Anderson, Scott F.

    2006-03-01

    We report identification of the radio-loud narrow-line quasar SDSS J172206.03+565451.6, which we found in the course of a search for radio-loud narrow-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SDSS J172206.03+565451.6 is only about the fourth securely identified radio-loud narrow-line quasar and the second-most radio loud, with a radio index R1.4~100-700. Its black hole mass, MBH~=(2-3)×107 Msolar estimated from Hβ line width and 5100 Å luminosity, is unusually small given its radio loudness, and the combination of mass and radio index puts SDSS J172206.03+565451.6 in a scarcely populated region of MBH-R diagrams. SDSS J172206.03+565451.6 is a classical narrow-line Seyfert 1-type object with FWHMHβ~=1490 km s-1, an intensity ratio of [O III]/Hβ~=0.7, and Fe II emission complexes with Fe II λ4570/Hβ~=0.7. The ionization parameter of its narrow-line region, estimated from the line ratio [O II]/[O III], is similar to Seyferts, and its high ratio of [Ne V]/[Ne III] indicates a strong EUV-to-soft X-ray excess. We advertise the combined usage of [O II]/[O III] and [Ne V]/[Ne III] diagrams as a useful diagnostic tool to estimate ionization parameters and to constrain the EUV-soft X-ray continuum shape relatively independently from other parameters.

  19. Radio spectra and polarisation properties of a bright sample of Radio-Loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Salerno, E; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Carballo, R; Benn, C R; González-Serrano, J I; Holt, J; Jiménez-Luján, F

    2012-01-01

    The origin of broad-absorption-line quasars (BAL QSOs) is still an open issue. Accounting for ~20% of the QSO population, these objects present broad absorption lines in their optical spectra generated from outflows with velocities up to 0.2c. In this work we present the results of a multi-frequency study of a well-defined radio-loud BAL QSO sample, and a comparison sample of radio-loud non-BAL QSOs, both selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We aim to test which of the currently-popular models for the BAL phenomenon - `orientation' or 'evolutionary' - best accounts for the radio properties of BAL quasars. Observations from 1.4 to 43 GHz have been obtained with the VLA and Effelsberg telescopes, and data from 74 to 408 MHz have been compiled from the literature. The fractions of candidate GHz-peaked sources are similar in the two samples (36\\pm12% vs 23\\pm8%), suggesting that BAL QSOs are not generally younger than non-BAL QSOs. BAL and non-BAL QSOs show a large range of spectral indices, consist...

  20. The compact radio structure of the high-redshift quasar OQ172

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Gu, M.; Gurvits, L. I.

    2016-02-01

    The GHz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) quasar OQ172 (J1445+0958) has an extremely high rest-frame rotation measure (RM > 20 000 rad m-2) and an RM gradient in its inner nucleus. Its jet observed with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is strongly bent along an arc spanning > 100 pc. Near infrared (NIR) spectra reveal an unusually large [O III] line width which suggests a large mass within the NLR and/or strong interactions between the emerging jet and the dense material therein. We present our VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) and Multi-frequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observation of the GPS quasar OQ172. The observations will help us to explore the VLBI radio properties and to better understand the circumnuclear environment of OQ172.

  1. Relations between integrated and monochromatic luminosities of flat-spectrum radio quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Fu Chen; Zhao-Yu Chen; Yi-Ping Qin; Min-Feng Gu; Lian-Zhong Lü; Cheng-Yue Su; You-Bing Li; Ye Chen

    2011-01-01

    We employ a sample of 362 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) to calculate their integrated luminosities by integrating the spectral energy distribution (SED) constructed with multi-band (radio, IR, optical, UV and X-ray) data.We compare these luminosities with those estimated from monochromatic luminosities by multiplying them by the conventional bolometric correction factors.Our analysis shows that the integrated luminosities calculated from the SED are much larger than the bolometric luminosities estimated from monochromatic luminosities.Their departing behavior tightly correlates with radio luminosities.The relations between integrated and monochromatic luminosities are explored, which are regarded as empirical relations that might be more suitable to be applied to estimate integrated luminosities of FSRQs from their monochromatic luminosities.

  2. Radio lobes and X-ray hot spots in the microquasar S26

    CERN Document Server

    Soria, Roberto; Broderick, Jess W; Corbel, Stephane; Motch, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the structure and energetics of the powerful microquasar/shock-ionized nebula S26 in NGC 7793, with particular focus on its radio and X-ray properties. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we have resolved for the first time the radio lobe structure and mapped the spectral index of the radio cocoon. The steep spectral index of the radio lobes is consistent with optically-thin synchrotron emission; outside the lobes, the spectral index is flatter, suggesting an additional contribution from free-free emission, and perhaps ongoing ejections near the core. The radio core is not detected, while the X-ray core has a 0.3-8 keV luminosity ~6 x 10^{36} erg/s. The size of the radio cocoon matches that seen in the optical emission lines and diffuse soft X-ray emission. The total 5.5-GHz flux of cocoon and lobes is ~2.1 mJy, which at the assumed distance of 3.9 Mpc corresponds to about 3 times the luminosity of Cas A. The total 9.0-GHz flux is ~1.6 mJy. The X-ray hot spots (combined 0.3-8 keV lumi...

  3. Evidence of non-thermal X-ray emission from radio lobes of Cygnus A

    CERN Document Server

    Yaji, Y; Isobe, N; Kino, M; Asada, K; Nagai, H; Koyama, S; Kusunose, M

    2010-01-01

    Using deep Chandra ACIS observation data for Cygnus A, we report evidence of non-thermal X-ray emission from radio lobes surrounded by a rich intra-cluster medium (ICM). The diffuse X-ray emission, which are associated with the eastern and western radio lobes, were observed in a 0.7--7 keV Chandra$ ACIS image. The lobe spectra are reproduced with not only a single-temperature Mekal model, such as that of the surrounding ICM component, but also an additional power-law (PL) model. The X-ray flux densities of PL components for the eastern and western lobes at 1 keV are derived as 77.7^{+28.9}_{-31.9} nJy and 52.4^{+42.9}_{-42.4} nJy, respectively, and the photon indices are 1.69^{+0.07}_{-0.13} and 1.84^{+2.90}_{-0.12}, respectively. The non-thermal component is considered to be produced via the inverse Compton (IC) process, as is often seen in the X-ray emission from radio lobes. From a re-analysis of radio observation data, the multiwavelength spectra strongly suggest that the seed photon source of the IC X-ra...

  4. A Search for double-lobed radio emission from Galactic Stars and Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, Abiel Felipe Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic search for two types of very unusual astronomical objects: Galactic stars and spiral galaxies with double radio lobes, i.e. radio emission on opposite sides of the optical object, suggesting the ejection of jets from them. We designed an algorithm to search for pairs of radio sources straddling objects from two unprecedented samples of 878,031 Galactic stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 675,874 spiral galaxy candidates drawn from the recent literature. We found three new examples of double-lobed radio stars, while for the spiral galaxies we only rediscovered one known such double source, confirming that the latter objects are extremely rare.

  5. Beamed radio and far infrared emission in quasars and radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H; Barthel, PD; Hes, R

    1997-01-01

    Simple orientation model predictions for the radio to far infrared spectral energy distributions of radio-loud AGN are confronted with observations at various radio frequencies. This model is subsequently used to investigate 60 mu m far-infrared data. The results are supportive of the unified scheme

  6. Beamed radio and far infrared emission in quasars and radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H; Barthel, PD; Hes, R

    Simple orientation model predictions for the radio to far infrared spectral energy distributions of radio-loud AGN are confronted with observations at various radio frequencies. This model is subsequently used to investigate 60 mu m far-infrared data. The results are supportive of the unified scheme

  7. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Martì, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bogazzi, C; Bormuth, R; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Core, L; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; De Rosa, G; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; DeBonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Escoffier, S; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Herrero, A; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, E; Lambard, G; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Müller, C; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; Păvălaş, G E; Perrina, C; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tayalati, Y; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tönnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yatkin, K; Yepes, H; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; Falco, E E

    2014-01-01

    Context. The jets of radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei are among the most powerful particle accelerators in the Universe, and a plausible production site for high-energy cosmic rays. The detection of high-energy neutrinos from these sources would provide unambiguous evidence of a hadronic component in such jets. High-luminosity blazars, such as the flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), are promising candidates to search for such emission. Because of the low fluxes due to large redshift, these sources are however challenging for the current generation of neutrino telescopes such as ANTARES and IceCube. Aims. This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazars. Methods. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed blazars, using data collected from 2007 to 2012 by ANTARES. The magnification factor is estimated for each syst...

  8. Hard X-Ray Spectrum from West Lobe of Radio Galaxy Fornax A Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Makoto S; Seta, Hiromi; Matsuta, Keiko; Yaji, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    An observation of the West lobe of radio galaxy Fornax A (NGC 1316) with Suzaku is reported. Since Feigelson et al. (1995) and Kaneda et al. (1995) discovered the cosmic microwave background boosted inverse-Comptonized (IC) X-rays from the radio lobe, the magnetic field and electron energy density in the lobes have been estimated under the assumption that a single component of the relativistic electrons generates both the IC X-rays and the synchrotron radio emission. However, electrons generating the observed IC X-rays in the 1 -- 10 keV band do not possess sufficient energy to radiate the observed synchrotron radio emission under the estimated magnetic field of a few micro-G. On the basis of observations made with Suzaku, we show in the present paper that a 0.7 -- 20 keV spectrum is well described by a single power-law model with an energy index of 0.68 and a flux density of 0.12+/-0.01 nJy at 1 keV from the West lobe. The derived multiwavelength spectrum strongly suggests that a single electron energy distr...

  9. The warm absorber in the radio-loud quasar 4C +74.26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gesu, L.; Costantini, E.

    2016-10-01

    Outflows of photoionized gas are commonly detected in the X-ray spectra of Seyfert 1 galaxies. However, the evidence for this phenomenon in broad line radio galaxies, which are analogous to Seyfert 1 galaxies in the radio-loud regime, has so far been scarce. Here, we present the analysis of the X-ray absorption in the radio-loud quasar 4C +74.26. With the aim of characterizing the kinetic and the ionization conditions of the absorbing material, we fitted jointly the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) spectra, which were taken 4 months apart. The intrinsic continuum flux did not vary significantly during this time lapse. The spectrum shows the absorption signatures (e.g., Fe-UTA, O vii, and Ne vii-Ne x) of a photoionized gas outflow (NH ~ 3.5 × 1021 cm-2, log ξ ~ 2.6, vout ~ 3600 km s-1) located at the redshift of source. We estimate that the gas is located outside the broad line region but within the boundaries of the putative torus. This ionized absorber is consistent with the X-ray counterpart of a polar scattering outflow reported in the optical band for this source. The kinetic luminosity carried by the outflow is insufficient to produce a significant feedback is this quasar. Finally, we show that the heavy soft X-ray absorption that was noticed in the past for this source arises mostly in the Galactic interstellar medium.

  10. Milliarcsecond Imaging of the Radio Emission from the Quasar with the Most Massive Black Hole at Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Momjian, Emmanuel; Carilli, Chris L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Strauss, Michael A.; Wang, Feige; Jiang, Linhua

    2017-02-01

    We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the z = 6.326 quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is by far the most optically luminous and is a radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z > 6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas ×5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6 ± 9.0 μJy beam‑1 and a total flux density of 88 ± 19 μJy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to (7.1 ± 3.5) mas × (3.1 ± 1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40 ± 20) pc × (18 ± 10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be TB = (1.6 ± 1.2) × 107 K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star-forming galaxies, indicating an active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest-redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example for studying the radio activity in optically luminous and radio-quiet AGNs in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.

  11. A Three-decade X-band VLBI Study of 3CR Lobe-dominated Quasar Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hough David H.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report X-band VLBI observations of several 3CR lobe-dominated quasar nuclei from 1981 to 2010, mostly obtained with the NRAO VLBA. The goal is to follow flux density outbursts and to fully determine the jet morphology and kinematics on 1-100 pc scales. In 3C207, the core region has flux outbursts at mean intervals of ~7 yr; one of these is actually a double outburst from a stationary true core and a swinging component ~0.5 mas apart. The position angle (PA of the swinging component varies by ~40°, while the PA values of the jet components span ~25°. The jet extends to ~25 mas. Average superluminal speeds are ~10c. One component shows apparent acceleration from 7c to 14c at 2-3 mas from the true core, in a jet recollimation zone that redirects the flow toward PA ~90°. Individual jet components expand until reaching the recollimation zone. In 3C263 and other objects, some of the same phenomena are seen, including ejection of jet components over a range in PA, superluminal motion, and apparent acceleration, but to a lesser degree. Possible physical interpretations involving beaming, orientation, projection, precession, and magnetic effects are discussed.

  12. Deep optical spectroscopy of extended Lyman alpha emission around three radio-quiet z=4.5 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Courbin, F; Eigenbrod, A; Chelouche, D

    2008-01-01

    We report the first results of a spectroscopic search for Lyman alpha, envelopes around three z=4.5 radio-quiet quasars. Our observational strategy uses the FORS2 spectrograph attached to the UT1 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in the multi-slit mode. This allows us to observe simultaneously the quasars and several PSF stars. The spectra of the latter are used to remove the point-like quasar from the data, and to unveil the faint underlying Lyman alpha, envelopes associated with the quasars with unprecedented depth. We clearly detect an envelope around two of the three quasars. These envelopes measure respectively 10" and 13" in extent (i.e. 67 kpc and 87 kpc). This is 5 to 10 times larger than predicted by the models of Haiman & Rees (2001) and up to 100 times fainter. Our observations better agree with models involing a clumpy envelope as in Alam & Miralda-Escude (2002) or Chelouche et al. (2008). We find that the brighter quasars also have the brighter envelopes but that the extend of the envelop...

  13. Complete Ionisation of the Neutral Gas in High Redshift Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, S J

    2012-01-01

    Cool neutral gas provides the raw material for all star formation in the Universe, and yet, from a survey of the hosts of high redshift radio galaxies and quasars, we find a complete dearth of atomic (HI 21-cm) and molecular (OH, CO, HCO+ & HCN) absorption at redshifts z > 3. Upon a thorough analysis of the optical photometry, we find that all of our targets have ionising ultra-violet continuum luminosities of logL > 23 W/Hz. We therefore attribute this deficit to the traditional optical selection of targets biasing surveys towards the most ultra-violet luminous objects, where the intense radiation excites the neutral gas to the point where it cannot engage in star formation. However, this hypothesis does not explain why there is a critical luminosity, rather than a continuum where the detections gradually become fewer and fewer as the harshness of the radiation increases. We show that by placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas there is always a finite ultra-violet luminosity above which all of the gas is...

  14. Coronal properties of the luminous radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202$-$209

    CERN Document Server

    Kammoun, E S; Stern, D; Jun, H D; Graham, M; Celotti, A; Behar, E; Elvis, M; Harrison, F A; Matt, G; Walton, D J

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the joint $XMM$-$Newton$ and $NuSTAR$ observations of the radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202$-$209. Using an optical observation from the Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory, we revise the redshift of the source from the previously reported $z=1.77$ to $z=0.532$, and we estimate the mass of the central black hole, $\\log (M_{\\rm BH}/M_{\\odot}) = 9.08 \\pm 0.18$. The X-ray spectrum of this source can be well described by a power-law of photon index $\\Gamma = 1.82 \\pm 0.05$ with $E_{\\rm cut} = 152_{-54}^{+103}\\,{\\rm keV}$, in the rest frame of the source. Assuming a Comptonisation model, we estimate the coronal temperature to be $kT_{\\rm e}=42\\pm 3 \\,{\\rm keV}$ and $kT_{\\rm e}= 56 \\pm 3\\,{\\rm keV}$ for a spherical and a slab geometry, respectively. The coronal properties are comparable to the ones derived for local AGN, despite a difference of around one order of magnitude in black hole mass and X-ray luminosity ($L_{2-10} = 1.93\\times 10^{45}\\,{\\rm erg\\,s^{-1}}$). The quasar is X-ray lo...

  15. Measuring the speed of light with ultra-compact radio quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shuo; Jackson, John; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on a 2.29 GHz VLBI all-sky survey of 613 milliarcsecond ultra-compact radio sources with $0.0035quasars ($10^{27}$ W/Hz$quasars extending to hi...

  16. Scorpius X-1: The Evolution and Nature of the Twin Compact Radio Lobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomalont, E. B.; Geldzahler, B. J.; Bradshaw, C. F.

    2001-09-01

    The motion and variability of the radio components in the low-mass X-ray binary system Sco X-1 have been monitored with extensive VLBI imaging at 1.7 and 5.0 GHz over 4 yr, including a 56 hr continuous VLBI observation in 1999 June. We detect one strong and one weak compact radio component, moving in opposite directions from the radio core. Their relative motion and flux densities are consistent with relativistic effects, from which we derive an average component speed of v/c=0.45+/-0.03 at an angle of 44deg+/-6deg to the line of sight. This inclination of the binary orbit suggests a mass of the secondary star that is less than 0.9 Msolar, assuming a neutron star mass of 1.4 Msolar. We suggest that the two moving radio components consist of ultrarelativistic plasma that is produced at a working surface where the energy in dual-opposing beams disrupt. The radio lobe advance velocity is constant over many hours, but differs among lobe-pairs: 0.32c, 0.46c, 0.48c, and 0.57c. A lobe-pair lifetime is less than 2 days, with a new pair formed near the core within a day. The lobe flux has flux density that is variable over a timescale of 1 hr, has a measured minimum size of 1 mas (4×108 km), and is extended perpendicular to its motion. This timescale and size are consistent with an electron radiative lifetime of less than 1 hr. Such a short lifetime can be caused by synchrotron losses if the lobe magnetic field is 300 G or by adiabatic expansion of the electrons as soon as they are produced at the working surface. The lobes also show periods of slow expansion and a steepening radio spectrum. Two of the core flares are correlated with the lobe flares under the assumption that the flares are produced by an energy burst traveling down the beams with a speed greater than 0.95. The radio morphology for Sco X-1 differs from most other Galactic jet sources. Possible reasons for the morphology difference are that Sco X-1 is associated with a neutron star, it is a persistent X

  17. BeppoSAX Observations of Synchrotron X-ray Emission from Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Ghisellini, G; Giommi, P; Perlman, E

    2002-01-01

    We present new BeppoSAX LECS, MECS, and PDS observations of four flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) having effective spectral indices alpha_ro and alpha_ox typical of high-energy peaked BL Lacs. Our sources have X-ray-to-radio flux ratios on average ~ 70 times larger than ``classical'' FSRQ and lie at the extreme end of the FSRQ X-ray-to-radio flux ratio distribution. The collected data cover the energy range 0.1 - 10 keV (observer's frame), reaching ~ 100 keV for one object. The BeppoSAX band in one of our sources, RGB J1629+4008, is dominated by synchrotron emission peaking at ~ 2 x 10^16 Hz, as also shown by its steep (energy index alpha_x ~ 1.5) spectrum. This makes this object the FIRST known FSRQ whose X-ray emission is not due to inverse Compton radiation. Two other sources display a flat BeppoSAX spectrum (alpha_x ~ 0.7), with weak indications of steepening at low X-ray energies. The combination of BeppoSAX and ROSAT observations, (non-simultaneous) multifrequency data, and a synchrotron inverse Compt...

  18. On the efficiency of jet production in FR II radio galaxies and quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinek, Katarzyna; Sikora, Marek; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, Dorota; Godfrey, Leith

    2017-04-01

    Jet powers in many radio galaxies with extended radio structures appear to exceed their associated accretion luminosities. In systems with very low accretion rates, this is likely due to the very low accretion luminosities resulting from radiatively inefficient accretion flows. In systems with high accretion rates, the accretion flows are expected to be radiatively efficient, and the production of such powerful jets may require an accretion scenario, which involves magnetically arrested discs (MADs). However, numerical simulations of the MAD scenario indicate that jet production efficiency is large only for geometrically thick accretion flows and scales roughly with (H/R)2, where H is the disc height and R is the distance from the black hole. Using samples of FR II radio galaxies and quasars accreting at moderate accretion rates, we show that their jets are much more powerful than predicted by the MAD scenario. We discuss possible origins of this discrepancy, suggesting that it can be related to approximations adopted in magnetohydrodynamic simulations to treat optically thick accretion flow within the MAD zone, or may indicate that accretion discs are geometrically thicker than the standard theory predicts.

  19. The warm absorber in the radio-loud quasar 4C +74.26

    CERN Document Server

    Di Gesu, L

    2016-01-01

    Outflows of photoionized gas are commonly detected in the X-ray spectra of Seyfert 1 galaxies. However, the evidence for this phenomenon in broad line radio galaxies, which are analogous to Seyfert 1 galaxies in the radio-loud regime, has so far been scarce. Here, we present the analysis of the X-ray absorption in the radio-loud quasar 4C +74.26. With the aim of characterizing the kinetic and the ionization conditions of the absorbing material, we fitted jointly the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) spectra, which were taken 4 months apart. The intrinsic continuum flux did not vary significantly during this time lapse. The spectrum shows the absorption signatures (e.g., Fe-UTA, \\ion{O}{vii}, and \\ion{Ne}{vii}--\\ion{Ne}{x}) of a photoionized gas outflow ($N_{\\rm H} \\sim 3.5 \\times 10^{21} \\rm cm^{-2}$, $\\log \\xi \\sim 2.6$, $v_{\\rm out}\\sim 3600 \\, \\rm km \\, s^{-1}$) located at the redshift of source. We estimate that the gas i...

  20. Dressing a naked quasar: star formation and AGN feedback in HE0450-2958

    CERN Document Server

    Klamer, I; Ekers, R; Middelberg, E; Klamer, Ilana; Papadopoulos, Padelis; Ekers, Ron; Middelberg, Enno

    2007-01-01

    We present Australia Telescope Compact Array radio continuum observations of the quasar/galaxy system HE0450-2958. An asymetric triple linear morphology is observed, with the central radio component coincident with the quasar core and a second radio component associated with a companion galaxy at a projected distance of 7kpc from the quasar. The system obeys the far-infrared to radio continuum correlation, implying the radio emission is energetically dominated by star formation activity. However, there is undoubtedly some contribution to the overall radio emission from a low-luminosity AGN core and a pair of radio lobes. Long baseline radio interferometric observations of the quasar core place a 3sigma upper limit of 0.6mJy at 1400MHz on the AGN contribution to the quasar's radio emission; less than 30% of the total. The remaining 70% of the radio emission from the quasar is associated with star formation activity and provides the first direct evidence for the quasar's host galaxy. A re-anlaysis of the VLT sp...

  1. AGN Feedback and Evolution of Radio Sources: Discovery of an X-ray Cluster Associated with z=1 Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Siemiginowska, A; La Massa, S; Burke, D; Aldcroft, T L; Bechtold, J; Elvis, M; Worrall, D M

    2005-01-01

    We report the first significant detection of an X-ray cluster associated with a powerful (L(bol) ~1e47 erg/sec) radio-loud quasar at high redshift (z=1.06). Diffuse X-ray emission is detected out to ~120 kpc from the CSS quasar 3C 186. A strong Fe-line emission at the z(rest)=1.06 confirms its thermal nature. We find that the CSS radio source is highly overpressured with respect to the thermal cluster medium by ~2-3 orders of magnitude. This provides direct observational evidence that the radio source is not thermally confined as posited in the ``frustrated'' scenario for CSS sources. Instead, the radio source may be young and at an early stage of its evolution. This source provides the first detection of the AGN in outburst in the center of a cooling flow cluster. Powerful radio sources are thought to be triggered by the cooling flows. The evidence for the AGN activity and intermittent outbursts comes from the X-ray morphology of low redshift clusters, which usually do not harbour quasars. 3C186 is a young a...

  2. Discovery of Radio-loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars Using Ultraviolet Excess and Deep Radio Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Brotherton, M S; Smith, R J; Boyle, B J; Shanks, T; Croom, S M; Miller, L; Becker, R H; Breugel, Wil van; Miller, Lance; Becker, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    We report the discovery of five broad-absorption-line (BAL) QSOs in a complete sample of 111 ultraviolet excess (UVX) QSO candidates also detected in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. All five BAL QSOs, which include two high-ionization BAL QSOs and three low-ionization BAL QSOs, are formally radio-loud. Of QSOs with z > 0.4, 3+/-2% show low-ionization BALs, and of QSOs with z > 1.5, all radio-loud, 9+/-5% show BALs; these frequencies are consistent with those of optical surveys. While the first reported radio-loud BAL QSO, FIRST J155633.8+351758, is likely to be heavily dust reddened and thus less radio-loud than indicated by its observed radio-to-optical luminosity, these QSOs are UVX selected and probably free of significant dust along the line of sight. We point out unusual features in two of the BAL QSOs and discuss the significance finding these heretofore rare objects.

  3. Buoyant radio-lobes in a viscous intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S; Fabian, A C; Stone, J M; Vernaleo, J C

    2004-01-01

    (Abridged) Ideal hydrodynamic models of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the core regions of galaxy clusters fail to explain both the observed temperature structure of this gas, and the observed morphology of radio-galaxy/ICM interactions. It has recently been suggested that, even in the presence of reasonable magnetic fields, thermal conduction in the ICM may be crucial for reproducing the temperature floor seen in many systems. If this is indeed correct, it raises the possibility that other transport processes may be important. With this motivation, we present a numerical investigation of the buoyant evolution of AGN-blown cavities in ICM that has a non-negligible shear viscosity. We use the ZEUS-MP code to follow the 3-d evolution of an initially static, hot bubble in a beta-model ICM atmosphere with varying degrees of shear viscosity. With no explicit viscosity, it is found that the combined action of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities shred the ICM cavity and one does not reproduce the in...

  4. Numerical modelling of the lobes of radio galaxies in cluster environments - III. Powerful relativistic and non-relativistic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, W.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Krause, M. G. H.

    2016-09-01

    We present results from two suites of simulations of powerful radio galaxies in poor cluster environments, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the radio lobes. One suite of models uses relativistic hydrodynamics and the other relativistic magnetohydrodynamics; both are set up to cover a range of jet powers and velocities. The dynamics of the lobes are shown to be in good agreement with analytical models and with previous numerical models, confirming in the relativistic regime that the observed widths of radio lobes may be explained if they are driven by very light jets. The ratio of energy stored in the radio lobes to that put into the intracluster gas is seen to be the same regardless of jet power, jet velocity or simulation type, suggesting that we have a robust understanding of the work done on the ambient gas by this type of radio source. For the most powerful jets, we at times find magnetic field amplification by up to a factor of 2 in energy, but mostly the magnetic energy in the lobes is consistent with the magnetic energy injected. We confirm our earlier result that for jets with a toroidally injected magnetic field, the field in the lobes is predominantly aligned with the jet axis once the lobes are well developed, and that this leads to radio flux anisotropies of up to a factor of about two for mature sources. We reproduce the relationship between 151 MHz luminosity and jet power determined analytically in the literature.

  5. The Young Radio Lobe of 3C 84: Inferred Gas Properties in the Central 10 Parsec

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Yutaka; Shlosman, Isaac; Ito, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the environment of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the centre of a massive elliptical galaxy NGC 1275 in the Perseus cluster, hosting the radio source 3C 84. We focus on the young radio lobe observed inside the estimated Bondi accretion radius. We discuss the momentum balance between the jet associated with the lobe and the surrounding gas. The results are compared with the proper motion of the radio lobe obtained with the VLBI. We find that under assumption of a high-density environment >~ 100 cm^-3), the jet power must be comparable to the Eddington luminosity --- this is clearly inconsistent with the current moderate activity of 3C 84, which indicates instead that the jet is expanding in a very low density region (<~1 cm^-3), along the rotation axis of the accretion flow. The power required for the jet to expand in the low-density environment is comparable to the past average jet power estimated from the X-ray observations. We estimate the classical Bondi accretion rate, assuming that (...

  6. The Einstein database of IPC x-ray observations of optically selected and radio-selected quasars, 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Worrall, D. M.; Avni, Yoram; Oey, M. S.; Flanagan, Joan

    1994-01-01

    We present the first volume of the Einstein quasar database. The database includes estimates of the X-ray count rates, fluxes, and luminosities for 514 quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) aboard the Einstein Observatory. All were previously known optically selected or radio-selected objects, and most were the targets of the X-ray observations. The X-ray properties of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) have been derived by reanalyzing the IPC data in a systematic manner to provide a uniform database for general use by the astronomical community. We use the database to extend earlier quasar luminosity studies which were made using only a subset of the currently available data. The database can be accessed on internet via the SAO Einstein on-line system ('Einline') and is available in ASCII format on magnetic tape and DOS diskette.

  7. Discovery of γ-Ray Emission from the Radio-intermediate Quasar III Zw 2: Violent Jet Activity with Intraday γ-Ray Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Neng-Hui; Xin, Yu-Liang; Fan, Xu-Liang; Weng, Shan-Shan; Li, Shao-Kun; Chen, Liang; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    III Zw 2 is the prototype of radio-intermediate quasars. Although there is the evidence of possessing strong jet, significant γ-ray emission has not been reported before. In this work, we carry out a detailed analysis of the latest Fermi-LAT Pass 8 data. No significant γ-ray signal has been detected in the time-averaged 7-year Fermi-LAT data of III Zw 2; however, we have identified two distinct γ-ray flares with isotropic luminosities of ˜1045 erg s-1. Multiwavelength data analysis (also including the optical photometric observations from Yunnan Observatories) are presented and the main finding is simultaneous optical and γ-ray flares of III Zw 2 appearing in 2009 November. Violent γ-ray variability with a doubling timescale of 2.5 hr was detected in another γ-ray flare in May 2010, for which the 3-hr γ-ray peak flux is ˜250 times of the average flux in 7 years. Rather similar behaviors are observed in blazars and the blazar model can reasonably reproduce the spectral energy distribution of III Zw 2 in a wide energy range, strongly suggesting that its central engine resembles that of blazars. In view of its core, which shares radio similarities with young radio sources, together with weak extended radio lobe emission, we suggest that III Zw 2 harbors a recurrent activity core and thus serves as a valuable target for investigating the fueling and triggering of the activity in radio-loud active galactic nuclei.

  8. The far-infrared emission of the radio-loud quasar 3C318

    CERN Document Server

    Podigachoski, P; Peletier, R F; Steendam, S

    2016-01-01

    3C318, a radio-loud quasar at z=1.574, is a subgalactic-sized radio source, and a good test-bed for the interplay between black hole and galaxy growth in the high-z Universe. Based on its IRAS, ISO, and SCUBA detections, it has long been considered as one of the most intrinsically luminous (L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ > 10$^{13}$ L$_{\\odot}$) infrared sources in the Universe. Recent far-infrared data from the Herschel Space Observatory reveal that most of the flux associated with 3C318 measured with earlier instruments in fact comes from a bright nearby source. Optical imaging and spectroscopy show that this infrared-bright source is a strongly star-forming pair of interacting galaxies at z=0.35. Adding existing Spitzer and SDSS photometry, we perform a spectral energy distribution analysis of the pair, and find that it has a combined infrared luminosity of L$_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ = 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{12}$ L$_{\\odot}$, comparable to other intermediate-redshift ultra-luminous infrared galaxies studied with Herschel. Isolating ...

  9. Intranight Optical Variability of Radio-Quiet Weak Emission Line Quasars-IV

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Parveen; Gopal-Krishna,

    2016-01-01

    We report an extension of our program to search for radio-quiet BL Lac candidates using intra-night optical variability (INOV) as a probe. The present INOV observations cover a well-defined representative set of 10 `radio-quiet weak-emission-line quasars' (RQWLQs), selected from a newly published sample of 46 such sources, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data release 7). Intra-night CCD monitoring of the 10 RQWLQs was carried out in 18 sessions lasting at least 3.5 hours. For each session, differential light curves (DLCs) of the target RQWLQ were derived relative to two steady comparison stars monitored simultaneously. Combining these new data with those already published by us for 15 RQWLQs monitored in 30 sessions, we estimate an INOV duty cycle of $\\sim 3\\%$ for the RQWLQs, which appears inconsistent with BL Lacs. However, the observed INOV events (which occurred in just two of the sessions) are strong (with a fractional variability amplitude $\\psi >$ 10\\%), hence blazar-like. We briefly point o...

  10. Intranight optical variability of radio-quiet weak emission line quasars - IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parveen; Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna

    2016-09-01

    We report an extension of our programme to search for radio-quiet BL Lac candidates using intranight optical variability (INOV) as a probe. The present INOV observations cover a well-defined representative set of 10 `radio-quiet weak-emission-line quasars' (RQWLQs), selected from a newly published sample of 46 such sources, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data release 7). Intranight CCD monitoring of the 10 RQWLQs was carried out in 18 sessions lasting at least 3.5 h. For each session, differential light curves of the target RQWLQ were derived relative to two steady comparison stars monitored simultaneously. Combining these new data with those already published by us for 15 RQWLQs monitored in 30 sessions, we estimate an INOV duty cycle of ˜3 per cent for the RQWLQs, which appears inconsistent with BL Lacs. However, the observed INOV events (which occurred in just two of the sessions) are strong (with a fractional variability amplitude ψ > 10 per cent), hence blazar-like. We briefly point out the prospects of an appreciable rise in the estimated INOV duty cycle for RQWLQs with a relatively modest increase in sensitivity for monitoring these rather faint objects.

  11. ALMA Science Verification Data: Millimeter Continuum Polarimetry of the Bright Radio Quasar 3C 286

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, H; Paladino, R; Hull, C L H; Cortes, P; Moellenbrock, G; Fomalont, E; Asada, K; Hada, K

    2016-01-01

    We present full-polarization observations of the compact, steep-spectrum radio quasar 3C~286 made with the ALMA at 1.3~mm. These are the first full-polarization ALMA observations, which were obtained in the framework of Science Verification. A bright core and a south-west component are detected in the total intensity image, similar to previous centimeter images. Polarized emission is also detected toward both components. The fractional polarization of the core is about 17\\%, this is higher than the fractional polarization at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the magnetic field is even more ordered in the millimeter radio core than it is further downstream in the jet. The observed polarization position angle (or EVPA) in the core is $\\sim$\\,$39^{\\circ}$, which confirms the trend that the EVPA slowly increases from centimeter to millimeter wavelengths. With the aid of multi-frequency VLBI observations, we argue that this EVPA change is associated with the frequency-dependent core position. We also report ...

  12. Correlations among Jet, Accretion Disk, and Broad Line Region of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin; He, Jian-Jian; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The SEDs of 18 GeV FSRQs are collected and compiled from literature, in which both the jet emission and the accretion disk radiation can be observed, in order to investigate the correlations among their jet power (P_jet), accretion disk luminosity (L_disk), and luminosity of broad line region (BLR, L_BLR). On the basis of the SED fits with the jet radiation and accretion disk radiation models, we calculate P_jet and L_disk. No correlation between P_jet with either L_disk or L_BLR is found. With a sub-sample of L_BLR for 13 GeV FSRQs, it is observed that L_BLR is strongly correlated with their L_disk. We also study the BLR covering factors of the GeV FSRQs in our sample, averagely which are smaller than that of the large samples of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars. P_jet of some GeV FSRQs is higher than L_disk, but P_jet of all the GeV FSRQs is lower than the accretion power of black hole (BH), which is estimated by \\dot{M}c^2=L_disk/0.1, indicating that the total accretion power of BH is sufficient to drive...

  13. MAGIC observations and multifrequency properties of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar 3C 279 in 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Berdyugin, A; Vornanen, T; Lähteenmäki, A; Tammi, J; Tornikoski, M; Hovatta, T; Max-Moerbeck, W; Readhead, A; Richards, J; Hayashida, M; Sanchez, D A; Fermi-LAT, on behalf of the; Marscher, A; Jorstad, S

    2013-01-01

    We study the multifrequency emission and spectral properties of the quasar 3C 279. We observed 3C 279 in very high energy (VHE, E>100GeV) gamma rays, with the MAGIC telescopes during 2011, for the first time in stereoscopic mode. We combine these measurements with observations at other energy bands: in high energy (HE, E>100MeV) gamma rays from Fermi-LAT, in X-rays from RXTE, in the optical from the KVA telescope and in the radio at 43GHz, 37GHz and 15GHz from the VLBA, Mets\\"ahovi and OVRO radio telescopes and optical polarisation measurements from the KVA and Liverpool telescopes. During the MAGIC observations (February to April 2011) 3C 279 was in a low state in optical, X-ray and gamma rays. The MAGIC observations did not yield a significant detection. These upper limits are in agreement with the extrapolation of the HE gamma-ray spectrum, corrected for extragalactic background light absorption, from Fermi-LAT. The second part of the MAGIC observations in 2011 was triggered by a high activity state in the...

  14. SDSS J013127.34–032100.1: A NEWLY DISCOVERED RADIO-LOUD QUASAR AT z = 5.18 WITH EXTREMELY HIGH LUMINOSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Wei-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Brandt, William N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kim, Minjin [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Ran [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); and others

    2014-11-10

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34–032100.1 (J0131–0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131–0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ∼100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L {sub bol} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1}, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131–0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  15. The shape of the blue\\/UV continuum of B3-VLA radio quasars Dependence on redshift, blue\\/UV luminosity and radio power

    CERN Document Server

    Carballo, R; Benn, C R; Sánchez, S F; Vigotti, M

    1999-01-01

    UBVR photometry of a sample of B3-VLA radio quasars, about 80 per cent complete, is used to analyse their spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are generally well fitted with power-laws, with an average slope alpha=-0.39 (S_nu propto nu^alpha). Two quasars appear clearly differenciated, exhibiting redder colours that the rest, and they have redshifts z=0.50 and 1.12. Broad-band composite SEDs in the range 1300-4500 AA were obtained from the remaining quasars and they show the CIV1549 line and a break at around 3000 A, where the SED changes from alpha_blue=0.11+-0.16 at lambda>3000 A to alpha_UV=-0.66+-0.15 at lambda1.2 alpha_UV is more flat, -0.48+-0.12. A similar trend is found between alpha_UV and luminosity at 2400 A, L_2400, with luminous quasars exhibiting a bluer spectrum. In addition, an intrinsic correlation is found between L_2400 and radio power at 408 MHz. The correlations alpha_UV-z, alpha_UV-L_2400 and L_2400-z are consistent with accretion disc models with approximately constant black hol...

  16. Measuring the speed of light with ultra-compact radio quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Jackson, John; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhao, Yuhang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, based on a 2.29 GHz VLBI all-sky survey of 613 milliarcsecond ultra-compact radio sources with 0.0035sample which can serve as individual standard rulers in cosmology. If the linear size of the compact structure is assumed to depend on source luminosity and redshift as lm=l Lβ (1+z)n, only intermediate-luminosity quasars (1027 W/Hzpopulation of such rulers with fixed characteristic length l=11.42 pc. With a sample of 120 such sources covering the redshift range 00.46quasars extending to high redshifts (0z~ 3.), we reconstruct the DA(z) function using the technique of Gaussian processes. This allows us to identify the redshift corresponding to the maximum of the DA(z) function: 0zm=1.7 and the corresponding angular diameter distance DA(zm)=1719.01±43.46 Mpc. Similar reconstruction of the expansion rate function H(z) based on the data from cosmic chronometers and BAO gives us H(zm)=176.77±6.11 km sec‑1 Mpc‑1. These measurements are used to estimate the speed of light: c=3.039(±0.180)× 105 km/s. This is the first measurement of the speed of light in a cosmological setting referring to the distant past.

  17. Coronal properties of the luminous radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202-209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, E. S.; Risaliti, G.; Stern, D.; Jun, H. D.; Graham, M.; Celotti, A.; Behar, E.; Elvis, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Matt, G.; Walton, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the radio-quiet quasar QSO B2202-209. Using an optical observation from the Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory, we revise the redshift of the source from the previously reported z = 1.77 to z = 0.532, and we estimate the mass of the central black hole, log (MBH/M⊙) = 9.08 ± 0.18. The X-ray spectrum of this source can be well described by a power law of photon index Γ = 1.82 ± 0.05 with E_cut = 152_{-54}^{+103} keV, in the rest frame of the source. Assuming a Comptonization model, we estimate the coronal temperature to be kTe = 42 ± 3 keV and kTe = 56 ± 3 keV for a spherical and a slab geometry, respectively. The coronal properties are comparable to the ones derived for local active galactic nuclei, despite a difference of around one order of magnitude in black hole mass and X-ray luminosity (L2 - 10 = 1.93 × 1045 erg s-1). The quasar is X-ray loud, with an unusually flat observed optical-to-X-ray spectral slope αOX = 1.00 ± 0.02, and has an exceptionally strong optical [O III] line. Assuming that both the X-ray emission and the [O III] line are isotropic, these two extreme properties can be explained by a nearly edge-on disc, leading to a reduction in the observed ultraviolet continuum light.

  18. X-Ray Observations of Optically Selected, Radio-quiet Quasars. I. The ASCA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, I. M.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Netzer, H.; Laor, A.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Nandra, K.; Takahashi, T.

    2000-03-01

    We present the result of 27 ASCA observations of 26 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) from the Palomar-Green (PG) survey. The sample is not statistically complete, but it is reasonably representative of RQQs in the PG survey. For many of the sources, the ASCA data are presented here for the first time. All the RQQs were detected except for two objects, both of which contain broad absorption lines in the optical band. We find the variability characteristics of the sources to be consistent with Seyfert 1 galaxies. A power law offers an acceptable description of the time-averaged spectra in the 2-10 keV (quasar frame) band for all but one data set. The best-fitting values of the photon index vary from object to object over the range 1.5~=2 and dispersion σ(Γ2-10)~=0.25. The distribution of Γ2-10 is therefore similar to that observed in other RQ active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and seems to be unrelated to X-ray luminosity. No single model adequately describes the full 0.6-10 keV (observed frame) continuum of all the RQQs. Approximately 50% of the sources can be adequately described by a single power law or by a power law with only very subtle deviations. All but one of the remaining data sets were found to have convex spectra (flattening as one moves to higher energies). The exception is PG 1411+442, in which a substantial column density (NH,z~2x1023 cm-2) obscures ~98% of the continuum. We find only five (maybe six) of 14 objects with z<~0.25 to have ``soft excesses'' at energies <~1 keV, but we find no universal shape for these spectral components. The spectrum of PG 1244+026 contains a rather narrow emission feature centered at an energy ~1 keV (quasar frame). The detection rate of absorption due to ionized material in these RQQs is lower than that seen in Seyfert 1 galaxies. In part, this may be due to selection effects. However, when detected, the absorbers in the RQQs exhibit a similar range of column density and ionization parameter as Seyfert 1 galaxies. We find

  19. STORM IN A {sup T}EACUP{sup :} A RADIO-QUIET QUASAR WITH ≈10 kpc RADIO-EMITTING BUBBLES AND EXTREME GAS KINEMATICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, C. M.; Thomson, A. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Edge, A. C.; Hogan, M. T.; Swinbank, A. M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifica Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Mullaney, J. R., E-mail: c.m.harrison@mail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S7 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-10

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup –1} and L {sub AGN} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the ''Teacup'' active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify ''bubbles'' of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the ''Teacup'' AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = –740 km s{sup –1}. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on ≳ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally ''radio-quiet'' the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.

  20. Storm in a "Teacup": A Radio-quiet Quasar with ≈10 kpc Radio-emitting Bubbles and Extreme Gas Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. M.; Thomson, A. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Edge, A. C.; Hogan, M. T.; Mullaney, J. R.; Swinbank, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) Very Large Array data, combined with VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph integral field unit data and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, of a z = 0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L 1.4 GHz ≈ 5 × 1023 W Hz-1 and L AGN ≈ 2 × 1045 erg s-1). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the "Teacup" active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the literature. We identify "bubbles" of radio emission that are extended ≈10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the "Teacup" AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ≈0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v = -740 km s-1. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on >~ 10 kpc scales. Our study highlights that even when a quasar is formally "radio-quiet" the radio emission can be extremely effective for observing the effects of AGN feedback.

  1. Giant Lobes of Centaurus A Radio Galaxy Observed with the Suzaku X-ray Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Stawarz, L; Madejski, G; O'Sullivan, S P; Cheung, C C; Feain, I J; Fukazawa, Y; Gandhi, P; Hardcastle, M J; Kataoka, J; Ostrowski, M; Reville, B; Siemiginowska, A; Simionescu, A; Takahashi, T; Takei, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Werner, N

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] We report on Suzaku observations of selected regions within the Southern giant lobe of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. We focus on distinct X-ray features likely associated with fine radio structure of the lobe. We find that the spectral properties of the detected X-ray features are equally consistent with thermal emission from hot gas, or with a power-law radiation continuum. However, the plasma parameters implied by these different models favor a synchrotron origin for the analyzed X-ray spots, indicating that a very efficient acceleration of electrons is taking place within the giant structure of Centaurus A, albeit only in isolated and compact regions. We also present a detailed analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission, resulting in a tentative detection of a soft excess component best fitted by a thermal model with a temperature of 0.5 keV. The exact origin of the observed excess remains uncertain, although energetic considerations point to thermal gas filling the bulk of the volume of the lobe an...

  2. Interstellar scintillation as the origin of the rapid radio variability of the quasar J1819+3845.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett-Thorpe, J; de Bruyn, A G

    2002-01-03

    The liberation of gravitational energy as matter falls onto a supermassive black hole at the centre of a galaxy is believed to explain the high luminosity of quasars. The variability of this emission from quasars and other types of active galactic nuclei can provide information on the size of the emitting regions and the physical process of fuelling the black hole. Some active galactic nuclei are variable at optical (and shorter) wavelengths, and display radio outbursts over years and decades. These active galactic nuclei often also show faster intraday variability at radio wavelengths. The origin of this rapid variability has been extensively debated, but a correlation between optical and radio variations in some sources suggests that both are intrinsic. This would, however, require radiation brightness temperatures that seem physically implausible, leading to the suggestion that the rapid variations are caused by scattering of the emission by the interstellar medium inside our Galaxy. Here we show that the rapid variations in the extreme case of quasar J1819+3845 (ref. 10) indeed arise from interstellar scintillation. The transverse velocity of the scattering material reveals the presence of plasma with a surprisingly high velocity close to the Solar System.

  3. Serendipitous discovery of an extended X-ray jet without a radio counterpart in a high-redshift quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Simionescu, A; Ichinohe, Y; Cheung, C C; Jamrozy, M; Siemiginowska, A; Hagino, K; Gandhi, P; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    A recent Chandra observation of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 585 has led to the discovery of an extended X-ray jet associated with the high-redshift background quasar B3 0727+409, a luminous radio source at redshift z=2.5. This is one of only few examples of high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. It has a clear extension of about 10-12", corresponding to a projected length of 80-100 kpc, with a possible hot spot as far as 35" from the quasar. The archival high resolution VLA maps surprisingly reveal no extended jet emission, except for one knot about 1.4" away from the quasar. The high X-ray to radio luminosity ratio for this source appears consistent with the $\\propto (1+z)^{4}$ amplification expected from the inverse Compton radiative model. This serendipitous discovery may signal the existence of an entire population of similar systems with bright X-ray and faint radio jets at high redshift, a selection bias which must be accounted for when drawing any conclusions about the redshift evolution of jet pr...

  4. The variability of the quasar 3C 273: a radio to gamma-ray view

    CERN Document Server

    Soldi, S; Türler, M

    2009-01-01

    We have analysed the first 15 months of Fermi/LAT data of the radio loud quasar 3C 273. Intense gamma-ray activity has been detected, showing an average flux of F(> 100 MeV) = 1.4e-6 ph/cm^2/s, with a peak at F(> 100 MeV) = 5.6e-6 ph/cm^2/s detected during a flare in September 2009. Together with the brightening of the source, a possible hardening of the gamma-ray spectrum is observed, pointing to a shift of the inverse Compton peak toward higher energies than the 1-10 MeV range in which 3C 273 inverse Compton emission is typically observed to peak. During the 15 months of observations the photon index is measured to vary between 2.4 and 3.3, with an average value of 2.78 +/- 0.03. When compared to the observations at other wavelengths, the gamma-rays show the largest flux variations and we discuss the possibility that two different components are responsible for the inverse Compton hump emission below and above the MeV peak.

  5. Black-hole mass estimates for a homogeneous sample of bright flat-spectrum radio quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Castignani, Gianluca; Lapi, Andrea; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Celotti, Annalisa; Danese, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    We have selected a complete sample of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) from the WMAP 7-yr catalog within the SDSS area, all with measured redshift, and have compared the black hole mass estimates based on fitting a standard accretion disk model to the `blue bump' with those obtained from the commonly used single epoch virial method. The sample comprises 79 objects with a flux density limit of 1 Jy at 23 GHz, 54 of which (68%) have a clearly detected `blue bump'. Thirty-four of the latter have, in the literature, black hole mass estimates obtained with the virial method. The mass estimates obtained from the two methods are well correlated. If the calibration factor of the virial relation is set to $f=4.5$, well within the range of recent estimates, the mean logarithmic ratio of the two mass estimates is equal to zero with a dispersion close to the estimated uncertainty of the virial method. The fact that the two independent methods agree so closely in spite of the potentially large uncertainties associated ...

  6. High energy properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar 4C 50.11

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jianeng; Liang, Chen; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the $\\gamma$-ray and X-ray properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) \\4c50 at redshift $z= 1.517$. The {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) data indicate that this source was in an active state since 2013 July. During the active period, the $\\gamma$-ray flux increased by more than a factor of three and two distinct flares were detected with the variability timescale as short as several hours. The $\\gamma$-ray spectra can be well fitted by a log-parabola. From the fitting, we find a correlation between the peak energy and spectral curvature for the $\\gamma$-ray spectra, which is the first time seen in $\\gamma$-ray emission from a blazar. The {\\it Swift} X-ray Telescope (XRT) data show that the source was variable at X-ray energies, but no evidence shows flux or spectral changes related to the $\\gamma$-ray activity. The broad-band X-ray spectrum obtained with {\\it Swift} XRT and {\\it NuSTAR} is well described by a broken PL model, with an extremely hard spectrum ($\\Gamma_{1} \\sim 0.1$...

  7. Suzaku diagnostics of the energetics in the lobes of the giant radio galaxy 3C 35

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Naoki; Gandhi, Poshak; Tashiro, Makoto S

    2010-01-01

    The Suzaku observation of a giant radio galaxy 3C 35 revealed faint extended X-ray emission, associated with its radio lobes and/or host galaxy. After careful subtraction of the X-ray and non-X-ray background and contaminating X-ray sources, the X-ray spectrum of the faint emission was reproduced by a sum of the power-law (PL) and soft thermal components. The soft component was attributed to the thermal plasma emission from the host galaxy. The photon index of the PL component, $\\Gamma = 1.35_{-0.86}^{+0.56} ergy density was calculated as $u_{\\rm m}=(3.1_{-1.0}^{+2.5}

  8. Numerical modelling of the lobes of radio galaxies in cluster environments - III. Powerful relativistic and nonrelativistic jets

    CERN Document Server

    English, William; Krause, Martin G H

    2016-01-01

    We present results from two suites of simulations of powerful radio galaxies in poor cluster environments, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the radio lobes. One suite of models uses relativistic hydrodynamics and the other relativistic magnetohydrodynamics; both are set up to cover a range of jet powers and velocities. The dynamics of the lobes are shown to be in good agreement with analytical models and with previous numerical models, confirming in the relativistic regime that the observed widths of radio lobes may be explained if they are driven by very light jets. The ratio of energy stored in the radio lobes to that put into the intracluster gas is seen to be the same regardless of jet power, jet velocity or simulation type, suggesting that we have a robust understanding of the work done on the ambient gas by this type of radio source. For the most powerful jets we at times find magnetic field amplification by up to a factor of two in energy, but mostly the magnetic energy in the lobes is co...

  9. Deep imaging of Fanaroff-Riley Class I radio galaxies with lobes

    CERN Document Server

    Laing, R A; Bridle, A H; Parma, P; Bondi, M

    2011-01-01

    We present deep, high-resolution imaging of the nearby Fanaroff-Riley Class I (FR I) radio galaxies NGC 193, B2 0206+35, B2 0755+37 and M 84 at frequencies of 4.9 and 1.4 GHz using new and archival multi-configuration observations from the Very Large Array. In addition, we describe lower-resolution observations of B2 0326+39 and a reanalysis of our published images of 3C 296. All of these radio galaxies show twin jets and well-defined lobes or bridges of emission, and we examine the common properties of this class of source. We show detailed images of total intensity, brightness gradient, spectral index, degree of polarization and projected magnetic-field direction. The jet bases are very similar to those in tailed twin-jet sources and show the characteristics of decelerating, relativistic flows. Except on one side of M 84, we find that the jets can be traced at least as far as the ends of the lobes, where they often form structures which we call "caps" with sharp outer brightness gradients. Continuing, but l...

  10. A Double Lobe Radio Galaxy Between Clusters: Constraints on the Intrafilament Medium Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Fadda, D.; Frayer, D. T.

    2011-01-01

    We have found the first bent double lobe radio source (DLRS) in a known cluster filament. This discovery has enabled us to constrain the intrafilament density (IFM) to be between (1-10)x10-29 gm/cm3. The host filament has been observed using extensive multiwavelength photometry and confirmed with hundreds of member redshifts. It stretches from the rich galaxy cluster Abell 1763 to the nearby cluster Abell 1770, 13Mpc away. Our recent observations from the VLA uncovered the DLRS at a distance of 3.4Mpc from the center of Abell 1763, well outside the virial radius of either cluster. We measure the jet flux and calculate the minimum pressure in the jet. Using geometric arguments to derive the orientation and bend of the jet, and assuming that the bend of the of the jet is due to ram pressure, we are able to constraint the density of the IFM. Our measurements agree with the small number of IFM estimates that currently exist, including results from different approaches such as the direct X-ray observations of Abell 222/223 and related WHIM measurements in Sculptor, as well as theoretical models. Our findings justify future searches for bent double lobe radio sources located several Mpc from cluster cores, as they may be good markers of super cluster filaments.

  11. Counting quasar--radio source pairs to derive the millijansky radio luminosity function and clustering strength to z=3.5

    CERN Document Server

    Fine, S; Johnston, R; Jarvis, M J; Mauch, T

    2015-01-01

    We apply a cross-correlation technique to infer the $S>3$mJy radio luminosity function (RLF) from the NRAO VLA sky survey (NVSS) to $z\\sim3.5$. We measure $\\Sigma$ the over density of radio sources around spectroscopically confirmed quasars. $\\Sigma$ is related to the space density of radio sources at the distance of the quasars and the clustering strength between the two samples, hence knowledge of one constrains the other. Under simple assumptions we find $\\Phi\\propto (1+z)^{3.7\\pm0.7}$ out to $z\\sim2$. Above this redshift the evolution slows and we constrain the evolution exponent to $<1.01$ ($2\\sigma$). This behaviour is almost identical to that found by previous authors for the bright end of the RLF potentially indicating that we are looking at the same population. This suggests that the NVSS is dominated by a single population; most likely radio sources associated with high-excitation cold-mode accretion. Inversely, by adopting a previously modelled RLF we can constrain the clustering of high-redshif...

  12. Synchrotron peak luminosity,black hole mass and Eddington ratio for SDSS flat-spectrum radio quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    For a sample of 185 flat-spectrum radio quasars(FSRQs) constructed from the SDSS DR3 quasar catalog,we found a significant correlation between the synchrotron peak luminosity and both the black hole mass and Eddington ratio.This implies that the physics of its jet formation is not only tightly related with the black hole mass,but also with the accretion rate.We verify that the synchrotron peak luminosity can be a better indicator of jet emission than 5 GHz luminosity,through comparing the relationships between each of these two parameters and both black hole mass and Eddington ratio.The fundamental plane of black hole activity for our FSRQs is established as Lr ∝ L0x.80 ± 0.06 Mbh -0.04 ± 0.09 with a weak dependence on black hole mass,however,the scatter is significant.

  13. Discerning the Gamma-Ray-emitting Region in the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y. G.; Yang, C. Y.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    A model-dependent method is proposed to determine the location of the γ-ray-emitting region for a given flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ). In the model, the extra-relativistic electrons are injected at the base of the jet and non-thermal photons are produced by both synchrotron radiation and inverse-Compton (IC) scattering in the energy dissipation region. The target photons dominating IC scattering originate from both synchrotron photons and external ambient photon fields, and the energy density of external radiation field is a function of the distance between the position of the dissipation region and a central supermassive black hole, and their spectra are seen in the comoving frame. Moreover, the energy dissipation region could be determined by the model parameter through reproducing the γ-ray spectra. Such a model is applied to reproduce the quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength observed data for 36 FSRQs. In order to define the width of the broad-line region (BLR) shell and dusty molecular torus (MT) shell, a simple numerical constraint is used to determine the outer boundary of the BLR and dusty MT. Our results show that (1) the γ-ray-emitting regions are located at the range from 0.1 to 10 pc; (2) the γ-ray-emitting regions are located outside the BLRs and within the dusty molecular tori; and (3) the γ-ray-emitting regions are located closer to the dusty MT ranges than the BLRs. Therefore, it may be concluded that direct evidence for the far site scenario could be obtained on the basis of the model results.

  14. The X-Ray Reflection Spectrum of the Radio-Loud Quasar 4C 74.26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohfink, Ann M.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, S. E.; Boorman, Peter; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Farrah, Duncan; Garcia, Javier; Hailey, C. J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The relativistic jets created by some active galactic nuclei are important agents of AGN feedback. In spite of this, our understanding of what produces these jets is still incomplete. X-ray observations, which can probe the processes operating in the central regions in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black hole, the presumed jet launching point, are potentially particularly valuable in illuminating the jet formation process. Here, we present the hard X-ray NuSTAR observations of the radio-loud quasar 4C 74.26 in a joint analysis with quasi-simultaneous, soft X-ray Swift observations. Our spectral analysis reveals a high-energy cutoff of -183+3551 keV and confirms the presence of ionized reflection in the source. From the average spectrum we detect that the accretion disk is mildly recessed, with an inner radius of Rin4180 Rg. However, no significant evolution of the inner radius is seen during the three months covered by our NuSTAR campaign. This lack of variation could mean that the jet formation in this radio-loud quasar differs from what is observed in broad-line radio galaxies.

  15. The X-Ray Reflection Spectrum of the Radio-loud Quasar 4C 74.26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohfink, Anne M.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ballantyne, David R.; Boggs, S. E.; Boorman, Peter; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Farrah, Duncan; García, Javier; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Ricci, Claudio; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, W. W.

    2017-06-01

    The relativistic jets created by some active galactic nuclei are important agents of AGN feedback. In spite of this, our understanding of what produces these jets is still incomplete. X-ray observations, which can probe the processes operating in the central regions in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black hole, the presumed jet launching point, are potentially particularly valuable in illuminating the jet formation process. Here, we present the hard X-ray NuSTAR observations of the radio-loud quasar 4C 74.26 in a joint analysis with quasi-simultaneous, soft X-ray Swift observations. Our spectral analysis reveals a high-energy cutoff of {183}-35+51 keV and confirms the presence of ionized reflection in the source. From the average spectrum we detect that the accretion disk is mildly recessed, with an inner radius of R in = 4-180 R g. However, no significant evolution of the inner radius is seen during the three months covered by our NuSTAR campaign. This lack of variation could mean that the jet formation in this radio-loud quasar differs from what is observed in broad-line radio galaxies.

  16. The effect of a Chandra-measured merger-related gas component on the lobes of a dead radio galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Worrall, D M; Kraft, R P; Hardcastle, M J

    2007-01-01

    We use Chandra data to infer that an X-ray bright component of gas is in the process of separating the radio lobes of 3C 442A. This is the first radio galaxy with convincing evidence that central gas, overpressured with respect to the lobe plasma and not simply a static atmosphere, is having a major dynamical effect on the radio structure. We speculate that the expansion of the gas also re-excites electrons in the lobes of 3C 442A through compression and adiabatic heating. Two features of 3C 442A contribute to its dynamical state. Firstly, the radio source is no longer being powered by a detected active jet, so that the dynamical state of the radio plasma is at the mercy of the ambient medium. Secondly the two early-type galaxies, NGC 7236 and NGC 7237, one of which was the original host of 3C 442A, are undergoing a merger and have already experienced a close encounter, suggesting that the X-ray bright gas is mostly the heated combined galaxy atmospheres. The lobes have been swept apart for about 10^8 yrs by ...

  17. Radio Jet Feedback and Star Formation in Heavily Obscured Quasars at Redshifts ~0.3-3, I: ALMA Obseravtions

    CERN Document Server

    Lonsdale, Carol J; Kimball, Amy E; Blain, Andrew; Whittle, Mark; Wilkes, Belinda; Stern, Dan; Condon, Jim; Kim, Minjin; Assef, Roberto J; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Efstathiou, Andreas; Jones, Suzy; Eisenhardt, Peter; Bridge, Carrie; Wu, Jinwen; Lonsdale, Colin J; Jones, Kristen; Jarrett, Tom; Smith, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA 870 micron (345 GHz) data for 49 high redshift (0.47radio-powerful AGN, obtained to constrain cool dust emission from starbursts concurrent with highly obscured radiative-mode black hole (BH) accretion in massive galaxies which possess a small radio jet. The sample was selected from WISE with extremely steep (red) mid-infrared (MIR) colors and with compact radio emission from NVSS/FIRST. Twenty-six sources are detected at 870 microns, and we find that the sample has large mid- to far-infrared luminosity ratios consistent with a dominant and highly obscured quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7 < log P3.0 GHz (W/Hz) < 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 < log M(BH) (Msun) < 10.2. The rest frame 1-5 um SEDs are very similar to the "Hot DOGs" (Hot Dust Obscured Galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estim...

  18. Magnetic Bubble Expansion as an Experimental Model for Extra-Galactic Radio Lobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Alan; Zhang, Yue; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) is conducting laboratory experiments to address outstanding nonlinear plasma physics issues related to how magnetic energy and helicity carried by extra-galactic jets interacts with the intergalactic medium to form radio lobe structures. Experiments are being conducted in the 4 meter long, 50 cm diameter HELCAT linear plasma device at UNM. A pulsed magnetized coaxial gun (˜10 kV, ˜100 kA, ˜2 mWb) forms and injects magnetized plasma bubbles perpendicularly into a lower pressure weakly magnetized background plasma formed by a helicon and/or hot cathode source in HELCAT. Ideal MHD simulations show that an MHD shock develops ahead of the bubble as it propagates, and that the bubble develops asymmetries due to the background field [1]. Experimental data from plasma bubble injection into a background plasma, particularly magnetic probe measurements, will be discussed. [4pt] [1] W. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072905 (2008).

  19. Exploratory X-ray monitoring of luminous radio-quiet quasars at high redshift: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Stein, Matthew S. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Paolillo, Maurizio [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II di Napoli, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Kaspi, Shai [School of Physics and Astronomy and the Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Vignali, Cristian [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università degli studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Gibson, Robert R., E-mail: ohad@unt.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We present initial results from an exploratory X-ray monitoring project of two groups of comparably luminous radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). The first consists of four sources at 4.10 ≤ z ≤ 4.35, monitored by Chandra, and the second is a comparison sample of three sources at 1.33 ≤ z ≤ 2.74, monitored by Swift. Together with archival X-ray data, the total rest-frame temporal baseline spans ∼2-4 yr and ∼5-13 yr for the first and second group, respectively. Six of these sources show significant X-ray variability over rest-frame timescales of ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days; three of these also show significant X-ray variability on rest-frame timescales of ∼1-10 days. The X-ray variability properties of our variable sources are similar to those exhibited by nearby and far less luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). While we do not directly detect a trend of increasing X-ray variability with redshift, we do confirm previous reports of luminous AGNs exhibiting X-ray variability above that expected from their luminosities, based on simplistic extrapolation from lower luminosity sources. This result may be attributed to luminous sources at the highest redshifts having relatively high accretion rates. Complementary UV-optical monitoring of our sources shows that variations in their optical-X-ray spectral energy distribution are dominated by the X-ray variations. We confirm previous reports of X-ray spectral variations in one of our sources, HS 1700+6416, but do not detect such variations in any of our other sources in spite of X-ray flux variations of up to a factor of ∼4. This project is designed to provide a basic assessment of the X-ray variability properties of RQQs at the highest accessible redshifts that will serve as a benchmark for more systematic monitoring of such sources with future X-ray missions.

  20. The interaction between radio lobes and hot gas in the nearby radio galaxies 3C285 and 3C442A

    CERN Document Server

    Hardcastle, M J; Worrall, D M; Croston, J H; Evans, D A; Birkinshaw, M; Murray, S S

    2007-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of two nearby radio galaxies in group environments, 3C285 and 3C442A. The host galaxies of both sources are involved in mergers with nearby massive galaxies, and the hot gas in the systems is extended along lines joining the interacting galaxies. Both sources show strong evidence for interactions between the radio lobes and the asymmetrical hot gas. We argue that the structure in the hot gas is independent of the existence of the radio lobes in these systems, and argue that hot gas shaped by an ongoing massive galaxy merger may play an important role in the dynamics of radio lobes in other objects. For 3C442A, our observations show that gas is being driven out of both members of the host interacting galaxy pair, and the implied constraints on galaxy velocities are consistent with mildly supersonic motions with respect to the group-scale hot gas. The previously known filamentary radio structure in the center of 3C442A may be a result of the interaction between hot gas expelled f...

  1. The Environmental Impact Of The High-redshift (z=1.532) Radio-loud Quasar 3c270.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Lal, D.; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Haas, M.; Barthel, P.; Willner, S.; Ashby, M.; Leipski, C.

    Chandra X-ray observations of the high-redshift (z=1.532) radio-loud quasar 3C 270.1 taken in Feb 2008 show the nucleus to have a typical power-law spectrum with a weak, 170 eV, Fe Kα emission line. The data also reveal extended emission, about half of which is associated with the strong radio

  2. The Jet/Disk Connection in AGN: Chandra and XMM-Newton Observations of Three Powerful Radio-Loud Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita; Gliozzi, Mario; Tavecchio, F.; Maraschi, L.; Foschini, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    The connection between the accretion process that powers AGN and the formation of jets is still poorly understood. Here we tackle this issue using new, deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of tlie cores of three powerful radio loud quasars: 1136-135, 1150+497 (Chandra), and 0723+679 (XMM-Newton), in the redshift range z=0.3-0.8. These sources are known from our previous Chandra siiapsliot survey to liave kpc-scale X-ray jets. In 1136-135 and 1150-1+497; evidence is found for the presence of diffuse thermal X-ray emission around the cores; on scales of 40-50 kpc and with luminosity L(sub 0.3-2 kev approx. 10(sup 43) erg per second, suggesting thermal emission from the host galaxy or a galaxy group. The X-ray continua of the cores in the three sources are described by an upward-curved (concave) broken power law, with photon indices GAMMA (sub soft) approx. 1.8 - 2.1 and GAMMA (sub hard) approx. 1.7 below and above approx. equal to 2 keV, respectively. There is evidence for an uiiresolved Fe K alpha line with EW approx. 70 eV in the three quasars. The Spectral Energy Distributions of the sources can be well described by a mix of jet and disk emission, with the jet dominating the radio and hard X-rays (via synchrotron and external Compton) and the disk dominating the optical/UV through soft X-rays. The ratio of the jet-to-disk powers is approx. 1, consistent with those derived for a number of gamma ray emitting blazars. This indicates that near equality of accretion and jet power may be common in powerful radio-loud AGN.

  3. Comparing different indicators of quasar orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Gorkom, Kyle J; Rauch, Andreas P; Gobeille, Doug B

    2015-01-01

    Radio core dominance, the rest-frame ratio of core to lobe luminosity, has been widely used as a measure of Doppler boosting of a quasar's radio jets and hence of the inclination of the central engine's spin axis to the line of sight. However, the use of the radio lobe luminosity in the denominator (essentially to try and factor out the intrinsic power of the central engine) has been criticized and other proxies for the intrinsic engine power have been proposed. These include the optical continuum luminosity, and the luminosity of the narrow-line region. Each is plausible, but so far none has been shown to be clearly better than the others. In this paper we evaluate four different measures of core dominance using a new sample of 126 radio loud quasars, carefully selected to be as free as possible of orientation bias, together with high quality VLA images and optical spectra from the SDSS. We find that normalizing the radio core luminosity by the optical continuum luminosity yields a demonstrably superior orie...

  4. J1649+26: A Grand-Design Spiral with a Large Double-Lobed Radio Source

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Minnie Y; Duffin, Ryan; Keel, Bill; Lacy, Mark; Momjian, Emmanuel; Morrison, Glenn; Mroczkowski, Tony; Neff, Susan; Norris, Ray P; Schmitt, Henrique; Toy, Vicki; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a grand-design spiral galaxy associated with a double-lobed radio source. J1649+2635 (z = 0.0545) is a red spiral galaxy with a prominent bulge that it is associated with a L$_{1.4{\\rm GHz}}\\sim$10$^{24}$WHz$^{-1}$ double-lobed radio source that spans almost 100kpc. J1649+2635 has a black hole mass of M$_{\\rm BH} \\sim$ 3--7 $\\times$ 10$^8$M$_{\\odot}$ and SFR$\\sim$ 0.26 -- 2.6M$_{\\odot}$year$^{-1}$. The galaxy hosts a $\\sim$96kpc diffuse optical halo, which is unprecedented for spiral galaxies. We find that J1649+2635 resides in an overdense environment with a mass of M$_{dyn} = 7.7^{+7.9}_{-4.3} \\times 10^{13}$M$_{\\odot}$, likely a galaxy group below the detection threshold of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We suggest one possible scenario for the association of double-lobed radio emission from J1649+2635 is that the source may be similar to a Seyfert galaxy, located in a denser-than-normal environment. The study of spiral galaxies that host large-scale radio emission is important becaus...

  5. Quasi-static model of collimated jets and radio lobes. I. Accretion disk and jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fowler, T. Kenneth [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pino, Jesse [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    This is the first of a series of papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetic helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures on very large scales and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. In this work, we solve a set of one-dimensional equations similar to the steady-state standard accretion disk model, but now including the large-scale magnetic fields giving rises to jets. We find that the frequently made assumption that large-scale fields are frozen into the disk is fundamentally incorrect, due to the necessity for current and the accreting mass to flow perpendicular to magnetic flux surfaces. A correct treatment greatly simplifies the calculations, yielding fields that leave the disk nearly vertically with magnetic profiles uniquely determined by disk angular momentum conservation. Representative solutions of the magnetic fields in different radial regions of the disk surface are given, and they determine the overall key features in the jet structure and its dissipation, which will be the subjects of later papers.

  6. QUASI-STATIC MODEL OF MAGNETICALLY COLLIMATED JETS AND RADIO LOBES. II. JET STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fowler, T. Kenneth [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hooper, E. Bickford [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); McClenaghan, Joseph; Lin, Zhihong [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    This is the second in a series of companion papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetically driven, and mediated helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. In the first paper, we showed self-consistently that minimizing viscous dissipation in the disk naturally leads to jets of maximum power with boundary conditions known to yield jets as a low-density, magnetically collimated tower, consistent with observational constraints of wire-like currents at distances far from the black hole. In this paper we show that these magnetic towers remain collimated as they grow in length at nonrelativistic velocities. Differences with relativistic jet models are explained by three-dimensional magnetic structures derived from a detailed examination of stability properties of the tower model, including a broad diffuse pinch with current profiles predicted by a detailed jet solution outside the collimated central column treated as an electric circuit. We justify our model in part by the derived jet dimensions in reasonable agreement with observations. Using these jet properties, we also discuss the implications for relativistic particle acceleration in nonrelativistically moving jets. The appendices justify the low jet densities yielding our results and speculate how to reconcile our nonrelativistic treatment with general relativistic MHD simulations.

  7. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetic bubble expansion as a model for extragalactic radio lobes

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lynn, Alan G

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the propagation and expansion of a magnetic "bubble" plasma into a lower density, weakly-magnetized background plasma are presented. These simulations mimic the geometry and parameters of the Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) [A. G. Lynn, Y. Zhang, S. C. Hsu, H. Li, W. Liu, M. Gilmore, and C. Watts, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. {\\bf 52}, 53 (2007)], which is studying magnetic bubble expansion as a model for extra-galactic radio lobes. The simulations predict several key features of the bubble evolution. First, the direction of bubble expansion depends on the ratio of the bubble toroidal to poloidal magnetic field, with a higher ratio leading to expansion predominantly in the direction of propagation and a lower ratio leading to expansion predominantly normal to the direction of propagation. Second, an MHD shock and a trailing slow-mode compressible MHD wavefront are formed ahead of the bubble as it propagates into the background plasma. Third, the bub...

  8. The Jet-Heated X-ray Filament in the Centaurus A Northern Middle Radio Lobe

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, R P; Hardcastle, M J; Birkinshaw, M; Croston, J H; Jones, C; Nulsen, P E J; Worrall, D M; Murray, S S

    2009-01-01

    We present results from a 40 ks {\\em XMM-Newton} observation of the X-ray filament coincident with the southeast edge of the Centaurus A Northern Middle Radio Lobe (NML). We find that the X-ray filament consists of five spatially resolved X-ray knots embedded in a continuous diffuse bridge. The spectrum of each knot is well fitted by a thermal model with temperatures ranging from 0.3-0.7 keV and subsolar elemental abundances. In four of the five knots, non-thermal models are a poor fit to the spectra, conclusively ruling out synchrotron or IC/CMB mechanisms for their emission. The internal pressures of the knots exceed that of the ambient ISM or the equipartition pressure of the NML by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating that they must be short lived ($\\sim3\\times10^6$ yrs). Based on energetic arguments, it is implausible that these knots have been ionized by the beamed flux from the active galactic nucleus of Cen A or that they have been shock-heated by supersonic inflation of the NML. In our view...

  9. RadioAstron Observations of the Quasar 3C273: a Challenge to the Brightness Temperature Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, Y Y; Kellermann, K I; Lobanov, A P; Johnson, M D; Gurvits, L I; Voitsik, P A; Zensus, J A; Anderson, J M; Bach, U; Jauncey, D L; Ghigo, F; Ghosh, T; Kraus, A; Kovalev, Yu A; Lisakov, M M; Petrov, L Yu; Romney, J D; Salter, C J; Sokolovsky, K V

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton cooling limits the brightness temperature of the radiating plasma to a maximum of $10^{11.5}$ K. Relativistic boosting can increase its observed value, but apparent brightness temperatures much in excess of $10^{13}$ K are inaccessible using ground-based very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at any wavelength. We present observations of the quasar 3C273, made with the space VLBI mission RadioAstron on baselines up to 171,000 km, which directly reveal the presence of angular structure as small as 26 $\\mu$as (2.7 light months) and brightness temperature in excess of $10^{13}$ K. These measurements challenge our understanding of the non-thermal continuum emission in the vicinity of supermassive black holes and require much higher jet speeds than are observed.

  10. Star formation in high-redshift quasars: excess [O II] emission in the radio-loud population

    CERN Document Server

    Kalfountzou, E; Bonfield, D G; Hardcastle, M J

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the [O II] emission line properties of 18,508 quasars at z38.6, tend to have the same level of [O II] emission. On the other hand, at lower optical luminosities \\log(L_opt/W)<38.6, there is a clear [O II] emission excess for the RLQs. As an additional check of our results we use the [O III] emission line as a tracer of the bolometric accretion luminosity, instead of the i'-band absolute magnitude, and we obtain similar results. Radio jets appear to be the main reason for the [O II] emission excess in the case of RLQs. In contrast, we suggest AGN feedback ensures that the two populations acquire the same [O II] emission at higher optical luminosities.

  11. The Quasi-Roche lobe overflow state in the evolution of Close Binary Systems containing a radio pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate mass donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These non-standard ingredients deeply modify the mass transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long standing mass transfer episodes, models including these effect suffer a number cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when detached they behave as a binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have a radius slightly smaller than its Roche lobe. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for orbital period and donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as "redbacks". Thus, redback companions ...

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Fourteen Low-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganguly, Rajib; Brotherton, Michael S.; Arav, Nahum

    2007-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z zz 1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasar......, HE0441-2826, contains extremely weak emission lines and our spectrum is consistent with a simple power-law continuum. The quasar is radio-loud, but has a steep spectral index and a lobe-dominated morphology, which argues against it being a blazar. The unusual spectrum of this quasar resembles...... the spectra of the quasars PG1407+265, SDSSJ1136+0242, and PKS1004+13 for which several possible explanations have been entertained....

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Fourteen Low-Redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguly, R; Arav, N; Heap, S R; Wisotzki, L; Aldcroft, T L; Alloin, D; Behar, E; Canalizo, G; Crenshaw, D M; De Kool, M; Chambers, K; Cecil, G; Chatzichristou, E T; Everett, J; Gabel, J; Gaskell, C M; Galliano, E; Green, R F; Hall, P B; Hines, D C; Junkkarinen, V T; Kaastra, J S; Kaiser, M E; Kazanas, D; Konigl, A; Korista, K T; Kriss, G A; Laor, A; Leighly, K M; Mathur, S; Ogle, P; Proga, D; Sabra, B; Sivron, R; Snedden, S A; Telfer, R; Vestergaard, M; Ganguly, Rajib; Brotherton, Michael S.; Arav, Nahum; Heap, Sara R.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Alloin, Danielle; Behar, Ehud; Canalizo, Gabriela; Kool, Martijn de; Chambers, Kenneth; Cecil, Gerald; Chatzichristou, Eleni; Everett, John; Gabel, Jack; Galliano, Emmanuel; Green, Richard F.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hines, Dean C.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Konigl, Arieh; Korista, Kirk T.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Laor, Ari; Leighly, Karen M.; Mathur, Smita; Ogle, Patrick; Proga, Daniel; Sabra, Bassem; Sivron, Ran; Snedden, Stephanie; Telfer, Randal; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasar, HE0441-2826, contains extremely weak emission lines and our spectrum is consistent with a simple power-law continuum. The quasar is radio-loud, but has a steep spectral index and a lobe-dominated morphology, which argues against it being a blazar. The unusual spectrum of this quasar resembles the spectra of the quasars PG1407+265, SDSSJ1136+0242, and PKS1004+13 for which several possible explanations have been entertained.

  14. Connections between the Radio, Optical and Soft X-ray Luminosities for Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhi-Fu Chen; Cai-Juan Pan; You-Bing Li; Yu-Tao Zhou

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the connections between radio, optical and soft X-ray luminosities with a sample of 538 FSRQs. We find that the radio luminosity is strongly correlated with the optical luminosity, as well as with the soft X-ray luminosity. We also find that the optical luminosity is strongly correlated with the soft X-ray luminosity.

  15. Suzaku Detection of Thermal X-Ray Emission Associated with the Western Radio Lobe of Fornax A

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Hiromi; Inoue, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray mapping observations of the western radio lobe of the Fornax A galaxy, using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) onboard the Suzaku satellite with a total exposure time of 327 ks. The purpose of this study is to investigate the nature and spatial extent of the diffuse thermal emission around the lobe by exploiting the low and stable background of the XIS. The diffuse thermal emission had been consistently reported in all previous studies of this region, but its physical nature and relation to the radio lobe had not been examined in detail. Using the data set covering the entire western lobe and the central galaxy NGC 1316, as well as comparison sets in the vicinity, we find convincingly the presence of thermal plasma emission with a temperature of ~1 keV in excess of conceivable background and contaminating emission (cosmic X-ray background, Galactic halo, intra-cluster gas of Fornax, interstellar gas of NGC 1316, and the ensemble of point-like sources). Its surface brightness...

  16. X-ray emission from the nuclei, lobes and hot-gas environments of two FR-II radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Croston, J H; Hardcastle, M J; Worrall, D M

    2004-01-01

    We report the detection of multiple components of X-ray emission from the two FR-II radio galaxies 3C 223 and 3C 284, based on new XMM-Newton observations. We attribute the detected X-ray emission from the lobes of both sources to inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons. With this model, we find that the magnetic field strength in the lobes is at the equipartition value for 3C 284, and within a factor of two of the equipartition value for 3C 223. We also detect group-scale hot atmospheres around both sources, and determine temperatures and pressures in the gas. The lobes of both sources are in pressure balance with the hot-gas environments, if the lobes contain only the synchrotron-emitting particles and the measured magnetic field strength. The core spectra of both sources contain an unabsorbed soft component, likely to be related to the radio jet, and an additional heavily absorbed power-law component. 3C 223 also displays a bright (EW ~ 500 eV) Fe K-alpha emission line.

  17. RadioAstron space VLBI imaging of polarized radio emission in the high-redshift quasar 0642+449 at 1.6 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanov, A P; Bruni, G; Kovalev, Y Y; Anderson, J; Bach, U; Kraus, A; Zensus, J A; Lisakov, M M; Sokolovsky, K V; Voytsik, P A

    2015-01-01

    Polarization of radio emission in extragalactic jets at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution holds important clues for understanding the structure of the magnetic field in the inner regions of the jets and in close vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the centers of active galaxies. Space VLBI observations provide a unique tool for polarimetric imaging at a sub-milliarcsecond angular resolution and studying the properties of magnetic field in active galactic nuclei on scales of less than 10^4 gravitational radii. A space VLBI observation of high-redshift quasar TXS 0642+449 (OH 471), made at a wavelength of 18 cm (frequency of 1.6 GHz) as part of the Early Science Programme (ESP) of the RadioAstron} mission, is used here to test the polarimetric performance of the orbiting Space Radio Telescope (SRT) employed by the mission, to establish a methodology for making full Stokes polarimetry with space VLBI at 1.6 GHz, and to study the polarized emission in the target object on sub-milliarcsecond scales. ...

  18. MAGIC gamma-ray and multifrequency observations of flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1510-089 in early 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Carreto-Fidalgo, D; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Vercellone, S; Verrecchia, F; Buson, S; D'Ammando, F; Stawarz, L; Giroletti, M; Orienti, M; Mundell, C; Steele, I; Zarpudin, B; Raiteri, C M; Villata, M; Sandrinelli, A; Lähteenäki, A; Tammi, J; Tornikoski, M; Hovatta, T; Readhead, A C S; Max-Moerbeck, W; Richards, J L; Jorstad, S; Marscher, A; Gurwell, M A; Larionov, V M; Blinov, D A; Konstantinova, T S; Kopatskaya, E N; Larionova, L V; Larionova, E G; Morozova, D A; Troitsky, I S; Mokrushina, A A; Pavlova, Yu V; Chen, W P; Lin, H C; Panwar, N; Agudo, I; Casadio, C; Gómez, J L; Molina, S N; Kurtanidze, O M; Nikolashvili, M G; Kurtanidze, S O; Chigladze, R A; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Carnerero, M I; Manilla-Robles, A; Ovcharov, E; Bozhilov, V; Metodieva, I; Aller, M F; Aller, H D; Fuhrmann, L; Angelakis, E; Nestoras, I; Krichbaum, T P; Zensus, J A; Ungerechts, H; Sievers, A; Riquelme, D

    2014-01-01

    Among more than fifty blazars detected in very high energy (VHE, E>100GeV) gamma-rays, only three belong to the subclass of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs). MAGIC observed FSRQ PKS 1510-089 in February-April 2012 during a high activity state in the high energy (HE, E>100 MeV) gamma-ray band observed by AGILE and Fermi. MAGIC observations result in the detection of a source with significance of 6.0 sigma. In agreement with the previous VHE observations of the source, we find no statistically significant variability during the MAGIC observations in daily, weekly or monthly time scales. The other two known VHE FSRQs have shown daily scale to sub-hour variability. We study the multifrequency behaviour of the source at the epoch of MAGIC observation, collecting quasi-simultaneous data at radio and optical (GASP-WEBT and F-Gamma collaborations, REM, Steward, Perkins, Liverpool, OVRO and VLBA telescopes), X-ray (Swift satellite) and HE gamma-ray frequencies. The gamma-ray SED combining AGILE, Fermi and MAGIC dat...

  19. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars in the fast-cooling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    In the external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of a very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution, N^' }_e({γ ^' })∝ {γ ^' }^{-p}, with spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electrons when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e. inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat-spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum and can explain in reasonable fashion the very hard Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) spectrum of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  20. Dual-frequency VSOP Imaging of a High-redshift Radio Quasar PKS 1402+044

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, J; Lobanov, A; Frey, S; Hong, X Y; Yang, Jun; Gurvits, Leonid; Lobanov, Andrei; Frey, Sandor; Hong, Xiao-Yu

    2006-01-01

    Based on the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz, we find that the luminous high-redshift (z=3.215) quasar PKS 1402+044 (J1405+0415) has a pronounced 'core--jet' structure. The jet shows a steeper spectral index and lower brightness temperature with the increase of the distance from the core. The variation of brightness temperature is basically consistent with the shock-in-jet model. Assuming that the jet is collimated by the ambient magnetic field, we estimate the mass of the central object as ~10^9 M_sun. The upper limit of the jet proper motion of PKS 1402+044 is 0.03 mas/yr (~3c) in the east-west direction.

  1. The Eddington Limit in Cosmic Rays: An Explanation for the Observed Lack of Radio-Loud Quasars and the M_{BH}-M_{Bulge} Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    We present a feedback mechanism for supermassive black holes and their host bulges that operates during epochs of radio-loud quasar activity. In the radio cores of relativistic quasar jets, internal shocks convert a fraction of ordered bulk kinetic energy into randomized relativistic ions, or in other words cosmic rays. By employing a phenomenologically-motivated jet model, we show that enough 1-10 GeV cosmic rays escape the radio core into the host galaxy to break the Eddington limit in cosmic rays. As a result, hydrostatic balance is lost and a cosmic ray momentum-driven wind develops, expelling gas from the host galaxy and thus self-limiting the black hole and bulge growth. Although the interstellar cosmic ray power is much smaller than the quasar photon luminosity, cosmic rays provide a stronger feedback than UV photons, since they exchange momentum with the galactic gas much more efficiently. The amount of energy released into the host galaxy as cosmic rays, per unit of black hole rest mass energy, is in...

  2. CGCG292-057: A Near-Distance Merger Galaxy with Double;Double Radio Lobes and X-shape Structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Jamrozy; D. Kozieł-Wierzbowska; S. Zoła; A. Kuźmicz; J. Machalski

    2011-12-01

    J1159+5820 is an extended radio galaxy with a quite unusual morphology, featuring two pairs of radio lobes. Such sources, called double–double radio galaxies, constitute a very rare class of extragalactic radio sources. Furthermore, the extended radio structure of this source shows an X-shape form. According to a much likely scenario, such a morphology is due to interrupting nuclear activity in its central active galactic nucleus. Interestingly, the host of this source is a near-distance bright galaxy named CGCG292-057, which is clearly disturbed, with tidal features and shells as plausible signs of a recent merger.

  3. An X-ray and Multiwavelength Survey of Highly Radio-Loud Quasars at z > 4: Jet-Linked Emission in the Brightest Radio Beacons of the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jianfeng; Miller, Brendan P; Garmire, Gordon P; Schneider, Donald P; Vignali, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a systematic study of the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of a sample of 17 highly radio-loud quasars (HRLQs) at z > 4 with sensitive X-ray coverage from new Chandra and archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations. Eight of the new and archival observations are reported in this work for the first time. New Chandra observations of two moderately radio-loud and highly optically luminous quasars at z > 4 are also reported. Our HRLQ sample represents the top ~5% of radio-loud quasars in terms of radio loudness. We found that our HRLQs have an X-ray emission enhancement over HRLQs at lower redshifts (by a typical factor of ~3), and this effect, after controlling for several factors which may introduce biases, has been solidly estimated to be significant at the 3-4 sigma level. HRLQs at z=3-4 are also found to have a similar X-ray emission enhancement over z < 3 HRLQs, which supports further the robustness of our results. We discuss models for the X-ray enhancement's origin in...

  4. Multiwavelength and Polarimetric Analysis of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars 3C 273 and 3C 279

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sunil; Patiño-Álvarez, Victor; Chavushyan, Vahram; Schlegel, Eric M.; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; León-Tavares, Jonathan; Carrasco, Luis; Valdés, José; Carramiñana, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents results of multiwavelength analyses of 3C 273 and 3C 279. The main goals were to identify the gamma-ray emission region and dominant high-energy emission processes. Our methodology consisted of analyzing light curves from radio to gamma-rays over 6 - 8 years and polarimetric, spectral and line emission behavior.In 3C 279, we found that the emission from millimeter to ultraviolet was simultaneous and therefore co-spatial. We identified two active states where different high-energy emission processes were dominant. We found multiwavelength flaring events consistent with component ejections and shocks. We proposed that the gamma-ray emission region changed over time based on observations of both simultaneous and delayed gamma-rays emission with respect to low-energy emission during different time-frames.In 3C 273, we identified a non-thermal flare related to a component ejection and a thermal flare related to accretion. From reverberation mapping we found that the broad line region dynamical behavior over time possibly affects the derived supermassive black hole mass.In both objects we found that the gamma-ray spectral index was variable, and a trend of harder spectral index with higher gamma-ray luminosity. From the identification of different dominant high-energy emission processes, we concluded that the dominant high-energy emission mechanism changes with time. Overall, we concluded that similar results from both objects points to behavior that is potentially common to flat spectrum radio quasars. Increasing the sample size of objects analyzed with similar methodologies will provide more results to confirm or refine our conclusions.

  5. High-energy properties of the high-redshift flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ammando, F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the gamma-ray and X-ray properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306 at redshift z = 2.345. A strong gamma-ray flare from this source was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope satellite in 2013 January, reaching on January 20 a daily peak flux of (301$\\pm$36)$\\times$10$^{-8}$ ph/cm$^2$/s in the 0.1-100 GeV energy range. This flux corresponds to an apparent isotropic luminosity of (1.5$\\pm$0.2)$\\times$10$^{50}$ erg/s, comparable to the highest values observed by a blazar so far. During the flare the increase of flux was accompanied by a significant change of the spectral properties. Moreover significant flux variations on a 6-h time-scale were observed, compatible with the light crossing time of the event horizon of the central black hole. The broad band X-ray spectra of PKS 2149-306 observed by Swift-XRT and NuSTAR are well described by a broken power-law model, with a very hard spectrum ($\\Gamma$$_1$ $\\sim$ 1) below the break energy, at ...

  6. THE QUASI-ROCHE LOBE OVERFLOW STATE IN THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS CONTAINING A RADIO PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (IALP), CCT-CONICET-UNLP. Paseo del Bosque S/N (B1900FWA), La Plata (Argentina); Horvath, J. E., E-mail: adevito@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: foton@iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo R. do Matão 1226 (05508-090), Cidade Universitária, São Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate-mass-donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These nonstandard ingredients deeply modify the mass-transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long-standing mass-transfer episodes, models including these effects suffer a number of cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer, the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when they are detached they behave as binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have radii slightly smaller than their Roche lobes. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for an orbital period as well as donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as ''redbacks''. Thus, redback companions should be quasi-RLOF stars. We show that the characteristics of the redback system PSR J1723-2837 are accounted for by these models. In each mass-transfer cycle these systems should switch from LMXB to binary radio pulsar states with a timescale of approximately one million years. However, there is recent and fast growing evidence of systems switching on far shorter, human timescales. This should be related to instabilities in the accretion disk surrounding the neutron star and/or radio ejection, still to be included in the model having the quasi-RLOF state as a general condition.

  7. Suzaku measurement of electron and magnetic energy densities in the east lobe of the giant radio galaxy DA 240

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S

    2011-01-01

    A careful analysis of the Suzaku data of the giant radio galaxy DA 240, of which the size is 1.48 Mpc, revealed diffuse X-ray emission associated with its east lobe. The diffuse X-ray spectrum was described with a simple power-law model with a photon index of 1.92 (-0.17+0.13) (-0.06+0.04), where the first and second errors represent the statistical and systematic ones. The agreement with the synchrotron radio photon index, 1.95 +- 0.01 in 326 -- 608.5 MHz, ensures that the excess X-ray emission is attributed to the inverse Compton emission from the synchrotron-radiating electrons, boosting up the cosmic microwave background photons. From the X-ray flux density, 51.5 +-3.9 (-5.4+6.2) nJy at 1 keV derived with the photon index fixed at the radio index, in comparison with the synchrotron radio intensity of 10.30 +- 0.12 Jy at 326 MHz, the magnetic and electron energy densities was estimated as u_m = (3.0 +-0.2 +-0.4) \\times 10^(-14) ergs/cm3 and u_e = (3.4 (-0.2+0.3) (-0.4+0.5)) \\times 10^(-14) ergs/cm3 integra...

  8. Star formation in 3CR radio galaxies and quasars at $z < 1$

    CERN Document Server

    Westhues, Christian; Barthel, Peter; Wilkes, Belinda J; Willner, S P; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Podigachoski, Pece; Leipski, Christian; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Siebenmorgen, Ralf; Chini, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory we have observed a representative sample of 87 powerful 3CR sources at redshift $z < 1$. The far-infrared (FIR, 70-500~$\\mu m$) photometry is combined with mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and catalogued data to analyse the complete spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of each object from optical to radio wavelength. To disentangle the contributions of different components, the SEDs are fitted with a set of templates to derive the luminosities of host galaxy starlight, dust torus emission powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and cool dust heated by stars. The level of emission from relativistic jets is also estimated, in order to isolate the thermal host galaxy contribution. The new data are in line with the orientation-based unification of high-excitation radio-loud AGN, in that the dust torus becomes optically thin longwards of $30~\\mu m$. The low excitation radio galaxies and the MIR weak sources represent MIR- and ...

  9. Relativistic and slowing down: the flow in the hotspots of powerful radio galaxies and quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kazanas, M G D

    2003-01-01

    Pairs of radio emitting jets with lengths up to several hundred kiloparsecs emanate from the central region (the `core') of radio loud active galaxies. In the most powerful of them, these jets terminate in the `hotspots', compact high brightness regions, where the jet flow collides with the intergalactic medium (IGM). Although it has long been established that in their inner ($\\sim$parsec) regions these jet flows are relativistic, it is still not clear if they remain so at their largest (hundreds of kiloparsec) scales. We argue that the X-ray, optical and radio data of the hotspots, despite their at-first-sight disparate properties, can be unified in a scheme involving a relativistic flow upstream of the hotspot that decelerates to the sub-relativistic speed of its inferred advance through the IGM and viewed at different angles to its direction of motion. This scheme, besides providing an account of the hotspot spectral properties with jet orientation, it also suggests that the large-scale jets remain relativ...

  10. Multi-Frequency Monitoring of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar PKS 1222+216 in 2008–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Troitskiy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the broadband activity of the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 1222+216 from 2008 to 2015 using multi-frequency monitoring which involves γ-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope, total intensity and linear polarization observations from different optical telescopes in R band, and imaging of the inner jet structure with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA at 43 GHz. During the observations, the source showed several dramatic flares at γ rays and optical bands, with the rising branch of a γ-ray flare accompanied by a rapid rotation of the polarization position angle (EVPA, a fast increase of the degree of polarization in the optical band, brightening of the VLBI core, and appearance of a new superluminal component in the parsec-scale jet. The rapid variability of the optical linear polarization may be explained by a strong turbulence in the jet plasma. We find a correlation between the γ rays, optical R band, and 43 GHz variability on a long-term scale (months and years, and a good general alignment between EVPAs in R band and at 43 GHz, while the correlation between short-term variations (days and weeks is weaker. Synchronous activity across the bands supports the idea that the emission regions responsible for the γ-ray and optical flares are co-spatial and located in the vicinity of the mm-wave core of the parsec-scale jet. However, these connections do not completely explain the challenging behaviour of PKS 1222+216, since there are some γ-ray flares which are not accompanied by jet events, and vice versa. We need a continuation of multi-frequency monitoring along with high resolution imaging of the parsec-scale jet to understand in detail the origin of high energy emission in blazars.

  11. AzTEC 1.1 mm images of 16 radio galaxies at 0.5quasar at z=6.3

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, A; Aretxaga, I; Hughes, D H; Yun, M S; Cybulski, R; Wilson, Grant W; Austermann, J; Ezawa, H; Kawabe, R; Kohno, K; Perera, T; Scott, K; Sánchez-Arguelles, D; Gutermuth, R

    2011-01-01

    We present 1.1 mm observations for a sample of 16 powerful radio galaxies at 0.5radio quiet quasar at z=6.3, obtained using the AzTEC bolometer array mounted on the ASTE or the JCMT. This paper more than doubles the number of high-z radio galaxies imaged at millimetre/sub-millimetre wavelengths. We detect probable millimetre-wave counterparts for 11 of the active galaxies. The 6 active galaxies which do not have a probable millimetre counterpart in our images nevertheless have one or more likely associated millimetric source. Thus, we conclude that powerful (radio-loud) active galaxies at high-z are beacons for finding luminous millimetre/sub-millimetre galaxies at high-z. The flux densities of our AzTEC counterparts imply star formation rates ranging from <200 to ~1300 M./yr. In addition, we find that for the radio galaxoes the 1.1 mm flux density is anticorrelated with the largest angular size of the radio source. We also present new Spitzer imaging observations of several active galax...

  12. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Romani, R.W.; Dermer, C.D.; Costamante, L.; King, O.G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Richards, J.L.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-04-16

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of FSRQs detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similarly to that of radio-quiet AGN. Also using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution of FSRQs in the 10 keV-100GeV band and show that there is no correlation of the peak {gamma}-ray luminosity with {gamma}-ray peak frequency. The coupling of the SED and LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}, that most are seen within 5{sup o} of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  13. A rare example of low surface-brightness radio lobes in a gas-rich early-type galaxy: the story of NGC 3998

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Bradley S; Oosterloo, Tom; Nyland, Kristina; Serra, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We study the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3998. This galaxy is known to host a low-power radio AGN with a kpc-size one-sided jet and a large, nearly polar HI disc. It is therefore a good system to study to understand the relation between the availability of cold-gas and the triggering of AGNs in galaxies. Our new WSRT data reveal two faint, S-shaped radio lobes extending out to $\\sim$10 kpc from the galaxy centre. Remarkably, we find that the inner HI disc warps back towards the stellar mid-plane in a way that mirrors the warping of the radio lobes. We suggest that the polar HI disc was accreted through a minor merger, and that the torques causing it to warp in the inner regions are also responsible for feeding the AGN. The "S" shape of the radio lobes would then be due to the radio jets adapting to the changing angular momentum of the accreted gas. The extended radio jets are likely poorly collimated, which would explain their quick fading and, therefore, their rarity in galaxies similar to NGC 3998. The fue...

  14. Ultraviolet/X-ray variability and the extended X-ray emission of the radio-loud broad absorption line quasar PG 1004+130

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, A E; Miller, B P; Luo, B; Gallagher, S C

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of recent Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Hubble Space Telescope observations of the radio-loud (RL), broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1004+130. We compare our new observations to archival X-ray and UV data, creating the most comprehensive, high signal-to-noise, multi-epoch, spectral monitoring campaign of a RL BAL quasar to date. We probe for variability of the X-ray absorption, the UV BAL, and the X-ray jet, on month-year timescales. The X-ray absorber has a low column density of $N_{H}=8\\times10^{20}-4\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ when it is assumed to be fully covering the X-ray emitting region, and its properties do not vary significantly between the 4 observations. This suggests the observed absorption is not related to the typical "shielding gas" commonly invoked in BAL quasar models, but is likely due to material further from the central black hole. In contrast, the CIV BAL shows strong variability. The equivalent width (EW) in 2014 is EW=11.24$\\pm$0.56 \\AA, showing a fractional increa...

  15. Giant lobes of Centaurus A as seen in radio and γ-ray images obtained with the Fermi-LAT and Planck satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-na; Yang, Rui-zhi; Mckinley, Benjamin; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-10-01

    The γ-ray data of Fermi-LAT on the giant lobes of Centaurus A are analysed together with the high frequency radio data obtained with the Planck satellite. The large γ-ray photon statistics, accumulated during seven years of observations, and the recently updated Fermi-LAT collaboration software tools allow substantial extension of the detected γ-ray emission towards higher energy, up to 30 GeV, and lower energy, down to 60 MeV. Moreover, the new γ-ray data allow us to explore the spatial features of γ-ray emission of the lobes. For the north lobe, we confirm, with higher statistical significance, our earlier finding on the extension of γ-ray emission beyond the radio image. Moreover, the new analysis reveals significant spatial variation of γ-ray spectra from both lobes. On the other hand, the Planck observations at microwave frequencies contain important information on spectra of synchrotron emission in the cutoff region, and thus allow model-independent derivation of the strength of the magnetic field and the distribution of relativistic electrons based on the combined γ-ray and radio data. The interpretation of multiwavelength spectral energy distributions of the lobes within a pure leptonic model requires strong enhancement of the magnetic field at the edge of the south lobe. Alternatively, a more complex, leptonic-hadronic model of the γ-ray emission, postulating a non-negligible contribution of the π0-decay component at highest energies, can explain the γ-ray data with a rather homogeneous distribution of the magnetic field over the giant lobes.

  16. Ultra-High-Density Molecular Core and Warped Nuclear Disk in the Deep Potential of Radio Lobe Galaxy NGC 3079

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofue, Y.; Koda, J.; Kohno, K.; Okumura, S. K.; Honma, M.; Kawamura, A.; Irwin, Judith A.

    2001-02-01

    We have performed high-resolution synthesis observations of the 12CO (J=1-0) line emission from the radio lobe edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 3079 using a seven-element millimeter-wave interferometer at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, which consisted of the 45 m telescope and six-element array. The nuclear molecular disk (NMD) of 750 pc radius is found to be inclined by 20° from the optical disk, and the NMD has spiral arms. An ultra-high-density core (UHC) of molecular gas was found at the nucleus. The gaseous mass of the UHC within 125 pc radius is as large as ~3×108 Msolar, an order of magnitude more massive than that in the same area of the Galactic center, and the mean density is as high as ~3×103H2 cm-3. A position-velocity diagram along the major axis indicates that the rotation curve already starts at a finite velocity exceeding 300 km s-1 from the nucleus. The surface mass density in the central region is estimated to be as high as ~105 Msolar pc-2, producing a very deep gravitational potential. We argue that the very large differential rotation in such a deep potential will keep the UHC gravitationally stable during the current star formation.

  17. The Discovery of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2013-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of quasars was discussed as early as 1960, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be an unrealistically high radio and optical luminosity. Following the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, and the subsequent identification with an apparent stellar object, Maarten Schmidt recognized that the relatively simple hydrogen line Balmer series spectrum implied a redshift of 0.16 Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as being by far the most distant and the most luminous objects in the Universe. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first catalogued in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely iden...

  18. Ultra-compact structure in intermediate-luminosity radio quasars: building a sample of standard cosmological rulers and improving the dark energy constraints up to z 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo; Zheng, Xiaogang; Biesiada, Marek; Qi, Jingzhao; Chen, Yun; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-09-01

    Context. Ultra-compact structure in radio sources (especially in quasars that can be observed up to very high redshifts), with milliarcsecond angular sizes measured by very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI), is becoming an important astrophysical tool for probing both cosmology and the physical properties of AGN. Aims: We present a newly compiled data set of 120 milliarcsec. compact radio sources representing intermediate-luminosity quasars covering the redshift range 0.46 quasars observed at 2.29 GHz show negligible dependence on redshifts and intrinsic luminosity, and thus represent a fixed comoving-length of standard ruler. Methods: For a cosmological ruler with intrinsic length lm, the angular size-redshift relation can be written as θ(z) = lm/DA(z, where θ(z) is the angular size at redshift z, and DA(z) is the corresponding angular diameter distance. We use a compilation of angular size and redshift data for ultra-compact radio sources from a well-known VLBI survey, and implement a new cosmology-independent technique to calibrate the linear size of this standard ruler, which is also used to test different cosmological models with and without the flat universe assumption. Results: We determine the linear size of this standard ruler as lm = 11.03 ± 0.25 pc, which is the typical radius at which AGN jets become opaque at the observed frequency ν 2 GHz. Our measurement of this linear size is also consistent with the previous and recent radio observations at other different frequencies. In the framework of flat ΛCDM model, we find a high value of the matter density parameter, Ωm = 0.322+0.244-0.141, and a low value of the Hubble constant, H0 = 67.6+7.8-7.4 km s-1 Mpc-1, which is in excellent agreement with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements by Planck. We obtain Ωm = 0.309+0.215-0.151, w = -0.970+0.500-1.730 at 68.3% CL for the constant w of a dynamical dark-energy model, which demonstrates no significant deviation from the

  19. An Accretion Disc-Irradiation Hybrid Model for The Optical/UV Variability in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hui; Li, Shuang-Liang; Gu, Minfeng

    2016-01-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However,the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model (Li & Cao 2008), which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous timescale of accretion disc to the variability times...

  20. Radio Jet Feedback and Star Formation in Heavily Obscured, Hyperluminous Quasars at Redshifts ˜ 0.5-3. I. ALMA Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lacy, M.; Kimball, A. E.; Blain, A.; Whittle, M.; Wilkes, B.; Stern, D.; Condon, J.; Kim, M.; Assef, R. J.; Tsai, C.-W.; Efstathiou, A.; Jones, S.; Eisenhardt, P.; Bridge, C.; Wu, J.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Jones, K.; Jarrett, T.; Smith, R.

    2015-11-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm (345 GHz) data for 49 high-redshift (0.47 red) mid-infrared colors and with compact radio emission from NVSS/FIRST. Twenty-six sources are detected at 870 μm, and we find that the sample has large mid- to far-infrared luminosity ratios, consistent with a dominant and highly obscured quasar. The rest-frame 3 GHz radio powers are 24.7\\lt {log}({P}\\text{3.0 GHz}/{{{W}} {Hz}}-1)\\lt 27.3, and all sources are radio-intermediate or radio-loud. BH mass estimates are 7.7 DOGs” (hot dust-obscured galaxies), and steeper (redder) than almost any other known extragalactic sources. ISM masses estimated for the ALMA-detected sources are 9.9 < log (MISM/M⊙) < 11.75 assuming a dust temperature of 30 K. The cool dust emission is consistent with star formation rates reaching several thousand M⊙ yr-1, depending on the assumed dust temperature, but we cannot rule out the alternative that the AGN powers all the emission in some cases. Our best constrained source has radiative transfer solutions with approximately equal contributions from an obscured AGN and a young (10-15 Myr) compact starburst.

  1. A rare example of low surface-brightness radio lobes in a gas-rich early-type galaxy: the story of NGC 3998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Bradley S.; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Nyland, Kristina; Serra, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We study the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3998. This galaxy is known to host a low-power radio AGN with a kpc-size one-sided jet and a large, nearly polar H i disc. It is therefore a good system to study to understand the relation between the availability of cold-gas and the triggering of AGNs in galaxies. Our new WSRT data reveal two faint, S-shaped radio lobes extending out to ~10 kpc from the galaxy centre. Remarkably, we find that the inner H i disc warps back towards the stellar mid-plane in a way that mirrors the warping of the radio lobes. We suggest that the polar H i disc was accreted through a minor merger, and that the torques causing it to warp in the inner regions are also responsible for feeding the AGN. The "S" shape of the radio lobes would then be due to the radio jets adapting to the changing angular momentum of the accreted gas. The extended radio jets are likely poorly collimated, which would explain their quick fading and, therefore, their rarity in galaxies similar to NGC 3998. The fuelling of the central super-massive black hole is likely occurring via "discrete events", suggested by the observed variability of the radio core and the extremely high core dominance, which we attribute to the formation and ejection of a new jet resulting from a recent fuelling event. The reduced radiocontinuum image and HI datacube (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A94

  2. The phylogeny of quasars and the ontogeny of their central black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Marziani, Paola; D'Onofrio, Mauro; Dultzin, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    The connection between multifrequency quasar observational and physical parameters related to accretion processes is still open to debate. In the last 20 year, Eigenvector 1-based approaches developed since the early papers by Boroson and Green (1992) and Sulentic et al. (2000b) have been proved to be a remarkably powerful tool to investigate this issue, and have led to the definition of a quasar "main sequence". In this paper we perform a cladistic analysis on two samples of 215 and 85 low-z quasars (z ~ 0.7) which were studied in several previous works and which offer a satisfactory coverage of the Eigenvector 1-derived main sequence. The data encompass accurate measurements of observational parameters which represents key aspects associated with the structural diversity of quasars. Cladistics is able to group sources radiating at higher Eddington ratios, as well as to separate radio-quiet (RQ) and radio-loud (RL) quasars. The analysis suggests a black hole mass threshold for powerful radio emission and also properly distinguishes core-dominated and lobe-dominated quasars, in accordance with the basic tenet of RL unification schemes. Considering that black hole mass provides a sort of "arrow of time" of nuclear activity, a phylogenetic interpretation becomes possible if cladistic trees are rooted on black hole mass: the ontogeny of black holes is represented by their monotonic increase in mass. More massive radio-quiet Population B sources at low-z become a more evolved counterpart of Population A i.e., wind dominated sources to which the "local" Narrow-Line Seyfert 1s belong.

  3. Giant lobes of Centaurus A as seen in radio and gamma-ray images obtained with the Fermi-LAT and Planck satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiao-na; Mckinley, Benjamin; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The {\\gamma}-ray data of Fermi-LAT on the giant lobes of Centaurus A are analysed together with the high frequency radio data obtained with the Planck satellite. The large {\\gamma}-ray photon statistics accumulated during seven years of observations, as well as the recently updated Fermi-LAT collaboration software tools allow substantial extension of the detected {\\gamma}-ray emission towards both the higher, up to 30 GeV, and the lower, down to 60 GeV, energies. Moreover, the new {\\gamma}-ray data allow us to explore the spatial features of {\\gamma}-ray emission of the lobes. For the north lobe, we confirm with higher statistical significance, our earlier finding on extension of {\\gamma}-ray emission beyond the radio image. Moreover, the new analysis reveals significant spatial variation of {\\gamma}-ray spectra from both lobes. On the other hand, the Planck observations at microwave frequencies contain important information on spectrum of synchrotron emission in the cutoff region, and thus allow model-indepe...

  4. PAH EMISSION IN STARBURST, SEYFERT, ULIRGS, QSOS AND QUASAR OBJECTS, AND THEIR RELATION WITH THE INFRARED, X-RAY AND RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-A. Higuera-G.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a second study in an ongoing work aimed to analyze the star formation activity and its relation with the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAHs emission. In this way, we have performed a study about the correlation between the ux of the 7.7 -m PAH band and its equivalent width, with the luminosities and uxes observed in JHK photometric bands, IRAS 12, 25, 60 and 100-m, the radio emission at 1.4GHz and X-ray at 2{10 keV, for a sample composed of Seyfert 1-2, QSOs, Quasars, Starburst, and ULIRGs. The results found let us discriminate between objects with more star formation activity from others with more AGN in uence.

  5. Modelling of the Spectral Energy Distribution of Fornax A: Leptonic and Hadronic Production of High Energy Emission from the Radio Lobes

    CERN Document Server

    McKinley, B; López-Caniego, M; Briggs, F; Hurley-Walker, N; Wayth, R B; Offringa, A R; Crocker, R; Bernardi, G; Procopio, P; Gaensler, B M; Tingay, S J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; McDonald, M; Bell, M; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Jacobs, D; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, D A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2014-01-01

    We present new low-frequency observations of the nearby radio galaxy Fornax A at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array, microwave flux-density measurements obtained from WMAP and Planck data, and gamma-ray flux densities obtained from Fermi data. We also compile a comprehensive list of previously published images and flux-density measurements at radio, microwave and X-ray energies. A detailed analysis of the spectrum of Fornax A between 154 MHz and 1510 MHz reveals that both radio lobes have a similar spatially-averaged spectral index, and that there exists a steep-spectrum bridge of diffuse emission between the lobes. Taking the spectral index of both lobes to be the same, we model the spectral energy distribution of Fornax A across an energy range spanning eighteen orders of magnitude, to investigate the origin of the X-ray and gamma-ray emission. A standard leptonic model for the production of both the X-rays and gamma-rays by inverse-Compton scattering does not fit the multi-wavelength observations. ...

  6. Dust Obscured Quasars: A Missing Link in Quasar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikman, Eilat; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A.; Lacy, M.

    2007-12-01

    A host of observational evidence over several decades of research has suggested a formation and evolutionary link between the growth of supermassive black holes, quasar activity and the build-up of the stellar populations in their host galaxies. Such evolutionary scenarios have been invoked to explain the presence of buried AGN seen in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, a high fraction of which also show evidence of merging and interaction. However, the morphologies of luminous, blue quasars show no signs of interaction. Their hosts are mostly undistrubed elliptical galaxies. These seemingly conflicting observations suggest a missing link in the evolutionary path where the dust that completely buried the ULIRG is being cleared, eventually to reveal an unobscured, luminous quasar. This missing link may be a population of highly reddened, but not completely obscured quasars. We have constructed asample of dust obscured quasars using FIRST and 2MASS. We find that for K CRATES flat-spectrum radio catalog.

  7. An accretion disc-irradiation hybrid model for the optical/UV variability in radio-quiet quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Li, Shuang-Liang; Gu, Minfeng; Guo, Hengxiao

    2016-10-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However, the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model, which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous time-scale of accretion disc to the variability time-scale observed and by including the irradiation/X-ray reprocessing to make the emitted spectrum become steeper. We find this hybrid model can reproduce the observed bluer-when-brighter trend quite well, which is used to validate the theoretical model by several works recently. The traditional correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength can also be well fitted by our model. In addition, a weak positive correlation between variability amplitude and black hole mass is present, qualitatively consistent with recent observations.

  8. An Accretion Disc-Irradiation Hybrid Model for The Optical/UV Variability in Radio-Quiet Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hui; Gu, Minfeng

    2016-01-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However,the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model (Li & Cao 2008), which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous timescale of accretion disc to the variability timescale observed and by including the irradiation/X-ray reprocessing to make the emitted spectrum become steeper. We find this hybrid model can reproduce the observed bluer-when-brighter trend quite well, which is used to validate the theoretical model by several works recently. The traditional correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength can also be well fitted by our model. In addition, a weak positive correlation between variability amplitude and black hole mass is present, qualitatively con...

  9. A Multi-band Study of the Remarkable Jet in Quasar 4C+19.44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D. E.; Lee, N. P.; Schwartz, D. A.; Siemiginowska, A.; Massaro, F.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Gelbord, J. M.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Landt, H.; Marshall, H.; Perlman, E. S.; Stawarz, L.; Uchiyama, Y.; Urry, C. M.

    2017-09-01

    We present arcsecond-resolution data in the radio, IR, optical, and X-ray for 4C+19.44 (=PKS 1354+195), the longest and straightest quasar jet with deep X-ray observations. We report results from radio images with half to one arcsecond angular resolution at three frequencies, plus Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer data. The Chandra data allow us to measure the X-ray spectral index in 10 distinct regions along the 18″ jet and compare with the radio index. The radio and X-ray spectral indices of the jet regions are consistent with a value of α =0.80 throughout the jet, to within 2σ uncertainties. The X-ray jet structure to the south extends beyond the prominent radio jet and connects to the southern radio lobe, and there is extended X-ray emission, both in the direction of the unseen counter-jet, and also coincident with the northern radio lobe. This jet is remarkable because its straight appearance over a large distance allows the geometry factors to be taken as fixed along the jet. Using the model of inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background (iC/CMB) by relativistic electrons, we find that the magnetic field strengths and Doppler factors are relatively constant along the jet. If instead the X-rays are synchrotron emission, they must arise from a population of electrons distinct from the particles producing the radio synchrotron spectrum.

  10. A Unified Model of the Fermi Bubbles, Microwave Haze, and Polarized Radio Lobes: Reverse Shocks in the Galactic Center's Giant Outflows

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic Center's giant outflows are manifest in three different, non-thermal phenomena: i) the hard-spectrum, \\gamma-ray `Fermi Bubbles' emanating from the nucleus and extending to |b| ~ 50 degrees; ii) the hard-spectrum, total-intensity microwave (~ 20-40 GHz) `Haze' extending to |b| ~ 35 degrees in the lower reaches of the Fermi Bubbles; and iii) the steep spectrum, polarized, `S-PASS' radio (~ 2-20 GHz) Lobes that envelop the Bubbles and extend to |b| ~ 60 degrees. We find that the nu...

  11. VLA and VLBI observations of core-dominated quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollgaard, R.I.

    1989-01-01

    High dynamic range VLA observations of the total intensity and linear polarization of 24 powerful, core dominated quasars have been made at 5 GHz, as well as the first millisecond linear polarization observations of 3C 273. For ten quasars the resolution of the VLA was sufficient to reveal details of the compact extended emission surrounding the bright cores. The former all exhibit one sided jets, and most show evidence of diffuse halos. The luminosity of the extended emission is sufficient for those to be Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio sources. This interpretation is confirmed by the linear polarization structure of the jets and terminal hotspots. If these quasars are similar to powerful lobe dominated sources but are oriented with jet axes close to the line of sight, the large degrees of polarization observed in the hotspots suggest that they are travelling at speeds {upsilon} > 0.5c. The superluminal quasar 3C 345 has been imaged with a variety of resolutions. In spite of the bending on the millisecond scale, the author finds that the jet of 3C 345 is very straight for the first 2 and then has two knots which show an abrupt shift in azimuth. The inferred magnetic field in the jet is offset {approximately}30{degree} from a perpendicular orientation with respect to the jet axis. This quasar also appears to have a faint counter jet, with the jet/counter jet luminosity ratio suggesting jet speeds {upsilon} > 0.56c. There is also an asymmetric diffuse halo. Milliarsecond polarization observations of 3C 273 show that the core (component D) is very weakly polarized. Appreciable polarized flux was detected from five of the superluminal components in the jet, with the fractional polarization increasing with distance from D.

  12. CHANG-ES. III. UGC 10288—An edge-on galaxy with a background double-lobed radio source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, Judith [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Krause, Marita; Beck, Rainer [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); English, Jayanne [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Murphy, Eric [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Wiegert, Theresa [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 2T3 (Canada); Heald, George [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Walterbos, Rene [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Rand, Richard J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, 800 Yale Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Porter, Troy, E-mail: irwin@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: mkrause@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: jayanne_english@umanitoba.ca, E-mail: emurphy@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: twiegert@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: heald@astron.nl, E-mail: rwalterb@nmsu.edu, E-mail: rjr@phys.unm.edu, E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This third paper in the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies—an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) series shows the first results from our regular data taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. The edge-on galaxy, UGC 10288, has been observed in the B, C, and D configurations at L band (1.5 GHz) and in the C and D configurations at C band (6 GHz) in all polarization products. We show the first spatially resolved images of this galaxy in these bands, the first polarization images, and the first composed image at an intermediate frequency (4.1 GHz) which has been formed from a combination of all data sets. A surprising new result is the presence of a strong, polarized, double-lobed extragalactic radio source (CHANG-ES A) almost immediately behind the galaxy and perpendicular to its disk. The core of CHANG-ES A has an optical counterpart (SDSS J161423.28–001211.8) at a photometric redshift of z {sub phot} = 0.39; the southern radio lobe is behind the disk of UGC 10288 and the northern lobe is behind the halo region. This background ''probe'' has allowed us to do a preliminary Faraday rotation analysis of the foreground galaxy, putting limits on the regular magnetic field and electron density in the halo of UGC 10288 in regions in which there is no direct detection of a radio continuum halo. We have revised the flux densities of the two sources individually as well as the star formation rate (SFR) for UGC 10288. The SFR is low (0.4-0.5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) and the galaxy has a high thermal fraction (44% at 6 GHz), as estimated using both the thermal and non-thermal SFR calibrations of Murphy et al. UGC 10288 would have fallen well below the CHANG-ES flux density cutoff, had it been considered without the brighter contribution of the background source. UGC 10288 shows discrete high-latitude radio continuum features, but it does not have a global radio continuum halo (exponential scale heights are typically ≈1 kpc averaged over regions with and

  13. CHANG-ES. III. UGC 10288—An Edge-on Galaxy with a Background Double-lobed Radio Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Judith; Krause, Marita; English, Jayanne; Beck, Rainer; Murphy, Eric; Wiegert, Theresa; Heald, George; Walterbos, Rene; Rand, Richard J.; Porter, Troy

    2013-12-01

    This third paper in the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies—an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) series shows the first results from our regular data taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. The edge-on galaxy, UGC 10288, has been observed in the B, C, and D configurations at L band (1.5 GHz) and in the C and D configurations at C band (6 GHz) in all polarization products. We show the first spatially resolved images of this galaxy in these bands, the first polarization images, and the first composed image at an intermediate frequency (4.1 GHz) which has been formed from a combination of all data sets. A surprising new result is the presence of a strong, polarized, double-lobed extragalactic radio source (CHANG-ES A) almost immediately behind the galaxy and perpendicular to its disk. The core of CHANG-ES A has an optical counterpart (SDSS J161423.28-001211.8) at a photometric redshift of z phot = 0.39; the southern radio lobe is behind the disk of UGC 10288 and the northern lobe is behind the halo region. This background "probe" has allowed us to do a preliminary Faraday rotation analysis of the foreground galaxy, putting limits on the regular magnetic field and electron density in the halo of UGC 10288 in regions in which there is no direct detection of a radio continuum halo. We have revised the flux densities of the two sources individually as well as the star formation rate (SFR) for UGC 10288. The SFR is low (0.4-0.5 M ⊙ yr-1) and the galaxy has a high thermal fraction (44% at 6 GHz), as estimated using both the thermal and non-thermal SFR calibrations of Murphy et al. UGC 10288 would have fallen well below the CHANG-ES flux density cutoff, had it been considered without the brighter contribution of the background source. UGC 10288 shows discrete high-latitude radio continuum features, but it does not have a global radio continuum halo (exponential scale heights are typically ≈1 kpc averaged over regions with and without extensions). One prominent feature

  14. A Search for TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from High-Peaked Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars Using the Whipple Air-Cherenkov Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Falcone, A D; Boyle, P J; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Celik, O; Cui, W; Dowdall, C; Duke, C; Fegan, D J; La Perez, I C; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortson, L F; Gaidos, J A; Gibbs, K; Gammell, S; Hall, J; Hall, T A; Hillas, A M; Holder, J; Horan, D; Jordan, M; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Knapp, J; Kosack, K; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Le Bohec, S; Linton, E T; Lloyd-Evans, J; Moriarty, P; Müller, D; Nagai, T N; Ong, R A; Page, M; Pallassini, R; Petry, D; Power-Mooney, B; Quinn, J; Rebillot, P; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V V; Wakely, S P; Walker, G; Weekes, T C

    2004-01-01

    Blazars have traditionally been separated into two broad categories based upon their optical emission characteristics; BL Lacs, with faint or no emission lines, and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) with prominent, broad emission lines. The spectral energy distribution of FSRQs has generally been thought of as being more akin to the low-peaked BL Lacs, which exhibit a peak in the infrared region of the spectrum, as opposed to high-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs), which exhibit a peak in UV/X-ray region of the spectrum. All blazars currently confirmed as sources of TeV emission are HBLs. Recent surveys have found several FSRQs exhibiting spectral properties similar to HBLs, particularly the synchrotron peak frequency. These objects are potential sources of TeV emission according to several models of blazar jet emission and blazar evolution. Measurements of TeV flux or upper limits could impact existing theories explaining the links between different blazar types and could have a significant impact on our understanding...

  15. Associated Absorption Lines in the Radio-Loud Quasar 3C 351 Far-Ultraviolet Echelle Spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Q; Brotherton, M; Tripp, T M; Kaiser, M E; Kriss, G A

    2002-01-01

    As one of the most luminous radio-loud quasars showing intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray absorption, 3C 351 provides a laboratory for studying the kinematics and physical conditions of such ionized absorbers. We present an analysis of the intrinsic absorption lines in the high-resolution ($\\sim$ 7 km/s) far-UV spectrum which was obtained from observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spectrum spans wavelengths from 1150 \\AA to 1710 \\AA, and shows strong emission lines from O VI and Ly$\\alpha$. Associated absorption lines are present on the blue wings of the high-ionization emission doublets O VI $\\lambda\\lambda$ 1032,1038 and N V $\\lambda\\lambda$ 1238,1242, as well as the Lyman lines through Ly$\\epsilon$. These intrinsic absorption features are resolved into several distinct kinematic components, covering rest-frame velocities from -40 to -2800 km/s, with respect to the systemic redshift of $z_{em}=0.3721$. For the majority of these abs...

  16. Similarity of Jet Radiation between Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars and GeV Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies: A Universal $\\delta$-$L_{\\rm c}$ Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yong-Kai; Zhang, Hai-Ming; Liang, En-Wei; Yan, Da-Hai; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    By modeling the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a typical flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ, 3C 279) and two GeV narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s, PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342) in different flux stages with the one-zone leptonic models, we find a universal correlation between their Doppler factors ($\\delta$) and peak luminosities ($L_{\\rm c}$) of external Compton scattering bumps. Compiling a combined sample of FSRQs and GeV NLS1s, it is found that both FSRQs and GeV NLS1s in different stages and in different sources well follow the same $\\delta$-$L_{\\rm c}$ correlation. This indicates that the variations of observed luminosities may be essentially due to the Doppler boosting effect. And the universal $\\delta$-$L_{\\rm c}$ relation between FSRQs and GeV NLS1s in different stages may be further evidence that the particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms for the two kinds of sources are similar. In addition, by replacing $L_{\\rm c}$ with the observed luminosity in the Fermi/LAT band ...

  17. The SINFONI survey of powerful radio galaxies at z~2: Jet-driven AGN feedback during the Quasar Era

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvadba, N; Lehnert, M D; Best, P N; Collet, C

    2016-01-01

    We present VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the warm ionized gas in 33 powerful radio galaxies at redshifts z>~2, which are excellent sites to study the interplay of rapidly accreting active galactic nuclei and the interstellar medium of the host galaxy in the very late formation stages of massive galaxies. Our targets span two orders of magnitude in radio size (2-400 kpc) and kinetic jet energy (a few 10^46 to almost 10^48 erg s^-1). All sources have complex gas kinematics with broad line widths up to ~1300 km s^-1. About half have bipolar velocity fields with offsets up to 1500 km s^-1 and are consistent with global back-to-back outflows. The others have complex velocity distributions, often with multiple abrupt velocity jumps far from the nucleus of the galaxy, and are not associated with a major merger in any obvious way. We present several empirical constraints that show why gas kinematics and radio jets seem to be physically related. The gas kinetic energy from large scale bulk and local outflow or t...

  18. The Road to Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2014-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of 3C 48 and other quasi stellar radio sources was discussed as early as 1960 by John Bolton and others, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be unrealistically high radio and optical luminosities. Not until the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, which led Maarten Schmidt to identify 3C 273 with an apparent stellar object at a redshift of 0.16, was the true nature understood. Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as the very luminous nuclei of galaxies. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first cataloged in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio inte...

  19. The SINFONI survey of powerful radio galaxies at z 2: Jet-driven AGN feedback during the Quasar Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvadba, N. P. H.; De Breuck, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Best, P. N.; Collet, C.

    2017-03-01

    We present VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the rest-frame optical emission lines of warm ionized gas in 33 powerful radio galaxies at redshifts z ≳ 2, which are excellent sites to study the interplay of rapidly accreting active galactic nuclei and the interstellar medium of the host galaxy in the very late formation stages of massive galaxies. Our targets span two orders of magnitude in radio size (2-400 kpc) and kinetic jet energy (a few 1046- almost 1048 erg s-1). All sources have complex gas kinematics with broad line widths up to 1300 km s-1. About half have bipolar velocity fields with offsets up to 1500 km s-1 and are consistent with global back-to-back outflows. The others have complex velocity distributions, often with multiple abrupt velocity jumps far from the nucleus of the galaxy, and are not associated with a major merger in any obvious way. We present several empirical constraints that show why gas kinematics and radio jets seem to be physically related in all galaxies of the sample. The kinetic energy in the gas from large scale bulk and local outflow or turbulent motion corresponds to a few 10-3 to 10-2 of the kinetic energy output of the radio jet. In galaxies with radio jet power ≳ 1047 erg s-1, the kinetic energy in global back-to-back outflows dominates the total energy budget of the gas, suggesting that bulk motion of outflowing gas encompasses the global interstellar medium. This might be facilitated by the strong gas turbulence, as suggested by recent analytical work. We compare our findings with recent hydrodynamic simulations, and discuss the potential consequences for the subsequent evolution of massive galaxies at high redshift. Compared with recent models of metal enrichment in high-z AGN hosts, we find that the gas-phase metallicities in our galaxies are lower than in most low-z AGN, but nonetheless solar or even super-solar, suggesting that the ISM we see in these galaxies is very similar to the gas from which massive low

  20. Radio Galaxies and the Magnetization of the IGM

    CERN Document Server

    Wiita, P J

    2003-01-01

    Observed radio galaxies had a much higher comoving density during the `quasar era', at z ~ 2-3, but these sources are only detectable for small fractions of their active lifetimes at such high z due to expansion losses and increased inverse Compton losses against the cosmic microwave background. Using recent models for the evolution of the size and luminosity of powerful double radio sources, as well as LCDM simulations of the cosmic web of baryonic material, we argue that during the quasar era a high volume fraction of this web was occupied by the lobes of double radio sources. They could have seeded the IGM with an average magnetic field approaching 10^{-8} G. Further, these advancing overpressured lobes could compress the denser interstellar gas clouds of the galaxies engulfed by them and thus trigger starbursts. This can probably account for much of the intense star-formation activity witnessed beyond z ~ 1.5. Also, the sweeping up of the ISM of the gas-rich galaxies by the rapidly advancing radio lobes m...

  1. Dusty Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Coleman M; Gallagher, S C; Leighly, Karen M; Hewett, Paul C; Ross, Nicholas P; Hall, P B

    2014-01-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ~35,000 uniformly-selected quasars with 00.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)>0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index (${\\alpha}_{\\lambda}$) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger ionizing spectral lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former indicating either smaller BH mass or more face-on orientation.

  2. Hidden blazars and emission line variability of high redshift quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ma

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a survey to search for hidden blazars in a sample of z 2 radio{loud quasars. The idea is based on our prediction that we should be able to see large C IV line variability not associated with observed continuum variations or most other emission lines in every radio{loud quasar. Here we report the initial results including the discovery of large C IV line variations in two quasars.

  3. Clues to Quasar Broad Line Region Geometry and Kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Wilkes, B. J.; Barthel, P. D.

    2000-01-01

    We present evidence that the high-velocity CIV lambda 1549 emission line gas of radio-loud quasars may originate in a disk-like configuration, in close proximity to the accretion disk often assumed to emit the low-ionization lines. For a sample of 36 radio-loud z~2 quasars we find the 20--30% peak...

  4. On the Relativistic Beaming and Orientation Effects in Core-Dominated Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. A. Ubachukwu; A. E. Chukwude

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relativistic beaming effects in a well-defined sample of core-dominated quasars using the correlation between the relative prominence of the core with respect to the extended emission (defined as the ratio of core- to lobe- flux density measured in the rest frame of the source) and the projected linear size as an indicator of relativistic beaming and source orientation. Based on the orientation-dependent relativistic beaming and unification paradigm for high luminosity sources in which the Fanaroff-Riley class-II radio galaxies form the unbeamed parent population of both the lobe- and core-dominated quasars which are expected to lie at successively smaller angles to the line of sight, we find that the flows in the cores of these core-dominated quasars are highly relativistic, with optimum bulk Lorentz factor, opt ∼ 6—16, and also highly anisotropic, with an average viewing angle, ∼ 9°-16°. Furthermore, the largest boosting occurs within a critical cone angle of ≈ 4°-10°.

  5. A Unified Model of the Fermi Bubbles, Microwave Haze, and Polarized Radio Lobes: Reverse Shocks in the Galactic Center’s Giant Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Roland M.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Carretti, Ettore

    2015-08-01

    The Galactic center’s giant outflows are manifest in three different, nonthermal phenomena: (1) the hard-spectrum, γ-ray “Fermi bubbles” emanating from the nucleus and extending to | b| ˜ 50^\\circ ; (2) the hard-spectrum, total-intensity microwave (˜20-40 GHz) “haze” extending to | b| ˜ 35^\\circ in the lower reaches of the Fermi bubbles; and (3) the steep-spectrum, polarized, “S-PASS” radio (˜2-20 GHz) lobes that envelop the bubbles and extend to | b| ˜ 60^\\circ . We find that the nuclear outflows inflate a genuine bubble in each Galactic hemisphere that has the classical structure, working outward, of reverse shock, contact discontinuity (CD), and forward shock. Expanding into the finite pressure of the halo and given appreciable cooling and gravitational losses, the CD of each bubble is now expanding only very slowly. We find observational signatures in both hemispheres of giant, reverse shocks at heights of ˜1 kpc above the nucleus; their presence ultimately explains all three of the nonthermal phenomena mentioned above. Synchrotron emission from shock-reaccelerated cosmic-ray electrons explains the spectrum, morphology, and vertical extent of the microwave haze and the polarized radio lobes. Collisions between shock-reaccelerated hadrons and denser gas in cooling condensations that form inside the CD account for most of the bubbles’ γ-ray emissivity. Inverse Compton emission from primary electrons contributes at the 10%-30% level. Our model suggests that the bubbles are signatures of a comparatively weak but sustained nuclear outflow driven by Galactic center star formation over ≳few × 108 yr.

  6. Discovery of an X-ray cavity near the radio lobes of Cygnus A indicating previous AGN activity

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Gayoung; Krause, Martin; Truemper, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cygnus A harbours the nearest powerful radio jet of an Fanaroff-Riley (FR) class II radio galaxy in a galaxy cluster where the interaction of the jet with the intracluster medium (ICM) can be studied in detail. We use a large set of Chandra archival data, VLA and new LOFAR observations to shed new light on the interaction of the jets with the ICM. We identify an X-ray cavity in the distribution of the X-ray emitting plasma in the region south of the Cyg A nucleus which has lower pressure than the surrounding medium. The LOFAR and VLA radio observations show that the cavity is filled with synchrotron emitting plasma. The spectral age and the buoyancy time of the cavity indicates an age at least as large as the current Cyg A jets and not much larger than twice this time. We suggest that this cavity was created in a previous active phase of Cyg A when the energy output of the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) was about two orders of magnitude less than today.

  7. Occurrence and Global Properties of Narrow CIV lambda 1549 Absorption Lines in Moderate-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    A statistical study is presented of (a) the frequency of narrow CIV lambda 1549 absorption lines in 1.5 ~50%) of narrow CIV absorbers is detected for the radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars, and a constant ~25% of all the quasars, irrespective of radio type display associated CIV absorbers stronger...... than a rest equivalent width of 0.5A. Both radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars with narrow absorption lines have systematically redder continua, especially strongly absorbed objects. There is evidence of inclination dependent dust reddening and absorption for the radio quasars. An additional key result...... is that the most strongly absorbed radio quasars have the largest radio source extent. This result is in stark contrast to a recent study of the low-frequency selected Molonglo survey in which a connection between the strength of the narrow absorbers and the (young) age of the radio source has been proposed...

  8. Galaxy clustering around nearby luminous quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, K B; Kirhakos, S; Schneider, D P; Fisher, Karl B; Bahcall, John N; Schneider, Donald P

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z 100 kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  9. BeppoSAX observations of quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, F.; Mineo, T.; Laor, A.; Giallongo, E

    1999-01-01

    We present results from recent BeppoSAX observations of low redshift (z<0.4, PG sample) and high redshift (2radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars. Significant curvature has been detected in the spectra of the observed PGs: the spectrum flattens by 0.5 above 2 keV. The possible presence of narrow features in the MECS spectra is discussed. Intrinsic absorption has been measured in the z=3.9 radio-loud quasar 1745+624. The z=2.3 radio-quiet quasar HE1104-1805 has been found at a very low flux level, in comparison with previous ROSAT and ASCA observations, implying large (factor of {approx} 4) variability on years timescales.

  10. Narrow CIV lambda 1549A Absorption Lines in Moderate-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    A large, high-quality spectral data base of well-selected, moderate-redshift radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars is used to characterize the incidence of narrow associated CIV lambda 1549 absorption, and how this may depend on some quasar properties, including radio-type. Preliminary results...

  11. Ultra-High-Density Molecular Core and Warped Nuclear Disk in the Deep Potential of Radio-Lobe Galaxy NGC 3079

    CERN Document Server

    Sofue, Y; Kohno, K; Okumura, S K; Honma, M; Kawamura, A; Irwin, J A; Irwin, Judith A.

    2001-01-01

    We have performed high-resolution synthesis observations of the 12CO (J=1-0) line emission from the radio lobe edge-on spiral NGC 3079 using a 7-element mm-wave interferometer at Nobeyama, which consisted of the 45-m telescope and 6-element Array. The molecular nuclear disk (NMD) of 750 pc radius is found to be inclined by 20 degrees from the optical disk, and the NMD has spiral arms. An ultra-high-density molecular core (UHC) was found at the nucleus. The gaseous mass of the UHC within 125 pc radius is as large as about 3 x 10^8 Msun, an order of magnitude more massive than that in the same area of the Galactic Center, and the mean density is as high as approximately 3 x 10^3 H2 cm^-3. A position-velocity diagram along the major axis indicates that the rotation curve starts at a finite velocity exceeding 300 \\kms already from the nucleus. The surface mass density in the central region is estimated to be as high as about 10^5 Msun pc^-2, producing a very deep gravitational potential. We argue that the very la...

  12. LAMOST Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the Chinese LAMOST spectroscopic quasar survey is to discover 0.4 million new quasars from 1 million quasar candidates brighter than the magnitude limit i=20.5 in the next 5 years. This will hopefully provide the largest quasar sample for the further studies of AGN physics and cosmology. The improved quasar selection criteria based on the UKIDSS near-IR and SDSS optical colors are presented, and their advantages in uncovering the missing quasars in the quasar 'redshift desert' are demonstrated. In addition, some recent discoveries of new quasars during the LAMOST commissioning phase are presented.

  13. Thermal and Nonthermal Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Antonucci, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Radio galaxies were discovered and mapped in the 1950s. The optical spectra showed little or no nuclear continuum light. Some also revealed powerful high ionization emission lines, while others showed at most weak low-ionization emission lines. Quasars were found in the 1960s, and their spectra were dominated by powerful continuum radiation which was subsequently identified with optically thick thermal radiation from copious accretion flows, as well as high ionization narrow emission lines, and powerful broad permitted lines. By the 1980s, data from optical polarization and statistics of the radio properties required that many radio galaxies contain hidden quasar nuclei, hidden from the line of sight by dusty, roughly toroidal gas distributions. The radio galaxies with hidden quasars are referred to as "thermal." Do all radio galaxies have powerful hidden quasars? We now know the answer using arguments based on radio, infrared, optical and X-ray properties. Near the top of the radio luminosity function, for F...

  14. An Apparent Redshift Dependence of Quasar Continuum: Implication for Cosmic Dust Extinction?

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., $\\alpha_{\

  15. High-redshift SDSS Quasars with Weak Emission Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W. N.

    2009-01-01

    We identify a sample of 74 high-redshift quasars (z > 3) with weak emission lines from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present infrared, optical, and radio observations of a subsample of four objects at z > 4. These weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) constitute a promine...

  16. Quasar polarization with ultralight (pseudo-)scalars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ki-Young choi; Subhayan Mandal; Chang Sub Shin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that the absence of circular polarization of visible light from quasars severely constrains the interpretation of axion-like particles (ALPs) as a solution for the generation of linear polarization. Furthermore, the new observation of linear polarization in radio wavelength from quasars, similar to the earlier observation performed in the optical bands, makes the ALPs scenario inconsistent with at least one of the two observations. In this study, we extend this scenario by including more scalars. We find that the effects from scalar and pseudoscalar neutralize each other, thereby suppressing the circular polarization, while preserving consistent linear polarization, as observed in both the visible and radio wave bands.

  17. High dynamic range VLA observations of eight core-dominated quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollgaard, R.I.; Wardle, J.F.C.; Roberts, D.H. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The Very Large Array has been used at 5 GHz to make high dynamic range observations of eight quasars with prominent cores. All exhibit one-sided jets, and all but one show evidence of diffuse halos. The luminosity of the extended emission by itself is sufficient for these to be Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio sources. This interpretation is confirmed by the polarization of the extended structure: the inferred magnetic field is parallel to the jet axis in all cases, and in all but one instance turns to be nearly perpendicular to the jet at its outer end. These latter structures are identified as classical terminal hot-spots. Both the total intensity data and especially the polarization data strongly support the notion that these quasars are similar to the classical lobe-dominated quasars, but are oriented with jet axes close to the line of sight. If this is so, then the relatively high degrees of polarization observed in the terminal hotspots appear to require that the downstream fluid velocities in the hotspots are mildly relativistic, in the range v/c = 0.2 - 0.8. This, in turn, implies that the jets are at least moderately relativistic over their entire length. 53 refs.

  18. Accretion States of the Galactic Micro Quasar GRS 1758-258

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Roberto; Mehdipour, Missagh; Broderick, Jess W.; Hao, JingFang; Hannikainen, Diana C.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a radio and X-ray study of the Galactic micro quasar GRS 1758-258, using unpublished archival data and new observations. We focus in particular on the 2000-2002 state transitions, and on its more quiet behaviour in 2008-2009. Our spectral and timing analysis of the XMM-Newton data shows that the source was in the canonical intermediate, soft and hard states in 2000 September 19,2001 March 22 and 2002 September 28, respectively. We estimate the disk size, luminosity and temperature, which are consistent with a black hole mass approx.10 Solar Mass, There is much overlap between the range of total X-ray luminosities (on average approx. 0.02L(sub Edd)) in the hard and soft states, and probably between the corresponding mass accretion rates; in fact, the hard state is often more luminous. The extended radio lobes seen in 1992 and 1997 are still present in 2008-2009. The 5-GHz radio core flux density has shown variability between approx. 0.1-0.5 mJy over the last two decades. This firmly places GRS 1758-258 in the radio-quiet sequence of Galactic black holes, in the radio/X-ray plane. We note that this dichotomy is similar to the dichotomy between the radio/X-ray sequences of Seyfert and radio galaxies. We propose that the different radio efficiency of the two sequences is due to relativistic electron/positron jets in radio-loud black holes, and sub-relativistic, thermally dominated outflows in radio-quiet sources.

  19. Does circular polarisation reveal the rotation of quasar engines?

    OpenAIRE

    Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2002-01-01

    Many radio sources like quasars, blazars, radio galaxies, and micro-quasars exhibit circular polarisation (CP) with surprising temporal persistent handedness. As a possible explanation we propose that the CP is due to Faraday conversion (FC) of linear polarisation (LP) synchrotron light which propagates along a line-of-sight (LOS) through twisted magnetic fields. The rotational nature of accretion flows onto black holes naturally generates the required magnetic twist in the emission region, i...

  20. Correlations between Optical Variability and Physical Parameters of Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wenwen Zuo; Xue-Bing Wu; Yi-Qing Liu; Cheng-Liang Jiao

    2014-09-01

    Optical variability is an important feature of quasars. Taking advantage of a larger sample of 7658 quasars from SDSS Stripe 82 and relatively more photometric data points for each quasar, we estimate their variability amplitudes and divide the sample into small bins of various parameters. An anticorrelation between variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength is found. Variability increases as either luminosity or Eddington ratio decreases. The relationship between variability and black hole mass is uncertain. The intrinsic distribution of variability amplitudes for radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are different. Both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars exhibit a bluer-when-brighter chromatism. With the Shakura–Sunyaev disk model, we find that changes of accretion rate play an important role in producing the observed optical variability. However, the predicted positive correlation between variability and black hole mass seems to be inconsistent with the observed negative correlation between them in small bins of Eddington ratio, which suggests that other physical mechanisms may still need to be considered in modifying the simple accretion disk model. The different mechanisms in radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars are discussed.

  1. Inspiring the next generation of scientists with their observations of quasars, black holes, Jupiter, and SETI with the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope, GAVRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauncey, D. L.; Levin, S.; Teitelbaum, L.; Hofstadter, M.; Arballo, J.; McConnell, S.; Dorcey, R.; Cole, K.; Kreuser-Jenkins, N.; Leflang, J.; Kruzins, E.; Ricardo, L.; Horiuchi, S.; Nagle, G.; Miro, C. G.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes a radio astronomy programfor schools, the Goldstone-AppleValley Radio Telescope,GAVRT. The GAVRT program is designed to bring the inspiration and enthusiasm to a younger generation of teachers and children who learn about science by doing real science, just as Iosif Shklovsky brought to an older generation.

  2. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly{alpha} emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly{alpha} scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1{sigma} surface-brightness limits of SB{sub Ly{alpha}}{approx_equal}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}) for diffuse Ly{alpha} emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale {approx}100 kpc Ly{alpha} emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R {approx}< 50 kpc extended Ly{alpha} nebulosities are detected in 34% of our sample, which are likely the high-redshift analogs of the extended emission-line regions (EELRs) commonly observed around low-redshift (z < 0.5) quasars. This may be fluorescent recombination radiation from a population of very dense clouds with a low covering fraction illuminated by the quasar. We also detect a compact high rest-frame equivalent width (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 50 A) Ly{alpha}-emitter with luminosity L{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.1 {+-} 0.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence

  3. An Infrared Study of the Large-Scale Jet in Quasar PKS 1136-135

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchiyama, Yasunobu; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Urry, C.Megan; Coppi, Paolo; Van Duyne, Jeffrey; /Yale U., Dept. Astron.; Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Sambruna, Rita M.; /NASA,; Takahashi, Tadayuki; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Tokyo U.; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; /Brera Observ.; Maraschi, Laura; /Brera Observ.

    2007-03-16

    We present Spitzer IRAC imaging of the large-scale jet in the quasar PKS 1136-135 at wavelengths of 3.6 and 5.8 {micro}m, combined with previous VLA, HST, and Chandra observations. We clearly detect infrared emission from the jet, resulting in the most detailed multifrequency data among the jets in lobe-dominated quasars. The spectral energy distributions of the jet knots have significant variations along the jet, like the archetypal jet in 3C 273. The infrared measurements with IRAC are consistent with the previous idea that the jet has two spectral components, namely (1) the low-energy synchrotron spectrum extending from radio to infrared, and (2) the high-energy component responsible for the X-ray flux. The optical fluxes may be a mixture of the two components. We consider three radiation models for the high-energy component: inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by radio-emitting electrons in a highly relativistic jet, synchrotron radiation by a second distinct electron population, and synchrotron radiation by ultra high energy protons. Each hypothesis leads to important insights into and constraints on particle acceleration in the jet, as well as the basic physical properties of the jet such as bulk velocity, transporting power, and particle contents.

  4. A Massive Molecular Gas Reservoir in the Z = 2.221 Type-2 Quasar Host Galaxy SMM J0939+8315 Lensed by the Radio Galaxy 3C220.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, T. K. Daisy; Riechers, Dominik A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the detection of CO(J = 3 \\to 2) line emission in the strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J0939+8315 at z = 2.221, using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. SMM J0939+8315 hosts a type-2 quasar, and is gravitationally lensed by the radio galaxy 3C220.3 and its companion galaxy at z = 0.685. The 104 GHz continuum emission underlying the CO line is detected toward 3C220.3 with an integrated flux density of Scont = 7.4 ± 1.4 mJy. Using the CO(J = 3 \\to 2) line intensity of ICO(3-2) = (12.6 ± 2.0) Jy km s-1, we derive a lensing- and excitation-corrected CO line luminosity of {L}{{CO(1-0)}}\\prime = (3.4 ± 0.7) × 1010 (10.1/μL) K km s-1 pc2 for the SMG, where μL is the lensing magnification factor inferred from our lens modeling. This translates to a molecular gas mass of Mgas = (2.7 ± 0.6) × 1010 (10.1/μL) M⊙. Fitting spectral energy distribution models to the (sub)-millimeter data of this SMG yields a dust temperature of T = 63.1{}-1.3+1.1 K, a dust mass of Mdust = (5.2 ± 2.1) × 108 (10.1/μL) M⊙, and a total infrared luminosity of LIR = (9.1 ± 1.2) ×1012 (10.1/μL) L⊙. We find that the properties of the interstellar medium of SMM J0939+8315 overlap with both SMGs and type-2 quasars. Hence, SMM J0939+8315 may be transitioning from a starbursting phase to an unobscured quasar phase as described by the “evolutionary link” model, according to which this system may represent an intermediate stage in the evolution of present-day galaxies at an earlier epoch.

  5. Relativistic Hotspots in FR II Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Alex M.; Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Gawronski, M. P.; Cederbloom, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a list of six FR II radio sources that are candidates to possess hotspots with modestly relativistic (v/c > 0.2) bulk velocities, in contrast to the vast majority of FR II radio sources that possess non-relativistic hotspot bulk velocities (e.g., v/c = 0.03+/- 0.02 from Scheuer 1995). These objects display arm- length and flux-ratio asymmetries between lobes that self-consistently indicate relativistic motion. The candidates are selected from the FIRST 1.4 GHz survey (including but not limited to the catalog of FR II quasars of de Vries et al. 2006) with the requirement that the radio core have a spectroscopic SDSS counterpart. We find no significant difference in the number of neighboring sources within 300 projected kpc of the candidate sources and randomly selected nearby regions. The deprojected and light travel-time corrected lobe distances are not abnormal for FR II sources, and neither are the core-to-lobe flux ratios after correcting for lobe beaming. We briefly consider four possibilities for these type of objects: (i) environmental interactions randomly mimicking relativistic effects, (ii) a restarted jet causing the near hotspot to brighten while the far hotspot still appears faint, (iii) observation during a short interval common to FR II lifetimes during which the hotspot decelerates from relativistic to non-relativistic velocities, and (iv) innately unusual characteristics (e.g., a mass-loaded jet) driving relativistic bulk velocities in the hotspots of a small fraction (< 1%) of FR II objects. We favor the last interpretation but cannot rule out the alternatives. We also comment on the useful external constraints such objects provide to the evaluation of hotspot X-ray emission mechanisms.

  6. Galaxy Clustering Around Nearby Luminous Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Karl B.; Bahcall, John N.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Schneider, Donald P.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z approx. less than 0.30) quasars observed with the Wide Field Camera-2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST resolution makes possible galaxy identification brighter than V = 24.5 and as close as 1 min or 2 min to the quasar. We find a significant enhancement of galaxies within a projected separation of approx. less than 100 1/h kpc of the quasars. If we model the QSO/galaxy correlation function as a power law with a slope given by the galaxy/galaxy correlation function, we find that the ratio of the QSO/galaxy to galaxy/galaxy correlation functions is 3.8 +/- 0.8. The galaxy counts within r less than 15 1/h kpc of the quasars are too high for the density profile to have an appreciable core radius (approx. greater than 100 1/h kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  7. Radio-loud AGNs at high redshifts and the cosmic microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, G; Tavecchio, F; Haardt, F; Sbarrato, T

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how the interaction between the electrons in a relativistic jet and the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) affects the observable properties of radio-loud AGN at early epochs. At high z the magnetic energy density in the radio lobes of powerful radio-loud quasars can be exceeded by the energy density of the CMB (because of its (1+z)^4 dependance). In this case, relativistic electrons cool preferentially by scattering off CMB photons, rather than by synchrotron. Thus, sources sharing the same intrinsic properties have different extended radio and X-ray luminosities when located at different z: more distant sources are less luminous in radio and more luminous in X-rays than their closer counterparts. Instead, in compact regions where the local magnetic field still exceeds the CMB in terms of energy density, synchrotron radiation would be unaffected by the presence of the CMB. Such regions include the compact inner jet and the so-called hot spots in the radio lobes. The decrease in radio luminosity is ...

  8. Merging Galaxies Create a Binary Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Observatory in California indicated that the object was likely a binary quasar in the midst of a galaxy merger. Carnegie's Mulchaey then used the 6.5 meter Baade-Magellan telescope at the Las Campanas observatory in Chile to obtain deeper images and more detailed spectroscopy of the merging galaxies. "Just because you see two galaxies that are close to each other in the sky doesn't mean they are merging," says Mulchaey. "But from the Magellan images we can actually see tidal tails, one from each galaxy, which suggests that the galaxies are in fact interacting and are in the process of merging." Thomas Cox, now a fellow at the Carnegie Observatories, corroborated this conclusion using computer simulations of the merging galaxies. When Cox's model galaxies merged, they showed features remarkably similar to what Mulchaey observed in the Magellan images. "The model verifies the merger origin for this binary quasar system," he says. "It also hints that this kind of galaxy interaction is a key component of the growth of black holes and production of quasars throughout our universe." * The authors of the paper published in the Astrophysical Journal are Paul J. Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Adam D. Myers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Wayne A. Barkhouse of the University of North Dakota, John S. Mulchaey of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Vardha N. Bennert of the Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Thomas J. Cox of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Thomas L. Aldcroft of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and Joan M. Wrobel of National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM. More information, including images and other multimedia, can be found at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  9. A Massive Molecular Gas Reservoir in the z=2.221 Type-2 Quasar Host Galaxy SMM J0939+8315 Lensed by the Radio Galaxy 3C220.3

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, T K Daisy

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of CO(J=3-2) line emission in the strongly-lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) SMM J0939+8315 at z=2.221, using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. SMM J0939+8315 hosts a type-2 quasar, and is gravitationally lensed by the radio galaxy 3C220.3 and its companion galaxy at z=0.685. The 104 GHz continuum emission underlying the CO line is detected toward 3C220.3 with an integrated flux density of S_cont = 7.4 +/- 1.4 mJy. Using the CO(J=3-2) line intensity of I_(CO(3-2)) = (12.6 +/- 2.0) Jy km s^-1, we derive a lensing- and excitation-corrected CO line luminosity of L'(CO(3-2)) = (3.4 +/- 0.7) x 10^10 (10.1/mu_L) K km s^-1 pc^2 for the SMG, where mu_L is the lensing magnification factor inferred from our lens modeling. This translates to a molecular gas mass of M_gas = (2.7 +/- 0.6) x 10^10 (10.1/mu_L) Msun. Fitting spectral energy distribution models to the (sub)-millimeter data of this SMG yields a dust temperature of T = 63.1^{+1.1}_{-1.3} K, a dust mass of M_du...

  10. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, G.; Barthel, P. D.; Peletier, R. F.; Pel, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and detect dust tori within radio galaxies of various types. Methods: Using VISIR on the VLT, we acquired sub-arcsecond (~0.40 arcsec) resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 μm, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio gala

  11. Extragalactic Jets as Probes of Distant Clusters of Galaxies and the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Wing, Joshua D; Ashby, M L N; Golden-Marx, Emmet; Brodwin, Mark; Douglass, E M; Randall, Scott W; Clarke, T E

    2014-01-01

    We are conducting a large survey of distant clusters of galaxies using radio sources with bent jets and lobes as tracers. These radio sources are driven by AGN and achieve their bent morphologies through interaction with the surrounding gas found in clusters of galaxies. Based on low-redshift studies, these types of sources can be used to identify clusters very efficiently. We present initial results from our survey of 653 bent-double radio sources with optical hosts too faint to appear in the SDSS. The sample was observed in the infrared with Spitzer, and it has revealed $\\sim$200 distant clusters or proto-clusters in the redshift range $z\\sim0.7 - 3.0$. The sample of bent-doubles contains both quasars and radio galaxies enabling us to study both radiative and kinetic mode feedback in cluster and group environments at a wide range of redshifts.

  12. 射电噪类星体与X射线双星的黑洞活动基本面关系∗%The Fundamental Plane of Radio Loud Quasars and X-ray Binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭; 张皓晶; 张雄

    2016-01-01

    在很多低/硬态X射线双星系统(XRB)中,射电和X射线光度之间存在较好的相关关系. Dong等人通过研究得出了射电静类星体(RQQ)也存在着这一关系,并且其关系式与低/硬态X射线双星的基本面关系有着一定的相似度.分析收集的射电噪类星体来探究射电噪类星体是否也存在着这种关联,这些源包含了255个射电噪类星体.分析结果表明:(1)255个射电噪类星体(RLQ)的黑洞质量与X射线和射电光度之间以及射电光度爱丁顿比率和X射线爱丁顿比率之间均存在相关性,这与Dong等人运用亮硬态黑洞双星和射电噪类星体所得出的基本面关系式有一定的相似性,但仍然存在一定差异.(2)低/硬态X射线双星与射电噪类星体的基本面关系式可统一为lg LR =0.998+0.045−0.045lg LX +0.592+0.049−0.049lg MBH −6.56+1.605−1.605(其中LR为射电光度, LX为X射线光度, MBH为黑洞质量).(3)研究结果进一步证明了X射线和射电光度与黑洞质量所构成的基本面关系式具有高度的统一性,不仅可用于描述低/硬态X射线双星系统和射电静类星体,同样可用于射电噪类星体.%Several X-ray binaries (X-ray binaries) in low/hard state that follow a track of radio-X-ray correlation have been found in recent years. Dong et al. also found this relation in RQQs (radio quiet quasars). Black hole accretion and jet formation are scale invariants which form the fundamental plane of black hole activity. It is a plane given in the space of the black hole mass and the radio/X-ray luminosities. In this paper, we compile a sample of radio loud active galactic nuclei and find that: (1) The hard X-ray photon indices and Eddington ratios of our sample are positively correlated, similar to XRBs. The Eddington-scaled radio-X-ray correlation of our sample also has that of outliers. A radiatively efficient accretion flow can regulate the positively correlated X-ray spectral

  13. High-redshift SDSS Quasars with Weak Emission Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W. N.

    2009-01-01

    We identify a sample of 74 high-redshift quasars (z > 3) with weak emission lines from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present infrared, optical, and radio observations of a subsample of four objects at z > 4. These weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) constitute a prominent...... tail of the Lya + N v equivalent width distribution, and we compare them to quasars with more typical emission-line properties and to low-redshift active galactic nuclei with weak/absent emission lines, namely BL Lac objects. We find that WLQs exhibit hot (T ~ 1000 K) thermal dust emission and have...... rest-frame 0.1-5 µm spectral energy distributions that are quite similar to those of normal quasars. The variability, polarization, and radio properties of WLQs are also different from those of BL Lacs, making continuum boosting by a relativistic jet an unlikely physical interpretation. The most...

  14. A morphological and spectral study of GPS galaxies and quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilizzi, RT; Tschager, W; Snellen, IAG; de Bruyn, AG; Miley, GK; Rottgering, HJA; van Langevelde, HJ; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Hirabayashi, H; Preston, RA; Gurvits, LI

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed HALCA and global VLBI data for 2021+614, the first of eleven GPS quasars and galaxies to be observed by HALCA. We show that 2021+614 is a compact symmetric object of overall size similar to 40 pc, and confirm that the speed of separation of the two dominant lobes is approximately on

  15. A morphological and spectral study of GPS galaxies and quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilizzi, RT; Tschager, W; Snellen, IAG; de Bruyn, AG; Miley, GK; Rottgering, HJA; van Langevelde, HJ; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Hirabayashi, H; Preston, RA; Gurvits, LI

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed HALCA and global VLBI data for 2021+614, the first of eleven GPS quasars and galaxies to be observed by HALCA. We show that 2021+614 is a compact symmetric object of overall size similar to 40 pc, and confirm that the speed of separation of the two dominant lobes is approximately

  16. A morphological and spectral study of GPS galaxies and quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilizzi, RT; Tschager, W; Snellen, IAG; de Bruyn, AG; Miley, GK; Rottgering, HJA; van Langevelde, HJ; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Hirabayashi, H; Preston, RA; Gurvits, LI

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed HALCA and global VLBI data for 2021+614, the first of eleven GPS quasars and galaxies to be observed by HALCA. We show that 2021+614 is a compact symmetric object of overall size similar to 40 pc, and confirm that the speed of separation of the two dominant lobes is approximately on

  17. The nuclear to host galaxy relation of high redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kotilainen, J K; Labita, M; Treves, A; Uslenghi, M

    2007-01-01

    We present near-infrared imaging with ESO VLT+ISAAC of the host galaxies of low luminosity quasars in the redshift range 1 < z < 2, aimed at investigating the relationship between the nuclear and host galaxy luminosities at high redshift. This work complements our previous study to trace the cosmological evolution of the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars (Falomo et al. 2004). The new sample includes 15 low luminosity quasars, nine radio-loud (RLQ) and six radio-quiet (RQQ). They have similar distribution of redshift and optical luminosity, and together with the high luminosity quasars they cover a large range (~4 mag) of the quasar luminosity function. The host galaxies of both types of quasars are in the range of massive inactive ellipticals between L* and 10 L*. RLQ hosts are systematically more luminous than RQQ hosts by a factor of ~2. This difference is similar to that found for the high luminosity quasars. This luminosity gap appears to be independent of the rest-frame U-band luminosity but...

  18. Obscuration of Quasars by Dust and the Reddening Mechanism in Parkes-Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Masci, F J

    1998-01-01

    A majority of quasar surveys have been based on criteria which assume strong blue continua or a UV-excess. Any amount of dust along the line-of-sight is expected to drastically extinguish the optical/UV flux leading to a selection bias. Radio surveys however should suffer no bias against extinction by dust. Recently, a large complete sample of radio-selected quasars has become available (the `Parkes sample'). A majority of these sources exhibit optical--to--near-infrared continua that are exceedingly `red', very unlike those of quasars selected optically. The purpose of this thesis, broadly speaking, is to explore the problem of incompleteness in optical quasar surveys due to obscuration by dust, and to interpret the relatively `red' continua observed in the Parkes quasar sample. The first part of this thesis explores the observational consequences of an intervening (foreground) cosmological dust component, such as that located in galaxies and clusters. The second part examines the continuum properties of Par...

  19. Broad absorption line (BAL) quasars as a class of low luminosity AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Roskowinski, C; Gawronski, M

    2015-01-01

    Broad absorption lines seen in some quasars prove the existence of ionized plasma outflows from the accretion disk. Outflows together with powerful jets are important feedback processes. Understanding physics behind BAL outflows might be a key to comprehend Galaxy Evolution as a whole. First radio-loud BAL quasar was discovered in 1997 and this discovery has opened new possibilities for studies of the BAL phenomena, this time on the basis of radio emission. However, information about the radio structures, orientation and age of BAL quasars is still very limited due to weak radio emission and small sizes of these objects. Our high-resolution radio survey of a sample of BAL quasars aims to increase our knowledge about these objects. In this article, we present some conclusions arising from our research.

  20. Powerful Activity in the Bright Ages. I. A Visible/IR Survey of High Redshift 3C Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hilbert, Bryan; Kotyla, JohnPaul; Tremblay, Grant R; Stanghellini, Carlo; Sparks, William B; Baum, Stefi A; Capetti, Alessandro; Macchetto, F Duccio; Miley, George K; O'Dea, Christopher P; Perlman, Eric S; Quillen, Alice C

    2016-01-01

    We present new rest frame UV and visible observations of 22 high-redshift (1 < z < 2.5) 3C radio galaxies and QSOs obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. Using a custom data reduction strategy in order to assure the removal of cosmic rays, persistence signal, and other data artifacts, we have produced high-quality science-ready images of the targets and their local environments. We observe targets with regions of UV emission suggestive of active star formation. In addition, several targets exhibit highly distorted host galaxy morphologies in the rest frame visible images. Photometric analyses reveals that brighter QSOs tend to be generally redder than their dimmer counterparts. Using emission line fluxes from the literature, we estimate that emission line contamination is relatively small in the rest frame UV images for the QSOs. Using archival VLA data, we have also created radio map overlays for each of our targets, allowing for analysis of the optical ...

  1. Correlations between different line-forming regions in quasar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Hamann, Fred; Lundgren, Britt

    2017-01-01

    The early stage of massive galaxy evolution can involve outflows driven by a starburst or a central quasar plus cold mode accretion (infall) adding to the mass build-up in the galaxies. We are using SDSS-BOSS DR12 database to study the nature of infall and outflows in quasar environments by examining the relationships of their narrow absorption lines (NALs) at positive and negative velocity shifts to other quasar properties such as their broad absorption line (BAL) outflows, emission line characteristics, radio-loudness, and reddening by dust. We also test for extreme high-velocity NAL outflows (with speeds 0.1-0.2c) based on relationships to low-speed NALs and quasar properties, and we perform detailed analyses of particular cases of rich multi-component NAL complexes that might result from high-speed quasar outflows shredding and dispersing interstellar clouds in the host galaxies. Our results show that low-velocity NALs and rich NAL complexes correlate strongly with BALs, suggesting a physical relationship. Infalling systems are less common in quasars with BALs, suggesting that BAL outflows can halt or disrupt gas accretion. The extreme high-velocity NALs (at 0.1-0.2c) show a weak relationship to BALs and a strong dependence on low-velocity NALs, indicating that a significant fraction of these systems is ejected from the quasars (and are *not* unrelated intervening clouds). We find no correlations between radio flux and low-velocity NALs, infalling systems, or rich complexes, which indicates that none of these features are closely tied to quasar radio properties. We analyze the relationship of the N V/C IV line strengths (a possible abundance/metallicity probe) in emission versus absorption lines and find no correlation between them.

  2. First `Winged' and `X'-shaped Radio Source Candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.

    2007-01-22

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies (17 from our own census of the literature) show an additional pair of low surface brightness ''wings'', thus forming an overall ''X''-shaped appearance. The origin of the wings in these radio sources is unclear. They may be the result of back-flowing plasma from the currently active radio lobes into an asymmetric medium surrounding the active nucleus, which would make these ideal systems in which to study thermal/non-thermal plasma interactions in extragalactic radio sources. Another possibility is that the wings are the aging radio lobes left over after a (rapid) realignment of the central supermassive black-hole/accretion disk system due perhaps to a merger. Generally, these models are not well tested; with the small number of known examples, previous works focused on detailed case studies of selected sources with little attempt at a systematic study of a large sample. Using the VLA-FIRST survey database, we are compiling a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources for such studies. As a first step toward this goal, an initial sample of 100 new candidate objects of this type are presented in this paper. The search process is described, optical identifications from available literature data, and basic radio data are presented. From the limited resolution FIRST images ({approx} 5''), we can already confidently classify a sufficient number of these objects as having the characteristic wing lengths >80% of the active lobes to more than double the number of known X-shaped radio sources. We have also included as candidates, radio sources with shorter wings (<80% wing to lobe length ratios), or simply ''winged'' sources, as it is probable that projection effects are important. Finally, among the candidates are four quasars (z=0.37 to 0.84), and several have morphologies suggestive of Fanaroff-Riley type-I (low-power) radio galaxies. While followup

  3. A rare example of low surface-brightness radio lobes in a gas-rich early-type galaxy: the story of NGC 3998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Bradley S.; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Nyland, Kristina; Serra, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We study the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3998. This galaxy is known to host a low-power radio AGN with a kpc-size one-sided jet and a large, nearly polar H i disc. It is therefore a good system to study to understand the relation between the availability of cold-gas and the triggering of AGNs in ga

  4. Changing Look Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul J.; MacLeod, Chelsea; Anderson, Scott F.; Eracleous, Michael; Ruan, John J.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Accretion onto black holes (BH) illuminates fascinating physics from the stellar mass BHs in Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) to the supermassive black holes (SMBH) in Seyferts and quasars. Alas, BH accretion regions are too compact to be spatially resolved. Temporal changes in XRB spectral states have gone a long way to unravel the accretion physics in XRBs, and suggest powerful theoretical and observational analogies to quasars. However, simple mass scaling to SMBHs suggests impractically long timescales (millenia) for accretion state transitions in quasars. However, large spectral state changes in quasars have now been detected that both inform and invigorate debates about accretion theory and the nature of historical quasar classes (e.g., Type 1 vs Type 2). In the last couple of years, a dozen luminous "changing-look quasars" (CLQs) were discovered to exhibit strong, persistent changes in luminosity, accompanied by the dramatic emergence or disappearance of broad emission-line (BEL) components. The availability of repeat spectroscopy for large samples of quasars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its ongoing Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) now extend this rare and remarkable phenomenon to regimes of luminosity and redshift that overlap the huge cosmological samples of quasars in the SDSS. We review the current understanding of these events, and upcoming possibilities for their detection, characterization and modeling.

  5. Decline of the space density of quasars between z=2 and z=4

    CERN Document Server

    Vigotti, M; Benn, C R; De Zotti, G; Fanti, R; Serrano, J I G; Mack, K H; Holt, J

    2003-01-01

    We define a new complete sample of 13 optically-luminous radio quasars M_AB(1450 Angstrom) 25.7 with redshift 3.8 < z < 4.5, obtained by cross-correlating the FIRST radio survey and the APM catalogue of POSS-I. We measure the space density to be 1.0 +/- 0.3 /Gpc^3, a factor 1.9 +/- 0.7 smaller than the space density of similar quasars at z=2. Using a new measurement of the radio-loud fraction of quasars we find that at z=4 the total space density of quasars with M_AB(1450 Angstrom) < -26.9 is 7.4 +/- 2.6/Gpc^3. This is a factor 1.8 +/- 0.8 less than the space density at z=2, found by the 2dF quasar survey. This (z=2)/(z=4) ratio, consistent with that of the radio-loud quasars, is significantly different from the ratio of about 10 found for samples including lower-luminosity quasars. This suggests that the decline of the space density beyond z=2 is slower for optically-luminous quasars than for less-luminous ones.

  6. Gravitational lensing of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Eigenbrod, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The universe, in all its richness, diversity and complexity, is populated by a myriad of intriguing celestial objects. Among the most exotic of them are gravitationally lensed quasars. A quasar is an extremely bright nucleus of a galaxy, and when such an object is gravitationally lensed, multiple images of the quasar are produced – this phenomenon of cosmic mirage can provide invaluable insights on burning questions, such as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. After presenting the basics of modern cosmology, the book describes active galactic nuclei, the theory of gravitational lensing, and presents a particular numerical technique to improve the resolution of astronomical data. The book then enters the heart of the subject with the description of important applications of gravitational lensing of quasars, such as the measurement of the famous Hubble constant, the determination of the dark matter distribution in galaxies, and the observation of the mysterious inner parts of quasars with much higher r...

  7. High-Redshift Quasars at the Highest Resolution: VSOP Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, S.; Gurvits, L. I.; Lobanov, A. P.; Schilizzi, R. T.; Paragi, Z.

    2009-08-01

    We studied the radio structure of high-redshift (z>3) quasars with VSOP at 1.6 and 5 GHz. These sources are the most distant objects ever observed with Space VLBI, at rest-frame frequencies up to ˜25 GHz. Here we give an account of the observations and briefly highlight the most interesting cases and results. These observations allowed us, among other things, to estimate the mass of the central black holes powering these quasars, to identify large misalignments between the milli-arcsecond (mas) and sub-mas scale radio structures, and to detect apparent superluminal motion at sub-mas scale.

  8. Is optical Fe II emission related to the soft X-ray properties of quasars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin; Mchardy, Ian

    1987-01-01

    Radio-quiet quasars generally show broad, blended multiplets of Fe II emission in their optical and UV spectra. Radio-loud quasars also show UV Fe II emission, but their optical Fe II emission is generally weaker. No satisfactory theory connecting the generation of Fe II and radio emission has been found to explain this effect. A second, well-established distinction between the two clases of quasar is in their X-ray properties: radio-loud quasars are more X-ray luminous, and recent results have shown that they also have systematically flatter soft X-ray slopes. Here it is proposed that the second effect causes the first; i.e., that the primary factor controlling the optical Fe II emission is the soft X-ray spectrum. This proposition is supported by X-ray and optical data for nine quasars, which shows a correlation between the soft X-ray slope and the strength of the optical Fe II emission. One of these quasars (1803+676) is radio-quiet, and yet its optical spectrum shows no evidence for Fe II emission. This quasar is also unusual in that it has a flat X-ray spectrum. This further supports the proposal that the X-ray spectrum is important in determining the relative strengths of UV and optical Fe II emission.

  9. A large sample of Kohonen-selected SDSS quasars with weak emission lines: selection effects and statistical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Meusinger, H

    2014-01-01

    We performed a search for WLQs in the spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 based on Kohonen self-organising maps for nearly 10^5 quasar spectra. The final sample consists of 365 quasars and includes in particular a subsample of 46 WLQs with equivalent widths W(MgII) 1500 A. The variability in the optical and UV is relatively low, even taking the variability-luminosity anti-correlation into account. The percentage of radio detected quasars and of core-dominant radio sources is significantly higher than for the control sample, whereas the mean radio-loudness is lower. The properties of our WLQ sample can be consistently understood assuming that it consists of a mix of quasars at the beginning of a stage of increased accretion activity and of beamed radio-quiet quasars. (Abstract modified to match the arXiv format)

  10. 30 GHz monitoring of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Ceglowski, Maciej; Pazderska, Bogna; Gawronski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Broad absorption line (BAL) quasars have been studied for over thirty years. Yet it is still unclear why and when we observe broad absorption lines in quasars. Is this phenomenon caused by geometry or is it connected with the evolution process? Variability of the BAL quasars, if present, can give us information about their orientation, namely it can indicate whether they are oriented more pole-on. Using the Torun 32-metre dish equipped with the One Centimetre Receiver Array (OCRA) we have started a monitoring campaign of a sample of compact radio-loud BAL quasars. This 30 GHz variability monitoring program supplements the high-resolution interferometric observations of these objects we have carried out with the EVN and VLBA.

  11. Red quasars not so dusty

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, C R; Carballo, R; González-Serrano, J I; Sánchez, S F

    1997-01-01

    Webster et al (1995) claimed that up to 80% of QSOs may be obscured by dust. They inferred the presence of this dust from the remarkably broad range of B-K optical-infrared colours of a sample of flat-spectrum PKS radio QSOs. If such dust is typical of QSOs, it will have rendered invisible most of those which would otherwise been have detected by optical surveys. We used the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma to obtain K infrared images of 54 B3 radio quasars selected at low frequency (mainly steep-spectrum), and we find that although several have very red optical-infrared colours, most of these can be attributed to an excess of light in K rather than a dust-induced deficit in B. We present evidence that some of the infrared excess comes from the light of stars in the host galaxy (some, as previously suggested, comes from synchrotron radiation associated with flat-spectrum radio sources). The B-K colours of the B3 QSOs provide no evidence for a large reddened population. Either the Webster et al QSOs are ...

  12. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  13. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  14. Quasars: A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Reports on some of the discoveries over the last quarter century regarding quasars including spectra and energy sources, formation and evolution, and cosmological probes. Describes some of the fundamental mysteries that remain. (CW)

  15. The jet-disc connection: evidence for a reinterpretation in radio loud and radio quiet active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Garofalo, David

    2013-01-01

    To constrain models of the jet-disc connection, we explore Eddington ratios reported in Foschini (2011) and interpret them in relation to the values in Sikora et al. across the active galactic nuclei population from radio loud quasars, their flat spectrum radio quasar subclass, the recently discovered gamma-ray loud narrow-line type 1 Seyfert galaxies, Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies and radio quiet quasars of the Palomar Green survey. While appeal to disc truncation in radiatively inefficient flow appears to explain the observed inverse relation between radio loudness and Eddington ratio in radio loud and radio quiet quasars, FR I objects, scale invariance and recent data on powerful jets in narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies offer compelling arguments in favour of a reinterpretaion of the jet-disc connection.

  16. X-ray emission from red quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A dozen red quasars were observed with the Einstein Observatory in order to determine their X-ray properties. The observations show that for all these sources, the infrared-optical continuum is so steep that when extrapolated to higher frequencies, it passes orders of magnitude below the measured X-ray flux. The X-ray emission is better correlated with the radio than with the infrared flux, suggesting a connection between the two. By applying the synchrotron-self-Compton model to the data, it is found that the infrared-optical region has a size of 0.01 pc or more and a magnetic field more than 0.1 G, values considerably different than are found in the radio region. Unlike other quasars, the ionizing continuum is dominated by the X-ray emission. The peculiar line ratios seen in these objects can be understood with a photoionization model, provided that the photon to gas density ratio (ionization parameter) is an order of magnitude less than in typical quasars.

  17. The High-Redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Paterno-Mahler, R; Ashby, M L N; Brodwin, M; Wing, J D; Anand, G; Decker, B; Golden-Marx, E

    2016-01-01

    We present 238 high-redshift galaxy cluster candidates based on galaxy overdensities in the Spitzer/IRAC imaging of the fields surrounding 646 bent, double-lobed radio sources drawn from the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey. The COBRA sources were chosen as objects in the VLA FIRST survey that lack optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to a limit of $m_r=22$, making them likely to lie at high redshift. This is confirmed by our observations: the redshift distribution of COBRA sources with estimated redshifts peaks near $z=1$, and extends out to $z\\approx3$. Cluster candidates were identified by comparing our sources to a background field and searching for overdensities. Forty-one of these sources are quasars with known spectroscopic redshifts, which may be tracers of some of the most distant clusters known.

  18. Weak hard X-ray emission from two broad absorption line quasars observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick absorption or intrinsic X-ray weakness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus ...

  19. The Dynamics of Radio Galaxies and Double–Double Radio Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. Konar; M. Jamrozy; M. J. Hardcastle; J. H. Croston; S. Nandi; D. J. Saikia; J. Machalski

    2011-12-01

    Relativistic and magnetized plasma ejected by radio loud AGNs through jets form the diffuse lobes of radio galaxies. The radiating particles (electron/electron–positron) in lobes emit in radio via the synchrotron process and X-ray via inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons. The thermal environment around radio galaxies emits X-rays via the thermal bremsstrahlung process. By combining information from these processes we can measure physical conditions in and around the radio lobes and thus study the dynamics of radio galaxies, including double–double radio galaxies.

  20. The double quasar 0957+561: examination of the gravitational lens hypothesis using the very large array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, P E; Roberts, D H; Burke, B F

    1980-05-02

    A full 12-hour synthesis at 6-centimeter wavelength with the Very Large Array confirms the major features previously reported for the double quasar 0957+561. In addition, the existence of radio jets apparently associated with both quasars is demonstrated. Gravitational lens models are now favored on the basis of recent optical observations, and the radio jets place severe constraints on such models. Further radio observations of the double quasar are needed to establish the expected relative time delay in variations between the images.

  1. TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 QUASARS IN THE MID-INFRARED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Ridgway

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 or \\obscured" AGN have long been identi ed at low AGN luminosities (e.g. Seyfert 2s or through their radio luminosities (e.g. radio galaxies. But radio-quiet quasars (RQQs are many times more common than radio-loud quasars, and it's therefore unsurprising that recent searches have revealed that radio-quiet quasar 2s also form a signi cant population. Finding the numbers, properties, and redshift distribution of quasar 2s will be very important to resolving questions about the formation and co-evolution of black holes and galaxies. We have selected a sample of Type 2 and Type 1 quasars matched in their mid-infrared luminosity from the Spitzer First Look Survey by selecting on their mid-infrared dust emission properties (as measured by Spitzer IRAC photometry. This emission provides a distinctive signature of AGN activity but should not be a cted by orientation or torus opening angle. We have obtained mid-infrared IRS spectroscopy of these samples to study star formation activity in the host galaxies and the dust environments of the AGN, using measurements of the PAH features, the shape of the mid-infrared SED, and the equivalent width of the silicate features at 10 microns. We nd that the quasar 2s have more diverse mid-IR spectral properties, and that obscuration of the AGN is linked to star formation activity in the host.

  2. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: Twelfth data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Aubourg, Éric; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Armengaud, Éric; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Hamann, Fred; Strauss, Michael A.; Albareti, Franco D.; Bovy, Jo; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Niel Brandt, W.; Brusa, Marcella; Buchner, Johannes; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Dwelly, Tom; Fan, Xiaohui; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hall, Patrick B.; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMahon, Richard G.; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Salvato, Mara; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H.; Zhu, Liu

    2017-01-01

    We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi [z = 2] half maximum (FWHM) larger than 500 km s-1 or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. The catalog also includes previously known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 297 301 quasars (272 026 are new discoveries since the beginning of SDSS-III) detected over 9376 deg2 with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with z > 2.15 (184 101, of which 167 742 are new discoveries) is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z > 2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (C iv, C iii], Mg ii). The catalog identifies 29 580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and Palomar Transient Factory multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra, covering the wavelength region 3600-10 500 Å at a spectral resolution in the range 1300 < R < 2500, can be retrieved from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server. We also provide a supplemental list of an additional 4841 quasars that have been identified serendipitously outside of

  3. Unified Schemes for Radio-loud AGN: Recent Results

    OpenAIRE

    Padovani, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    After briefly summarizing the main tenets of unified schemes of Active Galactic Nuclei, I review some recent results in the field of unification of radio-loud sources, both for the low-luminosity (BL Lacs and Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies) and high-luminosity (radio quasars and Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies) populations.

  4. Probing Quasar Winds Using Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, Christopher S.; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael; Roberts, Amber; Ganguly, Rajib; Misawa, Toru; Muzahid, Sowgat

    2017-01-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole. Furthermore, outflows potentially have a role in providing feedback to the galaxy, and halting star formation and infall of gas. The geometry and density of these outflows remain unknown, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. Having searched ultraviolet spectra at both high redshift (VLT/UVES; 1.4physically associated with) the quasar. We identify intrinsic NALs with a wide range of properties, including ejection velocity, coverage fraction, and ionization level. We also consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar properties (optical, radio and X-ray fluxes), and find that radio properties and quasar orientation are influential in determining if a quasar is likely to host an intrinsic system. We find that there is a continuum of properties within the intrinsic NAL sample, rather than discrete families, ranging from partially covered CIV systems with black Lya and with a separate low ionization gas phase to partially covered NV systems with partially covered Lya and without detected low ionization gas. Additionally, we construct a model describing the spatial distributions, geometries, and varied ionization structures of intrinsic NALs.

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothée; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: twelfth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Aubourg, Éric; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Armengaud, Éric; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Hamann, Fred; Strauss, Michael A; Albareti, Franco D; Bovy, Jo; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brandt, W Niel; Brusa, Marcella; Buchner, Johannes; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A C; Dwelly, Tom; Fan, Xiaohui; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hall, Patrick B; Jian, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMahon, Richard G; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Salvato, Mara; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H; Zhu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the SDSS-III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15 is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z>2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 29,580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and PTF multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properti...

  7. Quasar Absorption Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  8. Small jets in radio-loud hot DOGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, C. J.; Whittle, M.; Trapp, A.; Patil, P.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Thorp, R.; Lacy, M.; Kimball, A. E.; Blain, A.; Jones, S.; Kim, M.

    2016-02-01

    We address the impact of young radio jets on the ISM and star formation in a sample of radiatively efficient, highly obscured, radio AGN with look back times that place them near the peak of the galaxy and BH building era, z˜ 1-3. By selecting systems with a high mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity we aim to identify radiatively efficient (``quasar-mode'' or ``radiative-mode") AGN in a peak fueling phase, and by selecting compact radio sources we favor young or re-generated radio jets which are confined within the hosts. By selecting AGN which are very red through the optical-MIR we favor highly obscured systems likely to have been recently merger-triggered and still in the pre-blow-out phase of AGN feedback into the surrounding ISM. ALMA imaging at 345 GHz of 49 sources has revealed that they are accretion dominated, relative to star formation, with luminosities reaching 1014 L⊙. Extensive VLA imaging at 8-10 GHz in both A-array and B-array for 155 sources reveals that the majority of these powerful radio systems are compact on < 2-5 kpc scales while some have resolved structures on 3-25 kpc scales, and a small number have giant radio lobes on hundreds of kpc scales. The majority of the GHz range radio SEDs are typical of optically thin synchrotron, however for the 34 sources with data at more than 2 frequencies, 40 % are likely to be CSS, GPS, or HFP sources. VLBA imaging of 62 sources reveals varied morphologies, from unresolved sources to complex multicomponent 1-10 mas scale structures. Data from ALMA, VLA, and VLBA

  9. Astrometric Redshifts for Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaczmarczik, Michael C; Mehta, Sajjan S; Schlegel, David J

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes differential chromatic refraction (DCR), whereby objects imaged at different optical/UV wavelengths are observed at slightly different positions in the plane of the detector. Strong spectral features induce changes in the effective wavelengths of broad-band filters that are capable of producing significant positional offsets with respect to standard DCR corrections. We examine such offsets for broad-emission-line (type 1) quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spanning 0quasar spectrum with the SDSS bandpasses as a function of redshift and airmass. This astrometric information can be used to break degeneracies in photometric redshifts of quasars (or other emission-line sources) and, for extreme cases, may be suitable for determining "astrometric redshifts". On the SDSS's southern equatorial stripe, where it is pos...

  10. Lensed Quasar Hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C Y; Rix, H W; Keeton, C R; Falco, E E; Kochanek, C S; Lehár, J; McLeod, B A; Peng, Chien Y.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Keeton, Charles R.; Falco, Emilio E.; Kochanek, Chris S.; Lehar, Joseph; Leod, Brian A. Mc

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational lensing assists in the detection of quasar hosts by amplifying and distorting the host light away from the unresolved quasar core images. We present the results of HST observations of 30 quasar hosts at redshifts 1 1.7 is a factor of 3--6 higher than the local value. But, depending on the stellar content the ratio may decline at z>4 (if E/S0-like), flatten off to 6--10 times the local value (if Sbc-like), or continue to rise (if Im-like). We infer that galaxy bulge masses must have grown by a factor of 3--6 over the redshift range 3>z>1, and then changed little since z~1. This suggests that the peak epoch of galaxy formation for massive galaxies is above z~1. We also estimate the duty cycle of luminous AGNs at z>1 to be ~1%, or 10^7 yrs, with sizable scatter.

  11. Black holes, quasars, and the universe /2nd edition/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Topics of astronomy are discussed in terms of black holes, galaxies, quasars, and models of the universe. Black holes are approached through consideration of stellar evolution, white dwarfs, supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, the event horizon, Cygnus X-1, white holes, and worm holes. Attention is also given to radio waves from high speed electrons, the radiation emitted by quasars, active galaxies, galactic energy sources, and interpretations of the redshift. Finally, the life cycle of the universe is deliberated, along with the cosmic time scale, evidence for the Big Bang, and the future of the universe.

  12. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) I: First Phase Observations and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Induk; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Eugene; Shim, Hyunjin; Richards, Gordon T; Edge, Alastair C; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2008-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) as well as its basic observational setup. Previous and current large-area surveys have been successful in identifying many quasars, but they could have missed bright quasars due to their survey design. In order to help complete the census of bright quasars, we have performed spectroscopic observations of new bright quasar candidates selected from various methods based on optical colors, near-infrared colors, radio, and X-ray data. In 2005/2006, we observed 55 bright quasar candidates using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. We identify 14 quasars/Seyferts from our observation, including an optically bright quasar with i=14.98 mag at z=0.092 (SDSS J003236.59-091026.2). Non-quasar/Seyfert objects are found to be mostly stars, among which there are five M-type stars and one cataclysmic variable. Our result ...

  13. Dust in 3CR radio galaxies: On the FR 1 - FR 2 difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S. A. H.; Haas, M.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Klaas, U.; Meisenheimer, K.; Chini, R.; Albrecht, M.

    2004-11-01

    We compare three 3CR samples of 11 FR 1 galaxies, 17 FR 2 galaxies and 18 lobe-dominated quasars contained in the ISO Data Archive. In contrast to the powerful FR 2 galaxies with edge-brightened lobes, the low radio power FR 1 galaxies in our sample do not exhibit any high MIR or FIR dust luminosity, which is typical for a buried, intrinsically more luminous AGN. This consolidates the fact already inferred from optical studies that their AGNs have only a relatively low luminosity. Also the FR 1 galaxies show a high FIR/MIR luminosity ratio, compared to quasars, suggesting that their FIR luminosity is substantially powered by the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) of the giant elliptical hosts. Finally, we discuss the FR 1 - FR 2 morphological dichotomy. FR 1 galaxies do not have more interstellar matter (ISM) than FR 2s as traced - on the large scale - by the cool FIR emitting dust and - in the nuclear region - by the warm MIR emitting dust. Due to the lack of central gas we suggest that the black holes of our FR 1 galaxies are fed at a lower accretion rate than those of the FR 2 galaxies. Based on observations with the Infrared Space Observatory ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  14. Discovery of the low-energy cutoff in a powerful giant radio galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, K; Crawford, C; Erlund, M; Celotti, A; Blundell, Katherine; Fabian, Andy; Crawford, Carolin; Erlund, Mary; Celotti, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    The lobes of radio galaxies and quasars, fed by jets and hotspots, represent a significant, and currently ill-constrained, source of energy input into the inter-galactic medium (IGM). How much energy is input into the IGM depends on the minimum energy to which the power-law distribution of relativistic particles is accelerated in the hotspots. This has hitherto been unknown to within three orders of magnitude. We present direct evidence for the discovery of this low-energy cutoff in the lobe of a Mpc-sized radio galaxy via the existence of extended X-ray emission, inverse-Compton scattered from aged radio plasma, and its separation by 80kpc from regions containing freshly accelerated plasma from the hotspot. The low-energy cutoff of gamma ~ 10^4 in the hotspot is higher than previously thought, but reconciles discrepancies with magnetic field estimates which had been systematically lower than equipartition values. The inverse Compton scattering of the spent synchrotron plasma is at the expense of cosmic micro...

  15. Quasars : The Observational Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Shields, Greg; Gaskell, Martin; Boroson, Todd; Laor, Ari; Hawkins, Michael; Pronik, Vladimir; Sergeev, Sergey; Dultzin, Deborah; Grupe, Dirk; Richards, Gordon; Morganti, Raffaella; Volvach, Aleksander; Zamfir, Sebastian; Falcke, Heino; Körding, Elmar; Elvis, Martin; Turner, Tracey Jane; Kembhavi, Ajit; Foschini, Luigi; Neshpor, Yuri; Franceschini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The empirical basis of quasar astronomy can be overawing especially in the twenty-first century. A first source of intricacy involves the nomenclature that has evolved to label the multifold phenomenological manifestations now united under the umbrella of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A further com

  16. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  17. A Quasar Turns On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has discovered a quasar the brightly-shining, active nucleus of a galaxy abruptly turning on in what appears to be the fastest such transition ever seen in such an object.A Rapid TransitionQuasars are expected to show variations in brightness on timescales of hours to millions of years, but its not often that we get to study their major variability in real time! So far, weve discovered only a dozen changing-look quasars active galactic nuclei that exhibit major changes in their spectral class and brightness between observations. Roughly half of these were quasars that turned on and half were quasars that turned off, generally on timescales of maybe 5 or 10 years.The dramatic change in spectrum of iPTF 16bco between the archival SDSS data from 2004 (bottom) and the follow-up spectroscopy from Keck 2+DEIMOS in 2016 (top). [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]In June 2016, however, a team of scientists led by Suvi Gezari (University of Maryland) discovered iPTF 16bco, a nuclear transient that wasnt there the last time Palomar checked in 2012. A search through archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX data in addition to some follow-up X-ray imaging and spectroscopic observations told the team what they needed to know: iPTF 16bco is a quasar that only just turned on within the 500 days preceding the iPTF observations.This source, in fact, is a 100-million-solar-mass black hole located at the center of a galaxy at a redshift of z= 0.237. In just over a year, the source changed classification from a galaxy with weak narrow-line emission to a quasar with characteristic strong, broad emission lines and a ten-fold increase in continuum brightness! What caused this sudden transition?Instabilities at Fault?iPTF 16bco and the other known changing-look quasars with disappearing (red circles) and appearing (blue circles) broad-line emission. [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]Gezari and collaborators used the large number of recent

  18. Is the Long-Term Persistency of Circular Polarisation due to the Constant Helicity of the Magnetic Fields in Rotating Quasar Engines?

    OpenAIRE

    Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2003-01-01

    Many compact radio sources like quasars, blazars, radio galaxies, and micro-quasars emit circular polarisation (CP) with surprising temporal persistent handedness. We propose that the CP is caused by Faraday conversion of linear polarisation synchrotron light which propagates along a line-of-sight through helical magnetic fields. Jet outflows from radio galaxies should have the required magnetic helicity in the emission region due to the magnetic torque of the accretion disc. Also advection d...

  19. A VLBI survey of compact Broad Absorption Lines (BAL) quasars with BALnicity Index BI=0

    CERN Document Server

    Ceglowski, M; Roskowinski, C

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution observations, using both the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.7-GHz, and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 and 8.4-GHz to image radio structures of 14 compact sources classified as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars based on the absorption index (AI). All source but one were resolved, with the majority showing core-jet morphology typical for radio-loud quasars. We discuss in details the most interesting cases. The high radio luminosities and small linear sizes of the observed objects indicate they are strong young AGNs. Nevertheless, the distribution of the radio-loudness parameter, log(Ri), of a larger sample of AI quasars shows that the objects observed by us constitute the most luminous, small subgroup of AI population. Additionally we report that for the radio-loudness parameter, the distribution of AI quasars and those selected by using the traditional balnicity index (BI), BI quasars differ significantly. Strong absorption is connected with the lower log(Ri), and thus ...

  20. Detecting Relativistic X-ray Jets in High-Redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    McKeough, Kathryn; Cheung, C C; Stawarz, Lukasz; Kashyap, Vinay L; Stein, Nathan; Stampoulis, Vasileios; van Dyk, David A; Wardle, J F C; Lee, N P; Harris, D E; Schwartz, D A; Donato, Davide; Maraschi, Laura; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray images of a sample of 11 quasars that are known to contain kiloparsec scale radio jets. The sample consists of five high-redshift (z >= 3.6) flat-spectrum radio quasars, and six intermediate redshift (2.1 < z < 2.9) quasars. The dataset includes four sources with integrated steep radio spectra and seven with flat radio spectra. A total of 25 radio jet features are present in this sample. We apply a Bayesian multi-scale image reconstruction method to detect and measure the X-ray emission from the jets. We compute deviations from a baseline model that does not include the jet, and compare observed X-ray images with those computed with simulated images where no jet features exist. This allows us to compute p-value upper bounds on the significance that an X- ray jet is detected in a pre-determined region of interest. We detected 12 of the features unambiguously, and an additional 6 marginally. We also find residual emission in the cores of 3 quasars and in the background of 1 quasar...

  1. A robust derivation of the tight relationship of radio core dominance to inclination angle in high redshift 3CRR sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that, in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), the core radio flux density can be normalized to the flux density of the extended lobe emission to infer the orientation of a radio source. However very little is known about the reliability and precision of this method, and we are unaware of any robust conversion recipe to infer the inclination from the core dominance. Investigating whether or not the radio core dominance parameter R separates the quasars from the radio-galaxies in the $z \\ge$~1 3CRR catalog, we found excellent agreement of R with optical type, infrared flux ratios and optical polarization. This indicates that probably both R and optical classification are very good orientation indicators, and the unified model is strongly predictive for these objects. The relative number densities indicate half-opening angles close to 60$^\\circ$, as expected from large surveys. The separations of optical types according to radio core dominance as well as NIR/MIR ratios, which are essentially p...

  2. Quasar evolution and gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, A.; Giallongo, E.; Vagnetti, F.; Messina, A.

    1983-06-01

    The paper presents three convergent results concerning the sources in theactive nuclei of quasars and radio galaxies that derive their power fromconversion of gravitational energy. We first derive, for several leading modelsbased on liberation of gravitational energy from mass in a compact supply, thelaws governing the secular change L of the primary power driving the individual sources, and identify their common and key property: L increases, and eventually decreases, linearly or faster with the power itself, so that the associated time scales t/sub s/ = L/Vertical BarLVertical Bar obey dt/sub s/, (L)/dL<0. We then describe a general statistical framework to populate with sources the (luminosity, cosmic time)-plane, based on a continuity equation that embodies a given L. We show how the main features of the populations depend primarily on L, while the memory of the initial details is easily erased. With L as derived above, we obtain basic evolutions of the density (L>0) and of the luminosity (L<0) type, with a global differential character. Finally we compute the full evolution functions, comprising a brightening (L>0) and a dimming (L<0) phase, corresponding to three such models. Sub-Eddington accretion onto a massive black hole from a star cluster that self-destroys by collisions is close to reproduce the general course of the empirical models for the optical QSO population.

  3. Clusters of galaxies associated with quasars. I. 3C 206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, E.; Yee, H.K.C.; Green, R.F.; Kinman, T.D. (Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA); Montreal Universite (Canada); Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Multislit spectroscopy and three-color CCD photometry of the galaxies in the cluster associated with the quasar 3C 206 (PKS 0837-12) at z = 0.198 are presented. This cluster is the richest environment of any low-redshift quasar observed in an Abell richness class 1 cluster. The cluster has a very flattened structure and a very concentrated core about the quasar. Most of the galaxies in this field have colors and luminosities consistent with normal galaxies at this redshift. The background-corrected blue fraction of galaxies is consistent with values for other rich clusters. The existence of several blue galaxies in the concentrated cluster core is an anomaly for a region of such high galaxy density, however, suggesting the absence of a substantial intracluster medium. This claim is supported by the Fanaroff-Riley (1974) class II morphology of the radio source. The velocity dispersion calculated from 11 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members is 500 + or - 110 km/s, which is slightly lower than the average for Abell class 1 clusters. A high frequency of interaction between the quasar host galaxy and cluster core members at low relative velocities, and a low intracluster gas pressure, may comprise a favorable environment for quasar activity. The properties of the cluster of galaxies associated with 3C 206 are consistent with this model. 59 refs.

  4. Thermal Emission from Warm Dust in the Most Distant Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, R; Wagg, J; Bertoldi, F; Walter, F; Menten, K M; Omont, A; Cox, P; Strauss, M A; Fan, X; Jiang, L; Schneider, D P

    2008-01-01

    We report new continuum observations of fourteen z~6 quasars at 250 GHz and fourteen quasars at 1.4 GHz. We summarize all recent millimeter and radio observations of the sample of the thirty-three quasars known with 5.7110^{12}L_{\\odot}), while the average L_{FIR}/L_{bol} ratio of the non-detections is consistent with that of the optically-selected PG quasars. The MAMBO detections also tend to have weaker Ly\\alpha emission than the non-detected sources. We discuss possible FIR dust heating sources, and critically assess the possibility of active star formation in the host galaxies of the z~6 quasars. The average star formation rate of the MAMBO non-detections is likely to be less than a few hundred M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, but in the strong detections, the host galaxy star formation is probably at a rate of \\gtrsim10^{3} M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, which dominates the FIR dust heating.

  5. Direct Microlensing-Reverberation Observations of the Intrinsic magnetic Structure of AGN in Different Spectral States: A Tale of Two Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Rudolph E; Robertson, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    We show how direct microlensing-reverberation analysis performed on two well-known Quasars (Q2237 - The Einstein Cross and Q0957 - The Twin) can be used to observe the inner structure of two quasars which are in significantly different spectral states. These observations allow us to measure the detailed internal structure of quasar Q2237 in a radio quiet high-soft state, and compare it to quasar Q0957 in a radio loud low-hard state. We find that the observed differences in the spectral states of these two quasars can be understood as being due to the location of the inner radii of their accretion disks relative to the co-rotation radii of rotating intrinsically magnetic supermassive compact objects in the centers of these quasars.

  6. Planck revealed bulk motion of Centaurus A lobes

    CERN Document Server

    De Paolis, F; Nucita, A A; Ingrosso, G; Kashin, A L; Khachatryan, H G; Mirzoyan, S; Yegorian, G; Jetzer, Ph; Qadir, A; Vetrugno, D

    2015-01-01

    Planck data towards the active galaxy Centaurus A are analyzed in the 70, 100 and 143 GHz bands. We find a temperature asymmetry of the northern radio lobe with respect to the southern one that clearly extends at least up to 5 degrees from the Cen A center and diminishes towards the outer regions of the lobes. That transparent parameter - the temperature asymmetry - thus has to carry a principal information, i.e. indication on the line-of-sight bulk motion of the lobes, while the increase of that asymmetry at smaller radii reveals the differential dynamics of the lobes as expected at ejections from the center.

  7. Unseen cosmos the universe in radio

    CERN Document Server

    Graham-Smith, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Radio telescopes have transformed our understanding of the Universe. Pulsars, quasars, Big Bang cosmology: all are discoveries of the new science of radio astronomy. Here, Francis Graham-Smith describes the birth, development, and maturity of radio astronomy, from the first discovery of cosmic radio waves to its present role as a major part of modern astronomy. Radio is part of the electromagnetic spectrum, covering infra-red, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma-rays, and Graham-Smith explains why it is that radio waves give us a unique view of the Universe. Tracing the development o

  8. Exploration of the Radio-Loud/Radio Quiet Dichotomy for QSO: Using Radio Morphology and 4D Eigenvector 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfir, Sebastian; Sulentic, J. W.; Marziani, P.; Dultzin, D.

    2007-12-01

    The reality of a RL/RQ Dichotomy for QSO remains an open problem. Recent studies not only provide us with contradictory results, but also display the confusion of comparing conclusions drawn on the basis of different views on "what means radio-loud"? We propose a definition of radio loudness based on three criteria (simultaneously applied): radio morphology, radio luminosity and radio-optical flux density ratio. Fanaroff-Riley II radio sources (FRIIs) are assumed to be the parent population of RL quasars, while the core dominated RL quasars are assumed to be preferentially aligned FRIIs. Orientation-unification then suggests the RQ-RL boundary is set by the least radio luminous FRII and by the lowest radio-optical ratio for an FRII. We also consider RL and RQ quasars in the context of a 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) Parameter Space that is defined independently of any radio measure. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data for 400+ QSO (z<0.7 and brighter than psf g =17.5), coupled with FIRST and NVSS radio surveys (1.4GHz), we show that classical RL sources distribute very differently from the RQ majority of QSO.

  9. Host galaxies of luminous quasars: population synthesis of optical off-axis spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Wold, I; Wolf, M J; Hooper, E J

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of a connection between AGN activity and galaxy evolution. To obtain further insight into this potentially important evolutionary phase, we analyse the properties of quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we present a population synthesis modeling technique for off-axis spectra, the results of which constrain host colour and the stellar ages of luminous quasars (M_V(nuc) 10^40 erg s^-1) quasars to be located in redder host galaxies in comparison to th eir less luminous radio counterparts. While the host colour and age of our radio luminous sample is in close proximity to the green valley, our radio faint sample is consistent with quiescent star-forming galaxies. However, further observations are needed to confirm these results. Finally, we discuss future applications for our technique on a larger sample of objects being obtained via SALT and WIYN telescope observing campaigns.

  10. Dust reddened quasars in first and UKIDSS: Beyond the tip of the iceberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Urrutia, Tanya [Leibniz Institut fr Astrophysik, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Lacy, Mark [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, Ashish; Graham, Matthew [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Urry, Meg [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Croom, Scott [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ge, Jian, E-mail: eglikman@middlebury.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a pilot survey to find dust-reddened quasars by matching the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) radio catalog to the UKIDSS near-infrared survey and using optical data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select objects with very red colors. The deep K-band limit provided by UKIDSS allows for finding more heavily reddened quasars at higher redshifts as compared with previous work using FIRST and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). We selected 87 candidates with K ≤ 17.0 from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS) First Data Release (DR1), which covers 190 deg{sup 2}. These candidates reach up to ∼1.5 mag below the 2MASS limit and obey the color criteria developed to identify dust-reddened quasars. We have obtained 61 spectroscopic observations in the optical and/or near-infrared, as well as classifications in the literature, and have identified 14 reddened quasars with E(B – V) > 0.1, including 3 at z > 2. We study the infrared properties of the sample using photometry from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer and find that infrared colors improve the efficiency of red quasar selection, removing many contaminants in an infrared-to-optical color-selected sample alone. The highest-redshift quasars (z ≳ 2) are only moderately reddened, with E(B – V) ∼ 0.2-0.3. We find that the surface density of red quasars rises sharply with faintness, comprising up to 17% of blue quasars at the same apparent K-band flux limit. We estimate that to reach more heavily reddened quasars (i.e., E(B – V) ≳ 0.5) at z > 2 and a depth of K = 17, we would need to survey at least ∼2.5 times more area.

  11. GBT Detection of Polarization-Dependent HI Absorption and HI Outflows in Local ULIRGs and Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L(sub 8 - 1000 micron) > 10(exp 12) solar L) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km/s in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the FIR-strong and FIR-weak quasars, respectively). We attribute this result to absorption of polarized continuum emission from these sources by foreground HI clouds. About 60% of the quasars displaying polarized spectra are radio-loud, far higher than the approx 10% observed in the general AGN population. This discrepancy suggests that radio jets play an important role in shaping the environments in these galaxies. These systems may represent a transition phase in the evolution of gas-rich mergers into "mature" radio galaxies.

  12. Quasars in the Cosmic Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Dultzin, Deborah; Richards, Gordon; Knapen, Johan; Shlosman, Isaac; Morganti, Raffaella; Falomo, Renato; Hawkins, Mike; Cavaliere, Alfonso; McLure, Ross; Shields, Greg; Netzer, Hagai; Proga, Daniel; Franceschini, Alberto; Fan, Xiaoui; Elvis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We now consider the environment of quasars in the widest possible sense, from the circumnuclear regions to very large scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs. The circumgalactic environment of nearby quasars has been widely studied since the late 1960s in an attempt to test its influence on the triggering

  13. Outshining the quasars at reionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, D.; Reeves, J.N.; Hjorth, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January......Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January...

  14. The High-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey: The Spitzer Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno-Mahler, R.; Blanton, E. L.; Brodwin, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Golden-Marx, E.; Decker, B.; Wing, J. D.; Anand, G.

    2017-07-01

    We present 190 galaxy cluster candidates (most at high redshift) based on galaxy overdensity measurements in the Spitzer/IRAC imaging of the fields surrounding 646 bent, double-lobed radio sources drawn from the Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) Survey. The COBRA sources were chosen as objects in the Very Large Array FIRST survey that lack optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to a limit of m r = 22, making them likely to lie at high redshift. This is confirmed by our observations: the redshift distribution of COBRA sources with estimated redshifts peaks near z = 1 and extends out to z≈ 3. Cluster candidates were identified by comparing our target fields to a background field and searching for statistically significant (≥slant 2σ ) excesses in the galaxy number counts surrounding the radio sources; 190 fields satisfy the ≥slant 2σ limit. We find that 530 fields (82.0%) have a net positive excess of galaxies surrounding the radio source. Many of the fields with positive excesses but below the 2σ cutoff are likely to be galaxy groups. Forty-one COBRA sources are quasars with known spectroscopic redshifts, which may be tracers of some of the most distant clusters known.

  15. Low-frequency High-resolution Radio Observations of the TeV-emitting Blazar SHBLJ001355.9-185406

    CERN Document Server

    Zywucka, Natalia; Jamrozy, Marek; Ostrowski, Michal; Stawarz, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the unification scheme of radio-loud active galactic nuclei, BL Lac objects and quasars are the beamed end-on counterparts of low-power (FRI) and high-power (FRII) radio galaxies, respectively. Some BL Lacs have been found to possess the FRII-type large-scale radio morphology, suggesting that the parent population of BL Lacs is a mixture of low- and high-power radio galaxies. This seems to apply only to `low frequency-peaked' BL Lacs, since all the `high frequency-peaked' BL Lacs studied so far were shown to host exclusively the FRI-type radio jets. While analyzing the NVSS survey maps of the TeV detected BL Lacs, we have however discovered that the high frequency-peaked object SHBL J001355.9-185406 is associated uniquely with the one-sided, arcmin-scale, and edge-brightened jet/lobe-like feature extending to the south-west from the blazar core. In order to investigate in detail the large-scale morphology of SHBL J001355.9-185406, we have performed low-frequency and high-resolution observa...

  16. A multi-wavelength survey of obscured and reddened quasars at the peak of galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    While in the nearby universe the unification model seems firmly established, we are now seeing hints that at the peak of quasar activity and black hole growth (z~2.5) both obscured and reddened quasars may represent not just a specific quasar orientation but instead a unique stage of quasar evolution. Our group has developed several observational techniques to identify obscured and highly reddened quasars at z~2.5 using a combination of the SDSS spectroscopy and WISE photometry. Our sample contains objects with some of the most extreme ionized gas velocities observed (> 5000 km/s), indicating wind speeds too large to be contained by the galaxy potential though they are radio quiet. I will present both our sample selection and initial results from multi-wavelength follow-up of this sample using near-infrared spectroscopy, Keck spectropolarimentry and the VLA to test the AGN unification model and search for evidence of galaxy-wide quasar winds. High levels of polarized light (reaching ~20% of the total continuum emission in some cases) and changes in the polarization fraction and position angle across emission lines may argue for the presence of dusty outflows in our objects. This is supported by evidence from stacking analysis in the radio that presents a correlation between the observed outflow speeds in ionized gas (as measured by [OIII]) and the radio luminosity—arguing for a wind origin for the radio emission in these objects as well. The most extreme of these objects may thus represent the “blowout phase” of AGN evolution that proceeds or accompanies the cessation of star formation in the host galaxy due to the effects of radiatively-driven quasar driven winds.

  17. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  18. Quasars Probing Quasars VI. Excess HI Absorption Within One Proper Mpc of z~2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Bovy, Jo; Djorgovski, S G; Ellison, Sara L; Lau, Marie Wingyee; Martin, Crystal L; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H R; Simcoe, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the HI Lya absorption transverse to luminous, z~2 quasars at proper separations of 30kpc 17.3) at separations R<200kpc, which decreases to ~20% at R~1Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function xi_QA(r) = (r/r_0)^gamma with a large correlation length r_0 = 12.5+2.7-1.4 Mpc/h (comoving) and gamma = 1.68+0.14-0.30. The HI absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos Mhalo~10^12.5 Msun at z~2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased towards producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence th...

  19. Multifrequency observations of the superluminal quasar 3C 345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.; Roellig, T. P. L.; Bregman, J. D.; Witteborn, F. C.; Lester, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the continuum properties of the superluminal quasar 3C 345, on the basis of radio, optical, IR, and X-ray frequency monitorings, as well as by means of simultaneous multifrequency spectra extending from the radio through the X-ray bands. Radio outbursts, which appear to follow IR-optical outbursts by about one year, first occur at the highest frequencies, as expected from optical depth effects; the peak flux is nevertheless often reached at several frequencies at once. The beginning of outbursts, as defined by mm-measurements, corresponds to the appearance of the three known 'superluminal' components. An increase in the X-ray flux during 1979-1980 corresponds to increased radio flux, while the IR flux changes in the opposite sense.

  20. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Weedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A population of quasars at z ~ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities vLv(7.8 um) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio vLv(0.25 um)/vLv(7.8 um) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust which produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest frame 7.8 um are determined for quasars in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 um sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest frame 7.8 um, but the ratio Lv(100 um)/Lv(7.8 um) is about three times high...

  1. Observational constraints on the structure and evolution of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brandon C.

    2008-01-01

    I use X-ray and optical data to investigate the structure of quasars, and its dependence on luminosity, redshift, black hole mass, and Eddington ratio. In order to facilitate my work, I develop new statistical methods of accounting for measurement error, non-detections, and survey selection functions. The main results of this thesis follow. (1) The statistical uncertainty in the broad line mass estimates can lead to significant artificial broadening of the observed distribution of black hole mass. (2) The z = 0.2 broad line quasar black hole mass function falls off approximately as a power law with slope ~ 2 for M BH [Special characters omitted.] 10 8 [Special characters omitted.] . (3) Radio-quiet quasars become more X-ray quiet as their optical/UV luminosity, black hole mass, or Eddington ratio increase, and more X-ray loud at higher redshift. These correlations imply that quasars emit a larger fraction of their bolometric luminosity through the accretion disk component, as compared to the corona component, as black hole mass and Eddington ratio increase. (4) The X- ray spectral slopes of radio-quiet quasars display a non-monotonic trend with Eddington ratio, where the X-ray continuum softens with increasing Eddington ratio until L/L Edd ~ 0.3, and then begins to harden. This observed non- monotonic trend may be caused by a change in the structure of the disk/corona system at L/L Edd ~ 0.3, possibly due to increased radiation pressure. (5) The characteristic time scales of quasar optical flux variations increase with increasing M BH , and are consistent with disk orbital or thermal time scales. In addition the amplitude of short time scale variability decreases with increasing M BH . I interpret quasar optical light curves as being driven by thermal fluctuations, which in turn are driven by some other underlying stochastic process with characteristic time scale long compared to the disk thermal time scale. The stochastic model I use is able to explain both short

  2. The Radio Loud \\/ Radio Quiet dichotomy news from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cirasuolo, M; Celotti, A; Danese, L

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a sample of radio-detected quasars, obtained by matching together objects from the FIRST and 2dF Quasar Redshift Surveys. The dataset consists of 113 sources, spanning a redshift range 0.3 < z < 2.2, with optical magnitudes 18.25 < b_J < 20.85 and radio fluxes S_{1.4 GHz} < 1 mJy. These objects exhibit properties such as redshift and colour distribution in full agreement with those derived for the whole quasar population, suggestive of an independence of the mechanism(s) controlling the birth and life-time of quasars of their level of radio emission. The long debated question of radio-loud (RL)/radio-quiet (RQ) dichotomy is then investigated for the combined FIRST-2dF and FIRST-LBQS sample, since they present similar selection criteria. We find the fraction of radio detections to increase with magnitude from < 3% at the faintest levels up to 20% for the brightest sources. The classical RL/RQ dichotomy, in which the distribution of radio-to-optical ratios and...

  3. Testing Disk-Wind Models with Quasar CIV 1549Å Associated Absorption Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Narrow associated C IV 1549Å absorption lines (NALs) with a rest equivalent width EW =3 Å detected in z ˜ 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, (a) exhibit evidence of an origin in radiatively accelerated gas, and (b) may be closely related to broad absorption line (BAL) outflows. These NALs...... and the few BALs detected in this quasar sample obey key predictions of models of radiatively driven disk-winds in which (1) the local disk luminosity launches the wind, (2) the central UV radiation drives it outwards, and (3) the wind acceleration (i.e., terminal velocity) depends on the strength of the X......-ray to UV emission ratio, i.e., aOX. The latter means that quasars with flat aOX (like radio-louds) should not have strong, high-velocity (BAL-like) outflows. These results are of interest not only to studies of disk wind scenarios and quasar structure, but also to studies of quasar feedback: NALs...

  4. Testing Disk-Wind Models with Quasar CIV 1549Å Associated Absorption Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Narrow associated C IV 1549Å absorption lines (NALs) with a rest equivalent width EW =3 Å detected in z ˜ 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, (a) exhibit evidence of an origin in radiatively accelerated gas, and (b) may be closely related to broad absorption line (BAL) outflows. These NALs...... and the few BALs detected in this quasar sample obey key predictions of models of radiatively driven disk-winds in which (1) the local disk luminosity launches the wind, (2) the central UV radiation drives it outwards, and (3) the wind acceleration (i.e., terminal velocity) depends on the strength of the X......-ray to UV emission ratio, i.e., aOX. The latter means that quasars with flat aOX (like radio-louds) should not have strong, high-velocity (BAL-like) outflows. These results are of interest not only to studies of disk wind scenarios and quasar structure, but also to studies of quasar feedback: NALs...

  5. Multifrequency observations of the flaring quasar 1156+295

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Bregman, J. N.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.; Pica, A. J.; Pollock, J. T.; Leacock, R. J.; Smith, A. G.; Webb, J. R.; Wisniewski, W. Z.

    1983-01-01

    A report is presented on the optically violent variable quasar 1156+295, known also as 4C 29.45 and Ton 599. A large outburst of this quasar was discovered in April 1981 in the course of a program to obtain simultaneous multifrequency spectra of variable quasars. Ultraviolet observations taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite were coordinated with ground-based observations at radio, infrared, and optical wavelengths. Measurements were made at four epochs starting immediately after the outburst was discovered, when the B-magnitude was 14.0, and at intervals of 4 days, 60 days and 1 year. The luminosity integrated only over observed wavelength bands was approximately 3 x 10 to the 48th ergs/sec on the first epoch of observation. Modeling of the source with a synchrotron self-Compton model suggests that the core of the source has a linear dimension of 0.01 pc, a magnetic field strength in the range 0.1-30 gauss, and a bulk relativistic motion in the quasar rest frame characterized by a Lorentz factor in the range 2-8.

  6. Statistical properties of extragalactic radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiang-Shui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a large sample of extragalactic radio sources is analysed to show their statistical properties. The core and total radio powers are used to determine the core-dominance parameter for galaxies, BL Lacertae objects and quasars; mutual correlations between core radio power, total radio power, redshift and core dominance parameter are 0examined for different subclasses. A statistically significant correlation between the total and core radio power is confirmed. There are no obvious correlations between core-dominance parameter and the total power for our whole sample and quasars, but there is a statistically significant anti-correlation for our galaxy sample. Some discussions and comparison of the correlations with those obtained by other authors are also given.

  7. The Red Radio Ring: a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared radio galaxy at z = 2.553 discovered through the citizen science project SPACE WARPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J. E.; More, A.; Verma, A.; Marshall, P. J.; Jackson, N.; Belles, P.-E.; Beswick, R.; Baeten, E.; Chavez, M.; Cornen, C.; Cox, B. E.; Erben, T.; Erickson, N. J.; Garrington, S.; Harrison, P. A.; Harrington, K.; Hughes, D. H.; Ivison, R. J.; Jordan, C.; Lin, Y.-T.; Leauthaud, A.; Lintott, C.; Lynn, S.; Kapadia, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Macmillan, C.; Makler, M.; Miller, G.; Montaña, A.; Mujica, R.; Muxlow, T.; Narayanan, G.; O'Briain, D.; O'Brien, T.; Oguri, M.; Paget, E.; Parrish, M.; Ross, N. P.; Rozo, E.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez-Argüelles, D.; Simpson, R.; Snyder, C.; Schloerb, F. P.; Tecza, M.; Wang, W.-H.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Wilcox, J.; Viero, M.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.; Zeballos, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (intrinsic LIR ≈ 1013 L⊙) with strong radio emission (intrinsic L1.4 GHz ≈ 1025 W Hz-1) at z = 2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SPACE WARPS through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (re ≈ 3 arcsec) around an LRG at z = 0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3→2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [O III] and Hα line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph. We have resolved the radio emission with high-resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and Very Large Array C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-infrared imaging to construct a lens model, which indicates a lensing magnification of μ ≈ 10. The source reconstruction appears to support a radio morphology comprised of a compact (<250 pc) core and more extended component, perhaps indicative of an active nucleus and jet or lobe.

  8. A VLBI survey of compact broad absorption line quasars with balnicity index BI>0

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Katarzynski, K; Roskowinski, C

    2015-01-01

    We performed high resolution radio observations of a new sample of ten BAL quasars using both the VLBA and EVN at 5 GHz. All the selected sources have balnicity indices (BI) more than 0 and radio flux densities less than 80 mJy at 1.4 GHz. They are very compact with linear sizes of the order of a few tens of parsecs and radio luminosities at 1.4 GHz above the FRI-FRII luminosity threshold. Most of the observed objects have been resolved at 5 GHz showing one-sided, probably core-jet structures, typical for quasars. We discuss in detail their age and orientation based on the radio observations. We then used the largest available sample of BAL quasars to study the relationships between the radio and optical properties in these objects. We found that (1) the strongest absorption (high values of the balnicity index BI) is connected with the lower values of the radio-loudness parameter, logR_I<1.5, and thus probably with large viewing angles; (2) the large span of the BI values in each bin of the radio-loudness ...

  9. Discordance of the unified scheme with observed properties of quasars and high-excitation galaxies in the 3CRR sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, Ashok K., E-mail: asingal@prl.res.in [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India)

    2014-07-01

    We examine the consistency of the unified scheme of Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies and quasars with their observed number and size distributions in the 3CRR sample. We separate the low-excitation galaxies from the high-excitation ones, as the former might not harbor a quasar within and thus may not be partaking in the unified scheme models. In the updated 3CRR sample, at low redshifts (z < 0.5), the relative number and luminosity distributions of high-excitation galaxies and quasars roughly match the expectations from the orientation-based unified scheme model. However, a foreshortening in the observed sizes of quasars, which is a must in the orientation-based model, is not seen with respect to radio galaxies even when the low-excitation galaxies are excluded. This dashes the hope that the unified scheme might still work if one includes only the high-excitation galaxies.

  10. A unique UV flare in the optical light curve of the quasar J004457.9+412344

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzidimitriou D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We found that the nova candidate J004457.9+412344 is a radio-quiet quasar at z ∼ 2. Its optical long-term light curve, covering more than half a century, shows quasar typical flux variations superimposed by a spectacular single flare lasting more than one year (observer frame. We could not find comparable light curves among the several thousand catalogued radio-quiet quasars in the stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The decreasing part of the flare light curve roughly follows a power law t−5/3. The quasar spectrum, the total energy of the flare, and the decline of the light curve are consistent with the tidal disruption of a ∼10 Mʘ giant star by a supermassive black hole of a few 108 Mʘ. We argue that the alternative explanation by gravitational microlensing is less likely, though it cannot be definitely excluded.

  11. A study of the properties of twin radio arms of FR-II extragalactic radio sources within z≤1-II (dynamical properties)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchukwu, C. C.; Ubachukwu, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    We carried out a comparative study on the dynamical properties of the Longer Arm (LA) and the Shorter Arm (SA) of different classes of FR-II radio sources (Broad Line Radio Galaxies (BLRG), Quasars (Q), Narrow Line Radio Galaxies (NLRG) and Low Excitation Radio Galaxies (LERG)) based on self-similar model of time evolution of the radio lobes and hotspot properties of radio sources, using the power-law expression for the dependence of hotspot size (D_{hs}), the advance velocity of the hotspot (v_{hs}) and hotspot luminosity (PL) on the core-lobe length (DL). Using observational values of D_{hs}, PL and DL we constrained the exponents of these power-law relations for the LA and SA. We also estimated the hotspot pressure, (p_{hs}), cocoon pressure within the lobe (p_{cc}), the ratio of the hotspot pressure to the cocoon pressure (p_{hc}), the cocoon volume (Vcc), the energy density within the cocoon (u_{cc}), the equipartition magnetic field (B_{em}) in the lobe, the particle number density at the hotspot (n_{hs}), the external density profile (ρ _{ext}) and the kinetic jet power (Q_{jet}) for the LA and the SA. Linear regression analyses indicate a tight correlation between the D_{hs} and the DL of LA for all classes of radio sources with r˜0.5-0.8. Similar result was obtained for SA except for that of Q with r˜ 0.2. For P_{hs} and DL correlation, the result indicates a mild negative correlation that seems stronger for the SA (r˜-0.3 to -0.6) than LA (r˜-0.2 to -0.4) for all the different classes of radio sources. Comparing the values of ρ_{ext}, B_{em}, uB, p_{hs}, p_{cc}, Vcc, and u_{cc} between SA side and LA side, indicate that the SA values of the parameters are higher than those of LA; while (p_{hs}) showed higher values in LA than SA for all the different classes of radio sources. Generally, the hotspot has a larger volume on the LA side than on the SA side except for NLRG, while the hotspot of the SA side contains more particle per unit volume than the

  12. Evidence of the Dynamics of Relativistic Jet Launching in Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra of the EUV, the optically thick emission from the innermost accretion flow onto the central supermassive black hole, indicate that radio loud quasars (RLQs) tend to be EUV weak compared to the radio-quiet quasars; yet the remainder of the optically thick thermal continuum is indistinguishable. The deficit of EUV emission in RLQs has a straightforward interpretation as a missing or a suppressed innermost region of local energy dissipation in the accretion flow. This article is an examination of the evidence for a distribution of magnetic flux tubes in the innermost accretion flow that results in magnetically arrested accretion (MAA) and creates the EUV deficit. These same flux tubes and possibly the interior magnetic flux that they encircle are the sources of the jet power as well. In the MAA scenario, islands of large-scale vertical magnetic flux perforate the innermost accretion flow of RLQs. The first prediction of the theory that is supported by the HST data is that the strength of the (large-scale poloidal magnetic fields) jets in the MAA region is regulated by the ram pressure of the accretion flow in the quasar environment. The second prediction that is supported by the HST data is that the rotating magnetic islands remove energy from the accretion flow as a Poynting flux dominated jet in proportion to the square of the fraction of the EUV emitting gas that is displaced by these islands.

  13. EVIDENCE OF THE DYNAMICS OF RELATIVISTIC JET LAUNCHING IN QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punsly, Brian, E-mail: brian.punsly1@verizon.net [1415 Granvia Altamira, Palos Verdes Estates CA, USA 90274 and ICRANet, Piazza della Repubblica 10 Pescara I-65100 (Italy)

    2015-06-10

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra of the EUV, the optically thick emission from the innermost accretion flow onto the central supermassive black hole, indicate that radio loud quasars (RLQs) tend to be EUV weak compared to the radio-quiet quasars; yet the remainder of the optically thick thermal continuum is indistinguishable. The deficit of EUV emission in RLQs has a straightforward interpretation as a missing or a suppressed innermost region of local energy dissipation in the accretion flow. This article is an examination of the evidence for a distribution of magnetic flux tubes in the innermost accretion flow that results in magnetically arrested accretion (MAA) and creates the EUV deficit. These same flux tubes and possibly the interior magnetic flux that they encircle are the sources of the jet power as well. In the MAA scenario, islands of large-scale vertical magnetic flux perforate the innermost accretion flow of RLQs. The first prediction of the theory that is supported by the HST data is that the strength of the (large-scale poloidal magnetic fields) jets in the MAA region is regulated by the ram pressure of the accretion flow in the quasar environment. The second prediction that is supported by the HST data is that the rotating magnetic islands remove energy from the accretion flow as a Poynting flux dominated jet in proportion to the square of the fraction of the EUV emitting gas that is displaced by these islands.

  14. The structure and emission model of the relativistic jet in the quasar 3C 279 inferred from radio to high-energy gamma-ray observations in 2008-2010

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashida, M; Nalewajko, K; Sikora, M; Wehrle, A E; Ogle, P; Collmar, W; Larsson, S; Fukazawa, Y; Itoh, R; Chiang, J; Stawarz, L; Blandford, R D; Richards, J L; Max-Moerbeck, W; Readhead, A; Buehler, R; Cavazzuti, E; Ciprini, S; Gehrels, N; Reimer, A; Szostek, A; Tanaka, T; Tosti, G; Uchiyama, Y; Kawabata, K S; Kino, M; Sakimoto, K; Sasada, M; Sato, S; Uemura, M; Yamanaka, M; Greiner, J; Kruehler, T; Rossi, A; Macquart, J P; Bock, D C -J; Villata, M; Raiteri, C M; Agudo, I; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Arkharov, A A; Bach, U; Benitez, E; Berdyugin, A; Blinov, D A; Blumenthal, K; Boettcher, M; Buemi, C S; Carosati, D; Chen, W P; Di Paola, A; Dolci, M; Efimova, N V; Forne, E; Gomez, J L; Gurwell, M A; Heidt, J; Hiriart, D; Jordan, B; Jorstad, S G; Joshi, M; Kimeridze, G; Konstantinova, T S; Kopatskaya, E N; Koptelova, E; Kurtanidze, O M; Lahteenmaki, A; Lamerato, A; Larionov, V M; Larionova, E G; Larionova, L V; Leto, P; Lindfors, E; Marscher, A P; McHardy, I M; Molina, S N; Morozova, D A; Nikolashvili, M G; Nilsson, K; Reinthal, R; Roustazadeh, P; Sakamoto, T; Sigua, L A; Sillanpaa, A; Takalo, L; Tammi, J; Taylor, B; Tornikoski, M; Trigilio, C; Troitsky, I S; Umana, G

    2012-01-01

    We present time-resolved broad-band observations of the quasar 3C 279 obtained from multi-wavelength campaigns conducted during the first two years of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. While investigating the previously reported gamma-ray/optical flare accompanied by a change in optical polarization, we found that the optical emission appears delayed with respect to the gamma-ray emission by about 10 days. X-ray observations reveal a pair of `isolated' flares separated by ~90 days, with only weak gamma-ray/optical counterparts. The spectral structure measured by Spitzer reveals a synchrotron component peaking in the mid-infrared band with a sharp break at the far-infrared band during the gamma-ray flare, while the peak appears in the mm/sub-mm band in the low state. Selected spectral energy distributions are fitted with leptonic models including Comptonization of external radiation produced in a dusty torus or the broad-line region. Adopting the interpretation of the polarization swing involving pr...

  15. NEW SUPERLUMINAL QUASAR-1633+382 AND THE BLAZAR-GAMMA-RAY CONNECTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BARTHEL, PD; CONWAY, JE; MYERS, ST; PEARSON, TJ; READHEAD, ACS

    1995-01-01

    We report detection of superluminal motion in the core of 4C 38.41, associated with the z = 1.814 quasar 1633+382. The dominant nucleus in the similar to 30 kpc triple morphology of the radio source displays a core-jet structure on the milliarcsecond scale, and a jet component is found moving

  16. The Structure and Emission Model of the Relativistic Jet in the Quasar 3C 279 Inferred From Radio To High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observations in 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present time-resolved broad-band observations of the quasar 3C 279 obtained from multiwavelength campaigns conducted during the first two years of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. While investigating the previously reported gamma-ray/optical flare accompanied by a change in optical polarization, we found that the optical emission appears delayed with respect to the gamma-ray emission by about 10 days. X-ray observations reveal a pair of 'isolated' flares separated. by approx. 90 days, with only weak gamma-ray/optical counterparts. The spectral structure measured by Spitzer reveals a synchrotron component peaking in the mid-infrared band with a sharp break at the far-infrared band during the gamma-ray flare, while the peak appears in the mm/sub-mm band in the low state. Selected spectral energy distributions are fitted with leptonic models including Comptonization of external radiation produced in a dusty torus or the broad-line region. Adopting the interpretation of the polarization swing involving propagation of the emitting region along a curved trajectory, we can explain the evolution of the broad-band spectra during the gamma-ray flaring event by a shift of its location from approx. 1 pc to approx. 4 pc from the central black hole. On the other hand, if the gamma-ray flare is generated instead at sub-pc distance from the central black hole, the far-infrared break can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. We also model the low spectral state, dominated by the mm/sub-mm peaking synchrotron component, and suggest that the corresponding inverse-Compton component explains the steady X-ray emission.

  17. THE STRUCTURE AND EMISSION MODEL OF THE RELATIVISTIC JET IN THE QUASAR 3C 279 INFERRED FROM RADIO TO HIGH-ENERGY {gamma}-RAY OBSERVATIONS IN 2008-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, M.; Madejski, G. M.; Chiang, J.; Blandford, R. D.; Buehler, R. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Nalewajko, K. [University of Colorado, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Sikora, M. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Wehrle, A. E. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Ogle, P. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Collmar, W. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Larsson, S. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Fukazawa, Y.; Itoh, R. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Stawarz, L. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Richards, J. L.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Gehrels, N., E-mail: mahaya@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: knalew@Colorado.edu, E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2012-08-01

    We present time-resolved broadband observations of the quasar 3C 279 obtained from multi-wavelength campaigns conducted during the first two years of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission. While investigating the previously reported {gamma}-ray/optical flare accompanied by a change in optical polarization, we found that the optical emission appears to be delayed with respect to the {gamma}-ray emission by about 10 days. X-ray observations reveal a pair of 'isolated' flares separated by {approx}90 days, with only weak {gamma}-ray/optical counterparts. The spectral structure measured by Spitzer reveals a synchrotron component peaking in the mid-infrared band with a sharp break at the far-infrared band during the {gamma}-ray flare, while the peak appears in the millimeter (mm)/submillimeter (sub-mm) band in the low state. Selected spectral energy distributions are fitted with leptonic models including Comptonization of external radiation produced in a dusty torus or the broad-line region. Adopting the interpretation of the polarization swing involving propagation of the emitting region along a curved trajectory, we can explain the evolution of the broadband spectra during the {gamma}-ray flaring event by a shift of its location from {approx}1 pc to {approx}4 pc from the central black hole. On the other hand, if the {gamma}-ray flare is generated instead at sub-pc distance from the central black hole, the far-infrared break can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. We also model the low spectral state, dominated by the mm/sub-mm peaking synchrotron component, and suggest that the corresponding inverse-Compton component explains the steady X-ray emission.

  18. Unification of Radio Galaxies and their Accretion Jet Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingwen Wu; Ya-Di Xu; Xinwu Cao

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the relation between black hole mass, bh, and jet power, jet, for a sample of BL Lacs and radio quasars. We find that BL Lacs are separated from radio quasars by the FR I/II dividing line in bh-jet plane, which strongly supports the unification scheme of FR I/BL Lac and FR II/radio quasar. The Eddington ratio distribution of BL Lacs and radio quasars exhibits a bimodal nature with a rough division at bol/Edd ∼ 0.01, which imply that they may have different accretion modes. We calculate the jet power extracted from advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), and find that it requires dimensionless angular momentum of black hole ≃ 0.9 - 0.99 to reproduce the dividing line between FR I/II or BL Lac/radio quasar if dimensionless accretion rate $\\dot{m} = 0.01$ is adopted, which is required by the above bimodal distribution of Eddington ratios. Our results suggest that black holes in radio galaxies are rapidly spinning.

  19. Why do only some Radio Galaxies acquire giant Sizes?

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, Elizabeth López

    2016-01-01

    We study the morphology of the radio emission of giant radio galaxies (GRGs), a rare type of active galaxies, in order to find new clues for the reasons of their large size. Using radio images from two sky surveys at 1.4 GHz we quantified their radio morphology by measuring the geometry (armlength, bending angle, etc.) and flux symmetry for 58 such objects. Preliminary analysis suggests that radio source symmetry does not differ between galaxies and quasars, that there is no evidence for a decrease in linear size with redshift, and only a marginal trend for increasing symmetry with larger size. A merging with data available for other such objects is expected to yield new clues on the possible reasons for their large size. We also searched radio survey images around the positions of 1059 galaxies and quasars for further giant radio sources, and present a preliminary sample of six of these.

  20. On the Superluminal Motion of Radio-Loud AGNs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhi-Bin Zhang; Yi-Zhen Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Apparent superluminal motion of different radio-loud AGNs are similarly related with beaming effect. The cosmological expanding effect would play no part in the superluminal motion of radio galaxies, BL Lacertae objects as well as quasars.Meanwhile, we confirm that estimates for apparent velocity app and Doppler boosting factor based on multi-wavelength combination and variability are comparable.

  1. Chandra Observations of the Highest Redshift Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Shemmer, O; Brandt, W N; Brinkmann, J; Diamond-Stanic, A M; Fan, X; Gunn, J E; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Strauss, M A; Anderson, Scott F.; Brinkmann, Jon; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gunn, James E.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Strauss, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations of 21 z>4 quasars, including 11 sources at z>5. These observations double the number of X-ray detected quasars at z>5, allowing investigation of the X-ray spectral properties of a substantial sample of quasars at the dawn of the modern Universe. By jointly fitting the spectra of 15 z>5 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs), including sources from the Chandra archive, with a total of 185 photons, we find a mean X-ray power-law photon index of Gamma=1.95^{+0.30}_{-0.26}, and a mean neutral intrinsic absorption column density of N_H5 RQQs, excluding broad absorption line quasars, is alpha_ox=-1.69+/-0.03, which is consistent with the value predicted from the observed relationship between alpha_ox and ultraviolet luminosity. Four of the sources in our sample are members of the rare class of weak emission-line quasars, and we detect two of them in X-rays. We discuss the implications our X-ray observations have for the nature of these mysterious sources and, in particular, whether their wea...

  2. Radiative efficiency and content of extragalactic radio sources: Toward a universal scaling relation between jet power and radio power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bîrzan, L.; McNamara, B.R.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Carilli, C.L.; Wise, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    We present an analysis of the energetics and particle content of the lobes of 24 radio galaxies at the cores of cooling clusters. The radio lobes in these systems have created visible cavities in the surrounding hot, X-ray-emitting gas, which allow direct measurement of the mechanical jet power of

  3. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  4. Quasar emission lines as probes of orientation: implications for disc wind geometries and unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. H.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of broad absorption lines (BALs) in quasar samples is often interpreted in the context of a geometric unification model consisting of an accretion disc and an associated outflow. We use the the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar sample to test this model by examining the equivalent widths (EWs) of C IV 1550 Å, Mg II 2800 Å, [O III] 5007 Å and C III] 1909 Å. We find that the emission line EW distributions in BAL and non-BAL quasars are remarkably similar - a property that is inconsistent with scenarios in which a BAL outflow rises equatorially from a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disc. We construct simple models to predict the distributions from various geometries; these models confirm the above finding and disfavour equatorial geometries. We show that obscuration, line anisotropy and general relativistic effects on the disc continuum are unlikely to hide an EW inclination dependence. We carefully examine the radio and polarisation properties of BAL quasars. Both suggest that they are most likely viewed (on average) from intermediate inclinations, between type 1 and type 2 AGN. We also find that the low-ionization BAL quasars in our sample are not confined to one region of `Eigenvector I' parameter space. Overall, our work leads to one of the following conclusions, or some combination thereof: (i) the continuum does not emit like a geometrically thin, optically thick disc; (ii) BAL quasars are viewed from similar angles to non-BAL quasars, i.e. low inclinations; (iii) geometric unification does not explain the fraction of BALs in quasar samples.

  5. Correlation between -Ray and Radio Bands for -Ray Loud Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. X. Wu; J. H. Fan; S. H. Li

    2014-09-01

    The most identified sources observed by Fermi are blazars (Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) and BL Lacertae objects (BLs). In this paper, we obtained 124 -ray loud blazars with available -ray and radio (core and total) data. It is interesting that the -ray luminosity have a good correlation with the radio luminosity. This phenomenon exists in the core radio luminosity (c) and total radio luminosity (t). The correlation between the -ray and the radio luminosities is still stronger even after we eliminated the redshift effect, which suggests that the -ray radiations in the -ray loud blazars are strongly beamed.

  6. Extremely red quasars in BOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T.; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W. Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual `wingless' line profiles, large N V/Lyα, N V/C IV, Si IV/C IV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [O III] λ5007. Here we present a new catalogue of C IV and N V emission-line data for 216 188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR colour, secondarily on REW(C IV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a `core' sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 ≥ 4.6 (AB) and REW(C IV) ≥ 100 Å at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity ˜ 47.1, sky density 0.010 deg-2, surprisingly flat/blue UV spectra given their red UV-to-mid-IR colours, and common outflow signatures including BALs or BAL-like features and large C IV emission-line blueshifts. Their SEDs and line properties are inconsistent with normal quasars behind a dust reddening screen. We argue that the core ERQs are a unique obscured quasar population with extreme physical conditions related to powerful outflows across the line-forming regions. Patchy obscuration by small dusty clouds could produce the observed UV extinctions without substantial UV reddening.

  7. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  8. High redshift quasars monitoring campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Ismael; Lira, Paulina; Martinez, Jorge; Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai

    2014-07-01

    We present an update of the monitoring campaign we have undertaken to probe the most massive black holes in powerful quasars at high redshift through the reverberation mapping technique. Once this campaign has finished, we will be able to directly measure broad line region (BLR) sizes of quasars at z ~ 2-3, improving dramatically the BLR size-luminosity relation, and therefore, black hole mass estimates based on this relationship. So far, we have identified a dozen highly variable sources suitable for future cross-correlation analysis and reverberation measurements.

  9. VSOP Imaging of the Quasar PKS 1402+044 at z = 3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Gurvits, L. I.; Frey, S.; Lobanov, A. P.; Hong, X.-Y.

    2009-08-01

    We present results of VSOP observations of the high-redshift (z = 3.2) quasar PKS 1402+044 (J1405+0415) at 1.6 and 5 GHz, and VLA observations at 1.4, 5, 16, and 43 GHz. The source has a pronounced core-jet structure traced by VSOP down to sub-mas angular scales. The results offer a set of observational data enabling physical diagnostics of the inner parsecs of a typical radio-loud quasar.

  10. Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect from Quasar-driven Blast-waves

    CERN Document Server

    Platania, P; De Zotti, G; Lazzaro, E; Bersanelli, M

    2002-01-01

    Quasar-driven winds are currently the best candidates for accounting for the pre-heating of the intergalactic medium in clusters. Such winds, occurring during early phases of the evolution of spheroidal galaxies, shock-heat the interstellar gas, thus inducing a detectable Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We estimate the amplitude and the angular scale of such effect as well as its counts as a function of the comptonization parameter $y$. The contamination due to radio emission by the quasar itself is also discussed. The corresponding mean Compton distortion of the cosmic microwave background spectrum is found to be well below the COBE/FIRAS upper limit.

  11. Heating of the Intracluster Medium by Quasar Outflows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suparna Roychowdhury; Biman B. Nath

    2002-03-01

    We study the possibility of quasar outflows in clusters and groups of galaxies heating the intracluster gas in order to explain the recent observation of excess entropy in this gas. We show that radio galaxies alone cannot provide the energy required to explain the observations but the inclusion of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows can do so, and that in this scenario most of the heating takes place at ∼ 1–4, the ``preheating” epoch being at a lower redshift for lower mass clusters.

  12. Fundamental Plane of FSRQs from SDSS DR5 Quasar Catalogue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ting-Ting Wang; C.-Y. Su; Z.-F. Chen; Y.-P. Qin; G.-A. Wang

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we explore a sample of 362 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) to investigate the jet formation. We find that the fundamental plane for our FSRQs can be expressed as 5\\;GHz ∝ $^{-0.19}_{\\text{bh}}$ $^{1.08}_{\\text{2\\; keV}}$. We also find that the 5 GHz luminosities are tightly related to both black hole mass and Eddington ratio, which is established as 5\\;GHz ∝ $^{0.67}_{\\text{bh}}$ (bol/EDD)1.32.

  13. Giant radio galaxies and cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinämäki, Pekka

    2016-10-01

    Giant radio galaxies create the welldistinguishable class of sources.These sources are characterized with edge-brightened radio lobes withhighly collimated radio jets and large linear sizes which make themthe largest individual structures in the Universe. They are also knownto be hosted by elliptical/disturbed host galaxies and avoid clustersand high galaxy density regions. Because of GRG, large linear sizeslobes extend well beyond the interstellar media and host galaxyhalo the evolution of the radio lobes may depend on interactionwith this environment. Using our method to extract filamentarystructure of the galaxies in our local universe we study whetherradio lobe properties in some giant radio galaxies are determinedon an interaction of this filament ambient.

  14. Color and Polarization Models of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, K. C.

    2000-05-01

    The scattering of an anisotropic quasar beam by dust swept-up by a bipolar outflow is used to construct model color and polarization images for comparison with high redshift radio galaxies and quasars. The swept-up shell is assumed to be optically thin to dust scattering outside the nuclear region. The spectral energy distributions and polarization characteristics of the extended aligned emission from HZRGs and QSRs can be reproduced using an input quasar spectrum and the Loar & Draine (1993) silicate-graphite grain model.

  15. Tracking galaxy evolution through low frequency radio continuum observations using SKA and Citizen-science Research using Multi-wavelength data

    CERN Document Server

    Hota, Ananda; Stalin, C S; Vaddi, Sravani; Mohanty, Pradeepta K; Dabhade, Pratik; Bhoga, Sai Arun Dharmik; Rajoria, Megha; Sethi, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    We present a review on galaxy black hole co-evolution through merger, star formation and AGN-jet feedback. We highlight results on transitional galaxies (e.g. NGC1482, NGC6764, NGC3801, Speca, RAD-18 etc.) which has data from Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and other sub-mm, IR, optical, UV and X-ray telescopes. The `smoking gun' relic-evidences of past AGN-jet feedback which is believed to have quenched star formation in transitional galaxies are still missing. Relic radio lobes, as old as a few hundred Myr, can be best detected at low radio frequencies with the GMRT, LOFAR and in future SKA. However, similar relic evidences of quasar activities, known as `Hanny's Voorwerp' discovered by Galaxy Zoo in optical data, are only around a few tens of thousand years old. More discoveries are needed to match these time-scales with time since the decline of star formation in transitional galaxies. Such faint fuzzy relic emissions in optical and angular-scale sensitive radio interferometric images can be discov...

  16. Extremely Red Quasars in BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Fred; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D; Greene, Jenny E; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual "wingless" line profiles, large NV/Lya, NV/CIV, SiIV/CIV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [OIII] 5007. Here we present a new catalog of CIV and NV emission-line data for 216,188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR color, secondarily on REW(CIV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a "core" sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 > 4.6 (AB) and REW(CIV) > 100 A at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity log L (ergs/s) ~ 47.1, sk...

  17. Polarization of radio cores as a test of the unified schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Saikia, D J

    1998-01-01

    In the unified schemes for extragalactic radio sources, the quasars and BL Lac objects are intrinsically similar to the Fanaroff-Riley class II and I radio galaxies respectively, but appear to be different because they are viewed at different angles to the line-of-sight. The quasars and BL Lac objects are observed at small viewing angles while the radio galaxies lie close to the plane of the sky. In such schemes, the quasar or BL Lac nucleus is hidden from our view by a putative torus when the source is inclined at a large angle to the line-of-sight and appears as a radio galaxy. Such a scenario should also affect the observed polarization properties of the cores, with the cores in the radio galaxies and weak-cored quasars being less polarized than the core-dominated quasars and BL Lacs due to Faraday depolarization by the magnetoionic medium in the obscuring torus or disk. In this paper, we report that the core polarization of radio galaxies and weak-cored quasars is indeed much smaller than for the core-dom...

  18. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources. III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, O.; Pursimo, T.; Johnston, Helen M.; Stanford, Laura M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Jauncey, David L.; Zenere, Katrina A.

    2017-04-01

    In extending our spectroscopic program, which targets sources drawn from the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Catalog, we have obtained spectra for ˜160 compact, flat-spectrum radio sources and determined redshifts for 112 quasars and radio galaxies. A further 14 sources with featureless spectra have been classified as BL Lac objects. Spectra were obtained at three telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, and the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes in Hawaii and Chile. While most of the sources are powerful quasars, a significant fraction of radio galaxies is also included from the list of non-defining ICRF radio sources.

  19. Double-double radio galaxies: further insights into the formation of the radio structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brocksopp, Catherine; Schoenmakers, Arno; de Bruyn, Ger

    2010-01-01

    Double-double radio galaxies (DDRGs) offer a unique opportunity for us to study multiple episodes of jet activity in large-scale radio sources. We use radio data from the Very Large Array and the literature to model two DDRGs, B1450+333 and B1834+620, in terms of their dynamical evolution. We find that the standard Fanaroff-Riley II model is able to explain the properties of the two outer lobes of each source, whereby the lobes are formed by ram-pressure balance of a shock at the end of the jet with the surrounding medium. The inner pairs of lobes, however, are not well-described by the standard model. Instead we interpret the inner lobes as arising from the emission of relativistic electrons within the outer lobes, which are compressed and re-accelerated by the bow-shock in front of the restarted jets and within the outer lobes. The predicted rapid progression of the inner lobes through the outer lobes requires the eventual development of a hotspot at the edge of the outer lobe, causing the DDRG ultimately t...

  20. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  1. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of 13 gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Anupreeta; Oguri, Masamune; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A.; Santiago, Basilio X.; Mosquera, Ana M.; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Brownstein, Joel R.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Quimby, Robert M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ( ≲ 2 arcsec) confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs ≈ 4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  2. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of thirteen gravitationally lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    More, Anupreeta; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A; Santiago, Basilio X; Mosquera, Ana M; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S; Rusu, Cristian E; Brownstein, Joel R; da Costa, Luiz N; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A G; Quimby, Robert M; Schneider, Donald P; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ($\\lesssim$2") confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs$\\approx$4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  3. K-band imaging of 52 B3-VLA quasars Nucleus and host properties

    CERN Document Server

    Carballo, R; González-Serrano, J I; Benn, C R; Vigotti, M

    1997-01-01

    We present K-band imaging and photometry of a sample of 52 radio loud quasars (RQs) selected from the B3 survey with flux densities above 0.5 Jy at 408 MHz. The optical completeness of the sample is 90% and the quasars cover the redshift range 0.4 - 2.3. For ~57% of the sources for which the quality of the images allowed a detailed morphological study (16/28) resolved extended emission was detected around the QSO, and its K flux was measured. Interpreting this ``fuzz'' as starlight emission from the host galaxy, its location on the K-z plane at z<1 is consistent with radio quasars being hosted by galaxies similar to radio galaxies (RGs) or giant ellipticals (gEs). At higher redshifts the detected host galaxies of RQs are more luminous than typical RGs and gEs, although some weak detections or upper limits are consistent with a similar fraction of RQs being hosted by galaxies with the expected luminosities for RGs or gEs. We found a significant correlation between radio power and nuclear infrared luminosity...

  4. Quasar structure from microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher Warren

    2008-02-01

    I analyze microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars to yield measurements of the structure of their continuum emission regions. I first describe our lensed quasar monitoring program and RETROCAM, the auxiliary port camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I describe the application of our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to SDSS 0924+0219, a system with a highly anomalous optical flux ratio. For an inclination angle i, I find an optical scale radius log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] . I extrapolate the best-fitting light curves into the future to find a roughly 45% probability that the anomalous image (D) will brighten by at least an order of magnitude during the next decade. I expand our method to make simultaneous estimates of the time delays and structure of HE1104-1805 and QJ0158-4325, two doubly-imaged quasars with microlensing and intrinsic variability on comparable time scales. For HE1104- 1805 I find a time delay of D t AB = t A - t B = [Special characters omitted.] days and estimate a scale radius of log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] at 0.2mm in the rest frame. I am unable to measure a time delay for QJ0158-4325, but the scale radius is log[( r s /cm) [Special characters omitted.] ] = 14.9 ±1 0.3 at 0.3mm in the rest frame. I then apply our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to the optical light curves of 11 lensed quasar systems to show that quasar accretion disk sizes at 2500Å are related to black hole mass ( M BH ) by log( R 2500 /cm) = (15.7 ± 0.16) + (0.64± 0.18) log( M BH /10 9 [Special characters omitted.] ). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R 0( [Special characters omitted.] ), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(e) = -1.54 ± 0.36 + log( L/L E ) where e=3D L / ( M c 2 ). These sizes are also larger, by a factor of ~ 3, than

  5. A database of phase calibration sources and their radio spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Dubal, Shilpa S.; Sherkar, Sachin S.

    2016-12-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, ( u, v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and clean-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System ( aips) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications ( casa). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curved and complex shapes, (iii) quasars tend to exhibit flatter radio spectra as compared to the radio galaxies or the unidentified sources, (iv) quasars are also known to be radio variable and hence possibly show complex spectra more frequently, and (v) radio galaxies tend to have steeper spectra, which are possibly due to the large redshifts of distant galaxies causing the shift of spectrum to lower frequencies.

  6. A database of phase calibration sources and their radio spectra for the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Dharam V.; Dubal, Shilpa S.; Sherkar, Sachin S.

    2016-10-01

    We are pursuing a project to build a database of phase calibration sources suitable for Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). Here we present the first release of 45 low frequency calibration sources at 235 MHz and 610 MHz. These calibration sources are broadly divided into quasars, radio galaxies and unidentified sources. We provide their flux densities, models for calibration sources, (u,v) plots, final deconvolved restored maps and uc(clean)-component lists/files for use in the Astronomical Image Processing System (uc(aips)) and the Common Astronomy Software Applications (uc(casa)). We also assign a quality factor to each of the calibration sources. These data products are made available online through the GMRT observatory website. In addition we find that (i) these 45 low frequency calibration sources are uniformly distributed in the sky and future efforts to increase the size of the database should populate the sky further, (ii) spectra of these calibration sources are about equally divided between straight, curved and complex shapes, (iii) quasars tend to exhibit flatter radio spectra as compared to the radio galaxies or the unidentified sources, (iv) quasars are also known to be radio variable and hence possibly show complex spectra more frequently, and (v) radio galaxies tend to have steeper spectra, which are possibly due to the large redshifts of distant galaxies causing the shift of spectrum to lower frequencies.

  7. Does circular polarisation reveal the rotation of quasar engines?

    CERN Document Server

    Ensslin, T A

    2003-01-01

    Many radio sources like quasars, blazars, radio galaxies, and micro-quasars exhibit circular polarisation (CP) with surprising temporal persistent handedness. As a possible explanation we propose that the CP is due to Faraday conversion (FC) of linear polarisation synchrotron light which propagates along a line-of-sight (LOS) through twisted magnetic fields. The rotational nature of accretion flows onto black holes naturally generates the required magnetic twist in the emission region, independent of whether it is a jet or an ADAF. The expected twist in both types of flows is of the order of what is required for optimal CP generation, relaxing constraints on the plasma parameters, that were given in scenarios which rely on Faraday rotation (FR). The mechanism works in electron-positron (e+/e-) as well as electron-proton (e/p) plasma. In the latter case, the emission region should consist of individual flux tubes with independent polarities in order to suppress too strong FR. The predominant CP is expected to ...

  8. Decoding quasars: gravitationally redshifted spectral lines !

    CERN Document Server

    Kantharia, Nimisha G

    2016-01-01

    Further investigation of data on quasars, especially in the ultraviolet band, yields an amazingly coherent narrative which we present in this paper. Quasars are characterised by strong continuum emission and redshifted emission and absorption lines which includes the famous Lyman $\\alpha$ forest. We present irrefutable evidence in support of (1) the entire line spectrum arising in matter located inside the quasar system, (2) the range of redshifts shown by the lines being due to the variable contribution of the gravitational redshift in the observed line velocity, (3) existence of rotating black holes and of matter inside its ergosphere, (4) quasars located within cosmological redshifts $\\sim 3$, (5) $\\gamma$ ray bursts being explosive events in a quasar. These results are significant and a game-changer when we realise that the absorbing gas has been postulated to exist along the line-of-sight to the quasar and observations have accordingly been interpreted. In light of these definitive results which uniquely...

  9. The distribution of radio plasma in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Katherine M

    2005-03-15

    The influence of jet-ejected plasma has been an important theme of this meeting; I draw attention to the prevalence of jet-ejected plasma, in particular that which has not been properly accounted for in the past. There are three strands to this paper: important emission which is prominent only at the lowest radio frequencies; relic radio plasma which must exist if even the most basic aspects of radio source evolutionary models are correct; and evidence that some 'radio-quiet' quasars could be FR-I radio sources.

  10. The effects of frequency-dependent quasar evolution on the celestial reference frame

    CERN Document Server

    Shabala, Stanislav; McCallum, Jamie; Titov, Oleg; Blanchard, Jay; Lovell, Jim; Watson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We examine the relationship between source position stability and astrophysical properties of radio-loud quasars making up the International Celestial Reference Frame. We construct light curves for 95 most frequently observed ICRF2 quasars at both the geodetic VLBI observing bands. Because the appearance of new quasar components corresponds to an increase in quasar flux density, these light curves allow us to probe source structure on sub-100 microarcsecond scales, much smaller than conventional VLBI imaging. Flux density monitoring also allows us to trace the evolution of quasar structure. We test how source position stability depends on three astrophysical parameters: (1) Flux density variability at X-band; (2) Time lag between S and X-band light curves; (3) Spectral index rms, defined as the variability in the ratio between S and X-band flux densities. We find that small (<0.15 years) time lags between S and X-band light curves and low (<0.10) spectral index variability are excellent indicators of po...

  11. The first XMM-Newton spectrum of a high redshift quasar - PKS 0537-286

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, J N; Bennie, P J; Pounds, K A; Short, A; O'Brien, P T; Boller, T; Kuster, M; Tiengo, A; Boller, Th.

    2001-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the high redshift z=3.104, radio-loud quasar PKS 0537-286. The EPIC CCD cameras provide the highest signal-to-noise spectrum of a high-z quasar to date. The EPIC observations show that PKS 0537-286 is extremely X-ray luminous (Lx=2x10^47 erg/s), with an unusually hard X-ray spectrum (Gamma=1.27+/-0.02). The flat power-law emission extends over the whole observed energy range; there is no evidence of intrinsic absorption, which has been claimed in PKS 0537-286 and other high z quasars. However, there is evidence for weak Compton reflection. A redshifted iron K line, observed at 1.5 keV - corresponding to 6.15 keV in the quasar rest frame - is detected at 95% confidence. If confirmed, this is the most distant iron K line known. The line equivalent width is small (33eV), consistent with the `X-ray Baldwin effect' observed in other luminous quasars. The reflected continuum is also weak (R=0.25). We find the overall spectral energy distribution of PKS 0537-286 is dominated by ...

  12. AN APPARENT REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF QUASAR CONTINUUM: IMPLICATION FOR COSMIC DUST EXTINCTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun, E-mail: ssy@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of the composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., α{sub ν12} (1000 ∼ 2000 Å) and α{sub ν24} (2000 ∼ 4000 Å) derived from a power-law fitting. Generally, the UV spectra slope becomes harder (higher α{sub ν}) toward higher bolometric luminosity. On the other hand, when quasars are further grouped into luminosity bins, we find that both α{sub ν12} and α{sub ν24} show significant anti-correlations with redshift (i.e., the quasar continuum becomes redder toward higher redshift). We suggest that the cosmic dust extinction is very likely the cause of this observed α{sub ν} − z relation. We build a simple cosmic dust extinction model to quantify the observed reddening tendency and find an effective dust density nσ{sub v} ∼ 10{sup −5}h Mpc{sup −1} at z < 1.5. The other possibilities that could produce such a reddening effect have also been discussed.

  13. A Quasar Catalog with Simultaneous UV, Optical and X-ray Observations by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jian; Grupe, Dirk; Koch, Scott; Gelbord, Jonathan; Schneider, Donald P; Gronwall, Caryl; Wesolowski, Sarah; Porterfield, Blair L

    2012-01-01

    We have compiled a catalog of optically-selected quasars with simultaneous observations in UV/optical and X-ray bands by the Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer. Objects in this catalog are identified by matching the Swift pointings with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog. The final catalog contains 843 objects, among which 637 have both UVOT and XRT observations and 354 of which are detected by both instruments. The overall X-ray detection rate is ~60% which rises to ~85% among sources with at least 10 ks of XRT exposure time. We construct the time-averaged spectral energy distribution for each of the 354 quasars using UVOT photometric measurements and XRT spectra. From model fits to these SEDs, we find that the big blue bump contributes about 0.3 dex to the quasar luminosity. We re-visit the alpha_ox-L_uv relation by selecting a clean sample with only type 1 radio-quiet quasars; the dispersion of this relation is reduced by at least 15% compared to studies that use non-simultaneous UV/opt...

  14. Low redshift quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82. The local environments

    CERN Document Server

    Karhunen, K; Falomo, R; Bettoni, D

    2014-01-01

    We study the environments of low redshift (z < 0.5) quasars based on a large and homogeneous dataset from the Stripe 82 region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have compared the < 1 Mpc scale envi- ronments of 302 quasars that were resolved in our recent study to those of 288 inactive galaxies with closely matched redshifts. Crucially, the lu- minosities of the inactive galaxies and the quasar host galaxies are also closely matched, unlike in most previous studies. The environmental overdensities were studied by measuring the num- ber density of galaxies within a projected distance of 200 kpc to 1 Mpc. The galaxy number density of the quasar environments is comparable to that of the inactive galaxies with similar luminosities, both classes of ob- jects showing significant excess compared to the background galaxy density for distances < 400 kpc. There is no significant dependence of the galaxy number density on redshift, quasar or host galaxy luminosity, black hole mass or radio loudness. Th...

  15. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Dietrich, Matthias; Hamann, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Quasars are among the most luminous objects in the universe, and they can be studied in detail up to the highest known redshift. Assuming that the gas associated with quasars is closely related to the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, quasars can be used as tracer of the star formation history in the early universe. We have observed a small sample of quasars at redshifts 3= 10, corresponding to an age of the universe of less than 5*10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7).

  16. Functional Regression for Quasar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ciollaro, Mattia; Freeman, Peter; Genovese, Christopher; Lei, Jing; O'Connell, Ross; Wasserman, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha forest is a portion of the observed light spectrum of distant galactic nuclei which allows us to probe remote regions of the Universe that are otherwise inaccessible. The observed Lyman-alpha forest of a quasar light spectrum can be modeled as a noisy realization of a smooth curve that is affected by a `damping effect' which occurs whenever the light emitted by the quasar travels through regions of the Universe with higher matter concentration. To decode the information conveyed by the Lyman-alpha forest about the matter distribution, we must be able to separate the smooth `continuum' from the noise and the contribution of the damping effect in the quasar light spectra. To predict the continuum in the Lyman-alpha forest, we use a nonparametric functional regression model in which both the response and the predictor variable (the smooth part of the damping-free portion of the spectrum) are function-valued random variables. We demonstrate that the proposed method accurately predicts the unobserv...

  17. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now, it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalactic astronomers, irrespective of their favourite electromagnetic band(s), and even stellar astronomers might find it somewhat gratifying.

  18. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalac...

  19. Very-high-energy gamma rays from a distant quasar: how transparent is the universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, J; Aliu, E; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Curtef, V; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea Del Pozo, E; de Los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Goebel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kneiske, T M; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Mizobuchi, S; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Shore, S N; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Zapatero, J

    2008-06-27

    The atmospheric Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope MAGIC, designed for a low-energy threshold, has detected very-high-energy gamma rays from a giant flare of the distant Quasi-Stellar Radio Source (in short: radio quasar) 3C 279, at a distance of more than 5 billion light-years (a redshift of 0.536). No quasar has been observed previously in very-high-energy gamma radiation, and this is also the most distant object detected emitting gamma rays above 50 gigaelectron volts. Because high-energy gamma rays may be stopped by interacting with the diffuse background light in the universe, the observations by MAGIC imply a low amount for such light, consistent with that known from galaxy counts.

  20. Fast outflows in broad absorption line quasars and their connection with CSS/GPS sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bruni, G; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Brienza, M; González-Serrano, J I

    2015-01-01

    Broad absorption line quasars are among the objects presenting the fastest outflows. The launching mechanism itself is not completely understood. Models in which they could be launched from the accretion disk, and then curved and accelerated by the effect of the radiation pressure, have been presented. We conducted an extensive observational campaign, from radio to optical band, to collect information about their nature and test the models present in the literature, the main dichotomy being between a young scenario and an orientation one. We found a variety of possible orientations, morphologies, and radio ages, not converging to a particular explanation for the BAL phenomenon. From our latest observations in the m- and mm-band, we obtained an indication of a lower dust abundance with respect to normal quasars, thus suggesting a possible feedback process on the host galaxy. Also, in the low-frequency regime we confirmed the presence of CSS components, sometime in conjunction with a GPS one already detected at...

  1. Four quasars above redshift 6 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Willott, Chris J; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Albert, Loic; Reyle, Celine; Hill, Gary J; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Vinten, Phillip; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B; Schade, David; Simard, Luc; Sawicki, Marcin; Beelen, Alexandre; Cox, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) is an optical survey designed to locate quasars during the epoch of reionization. In this paper we present the discovery of the first four CFHQS quasars at redshift greater than 6, including the most distant known quasar, CFHQS J2329-0301 at z=6.43. We describe the observational method used to identify the quasars and present optical, infrared, and millimeter photometry and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We investigate the dust properties of these quasars finding an unusual dust extinction curve for one quasar and a high far-infrared luminosity due to dust emission for another. The mean millimeter continuum flux for CFHQS quasars is substantially lower than that for SDSS quasars at the same redshift, likely due to a correlation with quasar UV luminosity. For two quasars with sufficiently high signal-to-noise optical spectra, we use the spectra to investigate the ionization state of hydrogen at z>5. For CFHQS J1509-1749 at z=6.12, we find significant evol...

  2. Evidence for Quasar Activity Triggered by Galaxy Mergers in HST Observations of Dust-reddened Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Becker, Robert H.

    2008-02-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope ACS images of 13 dust-reddened type 1 quasars selected from the FIRST/2MASS Red Quasar Survey. These quasars have high intrinsic luminosities after correction for dust obscuration (-23.5 >= MB >= - 26.2 from K-magnitude). The images show strong evidence of recent or ongoing interaction in 11 of the 13 cases, even before the quasar nucleus is subtracted. None of the host galaxies are well fit by a simple elliptical profile. The fraction of quasars showing interaction is significantly higher than the 30% seen in samples of host galaxies of normal, unobscured quasars. There is a weak correlation between the amount of dust reddening and the magnitude of interaction in the host galaxy, measured using the Gini coefficient and the concentration index. Although few host galaxy studies of normal quasars are matched to ours in intrinsic quasar luminosity, no evidence has been found for a strong dependence of merger activity on host luminosity in samples of the host galaxies of normal quasars. We thus believe that the high merger fraction in our sample is related to their obscured nature, with a significant amount of reddening occurring in the host galaxy. The red quasar phenomenon seems to have an evolutionary explanation, with the young quasar spending the early part of its lifetime enshrouded in an interacting galaxy. This might be further indication of a link between AGNs and starburst galaxies.

  3. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wolk, G; Peletier, R F; Pel, J W

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and determine the presence of dust tori among radio galaxies of various types. Actively accreting supermassive black holes in the centres of radio galaxies may be uncovered through their dust tori reradiating the optical and ultraviolet continuum in mid-infrared bands. Using VISIR on the VLT, we have obtained sub-arcsecond (~0.40") resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 micron, of the nuclei of a sample of 27 radio galaxies of four types in the redshift range z=0.006-0.156. The sample consists of 8 edge-darkened, low-power Fanaroff-Riley class I (FR-I) radio galaxies, 6 edge-brightened, class II (FR-II) radio galaxies displaying low-excitation optical emission, 7 FR-IIs displaying high-excitation optical emission, and 6 FR-II broad emission line radio galaxies. Out of the sample of 27 objects, 10 nuclei are detected and several have constraining non-detections at 10 sigma sensitivities of 7 mJy. On the basis of the core ...

  4. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Snapshot Survey of 3CR Quasars: The Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Matthew D.; Miley, George K.; Sparks, William B.; Baum, Stefi A.; Biretta, John; Golombek, Daniel; de Koff, Sigrid; Macchetto, Ferdinando D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.

    1999-08-01

    We present images taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC-2) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of 43 quasars selected from the 3CR radio catalog. The redshift range of the targets is large--0.3Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  5. Radio Identifications of Markarian Galaxies and the Correlation between Radio and Far-Infrared Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Guang Luo; Xue-Bing Wu

    2005-01-01

    By checking DSS optical images and NVSS radio images, 782 Markarian galaxies were identified to be NVSS radio sources. A comparison of the radio luminosity at 1.4 GHz and the far-infrared (FIR) luminosity for 468 "normal"galaxies shows a tight correlation. Most of the Seyfert galaxies and quasars follow the radio-FIR relation deduced from the "normal" galaxy sample, but with a somewhat larger scatter. A total 167 Markarian galaxies, comprising 100 "normal"galaxies, 66 Seyfert galaxies and one quasar, have either excess radio emission or much lower FIR spectral index α(25μm, 60μm). These galaxies may be classified as "AGN-powered". For "normal" galaxies, the average q value (defined as the log ratio between FIR and radio luminosities) is 2.3. There seems a trend for q to slightly decrease with increasing radio luminosity. This may imply that the ongoing active star formation in galaxies with higher radio luminosities is more efficient in heating the cosmic-ray electrons.

  6. Hypersexuality after Temporal Lobe Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Amee D.; Wilson, Sarah J.; Bladin, Peter F.; Saling, Michael M.; Reutens, David C.

    2002-04-01

    Hypersexuality has occasionally been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy following temporal lobe resection. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon is poorly understood. We describe seven patients who spontaneously reported dramatic postoperative changes in sexual behavior after unilateral temporal lobe resection. Five of the seven patients showed evidence of bilateral temporal lobe abnormalities. All of the patients had significant difficulties with postoperative psychosocial adjustment that preceded the onset of hypersexuality. Five of the patients were completely seizure-free and one reported postoperative auras. Recurrent complex partial seizures occurred at a reduced frequency in one patient after 6 months. In this patient, the period of seizure freedom did not directly correlate with the period of hypersexuality. These cases suggest that hypersexuality following unilateral temporal lobe resection is more likely to occur in the presence of psychosocial difficulties and contralateral temporal lobe abnormalities. Neurophysiological processes associated with seizure cessation alone do not appear to account for postoperative hypersexuality.

  7. Inverse-Compton emission from the lobes of 3C 353

    CERN Document Server

    Goodger, J L; Croston, J H; Kassim, N E; Perley, R A

    2008-01-01

    X-ray emission due to inverse-Compton scattering of microwave background photons by electrons in the lobes of powerful radio galaxies has now been seen in a large number of objects. Combining an inverse-Compton model for the lobe X-ray emission with information obtained from radio synchrotron emission provides a method of constraining the electron population and magnetic field energy density, which cannot be accomplished using the radio data alone. Using six frequencies of new and archival radio data and new XMM-Newton observations of the Fanaroff & Riley class II radio galaxy 3C353, we show that inverse-Compton emission is detected in the radio lobes of this source at a level consistent with what is seen in other objects. We argue that variations in the X-ray/radio ratio in the brighter eastern lobe require positionally varying magnetic field strength. We also examine the X-ray nucleus and the cluster, Zw 1819.1-0108, spatially and spectrally.

  8. Parietal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, Vicenta

    2012-10-01

    Patients with parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE) exhibit an electroclinical epilepsy syndrome that is rarely seen even at large epilepsy centers. Clinically, most patients with PLE exhibit a somatosensory aura that may include painful dysesthesias, though vertigo, aphasia, disturbances of one's body image also occur, when ictal propagation occurs from the parietal lobe to the supplementary motor area, hypermotor manifestations are noted. When temporolimbic propagation occurs, complex visual or auditory hallucinations and automatisms may appear. Scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is often nonlocalizing. Ictal EEG is rarely localizing in PLE, and invasive EEG is often required for definitive localization and functional mapping. Recent advances in clinical neurophysiology during the evaluation of patients with refractory partial epilepsy include Ictal magnetic source imaging (MSI). Combined EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) may be useful for patients with PLE to refine the localization in patients undergoing a presurgical evaluation. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are more concentrated inside the seizure onset zone (SOZ), indicating that they may be used as interictal scalp EEG biomarker for the SOZ. When medical therapy fails, resective epilepsy surgery can result in seizure freedom or significant reduction especially when a lesion is present.

  9. Chandra Observations of 12 Luminous Red Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrutia, T; Lacy, M; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H

    2005-03-11

    The authors present results of a study of 12 dust-reddened quasars with 0.4 < z < 2.65 and reddenings in the range 0.15 < E(B-V) < 1.7. They obtained ACIS-S X-ray spectra of these quasars, estimated the column densities towards them, and hence obtained the gas:dust ratios in the material obscuring the quasar. They detect all but one of the red quasars in the X-rays. Even though there is no obvious correlation between the X-ray determined column densities of the sources and their optical color or reddening, all of the sources show absorbed X-ray spectra. When they correct the luminosity for absorption, they can be placed among luminous quasars; therefore their objects belong to the group of high luminosity analogues of the sources contributing to the X-ray background seen in deep X-ray observations. Such sources are also found in serendipitous shallow X-ray surveys. There is a hint that the mean spectral slope of the red quasar is higher than that of normal, unobscured quasars, which could be an indication for higher accretion rates and/or an evolutionary effect. They investigate the number density of these sources compared to type 2 AGN based on the X-ray background and estimate how many moderate luminosity red quasars may be found in deep X-ray fields.

  10. VLBI observations of a flared optical quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    CERN Document Server

    An, Tao; Paragi, Zsolt; Frey, Sandor; Gurvits, Leonid I; Gabanyi, Krisztina E

    2016-01-01

    A bright optical flare was detected in the high-redshift ($z=2.133$) quasar CGRaBS J0809+5341 on 2014 April 13. The absolute magnitude of the object reached $-30.0$ during the flare, making it the brightest one (in flaring stage) among all known quasars so far. The 15 GHz flux density of CGRaBS J0809+5341 monitored in the period from 2008 to 2016 also reached its peak at the same time. To reveal any structural change possibly associated with the flare in the innermost radio structure of the quasar, we conducted a pilot very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observation of CGRaBS J0809+5341 using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 2014 November 18, about seven months after the prominent optical flare. Three epochs of follow-up KaVA (Korean VLBI Network and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry Array) observations were carried out at 22 and 43 GHz frequencies from 2015 February 25 to June 4, with the intention of exploring a possibly emerging new radio jet component associated with the optical flare. ...

  11. The Neutrino Ball Model of a Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Manka, R; Karczewska, D

    1993-01-01

    It is suggested that the nonorthodox model of a quasar as a neutrino ball described in terms of the standard model extended by adding right-handed neutrinos and the Majorana scalar field can be presented in order to explain a quasar as a body of weak interacting neutrinos. Neutrino interaction with the scalar Majorana field violates the lepton number and produces the mass splitting of the neutrino due to the sea-saw mechanism. In this model a quasar is an object which appears in the result of the first order cosmological phase transition. In this interpretation a quasar may be regarded as a ball filled with Dirac neutrinos and can be treated as a remnant of phase transition with unbroken global lepton symmetry. In this paper we study the macroscopic parameters of such a configuration. In the result the mass-radius curve M(R) for the quasar is obtained.

  12. Infrared imaging of WENSS radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Villani, D

    1999-01-01

    We have performed deep imaging in the IR J- and K-bands for three sub-samples of radio sources extracted from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, a large low-frequency radio survey containing Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS), Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Flat Spectrum (FS) sources. We present the results of these IR observations, carried out with the ARcetri Near Infrared CAmera (ARNICA) at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), providing photometric and morphologic information on high redshift radio galaxies and quasars. We find that the radio galaxies contained in our sample do not show the pronounced radio/IR alignment claimed for 3CR sources. IR photometric measurements of the gravitational lens system 1600+434 are also presented.

  13. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B.; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; hide

    2016-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalogue, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver data. We constrain the form of the far-infrared emission and find 3 sigma-4 sigma evidence for the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy (6.2 plus or minus 1.7) × 10 (exp 60) erg. This amount of thermal energy is greater than expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of (1-5) × 10(exp 12) h(exp -1) solar mass that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. Our measurements are consistent with quasars depositing up to (14.5 +/- 3.3)tau (sub 8)(exp -1) per cent of their radiative energy into their circumgalactic environment if their typical period of quasar activity is tau(sub 8) x 108 yr. For high quasar host masses, approximately 10(exp 13) h(exp -1) solar mass, this percentage will be reduced. Furthermore, the uncertainty on this percentage is only statistical and additional systematic uncertainties enter at the 40 per cent level. The SEDs are dust dominated in all bands and we consider various models for dust emission. While sufficiently complex dust models can obviate the SZ effect, the SZ interpretation remains favoured at the 3 sigma-4 sigma level for most models.

  14. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B.; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Sifon, Cristobal; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Viero, Marco P.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalogue, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver data. We constrain the form of the far-infrared emission and find 3 sigma-4 sigma evidence for the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy (6.2 plus or minus 1.7) × 10 (exp 60) erg. This amount of thermal energy is greater than expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of (1-5) × 10(exp 12) h(exp -1) solar mass that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. Our measurements are consistent with quasars depositing up to (14.5 +/- 3.3)tau (sub 8)(exp -1) per cent of their radiative energy into their circumgalactic environment if their typical period of quasar activity is tau(sub 8) x 108 yr. For high quasar host masses, approximately 10(exp 13) h(exp -1) solar mass, this percentage will be reduced. Furthermore, the uncertainty on this percentage is only statistical and additional systematic uncertainties enter at the 40 per cent level. The SEDs are dust dominated in all bands and we consider various models for dust emission. While sufficiently complex dust models can obviate the SZ effect, the SZ interpretation remains favoured at the 3 sigma-4 sigma level for most models.

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 4. Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W.N.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester,; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Johns Hopkins U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona

    2007-04-01

    We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 5740 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2-minutes rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

  16. Tracing dark energy with quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Średzińska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Kurcz, A; Marziani, P; Pollo, A; Pych, W; Udalski, A

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark energy, driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe, is one of the most important issues in modern astrophysics. In order to understand this phenomenon, we need precise astrophysical probes of the universal expansion spanning wide redshift ranges. Quasars have recently emerged as such a probe, thanks to their high intrinsic luminosities and, most importantly, our ability to measure their luminosity distances independently of redshifts. Here we report our ongoing work on observational reverberation mapping using the time delay of the Mg II line, performed with the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  17. Temporal lobe epilepsy semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert D G

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures) is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE). Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  18. Time Dependent Hadronic Modeling of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Diltz, Christopher; Fossati, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new time-dependent lepto-hadronic model for blazar emission that takes into account the radiation emitted by secondary particles, such as pions and muons, from photo hadronic interactions. Starting from a baseline parameter set guided by a fit to the spectral energy distribution of the blazar 3C 279, we perform a parameter study to investigate the effects of perturbations of the input parameters to mimic different flaring events to study the resulting lightcurves in the optical, X-ray, high energy (HE: E > 100 MeV) and very-high-energy (VHE: E > 100 GeV) gamma-rays as well as the neutrino emission associated with charged-pion and muon decay. We find that flaring events from an increase in the efficiency of Fermi II acceleration will produce a positive correlation between all bandpasses and a marked plateau in the HE gamma-ray lightcurve. We also predict a distinctive dip in the HE lightcurve for perturbations caused by a change in the proton injection spectral index. These plateaus / dips could...

  19. HST images of FeLoBAL quasars: Testing quasar-galaxy evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Hanna; Hamann, Fred; Villforth, Carolin; Caselli, Paola; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from an HST imaging study of FeLoBAL quasars, which have extremely low-ionization Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows and might be a young quasar population based on their red colors, large far-IR luminosities (suggesting high star formation rates), and powerful outflows. Some models of quasar - host galaxy evolution propose a triggering event, such as a merger, to fuel both a burst of star formation and the quasar/AGN activity. These models suggest young quasars are initially obscured inside the dusty starburst until a "blowout" phase, driven by the starburst or quasar outflows like FeLoBALs, ends the star formation and reveals the visibly luminous quasar. Despite the popularity of this evolution scheme, there is little observational evidence to support the role of mergers in triggering AGN or the youth of dust-reddened quasars (such as FeLoBALs) compared to normal blue quasars.Our Cycle 22 HST program is designed to test the youth of FeLoBAL quasars and the connection of FeLoBALs to mergers. We obtain WFC3/IR F160W images of 10 FeLoBAL quasars at redshift z~0.9 (covering ~8500A in the quasar rest frame). We will compare the host galaxy morphologies and merger signatures of FeLoBALs with normal blue quasars (which are older according to the evolution model) and non-AGN galaxies matched in redshift and stellar mass. If FeLoBAL quasars are indeed in a young evolutionary state, close in time to the initial merging event, they should have stronger merger features compared to blue quasars and non-AGN galaxies. Preliminary results suggest that this is not the case - FeLoBAL quasars appear to reside in faint, compact hosts with weak or absent merger signatures. We discuss the implications of these results for galaxy evolution models and other studies of dust-reddened quasar populations.

  20. The jet power, radio loudness and black hole mass in radio loud AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Y; Gu, M F; Liu, Yi; Jiang, Dong Rong; Gu, Min Feng

    2006-01-01

    The jet formation is thought to be closely connected with the mass of central supermassive black hole in Active Galactic Nuclei. The radio luminosity commonly used in investigating this issue is merely an indirect measure of the energy transported through the jets from the central engine, and severely Doppler boosted in core-dominated radio quasars. In this work, we investigate the relationship between the jet power and black hole mass, by estimating the jet power using extrapolated extended 151 MHz flux density from the VLA 5 GHz extended radio emission, for a sample of 146 radio loud quasars complied from literature. After removing the effect of relativistic beaming in the radio and optical emission, we find a significant intrinsic correlation between the jet power and black hole mass. It strongly implies that the jet power, so as jet formation, is closely connected with the black hole mass.To eliminate the beaming effect in the conventional radio loudness, we define a new radio loudness as the ratio of the...

  1. Tracking Galaxy Evolution Through Low-Frequency Radio Continuum Observations using SKA and Citizen-Science Research using Multi-Wavelength Data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ananda Hota; C. Konar; C. S. Stalin; Sravani Vaddi; Pradeepta K. Mohanty; Pratik Dabhade; Sai Arun Dharmik Bhoga; Megha Rajoria; Sagar Sethi

    2016-12-01

    We present a brief review of progress in the understanding of general spiral and elliptical galaxies, through merger, star formation and AGN activities. With reference to case studies performed with the GMRT, we highlight the unique aspects of studying galaxies in the radio wavelengths where powerful quasars and bright radio galaxies are traditionally the dominating subjects. Though AGN or quasar activity is extremely energetic, it is extremely short-lived. This justify focussing on transitional galaxies to find relic-evidences of the immediate past AGN-feedback which decide the future course of evolution of a galaxy. Relic radio lobes can be best detected in low frequency observations with the GMRT, LOFAR and in future SKA. The age of these relic radio plasma can be as old as a few hundred Myr. There is a huge gap between this and what is found in optical bands. The very first relic-evidences of a past quasar activity (Hanny’s Voorwerp) was discovered in 2007 by a Galaxy Zoo citizen-scientist, a school teacher, in the optical bands. This relic is around a few tens of thousand years old. More discoveries needed to match these time-scales with star formation time-scales in AGN host galaxies to better understand black hole galaxy co-evolution process via feedback-driven quenching of star formation. It is now well-accepted that discovery and characterization of such faint fuzzy relic features can be more efficiently done by human eye than a machine. Radio interferometry images are more complicated than optical and need the citizen-scientists to be trained. RAD@home, the only Indian citizen-science research project in astronomy, analysing TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) 150 MHz data and observing from the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT), was launched in April 2013. Unique, zero-infrastructure zero-funded design of RAD@home as a collaboratory of 69 trained e-astronomers is briefly described. Some of the new-found objects like episodic radio galaxies, radio-jet and

  2. Tracking Galaxy Evolution Through Low-Frequency Radio Continuum Observations using SKA and Citizen-Science Research using Multi-Wavelength Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hota, Ananda; Konar, C.; Stalin, C. S.; Vaddi, Sravani; Mohanty, Pradeepta K.; Dabhade, Pratik; Dharmik Bhoga, Sai Arun; Rajoria, Megha; Sethi, Sagar

    2016-12-01

    We present a brief review of progress in the understanding of general spiral and elliptical galaxies, through merger, star formation and AGN activities. With reference to case studies performed with the GMRT, we highlight the unique aspects of studying galaxies in the radio wavelengths where powerful quasars and bright radio galaxies are traditionally the dominating subjects. Though AGN or quasar activity is extremely energetic, it is extremely short-lived. This justify focussing on transitional galaxies to find relic-evidences of the immediate past AGN-feedback which decide the future course of evolution of a galaxy. Relic radio lobes can be best detected in low frequency observations with the GMRT, LOFAR and in future SKA. The age of these relic radio plasma can be as old as a few hundred Myr. There is a huge gap between this and what is found in optical bands. The very first relic-evidences of a past quasar activity (Hanny's Voorwerp) was discovered in 2007 by a Galaxy Zoo citizen-scientist, a school teacher, in the optical bands. This relic is around a few tens of thousand years old. More discoveries needed to match these time-scales with star formation time-scales in AGN host galaxies to better understand black hole galaxy co-evolution process via feedback-driven quenching of star formation. It is now well-accepted that discovery and characterization of such faint fuzzy relic features can be more efficiently done by human eye than a machine. Radio interferometry images are more complicated than optical and need the citizen-scientists to be trained. RAD@home, the only Indian citizen-science research project in astronomy, analysing TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) 150 MHz data and observing from the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT), was launched in April 2013. Unique, zero-infrastructure zero-funded design of RAD@home as a collaboratory of 69 trained e-astronomers is briefly described. Some of the new-found objects like episodic radio galaxies, radio-jet and

  3. Quasar bolometric corrections: theoretical considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S

    2010-01-01

    Bolometric corrections based on the optical-to-ultraviolet continuum spectrum of quasars are widely used to quantify their radiative output, although such estimates are affected by a myriad of uncertainties, such as the generally unknown line-of-sight angle to the central engine. In order to shed light on these issues, we investigate the state-of-the-art models of Hubeny et al. that describe the continuum spectrum of thin accretion discs and include relativistic effects. We explore the bolometric corrections as a function of mass accretion rates, black hole masses and viewing angles, restricted to the parameter space expected for type-1 quasars. We find that a nonlinear relationship log L_bol=A + B log(lambda L_lambda) with B<=0.9 is favoured by the models and becomes tighter as the wavelength decreases. We calculate from the model the bolometric corrections corresponding to the wavelengths lambda = 1450A, 3000A and 5100A. In particular, for lambda=3000A we find A=9.24 +- 0.77 and B=0.81 +- 0.02. We demons...

  4. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  5. Possible Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes from FRI quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Matthew I; Garofalo, David; D'Avanzo, Jaclyn

    2016-01-01

    We explore the question of the rapid buildup of black hole mass in the early universe employing a growing black hole mass-based determination of both jet and disk powers predicted in recent theoretical work on black hole accretion and jet formation. Despite simplified, even artificial assumptions about accretion and mergers, we identify an interesting low probability channel for the growth of one billion solar mass black holes within hundreds of millions of years of the Big Bang without appealing to super Eddington accretion. This result is made more compelling by the recognition of a connection between this channel and an end product involving active galaxies with FRI radio morphology but weaker jet powers in mildly sub-Eddington accretion regimes. While FRI quasars have already been shown to occupy a small region of the available parameter space for black hole feedback in the paradigm, we further suggest that the observational dearth of FRI quasars is also related to their connection to the most massive bla...

  6. Possible evolution of supermassive black holes from FRI quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Matthew I.; Christian, Damian J.; Garofalo, David; D'Avanzo, Jaclyn

    2016-08-01

    We explore the question of the rapid buildup of black hole mass in the early universe employing a growing black hole mass-based determination of both jet and disc powers predicted in recent theoretical work on black hole accretion and jet formation. Despite simplified, even artificial assumptions about accretion and mergers, we identify an interesting low probability channel for the growth of one billion solar mass black holes within hundreds of millions of years of the big bang without appealing to super Eddington accretion. This result is made more compelling by the recognition of a connection between this channel and an end product involving active galaxies with FRI radio morphology but weaker jet powers in mildly sub-Eddington accretion regimes. While FRI quasars have already been shown to occupy a small region of the available parameter space for black hole feedback in the paradigm, we further suggest that the observational dearth of FRI quasars is also related to their connection to the most massive black hole growth due to both these FRIs high redshifts and relative weakness. Our results also allow us to construct the AGN (active galactic nucleus) luminosity function at high redshift, that agree with recent studies. In short, we produce a connection between the unexplained paucity of a given family of AGNs and the rapid growth of supermassive black holes, two heretofore seemingly unrelated aspects of the physics of AGNs.

  7. Halo Occupation Distribution of Infrared Selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kaustav

    2016-01-01

    We perform a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars that are observed in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) telescope with counter-parts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release (DR)-8 quasar catalog at a median redshift of $z\\sim 1.04 (\\pm 0.58)$. Using a four parameter HOD model we derive the host mass scales of WISE selected quasars. Our results show that the median halo masses of central and satellite quasars lie in the range $M_{\\mathrm{cen}} = (5 \\pm 1.0) \\times 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_{\\mathrm{sat}} = 8 (^{+7.8} _{-4.8}) \\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}$, respectively. The derived satellite fraction is $f_{\\mathrm{sat}}= 5.5 (^{+35} _{-5.0})\\times 10^{-3}$. Previously Richardson et al.\\ used the SDSS DR7 quasar clustering data to obtain the halo mass distributions of $z\\sim 1.4$ quasars. Our results on the HOD of central quasars are in excellent agreement with Richardson et al.\\ but the host mass scale of satellite ...

  8. In Search of Quasar Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Sturm, E.; Ciardullo, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Accretion-powered and star formation activity have been shown to coincide, motivating us to search for the star-forming regions in the host galaxies of quasars and to determine the star-formation rates. In this work we use calibrated narrow band emission line (H-beta and Pa-alpha) WFPC2 and NICMOS images as maps for total star formation rate. The main challenge in imaging quasar host galaxies is the separation of the quasar light from the galaxy light, especially in the case of z approximately 0.1 quasars in WFPC2 images where the PSF radius closely matches the expected host scale radius. To this this end we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light, which we have validated through extensive simulations using artificial quasar+galaxy images. The other significant challenge in mapping and measuring star forming regions is correcting for extinction, which we address using extinction maps created from the Pa-alpha/H-beta ratio. To determine the source of excitation, we utilize H-beta along with [OIII]5007 and [OII]3727 images in diagnostic line ratio (BPT) diagrams. We detect extended line emission in our targets on scales of order 1-2 kpc. A preliminary analysis suggests star formation rates of order 10 solar masses per year.

  9. Quasar Proximity Zones and Patchy Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Lidz, A; Zaldarriaga, M; Hernquist, L; Dutta, S; Lidz, Adam; Quinn, Matthew Mc; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Hernquist, Lars; Dutta, Suvendra

    2007-01-01

    Lyman-alpha forest absorption spectra towards quasars at z ~ 6 show regions of enhanced transmission close to their source. Several authors have argued that the apparently small sizes of these regions indicate that quasar ionization fronts at z >~ 6 expand into a largely or partly neutral intergalactic medium (IGM). Assuming that the typical region in the IGM is reionized by z <= 6, as is suggested by Ly-a forest observations, we argue that at {\\em least} 50% of the volume of the IGM was reionized before the highest redshift quasars turned on. Further, even if the IGM is as much as 50% neutral at quasar turn-on, the quasars are likely born into large galaxy-generated HII regions. The HII regions during reionization are themselves clustered, and using radiative transfer simulations, we find that long skewers through the IGM towards quasar progenitor halos pass entirely through ionized bubbles, even when the IGM is half neutral. These effects have been neglected in most previous analyses of quasar proximity ...

  10. X-ray Lighthouses of the High-Redshift Universe. II. Further Snapshot Observations of the Most Luminous z>4 Quasars with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Schneider, D P; Kaspi, S

    2005-01-01

    We report on Chandra observations of a sample of 11 optically luminous (Mb4 quasars known and hence represent ideal witnesses of the end of the "dark age ''. Nine quasars are detected by Chandra, with ~2-57 counts in the observed 0.5-8 keV band. These detections increase the number of X-ray detected AGN at z>4 to ~90; overall, Chandra has detected ~85% of the high-redshift quasars observed with snapshot (few kilosecond) observations. PSS 1506+5220, one of the two X-ray undetected quasars, displays a number of notable features in its rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum, the most prominent being broad, deep SiIV and CIV absorption lines. The average optical-to-X-ray spectral index for the present sample (=-1.88+/-0.05) is steeper than that typically found for z>4 quasars but consistent with the expected value from the known dependence of this spectral index on quasar luminosity. We present joint X-ray spectral fitting for a sample of 48 radio-quiet quasars in the redshift range 3.99-6.28 for which Chandra observati...

  11. PORTAL SUPPLY TO CAUDATE LOBE AND QUADRATE LOBE OF LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheswari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The precise knowledge of intra hepatic branching pattern of portal vein to caudate lobe and quadrate lobe is important for Gastroenterologist during hepatic segmental and subsegmental resection. The study was done in 47 adult human liver specimens. In this study methods like Manual dissection and Contrast study were used. During this study the portal branches to caudate l obe, Quadrate lobe and accessory branches to segment IV in addition to its branches were observed. The results were compared with previous studies

  12. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Stirpe, G M; Dultzin, D; Del Olmo, A; Martínez-Carballo, M A

    2015-01-01

    [Oiii]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 "blue outliers" -- that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars -- appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate-z sample of 52 sources qualify as blue outliers (i.e., quasars with [OIII] {\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of blue outliers to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  13. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  14. Spitzer observations of a gravitationally lensed quasar, QSO 2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Agol, Eric; Gorjian, Varoujan; Kimball, Amy; 10.1088/0004-637X/697/2/1010

    2009-01-01

    The four-image gravitationally lensed quasar QSO 2237+0305 is microlensed by stars in the lens galaxy. The amplitude of microlensing variability can be used to infer the relative size of the quasar as a function of wavelength; this provides a test of quasar models. Toward this end, we present Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations of QSO 2237+0305, finding the following. (1) The infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) is similar to that of other bright radio-quiet quasars, contrary to an earlier claim. (2) A dusty torus model with a small opening angle fits the overall shape of the IR SED well, but the quantitative agreement is poor due to an offset in wavelength of the silicate feature. (3) The flux ratios of the four lensed images can be derived from the IRAC data despite being unresolved. We find that the near-IR fluxes are increasingly affected by microlensing toward shorter wavelengths. (4) The wavelength dependence of the IRAC flux ratios is ...

  15. A Massive X-ray Outflow From The Quasar PDS 456

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, J. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ward, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    We report on XMM-Newton spectroscopic observations of the luminous, radio-quiet quasar PDS 456. The hard X-ray spectrum of PDS 456 shows a deep absorption trough (constituting 50% of the continuum) at energies above 7 keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be attributed to a series of blue-shifted K-shell absorption edges due to highly ionized iron. The higher resolution soft X-ray grating RGS spectrum exhibits a broad absorption line feature near 1 keV, which can be modeled by a blend of L-shell transitions from highly ionized iron (Fe XVII - XXIV). An extreme outflow velocity of approx. 50000 km/s is required to model the K and L shell iron absorption present in the XMM-Newton data. Overall, a large column density (N(sub H) = 5 x 10(exp 23)/sq cm) of highly ionized gas (log xi = 2.5) is required in PDS 456. A large mass outflow rate of approx. 10 solar mass/year (assuming a conservative outflow covering factor of 0.1 steradian) is derived, which is of the same order as the overall mass accretion rate in PDS 456. This represents a substantial fraction (approx. 10%) of the quasar energy budget, whilst the large column and outflow velocity place PDS 456 towards the extreme end of the broad absorption line quasar population.

  16. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Crichton, Devin; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A; Zakamska, Nadia L; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J Richard; Devlin, Mark J; Hill, J Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, John P; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Sievers, Jonathan L; Sifon, Cristobal; Staggs, Suzanne T; Viero, Marco P; Wollack, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalog, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy densities via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-SPIRE data. We constrain the form and evolution of the far-infrared emission finding 3-4$\\sigma$ evidence for the presence of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the millimetre bands. We find this signal to be characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy $(6.2 \\pm 1.7) \\times 10^{60}$erg. This amount of thermal energy is an order of magnitude greater than would be expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of $(1-5)\\times 10^{12}h^{-1}$M$_\\odot$ that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. We find that our measurements are consistent with a scenario in which quasars depo...

  17. Quasars Probing Quasars IV: Joint Constraints on the Circumgalactic Medium from Absorption and Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Hennawi, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick HI gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly-a emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly-a scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive slit-spectroscopic search (1-sigma limits of SB_Lya ~= 3e-18 erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2) for diffuse Ly-a emission in the environments of the foreground quasars is conducted. We fail to detect large-scale ~ 100 kpc Ly-a emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, w...

  18. A quasar companion to the puzzling quasar SDSS J0927+2943

    OpenAIRE

    Decarli, R.; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Barattini, M

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of a quasar close to SDSS J0927+2943 (z = 0.713), which is a massive binary / recoiling black hole candidate. The companion quasar is at a projected distance of 125 h_70^{-1} kpc and exhibits a radial velocity difference of ~1400 km/s with respect to the known quasar. We discuss the nature of this peculiar quasar pair and the properties of its environment. We propose that the overall system is caught in the process of ongoing structure formation.

  19. Radio Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  20. Relic Radio Bubbles and Cluster Cooling Flows

    CERN Document Server

    De Young, D S

    2003-01-01

    Recent suggestions that buoyant radio emitting cavities in the intracluster medium can cause significant reheating of cooling flows are re-examined when the effects of the intracluster magnetic field are included. Expansion of the cavity creates a tangential magnetic field in the ICM around the radio source, and this field can suppress instabilities that mix the ICM and the radio source. The onset of instability can be delayed for ~100 million years, and calculation of the actual reheating time shows that this may not occur until about 1Gy after creation of the cavity. These results may explain why the relic radio bubbles are still intact at such late times, and it may imply that the role of radio sources in reheating the ICM should be re-examined. In addition, the existence of relic radio cavities may also imply that the particle content of radio source lobes is primarily electrons and protons rather than electrons and positrons.

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U.; Richards, Gordon T.; /Drexel U.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Boroson, Todd A.; /Kitt Peak Observ.; Ross, Nicholas P.; /Penn State U.; Shen, Yue; /Princeton U. Observ.; Brandt, W.N.; /Penn State U.; Fan, Xiaohui; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Southampton U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-04-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of {approx} 9380 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than 4, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than 5. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i < 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1-inch rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.

  2. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR-II Radio Galaxy 3C353

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Siemiginowska, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Swain, M.R.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Goodger, J.L.; Iwasawa, K.; Edwards, P.G.

    2008-06-13

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4-inch wide and 2-feet long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  3. Massive Temporal Lobe Cholesteatoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasan Waidyasekara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intracranial extension of cholesteatoma is rare. This may occur de novo or recur some time later either contiguous with or separate to the site of the original cholesteatoma. Presentation of Case. A 63-year-old female presented to a tertiary referral hospital with a fluctuating level of consciousness, fever, headache, and right-sided otorrhoea, progressing over several days. Her past medical history included surgery for right ear cholesteatoma and drainage of intracranial abscess 23 years priorly. There had been no relevant symptoms in the interim until 6 weeks prior to this presentation. Imaging demonstrated a large right temporal lobe mass contiguous with the middle ear and mastoid cavity with features consistent with cholesteatoma. The patient underwent a combined transmastoid/middle fossa approach for removal of the cholesteatoma and repair of the tegmen dehiscence. The patient made an uneventful recovery and remains well over 12 months later. Conclusion. This case presentation details a large intracranial cholesteatoma which had extended through a tegmen tympani dehiscence from recurrent right ear cholesteatoma treated by modified radical mastoidectomy over two decades priorly. There was a completely asymptomatic progression of disease until several weeks prior to this presentation.

  4. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Semiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. G. Blair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy represents a multifaceted group of disorders divided into two broad categories, partial and generalized, based on the seizure onset zone. The identification of the neuroanatomic site of seizure onset depends on delineation of seizure semiology by a careful history together with video-EEG, and a variety of neuroimaging technologies such as MRI, fMRI, FDG-PET, MEG, or invasive intracranial EEG recording. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is the commonest form of focal epilepsy and represents almost 2/3 of cases of intractable epilepsy managed surgically. A history of febrile seizures (especially complex febrile seizures is common in TLE and is frequently associated with mesial temporal sclerosis (the commonest form of TLE. Seizure auras occur in many TLE patients and often exhibit features that are relatively specific for TLE but few are of lateralizing value. Automatisms, however, often have lateralizing significance. Careful study of seizure semiology remains invaluable in addressing the search for the seizure onset zone.

  5. Flickering Quasar Helps Chandra Measure the Expansion Rate of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    intervening galaxy can act as a lens," said Bautz. "Now imagine that the distant lensed quasar suddenly became brighter. The mirage images of the quasar will brighten up at different times depending on the difference in the light travel delay." Unlike ordinary galaxies, quasars do vary greatly in their intensity, especially in the X-ray waveband, said Gordon Garmire, Evan Pugh Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State. This is caused by the violent and erratic flow of gas into the black hole that is powering the quasar. In quasar RX J0911.4+0551, the astronomers saw a sudden brightening of X-ray intensity that lasted for about 2,000 seconds. This was observed in one of the four mirage images. Measuring the time-delay of the 2,000-second flare--or any flare-- from mirage to mirage can provide the absolute distance to the deflector (intervening galaxy) and can thus be used to estimate the expansion rate of the universe. Sjur Refsdal first proposed this promising method in 1964. The method avoids many uncertainties associated with the classic distance-ladder technique used to measure objects and the Hubble constant. The main difficulty in measuring time-delays is that the brightness of each image has to be carefully monitored over several periods of the time-delay. Also, the quasar has to show sufficient variability over time scales smaller than the time-delay. Most attempts to measure time-delays until now have been made in the optical and radio bands. The modest variability of quasars in these wavebands, however, has made it extremely difficult to place accurate constraints on time-delays. X-ray observations of gravitationally lensed quasars, on the other hand, show strong variability over time scales of hours to days. For example, it has taken almost 20 years of optical and radio monitoring to obtain a universal accepted time-delay for the lensed quasar Q0957+561 to an accuracy of 3percent. Chandra has the potential, the team has found, to determine the time

  6. Quasars as tracers of cosmic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Modzelewska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Petrogalli, F; Pych, W; Kurcz, A; Udalski, A

    2014-01-01

    Quasars, as the most luminous persistent sources in the Universe, have broad applications for cosmological studies. In particular, they can be employed to directly measure the expansion history of the Universe, similarly to SNe Ia. The advantage of quasars is that they are numerous, cover a broad range of redshifts, up to $z = 7$, and do not show significant evolution of metallicity with redshift. The idea is based on the relation between the time delay of an emission line and the continuum, and the absolute monochromatic luminosity of a quasar. For intermediate redshift quasars, the suitable line is Mg II. Between December 2012 and March 2014, we performed five spectroscopic observations of the QSO CTS C30.10 ($z = 0.900$) using the South African Large Telesope (SALT), supplemented with photometric monitoring, with the aim of determining the variability of the line shape, changes in the total line intensity and in the continuum. We show that the method is very promising.

  7. Local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Veilleux, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results from a comprehensive investigation of the most luminous mergers in the local universe, the ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and the quasars. First, the frequency of occurrence and importance of black hole driven nuclear activity in ULIRGs are discussed using the latest sets of optical, near-infrared, mid-infrared, and X-ray spectra on these objects. Obvious trends with luminosity, infrared color, and morphology are pointed out. Next, the host galaxy properties of ULIRGs are described in detail and then compared with local quasar hosts and inactive spheroids. By and large, these data are consistent with the scenario where ULIRGs are intermediate-mass elliptical galaxies in formation and in the process of becoming moderate-luminosity optical quasars. The powerful galactic winds detected in many ULIRGs may help shed any excess gas during this transformation. However, this evolutionary scenario does not seem to apply to all ULIRGs and quasars: Ultraluminous infrared m...

  8. Quasars as probes of cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mortlock, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Quasars are the most luminous non-transient sources in the epoch of cosmological reionization (i.e., which ended a billion years after the Big Bang, corresponding to a redshift of z ~ 5), and are powerful probes of the inter-galactic medium at that time. This review covers current efforts to identify high-redshift quasars and how they have been used to constrain the reionization history. This includes a full description of the various processes by which neutral hydrogen atoms can absorb/scatter ultraviolet photons, and which lead to the Gunn-Peterson effect, dark gap and dark pixel analyses, quasar near zones and damping wing absorption. Finally, the future prospects for using quasars as probes of reionization are described.

  9. Quasars as Extreme Case of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nasiri, S

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a phenomenological investigation of the evolution and large scale distribution of quasars using a modified version of the Field and Colgate gravitational contraction model for proto-galaxies. By studying the distribution of about 7000 quasars in 5 luminosity classes, it seems that, such a model is capable of solving the energy problem and discussing some of the observational properties of these objects. A sketch of luminosity function of the quasars and the normal galaxies shows a unified aspect for these objects. The large scale distribution of the quasars in the galactic coordinate shows the existence of filamentary structures and voids in the same sence that have been resolved by exploring the clusters of galaxies.

  10. New Discoveries Fill the Quasar Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Quasars active and luminous galactic centers can be difficult to find at some high redshifts due to their camouflaging color. A team of scientists has now come up with a way to detect these distant monsters in spite of their disguise.Quasar CamouflageThe color track of quasars between 5 z 6 in the commonly used i z and r i bands. Each dot on the red line marks a 0.1 difference in redshift. The contours show the colors of M dwarfs, from early type to late type. Quasars at a redshift of 5.3 z 5.7 are clearly contaminated by M dwarfs, making them difficult to identify. [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]One of the key ways we can study the early universe is by building a large sample of high-redshift quasars. In particular, we believe that reionization of the universe is just completing around z 6. Quasars near this redshift are crucial tools for probing the post-reionization epoch and exploring the evolution of the intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and early supermassive black hole growth.But quasars at this redshift are difficult to detect! The problem is contamination: quasars at this distance are the same color in commonly used optical bands as cool M-dwarf stars. As a result, surveys searching for quasars have often just cut out that entire section of the color space in order to avoid this contamination.This means that theres a huge gap in our sample of quasars around z 5.5: of the more than 300,000 quasars known, only 30 have been found in the redshift range of 5.3 z 5.7.The addition of new colorcolor selection criteria using infrared bands (bottom two plots) allows the authors to differentiate quasars (blue) from M dwarfs (grey), which isnt possible when only the traditional optical colorcolor selection criteria are used (top plot). [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]A New ApproachIn a recent publication led by Jinyi Yang (Peking University, China and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona), a team of scientists has demonstrated a new technique for finding

  11. Extremely Variable Quasars from CRTS and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    I will present deep dives on a few examples of highly variable quasars identified from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS) and WISE/NEOWISE. In particular, I will focus on a CRTS-identified iron low-ionization broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar which, over the past decade, has transformed into a more typical BAL quasar (Stern et al. 2017) and a WISE-identified quasar that has shut off in the past decade (Stern et al., in prep.). I will focus on what we learn about the physics of these systems from the multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopy. Given the pace of discovery, additional interesting examples are expected to be discovered before the conference.

  12. The death of FRII radio sources and their connection with radio relics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Kaiser, Christian R.; Cotter, Garret

    2002-01-01

    Radio relic sources in galaxy clusters are often described as the remnants of powerful radio galaxies. Here we develop a model for the evolution of such relics after the jets cease to supply energy to the lobes. This includes the treatment of a relic overpressured with respect to its gaseous surroundings even after the jets switch off. We also determine the radio emission of relics for a large variety of assumptions. We take into account the evolution of the strength of the magnetic field during the phase of relativistic particle injection into the lobes. The resulting spectra show mild steepening at around 1 GHz but avoid any exponential spectral cut-offs. The model calculations are used to fit the observed spectra of six radio relics. The quality of the fits is excellent for {\\it all} models discussed. Unfortunately, this implies that it is virtually impossible to determine any of the important source parameters from the observed radio emission alone.

  13. Numerical simulations of quasar absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Theuns, T

    2005-01-01

    The physical state of the intergalactic medium can be probed in great detail with the intervening absorption systems seen in quasar spectra. The properties of the Hydrogen absorbers depend on many cosmological parameters, such as the matter-power spectrum, reionisation history, ionising background and the nature of the dark matter. The spectra also contain metal lines, which can be used to constrain the star formation history and the feedback processes acting in large and small galaxies. Simulations have been instrumental in investigating to what extent these parameters can be unambiguously constrained with current and future data. This paper is meant as an introduction to this subject, and reviews techniques and methods for simulating the intergalactic medium.

  14. Expanding space, quasars and St. Augustine's fireworks

    CERN Document Server

    Chashchina, O I

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  15. Dust in the Quasar Wind (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Dusty grains -- including tiny specks of the minerals found in the gemstones peridot, sapphires and rubies -- can be seen blowing in the winds of a quasar, or active black hole, in this artist's concept. The quasar is at the center of a distant galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such quasar winds might have forged these dusty particles in the very early universe. The findings are another clue in an ongoing cosmic mystery: where did all the dust in our young universe come from? Dust is crucial for efficient star formation as it allows the giant clouds where stars are born to cool quickly and collapse into new stars. Once a star has formed, dust is also needed to make planets and living creatures. Dust has been seen as far back as when the universe was less than a tenth of its current age, but how did it get there? Most dust in our current epoch forms in the winds of evolved stars that did not exist when the universe was young. Theorists had predicted that winds from quasars growing in the centers of distant galaxies might be a source of this dust. While the environment close to a quasar is too hot for large molecules like dust grains to survive, dust has been found in the cooler, outer regions. Astronomers now have evidence that dust is created in these outer winds. Using Spitzer's infrared spectrograph instrument, scientists found a wealth of dust grains in a quasar called PG2112+059 located at the center of a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. The grains - including corundum (sapphires and rubies); forsterite (peridot); and periclase (naturally occurring in marble) - are not typically found in galaxies without quasars, suggesting they might have been freshly formed in the quasar's winds.

  16. Expanding Space, Quasars and St. Augustine's Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashchina, Olga; Silagadze, Zurab

    2015-10-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  17. Multiwavelength observations of the γ-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. V.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Hovatta, T.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multifrequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and γ-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi γ-ray telescope, Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40-m telescope and MOJAVE Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring programmes, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24 and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright γ-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4 ± 0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and γ-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the γ-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the value and direction of the linear polarization and the Faraday rotation measure. The value of the intrinsic brightness temperature of the core is above the equipartition state, while its value as a function of distance from the core is well approximated by the power law. Altogether these results show that the radio flaring activity of the quasar is accompanied by injection of relativistic particles and energy losses at the jet base, while S4 1030+61 has a stable, straight jet well described by standard conical jet theories.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Million Quasars (Milliquas) catalog (Flesch, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, E. W.

    2017-04-01

    This is a compendium of 452,794 type-I QSOs and AGN, largely complete from the literature to 21 June 2016. Also included are ~900K high-confidence quasar candidates from SDSS-based photometric quasar catalogs (of 90%+ likelihood) and from all-sky radio/X-ray associated objects (of 80%+ likelihood). Type-II and Bl Lac objects are also included, bringing the total count to 1,422,219. This version is the same as v4.8 but with these changes: (1) The 3XMM-DR6 X-ray source catalog (www.cosmos.esa.int/web/xmm-newton/xsa) has been added and new X-ray associations calculated. (2) Radio/X-ray data have been reprocessed in line with that of the new Million Optical Radio/X-ray (MORX) associations catalogue, in preparation. The catalog format is simple, each object is shown as one line bearing the J2000 coordinates, its original name, object class, red and blue optical magnitudes, PSF class, redshift, the citations for the name and redshift, plus up to four radio/X-ray identifiers where applicable. Questions/comments/praise/complaints may be directed to Eric Flesch at eric(at)flesch.org. (1 data file).

  19. The Host Galaxies of X-ray Quasars Are Not Strong Star Formers

    CERN Document Server

    Barger, A J; Owen, F N; Chen, C -C; Hasinger, G; Hsu, L -Y; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    We use ultradeep SCUBA-2 850um observations (~0.37 mJy rms) of the 2 Ms CDF-N and 4 Ms CDF-S X-ray fields to examine the amount of dusty star formation taking place in the host galaxies of high-redshift X-ray AGNs. Supplementing with COSMOS, we measure the submillimeter fluxes of the 4-8 keV sources at z>1, finding little flux at the highest X-ray luminosities but significant flux at intermediate luminosities. We determine grey body and MIR luminosities by fitting spectral energy distributions to each X-ray source and to each radio source in an ultradeep Karl G. Jansky VLA 1.4 GHz (11.5uJy at 5-sigma) image of the CDF-N. We confirm the FIR-radio and MIR-radio correlations to z=4 using the non-X-ray detected radio sources. Both correlations are also obeyed by the X-ray less luminous AGNs but not by the X-ray quasars. We interpret the low FIR luminosities relative to the MIR for the X-ray quasars as being due to a lack of star formation, while the MIR stays high due to the AGN contribution. We find that the FIR...

  20. Ubiquitous Giant Lyα Nebulae around the Brightest Quasars at z ∼ 3.5 Revealed with MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Elena; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lilly, Simon J.; Marino, Raffaella A.; Gallego, Sofia G.; Bacon, Roland; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bouché, Nicolas; Brinchmann, Jarle; Carollo, C. Marcella; Caruana, Joseph; Finley, Hayley; Herenz, Edmund C.; Richard, Johan; Schaye, Joop; Straka, Lorrie A.; Turner, Monica L.; Urrutia, Tanya; Verhamme, Anne; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    Direct Lyα imaging of intergalactic gas at z∼ 2 has recently revealed giant cosmological structures around quasars, e.g., the Slug Nebula. Despite their high luminosity, the detection rate of such systems in narrow-band and spectroscopic surveys is less than 10%, possibly encoding crucial information on the distribution of gas around quasars and the quasar emission properties. In this study, we use the MUSE integral-field instrument to perform a blind survey for giant {Ly}α nebulae around 17 bright radio-quiet quasars at 3\\lt z\\lt 4 that does not suffer from most of the limitations of previous surveys. After data reduction and analysis performed with specifically developed tools, we found that each quasar is surrounded by giant {Ly}α nebulae with projected sizes larger than 100 physical kiloparsecs and, in some cases, extending up to 320 kpc. The circularly averaged surface brightness profiles of the nebulae appear to be very similar to each other despite their different morphologies and are consistent with power laws with slopes ≈ -1.8. The similarity between the properties of all these nebulae and the Slug Nebula suggests a similar origin for all systems and that a large fraction of gas around bright quasars could be in a relatively “cold” (T ∼ 104 K) and dense phase. In addition, our results imply that such gas is ubiquitous within at least 50 kpc from bright quasars at 3\\lt z\\lt 4 independently of the quasar emission opening angle, or extending up to 200 kpc for quasar isotropic emission. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programs 094.A-0396, 095.A-0708, 096.A-0345, 094.A-0131, 095.A-0200, and 096.A-0222.

  1. Survey For Very High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, S.; MacAlpine, G.

    1997-12-01

    I will present the results from the deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars. The survey involved direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.0 < z < 5.4 were selected based on the detection of the Lyman alpha line and the strong drop in the spectrum blueward of this. Because of this response, quasars are clearly located away from the stellar locus on g - r vs. r - i diagrams. Quasar candidates in this redshift range have large values of g - r and small values of r - i. To confirm the candidates as quasars, the multi-fiber spectroscope Hydra, located on the WIYN telescope, was used. To date, spectral confirmation has been completed for ten degrees out of the approximately fifteen square degress of survey area. Several quasars were discovered, and I will present their spectra and information on the viability of this technique.

  2. The environment of low redshift quasar pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Sandrinelli, Angela; Treves, Aldo; Farina, Emanuele Paolo; Uslenghi, Michela

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxy environment of a sample of 14 low redshift (z $<$ 0.85) quasar physical pairs extracted from SDSS DR10 archives. The pairs have a systemic radial velocity difference $\\Delta V_\\parallel \\leqslant$ 600 $km \\ s^{-1}$ (based on [OIII]5007 \\AA \\ line) and projected distance $ R_\\bot \\leqslant$ 600 kpc. The physical association of the pairs is statistically confirmed at a level of $\\sim$ 90 %. For most of the images of these quasars we are able to resolve their host galaxies that turn out to be on average similar to those of quasars not in pairs. We also found that quasars in a pair are on average in region of modest galaxy overdensity extending up 0.5 Mpc from the QSO. This galaxy overdensity is indistinguishable from that of a homogeneous sample of isolated quasars at the same redshift and with similar host galaxy luminosity. These results, albeit derived from a small (but homogeneous) sample of objects, suggest that the rare activation of two quasars with small phy...

  3. Radio VLBI and the quantum interference paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We address here the question of interference of radio signals from astronomical sources like distant quasars, in a very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), where two (or more) distantly located radio telescopes (apertures), receive simultaneous signal from the sky. In an equivalent optical two-slit experiment, it is generally argued that for the photons involved in the interference pattern on the screen, it is not possible, even in principle, to ascertain which of the two slits a particular photon went through. It is argued that any procedure to ascertain this destroys the interference pattern. But in the case of the modern radio VLBI, it is a routine matter to record the phase and amplitude of the voltage outputs from the two radio antennas on a recording media separately and then do the correlation between the two recorded signals later in an offline manner. Does this not violate the quantum interference principle? We provide a resolution of this problem here.

  4. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ∼ 2 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H. R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 1A1 (Canada); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (≅ 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ∼20% at R ≅ 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξ{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup γ} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ∼ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  5. Occipital lobe infarctions are different

    OpenAIRE

    Naess, Halvor; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrikke; Thomassen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that occipital lobe infarctions differ from infarctions in other locations as to etiology, risk factors and prognosis among young adults. Methods Location, etiology, risk factors and long-term outcome were evaluated among all young adults 15–49 years suffering from cerebral infarction in Hordaland County, Norway between 1988 and 1997. Results The following variables were more frequent among patients with occipital lobe infarction compared with patients with infarcti...

  6. The Final SDSS High-Redshift Quasar Sample of 52 Quasars at z>5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A; Banados, Eduardo; Becker, Robert H; Bian, Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Shen, Yue; Wang, Feige; Wang, Ran; Wang, Shu; White, Richard L; Wu, Jin; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of nine quasars at $z\\sim6$ identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of $z\\sim6$ quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at $5.7quasars with $z_{\\rm AB}\\le20$ mag selected from 11,240 deg$^2$ of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with $20\\le z_{\\rm AB}\\le20.5$ selected from 4223 deg$^2$ of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to $z_{\\rm AB}\\approx22$ mag from the 277 deg$^2$ in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of $-29.0\\le M_{1450}\\le-24.5$. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\\sim6$. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ($M_{1450}\\ge-23$ mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope $\\beta$ of the QLF is well constrained to be $\\beta=-2.8\\pm0.2$. Due to the...

  7. Interstellar scintillation as a probe of microarcsecond scale structure in quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bignall, H E; Lovell, J E J; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; MacQuart, J P; Tzioumis, A K; Rickett, B J; Ojha, R; Carter, S; Cimo, G; Ellingsen, S P; McCulloch, P M

    2004-01-01

    Observations over the last two decades have shown that a significant fraction of all flat-spectrum, extragalactic radio sources exhibit flux density variations on timescales of a day or less at frequencies of several GHz. It has been demonstrated that interstellar scintillation (ISS) is the principal cause of such rapid variability. Observations of ISS can be used to probe very compact, microarcsecond-scale structure in quasar inner jets, as well as properties of turbulence in the local Galactic ISM. A few sources show unusually rapid, intra-hour variations, evidently due to scattering in very nearby, localized turbulence. We present recent findings for the rapidly scintillating quasar PKS 1257-326. The large-scale MASIV VLA Survey showed that such sources are extremely rare, implying that for most scintillating sources, longer-term, dedicated monitoring programs are required to extract detailed information on source structures.

  8. Radio Quiet AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Czerny, B; Karas, V; Ponti, G

    2005-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei are powered by accretion onto massive black holes. Although radio-quiet objects are not as spectacular sources of very high energy photons as radio-loud ones this class of objects also represents a challenge for modeling high energy processes close to a black hole. Both a hot optically thin plasma and a cooler optically thick accretion disk are usually thought to be present in the vicinity of a black hole although the details of the accretion flow are still under discussion. The role of the disk seems to decrease with a drop in the Eddington ratio: in sources like quasars and Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies disk flow dominates while in Seyfert galaxies the disk retreats, and in sources like LINERS or Sgr A* a disk is most likely absent. Shocks and reconnections are possibly taking place in an inner hot flow and in the magnetic corona above the cold disk. Uncollimated outflow is also present and it may carry significant fraction of available mass and energy.

  9. A representative survey of the dynamics and energetics of FRII radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Mingo, B.

    2017-01-01

    We report the first large, systematic study of the dynamics and energetics of a representative sample of FRII radio galaxies with well-characterized group/cluster environments. We used X-ray inverse-Compton and radio synchrotron measurements to determine the internal radio-lobe conditions, and these were compared with external pressures acting on the lobes, determined from measurements of the thermal X-ray emission of the group/cluster. Consistent with previous work, we found that FRII radio lobes are typically electron-dominated by a small factor relative to equipartition, and are over-pressured relative to the external medium in their outer parts. These results suggest that there is typically no energetically significant proton population in the lobes of FRII radio galaxies (unlike for FRIs), and so for this population, inverse-Compton modelling provides an accurate way of measuring total energy content and estimating jet power. We estimated the distribution of Mach numbers for the population of expanding radio lobes, finding that at least half of the radio galaxies are currently driving strong shocks into their group/cluster environments. Finally, we determined a jet power-radio luminosity relation for FRII radio galaxies based on our estimates of lobe internal energy and Mach number. The slope and normalisation of this relation are consistent with theoretical expectations, given the departure from equipartition and environmental distribution for our sample.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss,; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U.,

    2005-03-01

    We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

  11. iPTF Discovery of the Rapid “Turn-on” of a Luminous Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, S.; Hung, T.; Cenko, S. B.; Blagorodnova, N.; Yan, Lin; Kulkarni, S. R.; Mooley, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cantwell, T. M.; Yu, P. C.; Cao, Y.; Fremling, C.; Neill, J. D.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nugent, P. E.; Wozniak, P.

    2017-02-01

    We present a radio-quiet quasar at z = 0.237 discovered “turning on” by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). The transient, iPTF 16bco, was detected by iPTF in the nucleus of a galaxy with an archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum with weak narrow-line emission characteristic of a low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER). Our follow-up spectra show the dramatic appearance of broad Balmer lines and a power-law continuum characteristic of a luminous ({L}{bol}≈ {10}45 erg s‑1) type 1 quasar 12 yr later. Our photometric monitoring with PTF from 2009–2012 and serendipitous X-ray observations from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey in 2011 and 2015 constrain the change of state to have occurred less than 500 days before the iPTF detection. An enhanced broad Hα/[O iii] λ5007 line ratio in the type 1 state relative to other changing-look quasars also is suggestive of the most rapid change of state yet observed in a quasar. We argue that the >10 increase in Eddington ratio inferred from the brightening in UV and X-ray continuum flux is more likely due to an intrinsic change in the accretion rate of a preexisting accretion disk than an external mechanism such as variable obscuration, microlensing, or the tidal disruption of a star. However, further monitoring will be helpful in better constraining the mechanism driving this change of state. The rapid “turn-on” of the quasar is much shorter than the viscous infall timescale of an accretion disk and requires a disk instability that can develop around a ∼ {10}8 {M}ȯ black hole on timescales less than 1 yr.

  12. Extended Radio Emission in MOJAVE Blazars: Challenges to Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Cooper, N. J.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a study on the kiloparsec-scale radio emission in the complete flux density limited MOJAVE sample, comprising 135 radio-loud active galactic nuclei. New 1.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) radio images of six quasars and previously unpublished images of 21 blazars are presented, along with an analysis of the high-resolution (VLA A-array) 1.4 GHz emission for the entire sample. While extended emission is detected in the majority of the sources, about 7% of the sources exhibit only radio core emission. We expect more sensitive radio observations, however, to detect faint emission in these sources, as we have detected in the erstwhile "core-only" source, 1548+056. The kiloparsec-scale radio morphology varies widely across the sample. Many BL Lac objects exhibit extended radio power and kiloparsec-scale morphology typical of powerful FRII jets, while a substantial number of quasars possess radio powers intermediate between FRIs and FRIIs. This poses challenges to the simple radio-loud unified scheme, which links BL Lac objects to FRIs and quasars to FRIIs. We find a significant correlation between extended radio emission and parsec-scale jet speeds: the more radio powerful sources possess faster jets. This indicates that the 1.4 GHz (or low-frequency) radio emission is indeed related to jet kinetic power. Various properties such as extended radio power and apparent parsec-scale jet speeds vary smoothly between different blazar subclasses, suggesting that, at least in terms of radio jet properties, the distinction between quasars and BL Lac objects, at an emission-line equivalent width of 5 Å, is essentially an arbitrary one. While the two blazar subclasses display a smooth continuation in properties, they often reveal differences in the correlation test results when considered separately. This can be understood if, unlike quasars, BL Lac objects do not constitute a homogeneous population, but rather include both FRI and FRII radio galaxies for

  13. Extended radio emission and the nature of blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonucci, R.R.J.; Ulvestad, J.S.

    1985-07-01

    The VLA has been used at 20 cm to map all 23 of the 54 confirmed blazars listed in the Angel and Stockman review paper that had not been mapped before at high resolution. (Blazars include BL Lac objects and optically violently variable quasars.) In addition, data on most of the previously mapped blazars have been reprocessed in order to achieve higher dynamic range. Extended emission has been detected associated with 49 of the 54 objects. The extended radio emission has been used to test the hypothesis that blazars are normal radio galaxies and radio quasars viewed along the jet axes. We find that blazars have substantial extended power, consistent with this hypothesis. Many have extended powers as high as the luminous Fanaroff-Riley class 2 radio doubles. The projected linear sizes are small, as expected from foreshortening of the extended sources, and many blazars have the expected core-halo morphology. There are also several small doubles, a head-tail source, and some one-sided sources, and these could be in cases where the line of sight is slightly off the jet axis, or projections of asymmetrical radio galaxies and quasars. The ratio of core to extended radio emission has been studied as a possible indicator of viewing aspect or beaming intensity. It is found to correlate with optical polarization, optical and radio core variability, and one-sided radio morphology. We can go beyond these consistency checks and work toward a proof of the hypothesis under discussion. The flux from the extended emission alone is sufficient in some blazars to qualify them for inclusion in the 3C and 4C catalogs. Suppose that the radio core emission is anisotropic, but the extended emission is predominantly isotropic. The isotropy of the extended emission implies that these blazars would be in the catalogs even if viewed from the side.

  14. The unprecedented optical outburst of the quasar 3C 454.3. The WEBT campaign of 2004-2005

    CERN Document Server

    Villata, M; Balonek, T J; Aller, M F; Jorstad, S G; Kurtanidze, O M; Nicastro, F; Nilsson, K; Aller, H D; Arai, A; Arkharov, A; Bach, U; Benítez, E; Berdyugin, A; Buemi, C S; Böttcher, M; Carosati, D; Casas, R; Caulet, A; Chen, W P; Chiang, P S; Chou, Y; Ciprini, S; Coloma, J M; Di Rico, G; Díaz, C; Efimova, N V; Forsyth, C; Frasca, A; Fuhrmann, L; Gadway, B; Gupta, S; Hagen-Thorn, V A; Harvey, J; Heidt, J; Hernandez-Toledo, H; Hroch, F; Hu, C P; Hudec, R; Ibrahimov, M A; Imada, A; Kamata, M; Kato, T; Katsuura, M; Konstantinova, T; Kopatskaya, E; Kotaka, D; Kovalev, Y Y; Kovalev, Yu A; Krichbaum, T P; Kubota, K; Kurosaki, M; Lanteri, L; Larionov, V M; Larionova, L; Laurikainen, E; Lee, C U; Leto, P; Lahteenmaki, A; López-Cruz, O; Marilli, E; Marscher, A P; McHardy, I M; Mondal, S A; Mullan, B; Napoleone, N; Nikolashvili, M G; Ohlert, J M; Postnikov, S; Pursimo, T; Ragni, M; Ros, J A; Sadakane, K; Sadun, A C; Savolainen, T; Sergeeva, E A; Sigua, L A; Sillanpää, A; Sixtova, L; Sumitomo, N; Takalo, L O; Terasranta, H; Tornikoski, M; Trigilio, C; Umana, G; Volvach, A; Voss, B; Wortel, S

    2006-01-01

    The radio quasar 3C 454.3 underwent an exceptional optical outburst lasting more than 1 year and culminating in spring 2005. The maximum brightness detected was R = 12.0, which represents the most luminous quasar state thus far observed (M_B ~ -31.4). In order to follow the emission behaviour of the source in detail, a large multiwavelength campaign was organized by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT). Continuous optical, near-IR and radio monitoring was performed in several bands. ToO pointings by the Chandra and INTEGRAL satellites provided additional information at high energies in May 2005. The historical radio and optical light curves show different behaviours. Until about 2001.0 only moderate variability was present in the optical regime, while prominent and long-lasting radio outbursts were visible at the various radio frequencies, with higher-frequency variations preceding the lower-frequency ones. After that date, the optical activity increased and the radio flux is less variable. This suggests t...

  15. Quasar clustering in a galaxy and quasar formation model based on ultra high-resolution N-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Oogi, Taira; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate clustering properties of quasars using a new version of our semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation with state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In this study, we assume that a major merger of galaxies triggers cold gas accretion on to a supermassive black hole and quasar activity. Our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the evolution of quasars. We find that the median mass of quasar host dark matter haloes increases with cosmic time by an order of magnitude from z=4 (a few 1e+11 Msun) to z=1 (a few 1e+12 Msun), and depends only weakly on the quasar luminosity. Deriving the quasar bias through the quasar--galaxy cross-correlation function in the model, we find that the quasar bias does not depend on the quasar luminosity, similar to observed trends. This result reflects the fact that quasars with a fixed luminosity have various Eddington ratios and thus have various host halo masses that primarily determine the quasar bias. We also show that the quasar bias increas...

  16. The relationship between the radio core dominance parameter and the spectral index in different classes of extragalactic radio sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hui Fan; Jiang-He Yang; Jing Pan; Tong-Xu Hua

    2011-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have two major classes,namely radio loud AGNs and radio quiet AGNs.A small subset of the radio-loud AGNs is called blazars,which display extreme observational properties,such as rapid variability,high Iuminosity,high and variable polarization,and superluminal motion.All of those observational properties are probably due to a relativistic beaming effect with the jet pointing close to the line of sight.Observations suggest that the orientation can be expressed by a core-dominance parameter,R.The R,to some extent,is associated with the beaming effect.Blazars are believed to be unified with Fanaroff & Riley type I/Ⅱ (FRI/Ⅱ)radio galaxies.In this work,we collected relevant observations from the literature for a sample of 1223 AGNs including 77 BL Lacertae objects,495 quasars,460 galaxies,119 FRs and 72 unidentified sources,and calculated the core-dominance parameters and spectral indexes,discussed the relationship between the two parameters,and gave some discussions.Our analysis suggests that the core-dominance parameters in BL Lacertae objects are larger than those in quasars and galaxies,and the radio spectral indexes in BL Lacertae objects are lower than those in quasars and galaxies.We also found that the core-dominance parameter-spectral index correlation exists for a large sample presented in this work,which may come from a relativistic beaming effect.

  17. A Java Interface for Roche Lobe Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, D. A.; Leahy, J. C.

    2015-09-01

    A JAVA interface for calculating various properties of the Roche lobe has been created. The geometry of the Roche lobe is important for studying interacting binary stars, particularly those with compact objects which have a companion which fills the Roche lobe. There is no known analytic solution to the Roche lobe problem. Here the geometry of the Roche lobe is calculated numerically to high accuracy and made available to the user for arbitrary input mass ratio, q.

  18. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  19. Cosmic downsizing of powerful radio galaxies to low radio luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Rigby, E E; Best, P N; Rosario, D; Röttgering, H J A

    2015-01-01

    At bright radio powers ($P_{\\rm 1.4 GHz} > 10^{25}$ W/Hz) the space density of the most powerful sources peaks at higher redshift than that of their weaker counterparts. This paper establishes whether this luminosity-dependent evolution persists for sources an order of magnitude fainter than those previously studied, by measuring the steep--spectrum radio luminosity function (RLF) across the range $10^{24} 10^{26}$ W/Hz the redshift of the peak space density increases with luminosity, whilst at lower radio luminosities the position of the peak remains constant within the uncertainties. This `cosmic downsizing' behaviour is found to be similar to that seen at optical wavelengths for quasars, and is interpreted as representing the transition from radiatively efficient to inefficient accretion modes in the steep-spectrum population. This conclusion is supported by constructing simple models for the space density evolution of these two different radio galaxy classes; these are able to successfully reproduce the ...

  20. Far-infrared polarisation of the quasar 3C 279

    CERN Document Server

    Klaas, U; Clavel, J; Klaas, Ulrich; Laureijs, Rene J.; Clavel, Jean

    1999-01-01

    We present the first FIR polarisation results of the OVV quasar 3C 279 obtained with ISOPHOT for two epochs in 1996 and 1997. We describe its integral polarisation properties at a wavelength of 170 micron where the source shows a maximum in its energy distribution. After a gamma-ray flare in January 1996, a polarisation of 23 % closely aligned with the radio jet axis was measured in July 1996. In June 1997, the polarisation degree had decreased to 6.5 % with a less good alignment. On the other hand, the total 170 micron flux is the same for both epochs. Our measurements provide additional constraints for the multi-wavelength properties of synchrotron emission in radio jets and the temporal evolution of these properties: they show that the FIR radiation of 3C 279 is optically thin and that its origin is very close to the core. The variability of the FIR polarisation without any change of the total FIR flux can be explained by a disordering of the magnetic field in between the core and the first stationary VLBI...

  1. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-ray Weakness?

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Harrison, F A; Stern, D; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Farrah, D; Fiore, F; Fuerst, F; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Hickox, R; Madsen, K K; Matt, G; Ogle, P; Risaliti, G; Saez, C; Teng, S H; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2013-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain ~400-600 hard X-ray (>10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (NH<1E24 cm^{-2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be NH~7E24 cm^{-2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We d...

  2. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurements provide unique information on turbulence in the ISM as well as the mean plasma properties such as density and magnetic field strength. Radio propagation observations can provide input to the major contemporary questions on the nature of ISM turbulence, such as its dissipation mechanisms and the processes responsible for generating the turbulence on large spatial scales. Measurements of the large scale Galactic magnetic field via Faraday rotation provide unique observational input to theories of the generation of the ...

  3. The Redshift Distribution of Intervening Weak MgII Quasar Absorbers and a Curious Dependence on Quasar Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Jessica L; Murphy, Michael T; Nielsen, Nikole M; Klimek, Elizabeth S

    2013-01-01

    We have identified 469 MgII doublet systems having W_r >= 0.02 {\\AA} in 252 Keck/HIRES and UVES/VLT quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 = 1.0 {\\AA}) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is ~ 25% higher than toward faint quasars (10 sigma at low redshift, 0.4 <= z <= 1.4, and 4 sigma at high redshift, 1.4 < z <= 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being ~ 20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10 sigma at low redshift and 4 sigma at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  4. Emergence of a Quasar Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, F; Hidalgo, P Rodriguez; Prochaska, J X; Herbert-Fort, S

    2008-01-01

    We report the first discovery of the emergence of a high-velocity broad-line outflow in a luminous quasar, J105400.40+034801.2 at redshift z ~ 2.1. The outflow is evident in ultraviolet CIV and SiIV absorption lines with velocity shifts v ~ 26,300 km/s and deblended widths FWHM ~ 4000 km/s. These features are marginally strong and broad enough to be considered broad absorption lines (BALs), but their large velocities exclude them from the standard BAL definition. The outflow lines appeared between two observations in the years 2002.18 and 2006.96. A third observation in 2008.48 showed the lines becoming ~40% weaker and 10% to 15% narrower. There is no evidence for acceleration or for any outflow gas at velocities 21.2 and average space density n_H > 2 x 10^5 cm^-3. We attribute the emergence of the outflow lines to a substantial flow structure moving across our line of sight, possibly near the ragged edge of the main BAL flow or possibly related to the onset of a BAL evolutionary phase.

  5. Long Term Variability of SDSS Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    De Vries, W; White, R; Becker, Bob; Vries, Wim de; White, Rick

    2003-01-01

    We use a sample of 3791 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Early Data Release (EDR), and compare their photometry to historic plate material for the same set of quasars in order to study their variability properties. The time base-line we attain this way ranges from a few months to up to 50 years. In contrast to monitoring programs, where relatively few quasars are photometrically measured over shorter time periods, we utilize existing databases to extend this base-line as much as possible, at the cost of sampling per quasar. Our method, however, can easily be extended to much larger samples. We construct variability Structure Functions and compare these to the literature and model functions. From our modeling we conclude that 1) quasars are more variable toward shorter wavelengths, 2) their variability is consistent with an exponentially decaying light-curve with a typical time-scale of ~2 years, 3) these outbursts occur on typical time-scales of ~200 years. With the upcoming first data release...

  6. On the Search for Quasar Light Echoes

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli

    2007-01-01

    The UV radiation from a quasar leaves a characteristic pattern in the distribution of ionized hydrogen throughout the surrounding space. This pattern or light echo propagates through the intergalactic medium at the speed of light, and can be observed by its imprint on the Ly-alpha forest spectra of background sources. As the echo persists after the quasar has switched off, it offers the possibility of searching for dead quasars, and constraining their luminosities and lifetimes. We outline a technique to search for and characterize these light echoes. To test the method, we create artificial Ly-alpha forest spectra from cosmological simulations at z=3, apply light echoes and search for them. We show how the simulations can also be used to quantify the significance level of any detection. We find that light echoes from the brightest quasars could be found in observational data. With absorption line spectra of 100 redshift z~3-3.5 quasars or galaxies in a 1 square degree area, we expect that ~10 echoes from qua...

  7. Quasar Classification Using Color and Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Christina M; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Schmidt, Kasper B; Ivezić, Željko; Ross, Nicholas P; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Riegel, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a pilot investigation to determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. We use a Bayesian quasar selection algorithm (Richards et al. 2004) to identify 35,820 type 1 quasar candidates in a 239 square degree field of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, using a combination of optical photometry and variability. Color analysis is performed on 5-band single- and multi-epoch SDSS optical photometry to a depth of r ~22.4. From these data, variability parameters are calculated by fitting the structure function of each object in each band with a power law model using 10 to >100 observations over timescales from ~1 day to ~8 years. Selection was based on a training sample of 13,221 spectroscopically-confirmed type-1 quasars, largely from the SDSS. Using variability alone, colors alone, and combining variability and colors we achieve 91%, 93%, and 97% quasar completeness and 98%, 98%, and 97% efficiency ...

  8. The cluster environments of powerful radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN

    CERN Document Server

    McLure, R J

    2000-01-01

    The spatial clustering amplitude (B_{gq}) is determined for a sample of 44 powerful AGN at z~0.2. No significant difference is detected in the richness of the cluster environments of the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-samples, both of which typically inhabit environments as rich as Abell Class ~0. Comparison with radio luminosity-matched samples from Hill & Lilly (1991) and Wold et al. (2000a) suggests that there is no epoch-dependent change in environment richness out to at least z>=0.5 for either radio galaxies or radio quasars. Comparison with the APM cluster survey shows that, contrary to current folklore, powerful AGN do not avoid rich clusters, but rather display a spread in cluster environment which is perfectly consistent with being drawn at random from the massive elliptical population. Finally, we argue that virtually all Abell class ~0 clusters contained an active galaxy during the epoch of peak quasar activity at z~2.5.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS observations of the host galaxies of powerful radio sources : Does size matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, WH; O'Dea, CP; Barthel, PD; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Lehnert, MD

    2000-01-01

    We present near-infrared J- and K-band imaging of a sample of powerful radio source host galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS2 camera. These sources have been selected on their double-lobed radio structure and include a wide range of projected radio source sizes. The largest projected

  10. A CONSTRAINT ON QUASAR CLUSTERING AT z = 5 FROM A BINARY QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D., E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ∼135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5; the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r{sub 0}){sup −2}, this discovery implies a correlation length of r{sub 0} ≳ 20h{sup −1} Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift.

  11. A large sample of binary quasars: Does quasar bias tracks from Mpc scale to kpc scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the most precise estimate to date of the bias of quasars on very small scales, based on a measurement of the clustering of 47 spectroscopically confirmed binary quasars with proper transverse separations of ~25 h^{-1} kpc. The quasars in our sample, which is an order-of-magnitude larger than previous samples, are targeted using a Kernel Density Estimation technique (KDE) applied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging over most of the SDSS area. Our sample is "complete," in that all possible pairs of binary quasars across our area of interest have been spectroscopically confirmed from a combination of previous surveys and our own long-slit observational campaign. We determine the projected correlation function of quasars (\\bar W_p) in four bins of proper transverse scale over the range 17.0 \\lesssim R_{prop} \\lesssim 36.2 h^{-1} kpc. Due to our large sample size, our measured projected correlation function in each of these four bins of scale is more than twice as precise as any previous measurement made over our {\\em full} range of scales. We also measure the bias of our quasar sample in four slices of redshift across the range 0.43 \\le z \\le 2.26 and compare our results to similar measurements of how quasar bias evolves on Mpc-scales. This measurement addresses the question of whether it is reasonable to assume that quasar bias evolves with redshift in a similar fashion on both Mpc and kpc scales. Our results can meaningfully constrain the one-halo term of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) of quasars and how it evolves with redshift. This work was partially supported by NSF grant 1515404.

  12. Multi-wavelength observations of the gamma-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    CERN Document Server

    Kravchenko, E V; Hovatta, T; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multi-frequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and gamma-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi gamma-ray telescope, OVRO 40-m telescope and MOJAVE VLBA monitoring programs, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24, and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright gamma-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4+-0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and gamma-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the gamma-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the val...

  13. Millijansky Radio Variability in SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, J. A.; Becker, R. H.; White, R. L.; Richards, G. T.

    2013-06-01

    We report on a blind survey for extragalactic radio variability that was carried out by comparing two epochs of data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters survey with a third epoch from a new 1.4 GHz survey of SDSS Stripe 82. The three epochs are spaced seven years apart and have an overlapping area of 60 deg2. We uncover 89 variable sources down to the millijansky level, 75 of which are newly identified, and we find no evidence for transient phenomena. This new sample of variable sources allows us to infer an upper limit to the mean characteristic timescale of active galactic nucleus radio variability of 14 yr. We find that only 1% of extragalactic sources have fractional variability f var > 3, while 44% of Galactic sources vary by this much. The variable sample contains a larger fraction of quasars than a comparable non-variable control sample, though the majority of the variable sources appear to be extended galaxies in the optical. This implies that either quasars are not the dominant contributor to the variability of the sample, or that the deep optical data allow us to detect the host galaxies of some low-z quasars. We use the new, higher resolution data to report on the morphology of the variable sources. Finally, we show that the fraction of sources that are variable remains constant or increases at low flux densities. This may imply that next generation radio surveys with telescopes like Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder and MeerKAT will see a constant or even increasing fraction of variable sources down into the sub-millijansky regime.

  14. Binary Black Holes, Accretion Disks and Relativistic Jets: Photocenters of Nearby AGN and Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrle, Ann E.; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Piner, B. Glenn; Unwin, Stephen C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most challenging questions in astronomy today is to understand the origin, structure, and evolution of the central engines in the nuclei of quasars and active galaxies (AGNs). The favoured theory involves the activation of relativistic jets from the fueling of a supermassive black hole through an accretion disk. In some AGN an outer optically thick, dusty torus is seen orbiting the black hole system. This torus is probably related to an inner accretion disk - black hole system that forms the actual powerhouse of the AGN. In radio-loud AGN two oppositely-directed radio jets are ejected perpendicular to the torus/disk system. Although there is a wealth of observational data on AGN, some very basic questions have not been definitively answered. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will address the following three key questions about AGN. 1) Does the most compact optical emission from an AGN come from an accretion disk or from a relativistic jet? 2) Does the separation of the radio core and optical photocenter of the quasars used for the reference frame tie, change on the timescales of their photometric variability, or is the separation stable at the level of a few microarcseconds? 3) Do the cores of galaxies harbor binary supermassive black holes remaining from galaxy mergers? It is not known whether such mergers are common, and whether binaries would persist for a significant time.

  15. A LIKELY MICRO-QUASAR IN THE SHADOW OF M82 X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao-jie [Department of Astronomy and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Liu, Jifeng; Liu, Jiren, E-mail: xuxj@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jfliu@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories of China, 20 Datun Rd, Chaoyang, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-luminous X-ray source M82 X-1 is one of the most promising intermediate mass black hole candidates in the local universe based on its high X-ray luminosities (10{sup 40}–10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1}) and quasi-periodic oscillations, and is possibly associated with a radio flare source. In this work, applying the sub-pixel technique to the 120 ks Chandra observation (ID: 10543) of M82 X-1, we split M82 X-1 into two sources separated by 1.″1. The secondary source is not detected in other M82 observations. The radio flare source is not found to associate with M82 X-1, but is instead associated with the nearby transient source S1 with an outburst luminosity of ∼10{sup 39} erg s{sup −1}. With X-ray outburst and radio flare activities analogous to the recently discovered micro-quasar in M31, S1 is likely to be a micro-quasar hidden in the shadow of M82 X-1.

  16. VLBA polarimetric observations of the CSS quasar 3C147

    CERN Document Server

    Rossetti, A; Dallacasa, D; Junor, W; Salter, C J; Saikia, D J; 10.1051/0004-6361/200811190

    2009-01-01

    Aims. We report new VLBA polarimetric observations of the compact steep-spectrum (CSS) quasar 3C147 (B0538+498) at 5 and 8.4GHz. Methods. By using multifrequency VLBA observations, we derived milliarcsecond-resolution images of the total intensity, polarisation, and rotation measure distributions, by combining our new observations with archival data. Results. The source shows a one-sided structure, with a compact region, and a component extending about 200 mas to the south-west. The compact region is resolved into two main components with polarised emission, a complex rotation measure distribution, and a magnetic field dominated by components perpendicular to the source axis. Conclusions. By considering all the available data, we examine the possible location of the core component, and discuss two possible interpretations of the observed structure of this source: core-jet and lobe-hot spot. Further observations to unambiguously determine the location of the core would help distinguish between the two possibil...

  17. Interaction of Fanaroff-Riley class II radio jets with a randomly magnetized intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Krause, M.; Alexander, P.

    2011-12-01

    A combination of 3D magnetohydrodynamics and synthetic numerical simulations are presented to follow the evolution of a randomly magnetized plasma that models the intracluster medium, under the isolated effects of powerful, light, hypersonic and bipolar Fanaroff-Riley class II jets. We prescribe the cluster magnetic field (CMF) as a Gaussian random field with a Kolmogorov-like energy spectrum. Both the power of the jets and the viewing angle that is used for the synthetic rotation measure (RM) observations are investigated. We find the model radio sources introduce and amplify fluctuations on the RM statistical properties which we analyse as a function of time as well as the viewing angle. The average RM and the RM standard deviation are increased by the action of the jets. Energetics, RM statistics and magnetic power spectral analysis consistently show that the effects also correlate with the jets' power, and that the lightest, fastest jets produce the strongest changes in their environment. We see jets distort and amplify the CMFs especially near the edges of the lobes and the jets' heads. This process leads to a flattening of the RM structure functions at scales comparable to the source size. The edge features we find are similar to ones observed in Hydra A. The results show that jet-produced RM enhancements are more apparent in quasars than in radio galaxies. Globally, jets tend to enhance the RM standard deviation which may lead to overestimations of the CMFs' strength by about 70 per cent. This study means to serve as a pathfinder for the SKA, EVLA and LOFAR to follow the evolution of cosmic magnetic fields.

  18. An Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We find that by a redshift z ~ 3, about 5-80% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density > 10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at ~ 10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the fields observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification.

  19. Detecting the First Quasars with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, Marco; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2010-05-01

    We show that ALMA is the first telescope that can probe the dust-obscured central region of quasars at z > 5 with a maximum resolution of ~ 30 pc employing the 18 km baseline. We explore the possibility of detecting the first quasars with ALMA (Schleicher, Spaans, & Klessen 2009). For this purpose, we adopt the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 as a reference system and calculate the expected fluxes if this galaxy were placed at high redshift. This choice is motivated by the detailed observations available for this system and the absence of any indication for an evolution in metallicity in high-redshift quasars. It is a conservative choice due to the moderate column densities in NGC 1068, leading to moderate fluxes.

  20. The Sudden Death of the Nearest Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Schawinski, Kevin; Virani, Shanil; Urry, C Megan; Keel, William C; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Lintott, Chris J; Manning, Anna; Coppi, Paolo; Kaviraj, Sugata; Bamford, Steven P; Jozsa, Gyula I G; Garrett, Michael; van Arkel, Hanny; Gay, Pamela; Fortson, Lucy; 10.1088/2041-8205/724/1/L30

    2010-01-01

    Galaxy formation is significantly modulated by energy output from supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies which grow in highly efficient luminous quasar phases. The timescale on which black holes transition into and out of such phases is, however, unknown. We present the first measurement of the shutdown timescale for an individual quasar using X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy IC 2497, which hosted a luminous quasar no more than 70,000 years ago that is still seen as a light echo in `Hanny's Voorwerp', but whose present-day radiative output is lower by at least 2 and more likely by over 4 orders of magnitude. This extremely rapid shutdown provides new insights into the physics of accretion in supermassive black holes, and may signal a transition of the accretion disk to a radiatively inefficient state.

  1. Data Mining for Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally lensed (GL) quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine learning techniques and demonstrate that a two step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step we use catalog-level information ($griz$+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to preselect targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (Gradient-Boosted Trees), to form a final set of cand...

  2. The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Marziani, Paola; Zhang, Shaohua; Muzahid, Sowgat; O’Dea, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) variability (rest frame wavelengths 500–920 Å) of high-luminosity quasars using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (low to intermediate redshift sample) and Sloan Digital sky Survey (SDSS) (high redshift sample) archives. The combined HST and SDSS data indicates a much more pronounced variability when the sampling time between observations in the quasar rest frame is \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} compared to \\lt 1.5× {10}7 s. Based on an excess variance analysis, for time intervals \\lt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 10% of the quasars (4/40) show evidence of EUV variability. Similarly, for time intervals \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 55% of the quasars (21/38) show evidence of EUV variability. The propensity for variability does not show any statistically significant change between 2.5× {10}7 {{s}} and 3.16× {10}7 {{s}} (1 year). The temporal behavior is one of a threshold time interval for significant variability as opposed to a gradual increase on these timescales. A threshold timescale can indicate a characteristic spatial dimension of the EUV region. We explore this concept in the context of the slim disk models of accretion. We find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the radial infall time to the plunge region of the optically thin surface layer of the slim disk that is responsible for the preponderance of the EUV flux emission (primarily within 0–7 black hole radii from the inner edge of the disk) is consistent with the empirically determined variability timescale.

  3. Multifrequency observation of the optically violent variable quasar 3C 446

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.; Mchardy, I.

    1988-01-01

    Nearly 20 years of optical and radio monitoring data as well as seven multifrequency spectra of the violently variable quasar 3C 446 are reported. The monitoring data suggest a correlation between the radio and optical outbursts, with the optical flare preceding the radio activity by 400-600 days. Considerable processing occurs in the optical-emitting plasma before it becomes radio-emitting plasma. Within the radio band, outbursts proceed from high to low frequencies. The flat radio spectrum turns over at 3-10 x 10 to the 11th Hz and the continuum steepens with frequency. The X-ray emission lies an order of magnitude above an extrapolation of the optical-UV spectrum and has a harder spectrum. The power is primarily concentrated in the submillimeter and infrared region. The data suggest that the X-rays are produced by the inverse Compton process from an emitting region smaller than but related to the synchrotron-emitting UV-IR region. The characteristic size of the emitting region increases with decreasing frequency.

  4. Giant Radio Galaxies: I. Intergalactic Barometers

    CERN Document Server

    Malarecki, J M; Saripalli, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Jones, D H; Duffy, A R; Rioja, M

    2013-01-01

    We present new wideband radio observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of a sample of 12 giant radio galaxies. The radio observations are part of a larger radio-optical study aimed at relating the radio structures with the ambient medium on large scales. With projected linear sizes larger than 0.7 Mpc, these objects are ideal candidates for the study of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The sample includes sources with sizes spanning 0.8 to 3.2 Mpc and total powers of 1.2*10^24 to 4.0*10^26 W Hz^-1 at 2.1 GHz. Redshifts were limited to z<0.15 to permit spectroscopic observations of the hosts and neighbouring galaxies, which were obtained using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We derive lobe energy densities from the radio observations via equipartition arguments. The inferred pressures in the lobes of the giant radio sources, which range from 1.1*10^-15 to 2.0*10^-14 Pa (80 to 1500 cm^-3 K), are lower than previously inferred from X-ray observations of dens...

  5. Occipital lobe infarctions are different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halvor Naess

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Halvor Naess, Ulrikke Waje-Andreassen, Lars ThomassenDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, N-5021 Bergen, NorwayObjectives: We hypothesized that occipital lobe infarctions differ from infarctions in other locations as to etiology, risk factors and prognosis among young adults.Methods: Location, etiology, risk factors and long-term outcome were evaluated among all young adults 15–49 years suffering from cerebral infarction in Hordaland County, Norway between 1988 and 1997.Results: The following variables were more frequent among patients with occipital lobe infarction compared with patients with infarctions located elsewhere: younger age (P < 0.001, female sex (P = 0.016, prothrombotic state (P = 0.005 and lack of hypertension (P = 0.001. There was no difference as to long-term mortality or recurrence of cerebral infarction. Conclusion: Occipital lobe infarctions differ from infarctions in other locations among young adults. This may have important etiologic and therapeutical implications that need further studies.Keywords: cerebral infarction, occipital lobe, young adults

  6. Using quasars as standard clocks for measuring cosmological redshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn D; Stojkovic, Branislav; Stojkovic, Dejan; Weltman, Amanda

    2012-06-08

    We report hitherto unnoticed patterns in quasar light curves. We characterize segments of the quasar's light curves with the slopes of the straight lines fit through them. These slopes appear to be directly related to the quasars' redshifts. Alternatively, using only global shifts in time and flux, we are able to find significant overlaps between the light curves of different pairs of quasars by fitting the ratio of their redshifts. We are then able to reliably determine the redshift of one quasar from another. This implies that one can use quasars as standard clocks, as we explicitly demonstrate by constructing two independent methods of finding the redshift of a quasar from its light curve.

  7. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    La Plante, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled $N$-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models include two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function (QLF) given a halo catalog from an $N$-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurem...

  8. The Mid-Infrared Luminosity Evolution and Luminosity Function of Quasars with SDSS and WISE

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, J; Gerber, A

    2016-01-01

    We determine the 22$\\mu$m luminosity evolution and luminosity function for quasars from a data set of over 20,000 objects obtained by combining flux-limited Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical and Wide field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-infrared data. We apply methods developed in previous works to access the intrinsic population distributions non-parametrically, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population of quasars exhibits positive luminosity evolution with redshift in the mid-infrared, but with considerably less mid-infrared evolution than in the optical or radio bands. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolution and local mid-infrared luminosity function. The latter displays a sharp flattening at local luminosities below $\\sim 10^{31}$ erg sec$^{-1}$ Hz$^{-1}$, which has been reported previously at 15 $\\mu$m for AGN classified as both type-1 and type-2. We calculate the integrated total emission from quasars at 2...

  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog II. First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, D P; Hall, P B; Jester, S; Richards, G T; Stoughton, C; Strauss, M A; Subba-Rao, M; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, S F; Brandt, W N; Gunn, J E; Gray, J; Trump, J R; Voges, W; Yanny, B; Schneider, Donald P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Jester, Sebastian; Richards, Gordon T.; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; Rao, Mark Subba; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Gunn, James E.; Gray, Jim; Trump, Jonathan R.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2003-01-01

    We present the second edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of 16713 objects in the SDSS First Data Release (DR1) that have luminosities larger than M_i=-22 (H_0=70 km/s, Omega_M=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered is ~1360 deg^2 and the redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.43. Each object has positions accurate to better than 0.2" rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method, in addition to radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large area surveys. Calibrated digital spectra covering 3800-9200 Angstroms at a spectral resolution 1800-2100, are available. This publication supersedes the first SDSS Quasar Catalog, which was based on material from the SDSS Early Data Release. A summa...

  10. Black Hole or MECO? Decided by a Thin Luminous Ring Structure Deep Within Quasar Q0957

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Rudolph E

    2008-01-01

    Optical, Infrared, X-ray, and radio wavelength studies of quasars are beginning to define the luminous quasar structure from techniques of reverberation and microlensing. An important result is that the inner quasar structure of the first identified gravitational lens, Q0957+561 A,B seems not to show the kind of structure expected for a supermassive black hole, but instead show a clean-swept interior region as due to the action of a magnetic propeller, just as expected for a MECO (Magnetic Eternally Collapsing Object) structure. Given the present state of the observations, the strongest model discriminant seems to be the existence of a thin luminous band around the inner edge of the accretion disc, at a distant radius ~ 70 R_g from the ~ 4 x 10^9 Mo central object. Since the existence of a clean magnetic propeller swept inner region ~70 R_g surrounded by a sharp ~ 1 R_g disc edge are the low-hard state spectral properties associated with a highly redshifted central MECO object, we are led to the conclusion th...

  11. Radio archive

    OpenAIRE

    Street, Sean

    2008-01-01

    The Centre for Broadcasting History Research, in association with the\\ud British Universities Film and Video Council, is developing an online\\ud audio archive of UK commercial radio, from 1973 to 1992. Work produced\\ud before the Broadcasting Act 1990 represents a different ethos to the role\\ud commercial radio played, and subsequently,continues to play, in the UK.\\ud The change in commercial radio since this period is extraordinary. It is\\ud impossible for the young student of radio, born si...

  12. STRUCTURE FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM QUASAR VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W; Becker, R; White, R; Loomis, C

    2004-11-15

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35,165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6,413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of {approx}40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts/flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

  13. New quasar surveys with WIRO: Searching for high redshift (z~6) quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze Nunez, Evan; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William Bradford; Lee, Daniel; Lyke, Bradley; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    High redshift quasars (z~6) are of great interest to fundamental astronomy due to the information they hold about the early universe. With their low number density in the sky, however, they are elusive objects. Reported here is our search for these high redshift quasars using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) 2.3m telescope. We search for potential candidates that have been detected by surveys such as WISE, which have been mostly redshifted out of the optical. The main emission feature of these quasars (the Lyman-Alpha line at ~1216 Angstroms rest-frame) would be redshifted to the z-band or beyond. This means that the quasars should have very low levels of i-band flux. These objects are known as i-dropouts. By imaging the quasars in the i-band and running photometric analysis on our fields, candidates can be identified or rejected by whether or not they appear in our fields. We also provide an analysis of the colors of our candidate high-redshift quasars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST1560461

  14. THE LARGE SKY AREA MULTI-OBJECT FIBER SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE QUASAR SURVEY: QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM THE FIRST DATA RELEASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Y. L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Dong, Xiaoyi [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zuo, Wenwen; Shen, S.-Y. [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Y.-X.; Yuan, H.-L.; Song, Y.-H.; Yang, M.; Wu, H.; Shi, J.-R.; He, B.-L.; Lei, Y.-J.; Li, Y.-B. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences 100012, Beijing (China); Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo, E-mail: aiyl@pku.edu.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes the pilot survey and the first year of the regular survey. There are 3921 quasars reliably identified, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with a highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg ii, and C iv regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photometric data with model fitting, as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, with flags indicating the selection methods, and broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are also available. Of the 3921 quasars, 28% are independently selected with optical–infrared colors, indicating that the method is quite promising for the completeness of the quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the ongoing quasar survey will provide valuable data for studies of quasars.

  15. Giant scattering cones in obscured quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Obied, Georges; Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of scattering regions in 20 luminous obscured quasars at $0.24quasar hosts' star formation rates. Modeling these regions as illuminated dusty cones, we estimate the radial density distributions of the interstellar medium as well as the geometric properties of circumnuclear quasar obscuration -- inclinations and covering factors. Small derived opening angles (median half-angle and standard deviation 27\\dg$\\pm$9\\dg) are inconsistent with a 1:1 type 1 / type 2 ratio. We suggest that quasar obscuration is patchy and that the observer has a $\\sim 40\\%$ chan...

  16. The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian; Zhang, Shaohua; Muzahid, Sowgat; O'Dea, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) variability (rest frame wavelengths 500 - 920 $\\AA$) of high luminosity quasars using HST (low to intermediate redshift sample) and SDSS (high redshift sample) archives. The combined HST and SDSS data indicates a much more pronounced variability when the sampling time between observations in the quasar rest frame is $> 2\\times 10^{7}$ sec compared to $2\\times 10^{7}$ sec in the quasar rest frame, $55\\%$ of the quasars (21/38) show evidence of EUV variability. The propensity for variability does not show any statistically significant change between $2.5\\times 10^{7}$ sec and $3.16\\times 10^{7}$ sec (1 yr). The temporal behavior is one of a threshold time interval for significant variability as opposed to a gradual increase on these time scales. A threshold time scale can indicate a characteristic spatial dimension of the EUV region. We explore this concept in the context of the slim disk models of accretion. We find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the radial infall...

  17. Theoretical spectroscopy of quasars within Karlsson's law

    CERN Document Server

    Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The law introduced by Karlsson in spectroscopy of low-redshift quasars involves the Lyman spectrum of hydrogen atoms. Thus, it appears necessary to study the concepts introduced by a standard spectroscopy of quasars, studied here, with those deducted from $\\Lambda$-CDM.A visible absorption of a sharp and saturated spectral line in a gas requires a long path without perturbations as collisions or cosmological redshift. Spectra of absorbed, saturated lines of quasars obeying Karlsson's law mainly result from interactions of natural, thermal light radiated by quasar with relatively cold, low presure atomic hydrogen. These lines are produced by three processes: a) A conventional absorption in a relatively cold gas produces a set of lines; b) These lines are multiplied by absorption after fundamental 3K or 4K redshifts, where K is Karlsson's constant: Spectra show that redshifts 3K (or 4K) exactly bring absorbed Lyman beta (or gamma) line on Lyman alpha: redshift almost disappears, and gas lines are intensely abso...

  18. Black-hole masses of distant quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods commonly used to determine or estimate the black hole mass in quiescent or active galaxies is presented and it is argued that the use of mass-scaling relations is both a reliable and the preferred method to apply to large samples of distant quasars. The method uses...

  19. Measuring Distances to Remote Galaxies and Quasars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Patrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of spectroscopy and the redshift to measure how far an object is by measuring how fast it is receding from earth. Lists the most distant quasars yet found. Tables include "Redshift vs. Distance" and "Distances to Celestial Objects for Various Cosmologies." (CW)

  20. Quasar Mass Functions Across Cosmic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    I present mass functions of actively accreting black holes detected in different quasar surveys which in concert cover a wide range of cosmic history. I briefly address what we learn from these mass functions. I summarize the motivation for such a study and the methods by which we determine black...