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Sample records for lobe cell convection

  1. Excitation of transient lobe cell convection and auroral arc at the cusp poleward boundary during a transition of the interplanetary magnetic field from south to north

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    P. E. Sandholt

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available We document the activation of transient polar arcs emanating from the cusp within a 15 min long intermediate phase during the transition from a standard two-cell convection pattern, representative of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, to a "reverse" two-cell pattern, representative of strongly northward IMF conditions. During the 2–3 min lifetime of the arc, its base in the cusp, appearing as a bright spot, moved eastward toward noon by ~ 300 km. As the arc moved, it left in its "wake" enhanced cusp precipitation. The polar arc is a tracer of the activation of a lobe convection cell with clockwise vorticity, intruding into the previously established large-scale distorted two-cell pattern, due to an episode of localized lobe reconnection. The lobe cell gives rise to strong flow shear (converging electric field and an associated sheet of outflowing field-aligned current, which is manifested by the polar arc. The enhanced cusp precipitation represents, in our view, the ionospheric footprint of the lobe reconnection process.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers; plasma convection

  2. Plasma convection in the magnetotail lobes: statistical results from Cluster EDI measurements

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    S. Haaland

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A major part of the plasma in the Earth's magnetotail is populated through transport of plasma from the solar wind via the magnetotail lobes. In this paper, we present a statistical study of plasma convection in the lobes for different directions of the interplanetary magnetic field and for different geomagnetic disturbance levels. The data set used in this study consists of roughly 340 000 one-minute vector measurements of the plasma convection from the Cluster Electron Drift Instrument (EDI obtained during the period February 2001 to June 2007. The results show that both convection magnitude and direction are largely controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. For a southward IMF, there is a strong convection towards the central plasma sheet with convection velocities around 10 km s−1. During periods of northward IMF, the lobe convection is almost stagnant. A By dominated IMF causes a rotation of the convection patterns in the tail with an oppositely directed dawn-dusk component of the convection for the northern and southern lobe. Our results also show that there is an overall persistent duskward component, which is most likely a result of conductivity gradients in the footpoints of the magnetic field lines in the ionosphere.

  3. REVERSALS IN THE 6-CELLS CONVECTION DRIVEN

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    G.M. Vodinchar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the large-scale model geodynamo, which based on indirect data of inhomogeneities in the density of the Earth’s core. Convection structure is associated with spherical harmonic Y24 , which defines the basic poloidal component of velocity. Coriolis drift of this mode determines the toroidal component of velocity. Thus, 6 convective cells are formed. The model takes into account the feedback effect of the magnetic field on convection. It was ascertained that the model contains stable regimes of field generation. The velocity of convection and the dipole component of the magnetic field are close to the observed ones.

  4. Convective cells and transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassam, A.B.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1978-12-01

    The properties of convective cells and the diffusion resulting from such cells are significantly influenced by an inhomogeneity in the extermal confining magnetic field, such as that in toroidal plasmas. The convective diffusion in the presence of a field inhomogeneity is estimated. For a thermal background, this diffusion is shown to be substantially smaller than classical collisional diffusion. For a model nonthermal background, the diffusion is estimated, for typical parameters, to be at most of the order of collisional diffusion. The model background employed is based on spectra observed in numerical simulations of drift-wave-driven convective cells

  5. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  6. Hamiltonian Description of Convective-cell Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.; Kolesnikov, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinear statistical growth rate eq for convective cells driven by drift-wave (DW) interactions is studied with the aid of a covariant Hamiltonian formalism for the gyrofluid nonlinearities. A statistical energy theorem is proven that relates eq to a second functional tensor derivative of the DW energy. This generalizes to a wide class of systems of coupled partial differential equations a previous result for scalar dynamics. Applications to (i) electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes at small ion temperature, and (ii) weakly electromagnetic collisional DW's are noted

  7. Convection Cells in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Katherine; Mellado, Juan-Pedro

    2017-04-01

    In dry, shear-free convective boundary layers (CBLs), the turbulent flow of air is known to organise itself on large scales into coherent, cellular patterns, or superstructures, consisting of fast, narrow updraughts and slow, wide downdraughts which together form circulations. Superstructures act as transport mechanisms from the surface to the top of the boundary layer and vice-versa, as opposed to small-scale turbulence, which only modifies conditions locally. This suggests that a thorough investigation into superstructure properties may help us better understand transport across the atmospheric boundary layer as a whole. Whilst their existence has been noted, detailed studies into superstructures in the CBL have been scarce. By applying methods which are known to successfully isolate similar large-scale patterns in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we can assess the efficacy of those detection techniques in the CBL. In addition, through non-dimensional analysis, we can systematically compare superstructures in various convective regimes. We use direct numerical simulation of four different cases for intercomparison: Rayleigh-Bénard convection (steady), Rayleigh-Bénard convection with an adiabatic top lid (quasi-steady), a stably-stratified CBL (quasi-steady) and a neutrally-stratified CBL (unsteady). The first two are non-penetrative and the latter two penetrative. We find that although superstructures clearly emerge from the time-mean flow in the non-penetrative cases, they become obscured by temporal averaging in the CBL. This is because a rigid lid acts to direct the flow into counter-rotating circulation cells whose axis of rotation remains stationary, whereas a boundary layer that grows in time and is able to entrain fluid from above causes the circulations to not only grow in vertical extent, but also to move horizontally and merge with neighbouring circulations. Spatial filtering is a useful comparative technique as it can be performed on boundary

  8. Differential Growth in Periclinal and Anticlinal Walls during Lobe Formation in Arabidopsis Cotyledon Pavement Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, William J; Barton, Deborah A; Law, Andrew M K; Overall, Robyn L

    2015-09-01

    Lobe development in the epidermal pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons and leaves is thought to take place via tip-like growth on the concave side of lobes driven by localized concentrations of actin filaments and associated proteins, with a predicted role for cortical microtubules in establishing the direction of restricted growth at the convex side. We used homologous landmarks fixed to the outer walls of pavement cells and thin-plate spline analysis to demonstrate that lobes form by differential growth of both the anticlinal and periclinal walls. Most lobes formed within the first 24 h of the cotyledons unfurling, during the period of rapid cell expansion. Cortical microtubules adjacent to the periclinal wall were persistently enriched at the convex side of lobes during development where growth was anisotropic and were less concentrated or absent at the concave side where growth was promoted. Alternating microtubule-enriched and microtubule-free zones at the periclinal wall in neighboring cells predicted sites of new lobes. There was no particular arrangement of cortical actin filaments that could predict where lobes would form. However, drug studies demonstrate that both filamentous actin and microtubules are required for lobe formation. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential Growth in Periclinal and Anticlinal Walls during Lobe Formation in Arabidopsis Cotyledon Pavement Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Deborah A.; Law, Andrew M.K.; Overall, Robyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Lobe development in the epidermal pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons and leaves is thought to take place via tip-like growth on the concave side of lobes driven by localized concentrations of actin filaments and associated proteins, with a predicted role for cortical microtubules in establishing the direction of restricted growth at the convex side. We used homologous landmarks fixed to the outer walls of pavement cells and thin-plate spline analysis to demonstrate that lobes form by differential growth of both the anticlinal and periclinal walls. Most lobes formed within the first 24 h of the cotyledons unfurling, during the period of rapid cell expansion. Cortical microtubules adjacent to the periclinal wall were persistently enriched at the convex side of lobes during development where growth was anisotropic and were less concentrated or absent at the concave side where growth was promoted. Alternating microtubule-enriched and microtubule-free zones at the periclinal wall in neighboring cells predicted sites of new lobes. There was no particular arrangement of cortical actin filaments that could predict where lobes would form. However, drug studies demonstrate that both filamentous actin and microtubules are required for lobe formation. PMID:26296967

  10. Convection in a colloidal suspension in a closed horizontal cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smorodin, B. L.; Cherepanov, I. N.

    2015-01-01

    The experimentally detected [1] oscillatory regimes of convection in a colloidal suspension of nanoparticles with a large anomalous thermal diffusivity in a closed horizontal cell heated from below have been simulated numerically. The concentration inhomogeneity near the vertical cavity boundaries arising from the interaction of thermal-diffusion separation and convective mixing has been proven to serve as a source of oscillatory regimes (traveling waves). The dependence of the Rayleigh number at the boundary of existence of the traveling-wave regime on the aspect ratio of the closed cavity has been established. The spatial characteristics of the emerging traveling waves have been determined

  11. Revisiting coupled Shukla-Varma and convective cell mode in classical and quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

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    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Nargis, Shahida

    2010-08-01

    The coupled Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell mode is revisited in classical and quantum dusty magnetoplasmas. It is shown that the inclusion of electron thermal effects modifies the original coupled SV and convective cell mode. It is also discussed how the quantum effects can be incorporated in the coupled SV and convective cell mode.

  12. Regulation of spindle orientation and neural stem cell fate in the Drosophila optic lobe

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    Brand Andrea H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice of a stem cell to divide symmetrically or asymmetrically has profound consequences for development and disease. Unregulated symmetric division promotes tumor formation, whereas inappropriate asymmetric division affects organ morphogenesis. Despite its importance, little is known about how spindle positioning is regulated. In some tissues cell fate appears to dictate the type of cell division, whereas in other tissues it is thought that stochastic variation in spindle position dictates subsequent sibling cell fate. Results Here we investigate the relationship between neural progenitor identity and spindle positioning in the Drosophila optic lobe. We use molecular markers and live imaging to show that there are two populations of progenitors in the optic lobe: symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells and asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts. We use genetically marked single cell clones to show that neuroepithelial cells give rise to neuroblasts. To determine if a change in spindle orientation can trigger a neuroepithelial to neuroblast transition, we force neuroepithelial cells to divide along their apical/basal axis by misexpressing Inscuteable. We find that this does not induce neuroblasts, nor does it promote premature neuronal differentiation. Conclusion We show that symmetrically dividing neuroepithelial cells give rise to asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts in the optic lobe, and that regulation of spindle orientation and division symmetry is a consequence of cell type specification, rather than a mechanism for generating cell type diversity.

  13. Rayleigh-Benard Natural Convection Cell Formation and Nusselt number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Je Young; Chung, Bum Jin

    2013-01-01

    The experimental results lie within the predictions of the existing heat transfer correlations for the Rayleigh-Benard natural convections even though the material properties were different. For shorter separation distances, the heat transfers enhance due to the active interaction between heated and cooled plumes. For a step temperature difference, the time dependent Nusselt number variations were investigated. Both experimental and numerical results showed that with time the Nusselt number decreases monotonically to a minimum point presenting the onset of convection. As the hot and cold plumes increase and convey the heat to the other plates, the Nusselt number increases to the local maximum point, presenting the vertical movements of the plumes. Then, the Nusselt number fluctuates with the formation of square cells and larger vortices. This also predicted by the mass transfer experiment. The experiments and calculations show similar trend but the timings were different. These discrepancies are caused by the disturbances inherent in both systems. The molten pool is formed in a hypothetical severe accident condition at the lower head of reactor vessel and is stratified into two layers by the density difference: an upper metallic layer and a lower oxide pool. Rayleigh-Benard natural convection occurs in the metallic layer of relocated molten pool. This study aimed at the investigation of the time-dependent cell formation and Nusselt number variation in Rayleigh-Benard natural convection. Time dependent variation of Nusselt number was also measured experimentally and analyzed numerically to investigate the relationship between the cell formation and Nusselt number. Based on the analogy, heat transfer experiments were replaced by mass transfer experiments using a sulfuric acid-copper sulfate (H 2 SO 4 -CuSO 4 ) electroplating system. Numerical analysis using the commercial CFD program FLUENT 6.3 were carried out with the same material properties and heating conditions

  14. Mitosis and cell death in the optic lobes of workers, queens and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    of white, pink, brown and black eyes, and the beginning of tegument ... Our purpose was to investigate cell division and death in the optic lobes (OL) of workers, queens and males during ... new ones in each caste and sex. Nevertheless, most ...

  15. Convective flows of colloidal suspension in an inclined closed cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smorodin, Boris; Ishutov, Sergey [Department of Physics of Phase Transitions, Perm State University, Perm (Russian Federation); Cherepanov, Ivan, E-mail: bsmorodin@yandex.ru [Department of Radio Electronics and Information Security, Perm State University, Perm (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The nonlinear spatiotemporal evolution of convective flows is numerically investigated in the case of colloidal suspension filling an inclined closed cell heated from below. The bifurcation diagram (the dependency of the Nusselt number on the Rayleigh number) is obtained. The characteristics of the wave and steady patterns are investigated depending on heat intensity. The travelling wave changing travel direction and the non-regular oscillatory flow are found to be stable solutions within a certain interval of the Rayleigh number. Temporal Fourier decomposition is used together with other diagnostic tools to analyse the complex bifurcation and spatiotemporal properties caused by the interplay of the gravity-induced gradient of concentration and convective mixing of the fluid. It is shown that a more complex flow structure exists at a lower heating intensity (Rayleigh number). (paper)

  16. Scrape-off layer profile modifications by convective cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J.R.; DIppolito, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Convective cells (CC close-quote s) are important in understanding density profile modifications induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antennas. This has motivated the present work in which the effect of CC close-quote s on transport in the scrape-off layer is studied, in the regime where the density gradient scale length L n and the cell size L are comparable. Monte Carlo simulations show that closed cell convection acts to flatten the density profile, and that open cells enhance the particle flow to the wall, depleting the density and yielding profiles similar to those measured near ICRF antennas. A new one-dimensional, two-branch model of CC transport is shown to agree well with the simulations. The model gives rise to two characteristic scale lengths, only one of which is retained in the enhanced diffusion models that are applicable for L n >L. The two-branch model is expected to be useful in analyzing ICRF experiments. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Convective cells of internal gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere with finite temperature gradient

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    O. Onishchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated vortex structures (e.g. convective cells of internal gravity waves (IGWs in the earth's atmosphere with a finite vertical temperature gradient. A closed system of nonlinear equations for these waves and the condition for existence of solitary convective cells are obtained. In the atmosphere layers where the temperature decreases with height, the presence of IGW convective cells is shown. The typical parameters of such structures in the earth's atmosphere are discussed.

  18. Thermally driven convective cells and tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.R.; Diamond, P.H.

    1987-07-01

    A unified theory for the dynamics of thermally driven convective cell turbulence is presented. The cells are excited by the combined effects of radiative cooling and resistivity gradient drive. The model also includes impurity dynamics. Parallel thermal and impurity flows enhanced by turbulent radial duffusion regulate and saturate overlapping cells, even in regimes dominated by thermal instability. Transport coefficients and fluctuation levels characteristic of the saturated turbulence are calculated. It is found that the impurity radiation increases transport coefficients for high density plasmas, while the parallel conduction damping, elevated by radial diffusion, in turn quenches the thermal instability. The enhancement due to radiative cooling provides a resolution to the dilemma of explaining the experimental observation that potential fluctuations exceed density fluctuations in the edge plasma (e PHI/T/sub e/ > n/n 0 )

  19. Therapeutic value of lymph node dissection for right middle lobe non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Hiroaki; Mun, Mingyon; Motoi, Noriko; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ken; Yatabe, Yasushi; Okumura, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Background Superior mediastinal and #11i lymph node (LN) metastases are adverse prognostic factors in patients with middle lobe lung cancer. We aimed to clarify the benefit of thorough lymphadenectomy by LN station or zone in middle lobe non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Among 295 patients who underwent pulmonary resection and thorough lymphadenectomy for primary right middle lobe (RML) NSCLC at two institutions, we enrolled 68 patients (33 men, 35 women) and retrospectively studied their data. We divided each N1 location (i.e., #10, #11s and #11i) into N1(−)N2(+) and N1(+)N2(+) and divided the #12m location into N1(+)N2(−), N1(−)N2(+) and N1(+)N2(+). Results Interlobar node involvement was rare in pN1 NSCLC when compared with that in other N1 nodes. Lymph node dissection (LND) was beneficial when the hilar zone (HZ)/interlobar zone (IZ) LNs were located at the intermediate point of the upper zones (UZs) and subcarinal zones (SCZs), with the therapeutic benefit at the SCZ being 2.8-fold higher than that at the UZ and 9.7-fold higher than that at the lower zone (LZ). Furthermore, LND evidently had greater therapeutic value for the SCZ than the UZ, which was compatible with skip N2 metastases. Conclusions For middle lobe NSCLC, mediastinal LND should be considered a priority in the SCZ than in the UZ. Moreover, the HZ/IZ is central to unfavourable prognoses in patients with pN2 middle lobe NSCLC. PMID:27162652

  20. The structure and dynamics of patterns of Benard convection cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivier, N.; Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London; Lausanne Univ.

    1990-08-01

    Benard-Marangoni convection, in containers with large aspect ratio, exhibits space-filling cellular structures, highly deformable, but crystallized. They contain dislocations and grain boundaries generated and moved by elementary topological transformations, and are subjected to a weak shear stress due to the earth's rotation. The cellular structure and its fluctuations are analyzed from a crystallographic viewpoint, by using two complementary approaches. One is a global analysis of cellular structures in cylindrical symmetry. Their structural stability and defect pattern are obtained as topological mode-locking of a continuous structural parameter. The other, a local, molecular dynamics of the cells, gives a realistic parametrization of the forces and the transformations by generalizing the Voronoi cell construction in one extra dimension. 23 refs., 8 figs

  1. Role of JAK/STAT signaling in neuroepithelial stem cell maintenance and proliferation in the Drosophila optic lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Yonggang; Zhou, Liya; Yue, Haitao [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hong, E-mail: luohong@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} JAK/STAT activity is graded in the Drosophila optic lobe neuroepithelium. {yields} Inactivation of JAK signaling causes disintegration of the optic lobe neuroepithelium and depletion of the neuroepithelial stem cells. {yields} JAK pathway overactivation promotes neuroepithelial overgrowth. {yields} Notch signaling acts downstream of JAK/STAT to promote neuroepithelial growth and expansion. -- Abstract: During Drosophila optic lobe development, proliferation and differentiation must be tightly modulated to reach its normal size for proper functioning. The JAK/STAT pathway plays pleiotropic roles in Drosophila development and in the larval brain, has been shown to inhibit medulla neuroblast formation. In this study, we find that JAK/STAT activity is required for the maintenance and proliferation of the neuroepithelial stem cells in the optic lobe. In loss-of-function JAK/STAT mutant brains, the neuroepithelial cells lose epithelial cell characters and differentiate prematurely while ectopic activation of this pathway is sufficient to induce neuroepithelial overgrowth in the optic lobe. We further show that Notch signaling acts downstream of JAK/STAT to control the maintenance and growth of the optic lobe neuroepithelium. Thus, in addition to its role in suppression of neuroblast formation, the JAK/STAT pathway is necessary and sufficient for optic lobe neuroepithelial growth.

  2. Survival of mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in humans with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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    Seress, László; Abrahám, Hajnalka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József; Klemm, Joyce; Byrne, Richard; Bakay, Roy A E

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis can be identified in most patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Surgical removal of the sclerotic hippocampus is widely performed to treat patients with drug-resistant mesial TLE. In general, both epilepsy-prone and epilepsy-resistant neurons are believed to be in the hippocampal formation. The hilar mossy cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are usually considered one of the most vulnerable types of neurons. The aim of this study was to clarify the fate of mossy cells in the hippocampus in epileptic humans. Of the 19 patients included in this study, 15 underwent temporal lobe resection because of drug-resistant TLE. Four patients were used as controls because they harbored tumors that had not invaded the hippocampus and they had experienced no seizures. Histological evaluation of resected hippocampal tissues was performed using immunohistochemistry. Mossy cells were identified in the control as well as the epileptic hippocampi by using cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide immunohistochemistry. In most cases the number of mossy cells was reduced and thorny excrescences were smaller in the epileptic hippocampi than in controls; however, there was a significant loss of pyramidal cells and a partial loss of granule cells in the same epileptic hippocampi in which mossy cell loss was apparent. The loss of mossy cells could be correlated with the extent of hippocampal sclerosis, patient age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and frequency of seizures. In many cases large numbers of mossy cells were present in the hilus of the dentate gyrus when most pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and CA3 areas of the Ammon's horn were lost, suggesting that mossy cells may not be more vulnerable to epileptic seizures than the hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  3. Early local differentiation of the cell wall matrix defines the contact sites in lobed mesophyll cells of Zea mays.

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    Giannoutsou, E; Sotiriou, P; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2013-10-01

    The morphogenesis of lobed mesophyll cells (MCs) is highly controlled and coupled with intercellular space formation. Cortical microtubule rings define the number and the position of MC isthmi. This work investigated early events of MC morphogenesis, especially the mechanism defining the position of contacts between MCs. The distributions of plasmodesmata, the hemicelluloses callose and (1 → 3,1 → 4)-β-d-glucans (MLGs) and the pectin epitopes recognized by the 2F4, JIM5, JIM7 and LM6 antibodies were studied in the cell walls of Zea mays MCs. Matrix cell wall polysaccharides were immunolocalized in hand-made sections and in sections of material embedded in LR White resin. Callose was also localized using aniline blue in hand-made sections. Plasmodesmata distribution was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Before reorganization of the dispersed cortical microtubules into microtubule rings, particular bands of the longitudinal MC walls, where the MC contacts will form, locally differentiate by selective (1) deposition of callose and the pectin epitopes recognized by the 2F4, LM6, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies, (2) degradation of MLGs and (3) formation of secondary plasmodesmata clusterings. This cell wall matrix differentiation persists in cell contacts of mature MCs. Simultaneously, the wall bands between those of future cell contacts differentiate with (1) deposition of local cell wall thickenings including cellulose microfibrils, (2) preferential presence of MLGs, (3) absence of callose and (4) transient presence of the pectins identified by the JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies. The wall areas between cell contacts expand determinately to form the cell isthmi and the cell lobes. The morphogenesis of lobed MCs is characterized by the early patterned differentiation of two distinct cell wall subdomains, defining the sites of the future MC contacts and of the future MC isthmi respectively. This patterned cell wall differentiation precedes cortical microtubule

  4. Ecdysone-dependent and ecdysone-independent programmed cell death in the developing optic lobe of Drosophila.

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    Hara, Yusuke; Hirai, Keiichiro; Togane, Yu; Akagawa, Hiromi; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2013-02-01

    The adult optic lobe of Drosophila develops from the primordium during metamorphosis from mid-3rd larval stage to adult. Many cells die during development of the optic lobe with a peak of the number of dying cells at 24 h after puparium formation (h APF). Dying cells were observed in spatio-temporal specific clusters. Here, we analyzed the function of a component of the insect steroid hormone receptor, EcR, in this cell death. We examined expression patterns of two EcR isoforms, EcR-A and EcR-B1, in the optic lobe. Expression of each isoform altered during development in isoform-specific manner. EcR-B1 was not expressed in optic lobe neurons from 0 to 6h APF, but was expressed between 9 and 48 h APF and then disappeared by 60 h APF. In each cortex, its expression was stronger in older glia-ensheathed neurons than in younger ones. EcR-B1 was also expressed in some types of glia. EcR-A was expressed in optic lobe neurons and many types of glia from 0 to 60 h APF in a different pattern from EcR-B1. Then, we genetically analyzed EcR function in the optic lobe cell death. At 0 h APF, the optic lobe cell death was independent of any EcR isoforms. In contrast, EcR-B1 was required for most optic lobe cell death after 24 h APF. It was suggested that cell death cell-autonomously required EcR-B1 expressed after puparium formation. βFTZ-F1 was also involved in cell death in many dying-cell clusters, but not in some of them at 24 h APF. Altogether, the optic lobe cell death occurred in ecdysone-independent manner at prepupal stage and ecdysone-dependent manner after 24 h APF. The acquisition of ecdysone-dependence was not directly correlated with the initiation or increase of EcR-B1 expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated mouse thymic lobes. Kinetics and phenotype of progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangrude, G.J.; Scollay, R.

    1990-01-01

    To define cell populations which participate in the very early stages of T cell development in the mouse thymus, we enriched hematopoietic stem cells from mouse bone marrow and injected them into thymic lobes of irradiated Ly-5 congenic recipients. The progeny of the stem cells were identified and their phenotypes were determined by two-color flow cytometry for the expression of various cell surface differentiation Ag during the course of their subsequent intrathymic development. The majority of the differentiation which occurred in the first 10 days after intrathymic cell transfer was myeloid in nature; hence, this study demonstrates that the irradiated thymus is not strictly selective for T cell development. Further, the maximum rate of T cell development was observed after intrathymic injection of 200 stem cells. Donor-derived cells which did not express Ag characteristic of the myeloid lineage could be detected and their phenotypes could be determined by flow cytometry as early as 7 days after intrathymic injection. At this time, the cells were still very similar phenotypically to the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Exceptions to this were the expression of stem cell Ag 2 and a decrease in the level of MHC class I Ag expression. After 9 days, the donor-derived cells expressed high levels of the Thy-1 Ag and proceeded to change in cell surface phenotype as differentiation continued. These cell phenotypes are described for the time frame ending 18 days after injection, when most donor-derived cells were phenotypically small CD4+ CD8+ (double-positive) thymocytes

  6. S100β-Positive Cells of Mesenchymal Origin Reside in the Anterior Lobe of the Embryonic Pituitary Gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Horiguchi

    Full Text Available The anterior and intermediate lobes of the pituitary gland develop through invagination of the oral ectoderm and as they are endocrine tissues, they participate in the maintenance of vital functions via the synthesis and secretion of numerous hormones. We recently observed that several extrapituitary cells invade the anterior lobe of the developing pituitary gland. This raised the question of the origin(s of these S100β-positive cells, which are not classic endocrine cells but instead comprise a heterogeneous cell population with plural roles, especially as stem/progenitor cells. To better understand the roles of these S100β-positive cells, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using several markers in S100β/GFP-TG rats, which express GFP in S100β-expressing cells under control of the S100β promoter. GFP-positive cells were present as mesenchymal cells surrounding the developing pituitary gland and at Atwell's recess but were not present in the anterior lobe on embryonic day 15.5. These cells were negative for SOX2, a pituitary stem/progenitor marker, and PRRX1, a mesenchyme and pituitary stem/progenitor marker. However, three days later, GFP-positive and PRRX1-positive (but SOX2-negative cells were observed in the parenchyma of the anterior lobe. Furthermore, some GFP-positive cells were positive for vimentin, p75, isolectin B4, DESMIN, and Ki67. These data suggest that S100β-positive cells of extrapituitary origin invade the anterior lobe, undergoing proliferation and diverse transformation during pituitary organogenesis.

  7. S100β-Positive Cells of Mesenchymal Origin Reside in the Anterior Lobe of the Embryonic Pituitary Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Yako, Hideji; Yoshida, Saishu; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kanno, Naoko; Ueharu, Hiroki; Nishihara, Hiroto; Kato, Takako; Yashiro, Takashi; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The anterior and intermediate lobes of the pituitary gland develop through invagination of the oral ectoderm and as they are endocrine tissues, they participate in the maintenance of vital functions via the synthesis and secretion of numerous hormones. We recently observed that several extrapituitary cells invade the anterior lobe of the developing pituitary gland. This raised the question of the origin(s) of these S100β-positive cells, which are not classic endocrine cells but instead comprise a heterogeneous cell population with plural roles, especially as stem/progenitor cells. To better understand the roles of these S100β-positive cells, we performed immunohistochemical analysis using several markers in S100β/GFP-TG rats, which express GFP in S100β-expressing cells under control of the S100β promoter. GFP-positive cells were present as mesenchymal cells surrounding the developing pituitary gland and at Atwell's recess but were not present in the anterior lobe on embryonic day 15.5. These cells were negative for SOX2, a pituitary stem/progenitor marker, and PRRX1, a mesenchyme and pituitary stem/progenitor marker. However, three days later, GFP-positive and PRRX1-positive (but SOX2-negative) cells were observed in the parenchyma of the anterior lobe. Furthermore, some GFP-positive cells were positive for vimentin, p75, isolectin B4, DESMIN, and Ki67. These data suggest that S100β-positive cells of extrapituitary origin invade the anterior lobe, undergoing proliferation and diverse transformation during pituitary organogenesis.

  8. Effect of thermal-convection-induced defects on the performance of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Xie, Fengxian; Yin, Maoshu; He, Jinjin; Wang, Yanbo; Tang, Wentao; Chen, Han; Yang, Xudong; Han, Liyuan

    2017-07-01

    Thermal-convection-induced defects can cause huge loss in the power conversion efficiency of solution-processed perovskite solar cells. We investigated two types of convection in perovskite solution during the formation of perovskite films. By balancing the convection via special configurations of surface tension and boiling point in mixed γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), we removed microscopic defects such as rings, bumps, and crevices. The deposited perovskite films were smooth and dense, which enabled a high power conversion efficiency of 17.7% in a 1 cm2 cell area. We believe that the present strategy for controlling the convection can be helpful in improving the perovskite film quality for solvent-rich scalable solution processes of solar cells such as doctor blading, soft-cover deposition, printing, and slot-die coating.

  9. Feedback control and heat transfer measurements in a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, M.; Hernández, R. H.

    2017-07-01

    We report experimental results on the heat transfer and instability onset of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell of aspect ratios 6:3:1 filled with a high Prandtl aqueous solution of glycerol under feedback control. We investigate the transient and stationary response of both local temperature readings and heat transfer fluxes on the Rayleigh Bénard cell in both conductive and convective states when we perform two independent feedback control actions on both hot and cold walls. We evaluate the performance of both controllers to maintain a temperature gradient independently if the system is below or above the convection threshold. As the convection cell can be rotated at 180° about the shorter axis of the cell, it was possible to perform transitions between thermal conduction and convection regimes and vice versa under a constant temperature difference maintained by both independent controllers. The experimental setup provided an accurate measurement of the critical Rayleigh number and the evolution of the Nusselt number as a function of the Rayleigh number in the moderately supercritical regime (R a cellular convection pattern formed by 6 transverse rolls throughout the range of Rayleigh numbers.

  10. Uptake of ascorbic acid by freshly isolated cells and secretory granules from the intermediate lobe of ox hypophyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, A; Matsumoto, T; Farver, O

    1990-01-01

    Mechanically isolated cells from the intermediate lobe of ox hypophyses contained 40.6 +/- 3.7 nmol mg-1 protein (mean +/- SE, n = 5) of ascorbic acid. They accumulated radioactivity time dependently, on incubation with L-[14C]ascorbic acid in ionic medium dominated by NaCl. No definite saturation...

  11. Cognitive Impairment in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Role of Online and Offline Processing of Single Cell Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titiz, A. S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Testorf, M. E.; Holmes, G. L.; Scott, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common comorbidity in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and is often considered more detrimental to quality of life than seizures. While it has been previously shown that the encoding of memory during behavior is impaired in the pilocarpine model of TLE in rats, how this information is consolidated during the subsequent sleep period remains unknown. In this study, we first report marked deficits in spatial memory performance and severe cell loss in the CA1 layer of the hippocampus lower spatial coherence of firing in TLE rats. We then present the first evidence that the reactivation of behavior-driven patterns of activity of CA1 place cells in the hippocampus is intact in TLE rats. Using a template-matching method, we discovered that real-time (3–5 s) reactivation structure was intact in TLE rats. Furthermore, we estimated the entropy rate of short time scale (~250 ms) bursting activity using block entropies and found that significant, extended temporal correlations exist in both TLE and Control rats. Fitting a first order Markov Chain model to these bursting time series, we found that long sequences derived from behavior were significantly enriched in the Markov model over corresponding models fit on randomized data confirming the presence of replay in shorter time scales. We propose that the persistent consolidation of poor spatial information in both real-time and during bursting activity may contribute to memory impairments in TLE rats. PMID:24799359

  12. Granule cell dispersion is associated with memory impairment in right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Rafael Scarpa da Costa; de Souza Silva Tudesco, Ivanda; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Lancellotti, Carmen; Ferrari-Marinho, Taíssa; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-11-01

    We analyzed the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with memory performance, clinical data and surgical outcome in a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Hippocampal specimens from 54 patients with MTLE (27 patients with right MTLE and 27 with left MTLE) and unilateral MTS, who were separated into GCD and no-GCD groups and thirteen controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed using hippocampal sections stained with NeuN. Patients' neuropsychological measures, clinical data, type of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 28 (51.9%) patients. No correlation between GCD and MTS pattern, clinical data or surgical outcome was found. The presence of GCD was correlated with worse visuospatial memory performance in right MTLE, but not with memory performance in left MTLE. GCD may be related to memory impairment in right MTLE-MTS patients. However, the role of GCD in memory function is not precisely defined. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential gene expression in dentate granule cells in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Nicole G; Wang, Yu; Hulette, Christine M; Halvorsen, Matt; Cronin, Kenneth D; Walley, Nicole M; Haglund, Michael M; Radtke, Rodney A; Skene, J H Pate; Sinha, Saurabh R; Heinzen, Erin L

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common neuropathologic finding in cases of medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis to show that next-generation sequencing methods can produce interpretable genomic data from RNA collected from small homogenous cell populations, and to shed light on the transcriptional changes associated with hippocampal sclerosis. RNA was extracted, and complementary DNA (cDNA) was prepared and amplified from dentate granule cells that had been harvested by laser capture microdissection from surgically resected hippocampi from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Sequencing libraries were sequenced, and the resulting sequencing reads were aligned to the reference genome. Differential expression analysis was used to ascertain expression differences between patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis. Greater than 90% of the RNA-Seq reads aligned to the reference. There was high concordance between transcriptional profiles obtained for duplicate samples. Principal component analysis revealed that the presence or absence of hippocampal sclerosis was the main determinant of the variance within the data. Among the genes up-regulated in the hippocampal sclerosis samples, there was significant enrichment for genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of dentate granule cells from surgically resected hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with and without hippocampal sclerosis, we have demonstrated the utility of next-generation sequencing methods for producing biologically relevant results from small populations of homogeneous cells, and have provided insight on the transcriptional changes associated with this pathology. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  14. All Hormone-Producing Cell Types of the Pituitary Intermediate and Anterior Lobes Derive From Prop1-Expressing Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shannon W; Keisler, Jessica L; Pérez-Millán, María I; Schade, Vanessa; Camper, Sally A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in PROP1, the most common known cause of combined pituitary hormone deficiency in humans, can result in the progressive loss of all hormones of the pituitary anterior lobe. In mice, Prop1 mutations result in the failure to initiate transcription of Pou1f1 (also known as Pit1) and lack somatotropins, lactotropins, and thyrotropins. The basis for this species difference is unknown. We hypothesized that Prop1 is expressed in a progenitor cell that can develop into all anterior lobe cell types, and not just the somatotropes, thyrotropes, and lactotropes, which are collectively known as the PIT1 lineage. To test this idea, we produced a transgenic Prop1-cre mouse line and conducted lineage-tracing experiments of Prop1-expressing cells. The results reveal that all hormone-secreting cell types of both the anterior and intermediate lobes are descended from Prop1-expressing progenitors. The Prop1-cre mice also provide a valuable genetic reagent with a unique spatial and temporal expression for generating tissue-specific gene rearrangements early in pituitary gland development. We also determined that the minimal essential sequences for reliable Prop1 expression lie within 10 kilobases of the mouse gene and demonstrated that human PROP1 can substitute functionally for mouse Prop1. These studies enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease in patients with PROP1 mutations.

  15. Turbulence convective heat transfer for cooling the photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianmehr, Iman

    Solar PV (photovoltaic) is a rapidly advancing renewable energy technology which converts sunlight directly into electricity. One of the outstanding challenges of the current PV technology is the reduction in its conversion efficiency with increasing PV panel temperature, which is closely associated with the increase in solar intensity and the ambient temperature surrounding the PV panels. To more effectively capture the available energy when the sun is most intense, significant efforts have been invested in active and passive cooling research over the last few years. While integrated cooling systems can lead to the highest total efficiencies, they are usually neither the most feasible nor the most cost effective solutions. This work examines some simple passive means of manipulating the prevailing wind turbulence to enhance convective heat transfer over a heated plate in a wind tunnel.

  16. Cell structures caused by settling particles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhoon; Park, Sangro

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent thermal convection is an important phenomenon frequently found in nature and industrial processes, often with laden particles. In the last several decades, the vast majority of studies have addressed single phase convective flow with focus on the scaling relation of flow parameters associated with heat transfer. Particle-laden Rayleigh-Bénard convection, however, has not been sufficiently studied. In this study, modulation of cell structures by settling particles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a doubly periodic square channel is investigated using direct numerical simulation with a point particle approach. Flow parameters are fixed at Rayleigh number=106, Prandtl number=0.7, the aspect ratio=6, and Froude number=0.19. We report from the simulations that settling heavy particles modulate irregular large-scale thermal plume structures into organized polygonal cell structures. Different shapes of flow structures are obtained for different particle diameters and mass loadings. We found that polygonal cell structures arise due to asymmetric feedback force exerted by particles onto hot and cold plumes. Increasing the number of particles augments the asymmetry and the polygonal cell structures become smaller, eventually going to the hexagonal structures.

  17. Subcarinal lymph node in upper lobe non-small cell lung cancer patients: is selective lymph node dissection valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aokage, Keiju; Yoshida, Junji; Ishii, Genichiro; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Nagai, Kanji

    2010-11-01

    Little is known about selective lymph node dissection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We sought to gain insight into subcarinal node involvement for its frequency and impact on outcome to evaluate whether it is valid to omit subcarinal lymph node dissection in upper lobe NSCLC patients. We reviewed node metastases distribution according to node region, tumor location, and histology among 1099 patients with upper lobe NSCLC. We paid special attention to subcarinal metastases patients without superior mediastinal node metastases, because their pathological stages would have been underdiagnosed if subcarinal node dissection had been omitted. We also assessed the outcome and the pattern of failure among subcarinal metastases patients. To identify subcarinal node involvement predictors, we analyzed 7 clinical factors. Subcarinal node metastases were found in 20 patients and were least frequent among squamous cell carcinoma patients (0.5%). Two of them were free from superior mediastinal metastases but died of the disease at 1 month and due to an unknown cause at 18 months, respectively. Seventeen of the 20 patients developed multi-site recurrence within 37 months. The 5-year survival rate of the 20 patients with subcarinal metastases was 9.0%, which was significantly lower than 32.0% of patients with only superior mediastinal metastases. Clinical diagnosis of node metastases was significantly predictive of subcarinal metastases. Subcarinal node metastases from upper lobe NSCLC were rare and predicted an extremely poor outcome. It appears valid to omit subcarinal node dissection in upper lobe NSCLC patients, especially in clinical N0 squamous cell carcinoma patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Theory of modulational interaction of trapped ion convective cells and drift wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, V.D.; Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.; Soloviev, G.; Shevchenko, V.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies of the modulational interaction between trapped ion convective cells and short wavelength drift wave turbulence are discussed. These studies are motivated by the fact that cells and drift waves are expected to coexist in tokamaks so that: (a) cells strain and modulate drift waves, and (b) drift waves open-quote ride on close-quote a background of cells. The results of the authors' investigation indicate that: (1) (nonlinear) parametric growth rates of trapped ion convective cells can exceed linear predictions (for drift wave levels at the mixing length limit); (2) a set of coupled envelope equations, akin to the Zakharov equations from Langmuir turbulence, can be derived and used to predict the formation of a dipole pair of convective cells trapped by the drift wave envelope. This dipole pair is strongly anisotropic, due to the structure of the drift wave Reynolds stress which drives the cell flow. Numerical solutions of the envelope equations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, and indicate the persistence of the structure in time; (3) strong modulation and trapping of drift waves with k perpendicular ρ > 1 occurs. Extensions to magnetically sheared systems and the broader implications of this work as a paradigm for the dynamics of persistent structures in shearing flows are discussed

  19. Dentate gyrus progenitor cell proliferation after the onset of spontaneous seizures in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiruska, Premysl; Shtaya, Anan B Y; Bodansky, David M S; Chang, Wei-Chih; Gray, William P; Jefferys, John G R

    2013-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy alters adult neurogenesis. Existing experimental evidence is mainly from chronic models induced by an initial prolonged status epilepticus associated with substantial cell death. In these models, neurogenesis increases after status epilepticus. To test whether status epilepticus is necessary for this increase, we examined precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis after the onset of spontaneous seizures in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy induced by unilateral intrahippocampal injection of tetanus toxin, which does not cause status or, in most cases, detectable neuronal loss. We found a 4.5 times increase in BrdU labeling (estimating precursor cells proliferating during the 2nd week after injection of toxin and surviving at least up to 7days) in dentate gyri of both injected and contralateral hippocampi of epileptic rats. Radiotelemetry revealed that the rats experienced 112±24 seizures, lasting 88±11s each, over a period of 8.6±1.3days from the first electrographic seizure. On the first day of seizures, their duration was a median of 103s, and the median interictal period was 23min, confirming the absence of experimentally defined status epilepticus. The total increase in cell proliferation/survival was due to significant population expansions of: radial glial-like precursor cells (type I; 7.2×), non-radial type II/III neural precursors in the dentate gyrus stem cell niche (5.6×), and doublecortin-expressing neuroblasts (5.1×). We conclude that repeated spontaneous brief temporal lobe seizures are sufficient to promote increased hippocampal neurogenesis in the absence of status epilepticus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Convective cell excitation by inertial Alfven waves in a low density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhotelov, O.A.; Onishchenko, O.G.; Sagdeev, R.Z.; Srenflo, L.; Balikhin, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The parametric interaction of inertial Alfven waves with large-scale convective cells in a low-density plasma is investigated. It is shown that, in plasmas where the Alfven velocity is comparable to or exceeds the speed of light, the parametric interaction is substantially suppressed. A compact expression for the optimal scale and instability growth rate of the fastest growing mode is obtained [ru

  1. Formation of convective cells in the scrape-off layer of the Castor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckel, J.; Hron, M.; Adamek, J.; Brotankova, J.; Dejarnac, R.; Duran, I.; Panek, R.; Stejskal, P.; Zacek, F.; Devynck, P.; Gunn, J.; Martines, E.; Bonhomme, G.; Van Oost, G.; Hansen, T.; Gorler, T.; Svoboda, V.

    2004-01-01

    We describe experiments with a biased electrode inserted into the scrape-off layer (SOL) of the CASTOR tokamak. The resulting radial and poloidal electric field and plasma density modification are measured by means of Langmuir probe arrays with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Poloidally and radially localized stationary structures of the electric field (convective cells) are identified and a related significant modification of the particle transport in the SOL is observed. (authors)

  2. Sensory processing and corollary discharge effects in posterior caudal lobe Purkinje cells in a weakly electric mormyrid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviña, Karina; Sawtell, Nathaniel B

    2014-07-15

    Although it has been suggested that the cerebellum functions to predict the sensory consequences of motor commands, how such predictions are implemented in cerebellar circuitry remains largely unknown. A detailed and relatively complete account of predictive mechanisms has emerged from studies of cerebellum-like sensory structures in fish, suggesting that comparisons of the cerebellum and cerebellum-like structures may be useful. Here we characterize electrophysiological response properties of Purkinje cells in a region of the cerebellum proper of weakly electric mormyrid fish, the posterior caudal lobe (LCp), which receives the same mossy fiber inputs and projects to the same target structures as the electrosensory lobe (ELL), a well-studied cerebellum-like structure. We describe patterns of simple spike and climbing fiber activation in LCp Purkinje cells in response to motor corollary discharge, electrosensory, and proprioceptive inputs and provide evidence for two functionally distinct Purkinje cell subtypes within LCp. Protocols that induce rapid associative plasticity in ELL fail to induce plasticity in LCp, suggesting differences in the adaptive functions of the two structures. Similarities and differences between LCp and ELL are discussed in light of these results. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Granule cell dispersion is not a predictor of surgical outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Neves, Rafael Scarpa; Jardim, Anaclara Prada; Caboclo, Luís Otávio; Lancellotti, Carmen; Marinho, Taissa Ferrari; Hamad, Ana Paula; Marinho, Murilo; Centeno, Ricardo; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Scorza, Carla Alessandra; Targas Yacubian, Elza Márcia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of a series of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was to analyze the association of granule cell dispersion (GCD) with surgical prognosis, patterns of MTS and clinical data. Hippocampal specimens from 66 patients with MTLE and unilateral MTS and from 13 controls were studied. Quantitative neuropathological evaluation was performed on NeuN-stained hippocampal sections. Patients' clinical data, types of MTS and surgical outcome were reviewed. GCD occurred in 45.5% of cases and was not correlated with clinical variable. More severe neuronal loss was observed in patients with GCD. Except for MTS Type 2 - observed only in four no- GCD patients - groups did not differ with respect to the types of MTS. Surgical outcome was similar in both groups. In conclusion, GCD was associated with the degree of hippocampal cell loss, but was not a predictor of surgical outcome.

  4. Cell death in neural precursor cells and neurons before neurite formation prevents the emergence of abnormal neural structures in the Drosophila optic lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yusuke; Sudo, Tatsuya; Togane, Yu; Akagawa, Hiromi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2018-04-01

    Programmed cell death is a conserved strategy for neural development both in vertebrates and invertebrates and is recognized at various developmental stages in the brain from neurogenesis to adulthood. To understand the development of the central nervous system, it is essential to reveal not only molecular mechanisms but also the role of neural cell death (Pinto-Teixeira et al., 2016). To understand the role of cell death in neural development, we investigated the effect of inhibition of cell death on optic lobe development. Our data demonstrate that, in the optic lobe of Drosophila, cell death occurs in neural precursor cells and neurons before neurite formation and functions to prevent various developmental abnormalities. When neuronal cell death was inhibited by an effector caspase inhibitor, p35, multiple abnormal neuropil structures arose during optic lobe development-e.g., enlarged or fused neuropils, misrouted neurons and abnormal neurite lumps. Inhibition of cell death also induced morphogenetic defects in the lamina and medulla development-e.g., failures in the separation of the lamina and medulla cortices and the medulla rotation. These defects were reproduced in the mutant of an initiator caspase, dronc. If cell death was a mechanism for removing the abnormal neuropil structures, we would also expect to observe them in mutants defective for corpse clearance. However, they were not observed in these mutants. When dead cell-membranes were visualized with Apoliner, they were observed only in cortices and not in neuropils. These results suggest that the cell death occurs before mature neurite formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of cell death induced ectopic neuroepithelial cells, neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells in late pupal stages, at sites where the outer and inner proliferation centers were located at earlier developmental stages. Caspase-3 activation was observed in the neuroepithelial cells and neuroblasts in the proliferation centers

  5. Onset of oscillatory binary fluid convection in three-dimensional cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Arantxa; Batiste, Oriol [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the influence of the transverse walls on the onset of convection in a horizontal rectangular cavity of infinite length filled with a binary mixture when heated from below. For the first time we take into account the effect of the third dimension without making any approximation and considering realistic boundary conditions. In previous numerical works the width of the cell was either taken to be infinity (bulk mixtures) or different approximations usually valid in the narrow cell limit were assumed (i.e., Hele-Shaw and non-ideal Hele-Shaw approximations). The results we find show that the presence of the walls has a considerable effect on the onset of convection even for intermediate transverse aspect ratio cells. They also show that the approximations generally assumed fail to reproduce the correct behaviour of the critical parameters in an important range of aspect ratio values when the primary bifurcation is oscillatory. We have compared the critical values of the Rayleigh number and the frequency with those reported in the literature (Ohlsen et al. [1]) and we find a quantitative agreement within the experimental error. (orig.)

  6. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  7. Modeling the overall heat conductive and convective properties of open-cell graphite foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tee, C C; Yu, N; Li, H

    2008-01-01

    This work develops analytic models on the overall thermal conductivity, pressure drop and overall convective heat transfer coefficient of graphite foam. The models study the relationship between the overall heat conductive and convective properties, and foam microstructure, temperature, foam surface friction characteristics and cooling fluid properties. The predicted thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop agree well with experimental data

  8. Electron thermal effect on linear and nonlinear coupled Shukla-Varma and convective cell modes in dust-contaminated magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2010-11-01

    Linear and nonlinear properties of coupled Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell modes in the presence of electron thermal effects are studied in a nonuniform magnetoplasma composed of electrons, ions, and extremely massive and negatively charged immobile dust grains. In the linear case, the modified dispersion relation is given and, in the nonlinear case, stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations that govern the dynamics of coupled SV and convective cell modes are obtained. It is found that electrostatic dipolar and vortex street type solutions can appear in such a plasma. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to the Earth's mesosphere as well as in ionospheric plasmas is also pointed out.

  9. Electron thermal effect on linear and nonlinear coupled Shukla-Varma and convective cell modes in dust-contaminated magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2010-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear properties of coupled Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell modes in the presence of electron thermal effects are studied in a nonuniform magnetoplasma composed of electrons, ions, and extremely massive and negatively charged immobile dust grains. In the linear case, the modified dispersion relation is given and, in the nonlinear case, stationary solutions of the nonlinear equations that govern the dynamics of coupled SV and convective cell modes are obtained. It is found that electrostatic dipolar and vortex street type solutions can appear in such a plasma. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to the Earth's mesosphere as well as in ionospheric plasmas is also pointed out.

  10. Rayleigh-Benard convection in a Hele-Shaw cell - a numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, C.; Mueller, U.

    1987-05-01

    Free convection in narrow vertical gaps heated from below gives rise to several different flow patterns as has been demonstrated by previous experimental investigations. A numerical study is presented aimed at simulating the observed flow phenomena in Hele-Shaw cells of small lateral extend. The numerical study is based on the assumption that the flow is essentially two-dimensional. This allows an approach using a one-term Galerkin approximation with respect to the direction perpendicular to the gap and a finite difference scheme with regard to the coordinates in the plane of the gap. The calculations result in realistic values of the critical Rayleigh numbers for the onset of steady and oscillatory convection. Most of the observed unsteady flow patterns can be simulated numerically. It is shown that five different stable flow patterns can occur at one particular Rayleigh number. The different stable flow patterns are coupled by a variety of complex transitions. Moreover the calculations show that a realistic description of the observed flow phenomena can not be obtained by a simplified model using the Darcy law in the momentum equation and implying slip flow at the small confining boundaries. (orig.) [de

  11. Heat transfer measurements of internally heated liquids in cylindrical convection cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1978-10-01

    In hypothetical reactor accidents, the thermohydraulic behaviour of core melts heated by the after-heat must be analyzed. For this purpose model experiments have been performed to study the stationary, natural convective heat transfer of internally heated fluids in cylindrical convertion cells investigating also the influence of geometry (aspect ratio) as well as of difference thermal wall conditions on to the heat transport characteristics. Axial temperature profiles, local heat flux densities at the vertical walls and their dependence, on the external Rayleigh number ar in detail reported, besides the Nusselt vs Rayleigh correlations for the aspect ratios HID=1 and 0,25. The results of these experiments are compared, as for ar possible, with existing thermohydraulic codes and simpler model asoumptions like the zone-model of Baker et. al. and after experimental verification, be used to study realistic PAHR situations. Velocity measurements by means of Laser-Doppler-Method yield information about the flow characteristics near the vertical walls and within the central part of the convecting fluid. (GL) [de

  12. Current advances in polymer electrolyte fuel cells based on the promotional role of under-rib convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, K.S. [Industrial Technology Cooperation Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, B.G.; Park, K.; Kim, H.M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and High Safety Vehicle Core Technology Research Center, INJE University, 607 Eobang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Literature data on the promotional role of under-rib convection for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) fueled by hydrogen and methanol are structured and analyzed, thus providing a guide to improving fuel cell performance through the optimization of flow field interaction. Data are presented for both physical and electrochemical performance showing reactant mass transport, electrochemical reaction, water behavior, and power density enhanced by under-rib convection. Performance improvement studies ranging from single cell to stack are presented for measuring the performance of real operating conditions and large-scale setups. The flow field optimization techniques by under-rib convection are derived from the collected data over a wide range of experiments and modeling studies with a variety of components including both single cell and stack arrangements. Numerical models for PEFCs are presented with an emphasis on mass transfer and electrochemical reaction inside the fuel cell. The models are primarily used here as a tool in the parametric analysis of significant design features and to permit the design of the experiment. Enhanced flow field design that utilizes the promotional role of under-rib convection can contribute to commercializing PEFCs. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Stimulation of phospholipase C in cultured microvascular endothelial cells from human frontal lobe by histamine, endothelin and purinoceptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkiss, J. R.; West, D.; Wilkes, L. C.; Scott, C.; Yarrow, P.; Wilkinson, G. F.; Boarder, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    1. Cultures of endothelial cells derived from the microvasculature of human frontal lobe have been investigated for phospholipase C (PLC) responses to histamine, endothelins and purinoceptor agonists. 2. Using cells prelabelled with [3H]-inositol and measuring total [3H]-inositol (poly)phosphates, histamine acting at H1 receptors stimulated a substantial response with an EC50 of about 10 microM. 3. Endothelin-1 also gave a clear stimulation of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. Both concentration-response curves and binding curves showed effective responses and binding in the rank order of endothelin-1 > sarafotoxin S6b > endothelin-3, suggesting an ETA receptor. 4. Assay of total [3H]-inositol (poly)phosphates showed no response to the purinoceptor agonists, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-trisphosphate (2MeSATP), adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotrisphosphate) (ATP gamma S) or beta,gamma-methylene ATP. Both ATP and UTP gave a small PLC response. 5. Similarly, when formation of [32P]-phosphatidic acid from cells prelabelled with 32Pi was used as an index of both PLC and phospholipase D, a small response to ATP and UTP was seen but there was no response to the other purinoceptor agonists tested. 6. Study by mass assay of stimulation by ATP of inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate accumulation revealed a transient response in the first few seconds, a decline to basal, followed by a small sustained response. 7. These results show that human brain endothelial cells in culture are responsive to histamine and endothelins in a manner which may regulate brain capillary permeability. Purines exert a lesser influence. PMID:8032588

  14. Magnetospheric convection and current system in the dayside polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, A.; Mukai, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Hayakawa, H.

    1992-01-01

    Field and particle observations on EXOS-D (Akebono) have yielded new information on convection and current system in the dayside polar cap. Convection patterns are distinctly different depending upon whether IMF B z is northward or southward. The number of convection cells is two when B z is southward but four when B z is northward. Lobe cells in which plasma flows sunward in the region of open field lines are observed as a pair (of which one is in the dawn and the other in the dusk sector) for any polarity of IMF B y and B z . Ions in the keV range precipitate not only in the dayside cusp region but also along the sunward directed streamlines of the dawn and dusk lobe cells. These observations require reconsideration on the position and the extent of the reconnection region on the magnetopause. They also suggest that the magnetotail plays a vital role in some phenomena which have been ascribed to dayside magnetopause processes. We have not been able to find evidence to prove the presence of the viscous cell under southward IMF

  15. Pattern selection near the onset of convection in binary mixtures in cylindrical cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Arantxa; Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol

    2014-01-01

    We report numerical investigations of three-dimensional pattern formation of binary mixtures in a vertical cylindrical container heated from below. Negative separation ratio mixtures, for which the onset of convection occurs via a subcritical Hopf bifurcation, are considered. We focus on the dynamics in the neighbourhood of the initial oscillatory instability and analyze the spatio-temporal properties of the patterns for different values of the aspect ratio of the cell, 0.25≲Γ≲11 (Γ≡R/d, where R is the radius of the cell and d its height). Despite the oscillatory nature of the primary instability, for highly constrained geometries, Γ≲2.5, only pure thermal stationary modes are selected after long transients. As the aspect ratio of the cell increases, for intermediate aspect ratio cells such as Γ=3, multistability and coexistence of stationary and time-dependent patterns is observed. In highly extended cylinders, Γ≈11, the dynamics near the onset is completely different from the pure fluid case, and a startling diversity of confined patterns is observed. Many of these patterns are consistent with experimental observations. Remarkably, though, we have obtained persistent large amplitude highly localized states not reported previously. (paper)

  16. Pattern selection near the onset of convection in binary mixtures in cylindrical cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Arantxa; Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol, E-mail: arantxa@fa.upc.edu [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Mòdul B4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    We report numerical investigations of three-dimensional pattern formation of binary mixtures in a vertical cylindrical container heated from below. Negative separation ratio mixtures, for which the onset of convection occurs via a subcritical Hopf bifurcation, are considered. We focus on the dynamics in the neighbourhood of the initial oscillatory instability and analyze the spatio-temporal properties of the patterns for different values of the aspect ratio of the cell, 0.25≲Γ≲11 (Γ≡R/d, where R is the radius of the cell and d its height). Despite the oscillatory nature of the primary instability, for highly constrained geometries, Γ≲2.5, only pure thermal stationary modes are selected after long transients. As the aspect ratio of the cell increases, for intermediate aspect ratio cells such as Γ=3, multistability and coexistence of stationary and time-dependent patterns is observed. In highly extended cylinders, Γ≈11, the dynamics near the onset is completely different from the pure fluid case, and a startling diversity of confined patterns is observed. Many of these patterns are consistent with experimental observations. Remarkably, though, we have obtained persistent large amplitude highly localized states not reported previously. (paper)

  17. Model Based Analysis of Forced and Natural Convection Effects in an Electrochemical Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Brunner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available High purity copper, suitable for electrical applications, can only be obtained by electro-winning. The hallmark of this process is its self-induced natural convection through density variations of the electrolyte at both anode and cathode. In order to do this, first the full dynamic complexity of the process needs to be understood. Thus an OpenFoam®-based 2D model of the process has been created. This finite-volume multiphysics approach solves the laminar momentum and copper-ion species conservation equations, as well as local copper-ion conversion kinetics. It uses a Boussinesq approximation to simulate the species-momentum coupling, namely natural draft forces induced by variations of the spatial copper concentration within the fluid. The model shows good agreement with benchmark-cases of real-life electrochemical cells found in literature. An additional flow was imposed at the bottom of a small scale electrochemical cell in order to increase the ionic transport and thereby increase the overall performance of the cell. In a small scale electrochemical cell in strictly laminar flow, the overall performance could be increased and stratification decreased.

  18. Engineering Multifunctional Living Paints: Thin, Convectively-Assembled Biocomposite Coatings of Live Cells and Colloidal Latex Particles Deposited by Continuous Convective-Sedimentation Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jessica Shawn

    Advanced composite materials could be revolutionized by the development of methods to incorporate living cells into functional materials and devices. This could be accomplished by continuously and rapidly depositing thin ordered arrays of adhesive colloidal latex particles and live cells that maintain stability and preserve microbial reactivity. Convective assembly is one method of rapidly assembling colloidal particles into thin (advantages over thicker randomly ordered composites, including enhanced cell stability and increased reactivity through minimized diffusion resistance to nutrients and reduced light scattering. This method can be used to precisely deposit live bacteria, cyanobacteria, yeast, and algae into biocomposite coatings, forming reactive biosensors, photoabsorbers, or advanced biocatalysts. This dissertation developed new continuous deposition and coating characterization methods for fabricating and characterizing 90 hours) photohydrogen production under anoxygenic conditions. Nutrient reduction slows cell division, minimizing coating outgrowth, and promotes photohydrogen generation, improving coating reactivity. Scanning electron microscopy of microstructure revealed how coating reactivity can be controlled by the size and distribution of the nanopores in the biocomposite layers. Variations in colloid microsphere size and suspension composition do not affect coating reactivity, but both parameters alter coating microstructure. Porous paper coated with thin coatings of colloidal particles and cells to enable coatings to be used in a gas-phase without dehydration may offer higher volumetric productivity for hydrogen production. Future work should focus on optimization of cell density, light intensity, media cycling, and acetate concentration.

  19. Patient with Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Suspected Right Upper Lobe Abscess Presenting with a Purulent Pericardial Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Khushboo; Ateeli, Huthayfa; Ampel, Neil M; L'heureux, Dena

    2016-07-22

    BACKGROUND Cardiac tamponade caused by pericardial effusion has a high mortality rate; thus, it is important to diagnose and treat this condition immediately. Specifically, bacterial pericarditis, although now very rare, is often fatal because of its fulminant process. CASE REPORT We present a case of a 61-year-old man with metastatic small cell lung cancer undergoing chemotherapy who presented with fatigue, poor appetite, and altered mental status. He was found to have a large-volume pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. He underwent emergent pericardiocentesis. The pericardial effusion was nonmalignant, with cultures growing Streptococcus pneumoniae. It was only after his emergent pericardiocentesis that previous imaging from one month prior was able to be reviewed, which showed possible right upper lobe abscess. CONCLUSIONS Most pericardial effusions in cancer patients are related to their malignancy, either due to direct metastasis or secondary physiologic effects. This case is a unique example of a lung cancer patient presenting with a pneumococcal pericardial effusion, which in itself is a rare phenomenon. This case report demonstrates the importance of considering early antibiotic therapy in patients presenting with pericardial effusion, especially given the high mortality rates of infectious pericardial effusions.

  20. Naringin attenuates granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hannah; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Morphological abnormalities of the dentate gyrus (DG) are an important phenotype in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We recently reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, exerts beneficial effects in the kainic acid (KA) mouse model of epilepsy. We found that naringin treatment reduced seizure activities and decreased autophagic stress and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus following in vivo lesion with KA. However, it remains unclear whether naringin may also attenuate seizure-induced morphological changes in the DG, collectively known as granule cell dispersion (GCD). To clarify whether naringin treatment reduces GCD, we evaluated the effects of intraperitoneal injection of naringin on GCD and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), an important regulator of GCD, following intrahippocampal injection of KA. Our results showed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which was confirmed by assessing the phosphorylated form of the mTORC1 substrate, 4E-BP1, in the hippocampus. These results suggest that naringin treatment may help prevent epilepsy-induced hippocampal injury by inhibiting mTORC1 activation and thereby reducing GCD in the hippocampus in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intrinsic neurophysiological properties of hilar ectopic and normotopic dentate granule cells in human temporal lobe epilepsy and a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, A L; Sagher, O; Parent, J M; Murphy, G G

    2015-02-15

    Hilar ectopic dentate granule cells (DGCs) are a salient feature of aberrant plasticity in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and most rodent models of the disease. Recent evidence from rodent TLE models suggests that hilar ectopic DGCs contribute to hyperexcitability within the epileptic hippocampal network. Here we investigate the intrinsic excitability of DGCs from humans with TLE and the rat pilocarpine TLE model with the objective of comparing the neurophysiology of hilar ectopic DGCs to their normotopic counterparts in the granule cell layer (GCL). We recorded from 36 GCL and 7 hilar DGCs from human TLE tissue. Compared with GCL DGCs, hilar DGCs in patient tissue exhibited lower action potential (AP) firing rates, more depolarized AP threshold, and differed in single AP waveform, consistent with an overall decrease in excitability. To evaluate the intrinsic neurophysiology of hilar ectopic DGCs, we made recordings from retrovirus-birthdated, adult-born DGCs 2-4 mo after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus or sham treatment in rats. Hilar DGCs from epileptic rats exhibited higher AP firing rates than normotopic DGCs from epileptic or control animals. They also displayed more depolarized resting membrane potential and wider AP waveforms, indicating an overall increase in excitability. The contrasting findings between disease and disease model may reflect differences between the late-stage disease tissue available from human surgical specimens and the earlier disease stage examined in the rat TLE model. These data represent the first neurophysiological characterization of ectopic DGCs from human hippocampus and prospectively birthdated ectopic DGCs in a rodent TLE model. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Metallisation Technology of Silicon Solar Cells Using the Convectional and Laser Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek A. Dobrzanski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to optimize the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS and co-firing in the infrared conveyor furnace parameters in front Screen Printed (SP contacts. The co-firing in the infrared conveyor furnace was carried out at various temperature. The SLS was carried out at various a laser beam, scanning speed of the laser beam and front electrode thickness. The investigations were carried out on monocrystalline silicon wafers. During investigations was applied a silver powder with the grain size of 40 μm. The contacts parameters are obtained according to the Transmission Line Model (TLM measurements. Firstly, this paper shows the comparison between the convectional an unconventional method of manufacturing front contacts of monocrystalline silicon solar cells with the different morphology of silicon for comparative purposes. Secondly, the papers shows technological recommendations for both methods in relation to parameters such as: the optimal paste composition, the morphology of the silicon substrate to produce the front electrode of silicon solar cells, which were selected experimentally in order to produce a uniformly melted structure, well adhering to the substrate, with the low resistance of the front electrode-to-substrate joint zone.

  3. Multiple Convective Cell Identification and Tracking Algorithm for documenting time-height evolution of measured polarimetric radar and lightning properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, D.; Hu, J.; Zhang, P.; Snyder, J.; Orville, R. E.; Ryzhkov, A.; Zrnic, D.; Williams, E.; Zhang, R.

    2017-12-01

    A methodology to track the evolution of the hydrometeors and electrification of convective cells is presented and applied to various convective clouds from warm showers to super-cells. The input radar data are obtained from the polarimetric NEXRAD weather radars, The information on cloud electrification is obtained from Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMA). The development time and height of the hydrometeors and electrification requires tracking the evolution and lifecycle of convective cells. A new methodology for Multi-Cell Identification and Tracking (MCIT) is presented in this study. This new algorithm is applied to time series of radar volume scans. A cell is defined as a local maximum in the Vertical Integrated Liquid (VIL), and the echo area is divided between cells using a watershed algorithm. The tracking of the cells between radar volume scans is done by identifying the two cells in consecutive radar scans that have maximum common VIL. The vertical profile of the polarimetric radar properties are used for constructing the time-height cross section of the cell properties around the peak reflectivity as a function of height. The LMA sources that occur within the cell area are integrated as a function of height as well for each time step, as determined by the radar volume scans. The result of the tracking can provide insights to the evolution of storms, hydrometer types, precipitation initiation and cloud electrification under different thermodynamic, aerosol and geographic conditions. The details of the MCIT algorithm, its products and their performance for different types of storm are described in this poster.

  4. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause of frontal lobe epilepsy remains unknown. Complications Status epilepticus. Frontal lobe seizures tend to occur in clusters and may provoke a dangerous condition called status epilepticus — in which seizure activity lasts much longer than ...

  5. Fast wave experiments in LAPD: RF sheaths, convective cells and density modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T. A.; van Compernolle, B.; Martin, M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; van Eester, D.; Crombe, K.; Perkins, R.; Lau, C.; Martin, E.; Caughman, J.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Vincena, S.

    2017-10-01

    An overview is presented of recent work on ICRF physics at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The LAPD has typical plasma parameters ne 1012 -1013 cm-3, Te 1 - 10 eV and B 1000 G. A new high-power ( 150 kW) RF system and fast wave antenna have been developed for LAPD. The source runs at a frequency of 2.4 MHz, corresponding to 1 - 7fci , depending on plasma parameters. Evidence of rectified RF sheaths is seen in large increases ( 10Te) in the plasma potential on field lines connected to the antenna. The rectified potential scales linearly with antenna current. The rectified RF sheaths set up convective cells of local E × B flows, measured indirectly by potential measurements, and measured directly with Mach probes. At high antenna powers substantial modifications of the density profile were observed. The plasma density profile initially exhibits transient low frequency oscillations (10 kHz). The amplitude of the fast wave fields in the core plasma is modulated at the same low frequency, suggesting fast wave coupling is affected by the density rearrangement. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, supported jointly by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy.

  6. Dentate gyrus progenitor cell proliferation after the onset of spontaneous seizures in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Shtaya, A.B.Y.; Bodansky, D.M.S.; Chang, W.C.; Gray, W.P.; Jefferys, J. G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, Jun 2013 (2013), s. 492-498 ISSN 0969-9961 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : spontaneous seizures * temporal lobe epilepsy * neurogenesis * tetanus toxin * apoptosis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.202, year: 2013

  7. A Curious Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Chabot-Naud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of azygos lobe is presented. An azygos lobe is an accessory lobe of the lung that may occasionally be confused with a pathological process such as a bulla, lung abscess or neoplasm. Its pathogenesis is discussed, as are the characteristic x-ray features that enable an accurate diagnosis.

  8. Anomalous convection diffusion and wave coupling transport of cells on comb frame with fractional Cattaneo-Christov flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zheng, Liancun; Liu, Fawang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    An improved Cattaneo-Christov flux model is proposed which can be used to capture the effects of the time and spatial relaxations, the time and spatial inhomogeneous diffusion and the spatial transition probability of cell transport in a highly non-homogeneous medium. Solutions are obtained by numerical discretization method where the time and spatial fractional derivative are discretized by the L1-approximation and shifted Grünwald definition, respectively. The solvability, stability and convergence of the numerical method for the special case of the Cattaneo-Christov equation are proved. Results indicate that the fractional convection diffusion-wave equation is an evolution equation which displays the coexisting characteristics of parabolicity and hyperbolicity. In other words, for α in (0, 1), the cells transport occupies the characteristics of coupling convection diffusion and wave spreading. Moreover, the effects of pertinent time parameter, time and spatial fractional derivative parameters, relaxation parameter, weight coefficient and the convection velocity on the anomalous transport of cells are shown graphically and analyzed in detail.

  9. Polarimetric radar convective cell tracking reveals large sensitivity of cloud precipitation and electrification properties to CCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Zhang, P.; Snyder, J.; Orville, R. E.; Ryzhkov, A.; Zrnic, D.; Williams, E. R.; Zhang, R.

    2017-12-01

    Here we apply the cell tracking methodology, shown in our companion poster, to quantifying factors affecting the vigor and the time-height evolution of hydrometeors and electrification properties of convective cells. Benefitting from the Dual-polarimetric NEXRAD radar network, we composite more than 5000 well-tracked cells among three radars (at Houston, Lubbock and Oklahoma City), stratified by CCN, CAPE and land/sea locations. The analyzed cell properties include Z, ZDR, Kdp, and ρhv, Dm (raindrop diameter) and Nw (raindrop concentration) by the algorithm of Bringi et al. (2003). Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data is also included in the analysis, which provides a 3D structure of lightning occurrence and RF power. The contrasting CCN conditions over marine, land, pristine and polluted areas are identified based on the satellite retrieval technique described in Rosenfeld et al. (2016). The results show that more CCN are associated with: Increased echo top height, manifesting the invigoration effect. Enhanced reflectivities, especially above the freezing level at around 4.5 km. Raindrop sizes at the initial stage increase at the expense of their concentrations, due to the smaller cloud droplets and suppressed coalescence. Larger propensity for hail. Lightning sources increase with greater CCN concentration and is likely due to the delayed warm rain process and enhanced mixed phase process under more CCN condition, when activated CCN into cloud droplets is too high (> 1000 cm-3) the glaciation is delayed too much and leave little ice at lower levels and thus decrease lightning activity. Land pristine clouds have fewer lightning sources than polluted clouds. Marine pristine clouds seldom have lightning Increased CAPE had a similar effect to the effect of added CCN. The cloud tracking and properties are obtained by a new methodology of Multi-Cell Identification and Tracking (MCIT) algorithm (Hu et al, 2017), with details about the algorithm to be found in the author

  10. A Serrate-Notch-Canoe complex mediates essential interactions between glia and neuroepithelial cells during Drosophila optic lobe development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez-Gómez, R.; Slováková, J.; Rives-Quinto, N.; Krejčí, Alena; Carmena, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 21 (2013), s. 4873-4884 ISSN 0021-9533 Grant - others:Spanish Government(ES) BFU2009-08833; Spanish Government(ES) BFU2012-33020; Spanish Government(ES) CSD2007-00023 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : glia * Serrate- Notch signaling * optic lobe Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.325, year: 2013

  11. Sublimation pit distribution indicates convection cell surface velocities of ∼10 cm per year in Sputnik Planitia, Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Peter B.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2018-01-01

    The ∼106 km2 Sputnik Planitia, Pluto is the upper surface of a vast basin of nitrogen ice. Cellular landforms in Sputnik Planitia with areas in the range of a few × 102-103 km2 are likely the surface manifestation of convective overturn in the nitrogen ice. The cells have sublimation pits on them, with smaller pits near their centers and larger pits near their edges. We map pits on seven cells and find that the pit radii increase by between 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10-3 and 5.9 ± 0.8 × 10-3 m m-1 away from the cell center, depending on the cell. This is a lower bound on the size increase because of the finite resolution of the data. Accounting for resolution yields upper bounds on the size vs. distance distribution of between 4.2 ± 0.2 × 10-3 and 23.4 ± 1.5 × 10-3 m m-1. We then use an analytic model to calculate that pit radii grow via sublimation at a rate of 3.6-0.6+2.1 ×10-4 m yr-1, which allows us to convert the pit size vs. distance distribution into a pit age vs. distance distribution. This yields surface velocities between 1.5-0.2+1.0 and 6.2-1.4+3.4 cm yr-1 for the slowest cell and surface velocities between 8.1-1.0+5.5 and 17.9-5.1+8.9 cm yr-1 for the fastest cell. These convection rates imply that the surface ages at the edge of cells reach ∼4.2-8.9 × 105 yr. The rates are comparable to rates of ∼6 cm yr-1 that were previously obtained from modeling of the convective overturn in Sputnik Planitia (McKinnon et al., 2016). Finally, we investigate the surface rheology of the convection cells and estimate that the minimum ice viscosity necessary to support the geometry of the observed pits is of order 1016-1017 Pa s, based on the argument that pits would relax away before growing to their observed radii of several hundred meters if the viscosity were lower than this value.

  12. Development of charge structure in a short live convective cell observed by a 3D lightning mapper and a phased array radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S.; Adachi, T.; Kusunoki, K.; Wu, T.; Ushio, T.; Yoshikawa, E.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorm observation has been conducted in Osaka, Japan, with a use of a 3D lightning mapper, called Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorm (BOLT), and an X-band phased array radar (PAR). BOLT is a LF sensor network that receives LF emission associated with lightning discharges and locates LF radiation sources in 3D. PAR employs mechanical and electrical scans, respectively, in azimuthal and elevation direction, succeeding in quite high volume scan rate. In this presentation, we focus on lightning activity and charge structure in convective cells that lasted only short time (15 minutes or so). Thunderstorms that consisted of several convective cells developed near the radar site. Precipitation structure of a convective cell in the thunderstorm was clearly observed by PAR. A reflectivity core of the convective cell appeared at an altitude of 6 km at 2245 (JST). After that the core descended and reached the ground at 2256 (JST), resulting in heavy precipitation on surface. The echo top height (30dBZ) increased intermittently between 2245 (JST) and 2253 (JST) and it reached at the altitude of 12 km. The convective cell dissipated at 2300. Many intra-cloud (IC) flashes were initiated within the convective cell. Most IC flashes that were initiated in the convective cell occurred during the time when the echo top height increased, while a few IC flashes were initiated in the convective cell after the cease of the echo top vertical development. These facts indicate that strong updraft at upper levels (about 8 km or higher) plays an important role on thunderstorm electrification for IC flashes. Moreover, initiation altitudes of the IC flashes and the positive charge regions removed by the IC flashes increased, as the echo top height increased. This fact implies that the strong updraft at the upper levels blew up positively-charged ice pellets and negatively-charged graupel, and lifted IC flash initiation altitudes and positive charge regions

  13. OCCIPITAL LOBE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Shahdevi Nandar Kurniawan

    2016-01-01

    The ability to recognize objects and words is not just depend on the integrity of visual pathway and primary vision area on cerebral cortex (Brodmann area 17), but also secondary vision area 18 and tertiary vision area 19 on occipital lobe. Lesion in occipital lobe could disturb of human visual function such as visual field defects, inability to recognize colors, inability to recognize words, visual hallucinations and illusions, occipital lobe epilepsy, and Anton’s syndrome. Some causes of oc...

  14. Frontal lobe function in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretton, J.; Thompson, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is typically associated with long-term memory dysfunction. The frontal lobes support high-level cognition comprising executive skills and working memory that is vital for daily life functioning. Deficits in these functions have been increasingly reported in TLE. Evidence from both the neuropsychological and neuroimaging literature suggests both executive function and working memory are compromised in the presence of TLE. In relation to executive impairment, particular focus has been paid to set shifting as measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Other discrete executive functions such as decision-making and theory of mind also appear vulnerable but have received little attention. With regard to working memory, the medial temporal lobe structures appear have a more critical role, but with emerging evidence of hippocampal dependent and independent processes. The relative role of underlying pathology and seizure spread is likely to have considerable bearing upon the cognitive phenotype and trajectory in TLE. The identification of the nature of frontal lobe dysfunction in TLE thus has important clinical implications for prognosis and surgical management. Longitudinal neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies assessing frontal lobe function in TLE patients pre- and postoperatively will improve our understanding further. PMID:22100147

  15. Modulation of invasive phenotype by interstitial pressure-driven convection in aggregates of human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Tien

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effect of elevated pressure on the invasive phenotype of patterned three-dimensional (3D aggregates of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. We found that the directionality of the interstitial pressure profile altered the frequency of invasion by cells located at the surface of an aggregate. In particular, application of pressure at one end of an aggregate suppressed invasion at the opposite end. Experimental alteration of the configuration of cell aggregates and computational modeling of the resulting flow and solute concentration profiles revealed that elevated pressure inhibited invasion by altering the chemical composition of the interstitial fluid near the surface of the aggregate. Our data reveal a link between hydrostatic pressure, interstitial convection, and invasion.

  16. Enhanced object-based tracking algorithm for convective rain storms and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Carlos; Wang, Li-Pen; Willems, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes a new object-based storm tracking algorithm, based upon TITAN (Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis and Nowcasting). TITAN is a widely-used convective storm tracking algorithm but has limitations in handling small-scale yet high-intensity storm entities due to its single-threshold identification approach. It also has difficulties to effectively track fast-moving storms because of the employed matching approach that largely relies on the overlapping areas between successive storm entities. To address these deficiencies, a number of modifications are proposed and tested in this paper. These include a two-stage multi-threshold storm identification, a new formulation for characterizing storm's physical features, and an enhanced matching technique in synergy with an optical-flow storm field tracker, as well as, according to these modifications, a more complex merging and splitting scheme. High-resolution (5-min and 529-m) radar reflectivity data for 18 storm events over Belgium are used to calibrate and evaluate the algorithm. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with that of the original TITAN. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can better isolate and match convective rainfall entities, as well as to provide more reliable and detailed motion estimates. Furthermore, the improvement is found to be more significant for higher rainfall intensities. The new algorithm has the potential to serve as a basis for further applications, such as storm nowcasting and long-term stochastic spatial and temporal rainfall generation.

  17. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions, including having odd feelings — such as euphoria, deja vu or fear. Temporal lobe seizures are sometimes called ... sudden sense of unprovoked fear or joy A deja vu experience — a feeling that what's happening has happened ...

  18. Differentiation and functional incorporation of embryonic stem cell-derived GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus of mice with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano, Xu; Litvina, Elizabeth; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Aaron, Gloster B; Grabel, Laura B; Naegele, Janice R

    2012-01-04

    Cell therapies for neurological disorders require an extensive knowledge of disease-associated neuropathology and procedures for generating neurons for transplantation. In many patients with severe acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the dentate gyrus exhibits sclerosis and GABAergic interneuron degeneration. Mounting evidence suggests that therapeutic benefits can be obtained by transplanting fetal GABAergic progenitors into the dentate gyrus in rodents with TLE, but the scarcity of human fetal cells limits applicability in patient populations. In contrast, virtually limitless quantities of neural progenitors can be obtained from embryonic stem (ES) cells. ES cell-based therapies for neurological repair in TLE require evidence that the transplanted neurons integrate functionally and replace cell types that degenerate. To address these issues, we transplanted mouse ES cell-derived neural progenitors (ESNPs) with ventral forebrain identities into the hilus of the dentate gyrus of mice with TLE and evaluated graft differentiation, mossy fiber sprouting, cellular morphology, and electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons. In addition, we compared electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons with endogenous hilar interneurons in mice without TLE. The majority of transplanted ESNPs differentiated into GABAergic interneuron subtypes expressing calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, or calretinin. Global suppression of mossy fiber sprouting was not observed; however, ESNP-derived neurons formed dense axonal arborizations in the inner molecular layer and throughout the hilus. Whole-cell hippocampal slice electrophysiological recordings and morphological analyses of the transplanted neurons identified five basic types; most with strong after-hyperpolarizations and smooth or sparsely spiny dendritic morphologies resembling endogenous hippocampal interneurons. Moreover, intracellular recordings of spontaneous EPSCs indicated that

  19. Longitudinal positron emission tomography imaging of glial cell activation in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: Toward identification of optimal treatment windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc-Loc; Wimberley, Catriona; Truillet, Charles; Jego, Benoit; Caillé, Fabien; Pottier, Géraldine; Boisgard, Raphaël; Buvat, Irène; Bouilleret, Viviane

    2018-06-01

    Mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy is the most common type of drug-resistant partial epilepsy, with a specific history that often begins with status epilepticus due to various neurological insults followed by a silent period. During this period, before the first seizure occurs, a specific lesion develops, described as unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS). It is still challenging to determine which drugs, administered at which time point, will be most effective during the formation of this epileptic process. Neuroinflammation plays an important role in pathophysiological mechanisms in epilepsy, and therefore brain inflammation biomarkers such as translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) can be potent epilepsy biomarkers. TSPO is associated with reactive astrocytes and microglia. A unilateral intrahippocampal kainate injection mouse model can reproduce the defining features of human temporal lobe epilepsy with unilateral HS and the pattern of chronic pharmacoresistant temporal seizures. We hypothesized that longitudinal imaging using TSPO positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-DPA-714 could identify optimal treatment windows in a mouse model during the formation of HS. The model was induced into the right dorsal hippocampus of male C57/Bl6 mice. Micro-PET/computed tomographic scanning was performed before model induction and along the development of the HS at 7 days, 14 days, 1 month, and 6 months. In vitro autoradiography and immunohistofluorescence were performed on additional mice at each time point. TSPO PET uptake reached peak at 7 days and mostly related to microglial activation, whereas after 14 days, reactive astrocytes were shown to be the main cells expressing TSPO, reflected by a continuing increased PET uptake. TSPO-targeted PET is a highly potent longitudinal biomarker of epilepsy and could be of interest to determine the therapeutic windows in epilepsy and to monitor response to treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Morphologic Integration of Hilar Ectopic Granule Cells into Dentate Gyrus Circuitry in the Pilocarpine Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Michael C.; Zhan, Ren-Zhi; Nadler, J. Victor

    2014-01-01

    After pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, many granule cells born into the postseizure environment migrate aberrantly into the dentate hilus. Hilar ectopic granule cells (HEGCs) are hyperexcitable and may therefore increase circuit excitability. This study determined the distribution of their axons and dendrites. HEGCs and normotopic granule cells were filled with biocytin during whole-cell patch clamp recording in hippocampal slices from pilocarpine-treated rats. The apical dendrite of 86% of the biocytin-labeled HEGCs extended to the outer edge of the dentate molecular layer. The total length and branching of HEGC apical dendrites that penetrated the molecular layer were significantly reduced compared with apical dendrites of normotopic granule cells. HEGCs were much more likely to have a hilar basal dendrite than normotopic granule cells. They were about as likely as normotopic granule cells to project to CA3 pyramidal cells within the slice, but were much more likely to send at least one recurrent mossy fiber into the molecular layer. HEGCs with burst capability had less well-branched apical dendrites than nonbursting HEGCs, their dendrites were more likely to be confined to the hilus, and some exhibited dendritic features similar to those of immature granule cells. HEGCs thus have many paths along which to receive synchronized activity from normotopic granule cells and to transmit their own hyperactivity to both normotopic granule cells and CA3 pyramidal cells. They may therefore contribute to the highly interconnected granule cell hubs that have been proposed as crucial to development of a hyperexcitable, potentially seizure-prone circuit. PMID:21455997

  1. Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, Latif M.

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the follow ing ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters.

  2. Facilitation of granule cell epileptiform activity by mossy fiber-released zinc in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Olga; Nadler, J Victor

    2006-03-17

    Recurrent mossy fiber synapses in the dentate gyrus of epileptic brain facilitate the synchronous firing of granule cells and may promote seizure propagation. Mossy fiber terminals contain and release zinc. Released zinc inhibits the activation of NMDA receptors and may therefore oppose the development of granule cell epileptiform activity. Hippocampal slices from rats that had experienced pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and developed a recurrent mossy fiber pathway were used to investigate this possibility. Actions of released zinc were inferred from the effects of chelation with 1 mM calcium disodium EDTA (CaEDTA). When granule cell population bursts were evoked by mossy fiber stimulation in the presence of 6 mM K(+) and 30 microM bicuculline, CaEDTA slowed the rate at which evoked bursting developed, but did not change the magnitude of the bursts once they had developed fully. The effects of CaEDTA were then studied on the pharmacologically isolated NMDA receptor- and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated components of the fully developed bursts. CaEDTA increased the magnitude of NMDA receptor-mediated bursts and reduced the magnitude of AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated bursts. CaEDTA did not affect the granule cell bursts evoked in slices from untreated rats by stimulating the perforant path in the presence of bicuculline and 6 mM K(+). These results suggest that zinc released from the recurrent mossy fibers serves mainly to facilitate the recruitment of dentate granule cells into population bursts.

  3. Changes in Hippocampal Volume are Correlated with Cell Loss but Not with Seizure Frequency in Two Chronic Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli, Roberson S.; Malheiros, Jackeline M.; dos Santos, Renan; Hamani, Clement; Longo, Beatriz M.; Tannús, Alberto; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) or pilocarpine (PILO) have been used in rats to model human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) but the distribution and severity of structural lesions between these two models may differ. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have used quantitative measurements of hippocampal T2 (T2HP) relaxation time and volume, but simultaneous comparative results have not been reported yet. The aim of this study was to compare the MRI T2HP and volume with histological data and frequency of seizures in both models. KA- and PILO-treated rats were imaged with a 2 T MRI scanner. T2HP and volume values were correlated with the number of cells, mossy fiber sprouting, and spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) frequency over the 9 months following status epilepticus (SE). Compared to controls, KA-treated rats had unaltered T2HP, pronounced reduction in hippocampal volume and concomitant cell reduction in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3 at 3 months post SE. In contrast, hippocampal volume was unchanged in PILO-treated animals despite detectable increased T2HP and cell loss in granule cell layer, CA1 and CA3. In the following 6 months, MRI hippocampal volume remained stable with increase of T2HP signal in the KA-treated group. The number of CA1 and CA3 cells was smaller than age-matched CTL group. In contrast, PILO group had MRI volumetric reduction accompanied by reduction in the number of CA1 and CA3 cells. In this group, T2HP signal was unaltered at 6 or 9 months after status. Reductions in the number of cells were not progressive in both models. Notably, the SRS frequency was higher in PILO than in the KA model. The volumetry data correlated well with tissue damage in the epileptic brain, suggesting that MRI may be useful for tracking longitudinal hippocampal changes, allowing the assessment of individual variability and disease progression. Our results indicate that the temporal changes in hippocampal morphology are distinct for both models of TLE and that

  4. Dentate gyrus and hilus transection blocks seizure propagation and granule cell dispersion in a mouse model for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Häussler, Ute; Langlois, Mélanie; Hamelin, Sophie; Devaux, Bertrand; Deransart, Colin; Depaulis, Antoine

    2011-03-01

    Epilepsy-associated changes of the anatomical organization of the dentate gyrus and hilus may play a critical role in the initiation and propagation of seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). This study evaluated the role of longitudinal projections in the propagation of hippocampal paroxysmal discharges (HPD) in dorsal hippocampus by performing a selective transection in a mouse model for MTLE obtained by a single unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid (KA). Full transections of the dentate gyrus and hilus were performed in the transverse axis at 22 days after KA injection when spontaneous HPD were fully developed. They: (i) significantly reduced the occurrence of HPD; (ii) increased their duration at the KA injection site; (iii) abolished their spread along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampal formation and; (iv) limited granule cell dispersion (GCD) of the dentate gyrus posterior to the transection. These data suggest that: (i) longitudinal projections through the dentate gyrus and hilus are involved in HPD spread; (ii) distant hippocampal circuits participate in the generation and cessation of HPD and; (iii) GCD requires continuous HPD to develop, even when seizures are established. Our data reveal a critical role for longitudinal projections in the generation and spread of hippocampal seizures. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Modeling of Diffusive Convective and Electromechanical Processes in PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads

    of their impact on the operational performance of the fuel cell. In the modelling work presented, the commercial CFD package CFX4.4 is used as the foundation to generate a model of a PEM fuel cell. The CFX4.4 platform provides the framework of solving the three-dimensional transport equations for mass, momentum...... as the transport of protons in the membrane phase is accounted for. This provides the possibility of predicting the threedimensional distribution of the activation overpotential in the catalyst layer. The current density's dependency on the gas concentration and activation overpotential can thereby be addressed....... The proposed model makes it possible to predict the effect of geometrical and material properties on fuel cells performance, which means that the model can predict how the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and catalyst layers physical properties affects the distribution of current density, and how this affects...

  6. The morphological evolution and internal convection of ExB-drifting plasma clouds: Theory, dielectric-in-cell simulations, and N-body dielectric simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovsky, J.E.; Hansen, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The evolution of ExB-drifting plasma clouds is investigated with the aid of a computational technique denoted here as open-quotes dielectric-in-cell.close quotes Many of the familiar phenomena associated with clouds of collisionless plasma are seen and explained and less-well-known phenomena associated with convection patterns, with the stripping of cloud material, and with the evolution of plasma clouds composed of differing ion species are investigated. The effects of spatially uniform diffusion are studied with the dielectric-in-cell technique and with another computational technique denoted as open-quotes N-body dielectric;close quotes the suppression of convection, the suppression of structure growth, the increase in material stripping, and the evolution of cloud anisotropy are examined. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Reynolds number scaling in cryogenic turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical aspect ratio one cell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Věra; Králík, Tomáš; La Mantia, M.; Macek, Michal; Urban, Pavel; Skrbek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 832, OCT 26 (2017), s. 721-744 ISSN 0022-1120 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-03572S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Benard convection * turbulent convection * turbulent flows Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.821, year: 2016

  8. The pattern of convection in the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, N.O.

    1976-01-01

    The structure of solar magnetic fields is dominated by the effects of convection, which should be incorporated in any model of the solar cycle. Although mixing length theory is adequate for calculating the structure of main sequence stars, a better description of convection is needed for any detailed dynamo model. Recent work on nonlinear convection at low Prandt numbers is reviewed. There has been some progress towards a theory of compressible convection, though there is still no firm theoretical evidence for cells with scales less than the depth of the convecting layer. However, it remains likely that the pattern of solar convection is dominated by granules, supergranules and giant cells. The effects of rotation on these cells are briefly considered. (Auth.)

  9. Stellar convection and dynamo theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, R L

    1989-10-01

    In considering the large scale stellar convection problem the outer layers of a star are modelled as two co-rotating plane layers coupled at a fluid/fluid interface. Heating from below causes only the upper fluid to convect, although this convection can penetrate into the lower fluid. Stability analysis is then used to find the most unstable mode of convection. With parameters appropriate to the Sun the most unstable mode is steady convection in thin cells (aspect ratio {approx equal} 0.2) filling the convection zone. There is negligible vertical motion in the lower fluid, but considerable thermal penetration, and a large jump in helicity at the interface, which has implications for dynamo theory. An {alpha}{omega} dynamo is investigated in isolation from the convection problem. Complexity is included by allowing both latitudinal and time dependence in the magnetic fields. The nonlinear dynamics of the resulting partial differential equations are analysed in considerable detail. On varying the main control parameter D (the dynamo number), many transitions of behaviour are found involving many forms of time dependence, but not chaos. Further, solutions which break equatorial symmetry are common and provide a theoretical explanation of solar observations which have this symmetry. Overall the behaviour was more complicated than expected. In particular, there were multiple stable solutions at fixed D, meaning that similar stars can have very different magnetic patterns, depending upon their history. (author).

  10. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  11. Medial temporal lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, A.J.; Cross, D.T.; Friedman, D.P.; Bello, J.A.; Hilal, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    To better define the MR appearance of hippocampal sclerosis, the authors have reviewed over 500 MR coronal images of the temporal lobes. Many cysts were noted that analysis showed were of choroid-fissure (arachnoid) origin. Their association with seizures was low. A few nontumorous, static, medial temporal lesions, noted on T2-weighted coronal images, were poorly visualized on T1-weighted images and did not enhance with gadolinium. The margins were irregular, involved the hippocampus, and were often associated with focal atrophy. The lesions usually were associated with seizure disorders and specific electroencephalographic changes, and the authors believe they represented hippocampal sclerosis

  12. High-latitude convection on open and closed field lines for large IMF B(y)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. J.; Crooker, N. U.; Gorney, D. J.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    S3-3 electric field observations for August 23, 1976, show a single convection cell engulfing the northern polar cap. The flow direction is that for a positive IMF B(y) component. The particle data indicate that nearly half the duskside sunward flow occurs on closed field lines whereas the dawnside flow is entirely on open field lines. This is interpreted in terms of an IMF B(y)-induced deformation in the polar cap boundary, where the deformation moves with the convective flow. Thus, convection streamlines cross the deformed polar cap boundary, but no flow crosses the boundary because it is carried by the flow. Since southern hemisphere convection is expected to occur with the opposite sense of rotation, closed field lines that will be forced to tilt azimuthally are predicted. On the nightside the tilt produces a y component of the magnetic field in the same direction as the IMF for either sign of IMF B(y). This interpretation is consistent with observations of a greater y component in the plasma sheet than the tail lobes, which are difficult to understand in terms of the common explanation of IMF penetration. Alternatives to this interpretation are also discussed.

  13. High-latitude plasma convection during Northward IMF as derived from in-situ magnetospheric Cluster EDI measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Förster

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate statistical, systematic variations of the high-latitude convection cell structure during northward IMF. Using 1-min-averages of Cluster/EDI electron drift observations above the Northern and Southern polar cap areas for six and a half years (February 2001 till July 2007, and mapping the spatially distributed measurements to a common reference plane at ionospheric level in a magnetic latitude/MLT grid, we obtained regular drift patterns according to the various IMF conditions. We focus on the particular conditions during northward IMF, where lobe cells at magnetic latitudes >80° with opposite (sunward convection over the central polar cap are a permanent feature in addition to the main convection cells at lower latitudes. They are due to reconnection processes at the magnetopause boundary poleward of the cusp regions. Mapped EDI data have a particular good coverage within the central part of the polar cap, so that these patterns and their dependence on various solar wind conditions are well verified in a statistical sense. On average, 4-cell convection pattern are shown as regular structures during periods of nearly northward IMF with the tendency of a small shift toward negative clock angles. The positions of these high-latitude convection foci are within 79° to 85° magnetic latitude and 09:00–15:00 MLT. The MLT positions are approximately symmetric ±2 h about 11:30 MLT, i.e. slightly offset from midday toward prenoon hours, while the maximum (minimum potential of the high-latitude cells is at higher magnetic latitudes near their maximum potential difference at ≈−10° to −15° clock angle for the North (South Hemisphere. With increasing clock angle distances from ≈IMFBz+, a gradual transition occurs from the 4-cell pattern via a 3-cell to the common 2-cell convection pattern, in the course of which one of the medium-scale high-latitude dayside cells diminishes and disappears while the

  14. Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Studies for Flow-Field Optimization Based on Under-Rib Convection in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Duy Vinh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow-field design based on under-rib convection plays an important role in enhancing the performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs because it ensures the uniform distribution of the reacting gas and the facilitation of water. This research focused on developing suitable configurations of the anode and cathode bipolar plates to enhance the fuel cell performance based on under-rib convection. The work here evaluated the effects of flow-field designs, including a serpentine flow field with sub channel and by pass and a conventional serpentine flow-field on single-cell performance. Both the experiment and computer simulation indicated that the serpentine flow field with sub channel and by pass (SFFSB configuration enables more effective utilization of the electrocatalysts since it improves reactant transformation rate from the channel to the catalyst layer, thereby dramatically improving the fuel cell performance. The simulation and experimental results indicated that the power densities are increased by up to 16.74% and 18.21%, respectively, when applying suitable flow-field configurations to the anode and cathode bipolar plates. The findings in this are the foundation for enhancing efficient PEMFCs based on flow field design.

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma in Riedel's lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfir, R; Braşoveanu, V; Boroş, M; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2008-01-01

    We present a rare case of 65-year female with right abdominal mass and abdominal discomfort; a combination of Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography and laparotomy was utilized to make a diagnosis of tumoral Riedel's lobe. In our case, laparotomy with resection of Riedel's lobe was the proper therapeutical solution.

  16. Numerical simulations of convectively excited gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Magneto-convection and gravity waves are numerically simulated with a nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent model of a stratified, rotating, spherical fluid shell heated from below. A Solar-like reference state is specified while global velocity, magnetic field, and thermodynamic perturbations are computed from the anelastic magnetohydrodynamic equations. Convective overshooting from the upper (superadiabatic) part of the shell excites gravity waves in the lower (subadiabatic) part. Due to differential rotation and Coriolis forces, convective cell patterns propagate eastward with a latitudinally dependent phase velocity. The structure of the excited wave motions in the stable region is more time-dependent than that of the convective motions above. The magnetic field tends to be concentrated over giant-cell downdrafts in the convective zone but is affected very little by the wave motion in the stable region

  17. Response of the ionospheric convection pattern to a rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field on January 14, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumnock, J.A.; Heelis, R.A.; Hairston, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Ionospheric convection signatures observed over the polar regions are provided by the DMSP F8 satellite. The authors consider five passes over the southern summer hemisphere during a time when the z component of the interplantary magnetic field was stable and positive and the y component changed slowly from positive to negative. Large-scale regions of sunward flow are observed at very high latitudes consistent with a strong z component. When B y and B z are positive, but B y is greater than B z , strong evidence exists for dayside merging in a manner similar to that expected when B z is negative. This signature is diminished as B y decreases and becomes smaller than B z resulting in a four-cell convection pattern displaced toward the sunward side of the dawn-dusk meridian. In this case the sign of B y affects the relative sizes of the two highest-latitude cells. In the southern hemisphere the duskside high-latitude cell is dominant for B y positive and the dawnside high-latitude cell is dominant for B y negative. The relative importance of possible electric field sources in the low-latitude boundary layer, the dayside cusp, and the lobe all need to be considered to adequately explain the observed evolution of the convection pattern

  18. National Convective Weather Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCWF is an automatically generated depiction of: (1) current convection and (2) extrapolated signficant current convection. It is a supplement to, but does NOT...

  19. Artificial intelligence systems for rainy areas detection and convective cells' delineation for the south shore of Mediterranean Sea during day and nighttime using MSG satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbi, Mohsene Abdelfettah; Haddad, Boualem

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of cloud classification by means of support vector machines using high resolution images from northern Algeria. The images were taken from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. An automatic system was developed to operate during both day and nighttime by following two steps of data processing. The first aims to detect rainy areas in cloud systems, whereas the second delineates convective cells from stratiform ones. A set of 12 spectral parameters was selected to extract information about cloud properties, which are different from day to night. The training and validation steps of this study were performed by in-situ rainfall measurement data, collected during the rainy season of years 2011 and 2012 via automatic rain gauge stations distributed in northern Algeria. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) and support vector machine (SVM) were explored, by combining spectral parameters derived from MSG images. Better performances were obtained by the SVM classifier, in terms of Critical Success Index and Probability of Detection for rainy areas detection (CSI = 0.81, POD = 91%), and also for convective/stratiform delineation (CSI = 0.55, POD = 74%).

  20. Unstable mixed convective transport in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schincariol, R.A.; Schwartz, F.W.

    1990-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of variable density groundwater flow in homogeneous and lenticular porous media. A solution of 500 mg/l Rhodamine WT dye served as the carrier for various concentrations of solute (NaCl) introduced into a two-dimensional flow tank at concentrations ranging from 1000 to 100,000 mg/l. At the scale of the experiments, mass transport depends upon both forced and free convection. In addition, density differences as low as 0.008 g/cm 3 (1000 mg/l NaCl) between a plume of dense water and ambient groundwater in homogeneous medium produces gravitational instabilities at realistic groundwater velocities. These instabilities are manifest by lobe-shaped protuberances that formed first along the bottom edge of the plume and later within the plume. As the density difference increases to 0.0015 g/cm 3 (2000 mg/l NaCl), 0.0037 g/cm 3 (5000 mg/l NaCl) or higher, this unstable mixing due to convective dispersion significantly alters the spreading process, resulting in a large degree of vertical spreading of the plume. In a lenticular medium the combination of convective dispersion and nonuniform flow due to heterogeneities results in relatively large dispersion. Scale considerations indicate that convective dispersion may provide an important component of mixing at the field scale. (Author) (30 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.)

  1. Temperature-Driven Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohan, Richard J.; Vandegrift, Guy

    2003-02-01

    Warm air aloft is stable. This explains the lack of strong winds in a warm front and how nighttime radiative cooling can lead to motionless air that can trap smog. The stability of stratospheric air can be attributed to the fact that it is heated from above as ultraviolet radiation strikes the ozone layer. On the other hand, fluid heated from below is unstable and can lead to Bernard convection cells. This explains the generally turbulent nature of the troposphere, which receives a significant fraction of its heat directly from the Earth's warmer surface. The instability of cold fluid aloft explains the violent nature of a cold front, as well as the motion of Earth's magma, which is driven by radioactive heating deep within the Earth's mantle. This paper describes how both effects can be demonstrated using four standard beakers, ice, and a bit of food coloring.

  2. Convective equilibrium and mixing-length theory for stellarator reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    In high β stellarator and tokamak reactors, the plasma pressure gradient in some regions of the plasma may exceed the critical pressure gradient set by ballooning instabilities. In these regions, convective cells break out to enhance the transport. As a result, the pressure gradient can rise only slightly above the critical gradient and the plasma is in another state of equilibrium - ''convective equilibrium'' - in these regions. Although the convective transport cannot be calculated precisely, it is shown that the density and temperature profiles in the convective region can still be estimated. A simple mixing-length theory, similar to that used for convection in stellar interiors, is introduced in this paper to provide a qualitative description of the convective cells and to show that the convective transport is highly efficient. A numerical example for obtaining the density and temperature profiles in a stellarator reactor is given

  3. Microtubule-Associated Proteins in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with and without Psychiatric Comorbidities and Their Relation with Granular Cell Layer Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmyla Kandratavicius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite strong association between epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities, biological substrates are unknown. We have previously reported decreased mossy fiber sprouting in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE patients with psychosis and increased in those with major depression. Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs are essentially involved in dendritic and synaptic sprouting. Methods. MTLE hippocampi of subjects without psychiatric history, MTLE + major depression, and MTLE + interictal psychosis derived from epilepsy surgery and control necropsies were investigated for neuronal density, granular layer dispersion, and MAP2 and tau immunohistochemistry. Results. Altered MAP2 and tau expression in MTLE and decreased tau expression in MTLE with psychosis were found. Granular layer dispersion correlated inversely with verbal memory scores, and with MAP2 and tau expression in the entorhinal cortex. Patients taking fluoxetine showed increased neuronal density in the granular layer and those taking haloperidol decreased neuronal density in CA3 and subiculum. Conclusions. Our results indicate relations between MAPs, granular layer dispersion, and memory that have not been previously investigated. Differential MAPs expression in human MTLE hippocampi with and without psychiatric comorbidities suggests that psychopathological states in MTLE rely on differential morphological and possibly neurochemical backgrounds. This clinical study was approved by our institution’s Research Ethics Board (HC-FMRP no. 1270/2008 and is registered under the Brazilian National System of Information on Ethics in Human Research (SISNEP no. 0423.0.004.000-07.

  4. Modeling of plasma-sheet convection: implications for substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    An answer is suggested to the question of why plasma and magnetic energy accumulate in the Earth's magnetotail to be released in sporadic events, namely substorms. It is shown that the idea of steady convection is inconsistent with the idea of slow, approximately lossless, plasma convection in a long, closed-field-line region that extends into a long magnetotail, such as occurs during Earthward convection in the Earth's plasma sheet. This inconsistency is argued generally and demonstrated specifically using several quantitative models of the Earth's magnetospheric magnetic field. These results suggest that plasma-sheet convection is necessarily time dependent. If flux tubes are to convect adiabatically earthward, the confining magnetic pressure in the tail lobes must increase with time, and the magnetotail must evolve into a more stretched configuration. Eventually, the magnetosphere must find some way to release plasma from inner-plasma-sheet flux tubes. This suggests an obvious role for the magnetospheric substorm in the convection process. To probe this process further, a two-dimensional, self-consistent, quasi-static convection model was developed. This model self consistently includes a dipole field and can reasonably account for the effects of inner-magnetospheric shielding

  5. Brain SPECT imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausz, Y.; Yaffe, S.; Atlan, H.; Cohen, D.; Konstantini, S.; Meiner, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is diagnosed by clinical symptoms and signs and by localization of an epileptogenic focus. A brain SPECT study of two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, using 99m Tc-HMPAO, was used to demonstrate a perfusion abnormality in the temporal lobe, while brain CT and MRI were non-contributory. The electroencephalogram, though abnormal, did not localize the diseased area. The potential role of the SPECT study in diagnosis and localization of temporal lobe epilepsy is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Katherine C.; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Moseley, Brian D.; Wirrell, Elaine C.

    2012-01-01

    The temporal lobe is a common focus for epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children differs from the relatively homogeneous syndrome seen in adults in several important clinical and pathological ways. Seizure semiology varies by age, and the ictal EEG pattern may be less clear cut than what is seen in adults. Additionally, the occurrence of intractable seizures in the developing brain may impact neurocognitive function remote from the temporal area. While many children will respond favorably to medical therapy, those with focal imaging abnormalities including cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, or low-grade tumors are likely to be intractable. Expedient workup and surgical intervention in these medically intractable cases are needed to maximize long-term developmental outcome. PMID:22957247

  7. Occipital lobe infarctions are different

    OpenAIRE

    Naess, Halvor; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrikke; Thomassen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Halvor Naess, Ulrikke Waje-Andreassen, Lars ThomassenDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, N-5021 Bergen, NorwayObjectives: We hypothesized that occipital lobe infarctions differ from infarctions in other locations as to etiology, risk factors and prognosis among young adults.Methods: Location, etiology, risk factors and long-term outcome were evaluated among all young adults 15–49 years suffering from cerebral infarction in Hordaland County, Norw...

  8. Effects of variable thermal diffusivity on the structure of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcheritsa, O. V.; Getling, A. V.; Mazhorova, O. S.

    2018-03-01

    The structure of multiscale convection in a thermally stratified plane horizontal fluid layer is investigated by means of numerical simulations. The thermal diffusivity is assumed to produce a thin boundary sublayer convectively much more unstable than the bulk of the layer. The simulated flow is a superposition of cellular structures with three different characteristic scales. In contrast to the largest convection cells, the smaller ones are localised in the upper portion of the layer. The smallest cells are advected by the larger-scale convective flows. The simulated flow pattern qualitatively resembles that observed on the Sun.

  9. Excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in temporal lobe and hippocampus in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarac, Sinan; Afzal, Shoaib; Broholm, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is an invalidating disease and many patients are resistant to medical treatment. Increased glutamate concentration has been found in epileptogenic foci and may induce local over-excitation and cytotoxicity; one of the proposed mechanisms involves reduced...... extra-cellular clearance of glutamate by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT-1 to EAAT-5). EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 are mainly expressed on astroglial cells for the reuptake of glutamate from the extra-cellular space. We have studied the expression of EAAT-1 and EAAT-2 in the hippocampus and temporal lobe...

  10. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  11. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  12. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Condition of damping of anomalous radial transport, determined by ordered convective electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.I.; Barchuk, S.V.; Lapshin, V.I.; Volkov, E.D.; Melentsov, Yu.V.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown, that at development of instability due to a radial gradient of density in the crossed electric and magnetic fields in nuclear fusion installations ordering convective cells can be excited. It provides anomalous particle transport. The spatial structures of these convective cells have been constructed. The radial dimensions of these convective cells depend on their amplitudes and on a radial gradient of density. The convective-diffusion equation for radial dynamics of the electrons has been derived. At the certain value of the universal controlling parameter, the convective cell excitation and the anomalous radial transport are suppressed. (author)

  14. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  15. Observations of significant flux closure by dual lobe reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Imber

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an interval of dual lobe reconnection during which interplanetary magnetic field lines are captured by the magnetosphere by reconnecting at high latitudes in both the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres. This event was identified using measurements of the ionospheric convection flow and observations of the aurora using the SuperDARN radars and the IMAGE spacecraft. A cusp spot, characteristic of northward IMF, is clearly visible for a 30 min period enabling the ionospheric footprint of the Northern Hemisphere merging gap to be accurately determined. During the interval a strong burst of sunward flow across the dayside open/closed field line boundary (OCB is observed, which we interpret as the reconfiguration of the magnetosphere following a burst of reconnection. Noon-midnight and dawn-dusk keograms of the aurora show that the polar cap shrinks during the interval indicating that a large amount of flux was closed by the reconnection. Using the SuperDARN potential maps it is possible to calculate that the amount of flux closed during the interval is 0.13 GWb which represents approximately 10% of the pre-existing polar cap. The number of ions captured by the burst of dual lobe reconnection was calculated to be ~2.2×1031, more than sufficient to populate a cold, dense plasma sheet. That a dense plasma sheet was not subsequently observed is discussed in terms of subsequent changes in the IMF.

  16. Fuel cells cathode with multiple catalysis and electrocapillary convection; Catodo de celula a combustivel com catalise multipla e conveccao eletrocapilar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambace, Luis Antonio Waack; Nishimori, Miriam; Ramos, Fernando Manuel [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: bambace@dem.inpe.br; Bastos Netto, Demetrio [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Cachoeira Paulista, SP (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses a mathematical model for the chemical reactions and liquid phase flow processes occurring in a fuel cell cathode through non homogeneous catalysis carried by gold and Prussian Blue. The gold is applied inside the porous walls of micro-tubes, which may be obtained through several methods. The wall porosity ranging from 7 to 30% ensures gas exchange between the interior of a micro-tube and its exterior where gas flow takes place. The Prussian Blue consists of a thin porous layer located between the selective membrane and the micro-tube system, with void fraction in the 70 to 80% range. A porous electricity conducting carbide flux collector is placed between the tube system and the bipolar plates. The system return tubes possess a diameter much larger than one of the micro-tubes. The electric potential differences generated by the ionic currents in the system and its asymmetrical shape are used to generate electrocapillary flows, which are related with the surface tension changes with local potential. The hydrogen peroxide concentration and its transport to the Prussian Blue layer, and the oxygen transport inside the reactive tubular system are analyzed in this work. (author)

  17. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. VI - Convective propulsion. VII - Heat flow in a convective downdraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of negative aerodynamic drag in an ideal fluid subject to convective instability is considered. It is shown that a cylinder moving in such a fluid is propelled forward in its motion by the convective forces and that the characteristic acceleration time is comparable to the onset time of convective motions in the fluid. It is suggested that convective propulsion plays an important role in the dynamics of flux tubes extending through the surface of the sun. The suppression of the upward heat flow in a Boussinesq convective cell with free upper and lower boundaries by a downdraft is then analyzed. Application to the solar convection zone indicates that downdrafts of 1 to 2 km/s at depths of 1000 to 4000 km beneath the visible surface of the sun are sufficient to reduce the upward heat flux to a small fraction of the ambient value.

  18. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  19. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    for asteroseismology, because of the challenges inherent in modelling turbulent convection in 1D stellar models. As a result of oversimplifying the physics near the surface, theoretical calculations systematically overestimate the oscillation frequencies. This has become known as the asteroseismic surface effect. Due...... to lacking better options, this frequency difference is typically corrected for with ad-hoc formulae. The topic of this thesis is the improvement of 1D stellar convection models and the effects this has on asteroseismic properties. The source of improvements is 3D simulations of radiation...... atmospheres to replace the outer layers of stellar models. The additional turbulent pressure and asymmetrical opacity effects in the atmosphere model, compared to convection in stellar evolution models, serve to expand the atmosphere. The enlarged acoustic cavity lowers the pulsation frequencies bringing them...

  20. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  1. Convective transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Yu, G.Q.; Xu, X.Q.; Nevins, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Scrape-off-layer (SOL) convection in fusion experiments appears to be a universal phenomenon that can 'short-circuit' the divertor in some cases. The theory of 'blob' transport provides a simple and robust physical paradigm for studying convective transport. This paper summarizes recent advances in the theory of blob transport and its comparison with 2D and 3D computer simulations. We also discuss the common physical basis relating radial transport of blobs, pellets, and ELMs and a new blob regime that may lead to a connection between blob transport and the density limit. (author)

  2. Physics of Stellar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, W. David

    2009-05-01

    We review recent progress using numerical simulations as a testbed for development of a theory of stellar convection, much as envisaged by John von Newmann. Necessary features of the theory, non-locality and fluctuations, are illustrated by computer movies. It is found that the common approximation of convection as a diffusive process presents the wrong physical picture, and improvements are suggested. New observational results discussed at the conference are gratifying in their validation of some of our theoretical ideas, especially the idea that SNIb and SNIc events are related to the explosion of massive star cores which have been stripped by mass loss and binary interactions [1

  3. Parameterizing convective organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Earle Mapes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme. Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ∼3 h for a 2o model. Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1 plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2 plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing, and 3 increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model. Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time

  4. Mathematical models of convection

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Victor K; Goncharova, Olga N; Pukhnachev, Vladislav V

    2012-01-01

    Phenomena of convection are abundant in nature as well as in industry. This volume addresses the subject of convection from the point of view of both, theory and application. While the first three chapters provide a refresher on fluid dynamics and heat transfer theory, the rest of the book describes the modern developments in theory. Thus it brings the reader to the ""front"" of the modern research. This monograph provides the theoretical foundation on a topic relevant to metallurgy, ecology, meteorology, geo-and astrophysics, aerospace industry, chemistry, crystal physics, and many other fiel

  5. Sensitivity difference between anterior and posterior lobes of rat cerebellum to prenatal exposure to 2.5 Gy X-irradiation. A histological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmanto, W.; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Aolad, H.M.; Inouye, Minoru

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the histological differences in abnormality between anterior lobes (vermian lobules II, III and culmen IV, V) and posterior lobes (lobules IX, X) of the rat cerebellum following prenatal exposure to X-irradiation. Pregnant rats were exposed to 2.5 Gy X-irradiation at gestation day-21 (GD-21), and pups were sacrificed from birth through 15 days of age. Their cerebella were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for glial fibrillary acidic protein in Bergmann fibers. Extensive cell death was found in the external granular layer (EGL) of the cerebellum on the day of birth. In the anterior lobes, the number of cell deaths was higher than in the posterior lobes. During 5 days after birth, the recovery of EGL was earlier in the posterior lobes than in the anterior lobes. Seven days after birth, Bergmann fibers were more irregular in the anterior lobes than in the posterior lobes. The number of Purkinje cells in ectopic locations was higher in the anterior lobes than in the posterior lobes. The EGL and migrating Purkinje cells showed different responses to X-irradiation in the anterior than in the posterior lobes of the cerebellum. (author)

  6. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroto, J A; Perez-Munuzuri, V; Romero-Cano, M S

    2007-01-01

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics

  7. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroto, J A [Group of Physics and Chemistry of Linares, Escuela Politecnica Superior, St Alfonso X El Sabio, 28, University of Jaen, E-23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain); Perez-Munuzuri, V [Group of Nonlinear Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Romero-Cano, M S [Group of Complex Fluids Physics, Department of Applied Physics, University of Almeria, E-04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics.

  8. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15-day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibriu...

  9. Ionospheric convection response to changes of interplanetary magnetic field B-z component during strong B-y component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, C.S.; Murr, D.; Sofko, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    response to IMF Bz changes during strong IMF BZ. On March 23, 1995, B-x was small, B-y was strongly positive (7-11 nT), and the B-z polarity changed several times after 1300 UT. The dayside ionospheric convection is dominated by a large clockwise convection cell. The cell focus (the "eye" of the convection...... cell, or the largest change in the convection pattern, is limited roughly to the region between the previous cell focus and the new cell focus. Outside this region, the ionospheric flows could be greatly enhanced or weakened, while the convection pattern shape changes very little. When B-y is strong...... the dawn-dusk meridian plane, which is interpreted as propagation or expansion of newly generated convection cells in the cusp region. Other studies showed that the change in convection pattern in response to IMF reorientations is spatially fixed. In this paper, we investigate the ionospheric convection...

  10. A hybrid convection scheme for use in non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kuell

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The correct representation of convection in numerical weather prediction (NWP models is essential for quantitative precipitation forecasts. Due to its small horizontal scale convection usually has to be parameterized, e.g. by mass flux convection schemes. Classical schemes originally developed for use in coarse grid NWP models assume zero net convective mass flux, because the whole circulation of a convective cell is confined to the local grid column and all convective mass fluxes cancel out. However, in contemporary NWP models with grid sizes of a few kilometers this assumption becomes questionable, because here convection is partially resolved on the grid. To overcome this conceptual problem we propose a hybrid mass flux convection scheme (HYMACS in which only the convective updrafts and downdrafts are parameterized. The generation of the larger scale environmental subsidence, which may cover several grid columns, is transferred to the grid scale equations. This means that the convection scheme now has to generate a net convective mass flux exerting a direct dynamical forcing to the grid scale model via pressure gradient forces. The hybrid convection scheme implemented into the COSMO model of Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD is tested in an idealized simulation of a sea breeze circulation initiating convection in a realistic manner. The results are compared with analogous simulations with the classical Tiedtke and Kain-Fritsch convection schemes.

  11. Olfactory Information Processing in the Drosophila Antennal Lobe : Anything Goes?

    OpenAIRE

    Silbering, Ana F.; Okada, Ryuichi; Ito, Kei; Galizia, Cosmas Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    When an animal smells an odor, olfactory sensory neurons generate an activity pattern across olfactory glomeruli of the first sensory neuropil, the insect antennal lobe or the vertebrate olfactory bulb. Here, several networks of local neurons interact with sensory neurons and with output neurons-insect projection neurons, or vertebrate mitral/tufted cells. The extent and form of information processing taking place in these local networks has been subject of controversy. To investigate the ro...

  12. A Stochastic Framework for Modeling the Population Dynamics of Convective Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagos, Samson; Feng, Zhe; Plant, Robert S.; Houze, Robert A.; Xiao, Heng

    2018-02-01

    A stochastic prognostic framework for modeling the population dynamics of convective clouds and representing them in climate models is proposed. The framework follows the nonequilibrium statistical mechanical approach to constructing a master equation for representing the evolution of the number of convective cells of a specific size and their associated cloud-base mass flux, given a large-scale forcing. In this framework, referred to as STOchastic framework for Modeling Population dynamics of convective clouds (STOMP), the evolution of convective cell size is predicted from three key characteristics of convective cells: (i) the probability of growth, (ii) the probability of decay, and (iii) the cloud-base mass flux. STOMP models are constructed and evaluated against CPOL radar observations at Darwin and convection permitting model (CPM) simulations. Multiple models are constructed under various assumptions regarding these three key parameters and the realisms of these models are evaluated. It is shown that in a model where convective plumes prefer to aggregate spatially and the cloud-base mass flux is a nonlinear function of convective cell area, the mass flux manifests a recharge-discharge behavior under steady forcing. Such a model also produces observed behavior of convective cell populations and CPM simulated cloud-base mass flux variability under diurnally varying forcing. In addition to its use in developing understanding of convection processes and the controls on convective cell size distributions, this modeling framework is also designed to serve as a nonequilibrium closure formulations for spectral mass flux parameterizations.

  13. CDM Convective Forecast Planning guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CDM Convective Forecast Planning (CCFP) guidance product provides a foreast of en-route aviation convective hazards. The forecasts are updated every 2 hours and...

  14. Presentation on Tropical Mesoscale convective Systems and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Shallow convection- 70% of the storm heights are below 6 km. ♢ Deep convection ... Decay convection, the convective top is found at a higher altitude than deep .... Stratospheric Fountain – Two step process. Warm tropopause- preferable for.

  15. Heat transfer in cryogenic helium gas by turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Pavel; Hanzelka, Pavel; Musilová, Věra; Králík, Tomáš; La Mantia, M.; Srnka, Aleš; Skrbek, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 5 (2014), 053042: 1-40 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP203/12/P897 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Rayleigh-Bénard convection * heat transfer efficiency * cryogenic helium Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 3.558, year: 2014

  16. Convective overshooting in stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrássy, R.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous observations provide evidence that the standard picture, in which convective mixing is limited to the unstable layers of a star, is incomplete. The mixing layers in real stars are significantly more extended than what the standard models predict. Some of the observations require changing

  17. On the nature of rainfall in dry climate: Space-time patterns of convective rain cells over the Dead Sea region and their relations with synoptic state and flash flood generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belachsen, Idit; Marra, Francesco; Peleg, Nadav; Morin, Efrat

    2017-04-01

    Space-time patterns of rainfall are important climatic characteristics that influence runoff generation and flash flood magnitude. Their derivation requires high-resolution measurements to adequately represent the rainfall distribution, and is best provided by remote sensing tools. This need is further emphasized in dry climate regions, where rainfall is scarce and, often, local and highly variable. Our research is focused on understanding the nature of rainfall events in the dry Dead Sea region (Eastern Mediterranean) by identifying and characterizing the spatial structure and the dynamics of convective storm cores (known as rain cells). To do so, we take advantage of 25 years of corrected and gauge-adjusted weather radar data. A statistical analysis of convective rain-cells spatial and temporal characteristics was performed with respect to synoptic pattern, geographical location, and flash flood generation. Rain cells were extracted from radar data using a cell segmentation method and a tracking algorithm and were divided into rain events. A total of 10,500 rain cells, 2650 cell tracks and 424 rain events were elicited. Rain cell properties, such as mean areal and maximal rain intensity, area, life span, direction and speed, were derived. Rain events were clustered, according to several ERA-Interim atmospheric parameters, and associated with three main synoptic patterns: Cyprus Low, Low to the East of the study region and Active Red Sea Trough. The first two originate from the Mediterranean Sea, while the third is an extension of the African monsoon. On average, the convective rain cells in the region are 90 km2 in size, moving from West to East in 13 ms-1 and living 18 minutes. Several significant differences between rain cells of the various synoptic types were observed. In particular, Active Red Sea Trough rain cells are characterized by higher rain intensities and lower speeds, suggesting a higher flooding potential for small catchments. The north

  18. The frontal lobes and inhibitory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Seiki

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies using traditional tasks of inhibitory functions, such as the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) and the Go/No-Go Task have revealed that the frontal lobe is responsible for several types of inhibitory functions. However, the detailed psychological nature of the inhibitory functions and the precise location of their critical foci within the frontal lobe remain to be investigated. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides spatial and temporal resolution that allowed us to illuminate at least 4 frontal regions involved in inhibitory functions: the dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and rostral parts of the frontal lobe and the presupplementary motor area (preSMA). The ventrolateral part of the frontal lobe in the right hemisphere was activated during response inhibition. The preSMA in the left hemisphere was activated during inhibition of proactive interference immediately after the dimension changes of the WCST. The rostral part of the frontal lobe in the left hemisphere was activated during inhibition long after the dimension changes. The dorsolateral part of the frontal lobe in the left hemisphere was activated at the dimension changes in the first time, but not in the second time. These findings provide clues to our understanding of functional differentiation of inhibitory functions and their localization in the frontal lobe. (author)

  19. Convective Propagation Characteristics Using a Simple Representation of Convective Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, R. B.; Mapes, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    Observed equatorial wave propagation is intimately linked to convective organization and it's coupling to features of the larger-scale flow. In this talk we a use simple 4 level model to accommodate vertical modes of a mass flux convection scheme (shallow, mid-level and deep). Two paradigms of convection are used to represent convective processes. One that has only both random (unorganized) diagnosed fluctuations of convective properties and one with organized fluctuations of convective properties that are amplified by previously existing convection and has an explicit moistening impact on the local convecting environment We show a series of model simulations in single-column, 2D and 3D configurations, where the role of convective organization in wave propagation is shown to be fundamental. For the optimal choice of parameters linking organization to local atmospheric state, a broad array of convective wave propagation emerges. Interestingly the key characteristics of propagating modes are the low-level moistening followed by deep convection followed by mature 'large-scale' heating. This organization structure appears to hold firm across timescales from 5-day wave disturbances to MJO-like wave propagation.

  20. Emphysema lung lobe volume reduction: effects on the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Matthew S.; Kim, Hyun J.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, Maya; Pais, Richard; Da Costa, Irene G.; Ordookhani, Arash; Chong, Daniel; Ni, Chiayi; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Goldin, Jonathan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Strange, Charlie [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States); Tashkin, Donald P. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    To investigate volumetric and density changes in the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes following volume reduction of an emphysematous target lobe. The study included 289 subjects with heterogeneous emphysema, who underwent bronchoscopic volume reduction of the most diseased lobe with endobronchial valves and 132 untreated controls. Lobar volume and low-attenuation relative area (RA) changes post-procedure were measured from computed tomography images. Regression analysis (Spearman's rho) was performed to test the association between change in the target lobe volume and changes in volume and density variables in the other lobes. The target lobe volume at full inspiration in the treatment group had a mean reduction of -0.45 L (SE = 0.034, P < 0.0001), and was associated with volume increases in the ipsilateral lobe (rho = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and contralateral lung (rho = -0.16, P = 0.006), and overall reductions in expiratory RA (rho = 0.31, P < 0.0001) and residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC) (rho = 0.13, P = 0.03). When the volume of an emphysematous target lobe is reduced, the volume is redistributed primarily to the ipsilateral lobe, with an overall reduction. Image-based changes in lobar volumes and densities indicate that target lobe volume reduction is associated with statistically significant overall reductions in air trapping, consistent with expansion of the healthier lung. (orig.)

  1. Emphysema lung lobe volume reduction: effects on the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Matthew S.; Kim, Hyun J.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, Maya; Pais, Richard; Da Costa, Irene G.; Ordookhani, Arash; Chong, Daniel; Ni, Chiayi; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Strange, Charlie; Tashkin, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate volumetric and density changes in the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes following volume reduction of an emphysematous target lobe. The study included 289 subjects with heterogeneous emphysema, who underwent bronchoscopic volume reduction of the most diseased lobe with endobronchial valves and 132 untreated controls. Lobar volume and low-attenuation relative area (RA) changes post-procedure were measured from computed tomography images. Regression analysis (Spearman's rho) was performed to test the association between change in the target lobe volume and changes in volume and density variables in the other lobes. The target lobe volume at full inspiration in the treatment group had a mean reduction of -0.45 L (SE = 0.034, P < 0.0001), and was associated with volume increases in the ipsilateral lobe (rho = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and contralateral lung (rho = -0.16, P = 0.006), and overall reductions in expiratory RA (rho = 0.31, P < 0.0001) and residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC) (rho = 0.13, P = 0.03). When the volume of an emphysematous target lobe is reduced, the volume is redistributed primarily to the ipsilateral lobe, with an overall reduction. Image-based changes in lobar volumes and densities indicate that target lobe volume reduction is associated with statistically significant overall reductions in air trapping, consistent with expansion of the healthier lung. (orig.)

  2. Abscess of residual lobe after pulmonary resection for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligabue, Tommaso; Voltolini, Luca; Ghiribelli, Claudia; Luzzi, Luca; Rapicetta, Cristian; Gotti, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    Abscess of the residual lobe after lobectomy is a rare but potentially lethal complication. Between January 1975 and December 2006, 1,460 patients underwent elective pulmonary lobectomy for non-small-cell lung cancer at our institution. Abscess of the residual lung parenchyma occurred in 5 (0.3%) cases (4 bilobectomies and 1 lobectomy). Postoperative chest radiography showed incomplete expansion and consolidation of residual lung parenchyma. Flexible bronchoscopy revealed persistent bronchial occlusion from purulent secretions and/or bronchial collapse. Computed tomography in 3 patients demonstrated lung abscess foci. Surgical treatment included completion right pneumonectomy in 3 patients and a middle lobectomy in one. Complications after repeat thoracotomy comprised contralateral pneumonia and sepsis in 1 patient. Residual lobar abscess after lobectomy should be suspected in patients presenting with fever, leukocytosis, bronchial obstruction and lung consolidation despite antibiotic therapy, physiotherapy and bronchoscopy. Computed tomography is mandatory for early diagnosis. Surgical resection of the affected lobe is recommended.

  3. Alterations of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohid, Hassaan; Faizan, Muhammad; Faizan, Uzma

    2015-07-01

    The relationship of the occipital lobe of the brain with schizophrenia is not commonly studied; however, this topic is considered an essential subject matter among clinicians and scientists. We conducted this systematic review to elaborate the relationship in depth. We found that most schizophrenic patients show normal occipital anatomy and physiology, a minority showed dwindled values, and some demonstrated augmented function and structure. The findings are laborious to incorporate within single disease models that present the involvement of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia progresses clinically in the mid-twenties and thirties and its prognosis is inadequate. Changes in the volume, the gray matter, and the white matter in the occipital lobe are quite evident; however, the mechanism behind this involvement is not yet fully understood. Therefore, we recommend further research to explore the occipital lobe functions and volumes across the different stages of schizophrenia.

  4. Pressure balance between lobe and plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Luehr, H.

    1990-01-01

    Using eight months of AMPTE/IRM plasma and magnetic field data, the authors have done a statistical survey on the balance of total (thermal and magnetic) pressure in the Earth's plasma sheet and tail lobe. About 300,000 measurements obtained in the plasma sheet and the lobe were compared for different levels of magnetic activity as well as different distances from the Earth. The data show that lobe and plasma sheet pressure balance very well. Even in the worst case they do not deviate by more than half of the variance in the data itself. Approximately constant total pressure was also seen during a quiet time pass when IRM traversed nearly the whole magnetotail in the vertical direction, from the southern hemisphere lobe through the neutral sheet and into the northern plasma sheet boundary layer

  5. Microsurgical techniques in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Vanegas, Mario A; Lew, Sean M; Morino, Michiharu; Sarmento, Stenio A

    2017-04-01

    Temporal lobe resection is the most prevalent epilepsy surgery procedure. However, there is no consensus on the best surgical approach to treat temporal lobe epilepsy. Complication rates are low and efficacy is very high regarding seizures after such procedures. However, there is still ample controversy regarding the best surgical approach to warrant maximum seizure control with minimal functional deficits. We describe the most frequently used microsurgical techniques for removal of both the lateral and mesial temporal lobe structures in the treatment of medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) due to mesial temporal sclerosis (corticoamygdalohippocampectomy and selective amygdalohippocampectomy). The choice of surgical technique appears to remain a surgeon's preference for the near future. Meticulous surgical technique and thorough three-dimensional microsurgical knowledge are essentials for obtaining the best results. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  7. Alterations of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohid, Hassaan; Faizan, Muhammad; Faizan, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    The relationship of the occipital lobe of the brain with schizophrenia is not commonly studied; however, this topic is considered an essential subject matter among clinicians and scientists. We conducted this systematic review to elaborate the relationship in depth. We found that most schizophrenic patients show normal occipital anatomy and physiology, a minority showed dwindled values, and some demonstrated augmented function and structure. The findings are laborious to incorporate within single disease models that present the involvement of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia progresses clinically in the mid-twenties and thirties and its prognosis is inadequate. Changes in the volume, the gray matter, and the white matter in the occipital lobe are quite evident; however, the mechanism behind this involvement is not yet fully understood. Therefore, we recommend further research to explore the occipital lobe functions and volumes across the different stages of schizophrenia. PMID:26166588

  8. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semah, F.

    2006-01-01

    The research projects on epilepsy addressed two main issues: the pathophysiology of the inter-ictal hypo-metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy and the role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizure. Our research projects focused primarily on temporal lobe epilepsy: The pathophysiology of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism and its correlation with the epileptogenic network was investigated in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Inter-ictal hypo-metabolism is commonly found in mesio-temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that metabolic changes reflect the preferential networks involved in ictal discharges. We analyzed the topography of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism according to electro-clinical patterns in 50 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and consistent features of MTLE. Based on electro-clinical correlations we identified 4 groups:1) mesial group characterized by mesial seizure onset without evidence of early spread beyond the temporal lobe; 2) anterior mesio-lateral group (AML) with early anterior spread, involving the anterior lateral temporal cortex and insulo-fronto-opercular areas; 3) widespread mesio-lateral group (WML) with widespread spread, involving both anterior and posterior lateral temporal and peri-sylvian areas; 4) bi-temporal group (BT) with early contralateral temporal spread. Results of FDG-PET imaging in each group were compared to control subjects using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). MRI data and surgical outcome in each group were compared to metabolic findings. Hypo-metabolism was limited to the hippocampal gyrus, the temporal pole and the insula in the mesial group. Gradual involvement of the lateral temporal cortex, the insula and the peri-sylvian areas was observed in the AML and WML groups. The BT group differed from the others by mild bi-temporal involvement, bilateral insular hypo-metabolism and longer epilepsy duration. MRI

  9. PET imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semah, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, DSV-CEA, 91 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    The research projects on epilepsy addressed two main issues: the pathophysiology of the inter-ictal hypo-metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy and the role of the basal ganglia in the control of seizure. Our research projects focused primarily on temporal lobe epilepsy: The pathophysiology of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism and its correlation with the epileptogenic network was investigated in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Inter-ictal hypo-metabolism is commonly found in mesio-temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) but its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that metabolic changes reflect the preferential networks involved in ictal discharges. We analyzed the topography of inter-ictal hypo-metabolism according to electro-clinical patterns in 50 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and consistent features of MTLE. Based on electro-clinical correlations we identified 4 groups:1) mesial group characterized by mesial seizure onset without evidence of early spread beyond the temporal lobe; 2) anterior mesio-lateral group (AML) with early anterior spread, involving the anterior lateral temporal cortex and insulo-fronto-opercular areas; 3) widespread mesio-lateral group (WML) with widespread spread, involving both anterior and posterior lateral temporal and peri-sylvian areas; 4) bi-temporal group (BT) with early contralateral temporal spread. Results of FDG-PET imaging in each group were compared to control subjects using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). MRI data and surgical outcome in each group were compared to metabolic findings. Hypo-metabolism was limited to the hippocampal gyrus, the temporal pole and the insula in the mesial group. Gradual involvement of the lateral temporal cortex, the insula and the peri-sylvian areas was observed in the AML and WML groups. The BT group differed from the others by mild bi-temporal involvement, bilateral insular hypo-metabolism and longer epilepsy duration. MRI

  10. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-04

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  11. Convection heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Written by an internationally recognized authority on heat transfer and thermodynamics, this second edition of Convection Heat Transfer contains new and updated problems and examples reflecting real-world research and applications, including heat exchanger design. Teaching not only structure but also technique, the book begins with the simplest problem solving method (scale analysis), and moves on to progressively more advanced and exact methods (integral method, self similarity, asymptotic behavior). A solutions manual is available for all problems and exercises.

  12. Concepts of magnetospheric convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyliunas, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetospheric physics, which grew out of attempts to understand the space environment of the Earth, is becoming increasingly applicable to other systems in the Universe. Among the planets, in addition to the Earth, Jupiter, Mercury, Mars and (in a somewhat different way) Venus are now known to have magnetospheres. The magnetospheres of pulsars have been regarded as an essential part of the pulsar phenomenon. Other astrophysical systems, such as supernova remnant shells or magnetic stars and binary star systems, may be describable as magnetospheres. The major concepts of magnetospheric physics thus need to be formulated in a general way not restricted to the geophysical context in which they may have originated. Magnetospheric convection has been one of the most important and fruitful concepts in the study of the Earth's magnetosphere. This paper describes the basic theoretical notions of convection in a manner applicable to magnetospheres generally and discusses the relative importance of convective corotational motions, with particular reference to the comparison of the Earth and Jupiter. (Auth.)

  13. A model of the solar cycle driven by the dynamo action of the global convection in the solar convection zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.

    1976-01-01

    Extensive numerical studies of the dynamo equations due to the global convection are presented to simulate the solar cycle and to open the way to study general stellar magnetic cycles. The dynamo equations which represent the longitudinally-averaged magnetohydrodynamical action (mean magnetohydrodynamics) of the global convection under the influence of the rotation in the solar convection zone are considered here as an initial boundary-value problem. The latitudinal and radial structure of the dynamo action consisting of a generation action due to the differential rotation and a regeneration action due to the global convection is parameterized in accordance with the structure of the rotation and of the global convection. This is done especially in such a way as to represent the presence of the two cells of the regeneration action in the radial direction in which the action has opposite signs, which is typical of the regeneration action of the global convection. The effects of the dynamics of the global convection (e.g., the effects of the stratification of the physical conditions in the solar convection zone) are presumed to be all included in those parameters used in the model and they are presumed not to alter the results drastically since these effects are only to change the structure of the regeneration action topologically. (Auth.)

  14. The possibility of non-synchronism of convective secondaries in close binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.G.; Papaloizou, J.

    1983-01-01

    The non-synchronous velocity field is calculated for a low mass convective secondary in a close binary system, taking rotation into account. It is found that, contrary to previous belief, the velocity tends to zero as the L 1 point is approached. It is also found that the use of tidal lobes is inappropriate when the secondary is asynchronous. The action of a turbulent viscosity on the velocity field is considered and it is found that, when convection is inefficient, synchronization times can approach the lifetime of the system. (author)

  15. Natural convection in horizontal fluid layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo-Antilla, A.J.

    1977-02-01

    The experimental work includes developing and using a thermal convection cell to obtain measurements of the heat flux and turbulent core temperature of a horizontal layer of fluid heated internally and subject to both stabilizing and destabilizing temperature differences. The ranges of Rayleigh numbers tested were 10 7 equal to or less than R/sub I/ equal to or less than 10 13 and -10 10 equal to or less than R/sub E/ equal to or less than 10 10 . Power integral methods were found to be adequate for interpolating and extrapolating the data. The theoretical work consists of the derivation, solution and use of the mean field equations for study of thermally driven convection in horizontal layers of infinite extent. The equations were derived by a separation of variables technique where the horizontal directions were described by periodic structures and the vertical being some function of z. The derivation resulted in a coupled set of momentum and energy equations. The equations were simplified by using the infinite Prandtl number limit and neglecting direct intermodal interaction. Solutions to these equations are used to predict the existence of multi-wavenumber flows at all supercritical Rayleigh numbers. Subsequent inspection of existing experimental photographs of convecting fluids confirms their existence. The onset of time dependence is found to coincide with the onset of the second convective mode. Each mode is found to consist of two wavenumbers and typically the velocity and temperature fields of the right modal branch are found to be out of phase

  16. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  17. MRI findings of temporal lobe ganglioglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jun; Lee, Ho Kyu; Lee, Jung Kyo; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul

    1999-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a rare primary brain tumor usually found in the temporal lobe. The purpose of this study is to describe the characteristic MR findings of temporal lobe ganglioglioma. Over a seven-year period, ten patients with cerebral ganglioglioma were evaluated at our institution. Seven cases of temporal lobe ganglioma were found ; six of these involved men, and one, a woman ; their mean age was 29.6 years. In three patients, Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted images were also obtained. We retrospectively analysed the MRI findings with respect to location, size, cortical involvement, margin, cystic change, degree of enhancement, MR signal intensity, calcification and peritumoral change. In five cases, tumors were located within the temporal lobe. In one, a tumor extended from the temporal lobe to the thalamus, and in one from the temporal lobe to the thalamus and cerebral peduncle. All temporal gangliogliomas measured 1.6-3.8cm in their greatest diameter (mean diameter, 2.7cm). In all cases, the cortices were involved with the maintenance of gyriform. The tumor margin was ill defined in five cases and well defined in two. Tumors showed multiple small cystic changes in four cases, a large cyst in two, and a solid nodule in one. In three cases in which contrast media was administered, no lesions were enhanced. On T1-weighted images, iso-signal intensities were seen in five cases and high signal intensities in two. On T2-weighted images, the corresponding figures were five and two. On MRI, tumor calcification and calvarial erosion were each detected in two cases. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in whom cortical solid or cystic and poorly enhanced lesions were seen on brain MRI, and in whom associated findings such as calcification and or adjacent bony erosion were noted, ganglioglioma must be considered

  18. Microsurgical anatomy of the central lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, Thomas; Paglioli, Eliseu; de Oliveira, Evandro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2015-03-01

    The central lobe consists of the pre- and postcentral gyri on the lateral surface and the paracentral lobule on the medial surface and corresponds to the sensorimotor cortex. The objective of the present study was to define the neural features, craniometric relationships, arterial supply, and venous drainage of the central lobe. Cadaveric hemispheres dissected using microsurgical techniques provided the material for this study. The coronal suture is closer to the precentral gyrus and central sulcus at its lower rather than at its upper end, but they are closest at a point near where the superior temporal line crosses the coronal suture. The arterial supply of the lower two-thirds of the lateral surface of the central lobe was from the central, precentral, and anterior parietal branches that arose predominantly from the superior trunk of the middle cerebral artery. The medial surface and the superior third of the lateral surface were supplied by the posterior interior frontal, paracentral, and superior parietal branches of the pericallosal and callosomarginal arteries. The venous drainage of the superior two-thirds of the lateral surface and the central lobe on the medial surface was predominantly through the superior sagittal sinus, and the inferior third of the lateral surface was predominantly through the superficial sylvian veins to the sphenoparietal sinus or the vein of Labbé to the transverse sinus. The pre- and postcentral gyri and paracentral lobule have a morphological and functional anatomy that differentiates them from the remainder of their respective lobes and are considered by many as a single lobe. An understanding of the anatomical relationships of the central lobe can be useful in preoperative planning and in establishing reliable intraoperative landmarks.

  19. High-resolution space-time characterization of convective rain cells: implications on spatial aggregation and temporal sampling operated by coarser resolution instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat

    2017-04-01

    Forecasting the occurrence of flash floods and debris flows is fundamental to save lives and protect infrastructures and properties. These natural hazards are generated by high-intensity convective storms, on space-time scales that cannot be properly monitored by conventional instrumentation. Consequently, a number of early-warning systems are nowadays based on remote sensing precipitation observations, e.g. from weather radars or satellites, that proved effective in a wide range of situations. However, the uncertainty affecting rainfall estimates represents an important issue undermining the operational use of early-warning systems. The uncertainty related to remote sensing estimates results from (a) an instrumental component, intrinsic of the measurement operation, and (b) a discretization component, caused by the discretization of the continuous rainfall process. Improved understanding on these sources of uncertainty will provide crucial information to modelers and decision makers. This study aims at advancing knowledge on the (b) discretization component. To do so, we take advantage of an extremely-high resolution X-Band weather radar (60 m, 1 min) recently installed in the Eastern Mediterranean. The instrument monitors a semiarid to arid transition area also covered by an accurate C-Band weather radar and by a relatively sparse rain gauge network ( 1 gauge/ 450 km2). Radar quantitative precipitation estimation includes corrections reducing the errors due to ground echoes, orographic beam blockage and attenuation of the signal in heavy rain. Intense, convection-rich, flooding events recently occurred in the area serve as study cases. We (i) describe with very high detail the spatiotemporal characteristics of the convective cores, and (ii) quantify the uncertainty due to spatial aggregation (spatial discretization) and temporal sampling (temporal discretization) operated by coarser resolution remote sensing instruments. We show that instantaneous rain intensity

  20. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  1. The occipital lobe convexity sulci and gyri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Raphael V; Ribas, Guilherme C; Párraga, Richard G; de Oliveira, Evandro

    2012-05-01

    The anatomy of the occipital lobe convexity is so intricate and variable that its precise description is not found in the classic anatomy textbooks, and the occipital sulci and gyri are described with different nomenclatures according to different authors. The aim of this study was to investigate and describe the anatomy of the occipital lobe convexity and clarify its nomenclature. The configurations of sulci and gyri on the lateral surface of the occipital lobe of 20 cerebral hemispheres were examined in order to identify the most characteristic and consistent patterns. The most characteristic and consistent occipital sulci identified in this study were the intraoccipital, transverse occipital, and lateral occipital sulci. The morphology of the transverse occipital sulcus and the intraoccipital sulcus connection was identified as the most important aspect to define the gyral pattern of the occipital lobe convexity. Knowledge of the main features of the occipital sulci and gyri permits the recognition of a basic configuration of the occipital lobe and the identification of its sulcal and gyral variations.

  2. MRI in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The present study investigated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in temporal lobe epilepsy and correlated them with clinical variables, such as age, illness duration, past history, and the frequency of seizure. Cerebral MRI was performed in 45 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy of unknown etiology, using a 0.5 T and/or a 1.5 T MRI systems. The temporal lobe was seen as high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and/or proton density-weighted images in 6 patients, although it was missed on CT and T1-weighted images. The high intensity area seemed to reflect sclerosis of the temporal lobe. This finding was significantly associated with partial seizure. Of these patients, 3 had a history of febrile convulsions. Ten patients had slight dilatation of the inferior horn of the lateral ventricle. They were significantly old at the time of onset and examination, as compared with those without dilatation. Furthermore, 6 patients with unilateral dilatation were significantly younger than the other 4 with bilateral dilatation. Nine patients had small multiple high signal areas in white matter, mainly in the parietal lobe, which suggested vascular origin. These patients were significantly old at the time of onset and examination, as compared with those having no such findings. In depicting high signal intensity areas, a 1.5 T MRI system was not always superior to a 0.5 T MRI system. Proton density-weighted images were better than T2-weighted images in some patients. (N.K.)

  3. Infectious Causes of Right Middle Lobe Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Aatif; Nanjappa, Sowmya; Greene, John N

    2017-01-01

    Right middle lobe (RML) syndrome is defined as recurrent or chronic obstruction or infection of the middle lobe of the right lung. Nonobstructive causes of middle lobe syndrome include inflammatory processes and defects in the bronchial anatomy and collateral ventilation. We report on 2 case patients with RML syndrome, one due to infection with Mycobacterium avium complex followed by M asiaticum infection and the other due to allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A history of atopy, asthma, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been reported in up to one-half of those with RML. The diagnosis can be made by plain radiography, computed tomography, and bronchoscopy. Medical treatment consists of bronchodilators, mucolytics, and antimicrobials. Patients whose disease is unresponsive to treatment and those with obstructive RML syndrome can be offered surgical treatment.

  4. Medical image of the week: azygous lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupinder Natt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 59 year old man underwent chest radiography for evaluation of fever and cough. Imaging showed an accessory azygous lobe. An azygos lobe is found in 1% of anatomic specimens and forms when the right posterior cardinal vein, one of the precursors of the azygos vein, fails to migrate over the apex of the lung (1. Instead, the vein penetrates the lung carrying along pleural layers that entrap a portion of the right upper lobe. The vein appears to run within the lung, but is actually surrounded by both parietal and visceral pleura. The azygos fissure therefore consists of four layers of pleura, two parietal layers and two visceral layers, which wrap around the vein giving the appearance of a tadpole. Apart from an interesting incidental radiological finding, it is of limited clinical importance except that its presence should be recognized during thoracoscopic procedures. This patient was found to have …

  5. Lung lobe collapse: pathophysiology and radiologic significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, P.F.; Gomez, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The radiographic changes caused by collapse of lung lobes in pulmonary disease, pneumothorax, and pleural effusion depend on the lobar recoiling force and local pleural pressure. Differences in the tendency of normal lung lobes or regions to collapse depend on the relative surface-to-volume ratio, determined by shape and size of the region or lobe. This ratio affects the physiologic parameters of pulmonary interdependence, compliance, and collateral air flow. Pulmonary surfactant increases compliance, particularly at low volumes, maintains alveolar stability, and assists in maintaining capillary patency and preventing pulmonary edema. Its loss due to lung injury increases collapsing forces. In the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, diseases that cause lobar collapse produce localized air or fluid entrapment that is a diagnostic sign of the presence of the underlying pulmonary disease

  6. Improved nowcasting of precipitation based on convective analysis fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Haiden

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The high-resolution analysis and nowcasting system INCA (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis developed at the Austrian national weather service provides three-dimensional fields of temperature, humidity, and wind on an hourly basis, and two-dimensional fields of precipitation rate in 15 min intervals. The system operates on a horizontal resolution of 1 km and a vertical resolution of 100–200 m. It combines surface station data, remote sensing data (radar, satellite, forecast fields of the numerical weather prediction model ALADIN, and high-resolution topographic data. An important application of the INCA system is nowcasting of convective precipitation. Based on fine-scale temperature, humidity, and wind analyses a number of convective analysis fields are routinely generated. These fields include convective boundary layer (CBL flow convergence and specific humidity, lifted condensation level (LCL, convective available potential energy (CAPE, convective inhibition (CIN, and various convective stability indices. Based on the verification of areal precipitation nowcasts it is shown that the pure translational forecast of convective cells can be improved by using a decision algorithm which is based on a subset of the above fields, combined with satellite products.

  7. Scannographic appearance of increased colloid uptake in the left liver lobe (Case presentation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadzher, Isak S.; Josifovska, Tatjana; Popgjorcheva, Daniela

    1996-01-01

    Incidentally increased uptake of Tc-99m sulfur colloid was found in scannographic images in the whole left liver lobe in all positions (PA, AP, DL, LL). The patient, a 60-year-old woman, was three years earlier cholocystecomized and had since occasional pain in the right upper abdominal quadrant due to biliary dyskinesia. Accessory spleen tissue was seen as well in the inferior lineal pole, probably presenting Shurer's phenomenon of 'lienis in liene' thus augmenting the serendipity of the scanographic findings. Imaging of the accessory spleen with heat denaturated spherocytes - Tc-99m confirmed the lienal structure of the tissue with preserved red pulp trabecular trapping mechanism in addition to phagocytic function of lineal Kupffer cells (in white pulp). Mebrofenin-Tc-99m (IDA-agent) showed in our patient normal distribution in both liver lobes contrary to focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma of the liver where IDA-radio- pharmaceuticals have delayed clearance due to abnormal biliary canaliculi. In our patient uptake, distribution, excretion and liver washout of mebrofenin-Tc-99m was found to be normal. This is in favor of an exclusive, solitary increase of the number of Kupffer cells confined to the whole left lobe of the liver. Increased colloid uptake in the left liver lobe is dependent on a greater number of Kupffer cells pro volume than in the right lobe. (Author)

  8. Split tolerance in nude mice transplanted with 2'-deoxyguanosine-treated allogeneic thymus lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, G.; Moriyama, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kawase, Y.; Habu, S.

    1989-01-01

    To elucidate the acquisition of self tolerance in the thymus, full-allogeneic thymic chimeras were constructed. Athymic C3H and BALB/c nude mice were reconstituted with the thymic lobes of BALB/c and B10.BR fetuses, respectively, that were organ cultured for 5 days in the presence of 2'-deoxyguanosine. T cells in these chimeras were tolerized to the host MHC in both MLR and CTL assays. In contrast, T cells in the chimeras exhibited split tolerance for the thymic MHC haplotype. CTL specific for class I MHC of the thymic haplotype were generated not only from the peripheral T cells of the chimeras but also from thymocytes re-populated in the engrafted thymic lobes. However, T cells in these chimeras responded poorly to the class II MHC of the thymic haplotype in a standard MLR assay. In a syngeneic MLR culture upon stimulation with enriched APC of the thymic haplotype, only 22 to 48% of the responses were mediated by CD4+ cells, and proliferations of CD4- cells were prominent. There were no haplotype-specific suppressor cells detected which would cause the unresponsiveness to the thymic class II MHC. These results indicated that the thymic lobes treated with 2'-deoxyguanosine were defective in the ability to induce the transplantation tolerance for the class I MHC expressed on the thymus, although the same thymic lobes were able to induce the transplantation tolerance for the thymic class II MHC

  9. Inverted Lobes Have Satisfactory Functions Compared With Noninverted Lobes in Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayawake, Hidenao; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Motoyama, Hideki; Hamaji, Masatsugu; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Goda, Yasufumi; Oda, Hiromi; Ueda, Satoshi; Date, Hiroshi

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the problem of small-for-size grafts in standard living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT), we developed inverted LDLLT, in which a right lower lobe from 1 donor is implanted as a right graft and another right lower lobe from another donor is implanted as a left graft. We retrospectively analyzed the functions of inverted grafts vs noninverted grafts. Between 2008 and 2015, 64 LDLLTs were performed. Included were 35 LDLLTs whose recipients were adults and monitored for more than 6 months without developing chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Among them, 65 implanted lobes were eligible for this analysis. There were 31 right lower lobes implanted as right grafts (right-to-right group), 7 right lower lobes as inverted left grafts (right-to-left group), and 27 left lower lobes as left grafts (left-to-left group). We evaluated the graft forced vital capacity (G-FVC) and graft volume of the 65 lobes before and 6 months after LDLLT and compared them among the three groups. Preoperatively, G-FVC in the right-to-left group (1,050 mL) was comparable to that in the right-to-right group (1,177 mL) and better than that in the left-to-left group (791 mL, p satisfactory compared with those of noninverted grafts. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Temporal lobe sclerosis associated with hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy: neuropathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Maria; Eriksson, Sofia; Martinian, Lillian; Caboclo, Luis O; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2009-08-01

    Widespread changes involving neocortical and mesial temporal lobe structures can be present in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. The incidence, pathology, and clinical significance of neocortical temporal lobe sclerosis (TLS) are not well characterized. We identified TLS in 30 of 272 surgically treated cases of hippocampal sclerosis. Temporal lobe sclerosis was defined by variable reduction of neurons from cortical layers II/III and laminar gliosis; it was typically accompanied by additional architectural abnormalities of layer II, that is, abnormal neuronal orientation and aggregation. Quantitative analysis including tessellation methods for the distribution of layer II neurons supported these observations. In 40% of cases, there was a gradient of TLS with more severe involvement toward the temporal pole, possibly signifying involvement of hippocampal projection pathways. There was a history of a febrile seizure as an initial precipitating injury in 73% of patients with TLS compared with 36% without TLS; no other clinical differences between TLS and non-TLS cases were identified. Temporal lobe sclerosis was not evident preoperatively by neuroimaging. No obvious effect of TLS on seizure outcome was noted after temporal lobe resection; 73% became seizure-free at 2-year follow-up. In conclusion, approximately 11% of surgically treated hippocampal sclerosis is accompanied by TLS. Temporal lobe sclerosis is likely an acquired process with accompanying reorganizational dysplasia and an extension of mesial temporal sclerosis rather than a separate pathological entity.

  11. Convergence behavior of idealized convection-resolving simulations of summertime deep moist convection over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panosetti, Davide; Schlemmer, Linda; Schär, Christoph

    2018-05-01

    Convection-resolving models (CRMs) can explicitly simulate deep convection and resolve interactions between convective updrafts. They are thus increasingly used in numerous weather and climate applications. However, the truncation of the continuous energy cascade at scales of O (1 km) poses a serious challenge, as in kilometer-scale simulations the size and properties of the simulated convective cells are often determined by the horizontal grid spacing (Δ x ).In this study, idealized simulations of deep moist convection over land are performed to assess the convergence behavior of a CRM at Δ x = 8, 4, 2, 1 km and 500 m. Two types of convergence estimates are investigated: bulk convergence addressing domain-averaged and integrated variables related to the water and energy budgets, and structural convergence addressing the statistics and scales of individual clouds and updrafts. Results show that bulk convergence generally begins at Δ x =4 km, while structural convergence is not yet fully achieved at the kilometer scale, despite some evidence that the resolution sensitivity of updraft velocities and convective mass fluxes decreases at finer resolution. In particular, at finer grid spacings the maximum updraft velocity generally increases, and the size of the smallest clouds is mostly determined by Δ x . A number of different experiments are conducted, and it is found that the presence of orography and environmental vertical wind shear yields more energetic structures at scales much larger than Δ x , sometimes reducing the resolution sensitivity. Overall the results lend support to the use of kilometer-scale resolutions in CRMs, despite the inability of these models to fully resolve the associated cloud field.

  12. Convection in Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Convection in Porous Media, 4th Edition, provides a user-friendly introduction to the subject, covering a wide range of topics, such as fibrous insulation, geological strata, and catalytic reactors. The presentation is self-contained, requiring only routine mathematics and the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The book will be of use not only to researchers and practicing engineers as a review and reference, but also to graduate students and others entering the field. The new edition features approximately 1,750 new references and covers current research in nanofluids, cellular porous materials, strong heterogeneity, pulsating flow, and more. Recognized as the standard reference in the field Includes a comprehensive, 250-page reference list Cited over 2300 times to date in its various editions Serves as an introduction for those entering the field and as a comprehensive reference for experienced researchers Features new sections on nanofluids, carbon dioxide sequestration, and applications...

  13. Convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    1992-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to the topic of convection in porous media The authors as- sume that the reader is familiar with the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, but otherwise the book is self-contained The book will be useful both as a review (for reference) and as a tutorial work, suitable as a textbook in a graduate course or seminar The book brings into perspective the voluminous research that has been performed during the last two decades The field has recently exploded because of worldwide concern with issues such as energy self-sufficiency and pollution of the environment Areas of application include the insulation of buildings and equipment, energy storage and recovery, geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste disposal, chemical reactor engineering, and the storage of heat-generating materials such as grain and coal Geophysical applications range from the flow of groundwater around hot intrusions to the stability of snow against avalanches

  14. Gene expression profile in temporal lobe epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Gorter, Jan A.

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) represents the most frequent epilepsy syndrome in adult patients with resistance to pharmacological treatment. In TLE, the origin of seizure activity typically involves the hippocampal formation, which displays

  15. Gene expression profile in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, E.M.A.; Gorter, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) represents the most frequent epilepsy syndrome in adult patients with resistance to pharmacological treatment. In TLE, the origin of seizure activity typically involves the hippocampal formation, which displays

  16. Formation of Bipolar Lobes by Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soker, Noam

    2002-04-01

    I conduct an analytical study of the interaction of jets, or a collimated fast wind (CFW), with a previously blown asymptotic giant branch (AGB) slow wind. Such jets (or CFWs) are supposedly formed when a compact companion, a main-sequence star, or a white dwarf accretes mass from the AGB star, forms an accretion disk, and blows two jets. This type of flow, which I think shapes bipolar planetary nebulae (PNs), requires three-dimensional gasdynamical simulations, which are limited in the parameter space they can cover. By imposing several simplifying assumptions, I derive simple expressions which reproduce some basic properties of lobes in bipolar PNs and which can be used to guide future numerical simulations. I quantitatively apply the results to two proto-PNs. I show that the jet interaction with the slow wind can form lobes which are narrow close to, and far away from, the central binary system, and which are wider somewhere in between. Jets that are recollimated and have constant cross section can form cylindrical lobes with constant diameter, as observed in several bipolar PNs. Close to their source, jets blown by main-sequence companions are radiative; only further out they become adiabatic, i.e., they form high-temperature, low-density bubbles that inflate the lobes.

  17. Centrifugal acceleration in the magnetotail lobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nilsson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Combined Cluster EFW and EDI measurements have shown that cold ion outflow in the magnetospheric lobes dominates the hydrogen ion outflow from the Earth's atmosphere. The ions have too low kinetic energy to be measurable with particle instruments, at least for the typical spacecraft potential of a sunlit spacecraft in the tenuous lobe plasmas outside a few RE. The measurement technique yields both density and bulk velocity, which can be combined with magnetic field measurements to estimate the centrifugal acceleration experienced by these particles. We present a quantitative estimate of the centrifugal acceleration, and the velocity change with distance which we would expect due to centrifugal acceleration. It is found that the centrifugal acceleration is on average outward with an average value of about of 5 m s−2. This is small, but acting during long transport times and over long distances the cumulative effect is significant, while still consistent with the relatively low velocities estimated using the combination of EFW and EDI data. The centrifugal acceleration should accelerate any oxygen ions in the lobes to energies observable by particle spectrometers. The data set also put constraints on the effectiveness of any other acceleration mechanisms acting in the lobes, where the total velocity increase between 5 and 19 RE geocentric distance is less than 5 km s−1.

  18. Radiologic evaluation of right middle lobe collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwun, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Deok; Kim, Jong Chul

    1989-01-01

    There are many pathogenetic factors for collapse of right middle lobe; profuse peribronchial clustering of lymph nodes about the right middle lobe bronchus, poor drainage of the bronchus because of its acute angle of take-off from the intermediate bronchus, and the isolation of this small lobe from the right upper and lower lobes, and thus from the aerating effects of collateral ventilation. Retrospectively we reviewed 36 cases of right of right middle lobe collapse of which causes were confirmed by histopathologic or bronchographic findings during the recent 6 years from March 1983 to February 1988 at Inje College Pusan Paik Hospital, and obtained the following results: 1. Male to female ratio was 1:1:4,and peak incidence (64%) was in the fifth and sixth decades with the mean age of 51.1 years. 2. Bronchiectasis was the most common cause (30.6%), and the others were chronic bronchitis (25.0%), pulmonary tuberculosis (19.4%), lung cancer (16.7%), and non-specific inflammatory disease (8.3%). This suggests benign disease is 5 times more common cause of right middle lobe collapse than lung cancer. 3. Among the plain chest radiolograph findings, obliteration of right cardiac border and triangular radiopaque density were the most frequent findings(77.8% in each) and the next was downward and anterior displacement of minor and major fissures (55.6%) 4. Bronchography was done in 11 cases; bronchiectasis was found in 8 cases and chronic bronchitis in 3 cases. Right middle lobe bronchus was obstructed in 2 cases of chronic bronchitis. 5. Chest CT scan was performed in 4 cases of lung cancer, 2 of non-specific inflammatory disease, and 1 of pulmonary tuberculosis: all of lung cancer revealed hilar mass, budged or lobulated fissures, in homogenous density, and mediastinal lymph node enlargement, and all benign disease showed homogenous density and flat to concave fissures. Right middle lobar bronchus narrowing was seen in 5 cases and its obstruction in 2 cases

  19. Frontal lobe atrophy in motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, J A; Hudson, A J

    1994-08-01

    Neuronal degeneration in the precentral gyrus alone cannot account for the occurrence of spastic paresis in motor neuron diseases. To look for more extensive cortical atrophy we measured MRIs of the upper parts of the frontal and parietal lobes in 11 sporadic cases of classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), eight patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) and an age- and sex-matched group of 49 neurologically normal people. None of the patients had overt dementia or other mental diseases. In PLS there is progressive spastic paresis but in contrast to ALS there is no lower motor neuron degeneration. The surface area of the precentral gyri and the amount of underlying white matter in PLS were consistently approximately 75% of the normal size. By contrast, there was some shrinkage of the precentral gyri in some of the ALS patients but the mean measurements for the group did not differ significantly from the controls. Anterior to the precentral sulci, the cortical surface area in PLS was approximately 85% of that of the controls, with correspondingly reduced white matter. In ALS the cortical surface areas of the anterior frontal lobes did not differ from those of the controls, but the amount of underlying white matter was reduced almost as much in ALS as it was in PLS. The measured changes in the frontal lobes suggest that in PLS there is simultaneous atrophy of the primary, premotor and supplementary motor areas of the cortex, with consequent degeneration of corticospinal and corticoreticular axons descending through the underlying white matter. These changes could account for the progressive upper motor neuron syndrome. In ALS, with no significant frontal cortical atrophy, the shrinkage of the white matter may be due to degeneration of axons projecting to the frontal cortex from elsewhere. Deprivation of afferents could explain the diminution of motor functions of the frontal lobes in ALS and also the changes in word fluency, judgement and attention that

  20. Semantic memory is impaired in patients with unilateral anterior temporal lobe resection for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Ehsan, Sheeba; Baker, Gus A; Rogers, Timothy T

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary clinical and basic neuroscience studies have increasingly implicated the anterior temporal lobe regions, bilaterally, in the formation of coherent concepts. Mounting convergent evidence for the importance of the anterior temporal lobe in semantic memory is found in patients with bilateral anterior temporal lobe damage (e.g. semantic dementia), functional neuroimaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studies. If this proposal is correct, then one might expect patients with anterior temporal lobe resection for long-standing temporal lobe epilepsy to be semantically impaired. Such patients, however, do not present clinically with striking comprehension deficits but with amnesia and variable anomia, leading some to conclude that semantic memory is intact in resection for temporal lobe epilepsy and thus casting doubt over the conclusions drawn from semantic dementia and linked basic neuroscience studies. Whilst there is a considerable neuropsychological literature on temporal lobe epilepsy, few studies have probed semantic memory directly, with mixed results, and none have undertaken the same type of systematic investigation of semantic processing that has been conducted with other patient groups. In this study, therefore, we investigated the semantic performance of 20 patients with resection for chronic temporal lobe epilepsy with a full battery of semantic assessments, including more sensitive measures of semantic processing. The results provide a bridge between the current clinical observations about resection for temporal lobe epilepsy and the expectations from semantic dementia and other neuroscience findings. Specifically, we found that on simple semantic tasks, the patients' accuracy fell in the normal range, with the exception that some patients with left resection for temporal lobe epilepsy had measurable anomia. Once the semantic assessments were made more challenging, by probing specific-level concepts, lower frequency

  1. Severe atrophy of right hepatic lobe simulating right hepatic lobectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.W.; Strashun, A.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Absence of the right hepatic lobe following blunt abdominal trauma without surgical resection is reported. The usual site of the right hepatic lobe is demonstrated to be occupied by bowel by hepatobiliary imaging

  2. The convection patterns in microemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korneta, W.; Lopez Quintela, M.A.; Fernandez Novoa, A.

    1991-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Benard convection in the microemulsion consisting of water (7.5%), cyclohexan (oil-61.7%) and diethylenglycolmonobutylether (surfactant-30.8%) is studied from the onset of convection to the phase separation. The five classes of convection patterns are observed and recorded on the video: localized travelling waves, travelling waves, travelling waves and localized steady rolls, steady rolls and steady polygons. The Fourier transforms and histograms of these patterns are presented. The origin of any pattern is discussed. The intermittent behaviour close to the phase separation was observed. Possible applications of the obtained results are suggested. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  3. Confabulation and memory impairments following frontal lobe lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Martha

    2005-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have provided considerable evidence for frontal lobe involvement in memory processing. Memory impairments arc also frequently reported in patients with frontal lobe lesions. However detailed anatomical localisation is rare, making integration of lesion and imaging findings difficult. An investigation of the functional and anatomical contributions of the frontal lobes to memory was conducted in 42 patients with frontal lobe lesions, examining memory processes identified in...

  4. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  5. A Rare Case of Craniopharyngioma in the Temporal Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Razmjoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report on a rare case of craniopharyngioma arising in the left temporal lobe with no prior history of head trauma or surgery. There was a solid-cystic mass in the left temporal lobe on MR images. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of a craniopharyngioma occurring in the temporal lobe.

  6. Fatal stroke after completion pneumonectomy for torsion of left upper lobe following left lower lobectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolakis Efstratios

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lobar torsion after lung surgery is a rare complication with an incidence of 0.09 to 0.4 %. It may occur after twisting of the bronchovascular pedicle of the remaining lobe after lobectomy, usually on the right side. The 180-degree rotation of the pedicle produces an acute obstruction of the lobar bronchus (atelectasis and of the lobar vessels as well. Without prompt treatment it progresses to lobar ischemia, pulmonary infarction and finally fatal gangrene. Case Presentation A 62 years old female patient was admitted for surgical treatment of lung cancer. She underwent elective left lower lobectomy for squamous cell carcinoma (pT2 N0. The operation was unremarkable, and the patient was extubated in the operating room. After eight hours the patient established decrease of pO2 and chest x-ray showed atelectasis of the lower lobe. To establish diagnosis, bronchoscopy was performed, demonstrating obstructed left lobar bronchus. The patient was re-intubated, and admitted to the operating room where reopening of the thoracotomy was performed. Lobar torsion was diagnosed, with the diaphragmatic surface of the upper lobe facing in an anterosuperior orientation. A completion pneumonectomy was performed. At the end of the procedure the patient developed a right pupil dilatation, presumably due to a cerebral embolism. A subsequent brain angio-CT scan established the diagnosis. She died at the intensive care unit 26 days later. Conclusion The thoracic surgeon should suspect this rare early postoperative complication after any thoracic operation in every patient with atelectasis of the neighboring lobe. High index of suspicion and prompt diagnosis may prevent catastrophic consequences, such as, infarction or gangrene of the pulmonary lobe. During thoracic operations, especially whenever the lung or lobe hilum is full mobilized, fixation of the remaining lobe may prevent this life threatening complication.

  7. Convection in the Labrador Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, R

    1997-01-01

    The long-term goal of this grant was to describe the process of deep oceanic convection well enough to provide critical tests of, and guidance to, models used to predict subsurface ocean conditions...

  8. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  9. Convection-enhanced water evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    B. M. Weon; J. H. Je; C. Poulard

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor is lighter than air; this can enhance water evaporation by triggering vapor convection but there is little evidence. We directly visualize evaporation of nanoliter (2 to 700 nL) water droplets resting on silicon wafer in calm air using a high-resolution dual X-ray imaging method. Temporal evolutions of contact radius and contact angle reveal that evaporation rate linearly changes with surface area, indicating convective (instead of diffusive) evaporation in nanoliter water droplet...

  10. GINGIVAL ENLARGEMENT ASSOCIATED WITH NOCTURNAL FRONTAL LOBE EPILEPSY. A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma ANAMIKA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available „Epilepsy” refers to a group of neurological disorders characterized by chronic, recurrent, paroxysmal seizure activity. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by brief, recurring seizures produ‑ ced in the frontal lobes of the brain, often while the patient is sleeping, and also by clusters of brief motor seizures. Seizure disorders may affect the dental status and oral health of patients. Epileptic drugs lead to gingival hyper‑ plasia, namely tissue enlargement, caused by an increased number of cells.

  11. Brain metabolite changes in alcoholism: Localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of the occipital lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modi, Shilpi; Bhattacharya, Manisha; Kumar, Pawan [NMR Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (DRDO), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 (India); Deshpande, Smita N. [Department of Psychiatry, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi (India); Tripathi, Rajendra Prasad [NMR Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (DRDO), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 (India); Khushu, Subash, E-mail: skhushu@yahoo.com [NMR Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (DRDO), Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with altered brain metabolism, morphology and cognitive abilities. Besides deficits in higher order cognitive functions, alcoholics also show a deficit in the processing of basic sensory information viz. visual stimulation. To assess the metabolic changes associated with this deficit, {sup 1}H MRS was carried out in the occipital lobe of alcohol dependents. A significant increase in Cho/Cr ratio (p < 0.015) was observed in occipital lobe in the alcoholic group indicating altered cell membrane metabolism, which may probably be associated with the alterations in the cognitive abilities associated with vision.

  12. Brain metabolite changes in alcoholism: Localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of the occipital lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modi, Shilpi; Bhattacharya, Manisha; Kumar, Pawan; Deshpande, Smita N.; Tripathi, Rajendra Prasad; Khushu, Subash

    2011-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with altered brain metabolism, morphology and cognitive abilities. Besides deficits in higher order cognitive functions, alcoholics also show a deficit in the processing of basic sensory information viz. visual stimulation. To assess the metabolic changes associated with this deficit, 1 H MRS was carried out in the occipital lobe of alcohol dependents. A significant increase in Cho/Cr ratio (p < 0.015) was observed in occipital lobe in the alcoholic group indicating altered cell membrane metabolism, which may probably be associated with the alterations in the cognitive abilities associated with vision.

  13. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van; Zaknun, John J.; Maes, Alex; Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon; Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina; Bal, C.S.; Dondi, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  14. Dynamic perfusion patterns in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Patrick; Paesschen, Wim van [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Zaknun, John J. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Maes, Alex [KU Leuven/UZ Gasthuisberg, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Center and Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); AZ Groeninge, Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Locharernkul, Chaichon [Chulalongkorn University, Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Bangkok (Thailand); Vasquez, Silvia; Carpintiero, Silvina [Fleni Instituto de Investigaciones Neurologicas, Nuclear Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bal, C.S. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Dondi, Maurizio [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Medicine Section, Division of Human Health, Wagramer Strasse 5, PO BOX 200, Vienna (Austria); Ospedale Maggiore, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    To investigate dynamic ictal perfusion changes during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We investigated 37 patients with TLE by ictal and interictal SPECT. All ictal injections were performed within 60 s of seizure onset. Statistical parametric mapping was used to analyse brain perfusion changes and temporal relationships with injection time and seizure duration as covariates. The analysis revealed significant ictal hyperperfusion in the ipsilateral temporal lobe extending to subcortical regions. Hypoperfusion was observed in large extratemporal areas. There were also significant dynamic changes in several extratemporal regions: ipsilateral orbitofrontal and bilateral superior frontal gyri and the contralateral cerebellum and ipsilateral striatum. The study demonstrated early dynamic perfusion changes in extratemporal regions probably involved in both propagation of epileptic activity and initiation of inhibitory mechanisms. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging of temporal lobe meningoencephalocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tampieri, D.; Leblanc, R.; Melangon, D.; del-Carpio-O'Donovan, R.; Ethier, R.

    1991-01-01

    Basal meningoencephaloceles represent a rare entity, and they may be associated with a variety of midline cerebral abnormalities. The classification of basal meningoencephaloceles is related to their anatomic location. This paper reports experience in 3 patients, 2 who have temporal lobe epilepsy and a bone defect in the region of the foramen rotondum. In these 2 patients the encephalocele and its covering were protruding into the pterygopalatine fossa without any orbital involvement. The third patient presented with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea caused by a transsphenoidal meningoencephalocele. MR imaging is the examination of choice for detecting these lesions since it allows for the visualization of the encephalocele and its meningeal covering as well as the bone defect and associated lesions in the temporal lobes

  16. MRI findings of temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Ichiro; Yin, Dali; Fukami, Masahiro; Kondo, Seiji; Takeuchi, Juji; Kanemoto, Kousuke; Sengoku, Akira; Kawai, Itsuo

    1992-01-01

    MRI findings were analyzed retrospectively in 46 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in which the side of epileptogenic focus had been confirmed by EEG studies. T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images were obtained by the use of a 1.0 or 1.5 T superconducting-type MRI machine with a coronal scan perpendicular to the axis of the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle. Additional axial and sagittal scans were performed in some cases. The area of the hippocampal body was measured quantitatively using a computerized image-analysis system in 26 cases in which the hippocampus had been visualized with enough contrast on T 1 -weighted coronal images. Abnormal findings were observed in 31/46 (67%) cases. Hippocampal (HC) and temporal lobe (TL) atrophy were observed in 18/46 (39%) and 23/46 (50%) cases respectively, and the side of the atrophy corresponded with the side of the epileptogenic focus, as confirmed by EEG studies, with specificities of 89% and 74% respectively. A quantitative measurement of the area of the hippocampal body showed unilateral hippocampal atrophy more than 10% in 18/25 (69%) cases (10-25%: 10 cases, 25-50%: 7 cases, 50% 2 abnormality was observed in only 4 cases. Structural lesions were observed in 4 cases including an arachnoid cyst, an astrocytoma in amygdala, the Dandy-Walker syndrome, and tuberous sclerosis, using the more efficient imaging qualities than the CT scan. From these observations, it is apparant that superconducting MRI is extremely useful in the diagnosis of the epileptogenic topography of temporal lobe epilepsy. Particularly, hippocampal atrophy was found to correspond with the side of the epileptogenic focus on EEG with a high specificity; its quantitative evaluation could be one of the most important standards in detecting the operative indications for temporal lobe epilepsy. (author)

  17. Heating-insensitive scale increase caused by convective precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerter, Jan; Moseley, Christopher; Berg, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The origin of intense convective extremes and their unusual temperature dependence has recently challenged traditional thermodynamic arguments, based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. In a sequence of studies (Lenderink and v. Mejgaard, Nat Geosc, 2008; Berg, Haerter, Moseley, Nat Geosc, 2013; and Moseley, Hohenegger, Berg, Haerter, Nat Geosc, 2016) the argument of convective-type precipitation overcoming the 7%/K increase in extremes by dynamical, rather than thermodynamic, processes has been promoted. How can the role of dynamical processes be approached for precipitating convective cloud? One-phase, non-precipitating Rayleigh-Bénard convection is a classical problem in complex systems science. When a fluid between two horizontal plates is sufficiently heated from below, convective rolls spontaneously form. In shallow, non-precipitating atmospheric convection, rolls are also known to form under specific conditions, with horizontal scales roughly proportional to the boundary layer height. Here we explore within idealized large-eddy simulations, how the scale of convection is modified, when precipitation sets in and intensifies in the course of diurnal solar heating. Before onset of precipitation, Bénard cells with relatively constant diameter form, roughly on the scale of the atmospheric boundary layer. We find that the onset of precipitation then signals an approximately linear (in time) increase in horizontal scale. This scale increase progresses at a speed which is rather insensitive to changes in surface temperature or changes in the rate at which boundary conditions change, hinting at spatial characteristics, rather than temperature, as a possible control on spatial scales of convection. When exploring the depth of spatial correlations, we find that precipitation onset causes a sudden disruption of order and a subsequent complete disintegration of organization —until precipitation eventually ceases. Returning to the initial question of convective

  18. Bilateral optical nerve atrophy secondary to lateral occipital lobe infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junfeng; Wei, Shihui

    2013-06-01

    To report a phenomenon of optical nerve atrophy secondary to lateral occipital lobe infarction. Two successive patients with unilateral occipital lobe infarction who experienced bilateral optical nerve atrophy during the follow-up underwent cranial imaging, fundus photography, and campimetry. Each patient was diagnosed with occipital lobe infarction by cranial MRI. During the follow-up, a bilateral optic atrophy was revealed, and campimetry showed a right homonymous hemianopia of both eyes with concomitant macular division. Bilateral optic atrophy was related to occipital lobe infarction, and a possible explanation for the atrophy was transneuronal degeneration caused by occipital lobe infarction.

  19. Upper motor neuron predominant degeneration with frontal and temporal lobe atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, M; Sakai, M; Matsuoka, Y; Konagaya, Y; Hashizume, Y

    1998-11-01

    The autopsy findings of a 78-year-old man mimicking primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) are reported. He showed slowly progressive spasticity, pseudobulbar palsy and character change, and died 32 months after the onset of symptoms. Autopsy revealed severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, remarkable neuronal loss and gliosis in the precentral gyrus, left temporal lobe pole and amygdala, mild degeneration of the Ammon's horn, degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and very mild involvement of the lower motor neurons. The anterior horn cells only occasionally demonstrated Bunina body by cystatin-C staining, and skein-like inclusions by ubiquitin staining. This is a peculiar case with concomitant involvement in the motor cortex and temporal lobe in motor neuron disease predominantly affecting the upper motor neuron.

  20. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgery Failures: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harroud, Adil; Bouthillier, Alain; Weil, Alexander G.; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2012-01-01

    Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are refractory to antiepileptic drugs in about 30% of cases. Surgical treatment has been shown to be beneficial for the selected patients but fails to provide a seizure-free outcome in 20–30% of TLE patients. Several reasons have been identified to explain these surgical failures. This paper will address the five most common causes of TLE surgery failure (a) insufficient resection of epileptogenic mesial temporal structures, (b) relapse on the contralateral mesial temporal lobe, (c) lateral temporal neocortical epilepsy, (d) coexistence of mesial temporal sclerosis and a neocortical lesion (dual pathology); and (e) extratemporal lobe epilepsy mimicking TLE or temporal plus epilepsy. Persistence of epileptogenic mesial structures in the posterior temporal region and failure to distinguish mesial and lateral temporal epilepsy are possible causes of seizure persistence after TLE surgery. In cases of dual pathology, failure to identify a subtle mesial temporal sclerosis or regions of cortical microdysgenesis is a likely explanation for some surgical failures. Extratemporal epilepsy syndromes masquerading as or coexistent with TLE result in incomplete resection of the epileptogenic zone and seizure relapse after surgery. In particular, the insula may be an important cause of surgical failure in patients with TLE. PMID:22934162

  1. Occipital lobe infarction and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagawa, Koichi; Nagata, Ken; Shishido, Fumio (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1990-08-01

    Even though the PET study revealed a total infarct in the territory of the left PCA in our 3 cases of pure alesia, it is still obscure which part of the left occipital lobe is most closely associated with the occurrence of the pure alexia. In order to elucidate the intralobar localization of the pure alexia, it is needed to have an ideal case who shows an pure alexia due to the localized lesion within the left occipital lobe. Furthermore, high-resolution PET scanner will circumvent the problem in detecting the metabolism and blood flow in the corpus callosum which plays an important role in the pathogenesis. We have shown that the occlusion of the right PCA also produced a left unilateral agnosia which is one of the common neurological signs in the right MCA infarction. To tell whether the responsible lesion for the unilateral spatial agnosia differs between the PCA occlusion and the MCA occlusion, the correlation study should be carried out in a greater number of the subjects. Two distinctive neuropsychological manifestations, cerebral color blidness and prosopagnosia, have been considered to be produced by the bilateral occipital lesion. The PET studies disclosed reduction of blood flow and oxygen metabolism in both occipital lobes in our particular patient who exibited cerebral color blindness and posopagnosia. (author).

  2. Occipital lobe infarction and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Koichi; Nagata, Ken; Shishido, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    Even though the PET study revealed a total infarct in the territory of the left PCA in our 3 cases of pure alesia, it is still obscure which part of the left occipital lobe is most closely associated with the occurrence of the pure alexia. In order to elucidate the intralobar localization of the pure alexia, it is needed to have an ideal case who shows an pure alexia due to the localized lesion within the left occipital lobe. Furthermore, high-resolution PET scanner will circumvent the problem in detecting the metabolism and blood flow in the corpus callosum which plays an important role in the pathogenesis. We have shown that the occlusion of the right PCA also produced a left unilateral agnosia which is one of the common neurological signs in the right MCA infarction. To tell whether the responsible lesion for the unilateral spatial agnosia differs between the PCA occlusion and the MCA occlusion, the correlation study should be carried out in a greater number of the subjects. Two distinctive neuropsychological manifestations, cerebral color blidness and prosopagnosia, have been considered to be produced by the bilateral occipital lesion. The PET studies disclosed reduction of blood flow and oxygen metabolism in both occipital lobes in our particular patient who exibited cerebral color blindness and posopagnosia. (author)

  3. Autonomous learning in gesture recognition by using lobe component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian; Weng, Juyang

    2007-02-01

    Gesture recognition is a new human-machine interface method implemented by pattern recognition(PR).In order to assure robot safety when gesture is used in robot control, it is required to implement the interface reliably and accurately. Similar with other PR applications, 1) feature selection (or model establishment) and 2) training from samples, affect the performance of gesture recognition largely. For 1), a simple model with 6 feature points at shoulders, elbows, and hands, is established. The gestures to be recognized are restricted to still arm gestures, and the movement of arms is not considered. These restrictions are to reduce the misrecognition, but are not so unreasonable. For 2), a new biological network method, called lobe component analysis(LCA), is used in unsupervised learning. Lobe components, corresponding to high-concentrations in probability of the neuronal input, are orientation selective cells follow Hebbian rule and lateral inhibition. Due to the advantage of LCA method for balanced learning between global and local features, large amount of samples can be used in learning efficiently.

  4. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Natural convection heat transfer in an anisotropic porous cavity heated from the side. 2nd Report. experiment by hele-shaw cell; Tosuiritsu ni ihosei wo yusuru howa takoshitsu sonai no sokuho kanetsu ni yoru shizen tairyu netsu dentatsu. 2. Hele shaw cell ni yoru jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, S; Okajima, A; Kiwata, T [Kanazawa University, Ishikawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    2000-11-25

    Natural convection heat transfer and flow structure in an anisotropic porous medium of square cavity saturated with Boussinesq fluid has been studied experimentally using a Hele-Shaw cell. The permeability ratio defined by K=K{sub y}/K{sub x} was put to three different values; 0.4, 1 and 2.5. The convection patterns at three different permeability ratios are visualized for several different Rayleigh numbers by the pH indicator method. When K is 0.25, the visualized flow is mainly in the vertical direction. On the contrary for K=4 the convecting flow is in the horizontal direction. The average heat transfer coefficients are also measured, and the corresponding Nusselt number are plotted as a function of K. It is found that the corresponding Nusselt numbers are scaled with (KRa){sup 1/2}. The experimental results of flow pattern and heat transfer are accord with those obtained by our previous theory. (author)

  6. Theoretical study of the high-latitude ionosphere's response to multicell convection patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sojka, J.J.; Schunk, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that the convection electric fields have an important effect on the ionosphere at high latitudes and that a quantitative understanding of their effect requires a knowledge of the plasma convection pattern. When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is southward, plasma convection at F region altitudes displays a two-cell pattern with antisunward flow over the polar cap and return flow at lower latitudes. However, when the IMF is northward, multiple convection cells can exist, with both sunward flow and auroral precipitation (theta aurora) in the polar cap. The characteristic ionospheric signatures associated with multicell convection patterns were studied with the aid of a three-dimensional time-dependent ionospheric model. Two-, three-, and four-cell patterns were considered and the ionosphere's response was calculated for the same cross-tail potential and for solar maximum and winter conditions in the northern hemisphere. As expected, there are major distinguishing ionospheric features associated with the different convection patterns, particularly in the polar cap. For two-cell convection the antisunward flow the plasma from the dayside into the polar cap. For two-cell convection the antisunward flow of plasma from the dayside into the polar cap acts to maintain the densities in this region in winter. For four-cell convection, on the other hand, the two aditional convection cells in the polar cap are in darkness most of the time, and the resulting O + decay acts to produce twin polar holes that are separated by a sun-aligned ridge of enhanced ionization due to theta aurora precipitation

  7. Impacts of initial convective structure on subsequent squall line evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varble, A.; Morrison, H.; Zipser, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    A Weather Research and Forecasting simulation of the 20 May 2011 MC3E squall line using 750-m horizontal grid spacing produces wide convective regions with strongly upshear tilted convective updrafts and mesoscale bowing segments that are not produced in radar observations. Similar features occur across several different bulk microphysics schemes, despite surface observations exhibiting cold pool equivalent potential temperature drops that are similar to and pressure rises that are greater than those in the simulation. Observed rear inflow remains more elevated than simulated, partly counteracting the cold pool circulation, whereas the simulated rear inflow descends to low levels, maintaining its strength and reinforcing the cold pool circulation that overpowers the pre-squall line low level vertical wind shear. The descent and strength of the simulated rear inflow is fueled by strong latent cooling caused by large ice water contents detrained from upshear tilted convective cores that accumulate at the rear of the stratiform region. This simulated squall evolution is sensitive to model resolution, which is too coarse to resolve individual convective drafts. Nesting a 250-m horizontal grid spacing domain into the 750-m domain substantially alters the initial convective cells with reduced latent cooling, weaker convective downdrafts, and a weaker initial cold pool. As the initial convective cells develop into a squall line, the rear inflow remains more elevated in the 250-m domain with a cold pool that eventually develops to be just as strong and deeper than the one in the 750-m run. Despite this, the convective cores remain more upright in the 250-m run with the rear inflow partly counteracting the cold pool circulation, whereas the 750-m rear inflow near the surface reinforces the shallower cold pool and causes bowing in the squall line. The different structure in the 750-m run produces excessive mid-level front-to-rear detrainment that widens the convective region

  8. Clinical study on temporal lobe epilepsy in childhood caused by temporal lobe space occupying lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Mariko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Funatsuka, Makoto; Osawa, Makiko; Yamane, Fumitaka; Hori, Tomokatsu; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    We studied the clinicoelectrical and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) caused by temporal lobe space occupying lesions (SOLs), and compared its characteristics with those of 19 mesial TLE (MTLE) patients. Brain MRI demonstrated SOLs in the mesiotemporal lobe in 9, and laterotemporal lobe in the remaining 2 patients. Ten of the 11 patients successfully underwent surgery, which revealed tumors in 7 and focal cortical dysplasia in 3 patients. Comparisons of the clinical features between those with space occupying TLE (SOTLE) and MTLE showed that both conditions shared the same clinical seizure manifestations such as gastric uprising sensation or ictal fear and a favorable response to surgery. However, the patients with SOTLE had fewer febrile convulsion, and more frequent seizure recurrences as well as TLE EEG discharges and associations of the monophasic clinical course than those with MTLE. In addition, the MRI findings were characterized by unilateral hippocampal atrophy in MTLE and expanding or SOLs in the SOTLE group. Children with complex partial seizures of suspected temporal lobe origin should undergo extensive neuroimaging evaluation. (author)

  9. Mismatch between the eye and the optic lobe in the giant squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yung-Chieh; Liu, Tsung-Han; Yu, Chun-Chieh; Su, Chia-Hao; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-07-01

    Giant squids ( Architeuthis ) are a legendary species among the cephalopods. They live in the deep sea and are well known for their enormous body and giant eyes. It has been suggested that their giant eyes are not adapted for the detection of either mates or prey at distance, but rather are best suited for monitoring very large predators, such as sperm whales, at distances exceeding 120 m and at a depth below 600 m (Nilsson et al. 2012 Curr. Biol. 22 , 683-688. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2012.02.031)). However, it is not clear how the brain of giant squids processes visual information. In this study, the optic lobe of a giant squid ( Architeuthis dux , male, mantle length 89 cm), which was caught by local fishermen off the northeastern coast of Taiwan, was scanned using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in order to examine its internal structure. It was evident that the volume ratio of the optic lobe to the eye in the giant squid is much smaller than that in the oval squid ( Sepioteuthis lessoniana ) and the cuttlefish ( Sepia pharaonis ). Furthermore, the cell density in the cortex of the optic lobe is significantly higher in the giant squid than in oval squids and cuttlefish, with the relative thickness of the cortex being much larger in Architeuthis optic lobe than in cuttlefish. This indicates that the relative size of the medulla of the optic lobe in the giant squid is disproportionally smaller compared with these two cephalopod species. This morphological study of the giant squid brain, though limited only to the optic lobe, provides the first evidence to support that the optic lobe cortex, the visual information processing area in cephalopods, is well developed in the giant squid. In comparison, the optic lobe medulla, the visuomotor integration centre in cephalopods, is much less developed in the giant squid than other species. This finding suggests that, despite the giant eye and a full-fledged cortex within the optic lobe, the brain of giant

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy. Usefulness for the etiological diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.; Lueders, H.O.

    2000-01-01

    With improvement in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, the ability to identify lesions responsible for temporal lobe epilepsy has increased. MR imaging has also enabled the in vivo diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis. Brain tumors are responsible for 2-4% of epilepsies in adult population and 10-20% of medically intractable epilepsy. The sensitivity of MR imaging in the diagnosis of tumors and other lesions of the temporal lobe (vascular malformations, etc.) is around 90%. Both hippocampal sclerosis and other temporal lobe lesions are amenable to surgical therapy with excellent postsurgical seizure outcome. In this article, we characterize and underline distinguishing features of the different pathological entities. We also suggest an approach to reviewing the MR images of an epileptic patient. (author)

  11. Mantle Convection on Modern Supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismüller, J.; Gmeiner, B.; Huber, M.; John, L.; Mohr, M.; Rüde, U.; Wohlmuth, B.; Bunge, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle convection is the cause for plate tectonics, the formation of mountains and oceans, and the main driving mechanism behind earthquakes. The convection process is modeled by a system of partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Characteristic to mantle flow is the vast disparity of length scales from global to microscopic, turning mantle convection simulations into a challenging application for high-performance computing. As system size and technical complexity of the simulations continue to increase, design and implementation of simulation models for next generation large-scale architectures is handled successfully only in an interdisciplinary context. A new priority program - named SPPEXA - by the German Research Foundation (DFG) addresses this issue, and brings together computer scientists, mathematicians and application scientists around grand challenges in HPC. Here we report from the TERRA-NEO project, which is part of the high visibility SPPEXA program, and a joint effort of four research groups. TERRA-NEO develops algorithms for future HPC infrastructures, focusing on high computational efficiency and resilience in next generation mantle convection models. We present software that can resolve the Earth's mantle with up to 1012 grid points and scales efficiently to massively parallel hardware with more than 50,000 processors. We use our simulations to explore the dynamic regime of mantle convection and assess the impact of small scale processes on global mantle flow.

  12. Fusing Multiple Satellite Datasets Toward Defining and Understanding Organized Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, G.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    How do we differentiate unorganized from organized convection? We might think of organized convection as being long lasting (at least longer than the lifetime of any individual cumulus cell), clustered at larger spatial scales (>100 km), and responsible for substantial rainfall accumulation. Organized convection is sustained on such scales due to the arrangement of moist/dry and buoyant/non-buoyant mesoscale circulations. The nature of these circulations is tied to system diabatic heating profiles; in particular, the 2nd baroclinic (top-heavy), stratiform heating mode is thought to be important for organized convection maintenance/propagation. We investigate the extent to which these characteristics are jointly found in propagating convective systems. Lifecycle information comes from hi-res IR data. Diabatic heating profiles, convective fractions and rainfall are provided by GPM retrievals mapped to convective system tracks. Moisture is provided by AIRS/AMSU and passive microwave retrievals. Instead of compositing heating profile information along a system track, where information is smoothed out, we sort system heating profile structures according to their "top heaviness" and then analyze PDFs of system rainfall, system sizes, durations, convective/stratiform ratios, etc. as a function of diabatic heating structure. Perhaps contrary to expectation, we find only small differences in PDFs of rainfall rates, system sizes, and system duration for different heating profile structures. If organization is defined according to heating structures, then one possible interpretation of these results is that organization is independent of system size, duration, and many times, even lifecycle stage. Is it possible that most systems "hobble" along and exhibit varying degrees of organization, dependent on local environment moisture/buoyancy variations, unlike the archetypical MCS paradigm? This presentation will also discuss the questions posed above within the context of

  13. Immunohistochemical study of Metallothionein in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Rebollar, Daniel; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Nava-Ruíz, Concepción; Buentello-García, Masao; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; Díaz-Ruíz, Araceli; Rios, Camilo; Méndez-Armenta, Marisela

    2017-05-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common serious neurological example of acquired and frequent epilepsy. Oxidative stress is recognized as playing a contributing role in several neurological disorders, and most recently have been implicated in acquired epilepsies. The MTs occur in several brain regions and may serve as neuroprotective proteins against reactive oxygen species causing oxidative damage and stress. The main aim of this work was to describe the immunohistochemical localization of MT in the specimens derived from the patients affected by TLE. Histopathological examination showed NeuN, GFAP and MT immunopositive cells that were analyzed for determinate in hippocampal and parietal cortex samples. An increase in the reactive gliosis associated with increased MT expression was observed in patients with TLE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Convective behaviour in severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    The nature and magnitude of the hazard from radioactivity posed by a possible nuclear accident depend strongly on convective behaviour within and immediately adjacent to the plant in question. This behaviour depends upon the nature of the vapour-gas-aerosol mixture concerned, and can show unusual properties such as 'upside-down' convection in which hot mixtures fall and cold mixtures rise. Predictions and criteria as to the types of behaviour which could possibly occur are summarised. Possible applications to present reactors are considered, and ways in which presently expected convection could be drastically modified are described. In some circumstances these could be used to suppress the radioactive source term or to switch its effect between distant dilute contamination and severe local contamination. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Numerical investigation of natural convection heat transfer of nano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An enhanced cell-centered finite-volume procedure has been presented for solving the natural convection of the laminar Al O /Water nanofluid flow in a Γ shaped micro-channel in the slip flow region, including the effects of velocity slip and temperature jump at the wall, which are the main characteristics of flow in the slip ...

  16. Mass transport in propagating patterns of convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.; Steinberg, V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies of propagating waves in an oscillatory convection of binary mixtures arise questions about transport properties of this flow. Optical visualization of a field of refraction index due to a shadowgraph technique gives information on the temperature and concentration fields. However, experimental observation of rolls propagating along the cell as travelling waves (TW) does not necessarily imply that mass is transferred hydrodynamically by the convective motion along the cell. One of the possibilities discussed, e.g., is that TW observed is only a phase propagation. The traditional examples of such situations come from the domain of linear, superposition-oriented physics. Acoustic waves transfer momentum and energy, but do not cause the mass to make excursions for their equilibrium point that are larger than the oscillation amplitude. In the case of nonlinear physics we were aware that small amplitude surface waves cause only small oscillatory motion round the equilibrium point, while larger amplitudes can cause the mass to start moving in the direction of the TW. This paper discussed the different possibilities of mass transfer by TW. 27 refs., 20 figs

  17. Numerical simulation in three space dimensions of time-dependent thermal convection in a rotating fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathaway, D.H.; Somerville, R.C.J.; National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM; California Univ., La Jolla)

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional, time-dependent convection in a plane layer of fluid, uniformly heated from below and subject to vertical shear and to rotation about an axis tilted from the vertical, was simulated by the numerical solution of the Boussinesq equations, including all Coriolis terms. Rotation about a vertical axis produces smaller convection cells with diminished heat fluxes and considerable vorticity. When the rotation axis is tilted from the vertical to represent tropical latitudes, the convection cells become elongated in a N-S direction. Imposed flows with constant vertical shear produce convective rolls aligned with the mean flow. When the rotation vector is tilted from the vertical, the competing effects due to rotation and shear can stabilize the convective motions. 15 references

  18. Topology Optimization for Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    2011-01-01

    This report deals with the topology optimization of convection problems.That is, the aim of the project is to develop, implement and examine topology optimization of purely thermal and coupled thermomechanical problems,when the design-dependent eects of convection are taken into consideration.......This is done by the use of a self-programmed FORTRAN-code, which builds on an existing 2D-plane thermomechanical nite element code implementing during the course `41525 FEM-Heavy'. The topology optimizationfeatures have been implemented from scratch, and allows the program to optimize elastostatic mechanical...

  19. Experimental methods in natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.N.

    1982-11-01

    Some common experimental techniques to determine local velocities and to visualize temperature fields in natural convection research are discussed. First the physics and practice of anemometers are discussed with emphasis put on optical anemometers. In the second and third case the physics and practice of the most developed interferometers are discussed; namely differential interferometry for visualization of temperature gradient fields and holographic interferometry for visualization of temperature fields. At the Institut fuer Reaktorbauelemente these three measuring techniques are applied for convection and pipe flow studies. (orig.) [de

  20. Developmental distribution of CaM kinase II in the antennal lobe of the sphinx moth Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Christian; Bergstein, Sandra; Hirnet, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The antennal lobe (primary olfactory center of insects) is completely reorganized during metamorphosis. This reorganization is accompanied by changing patterns of calcium signaling in neurons and glial cells. In the present study, we investigated the developmental distribution of a major calcium-dependent protein, viz., calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II), in the antennal lobe of the sphinx moth Manduca sexta by using a monoclonal antibody. During synaptogenesis (developmental stages 6-10), we found a redistribution of CaM kinase II immunoreactivity, from a homogeneous distribution in the immature neuropil to an accumulation in the neuropil of the glomeruli. CaM kinase II immunoreactivity was less intense in olfactory receptor axons of the antennal nerve and antennal lobe glial cells. Western blot analysis revealed a growing content of CaM kinase II in antennal lobe tissue throughout metamorphosis. Injection of the CaM kinase inhibitor KN-93 into pupae resulted in a reduced number of antennal lobe glial cells migrating into the neuropil to form borders around glomeruli. The results suggest that CaM kinase II is involved in glial cell migration.

  1. Origin of frontal lobe spikes in the early onset benign occipital lobe epilepsy (Panayiotopoulos syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Alberto J R; Ferreira, José C; Dias, Ana I; Calado, Eulália

    2008-09-01

    Early onset benign occipital lobe epilepsy (Panayiotopoulos syndrome [PS]) is a common and easily recognizable epilepsy. Interictal EEG spike activity is often multifocal but most frequently localized in the occipital lobes. The origin and clinical significance of the extra-occipital spikes remain poorly understood. Three patients with the PS and interictal EEG spikes with frontal lobe topography were studied using high-resolution EEG. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to decompose the spikes in components with distinct temporal dynamics. The components were mapped in the scalp with a spline-laplacian algorithm. The change in scalp potential topography from spike onset to peak, suggests the contribution of several intracranial generators, with different kinetics of activation and significant overlap. ICA was able to separate the major contributors to frontal spikes and consistently revealed an early activating group of components over the occipital areas in all the patients. The local origin of these early potentials was established by the spline-laplacian montage. Frontal spikes in PS are consistently associated with early and unilateral occipital lobe activation, suggesting a postero-anterior spike propagation. Frontal spikes in the PS represent a secondary activation triggered by occipital interictal discharges and do not represent an independent focus.

  2. Climatology and Impact of Convection on the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin; Pittman, Jasna

    2007-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in controlling the radiative balance and the chemical composition of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Mechanisms ranging from slow transport and dehydration under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions to fast transport in convection have been proposed as regulators of the amount of water vapor in this layer. However,.details of these mechanisms and their relative importance remain poorly understood, The recently completed Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) campaign had the opportunity to sample the.TTL over the Eastern Tropical Pacific using ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne instruments. The main goal of this study is to provide the climatological context for this campaign of deep and overshooting convective activity using various satellite observations collected during the summertime. We use the Microwave Humidity Sensor (MRS) aboard the NOAA-18 satellite to investigate the horizontal extent.and the frequency of convection reaching and penetrating into the TTL. We use the Moderate Resolution I1l1aging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite to investigate the frequency distribution of daytime cirrus clouds. We use the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission(TRMM) and CloudSat to investigate the vertical structure and distribution of hydrometeors in the convective cells, In addition to cloud measurements; we investigate the impact that convection has on the concentration of radiatively important gases such as water vapor and ozone in the TTL by examining satellite measurement obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder(MLS) aboard the Aura satellite.

  3. Anterior Temporal Lobe Morphometry Predicts Categorization Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Béatrice; Urbanski, Marika; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Levy, Richard; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2018-01-01

    Categorization is the mental operation by which the brain classifies objects and events. It is classically assessed using semantic and non-semantic matching or sorting tasks. These tasks show a high variability in performance across healthy controls and the cerebral bases supporting this variability remain unknown. In this study we performed a voxel-based morphometry study to explore the relationships between semantic and shape categorization tasks and brain morphometric differences in 50 controls. We found significant correlation between categorization performance and the volume of the gray matter in the right anterior middle and inferior temporal gyri. Semantic categorization tasks were associated with more rostral temporal regions than shape categorization tasks. A significant relationship was also shown between white matter volume in the right temporal lobe and performance in the semantic tasks. Tractography revealed that this white matter region involved several projection and association fibers, including the arcuate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. These results suggest that categorization abilities are supported by the anterior portion of the right temporal lobe and its interaction with other areas.

  4. Anterior Temporal Lobe Morphometry Predicts Categorization Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Garcin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Categorization is the mental operation by which the brain classifies objects and events. It is classically assessed using semantic and non-semantic matching or sorting tasks. These tasks show a high variability in performance across healthy controls and the cerebral bases supporting this variability remain unknown. In this study we performed a voxel-based morphometry study to explore the relationships between semantic and shape categorization tasks and brain morphometric differences in 50 controls. We found significant correlation between categorization performance and the volume of the gray matter in the right anterior middle and inferior temporal gyri. Semantic categorization tasks were associated with more rostral temporal regions than shape categorization tasks. A significant relationship was also shown between white matter volume in the right temporal lobe and performance in the semantic tasks. Tractography revealed that this white matter region involved several projection and association fibers, including the arcuate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. These results suggest that categorization abilities are supported by the anterior portion of the right temporal lobe and its interaction with other areas.

  5. Segregation and convection in dendritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    Microsegregation in dentritic alloys is discussed, including solidification with and without thermal gradient, the convection of interdendritic liquid. The conservation of momentum, energy, and solute is considered. Directional solidification and thermosolutal convection are discussed.

  6. Occurrence of the lobe plasma at lunar distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, D.A.; Hills, H.K.; Freeman, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    Recent analysis has confirmed and expanded the characterization of the lobe plasma, the extension of the 'boundary layer' and 'plasma mantle' to lunar distances. Careful statistical analysis has verified that Magnetic Field (1MF). When the moon is in the dawnside of the northern lobe or duskside of the southern lobe, the probability for observation of the lobe plasma is greatly increased when, in the hour preceding, the IMF has had a positive y component. Conversely, when the moon is in the duskside of the northern lobe or dawnside of the southern lobe, the probability for observation is much increased when the IMF has a negative y component. Analysis of lobe plasma data in conjunction with high time resolution IMF data has shown the probability of observation also is greater with a southward pointing IMF. The observed correlations with the y and z components the IMF reflect the fact that the asymmetry and changes in magnitude of the polar cap electric field induced by the IMF extends to lunar distances and determines the depth into the tail to which the ions can drift. Generally, the lobe plasma is observed sporadically for a full day after the moon has entered the tail and a full day before the last magnetopause crossing as it exits the tail. An average extent of approx.8--10R/sub e/ inward from the magnetopause is inferred; however, the lobe plasma has been seen all across the tail

  7. Surgical Considerations of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boling, Warren W.

    2018-01-01

    Surgery of temporal lobe epilepsy is the best opportunity for seizure freedom in medically intractable patients. The surgical approach has evolved to recognize the paramount importance of the mesial temporal structures in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who have a seizure origin in the mesial temporal structures. For those individuals with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, a selective amygdalohippocampectomy surgery can be done that provides an excellent opportunity for seizure freedom and limits the resection to temporal lobe structures primarily involved in seizure genesis. PMID:29461485

  8. Surgical Considerations of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren W. Boling

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Surgery of temporal lobe epilepsy is the best opportunity for seizure freedom in medically intractable patients. The surgical approach has evolved to recognize the paramount importance of the mesial temporal structures in the majority of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who have a seizure origin in the mesial temporal structures. For those individuals with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, a selective amygdalohippocampectomy surgery can be done that provides an excellent opportunity for seizure freedom and limits the resection to temporal lobe structures primarily involved in seizure genesis.

  9. Channel systems and lobe construction in the Mississippi Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. E.; Kenyon, Neil H.; Bouma, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Morphological features on the Mississippi Fan in the eastern Gulf of Mexico were mapped using GLORIA II, a long-range side-scan sonar system. Prominent is a sinuous channel flanked by well-developed levees and occasional crevasse splays. The channel follows the axis and thickest part of the youngest fan lobe; seismic-reflection profiles offer evidence that its course has remained essentially constant throughout lobe development. Local modification and possible erosion of levees by currents indicates a present state of inactivity. Superficial sliding has affected part of the fan lobe, but does not appear to have been a factor in lobe construction. ?? 1982 A. M. Dowden, Inc.

  10. Field-aligned currents and convection patterns in the Southern Polar Cap during stable northward, southward, and azimuthal IMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papitashvili, V.O.; Belov, B.A.; Gromova, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    Equivalent ionospheric current patterns are derived from ground-based geomagnetic observations for events on 11-12 November 1979 (B/sub z/ >> 0), 24 November 1981 (B/sub z/ > 0) (B/sub y/ >> 0), and 25-26 November 1979 (B/sub y/ 0 . Due to stable external conditions, it is possible to calculate the field-aligned current (FAC) density within cells formed by two adjacent stations by taking into account the uniform conductivity of the summer polar ionosphere. These results completely correspond to regressional analysis of interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF) and ground-based geomagnetic data, and also to satellite observations of the NBZ current system. During stable southward IMF a new result was obtained, a reversal of antisunward convection flow is identified, and an NBZ-like FAC system is restored in the central part of the southern polar cap. The authors conclude that there may be an additional NBZ-like FAC system poleward of -85 0 , which is independent of the IMF and is generated by the quasi-viscous interaction between solar-wind plasma and high-latitude lobes of the magnetospheric tail

  11. Boiling Suppression in Convective Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aounallah, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The development of convective boiling heat transfer correlations and analytical models has almost exclusively been based on measurements of the total heat flux, and therefore on the overall two-phase heat transfer coefficient, when the well-known heat transfer correlations have often assumed additive mechanisms, one for each mode of heat transfer, convection and boiling. While the global performance of such correlations can readily be assessed, the predictive capability of the individual components of the correlation has usually remained elusive. This becomes important when, for example, developing mechanistic models for subcooled void formation based on the partitioning of the wall heat flux into a boiling and a convective component, or when extending a correlation beyond its original range of applications where the preponderance of the heat transfer mechanisms involved can be significantly different. A new examination of existing experimental heat transfer data obtained under fixed hydrodynamic conditions, whereby the local flow conditions are decoupled from the local heat flux, has allowed the unequivocal isolation of the boiling contribution over a broad range of thermodynamic qualities (0 to 0.8) for water at 7 MPa. Boiling suppression, as the quality increases, has consequently been quantified, thus providing valuable new insights on the functionality and contribution of boiling in convective flows. (author)

  12. Intensive probing of a clear air convective field by radar and instrumental drone aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An instrumented drone aircraft was used in conjunction with ultrasensitive radar to study the development of a convective field in the clear air. Radar data are presented which show an initial constant growth rate in the height of the convective field of 3.8 m/min, followed by a short period marked by condensation and rapid growth at a rate in excess of 6.1 m/min. Drone aircraft soundings show general features of a convective field including progressive lifting of the inversion at the top of the convection and a cooling of the air at the top of the field. Calculations of vertical heat flux as a function of time and altitude during the early stages of convection show a linear decrease in heat flux with altitude to near the top of the convective field and a negative heat flux at the top. Evidence is presented which supports previous observations that convective cells overshoot their neutral buoyancy level into a region where they are cool and moist compared to their surroundings. Furthermore, only that portion of the convective cell that has overshot its neutral buoyancy level is generally visible to the radar.

  13. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  14. Modulation of calmodulin lobes by different targets: an allosteric model with hemiconcerted conformational transitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin is a calcium-binding protein ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells, involved in numerous calcium-regulated biological phenomena, such as synaptic plasticity, muscle contraction, cell cycle, and circadian rhythms. It exibits a characteristic dumbell shape, with two globular domains (N- and C-terminal lobe joined by a linker region. Each lobe can take alternative conformations, affected by the binding of calcium and target proteins. Calmodulin displays considerable functional flexibility due to its capability to bind different targets, often in a tissue-specific fashion. In various specific physiological environments (e.g. skeletal muscle, neuron dendritic spines several targets compete for the same calmodulin pool, regulating its availability and affinity for calcium. In this work, we sought to understand the general principles underlying calmodulin modulation by different target proteins, and to account for simultaneous effects of multiple competing targets, thus enabling a more realistic simulation of calmodulin-dependent pathways. We built a mechanistic allosteric model of calmodulin, based on an hemiconcerted framework: each calmodulin lobe can exist in two conformations in thermodynamic equilibrium, with different affinities for calcium and different affinities for each target. Each lobe was allowed to switch conformation on its own. The model was parameterised and validated against experimental data from the literature. In spite of its simplicity, a two-state allosteric model was able to satisfactorily represent several sets of experiments, in particular the binding of calcium on intact and truncated calmodulin and the effect of different skMLCK peptides on calmodulin's saturation curve. The model can also be readily extended to include multiple targets. We show that some targets stabilise the low calcium affinity T state while others stabilise the high affinity R state. Most of the effects produced by calmodulin targets can be

  15. Plume structure in high-Rayleigh-number convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthenveettil, Baburaj A.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2005-10-01

    Near-wall structures in turbulent natural convection at Rayleigh numbers of 10^{10} to 10^{11} at A Schmidt number of 602 are visualized by a new method of driving the convection across a fine membrane using concentration differences of sodium chloride. The visualizations show the near-wall flow to consist of sheet plumes. A wide variety of large-scale flow cells, scaling with the cross-section dimension, are observed. Multiple large-scale flow cells are seen at aspect ratio (AR)= 0.65, while only a single circulation cell is detected at AR= 0.435. The cells (or the mean wind) are driven by plumes coming together to form columns of rising lighter fluid. The wind in turn aligns the sheet plumes along the direction of shear. the mean wind direction is seen to change with time. The near-wall dynamics show plumes initiated at points, which elongate to form sheets and then merge. Increase in rayleigh number results in a larger number of closely and regularly spaced plumes. The plume spacings show a common log normal probability distribution function, independent of the rayleigh number and the aspect ratio. We propose that the near-wall structure is made of laminar natural-convection boundary layers, which become unstable to give rise to sheet plumes, and show that the predictions of a model constructed on this hypothesis match the experiments. Based on these findings, we conclude that in the presence of a mean wind, the local near-wall boundary layers associated with each sheet plume in high-rayleigh-number turbulent natural convection are likely to be laminar mixed convection type.

  16. Effective diffusion in laminar convective flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbluth, M.N.; Berk, H.L.; Doxas, I.; Horton, W.

    1987-03-01

    The effective diffusion coefficient D* of a passive component, such as test particles, dye, temperature, magnetic flux, etc., is derived for motion in periodic two-dimensional incompressible convective flow with characteristic velocity v and size d in the presence of an intrinsic local diffusivity D. Asymptotic solutions for effective diffusivity D*(P) in the large P limit, with P ∼ vd/D, is shown to be of the form D* = cDP/sup 1/2/ with c being a coefficient that is determined analytically. The constant c depends on the geometry of the convective cell and on an average of the flow speed along the separatrix. The asymptotic method of evaluation applies to both free boundary and rough boundary flow patterns and it is shown that the method can be extended to more complicated patterns such as the flows generated by rotating cylinders, as in the problem considered by Nadim, Cox, and Brenner [J. Fluid Mech., 164: 185 (1986)]. The diffusivity D* is readily calculated for small P, but the evaluation for arbitrary P requires numerical methods. Monte Carlo particle simulation codes are used to evaluate D* at arbitrary P, and thereby describe the transition for D* between the large and small P limits

  17. Measurement of the temperature of density maximum of water solutions using a convective flow technique

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley, M.F.; McGlynn, D.; Mooney, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A technique is described which yields an accurate measurement of the temperature of density maximum of fluids which exhibit such anomalous behaviour. The method relies on the detection of changes in convective flow in a rectangular cavity containing the test fluid.The normal single-cell convection which occurs in the presence of a horizontal temperature gradient changes to a double cell configuration in the vicinity of the density maximum, and this transition manifests itself in changes in th...

  18. Interictal psychosis following temporal lobe surgery: dentate gyrus pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, M; Kensche, M; Maynard, J; Liu, J; Reeves, C; Goc, J; Marsdon, D; Fluegel, D; Foong, J

    2014-10-01

    De novo interictal psychosis, albeit uncommon, can develop in patients following temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy. Pathological alterations of the dentate gyrus, including cytoarchitectural changes, immaturity and axonal reorganization that occur in epilepsy, may also underpin co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to study candidate pathways that may be associated with the development of interictal psychosis post-operatively in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS). A total of 11 patients with HS who developed interictal psychosis (HS-P) post-operatively were compared with a matched surgical HS group without psychosis (HS-NP). Resected tissues were investigated for the extent of granule cell dispersion, mossy fibre sprouting and calbindin expression in the granule cells. We quantified doublecortin, mini-chromosome maintenance protein 2 (MCM2) and reelin-expressing neuronal populations in the dentate gyrus as well as the distribution of cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CBR1). The patterns of neuronal loss and gliosis were similar in both groups. HS-P patients demonstrated less mossy fibre sprouting and granule cell dispersion (p gyrus pathology found in HS-P patients could indicate underlying differences in the cellular response to seizures. These mechanisms may predispose to the development of psychosis in epilepsy and warrant further investigation.

  19. Compressible Convection Experiment using Xenon Gas in a Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaut, R.; Alboussiere, T.; Corre, Y.; Huguet, L.; Labrosse, S.; Deguen, R.; Moulin, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present here an experiment especially designed to study compressible convection in the lab. For significant compressible convection effects, the parameters of the experiment have to be optimized: we use xenon gaz in a cubic cell. This cell is placed in a centrifuge to artificially increase the apparent gravity and heated from below. With these choices, we are able to reach a dissipation number close to Earth's outer core value. We will present our results for different heating fluxes and rotation rates. We success to observe an adiabatic gradient of 3K/cm in the cell. Studies of pressure and temperature fluctuations lead us to think that the convection takes place under the form of a single roll in the cell for high heating flux. Moreover, these fluctuations show that the flow is geostrophic due to the high rotation speed. This important role of rotation, via Coriolis force effects, in our experimental setup leads us to develop a 2D quasigeostrophic compressible model in the anelastic liquid approximation. We test numerically this model with the finite element solver FreeFem++ and compare its results with our experimental data. In conclusion, we will present our project for the next experiment in which the cubic cell will be replace by a annulus cell. We will discuss the new expected effects due to this geometry as Rossby waves and zonal flows.

  20. The mirror mechanism in the parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Rozzi, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The mirror mechanism is a basic mechanism that transforms sensory representations of others' actions into motor representations of the same actions in the brain of the observer. The mirror mechanism plays an important role in understanding actions of others. In the present chapter we discuss first the basic organization of the posterior parietal lobe in the monkey, stressing that it is best characterized as a motor scaffold, on the top of which sensory information is organized. We then describe the location of the mirror mechanism in the posterior parietal cortex of the monkey, and its functional role in areas PFG, and anterior, ventral, and lateral intraparietal areas. We will then present evidence that a similar functional organization is present in humans. We will conclude by discussing the role of the mirror mechanism in the recognition of action performed with tools. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Frontal Lobe Function in Chess Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Nejati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chess is considered as a cognitive game because of severe engagement of the mental resources during playing. The purpose of this study is evaluation of frontal lobe function of chess players with matched non-players. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST data showed no difference between the player and non-player groups in preservation error and completed categories but surprisingly showed significantly lower grade of the player group in correct response. Our data reveal that chess players dont have any preference in any stage of Stroop test. Chess players dont have any preference in selective attention, inhibition and executive cognitive function. Chess players' have lower shifting abilities than non-players.

  2. Frontal lobe function in chess players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Majid; Nejati, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    Chess is considered as a cognitive game because of severe engagement of the mental resources during playing. The purpose of this study is evaluation of frontal lobe function of chess players with matched non-players. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) data showed no difference between the player and non-player groups in preservation error and completed categories but surprisingly showed significantly lower grade of the player group in correct response. Our data reveal that chess players don't have any preference in any stage of Stroop test. Chess players don't have any preference in selective attention, inhibition and executive cognitive function. Chess players' have lower shifting abilities than non-players.

  3. MR imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fobben, E.S.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Sperling, M.R.; Kohn, M.I.; Atlas, S.W.; Hackney, D.B.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging examinations of 31 patients undergoing temporal lobe resection for refractory partial epilepsy were reviewed retrospectively for the presence of signal abnormalities as well as atrophy. High-signal abnormalities were present in only two of the described 31 patients (6.5%). Pathologically, these represented mesial temporal sclerosis and a hamartoma. Of the remaining 29 cases, 13 showed pathologically varying degrees of mesial temporal sclerosis and gliosis and 16 were pathologically normal. Atrophy, as determined by gross asymmetry, sulcal and temporal horn enlargement, and computer volume measurements, was observed in 23 of 31 patients, correlating with the clinically affected side in 20 and the contralateral side in three. In this series, in contrast to others reported, focal MR signal abnormalities were not detected in the vast majority of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis

  4. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  5. Xenomelia: a new right parietal lobe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Paul D; Brang, David; Song, Tao; Lee, Roland R; Huang, Mingxiong; Ramachandran, V S

    2011-12-01

    Damage to the right parietal lobe has long been associated with various disorders of body image. The authors have recently suggested that an unusual behavioural condition in which otherwise rational individuals desire the amputation of a healthy limb might also arise from right parietal dysfunction. Four subjects who desired the amputation of healthy legs (two right, one left and one, at first, bilateral and then left only) were recruited and underwent magnetoencephalography (MEG) scans during tactile stimulation of sites above and below the desired amputation line. Regions of interest (ROIs) in each hemisphere (superior parietal lobule (SPL), inferior parietal lobule, S1, M1, insula, premotor cortex and precuneus) were defined using FreeSurfer software. Analysis of average MEG activity across the 40-140 ms post-stimulation timeframe was carried out using an unpaired t test. This revealed significantly reduced activation only in the right SPL ROI for the subjects' affected legs when compared with both subjects' unaffected legs and that of controls. The right SPL is a cortical area that appears ideally placed to unify disparate sensory inputs to create a coherent sense of having a body. The authors propose that inadequate activation of the right SPL leads to the unnatural situation in which the sufferers can feel the limb in question being touched without it actually incorporating into their body image, with a resulting desire for amputation. The authors introduce the term 'xenomelia' as a more appropriate name than apotemnophilia or body integrity identity disorder, for what appears to be an unrecognised right parietal lobe syndrome.

  6. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. IV. Aerodynamic lift on a thin cylinder in convective flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsinganos, K.C.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic lift exerted on a long circular cylinder immersed in a convective flow pattern in an ideal fluid is calculated to establish the equilibrium position of the cylinder. The calculations establish the surprising result that the cylinder is pushed out of the upwellings and the downdrafts of the convective cell, into a location midway between them.The implications for the intense magnetic flux tubes in the convection beneath the surface of the Sun are considered

  7. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. IV - Aerodynamic lift on a thin cylinder in convective flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinganos, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic lift exerted on a long circular cylinder immersed in a convective flow pattern in an ideal fluid is calculated to establish the equilibrium position of the cylinder. The calculations establish the surprising result that the cylinder is pushed out the upwellings and the downdrafts of the convective cell, into a location midway between them. The implications for the intense magnetic flux tubes in the convection beneath the surface of the sun are considered.

  8. Nonlinear 2D convection and enhanced cross-field plasma transport near the MHD instability threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastukhov, V.P.; Chudin, N.V.

    2003-01-01

    Results of theoretical study and computer simulations of nonlinear 2D convection induced by a convective MHD instability near its threshold in FRC-like non-paraxial magnetic confinement system are presented. An appropriate closed set of weakly nonideal reduced MHD equations is derived to describe the self-consistent plasma dynamics. It is shown that the convection forms nonlinear large scale stochastic vortices (convective cells), which tend to restore and to maintain the marginally stable pressure pro e and result in an essentially nonlocal enhanced heat transport. A large amount of data on the structure of the nascent convective flows is obtained and analyzed. The computer simulations of long time plasma evolutions demonstrate such features of the resulting anomalous transport as pro e consistency, L-H transition, external transport barrier, pinch of impurities, etc. (author)

  9. Craniopharyngioma in the temporal lobe: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Chul-Ho; Baik, Seung-Kug; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Il-Man; Sevick, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Herein, we report on an unusual case of craniopharyngioma arising in the temporal lobe with no prior history of surgery and with no connection to the craniopharyngeal duct. MR images showed cystic tumor with a small solid portion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a craniopharyngioma occurring in the temporal lobe

  10. Craniopharyngioma in the temporal lobe: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Chul-Ho; Baik, Seung-Kug; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Il-Man; Sevick, Robert J. [University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)

    2004-03-15

    Herein, we report on an unusual case of craniopharyngioma arising in the temporal lobe with no prior history of surgery and with no connection to the craniopharyngeal duct. MR images showed cystic tumor with a small solid portion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a craniopharyngioma occurring in the temporal lobe.

  11. Craniopharyngioma in the Temporal Lobe: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Seung Kug; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Il-Man; Sevick, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Herein, we report on an unusual case of craniopharyngioma arising in the temporal lobe with no prior history of surgery and with no connection to the craniopharyngeal duct. MR images showed a cystic tumor with a small solid portion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a craniopharyngioma occurring in the temporal lobe. PMID:15064562

  12. A comparative perspective on the human temporal lobe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryant, K.L.; Preuss, T.M.; Bruner, E.; Ogihara, N.; Tanabe, H.

    2018-01-01

    The temporal lobe is a morphological specialization of primates resulting from an expansion of higher-order visual cortex that is a hallmark of the primate brain. Among primates, humans possess a temporal lobe that has significantly expanded. Several uniquely human cognitive abilities, including

  13. Surgical anatomy of the pyramidal lobe and its significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In diffuse thyroid diseases, the lobes were always pathologically involved and significantly longer. Conclusion. Since the pyramidal lobe is a normal component of the thyroid gland, of varying position and size, with pathological changes in benign and malignant diseases, it should always be examined during thyroid surgery ...

  14. Hilar somatostatin interneuron loss reduces dentate gyrus inhibition in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Gabrielle; Balgooyen, Laura; Mattis, Joanna; Deisseroth, Karl; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures usually start in the hippocampus, and dentate granule cells are hyperexcitable. Somatostatin interneurons are a major subpopulation of inhibitory neurons in the dentate gyrus, and many are lost in patients and animal models. However, surviving somatostatin interneurons sprout axon collaterals and form new synapses, so the net effect on granule cell inhibition remains unclear. The present study uses optogenetics to activate hilar somatostatin interneurons and measure the inhibitory effect on dentate gyrus perforant path-evoked local field potential responses in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In controls, light activation of hilar somatostatin interneurons inhibited evoked responses up to 40%. Epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice exhibited loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons and less light-induced inhibition of evoked responses. These findings suggest that severe epilepsy-related loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons can overwhelm the surviving interneurons' capacity to compensate by sprouting axon collaterals. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Hydrothermal convection and uranium deposits in abnormally radioactive plutons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Hydrothermal uranium deposits are often closely associated with granites of abnormally high uranium content. We have studied the question whether the heat generated within such granites can cause fluid convection of sufficient magnitude to develop hydrothermal uranium deposits. Numerical models of flow through porous media were used to calculate temperatures and fluid flow in and around plutons similar to the Conway Granite, New Hampshire, i.e. with a halfwidth of 17 km, a thickness of 6.25 km, and with a uniform internal heat generation rate of 20 x 10 -13 cal/cm 3 -sec. Fluid convection was computed for plutons with permeabilities between 0.01 and 5 millidarcies (1 x10 -13 cm 2 to 5 x 10 -11 cm 2 . Flow rates and the size and location of convection cells in and around radioactive plutons like the Conway Granite were found to depend critically on the permeability distribution within the pluton and in adjacent country rocks. The depth of burial, the distribution of heat sources within the pluton, and small rates of heat generation in the country rock are only of minor importance. Topographic relief is unlikely to effect flow rates significantly, but can have a major influence on the distribution of recharge and discharge areas. Within a few million years, the mass of water transported by steady state convection through such radioactive plutons can equal the mass of water which can convect through them during initial cooling from magmatic temperatures. If the permeability in a Conway-type pluton is on the order of 0.5 millidarcies, the rate of fluid convection is probably sufficient to develop a hydrothermal ore deposit containing 10,000 tons of uranium in a period of two million years. Such a uranium deposit is most likely to develop in an area of strong upwelling or strong downwelling flow

  16. Dry storage systems with free convection air cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kioes, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    Several design principles to remove heat from the spent fuel by free air convection are illustrated and described. The key safety considerations were felt to be: loss of coolant is impossible as the passive system uses air as a coolant; overheating is precluded because as the temperatures of the containers rises the coolant flow rate increases; mass of the storage building provides a large heat sink and therefore a rapid temperature rise is impossible; and lack of any active external support requirements makes the cooling process less likely to equipment or operator failures. An example of this type of storage already exists. The German HTGR is operated with spherical graphite fuel elements which are stored in canister and in storage cells. The concept is a double cooling system with free convection inside the cells and heat exchange via two side walls of the cell to the ambient air in the cooling ducts. Technical description of the TN 1300 cask is also presented

  17. Mirror focus in a patient with intractable occipital lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Shin, Hae Kyung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Su Jung; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Hong, Seung Chul; Seo, Dae-Won

    2014-06-01

    Mirror focus is one of the evidence of progression in epilepsy, and also has practical points for curative resective epilepsy surgery. The mirror foci are related to the kindling phenomena that occur through interhemispheric callosal or commissural connections. A mirror focus means the secondary epileptogenic foci develop in the contralateral hemispheric homotopic area. Thus mirror foci are mostly reported in patients with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in occipital lobe epilepsy. We have observed occipital lobe epilepsy with mirror focus. Before epilepsy surgery, the subject's seizure onset zone was observed in the left occipital area by ictal studies. Her seizures abated for 10 months after the resection of left occipital epileptogenic focus, but recurred then. The recurred seizures were originated from the right occipital area which was in the homotopic contralateral area. This case can be an evidence that occipital lobe epilepsy may have mirror foci, even though each occipital lobe has any direct interhemispheric callosal connections between them.

  18. Supplementary CT temporal lobe cuts confer no worthwhile benefit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straiton, J A; Macpherson, P; Teasdale, E M [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (UK). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    1991-02-01

    The value of angled temporal lobe cuts as a supplement to conventional head computed tomography (CT) has been assessed by comparing the diagnostic yield of standard axial and specific temporal lobe images (TLCT) in 62 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 87 with Alzheimer-type senile dementia. Fewer than one patient in six had structural abnormality in the temporal lobe most readily demonstrated by axial CT. Five patients with epilepsy and ten with dementia had changes demonstrated only by TLCT, reported on by one or other of a pair of observers. However such changes were of dubious clinical relevance, or arose as a result of artefact. In one patient with epilepsy and underlying neoplasm, axial CT was positive and TLCT false-negative. The routine addition of temporal lobe cuts to a conventional axial examination confers no added benefit to justify the prolonged examination time and increased radiation dose to the lens of the eye. (orig.).

  19. Supplementary CT temporal lobe cuts confer no worthwhile benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straiton, J.A.; Macpherson, P.; Teasdale, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    The value of angled temporal lobe cuts as a supplement to conventional head computed tomography (CT) has been assessed by comparing the diagnostic yield of standard axial and specific temporal lobe images (TLCT) in 62 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and 87 with Alzheimer-type senile dementia. Fewer than one patient in six had structural abnormality in the temporal lobe most readily demonstrated by axial CT. Five patients with epilepsy and ten with dementia had changes demonstrated only by TLCT, reported on by one or other of a pair of observers. However such changes were of dubious clinical relevance, or arose as a result of artefact. In one patient with epilepsy and underlying neoplasm, axial CT was positive and TLCT false-negative. The routine addition of temporal lobe cuts to a conventional axial examination confers no added benefit to justify the prolonged examination time and increased radiation dose to the lens of the eye. (orig.)

  20. An Efficient Approach for Identifying Stable Lobes with Discretization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohai Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach for quick identification of chatter stability lobes with discretization method. Firstly, three different kinds of stability regions are defined: absolute stable region, valid region, and invalid region. Secondly, while identifying the chatter stability lobes, three different regions within the chatter stability lobes are identified with relatively large time intervals. Thirdly, stability boundary within the valid regions is finely calculated to get exact chatter stability lobes. The proposed method only needs to test a small portion of spindle speed and cutting depth set; about 89% computation time is savedcompared with full discretization method. It spends only about10 minutes to get exact chatter stability lobes. Since, based on discretization method, the proposed method can be used for different immersion cutting including low immersion cutting process, the proposed method can be directly implemented in the workshop to promote machining parameters selection efficiency.

  1. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  2. CRUCIB: an axisymmetric convection code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, L.A.

    1975-03-01

    The CRUCIB code was written in support of an experimental program aimed at measurement of thermal diffusivities of refractory liquids. Precise values of diffusivity are necessary to realistic analysis of reactor safety problems, nuclear waste disposal procedures, and fundamental metal forming processes. The code calculates the axisymmetric transient convective motions produced in a right circular cylindrical crucible, which is surface heated by an annular heat pulse. Emphasis of this report is placed on the input-output options of the CRUCIB code, which are tailored to assess the importance of the convective heat transfer in determining the surface temperature distribution. Use is limited to Prandtl numbers less than unity; larger values can be accommodated by replacement of a single block of the code, if desired. (U.S.)

  3. Pulmonary microRNA profiling: implications in upper lobe predominant lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, David A.; Nymon, Amanda B.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Lesseur, Corina; Hazlett, Haley F.; Howard, Louisa; Marsit, Carmen J.; Ashare, Alix

    2017-01-01

    Background Numerous pulmonary diseases manifest with upper lobe predominance including cystic fibrosis, smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and tuberculosis. Zonal hypoxia, characteristic of these pulmonary maladies, and oxygen stress in general is known to exert profound effects on various important aspects of cell biology. Lung macrophages are major participants in the pulmonary innate immune response and regional differences in macrophage responsiveness to hypoxia may co...

  4. VHF/UHF radar observations of tropical mesoscale convective systems over southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Several campaigns have been carried out to study the convective systems over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a tropical station in India, using VHF and UHF radars. The height-time sections of several convective systems are investigated in detail to study reflectivity, turbulence and vertical velocity structure. Structure and dynamics of the convective systems are the main objectives of these campaigns. The observed systems are classified into single- and multi-cell systems. It has been observed that most of the convective systems at this latitude are multi-cellular in nature. Simultaneous VHF and UHF radar observations are used to classify the observed precipitating systems as convective, intermediary and stratiform regions. Composite height profiles of vertical velocities in these regions were obtained and the same were compared with the profiles obtained at other geographical locations. These composite profiles of vertical velocity in the convective regions have shown their peaks in the mid troposphere, indicating that the maximum latent heat is being released at those heights. These profiles are very important for numerical simulations of the convective systems, which vary significantly from one geographical location to the other.

    Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Mesoscale meteorology; Convective processes – Radio science (Remote sensing

  5. VHF/UHF radar observations of tropical mesoscale convective systems over southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore Kumar

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Several campaigns have been carried out to study the convective systems over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a tropical station in India, using VHF and UHF radars. The height-time sections of several convective systems are investigated in detail to study reflectivity, turbulence and vertical velocity structure. Structure and dynamics of the convective systems are the main objectives of these campaigns. The observed systems are classified into single- and multi-cell systems. It has been observed that most of the convective systems at this latitude are multi-cellular in nature. Simultaneous VHF and UHF radar observations are used to classify the observed precipitating systems as convective, intermediary and stratiform regions. Composite height profiles of vertical velocities in these regions were obtained and the same were compared with the profiles obtained at other geographical locations. These composite profiles of vertical velocity in the convective regions have shown their peaks in the mid troposphere, indicating that the maximum latent heat is being released at those heights. These profiles are very important for numerical simulations of the convective systems, which vary significantly from one geographical location to the other. Keywords. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (Mesoscale meteorology; Convective processes – Radio science (Remote sensing

  6. Fluid convection, constraint and causation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Complexity—nonlinear dynamics for my purposes in this essay—is rich with metaphysical and epistemological implications but is receiving sustained philosophical analysis only recently. I will explore some of the subtleties of causation and constraint in Rayleigh–Bénard convection as an example of a complex phenomenon, and extract some lessons for further philosophical reflection on top-down constraint and causation particularly with respect to causal foundationalism. PMID:23386955

  7. The cognitive profile of occipital lobe epilepsy and the selective association of left temporal lobe hypometabolism with verbal memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopman, Alex A; Wong, Chong H; Stevenson, Richard J; Homewood, Judi; Mohamed, Armin; Somerville, Ernest; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Bleasel, Andrew F

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the cognitive profile of structural occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) and whether verbal memory impairment is selectively associated with left temporal lobe hypometabolism on [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nine patients with OLE, ages 8-29 years, completed presurgical neuropsychological assessment. Composite measures were calculated for intelligence quotient (IQ), speed, attention, verbal memory, nonverbal memory, and executive functioning. In addition, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was used as a specific measure of frontal lobe functioning. Presurgical FDG-PET was analyzed with statistical parametric mapping in 8 patients relative to 16 healthy volunteers. Mild impairments were evident for IQ, speed, attention, and executive functioning. Four patients demonstrated moderate or severe verbal memory impairment. Temporal lobe hypometabolism was found in seven of eight patients. Poorer verbal memory was associated with left temporal lobe hypometabolism (p = 0.002), which was stronger (p = 0.03 and p = 0.005, respectively) than the association of left temporal lobe hypometabolism with executive functioning or with performance on the WCST. OLE is associated with widespread cognitive comorbidity, suggesting cortical dysfunction beyond the occipital lobe. Verbal memory impairment is selectively associated with left temporal lobe hypometabolism in OLE, supporting a link between neuropsychological dysfunction and remote hypometabolism in focal epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Cryogenic helium gas convection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    This is a report prepared by a group interested in doing research in thermal convection using the large scale refrigeration facilities available at the SSC Laboratories (SSCL). The group preparing this report consists of Michael McAshan at SSCL, Robert Behringer at Duke University, Katepalli Sreenivasan at Yale University, Xiao-Zhong Wu at Northern Illinois University and Russell Donnelly at the University of Oregon, who served as Editor for this report. This study reports the research and development opportunities in such a project, the technical requirements and feasibility of its construction and operation, and the costs associated with the needed facilities and support activities. The facility will be a unique national resource for studies of high-Reynolds-number and high-Rayleigh-number and high Rayleigh number turbulence phenomena, and is one of the six items determined as suitable for potential funding through a screening of Expressions of Interest. The proposed facility is possible only because of the advanced cryogenic technology available at the SSCL. Typical scientific issues to be addressed in the facility will be discussed. It devolved during our study, that while the main experiment is still considered to be the thermal convection experiment discussed in our original Expression of Interest, there are now a very substantial set of other, important and fundamental experiments which can be done with the large cryostat proposed for the convection experiment. We believe the facility could provide several decades of front-line research in turbulence, and shall describe why this is so

  9. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  10. Rat intermediate lobe in culture: a histological and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronwall, B M; Bishop, J F; Gehlert, D R

    1988-01-01

    The histology, immunohistochemistry, peptide synthesis and secretion as well as proliferation rate of rat intermediate lobe (IL) were studied in primary cultures. The cultures contained two populations of cells: melanotrophs either organized in free floating lobules or in lobules which attached to the dishes and formed a monolayer. Both populations retained their in vivo morphology: polyhedral cells with smooth, ovoid nuclei and a large number of cytoplasmic secretory coated vesicles, a well developed Golgi apparatus, abundant mitochondria and extensive areas of rough endoplasmic reticulum. The melanotrophs stained with varying intensity for alpha-MSH and in situ hybridization showed the presence of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA. 35S-methionine incorporation combined with 2-D gel electrophoresis demonstrated POMC peptide synthesis and radioimmunoassay confirmed its secretion into the medium. 3H-thymidine uptake in the attached melanotrophs was considerably higher than that in the free-floating melanotrophs, demonstrating the dependency of proliferation rate on the cytoarchitecture of the explant. The retention of melanotroph morphology, biosynthetic and proliferative capacity in vitro affords a valid model system for studying POMC gene expression.

  11. Plume dynamics in quasi-2D turbulent convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizon, C.; Werne, J.; Predtechensky, A.A.; Julien, K.; McCormick, W.D.; Swift, J.B.; Swinney, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied turbulent convection in a vertical thin (Hele-Shaw) cell at very high Rayleigh numbers (up to 7x10 4 times the value for convective onset) through experiment, simulation, and analysis. Experimentally, convection is driven by an imposed concentration gradient in an isothermal cell. Model equations treat the fields in two dimensions, with the reduced dimension exerting its influence through a linear wall friction. Linear stability analysis of these equations demonstrates that as the thickness of the cell tends to zero, the critical Rayleigh number and wave number for convective onset do not depend on the velocity conditions at the top and bottom boundaries (i.e., no-slip or stress-free). At finite cell thickness δ, however, solutions with different boundary conditions behave differently. We simulate the model equations numerically for both types of boundary conditions. Time sequences of the full concentration fields from experiment and simulation display a large number of solutal plumes that are born in thin concentration boundary layers, merge to form vertical channels, and sometimes split at their tips via a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Power spectra of the concentration field reveal scaling regions with slopes that depend on the Rayleigh number. We examine the scaling of nondimensional heat flux (the Nusselt number, Nu) and rms vertical velocity (the Pacute eclet number, Pe) with the Rayleigh number (Ra * ) for the simulations. Both no-slip and stress-free solutions exhibit the scaling NuRa * ∼Pe 2 that we develop from simple arguments involving dynamics in the interior, away from cell boundaries. In addition, for stress-free solutions a second relation, Nu∼√(nPe), is dictated by stagnation-point flows occurring at the horizontal boundaries; n is the number of plumes per unit length. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. Land surface sensitivity of mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournay, Robert C.

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important contributors to the hydrologic cycle in many regions of the world as well as major sources of severe weather. MCSs continue to challenge forecasters and researchers alike, arising from difficulties in understanding system initiation, propagation, and demise. One distinct type of MCS is that formed from individual convective cells initiated primarily by daytime heating over high terrain. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the land surface sensitivity of this class of MCS in the contiguous United States. First, a climatology of mesoscale convective systems originating in the Rocky Mountains and adjacent high plains from Wyoming southward to New Mexico is developed through a combination of objective and subjective methods. This class of MCS is most important, in terms of total warm season precipitation, in the 500 to 1300m elevations of the Great Plains (GP) to the east in eastern Colorado to central Nebraska and northwest Kansas. Examining MCSs by longevity, short lasting MCSs (15 hrs) reveals that longer lasting systems tend to form further south and have a longer track with a more southerly track. The environment into which the MCS is moving showed differences across commonly used variables in convection forecasting, with some variables showing more favorable conditions throughout (convective inhibition, 0-6 km shear and 250 hPa wind speed) ahead of longer lasting MCSs. Other variables, such as convective available potential energy, showed improving conditions through time for longer lasting MCSs. Some variables showed no difference across longevity of MCS (precipitable water and large-scale vertical motion). From subsets of this MCS climatology, three regions of origin were chosen based on the presence of ridgelines extending eastward from the Rocky Mountains known to be foci for convection initiation and subsequent MCS formation: Southern Wyoming (Cheyenne Ridge), Colorado (Palmer divide) and

  13. [Mirror movement due to the medial frontal lobe lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N; Kawamura, M; Hirayama, K

    1995-01-01

    We reported a case with acquired mirror movement in upper limbs due to the lesion of right medial frontal lobe including supplementary motor area, and also discussed a possible mechanism underlying it. A 59-year-old right-handed woman developed left hemiparesis caused by cerebral hemorrhage in the right frontoparietal lobe, on April 5, 1981. She had right hemiparesis and right hemianopsia due to cerebral hemorrhage in the left parieto-occipital lobe, 13 days later. As the patient was recovering from paresis, mirror movement appeared on upper limbs. The features of the mirror movement of this case are summarized as follows: (1) it appeared when using both proximal and distal region of upper limbs; (2) it appeared on left upper limb when the patient intended to move right upper limb or on right upper limb when intended to move left upper limb, while it appeared predominantly in the former; and (3) it was more remarkably found in habitual movement using gesture and pantomimic movement for the use of objects, and it was found in lower degree when actual object was used or when the patient tried to imitate the gesture of the examiner. The lesions in MRI were found in medial region of right frontal lobe (supplementary motor area, medial region of motor area, and cingulate gyrus), right medial parietal lobe, posterior region of right occipital lobe, and medial regions of left parietal and occipital lobes. There was no apparent abnormality in corpus callosum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  15. Modeling the Solar Convective Dynamo and Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent years in global-scale fully dynamic three-dimensional convective dynamo simulations of the solar/stellar convective envelopes to reproduce some of the basic features of the Sun's large-scale cyclic magnetic field. It is found that the presence of the dynamo-generated magnetic fields plays an important role for the maintenance of the solar differential rotation, without which the differential rotation tends to become anti-solar (with a faster rotating pole instead of the observed faster rotation at the equator). Convective dynamo simulations are also found to produce emergence of coherent super-equipartition toroidal flux bundles with a statistically significant mean tilt angle that is consistent with the mean tilt of solar active regions. The emerging flux bundles are sheared by the giant cell convection into a forward leaning loop shape with its leading side (in the direction of rotation) pushed closer to the strong downflow lanes. Such asymmetric emerging flux pattern may lead to the observed asymmetric properties of solar active regions.

  16. Atypical handedness in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležalová, Irena; Schachter, Steven; Chrastina, Jan; Hemza, Jan; Hermanová, Markéta; Rektor, Ivan; Pažourková, Marta; Brázdil, Milan

    2017-07-01

    The main aim of our study was to investigate the handedness of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We also sought to identify clinical variables that correlated with left-handedness in this population. Handedness (laterality quotient) was assessed in 73 consecutive patients with MTLE associated with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. Associations between right- and left-handedness and clinical variables were investigated. We found that 54 (74.0%) patients were right-handed, and 19 (26%) patients were left-handed. There were 15 (36.6%) left-handed patients with left-sided seizure onset compared to 4 (12.5%) left-handed patients with right-sided seizure onset (p=0.030). Among patients with left-sided MTLE, age at epilepsy onset was significantly correlated with handedness (8years of age [median; min-max 0.5-17] in left-handers versus 15years of age [median; min-max 3-30] in right-handers (p<0.001). Left-sided MTLE is associated with atypical handedness, especially when seizure onset occurs during an active period of brain development, suggesting a bi-hemispheric neuroplastic process for establishing motor dominance in patients with early-onset left-sided MTLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Episodic reinstatement in the medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staresina, Bernhard P; Henson, Richard N A; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Alink, Arjen

    2012-12-12

    The essence of episodic memory is our ability to reexperience past events in great detail, even in the absence of external stimulus cues. Does the phenomenological reinstatement of past experiences go along with reinstating unique neural representations in the brain? And if so, how is this accomplished by the medial temporal lobe (MTL), a brain region intimately linked to episodic memory? Computational models suggest that such reinstatement (also termed "pattern completion") in cortical regions is mediated by the hippocampus, a key region of the MTL. Although recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies demonstrated reinstatement of coarse item properties like stimulus category or task context across different brain regions, it has not yet been shown whether reinstatement can be observed at the level of individual, discrete events-arguably the defining feature of episodic memory-nor whether MTL structures like the hippocampus support this "true episodic" reinstatement. Here we show that neural activity patterns for unique word-scene combinations encountered during encoding are reinstated in human parahippocampal cortex (PhC) during retrieval. Critically, this reinstatement occurs when word-scene combinations are successfully recollected (even though the original scene is not visually presented) and does not encompass other stimulus domains (such as word-color associations). Finally, the degree of PhC reinstatement across retrieval events correlated with hippocampal activity, consistent with a role of the hippocampus in coordinating pattern completion in cortical regions.

  18. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, D.A.; Maksyutov, S.; Krol, M.C.; Fraser, A.; Rigby, M.; Bian, H.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bousquet, P.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Gloor, E.; Haynes, K.; Hess, P.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Loh, Z.; Meng, L.; Palmer, P.I.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical

  19. Convective overshoot at the solar tachocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Anders, Evan H.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2017-08-01

    At the base of the solar convection zone lies the solar tachocline. This internal interface is where motions from the unstable convection zone above overshoot and penetrate downward into the stiffly stable radiative zone below, driving gravity waves, mixing, and possibly pumping and storing magnetic fields. Here we study the dynamics of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces with some properties similar to the internal boundary layer within the Sun. We use the Dedalus pseudospectral framework and study fully compressible dynamics at moderate to high Peclet number and low Mach number, probing a regime where turbulent transport is important, and where the compressible dynamics are similar to those of convective motions in the deep solar interior. We find that the depth of convective overshoot is well described by a simple buoyancy equilibration model, and we consider implications for dynamics at the solar tachocline and for the storage of magnetic fields there by overshooting convection.

  20. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  1. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma in a thyroid pyramidal lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae Kwan; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Ha Kyoung; Jung, Soo Jin [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We report an extremely rare case of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) in the thyroid pyramidal lobe (TPL). A 48-year-old woman underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for a small thyroid nodule in the right lobe in local clinic, and it revealed a malignant cytology. On preoperative ultrasonography for tumor staging in our hospital, another small suspiciously malignant hypoechoic nodule was detected in the left TPL. Total thyroidectomy and central nodal dissection were performed. Histopathology confirmed PTMCs in the left TPL and both thyroid lobes. Ultrasonography for TPL should be required for complete evaluation of possible multifocality of thyroid malignancy.

  2. Convection Weather Detection by General Aviation Pilots with Convectional and Data-Linked Graphical Weather Information Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, James P.; Latorella, Kara A.

    2001-01-01

    This study compares how well general aviation (GA) pilots detect convective weather in flight with different weather information sources. A flight test was conducted in which GA pilot test subjects were given different in-flight weather information cues and flown toward convective weather of moderate or greater intensity. The test subjects were not actually flying the aircraft, but were given pilot tasks representative of the workload and position awareness requirements of the en route portion of a cross country GA flight. On each flight, one test subject received weather cues typical of a flight in visual meteorological conditions (VMC), another received cues typical of flight in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and a third received cues typical of flight in IMC but augmented with a graphical weather information system (GWIS). The GWIS provided the subject with near real time data-linked weather products, including a weather radar mosaic superimposed on a moving map with a symbol depicting the aircraft's present position and direction of track. At several points during each flight, the test subjects completed short questionnaires which included items addressing their weather situation awareness and flight decisions. In particular, test subjects were asked to identify the location of the nearest convective cells. After the point of nearest approach to convective weather, the test subjects were asked to draw the location of convective weather on an aeronautical chart, along with the aircraft's present position. This paper reports preliminary results on how accurately test subjects provided with these different weather sources could identify the nearest cell of moderate or greater intensity along their route of flight. Additional flight tests are currently being conducted to complete the data set.

  3. Three caveats for linear stability theory: Rayleigh-Benard convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenside, H.S.

    1984-06-01

    Recent theories and experiments challenge the applicability of linear stability theory near the onset of buoyancy-driven (Rayleigh-Benard) convection. This stability theory, based on small perturbations of infinite parallel rolls, is found to miss several important features of the convective flow. The reason is that the lateral boundaries have a profound influence on the possible wave numbers and flow patterns even for the largest cells studied. Also, the nonlinear growth of incoherent unstable modes distorts the rolls, leading to a spatially disordered and sometimes temporally nonperiodic flow. Finally, the relation of the skewed varicose instability to the onset of turbulence (nonperiodic time dependence) is examined. Linear stability theory may not suffice to predict the onset of time dependence in large cells close to threshold

  4. Turbulent measurements in the lobe mixer of a turbofan engine. Turbofan engine lobe mixer nagare no ranryu keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuji; Arakawa, Chuichi; Tagori, Tetsuo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd., Tokyo, (Japan) Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo, (Japan) The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, (Japan). Faculty of Engineering The Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, (Japan)

    1990-01-25

    In order to examine the flow generated by the lobe mixer of a turbofan engine precisely, after measuring a three dimensional turbulent flow by a hot-wire anemometer, the mixing process of a bypass flow and a core flow with cross-sectional vortexes, and factors generating the vortex were clarified experimentally using the scale model of an exhaust duct with the lobe mixer. As a result, the mixing process was strongly affected by a lobe tip figure and a lobe figure near a center-body, and affected by the minimum gap between the lobe and center-body. The subsequent mixing process was scarcely affected by the ratio of a core flow velocity to a bypass flow one, although strongly affected by flow conditions on a lobe surface. Since the lobe mixer promoted the mixing around a center axis shifting a fast core flow outwards, it was unfavorable to mixing, however, it was expected to be useful for reducing engine jet noise. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Magnetic particle mixing with magnetic micro-convection for microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Kitenbergs , Guntars; Erglis , Kaspars; Perzynski , Régine; Cēbers , Andrejs

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper we discuss the magnetic micro-convection phenomenon as a tool for mixing enhancement in microfluidics systems in cases when one of the mis-cible fluids is a magnetic particle colloid. A system of a water-based magnetic fluid and water is investigated experimentally under homogeneous magnetic field in a Hele-Shaw cell. Subsequent image analysis both qualitatively and quan-titatively reveals the high enhancement of mixing efficiency provided by this method....

  6. Titan Balloon Convection Model, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  7. Scale analysis of convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Gryschka

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The size distribution of cumulus clouds due to shallow and deep convection is analyzed using satellite pictures, LES model results and data from the German rain radar network. The size distributions found can be described by simple power laws as has also been proposed for other cloud data in the literature. As the observed precipitation at ground stations is finally determined by cloud numbers in an area and individual sizes and rain rates of single clouds, the cloud size distributions might be used for developing empirical precipitation forecasts or for validating results from cloud resolving models being introduced to routine weather forecasts.

  8. Characterizing Convection in Stellar Atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Joel; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre; Robinson, Frank

    2011-01-01

    We perform 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations to study the properties of convection in the superadiabatic layer of stars. The simulations show differences in both the stratification and turbulent quantities for different types of stars. We extract turbulent pressure and eddy sizes, as well as the T-τ relation for different stars and find that they are sensitive to the energy flux and gravity. We also show that contrary to what is usually assumed in the field of stellar atmospheres, the structure and gas dynamics of simulations of turbulent atmospheres cannot be parameterized with T eff and log(g) alone.

  9. Constraints on the properties of Pluto's nitrogen-ice rich layer from convection simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T.; McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto's Sputnik Planum basin (informally named) displays regular cellular patterns strongly suggesting that solid-state convection is occurring in a several-kilometers-deep nitrogen-ice rich layer (McKinnon et al., Convection in a volatile nitrogen-ice-rich layer drives Pluto's geological vigour, Nature 534, 82-85, 2016). We investigate the behavior of thermal convection in 2-D that covers a range of parameters applicable to the nitrogen ice layer to constrain its properties such that these long-wavelength surface features can be explained. We perform a suite of numerical simulations of convection with basal heating and temperature-dependent viscosity in either exponential form or Arrhenius form. For a plausible range of Rayleigh numbers and viscosity contrasts for solid nitrogen, convection can occur in all possible regimes: sluggish lid, transitional, or stagnant lid, or the layer could be purely conducting. We suggest the range of depth and temperature difference across the layer for convection to occur. We observe that the plume dynamics can be widely different in terms of the aspect ratio of convecting cells, or the width and spacing of plumes, and also in the lateral movement of plumes. These differences depend on the regime of convection determined by the Rayleigh number and the actual viscosity contrast across the layer, but is not sensitive to whether the viscosity is in Arrhenius or exponential form. The variations in plume dynamics result in different types of dynamic topography, which can be compared with the observed horizontal and vertical scales of the cells in Sputnik Planum. Based on these simulations we suggest several different possibilities for the formation and evolution of Sputnik Planum, which may be a consequence of the time-dependent behavior of thermal convection.

  10. [Two cases of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with old intracerebral hemorrhage in the lateral temporal lobe without "dual pathology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, T; Nishio, S; Hisada, K; Muraishi, M; Ishibashi, H; Mamiya, K; Ohfu, M; Fukui, M

    1998-05-01

    Two cases of intractable temporal lobe epilepsy associated with old intracerebral hemorrhage in the lateral temporal lobe were reported. Although preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) failed to reveal hippocampal atrophy with T2 hyperintensity, electrocorticographic (ECoG) recording with chronic invasive subdural electrodes indicated the mesial temporal lobe to be an ictal onset zone. After anterior temporal lobectomy involving the lesion and hippocampectomy, the patients became seizure-free. Hippocampal sclerosis, namely "dual pathology", was not noted on histological examination. Careful ECoG recording with chronic subdural electrodes is mandatory even when the preoperative MRI does not demonstrate the radiological hippocampal sclerosis.

  11. Experimental investigation of natural convection induced by internal heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Y; Kudoh, Y; Takeda, Y; Yanagisawa, T

    2005-01-01

    Dilatation of a convection cell with respect to its Rayleigh number, one of the problems in internally heated convection, was quantitatively investigated by analyzing temperature field in a cell. The temperature field visualized by a thermo-chromic liquid crystal (TLC) expresses the cell dilatation. A calibration system was developed to convert the visualized photographs of the temperature field to the temperature field. A calibration curve correlating color information extracted from the photograph and temperature was determined from the approximately linear temperature distribution in the horizontal fluid layer using the hue method. Photos taken at various internal Rayleigh numbers were converted to the temperature field by the obtained curve. Extracting individual cells from a temperature field achieves a quantitative expression of the cell dilatation as the variation of the wavenumber of the cell with Rayleigh number increases. The temperature profile in a cell shows that high temperature areas appear at the apexes of the cell, largely different from the profile obtained by linear theory

  12. Pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy : white matter abnormalities and cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, H.M.H.; Vaessen, M.J.; Jansen, J.F.A.; Debeij-van Hall, M.H.J.A.; Louw, de A.; Hofman, P.A.M.; Vles, J.S.H.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Backes, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cognitive impairment is frequent in children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). Its etiology remains unknown. With diffusion tensor imaging, we have studied cerebral white matter properties and associations with cognitive functioning in children with FLE and healthy controls.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with ADNFLE have experienced psychiatric disorders (such as schizophrenia), behavioral problems, or intellectual disability. It is unclear ... Epilepsy Society Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE) GeneReviews (1 link) Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe ...

  14. Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) for lesions of the temporal lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Felix, R.; Meencke, H.J.; Freie Univ. Berlin; Freie Univ. Berlin

    1985-01-01

    A comparative study between magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) and CT was carried out in 16 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The MRT studies were performed on a 0.35 T Magnetom with T.1 modes in a coronal plane. MRT proved to the superior to CT. CT demonstrated a discrete temporal lobe lesion in three patients and MRT in four patients. In addition, unilateral atrophy of the temporal lobe was demonstrated by MRT in six cases; these could not be diagnosed by CT. The lack of artifacts near the skull base, the possibility of producing coronal sections and the excellent tissue differential of MRT provide the basis for improved diagnosis of lesions in the temporal lobes. (orig.) [de

  15. Cognitive impairments in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Tavakoli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: These findings indicated that WMS-III and WAIS-R can differentiate patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy from normal subjects. However, the obtained cognitive profile could not differentiate between the right and the left TLE.

  16. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF HOTSPOTS IN RADIO LOBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Michael W.; Murphy, David W.; Livingston, John H.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Lawrence, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic search with Spitzer Warm Mission and archival data for infrared emission from the hotspots in radio lobes that have been described by Hardcastle et al. These hotspots have been detected with both radio and X-ray observations, but an observation at an intermediate frequency in the infrared can be critical to distinguish between competing models for particle acceleration and radiation processes in these objects. Between the archival and warm mission data, we report detections of 18 hotspots; the archival data generally include detections at all four IRAC bands, the Warm Mission data only at 3.6 μm. Using a theoretical formalism adopted from Godfrey et al., we fit both archival and warm mission spectral energy distributions (SEDs)—including radio, X-ray, and optical data from Hardcastle as well as the Spitzer data—with a synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the X-rays are produced by Compton scattering of the radio frequency photons by the energetic electrons which radiate them. With one exception, an SSC model requires that the magnetic field be less or much less than the equipartition value which minimizes total energy and has comparable amounts of energy in the magnetic field and in the energetic particles. This conclusion agrees with those of comparable recent studies of hotspots, and with the analysis presented by Hardcastle et al. We also show that the infrared data rule out the simplest synchrotron-only models for the SEDs. We briefly discuss the implications of these results and of alternate interpretations of the data.

  18. Cognitive dysfunctions in occipital lobe epilepsy compared to temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Gabriella; Trojano, Luigi; Vitale, Carmine; Improta, Ilaria; Alineri, Irma; Meo, Roberta; Bilo, Leonilda

    2017-06-01

    To compare cognitive profiles of occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and to investigate whether impairment of visuospatial functions is a specific deficit of OLE. Eighteen patients with OLE, 18 patients with TLE, and 18 controls underwent a neuropsychological battery assessing memory, visuospatial functions, and frontal/executive functions. Multivariate analysis evidenced poorer performance of patients with TLE and patients with OLE relative to controls on tasks assessing verbal and non-verbal long-term memory, frontal functions, and visuospatial functions. Patients with OLE had poorer performance than patients with TLE on visuospatial tasks, whereas patients with TLE performed worse than patients with OLE on verbal long-term memory test. Discriminant analysis identified two canonical discriminant functions: The first explained 53.3% of the variance, and the second explained 46.7% of the variance. The first function included verbal and non-verbal memory tests distinguishing controls from both OLE and TLE, whereas the second factor including a visuoconstructional test distinguished OLE from TLE and controls. The results demonstrate that visuoconstructional dysfunction is related to OLE and support the idea that alterations of occipito-parietal stream may be specific to patients with OLE. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Patterns of verbal learning and memory in children with intractable temporal lobe or frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Amanda; Smith, Mary Lou

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a better understanding of the verbal learning and memory (VLM) patterns that might differentiate children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) from children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and to examine the impact of variables thought to influence outcomes (seizure laterality, age at seizure onset, age at assessment, epilepsy duration, number of antiepileptic drugs). Retrospective analyses were carried out for children with intractable unilateral TLE (n=100) and FLE (n=27) who completed standardized measures of VLM entailing lists of single words or lists of word pairs. Mean intelligent quotients and VLM scores on single words fell within the average range for both groups, whereas scores fell within the low average to borderline range on word pairs. No significant overall differences in VLM were found between the group with TLE and the group with FLE. Older age at assessment and older age at seizure onset were generally associated with better VLM in both groups but were related to better performance in a number of indices in the group with TLE and only fewer intrusions in the group with FLE. The VLM profiles of children with TLE and FLE are generally similar. Older age at assessment and older age at seizure onset have a favorable impact on both groups but are related to better encoding, retrieval, and monitoring processes for the group with TLE and improved memory monitoring (i.e., as indicated by fewer intrusions) in the group with FLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mirror Focus in a Patient with Intractable Occipital Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jiyoung; Shin, Hae kyung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Su Jung; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Hong, Seung Chul; Seo, Dae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Mirror focus is one of the evidence of progression in epilepsy, and also has practical points for curative resective epilepsy surgery. The mirror foci are related to the kindling phenomena that occur through interhemispheric callosal or commissural connections. A mirror focus means the secondary epileptogenic foci develop in the contralateral hemispheric homotopic area. Thus mirror foci are mostly reported in patients with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in occipital lobe epilepsy....

  1. Altered organization of face processing networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey D.; Fling, Brett W.; Cramer, Steven C.; Lin, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Deficits in social cognition are common and significant in people with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but the functional and structural underpinnings remain unclear. The present study investigated how the side of seizure focus impacts face processing networks in temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of a face processing paradigm to identify face responsive regions in 24 individuals with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (Left = 15; Right = 9) and 19 healthy controls. fMRI signals of face responsive regions ispilateral and contralateral to the side of seizure onset were delineated in TLE and compared to the healthy controls with right and left side combined. Diffusion tensor images were acquired to investigate structural connectivity between face regions that differed in fMRI signals between the two groups. Results In temporal lobe epilepsy, activation of the cortical face processing networks varied according to side of seizure onset. In temporal lobe epilepsy, the laterality of amygdala activation was shifted to the side contralateral to the seizure focus while controls showed no significant asymmetry. Furthermore, compared to controls, patients with TLE showed decreased activation of the occipital face responsive region in the ipsilateral side and an increased activity of the anterior temporal lobe in the contralateral side to the seizure focus. Probabilistic tractography revealed that the occipital face area and anterior temporal lobe are connected via the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, which in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy showed reduced integrity. Significance Taken together, these findings suggest that brain function and white matter integrity of networks subserving face processing are impaired on the side of seizure onset, accompanied by altered responses on the side contralateral to the seizure. PMID:25823855

  2. A comparison of occipital and temporal lobe epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, S; Sharan, A D; Tracy, J I; Evans, J; Sperling, M R

    2015-10-01

    Differentiating between occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is often challenging. This retrospective case-control study compares OLE to TLE and explores markers that suggest the diagnosis of OLE. We queried the Jefferson Epilepsy Center surgery database for patients who underwent a resection that involved the occipital lobe. For each patient with OLE, three sequential case-control patients with TLE were matched. Demographic characteristics, symptoms, electrophysiological findings, imaging findings, and surgical outcome were compared. Nineteen patients with OLE and 57 patients with TLE were included in the study. Visual symptoms were unique to patients with OLE (8/19) and were not reported by patients with TLE (P Occipital interictal spikes (IIS) were found only in one-third of the patients with OLE (6/19) and in no patients with TLE (P lobe were found in five of 19 patients with OLE vs one of 57 patients with TLE (P = 0.003). IIS involved more than one lobe of the brain in most patients with OLE (11/19) but only in nine of 57 the TLE group. (P = 0.0003) Multilobar resection was needed in most patients with OLE (15/19), typically including the temporal lobe, but in only one of the patients with TLE (P Occipital lobe epilepsy is difficult to identify and may masquerade as temporal lobe epilepsy. Visual symptoms and occipital findings in the EEG suggest the diagnosis of OLE, but absence of these features, does not exclude the diagnosis. When posterior temporal EEG findings or multilobar involvement occurs, the diagnosis of OLE should be considered. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Accessory hepatic lobe simulating a left hemidiaphragmatic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Hirata, Hitoshi; Iwashita, Akinori; Yasumori, Kotaro; Mogami, Hiroshi; Teraoka, Hiroaki

    1984-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with a 20-year history of neuralgia was confirmed at surgery to have a tumor in the left hemidiaphragmatic region which was connected with the left lobe of the liver. Reassessment of radiological diagnosis after surgery revealed that hepatobiliary scintigraphy and computed tomography using left anterior oblique scanning are useful in differentiating the accessory hepatic lobe of the liver from a tumor and in confirming the diagnosis, respectively. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Two-dimensional turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    We present an overview of the most relevant, and sometimes contrasting, theoretical approaches to Rayleigh-Taylor and mean-gradient-forced Rayleigh-Bénard two-dimensional turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidences for their support. The main aim of this overview is to emphasize that, despite the different character of these two systems, especially in relation to their steadiness/unsteadiness, turbulent fluctuations are well described by the same scaling relationships originated from the Bolgiano balance. The latter states that inertial terms and buoyancy terms balance at small scales giving rise to an inverse kinetic energy cascade. The main difference with respect to the inverse energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence [R. H. Kraichnan, "Inertial ranges in two-dimensional turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)] is that the rate of cascade of kinetic energy here is not constant along the inertial range of scales. Thanks to the absence of physical boundaries, the two systems here investigated turned out to be a natural physical realization of the Kraichnan scaling regime hitherto associated with the elusive "ultimate state of thermal convection" [R. H. Kraichnan, "Turbulent thermal convection at arbitrary Prandtl number," Phys. Fluids 5, 1374-1389 (1962)].

  5. Versive seizures in occipital lobe epilepsy: lateralizing value and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Kondo, Akihiko; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2011-11-01

    To clarify the value of versive seizures in lateralizing and localizing the epileptogenic zone in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, we studied 13 occipital lobe epilepsy patients with at least one versive seizure recorded during preoperative noninvasive video-EEG monitoring, who underwent occipital lobe resection, and were followed postoperatively for more than 2 years with Engel's class I outcome. The videotaped versive seizures were analyzed to compare the direction of version and the side of surgical resection in each patient. Moreover, we examined other motor symptoms (partial somatomotor manifestations such as tonic and/or clonic movements of face and/or limbs, automatisms, and eyelid blinking) associated with version. Forty-nine versive seizures were analyzed. The direction of version was always contralateral to the side of resection except in one patient. Among accompanying motor symptoms, partial somatomotor manifestations were observed in only five patients. In conclusion, versive seizure is a reliable lateralizing sign indicating contralateral epileptogenic zone in occipital lobe epilepsy. Since versive seizures were accompanied by partial somatomotor manifestations in less than half of the patients, it is suggested that the mechanism of version in occipital lobe epilepsy is different from that in frontal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bicavitary effusion secondary to liver lobe torsion in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Z

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zaheda Khan,1 Kathryn Gates,2 Stephen A Simpson,31Emergency and Critical Care, Animal Specialty and Emergency Center, Los Angeles, CA, 2Emergency and Critical Care, Advanced Critical Care, Emergency and Specialty Services, Culver City, CA 3Emergency and Critical Care, Southern California Veterinary Specialty Hospital, Irvine, CA, USA Abstract: We described the diagnosis and successful treatment of pleural and peritoneal effusion secondary to liver lobe torsion in a dog. A 12-year-old female spayed Borzoi dog was referred for heart failure. Emergency room thoracic and abdominal ultrasound showed a large volume of pleural effusion with mild peritoneal effusion and an abdominal mass. Pleural fluid analysis classified the effusion as exudative. A complete ultrasound revealed mild peritoneal effusion and decreased blood flow to the right liver lobe. Other causes of bicavitary effusion were ruled out based on blood work, ultrasound, echocardiogram, and computed tomography. The patient was taken to surgery and diagnosed with caudate liver lobe torsion and had a liver lobectomy. At the 2-week postoperative recheck, the patient was doing well and there was complete resolution of the pleural effusion. Liver lobe torsion is a rare occurrence in dogs and can be difficult to diagnose. Clinical signs are nonspecific for liver lobe torsion and patients may present in respiratory distress with significant pleural fluid accumulation. When assessing patients with pleural and peritoneal effusion, liver lobe torsion should be considered as a differential diagnosis.Keywords: pleural effusion, peritoneal effusion, hepatic torsion

  7. Transient simulation in interior flow field of lobe pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y B; Sang, X H; Shen, H; Jia, K; Meng, Q W

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this paper is mainly focused on the development and control of the double folium and trifolium lobe pump profiles by using the principle of involute engagement and use CAD to get an accurate involute profile. We use the standard k-ε turbulence model and PISO algorithm based on CFD software FLUENT. The dynamic mesh and UDF technology is introduced to simulate the interior flow field inside a lobe pump, and the variation of interior flow field under the condition of the lobe rotating is analyzed. We also analyse the influence produced by the difference in lobes, and then reveal which lobe is best. The results show that dynamic variation of the interior flow field is easily obtained by dynamic mesh technology and the distribution of its pressure and velocity. Because of the small gaps existing between the rotors and pump case, the higher pressure area will flow into the lower area though the small gaps which cause the working area keep with higher pressure all the time. Both of the double folium and trifolium are existing the vortex during the rotting time and its position, size and shape changes all the time. The vortexes even disappear in a circle period and there are more vortexes in double folium lobe pump. The velocity and pressure pulsation of trifolium pump are lower than that of the double folium

  8. Medical image of the week: right middle lobe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristan EA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 73 year-old woman, a lifetime non-smoker, presented to the pulmonary clinic with chronic dyspnea on exertion and cough. Physical exam was unremarkable and pulmonary function testing showed normal spirometry. A chest radiograph revealed calcified mediastinal adenopathy and increased density in the right middle lobe region (Figure 1. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed significant narrowing of the right middle lobe bronchus with partial atelectasis and prominent calcified mediastinal lymphadenopathy (Figure 2. Bronchoscopy showed no endobronchial lesions but there was evidence of extrinsic compression surrounding the right middle lobe orifice. An endobronchial biopsy revealed noncaseating granulomas. Bronchoscopy cultures and cytology were negative and this was presumed to be from a previous infection with histoplasmosis given the patient’s long-term residence in an endemic area. Given chronic narrowing of right middle lobe bronchus with persistent atelectasis of the right middle lobe, the patient was diagnosed with right middle lobe syndrome. ...

  9. Lagrangian evaluation of convective shower characteristics in a convection-permitting model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Brisson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Convection-permitting models (CPMs have proven their usefulness in representing precipitation on a sub-daily scale. However, investigations on sub-hourly scales are still lacking, even though these are the scales for which showers exhibit the most variability. A Lagrangian approach is implemented here to evaluate the representation of showers in a CPM, using the limited-area climate model COSMO-CLM. This approach consists of tracking 5‑min precipitation fields to retrieve different features of showers (e.g., temporal pattern, horizontal speed, lifetime. In total, 312 cases are simulated at a resolution of 0.01 ° over Central Germany, and among these cases, 78 are evaluated against a radar dataset. The model is able to represent most observed features for different types of convective cells. In addition, the CPM reproduced well the observed relationship between the precipitation characteristics and temperature indicating that the COSMO-CLM model is sophisticated enough to represent the climatological features of showers.

  10. Natural convection between parallel vertical plates; Convection naturelle entre plaques paralleles verticales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin, M; Schwab, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    In the thermal study of a 'swimming-pool' type of pile, the flow of water between vertical plates of 'combustible' material must be investigated. Therefore starting from general equations of natural convection, we have determined, the law of distribution of velocities, then that of temperatures, and finally the value of the Biot-Nusselt number, assuming steady-state conditions (both dynamic and thermal) and a constant heat flow at the surface. An abacus (fig. 7, 8 and 9) allows working power to be related to the average velocity and to the heating of the water which passes through the pile. For purposes of comparison, the curves on the calculation presented by S. GLASSTONE (31) have been drawn. (author) [French] L'etude thermique d'une pile du type 'piscine' necessite l'etude de l'ecoulement de l'eau entre les plaques verticales de materiau 'combustible'. Nous avons donc, a partir des equations generales de la convection naturelle, determine la loi de repartition des vitesses, puis celle des temperatures et enfin la valeur du nombre de Biot-Niisselt, en supposant les regimes, dynamique et thermique, etablis et la densite de flux calorifique a la paroi constante. Un abaque (fig. 7, 8 et 9) permet de relier a la puissance de fonctionnement, la vitesse moyenne de l'echauffement de l'eau qui traverse la pile. On a trace a titre de comparaison, les courbes du calcul presente par S. GLASSTONE (3). (auteur)

  11. Tropical continental downdraft characteristics: mesoscale systems versus unorganized convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, Kathleen A.; Neelin, J. David

    2018-02-01

    Downdrafts and cold pool characteristics for strong mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) and isolated, unorganized deep precipitating convection are analyzed using multi-instrument data from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) GoAmazon2014/5 campaign. Increases in column water vapor (CWV) are observed leading convection, with higher CWV preceding MCSs than for isolated cells. For both MCSs and isolated cells, increases in wind speed, decreases in surface moisture and temperature, and increases in relative humidity occur coincidentally with system passages. Composites of vertical velocity data and radar reflectivity from a radar wind profiler show that the downdrafts associated with the sharpest decreases in surface equivalent potential temperature (θe) have a probability of occurrence that increases with decreasing height below the freezing level. Both MCSs and unorganized convection show similar mean downdraft magnitudes and probabilities with height. Mixing computations suggest that, on average, air originating at heights greater than 3 km must undergo substantial mixing, particularly in the case of isolated cells, to match the observed cold pool θe, implying a low typical origin level. Precipitation conditionally averaged on decreases in surface equivalent potential temperature (Δθe) exhibits a strong relationship because the most negative Δθe values are associated with a high probability of precipitation. The more physically motivated conditional average of Δθe on precipitation shows that decreases in θe level off with increasing precipitation rate, bounded by the maximum difference between surface θe and its minimum in the profile aloft. Robustness of these statistics observed across scales and regions suggests their potential use as model diagnostic tools for the improvement of downdraft parameterizations in climate models.

  12. A two-column formalism for time-dependent modelling of stellar convection. I. Description of the method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, A.

    2008-11-01

    Context: In spite of all the advances in multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, investigations of stellar evolution and stellar pulsations still depend on one-dimensional computations. This paper devises an alternative to the mixing-length theory or turbulence models usually adopted in modelling convective transport in such studies. Aims: The present work attempts to develop a time-dependent description of convection, which reflects the essential physics of convection and that is only moderately dependent on numerical parameters and far less time consuming than existing multi-dimensional hydrodynamics computations. Methods: Assuming that the most extensive convective patterns generate the majority of convective transport, the convective velocity field is described using two parallel, radial columns to represent up- and downstream flows. Horizontal exchange, in the form of fluid flow and radiation, over their connecting interface couples the two columns and allows a simple circulating motion. The main parameters of this convective description have straightforward geometrical meanings, namely the diameter of the columns (corresponding to the size of the convective cells) and the ratio of the cross-section between up- and downdrafts. For this geometrical setup, the time-dependent solution of the equations of radiation hydrodynamics is computed from an implicit scheme that has the advantage of being unaffected by the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy time-step limit. This implementation is part of the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code). Results: To demonstrate the approach, results for convection zones in Cepheids are presented. The convective energy transport and convective velocities agree with expectations for Cepheids and the scheme reproduces both the kinetic energy flux and convective overshoot. A study of the parameter influence shows that the type of solution derived for these stars is in fact fairly robust with respect to the constitutive numerical

  13. Benard convection in gaps and cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.

    1981-04-01

    The article contains two parts. In the first part a condensed review of the most striking phenomena in Benard convection in laterally confined fluid layers is given. In the second part recent experimental and theoretical work on Benard convection in gaps is presented an analysed. (orig.) [de

  14. Convective mixing and accretion in white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, D.

    1976-01-01

    The evolution of convection zones in cooling white dwarfs with helium envelopes and outer hydrogen layers is calculated with a complete stellar evolution code. It is shown that white dwarfs of spectral type DB cannot be formed from DA stars by convective mixing. However, for cooler temperatures (Tsub(e) [de

  15. Southern Ocean Convection and tropical telleconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I.; Cabre, A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2014-12-01

    We show that Southern Ocean (SO) temperatures in the latest generation of Earth System Models exhibit two major modes of variation, one driven by deep convection, the other by tropical variability. We perform a CMIP5 model intercomparison to understand why different climate models represent SO variability so differently in long, control simulations. We show that multiyear variability in Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) can in turn influence oceanic and atmospheric conditions in the tropics on short (atmospheric) time-scales. We argue that the strength and pattern of SO-tropical teleconnections depends on the intensity of SO deep convection. Periodic convection in the SO is a feature of most CMIP5 models under preindustrial forcing (deLavergne et al., 2014). Models show a wide distribution in the spatial extent, periodicity and intensity of their SO convection, with some models convecting most of the time, and some showing very little convection. In a highly convective coupled model, we find that multidecadal variability in SO and global SSTs, as well as SO heat storage are driven by Weddell Sea convective variability, with convective decades relatively warm due to the heat released from the deep southern ocean and non-convective decades cold due to the subsurface storage of heat. Furthermore, pulses of SO convection drive SST and sea ice variations, influencing absorbed shortwave and emitted longwave radiation, wind, cloud and precipitation patterns, with climatic implications for the low latitudes via fast atmospheric teleconnections. We suggest that these high-low latitude teleconnection mechanisms are relevant for understanding hiatus decades. Additionally, Southern Ocean deep convection varied significantly during past, natural climate changes such as during the last deglaciation. Weddell Sea open convection was recently weakened, likely as a consequence of anthropogenic forcing and the resulting surface freshening. Our study opens up the

  16. Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, R.J.; Peterson, P.F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Corradini, M.L.; Pernsteiner, A.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure was studied numerically and the results were compared with experiments. In both the numerical and experimental investigations, mist formation was observed to occur near the cooling wall, with significant droplet concentrations in the bulk. Large recirculation cells near the end of the condensing section were generated as the heavy noncondensing gas collecting near the cooling wall was accelerated downward. Near the top of the enclosure the recirculation cells became weaker and smaller than those below, ultimately disappearing near the top of the condenser. In the experiment the mist density was seen to be highest near the wall and at the bottom of the condensing section, whereas the numerical model predicted a much more uniform distribution. The model used to describe the formation of mist was based on a Modified Critical Saturation Model (MCSM), which allows mist to be generated once the vapor pressure exceeds a critical value. Equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and MCSM calculations were preformed, showing the experimental results to lie somewhere in between the equilibrium and nonequilibrium predictions of the numerical model. A single adjustable constant (indicating the degree to which equilibrium is achieved) is used in the model in order to match the experimental results.

  17. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport...... in a surrounding uid, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, where the convective velocity field is found from solving the isothermal incompressible steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. Topology optimisation is also applied to steady-state natural convection problems. The modelling is done using stabilised...... finite elements, the formulation and implementation of which was done partly during a special course as prepatory work for this thesis. The formulation is extended with a Brinkman friction term in order to facilitate the topology optimisation of fluid flow and convective cooling problems. The derived...

  18. Convective penetration in a young sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Jane; Baraffe, Isabelle; Goffrey, Tom; MUSIC developers group

    2018-01-01

    To interpret the high-quality data produced from recent space-missions it is necessary to study convection under realistic stellar conditions. We describe the multi-dimensional, time implicit, fully compressible, hydrodynamic, implicit large eddy simulation code MUSIC. We use MUSIC to study convection during an early stage in the evolution of our sun where the convection zone covers approximately half of the solar radius. This model of the young sun possesses a realistic stratification in density, temperature, and luminosity. We approach convection in a stellar context using extreme value theory and derive a new model for convective penetration, targeted for one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations. This model provides a scenario that can explain the observed lithium abundance in the sun and in solar-like stars at a range of ages.

  19. Characterization of neurons in the cortical white matter in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Zsófia; Janszky, József; Sétáló, György; Horváth, Réka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Seress, László; Ábrahám, Hajnalka

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter, and to investigate their distribution in mesial temporal sclerosis. Immunohistochemistry and quantification of neurons were performed on surgically resected tissue sections of patients with therapy-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal lobe tissues of patients with tumor but without epilepsy and that from autopsy were used as controls. Neurons were identified with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against NeuN, calcium-binding proteins, transcription factor Tbr1 and neurofilaments. We found significantly higher density of neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy than in that of controls. Based on their morphology and neurochemical content, both excitatory and inhibitory cells were present among these neurons. A subset of neurons in the white matter was Tbr-1-immunoreactive and these neurons coexpressed NeuN and neurofilament marker SMI311R. No colocalization of Tbr1 was observed with the inhibitory neuronal markers, calcium-binding proteins. We suggest that a large population of white matter neurons comprises remnants of the subplate. Furthermore, we propose that a subset of white matter neurons was arrested during migration, highlighting the role of cortical maldevelopment in epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Temporal lobe developmental malformations and epilepsy: dual pathology and bilateral hippocampal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, S S; Kuzniecky, R I; Gilliam, F; Faught, E; Morawetz, R

    1998-03-01

    Temporal lobe developmental malformations (TLDM) with focal cortical dysplasia and balloon cells may coexist with mesial temporal sclerosis. The true incidence of this dual pathology is unknown. Our aim was to assess the frequency of amygdala (AM)-hippocampal abnormality in a homogeneous population with this specific developmental malformation. MRI-based volumetry of the AM and hippocampal formation (HF) in 30 patients with unilateral TLDM and intractable partial epilepsy was performed. A volume normalization process defined a normal range of HF and AM volumes in control subjects, and enabled the detection of bilateral volume loss. Normalized volumes detected HF atrophy in 26 patients (nine unilateral and 17 bilateral) and AM atrophy in 18 patients (three unilateral and 15 bilateral). Visual analysis detected unilateral HF abnormality in 21 patients and bilateral abnormality in two. When compared with a group of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and pure hippocampal sclerosis (N = 92), where volumetry revealed bilateral HF atrophy in 18%, a significant difference in the frequency of bilateral HF atrophy was found (p Dual pathology is frequent in patients with TLDM (87%), and the AM-HF abnormality is often bilateral (57%). Our data suggest that more widespread and potentially epileptogenic lesions coexist with visibly detectable unilateral TLDM. This has implications for the selection of patients for temporal lobe surgery and may influence surgical strategies.

  1. Effect of pregabalin on apoptotic regulatory genes in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yi-dan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of pregabalin on the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of chronic epileptic rats induced by pilocarpine, to explore the anti-epileptic pharmacology mechanism of pregabalin, and its anti-apoptotic effect on hippocampal neurons of rats. Methods The model of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats induced by lithium-pilocarpine was established, then the rats in pregabalin treatment group received intraperitoneal injection of pregabalin (40 mg/kg once daily for three weeks. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of all rats was detected by immunohistochemical technique and Western blotting. Results Compared with normal saline group rats, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy was significantly increased (P = 0.000, for all. Pregabalin can down-regulate the expression of Bax and up-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 in hippocampus of rats compared to model group rats (P = 0.000, for all. Conclusion Pregabalin may have the effects of inhibiting cell apoptosis and protecting neurons through lowing Bax level and increasing Bcl-2 level in hippocampus of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats.

  2. Expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Li-ping

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 protein in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy after status epilepticus (SE and explore its function in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods Rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy was induced by lithium chloride (LiCl-pilocarpine. Total protein was extracted from hippocampus and rat brain slices were obtained at different time points (0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30, 50 d after SE. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining were used for detection of the expression of TLR4 in the hippocampus. Results The results of Western blotting showed the TLR4 protein expression at 0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30 d after SE was higher than that in the control group (P 0.05. Conclusion TLR4 protein was mainly expressed in cytoplasm of pyramidal cells in CA3 area of hippocampus. TLR4 protein expression in the hippocampus was increased in varying degrees at different observation time points after SE, indicating that TLR4 may play an important role in the development of epilepsy.

  3. Time-dependent patterns in quasivertical cylindrical binary convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Arantxa; Mercader, Isabel; Batiste, Oriol

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports on numerical investigations of the effect of a slight inclination α on pattern formation in a shallow vertical cylindrical cell heated from below for binary mixtures with a positive value of the Soret coefficient. By using direct numerical simulation of the three-dimensional Boussinesq equations with Soret effect in cylindrical geometry, we show that a slight inclination of the cell in the range α ≈0.036 rad =2∘ strongly influences pattern selection. The large-scale shear flow (LSSF) induced by the small tilt of gravity overcomes the squarelike arrangements observed in noninclined cylinders in the Soret regime, stratifies the fluid along the direction of inclination, and produces an enhanced separation of the two components of the mixture. The competition between shear effects and horizontal and vertical buoyancy alters significantly the dynamics observed in noninclined convection. Additional unexpected time-dependent patterns coexist with the basic LSSF. We focus on an unsual periodic state recently discovered in an experiment, the so-called superhighway convection state (SHC), in which ascending and descending regions of fluid move in opposite directions. We provide numerical confirmation that Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations with standard boundary conditions contain the essential ingredients that allow for the existence of such a state. Also, we obtain a persistent heteroclinic structure where regular oscillations between a SHC pattern and a state of nearly stationary longitudinal rolls take place. We characterize numerically these time-dependent patterns and investigate the dynamics around the threshold of convection.

  4. Lightning-based propagation of convective rain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dietrich

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new multi-sensor approach for continuously monitoring convective rain cells. It exploits lightning data from surface networks to propagate rain fields estimated from multi-frequency brightness temperature measurements taken by the AMSU/MHS microwave radiometers onboard NOAA/EUMETSAT low Earth orbiting operational satellites. Specifically, the method allows inferring the development (movement, morphology and intensity of convective rain cells from the spatial and temporal distribution of lightning strokes following any observation by a satellite-borne microwave radiometer. Obviously, this is particularly attractive for real-time operational purposes, due to the sporadic nature of the low Earth orbiting satellite measurements and the continuous availability of ground-based lightning measurements – as is the case in most of the Mediterranean region. A preliminary assessment of the lightning-based rainfall propagation algorithm has been successfully made by using two pairs of consecutive AMSU observations, in conjunction with lightning measurements from the ZEUS network, for two convective events. Specifically, we show that the evolving rain fields, which are estimated by applying the algorithm to the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the first AMSU overpass, show an overall agreement with the satellite-based rainfall estimates for the second AMSU overpass.

  5. Magnetic particle mixing with magnetic micro-convection for microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitenbergs, Guntars; Erglis, Kaspars; Perzynski, Régine; Cēbers, Andrejs

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the magnetic micro-convection phenomenon as a tool for mixing enhancement in microfluidics systems in cases when one of the miscible fluids is a magnetic particle colloid. A system of a water-based magnetic fluid and water is investigated experimentally under homogeneous magnetic field in a Hele–Shaw cell. Subsequent image analysis both qualitatively and quantitatively reveals the high enhancement of mixing efficiency provided by this method. The mixing efficiency dependence on the magnetic field and the physical limits is discussed. A suitable model for a continuous-flow microfluidics setup for mixing with magnetic micro-convection is also proposed and justified with an experiment. In addition, possible applications in improving the speed of ferrohydrodynamic sorting and magnetic label or selected tracer mixing in lab on a chip systems are noted. - Highlights: • We study the magnetic micro-convection as a mixing method in microfluidics. • We show that the method enhances mixing with magnetic field squared dependency. • We propose a flow cell setup for mixing and justify it with a sample experiment. • The mixing method can be easily implemented in an existing microfluidics setup

  6. Changes in flip/flop splicing of astroglial AMPA receptors in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Gerald; Schröder, Wolfgang; Hinterkeuser, Stefan; Schumacher, Thekla; Schramm, Johannes; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Recent data suggested a role for glial cells in epilepsy. This study sought to identify and functionally characterize AMPA receptors expressed by astrocytes in human hippocampal tissue resected from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Patch-clamp and fast application methods were combined to investigate astrocytes in situ and after fresh isolation from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Relying on presurgical and histopathologic analysis, we divided human specimens into two groups, Ammon's horn sclerosis (AHS) and lesion-associated epilepsy. Fast application of glutamate and kainate evoked receptor currents in all cells studied. Reversal-potential analysis revealed an intermediate Ca2+ permeability of the receptor channels that did not vary between the two groups of patients. However, preapplication of the AMPA receptor-specific modulator, cyclothiazide, disclosed differences in flip-flop splicing. This treatment considerably enhanced the receptor conductance, with potentiation being significantly stronger in cells from AHS specimens compared with lesion-associated cells, suggesting upregulation of AMPA receptor flip splice variants in astrocytes of the sclerotic tissue. Compelling evidence has been accumulated showing direct and rapid signaling between neurons and glial cells. Our data suggest that in AHS patients, neuronally released glutamate will lead to an enhanced and prolonged depolarization of astrocytes, which might be involved in seizure generation and spread in this particular condition of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

  7. Magnetic Fields in the Solar Convection Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuhong

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the dynamic evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone are reviewed with focus on emerging flux tubes responsible for the formation of solar active regions. The current prevailing picture is that active regions on the solar surface originate from strong toroidal magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo mechanism at the thin tachocline layer at the base of the solar convection zone. Thus the magnetic fields need to traverse the entire convection zone before they reach the photosphere to form the observed solar active regions. This review discusses results with regard to the following major topics: 1. the equilibrium properties of the toroidal magnetic fields stored in the stable overshoot region at the base of the convection zone, 2. the buoyancy instability associated with the toroidal magnetic fields and the formation of buoyant magnetic flux tubes, 3. the rise of emerging flux loops through the solar convective envelope as modeled by the thin flux tube calculations which infer that the field strength of the toroidal magnetic fields at the base of the solar convection zone is significantly higher than the value in equipartition with convection, 4. the minimum twist needed for maintaining cohesion of the rising flux tubes, 5. the rise of highly twisted kink unstable flux tubes as a possible origin of d -sunspots, 6. the evolution of buoyant magnetic flux tubes in 3D stratified convection, 7. turbulent pumping of magnetic flux by penetrative compressible convection, 8. an alternative mechanism for intensifying toroidal magnetic fields to significantly super-equipartition field strengths by conversion of the potential energy associated with the superadiabatic stratification of the solar convection zone, and finally 9. a brief overview of our current understanding of flux emergence at the surface and post-emergence evolution of the subsurface magnetic fields.

  8. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A.; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S.

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  9. Edge plasma density convection during ICRH on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becoulet, M.; Colas, L.; Gunn, J.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, A. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Pecoul, S.; Heuraux, S. [Nancy-1 Univ., 54 (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    2001-11-01

    The 2D edge plasma density distribution around ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennae is studied experimentally and numerically in the tokamak Tore Supra (TS). A local density decrease in front of the loaded ICRH antenna ('pump-out' effect) is demonstrated by Langmuir probe measurements in a low recycling regime. An up-down asymmetry in the heat-flux and in the antenna erosion is also observed, and is associated with poloidal variations of the local density. These density redistributions are ascribed to an ExB convection process linked with RF-sheaths. To assess this interpretation, the 2D transport code CELLS was developed for modeling the density distribution near an antenna. The code takes into account perpendicular diffusion, parallel transport and convection in RF-sheath-driven potentials given by the 3D-antenna code ICANT. The strong density differences obtained in simulations reproduce up-down asymmetries of the heat fluxes. (authors)

  10. The Earth's magnetosphere is 165 R(sub E) long: Self-consistent currents, convection, magnetospheric structure, and processes for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedder, J. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a self-consistent, magnetohydrodynamic numerical realization for the Earth's magnetosphere which is in a quasi-steady dynamic equilibrium for a due northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Although a few hours of steady northward IMF are required for this asymptotic state to be set up, it should still be of considerable theoretical interest because it constitutes a 'ground state' for the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. Moreover, particular features of this ground state magnetosphere should be observable even under less extreme solar wind conditions. Certain characteristics of this magnetosphere, namely, NBZ Birkeland currents, four-cell ionospheric convection, a relatively weak cross-polar potential, and a prominent flow boundary layer, are widely expected. Other characteristics, such as no open tail lobes, no Earth-connected magnetic flux beyond 155 R(sub E) downstream, magnetic merging in a closed topology at the cusps, and a 'tadpole' shaped magnetospheric boundary, might not be expected. In this paper, we will present the evidence for this unusual but interesting magnetospheric equilibrium. We will also discuss our present understanding of this singular state.

  11. A CLINICORADIOLOGICAL STUDY OF MIDDLE LOBE SYNDROME DUE TO TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Karmakar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Although pulmonary tuberculosis is a common disease in India, tuberculosis of right middle lobe is infrequent. Tuberculosis of the right middle lobe leading to chronic collapse is a cause of Right Middle Lobe syndrome. METHODS The patients attended Pulmonary Medicine Outdoor at Era’s Lucknow Medical College, Lucknow from April 2015 to March 2016. The purpose of this study is to describe the clinicoradiological features of patients of middle lobe syndrome due to tuberculosis. All patients presented with cough with or without expectoration, fever, chest pain, haemoptysis and constitutional symptoms like loss of appetite and weight. Chest X-ray PA view revealed ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border. HRCT thorax was done in each case. The diagnosis of tuberculous aetiology was based on (1 History of chronic cough and fever, not responding to antibiotic therapy and constitutional symptoms, (2 A positive tuberculin test using 2 TU of PPD RT 23 and (3 Detection of acid fast bacilli by direct smear or Mycobacterium tuberculosis by polymerase chain reaction in bronchoalveolar lavage. RESULTS Out of 10 patients, 4 (40% were males and 6 (60% were females. The mean ages of the males were 55.8 years and females were 60.8 years and overall mean age was 59 years. Most of the patients were females and belonged to the middle age and old age group. ATT was started in all the patients. CONCLUSIONS Right middle lobe syndrome predominantly affects the older population and the female gender. Although tuberculosis is a common disease in India, Middle Lobe Syndrome is a very rare presentation of the disease. Due to non-specific symptoms and usually normal chest X-ray PA view in Right Middle Lobe Syndrome, we should keep a high index of suspicion to diagnose the condition.

  12. Decreased occipital lobe metabolism by FDG-PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnes, Lilja; Nalluri, Abhinav; Cohen, Jesse; Jones, Krystyna M.; Zan, Elcin; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Venkatesan, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare brain metabolism patterns on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT in anti–NMDA receptor and other definite autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and to assess how these patterns differ between anti–NMDA receptor neurologic disability groups. Methods: Retrospective review of clinical data and initial dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT studies for neurology inpatients with definite AE, per published consensus criteria, treated at a single academic medical center over a 10-year period. Z-score maps of FDG-PET/CT were made using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projections in comparison to age group–matched controls. Brain region mean Z scores with magnitudes ≥2.00 were interpreted as significant. Comparisons were made between anti–NMDA receptor and other definite AE patients as well as among patients with anti–NMDA receptor based on modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at the time of FDG-PET/CT. Results: The medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic in 6 of 8 patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis and as a group (Z = −4.02, interquartile range [IQR] 2.14) relative to those with definite AE (Z = −2.32, 1.46; p = 0.004). Among patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, the lateral and medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic for patients with mRS 4–5 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −3.69, IQR 1; medial occipital lobe Z = −4.08, 1) compared with those with mRS 0–3 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −0.83, 2; p occipital lobe Z = −1.07, 2; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Marked medial occipital lobe hypometabolism by dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT may serve as an early biomarker for discriminating anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis from other AE. Resolution of lateral and medial occipital hypometabolism may correlate with improved neurologic status in anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis. PMID:29159205

  13. Convection measurement package for space processing sounding rocket flights. [low gravity manufacturing - fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spradley, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The effects on heated fluids of nonconstant accelerations, rocket vibrations, and spin rates, was studied. A system is discussed which can determine the influence of the convective effects on fluid experiments. The general suitability of sounding rockets for performing these experiments is treated. An analytical investigation of convection in an enclosure which is heated in low gravity is examined. The gravitational body force was taken as a time-varying function using anticipated sounding rocket accelerations, since accelerometer flight data were not available. A computer program was used to calculate the flow rates and heat transfer in fluids with geometries and boundary conditions typical of space processing configurations. Results of the analytical investigation identify the configurations, fluids and boundary values which are most suitable for measuring the convective environment of sounding rockets. A short description of fabricated fluid cells and the convection measurement package is given. Photographs are included.

  14. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-01-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem. (letter)

  15. Effects of TRPV1 activation on synaptic excitation in the dentate gyrus of a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Muthu D; Smith, Bret N

    2010-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a condition characterized by an imbalance between excitation and inhibition in the temporal lobe. Hallmarks of this change are axon sprouting and accompanying synaptic reorganization in the temporal lobe. Synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids have variable therapeutic potential in treating intractable temporal lobe epilepsy, in part because cannabinoid ligands can bind multiple receptor types. This study utilized in vitro electrophysiological methods to examine the effect of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) activation in dentate gyrus granule cells in a murine model of TLE. Capsaicin, a selective TRPV1 agonist had no measurable effect on overall synaptic input to granule cells in control animals, but significantly enhanced spontaneous and miniature EPSC frequency in mice with TLE. Exogenous application of anandamide, an endogenous cannabinoid that acts at both TRPV1 and cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1R), also enhanced glutamate release in the presence of a CB1R antagonist. Anandamide reduced the EPSC frequency when TRPV1 were blocked with capsazepine. Western blot analysis of TRPV1 receptor indicated protein expression was significantly greater in the dentate gyrus of mice with TLE compared with control mice. This study indicates that a prominent cannabinoid agonist can increase excitatory circuit activity in the synaptically reorganized dentate gyrus of mice with TLE by activating TRPV1 receptors, and suggests caution in designing anticonvulsant therapy based on modulating the endocannabinoid system. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Giant lipoma arising from deep lobe of the parotid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Ying-Che

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipomas are common benign soft tissue neoplasms but they are found very rarely in the deep lobe of parotid gland. Surgical intervention in these tumors is challenging because of the proximity of the facial nerve, and thus knowledge of the anatomy and meticulous surgical technique are essential. Case presentation A 71-year-old female presented with a large asymptomatic mass, which had occupied the left facial area for over the past fifteen years, and she requested surgical excision for a cosmetically better facial appearance. The computed tomography (CT scan showed a well-defined giant lipoma arising from the left deep parotid gland. The lipoma was successfully enucleated after full exposure and mobilization of the overlying facial nerve branches. The surgical specimen measured 9 × 6 cm in size, and histopathology revealed fibrolipoma. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery, with a satisfying facial contour and intact facial nerve function. Conclusion Giant lipomas involving the deep parotid lobe are extremely rare. The high-resolution CT scan provides an accurate and cost-effective preoperative investigative method. Surgical management of deep lobe lipoma should be performed by experienced surgeons due to the need for meticulous dissection of the facial nerve branches. Superficial parotidectomy before deep lobe lipoma removal may be unnecessary in selected cases because preservation of the superficial lobe may contribute to a better aesthetic and functional result.

  17. Temporal order processing of syllables in the left parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Dana; Baker, Julie M; Sanchez, Carmen E; Rorden, Chris; Fridriksson, Julius

    2009-10-07

    Speech processing requires the temporal parsing of syllable order. Individuals suffering from posterior left hemisphere brain injury often exhibit temporal processing deficits as well as language deficits. Although the right posterior inferior parietal lobe has been implicated in temporal order judgments (TOJs) of visual information, there is limited evidence to support the role of the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL) in processing syllable order. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the left inferior parietal lobe is recruited during temporal order judgments of speech stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected on 14 normal participants while they completed the following forced-choice tasks: (1) syllable order of multisyllabic pseudowords, (2) syllable identification of single syllables, and (3) gender identification of both multisyllabic and monosyllabic speech stimuli. Results revealed increased neural recruitment in the left inferior parietal lobe when participants made judgments about syllable order compared with both syllable identification and gender identification. These findings suggest that the left inferior parietal lobe plays an important role in processing syllable order and support the hypothesized role of this region as an interface between auditory speech and the articulatory code. Furthermore, a breakdown in this interface may explain some components of the speech deficits observed after posterior damage to the left hemisphere.

  18. Frontal lobe atrophy of the brain in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Tomio

    1981-01-01

    Reported here are the CT findings on cerebral atrophic lesion chiefly developed in the frontal lobe in schizophrenics with unusual organic encephalopathy. Encephalopathy was recognized in 84 (73%) of 115 schizophrenics and 13 (33%) of 40 neurotics. In an attempt to exclude the effects of aging on encephalopathy, the ages at CT and at the development of disease, the number of morbid years, subtypical schizophrenia and relation between the clinical severity and the atrophic condition were comparatively studied. As a result, cerebral atrophy tended to increase along with aging, but the findings differed in that atrophia classified by age covered the entire brain in general, whereas atrophia in schizophrenics was found in the frontal lobe. In particular, because of the fact that clinical severity and atrophia in the frontal lobe are high correlated and that severe atrophia is recognized even in young people, schizophrenia and atrophia in the frontal lobe are considered to be closely related to each other. It is therefore suggested that the CT findings are useful to clinicians for finding appropriate methods to deal with the prognosis of schizophrenics in their daily diagnosis and for the therapeutic prevention of encephalatrophy by stimulating the frontal lobe, thereby delaying mental deterioration. (author)

  19. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; p<0.001) and significantly more often lateralizing seizure phenomena pointing to bilateral seizure onset compared to patients with unilateral TLE (67% vs. 11%; p<0.001). The sensitivity of identical vs. different seizure semiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Epilepsy in multiple sclerosis: The role of temporal lobe damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, M; Castellaro, M; Bertoldo, A; De Luca, A; Pizzini, F B; Ricciardi, G K; Pitteri, M; Zimatore, S; Magliozzi, R; Benedetti, M D; Manganotti, P; Montemezzi, S; Reynolds, R; Gajofatto, A; Monaco, S

    2017-03-01

    Although temporal lobe pathology may explain some of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), its role in the pathogenesis of seizures has not been clarified yet. To investigate the role of temporal lobe damage in MS patients suffering from epilepsy, by the application of advanced multimodal 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis. A total of 23 relapsing remitting MS patients who had epileptic seizures (RRMS/E) and 23 disease duration matched RRMS patients without any history of seizures were enrolled. Each patient underwent advanced 3T MRI protocol specifically conceived to evaluate grey matter (GM) damage. This includes grey matter lesions (GMLs) identification, evaluation of regional cortical thickness and indices derived from the Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging model. Regional analysis revealed that in RRMS/E, the regions most affected by GMLs were the hippocampus (14.2%), the lateral temporal lobe (13.5%), the cingulate (10.0%) and the insula (8.4%). Cortical thinning and alteration of diffusion metrics were observed in several regions of temporal lobe, in insular cortex and in cingulate gyrus of RRMS/E compared to RRMS ( ptemporal lobe, which exceeds what would be expected on the basis of the global GM damage observed.

  1. Quantifying interictal metabolic activity in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, T.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, J. Jr.; Christenson, P.D.; Zhang, J.X.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of patients with complex partial seizures of unilateral temporal lobe origin have interictal temporal hypometabolism on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) studies. Often, this hypometabolism extends to ipsilateral extratemporal sites. The use of accurately quantified metabolic data has been limited by the absence of an equally reliable method of anatomical analysis of PET images. We developed a standardized method for visual placement of anatomically configured regions of interest on FDG PET studies, which is particularly adapted to the widespread, asymmetric, and often severe interictal metabolic alterations of temporal lobe epilepsy. This method was applied by a single investigator, who was blind to the identity of subjects, to 10 normal control and 25 interictal temporal lobe epilepsy studies. All subjects had normal brain anatomical volumes on structural neuroimaging studies. The results demonstrate ipsilateral thalamic and temporal lobe involvement in the interictal hypometabolism of unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Ipsilateral frontal, parietal, and basal ganglial metabolism is also reduced, although not as markedly as is temporal and thalamic metabolism

  2. Use of explicit memory cues following parietal lobe lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Ian G; Jaeger, Antonio; Studer, Bettina; Simons, Jon S

    2012-11-01

    The putative role of the lateral parietal lobe in episodic memory has recently become a topic of considerable debate, owing primarily to its consistent activation for studied materials during functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of recognition. Here we examined the performance of patients with parietal lobe lesions using an explicit memory cueing task in which probabilistic cues ("Likely Old" or "Likely New"; 75% validity) preceded the majority of verbal recognition memory probes. Without cues, patients and control participants did not differ in accuracy. However, group differences emerged during the "Likely New" cue condition with controls responding more accurately than parietal patients when these cues were valid (preceding new materials) and trending towards less accuracy when these cues were invalid (preceding old materials). Both effects suggest insufficient integration of external cues into memory judgments on the part of the parietal patients whose cued performance largely resembled performance in the complete absence of cues. Comparison of the parietal patients to a patient group with frontal lobe lesions suggested the pattern was specific to parietal and adjacent area lesions. Overall, the data indicate that parietal lobe patients fail to appropriately incorporate external cues of novelty into recognition attributions. This finding supports a role for the lateral parietal lobe in the adaptive biasing of memory judgments through the integration of external cues and internal memory evidence. We outline the importance of such adaptive biasing through consideration of basic signal detection predictions regarding maximum possible accuracy with and without informative environmental cues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Case Report: A Rare Case Report of Frontal Lobe Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Nouri- Khajavi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The frontal lobe syndrome is a permanent personality change disorder with characteristic clinical pictures, which followed by frontal lobes damage. Clinical picture include: Affective instability, recurrent aggressive behavior, impaired social judgment, apathy and undifferentiating or suspiciousness and paranoid ideations. According DSM-IV classification frontal lobe syndrome named personality change due to head trauma on Axis I. Herein we report a case of 46 years-old man, who has developed behavioral disturbances following head trauma, about 10 years ago. Main clinical figures in this case are apathy, avolition and, undifferentiating. Clinical pictures are constant during these 10 years. The diagnostic approach has been based on patient’s problems history which, has taken from his family, mental status examination, Neurological examination, Brain imaging and Neuropsychological assessments which related to frontal lobes function. Because of rarity & neglection due to mysterious function of frontal lobes, and also considering that personality change from previous level is prominent figure of this syndrome and also brain imaging findings, which compatible with clinical findings, with this aim, we have reported this case.

  4. Kinematic structure of convective-scale elements in the rainbands of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hence, Deanna A.; Houze, Robert A.

    2008-08-01

    Airborne Doppler radar data collected during the Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) show the convective-scale air motions embedded in the principal rainbands of hurricanes Katrina and Rita. These embedded convective cells have overturning updrafts and low-level downdrafts (originating at 2-4 km) that enter the rainband on its radially outward side and cross over each other within the rainband as well as a strong downdraft emanating from upper levels (6+ km) on the radially inward side. These vertical motion structures repeat from one convective cell to another along each rainband. The resulting net vertical mass transport is upward in the upwind portion of the band and greatest in the middle sector of the principal rainband, where the updraft motions contribute generally to an increase of potential vorticity below the 3-4 km level. Because the convective cells in the middle sector are systematically located radially just inside the secondary horizontal wind maximum (SHWM), the local increase in vorticity implied by the convective mass transport is manifest locally as an increase in the strength of the SHWM at midlevels (˜4 km). The overturning updrafts of the convective cells tilt, stretch, and vertically transport vorticity such that the convergence of the vertical flux of vorticity strengthens the vorticity anomaly associated with the SHWM. This process could strengthen the SHWM by several meters per second per hour, and may explain how high wave number convective-scale features can influence a low wave number feature such as the principal rainband, and subsequently influence the primary vortex.

  5. A thermodynamically general theory for convective vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Nilton O.

    2008-08-01

    Convective vortices are common features of atmospheres that absorb lower-entropy-energy at higher temperatures than they reject higher-entropy-energy to space. These vortices range from small to large-scale and play an important role in the vertical transport of heat, momentum, and tracer species. Thus, the development of theoretical models for convective vortices is important to our understanding of some of the basic features of planetary atmospheres. The heat engine framework is a useful tool for studying convective vortices. However, current theories assume that convective vortices are reversible heat engines. Since there are questions about how reversible real atmospheric heat engines are, their usefulness for studying real atmospheric vortices is somewhat controversial. In order to reduce this problem, a theory for convective vortices that includes irreversible processes is proposed. The paper's main result is that the proposed theory provides an expression for the pressure drop along streamlines that includes the effects of irreversible processes. It is shown that a simplified version of this expression is a generalization of Bernoulli's equation to convective circulations. It is speculated that the proposed theory not only explains the intensity, but also sheds light on other basic features of convective vortices such as their physical appearance.

  6. Tropical teleconnections via the ocean and atmosphere induced by Southern Ocean deep convective events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I.; Cabre, A.; Gunn, A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2016-12-01

    The current generation (CMIP5) of Earth System Models (ESMs) shows a huge variability in their ability to represent Southern Ocean (SO) deep-ocean convection and Antarctic Bottom Water, with a preference for open-sea convection in the Weddell and Ross gyres. A long control simulation in a coarse 3o resolution ESM (the GFDL CM2Mc model) shows a highly regular multi-decadal oscillation between periods of SO open sea convection and non-convective periods. This process also happens naturally, with different frequencies and durations of convection across most CMIP5 models under preindustrial forcing (deLavergne et al, 2014). Here we assess the impact of SO deep convection and resulting sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on the tropical atmosphere and ocean via teleconnections, with a focus on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We combine analysis of our low-resolution coupled model with inter-model analysis across historical CMIP5 simulations. SST cooling south of 60S during non-convective decades triggers a stronger, northward shifted SH Hadley cell, which results in intensified northward cross-equatorial moist heat transport and a poleward shift in the ITCZ. Resulting correlations between the cross-equatorial atmospheric heat transport and ITCZ location are in good agreement with recent theories (e.g. Frierson et al. 2013; Donohoe et al. 2014). Lagged correlations between a SO convective index and cross-equatorial heat transports (in the atmosphere and ocean), as well as various tropical (and ENSO) climate indices are analyzed. In the ocean realm, we find that non-convective decades result in weaker AABW formation and weaker ACC but stronger Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) formation, likely as a result of stronger SO westerlies (more positive SAM). The signals of AABW and AAIW are seen in the tropics on short timescales of years to decades in the temperature, heat storage and heat transport anomalies and also in deep and intermediate ocean oxygen. Most

  7. Boundary Layer Control of Rotating Convection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E. M.; Stellmach, S.; Noir, J.; Hansen, U.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Rotating convection is ubiquitous in the natural universe, and is likely responsible for planetary processes such magnetic field generation. Rapidly rotating convection is typically organized by the Coriolis force into tall, thin, coherent convection columns which are aligned with the axis of rotation. This organizational effect of rotation is thought to be responsible for the strength and structure of magnetic fields generated by convecting planetary interiors. As thermal forcing is increased, the relative influence of rotation weakens, and fully three-dimensional convection can exist. It has long been assumed that rotational effects will dominate convection dynamics when the ratio of buoyancy to the Coriolis force, the convective Rossby number, Roc, is less than unity. We investigate the influence of rotation on turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection via a suite of coupled laboratory and numerical experiments over a broad parameter range: Rayleigh number, 10310; Ekman number, 10-6≤ E ≤ ∞; and Prandtl number, 1≤ Pr ≤ 100. In particular, we measure heat transfer (as characterized by the Nusselt number, Nu) as a function of the Rayleigh number for several different Ekman and Prandtl numbers. Two distinct heat transfer scaling regimes are identified: non-rotating style heat transfer, Nu ~ Ra2/7, and quasigeostrophic style heat transfer, Nu~ Ra6/5. The transition between the non-rotating regime and the rotationally dominant regime is described as a function of the Ekman number, E. We show that the regime transition depends not on the global force balance Roc, but on the relative thicknesses of the thermal and Ekman boundary layers. The transition scaling provides a predictive criterion for the applicability of convection models to natural systems such as Earth's core.

  8. Measuring Convective Mass Fluxes Over Tropical Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, David

    2017-04-01

    Deep convection forms the upward branches of all large-scale circulations in the tropics. Understanding what controls the form and intensity of vertical convective mass fluxes is thus key to understanding tropical weather and climate. These mass fluxes and the corresponding conditions supporting them have been measured by recent field programs (TPARC/TCS08, PREDICT, HS3) in tropical disturbances considered to be possible tropical storm precursors. In reality, this encompasses most strong convection in the tropics. The measurements were made with arrays of dropsondes deployed from high altitude. In some cases Doppler radar provided additional measurements. The results are in some ways surprising. Three factors were found to control the mass flux profiles, the strength of total surface heat fluxes, the column-integrated relative humidity, and the low to mid-tropospheric moist convective instability. The first two act as expected, with larger heat fluxes and higher humidity producing more precipitation and stronger lower tropospheric mass fluxes. However, unexpectedly, smaller (but still positive) convective instability produces more precipitation as well as more bottom-heavy convective mass flux profiles. Furthermore, the column humidity and the convective instability are anti-correlated, at least in the presence of strong convection. On spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers, the virtual temperature structure appears to be in dynamic balance with the pattern of potential vorticity. Since potential vorticity typically evolves on longer time scales than convection, the potential vorticity pattern plus the surface heat fluxes then become the immediate controlling factors for average convective properties. All measurements so far have taken place in regions with relatively flat sea surface temperature (SST) distributions. We are currently seeking funding for a measurement program in the tropical east Pacific, a region that exhibits strong SST gradients and

  9. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-19

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  10. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Barton; Schultz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  11. Chronic inflammation in refractory hippocampal sclerosis-related temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, Jordan M; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests chronic inflammation may play a role in hippocampal sclerosis-associated temporal lobe epilepsy. We sought to systematically evaluate for its presence in a group of 315 patients who underwent surgery for medically-refractory epilepsy and who had hippocampal sclerosis. Upon histologic review of hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections, 95 (41%) cases demonstrated the presence of lymphocytes within the perivascular region and diffusely within the brain parenchyma. Those cases with chronic inflammation evident on hematoxylin and eosin staining were significantly more likely to experience a post-operative seizure recurrence than those without it (p=0.03). In 9 cases of hippocampi with chronic inflammation observed on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections, there was a mixture of both T (CD3+) and B (CD20+) lymphocytes located around blood vessels and interspersed within the brain parenchyma and a predominance of CD4 positive T cells versus CD8 positive cells. Ten hippocampi, apparently devoid of chronic inflammation upon inspection with hematoxylin and eosin stained sections, were stained with the lymphocyte common antigen CD45. In all 10 cases, scattered lymphoid cells were observed in the brain parenchyma, suggesting some level of chronic inflammation may be present in more cases than casual inspection might suggest. This study was the first to evaluate the incidence of chronic inflammation within a large temporal lobe epilepsy population. The study findings suggest chronic inflammation may be a more common component of hippocampal sclerosis -associated temporal lobe epilepsy than previously believed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Usefulness of PET in non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuluchi, M.; Arganaraz, R.; Buznick, J.; Pomata, H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of PET in patients with refractory non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy. Material and methods. We present three patients with features of temporal lobe epilepsy refractory to medication, where high definition MRI was normal. Results. These patients had PET hypometabolism in the temporal areas related to clinical and neurophysiological findings. Two of these patients were implanted with subdural grids to confirm the diagnosis and the third was operated directly based on the findings of PET. Encourage the presentation of the importance in recent years is acquiring the PET. Conclusion. In those patients in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy with suspected temporal lobe, but in the MRI images show no structural lesions, PET can play an important role defining the diagnosis. (authors)

  13. Altered cortical anatomical networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bin; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Li, Wenjing; Dai, Dai; Li, Meng; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common epilepsy syndromes with focal seizures generated in the left or right temporal lobes. With the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), many evidences have demonstrated that the abnormalities in hippocampal volume and the distributed atrophies in cortical cortex. However, few studies have investigated if TLE patients have the alternation in the structural networks. In the present study, we used the cortical thickness to establish the morphological connectivity networks, and investigated the network properties using the graph theoretical methods. We found that all the morphological networks exhibited the small-world efficiency in left TLE, right TLE and normal groups. And the betweenness centrality analysis revealed that there were statistical inter-group differences in the right uncus region. Since the right uncus located at the right temporal lobe, these preliminary evidences may suggest that there are topological alternations of the cortical anatomical networks in TLE, especially for the right TLE.

  14. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A case of luftsichel sign for left upper lobe collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erden Erol Ünlüer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis of dyspnea in Emergency Department (ED patients is broad and atelectasis is one of the differentials among these. We present a 29-year-old women presented to our ED for evaluation of shortness of breath. On her chest examination, air entry and breath sounds were diminished on the left side but normal on the right. A posteroanterior chest radiograph showed radioluscent area in the upper zone of the left lung, around the aortic arch and also hyperdens area neighbouring this, like covered by a veil. Luftsichel sign together with this hiperdensity were consistent with the diagnose of left lung upper lobe collapse. The Luftsichel sign represents the hyperexpanded superior segment of the left lower lobe interposed between the atelectatic left upper lobe and aortic arch. Patient was discharged to home with chest physiotherapy and breathing exercises together with analgesic prescreption.

  16. Late bilateral temporal lobe necrosis after conventional radiotherapy. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Michio; Hayashi, Toshiyuki; Kagami, Hiroshi; Murase, Ikurou; Nakatsukasa, Masashi [Saiseikai Utsunomiya Hospital (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with radionecrosis in the bilateral temporal lobes manifesting as dementia about 30 years after undergoing conventional radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed edema and cystic lesions in both temporal lobes. The mass in the left temporal lobe was excised. MR imaging 12 days after surgery showed reduced edema. Her dementia had improved. Radionecrosis usually occurs between several months and a few years after radiotherapy. The incidence of radionecrosis is estimated as 5%, but may be higher with longer follow-up periods. Clinical reports have suggested that larger total doses of radiation are associated with earlier onset of delayed necrosis and the fractional dose is the most significant factor causing cerebral radionecrosis. Radionecrosis can occur long after conventional radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery using a linac-based system or a gamma knife unit. (author)

  17. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma in a thyroid pyramidal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kwun Ha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available

    We report an extremely rare case of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC in the thyroid Epub ahead of print pyramidal lobe (TPL. A 48-year-old woman underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for a small thyroid nodule in the right lobe in local clinic, and it revealed a malignant cytology. On preoperative ultrasonography for tumor staging in our hospital, another small suspiciously malignant hypoechoic nodule was detected in the left TPL. Total thyroidectomy and central nodal dissection were performed. Histopathology confirmed PTMCs in the left TPL and both thyroid lobes. Ultrasonography for TPL should be required for complete evaluation of possible multifocality of thyroid malignancy.

  18. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  19. Apis mellifera octopamine receptor 1 (AmOA1 expression in antennal lobe networks of the honey bee (Apis mellifera and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina T Sinakevitch

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Octopamine (OA underlies reinforcement during appetitive conditioning in the honey bee and fruit fly, acting via different subtypes of receptors. Recently, antibodies raised against a peptide sequence of one honey bee OA receptor, AmOA1, were used to study the distribution of these receptors in the honey bee brain (Sinakevitch et al., 2011. These antibodies also recognize an isoform of the AmOA1 ortholog in the fruit fly (OAMB, mushroom body OA receptor. Here we describe in detail the distribution of AmOA1 receptors in different types of neurons in the honey bee and fruit fly antennal lobes. We integrate this information into a detailed anatomical analysis of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, uni- and multi-glomerular projection neurons (uPNs, and mPNs and local interneurons in glomeruli of the antennal lobe. These neurons were revealed by dye injection into the antennal nerve, antennal lobe, medial and lateral antenno-protocerbral tracts (m-APT and l-APT, and lateral protocerebral lobe by use of labeled cell lines in the fruit fly or by staining with anti-GABA. We found that ORN receptor terminals and uPNs largely do not show immunostaining for AmOA1. About seventeen GABAergic mPNs leave the antennal lobe through the ml-APT and branch into the lateral protocerebral lobe. Many, but not all, mPNs show staining for AmOA1. AmOA1 receptors are also in glomeruli on GABAergic processes associated with local interneurons. The data suggest that in both species one important action of OA in the antennal lobe involves modulation of different types of inhibitory neurons via AmOA1 receptors. We integrated this new information into a model of circuitry within glomeruli of the antennal lobes of these species.

  20. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of the human temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Colon-Perez

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Fresh ex vivo MR imaging, along with tractography, revealed complex intra-temporal structural variation corresponding to neuronal cell body layers, dendritic fields, and axonal projection systems evident histologically. This is the first study to describe in detail the human temporal lobe structural organization using high-field MR imaging and tractography. By preserving the 3-dimensional structures of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, specific changes in anatomy may inform us about the changes that occur in TLE in relation to the disease process and structural underpinnings in epilepsy-related memory dysfunction.

  1. Determinants of brain metabolism changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassoux, Francine; Artiges, Eric; Semah, Franck; Desarnaud, Serge; Laurent, Agathe; Landre, Elisabeth; Gervais, Philippe; Devaux, Bertrand; Helal, Ourkia Badia

    2016-06-01

    To determine the main factors influencing metabolic changes in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) due to hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We prospectively studied 114 patients with MTLE (62 female; 60 left HS; 15- to 56-year-olds) with (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and correlated the results with the side of HS, structural atrophy, electroclinical features, gender, age at onset, epilepsy duration, and seizure frequency. Imaging processing was performed using statistical parametric mapping. Ipsilateral hypometabolism involved temporal (mesial structures, pole, and lateral cortex) and extratemporal areas including the insula, frontal lobe, perisylvian regions, and thalamus, more extensively in right HS (RHS). A relative increase of metabolism (hypermetabolism) was found in the nonepileptic temporal lobe and in posterior areas bilaterally. Voxel-based morphometry detected unilateral hippocampus atrophy and gray matter concentration decrease in both frontal lobes, more extensively in left HS (LHS). Regardless of the structural alterations, the topography of hypometabolism correlated strongly with the extent of epileptic networks (mesial, anterior-mesiolateral, widespread mesiolateral, and bitemporal according to the ictal spread), which were larger in RHS. Notably, widespread perisylvian and bitemporal hypometabolism was found only in RHS. Mirror hypermetabolism was grossly proportional to the hypometabolic areas, coinciding partly with the default mode network. Gender-related effect was significant mainly in the contralateral frontal lobe, in which metabolism was higher in female patients. Epilepsy duration correlated with the contralateral temporal metabolism, positively in LHS and negatively in RHS. Opposite results were found with age at onset. High seizure frequency correlated negatively with the contralateral metabolism in LHS. Epileptic networks, as assessed by electroclinical correlations, appear to be the main determinant of

  2. Sensitivity study of CFD turbulent models for natural convection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu sun, Park

    2007-01-01

    The buoyancy driven convective flow fields are steady circulatory flows which were made between surfaces maintained at two fixed temperatures. They are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in many engineering applications. Application of a natural convection can reduce the costs and efforts remarkably. This paper focuses on the sensitivity study of turbulence analysis using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) for a natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity. Using commercial CFD code, FLUENT and various turbulent models were applied to the turbulent flow. Results from each CFD model will be compared each other in the viewpoints of grid resolution and flow characteristics. It has been showed that: -) obtaining general flow characteristics is possible with relatively coarse grid; -) there is no significant difference between results from finer grid resolutions than grid with y + + is defined as y + = ρ*u*y/μ, u being the wall friction velocity, y being the normal distance from the center of the cell to the wall, ρ and μ being respectively the fluid density and the fluid viscosity; -) the K-ε models show a different flow characteristic from K-ω models or from the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM); and -) the y + parameter is crucial for the selection of the appropriate turbulence model to apply within the simulation

  3. Early seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures and its surgical implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2008-12-01

    Intracranial EEG documentation of seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures is relatively rare. We retrospectively analyzed intracranial EEG recorded with electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe in patients who underwent occipital lobe surgery. Four patients with occipital lesions, who underwent intracranial EEG monitoring with intracerebral electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe prior to occipital lobe surgery, were studied. Subdural electrodes were placed over the occipital lobe and adjacent areas. Intracerebral electrodes were implanted into bilateral hippocampi and the amygdala in three patients, and in the hippocampus and amygdala ipsilateral to the lesion in one. In light of the intracranial EEG findings, the occipital lobe was resected but the medial temporal lobe was spared in all patients. The follow-up period ranged from six to 16 years, and seizure outcome was Engel Class I in all patients. Sixty six seizures were analyzed. The majority of the seizures originated from the occipital lobe. In complex partial seizures, ictal discharges propagated to the medial temporal lobe. No seizures originating from the temporal lobe were documented. In some seizures, the ictal-onset zone could not be identified. In these seizures, very early propagation to the medial temporal lobe was observed. Interictal spikes were recorded in the medial temporal lobe in all cases. Intracranial EEG revealed very early involvement of the medial temporal lobe in some seizures. Seizure control was achieved without resection of the medial temporal structures.

  4. Transient response of two lobe aerodynamic journal bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kumar Yadav

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of a rotor-dynamic system is greatly affected by the performance of aerodynamic bearing and the performance of bearing is characterized by the stiffness and damping coefficients. In the present work, stiffness and damping coefficients of bearing are computed and the performance of the bearing is greatly changed with the change in bearing air film profile. The effect of lobe offset factors on the transient performance of aerodynamic bearing is presented. Bifurcation and Poincare diagrams of two lobe journal bearing have been presented for different offset factors. A bearing designer can judge the bearing performance based on bifurcation diagrams.

  5. A case of viral encephalitis localized in the occipital lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izawa, Masahiro; Okino, Teruhiko; Kagawa, Mizuo; Kitamura, Koichi.

    1987-01-01

    A case is reported of a 63-year-old female admitted to our hospital in Oct., 1986, with complaints of headache and visual field disturbance. A plain CT scan showed no abnormal low-density focal area. A contrast-enhancement CT scan, however, showed a localized linear abnormal enhancement in the right occipital lobe, without any mass-effect. A dynamic CT scan demonstrated a hyperemic perfusion pattern of the right occipital lobe. A visual-field examination showed left homonymous hemianopsia with concentric narrowing. These abnormal findings on CT, EEG, and ophthalmological examination disappeared within 3 weeks. (author)

  6. Visual field defects after temporal lobe resection for epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, Alvilda T; Olsen, Ane Sophie; Litman, Minna

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine visual field defects (VFDs) using methods of varying complexity and compare results with subjective symptoms in a population of newly operated temporal lobe epilepsy patients. METHODS: Forty patients were included in the study. Two patients failed to perform VFD testing...... symptoms were only reported by 28% of the patients with a VFD and in two of eight (sensitivity=25%) with a severe VFD. Most patients (86%) considered VFD information mandatory. CONCLUSION: VFD continue to be a frequent adverse event after epilepsy surgery in the medial temporal lobe and may affect...

  7. Preoperative visual field deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeet S. Grewal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical resection and laser thermoablation have been used to treat drug resistant epilepsy with good results. However, they are not without risk. One of the most commonly reported complications of temporal lobe surgery is contralateral superior homonymous quadrantanopsia. We describe a patient with asymptomatic preoperative quadrantanopsia fortuitously discovered as part of our recently modified protocol to evaluate patients prior to temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. This visual field deficit was subtle and not detected on routine clinical neurological examination. While we understand that this is a single case, we advocate further study for more detailed preoperative visual field examinations to characterize the true incidence of postoperative visual field lesions.

  8. Radiosurgery in the Management of Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñagarícano, José; Serletis, Demitre

    2015-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) describes recurrent seizure activity originating from the depths of the temporal lobe. MTLE patients who fail two trials of medication now require testing for surgical candidacy at an epilepsy center. For these individuals, temporal lobectomy offers the greatest likelihood for seizure-freedom (up to 80-90%); unfortunately, this procedure remains largely underutilized. Moreover, for select patients unable to tolerate open surgery, novel techniques are emerging for selective ablation of the mesial temporal structures, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We present here a review of SRS as a potential therapy for MTLE, when open surgery is not an option.

  9. Convection in complex shaped vessel; Convection dans des enceintes de forme complexe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The 8 november 2000, the SFT (Societe Francaise de Thermique) organized a technical day on the convection in complex shaped vessels. Nine papers have been presented in the domains of the heat transfers, the natural convection, the fluid distribution, the thermosyphon effect, the steam flow in a sterilization cycle and the transformers cooling. Eight papers are analyzed in ETDE and one paper dealing with the natural convection in spent fuels depository is analyzed in INIS. (A.L.B.)

  10. Free surface deformation and heat transfer by thermocapillary convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael; Basting, Steffen; Bänsch, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Knowing the location of the free liquid/gas surface and the heat transfer from the wall towards the fluid is of paramount importance in the design and the optimization of cryogenic upper stage tanks for launchers with ballistic phases, where residual accelerations are smaller by up to four orders of magnitude compared to the gravity acceleration on earth. This changes the driving forces drastically: free surfaces become capillary dominated and natural or free convection is replaced by thermocapillary convection if a non-condensable gas is present. In this paper we report on a sounding rocket experiment that provided data of a liquid free surface with a nonisothermal boundary condition, i.e. a preheated test cell was filled with a cold but storable liquid in low gravity. The corresponding thermocapillary convection (driven by the temperature dependence of the surface tension) created a velocity field directed away from the hot wall towards the colder liquid and then in turn back at the bottom towards the wall. A deformation of the free surface resulting in an apparent contact angle rather different from the microscopic one could be observed. The thermocapillary flow convected the heat from the wall to the liquid and increased the heat transfer compared to pure conduction significantly. The paper presents results of the apparent contact angle as a function of the dimensionless numbers (Weber-Marangoni and Reynolds-Marangoni number) as well as heat transfer data in the form of a Nusselt number. Experimental results are complemented by corresponding numerical simulations with the commercial software Flow3D and the inhouse code Navier.

  11. Steady, three-dimensional, internally heated convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, G.; Glatzmaier, G.A.; Travis, B.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been carried out of steady, symmetric, three-dimensional modes of convection in internally heated, infinite Prandtl number, Boussinesq fluids at a Rayleigh number of 1.4x10 4 in a spherical shell with inner/outer radius of 0.55 and in a 3x3x1 rectangular box. Multiple patterns of convection occur in both geometries. In the Cartesian geometry the patterns are dominated by cylindrical cold downflows and a broad hot upwelling. In the spherical geometry the patterns consist of cylindrical cold downwellings centered either at the vertices of a tetrahedron or the centers of the faces of a cube. The cold downflow cylinders are immersed in a background of upwelling within which there are cylindrical hot concentrations (plumes) and hot halos around the downflows. The forced hot upflow return plumes of internally heated spherical convection are fundamentally different from the buoyancy-driven plumes of heated from below convection

  12. Convective Radio Occultations Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondi, R. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Deep convective systems are destructive weather phenomena that annually cause many deaths and injuries as well as much damage, thereby accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena have increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe. Damage is mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain parameters that are strongly connected to the structure of the particular storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes that remain mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or unreliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage.

  13. Ignition in Convective-Diffusive Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Law, Chung

    1999-01-01

    ... efficiency as well as the knock and emission characteristics. The ignition event is clearly controlled by the chemical reactions of fuel oxidation and the fluid mechanics of convective and diffusive transport...

  14. Understanding and controlling plasmon-induced convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxworthy, Brian J.; Bhuiya, Abdul M.; Vanka, Surya P.; Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2014-01-01

    The heat generation and fluid convection induced by plasmonic nanostructures is attractive for optofluidic applications. However, previously published theoretical studies predict only nanometre per second fluid velocities that are inadequate for microscale mass transport. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally that an array of plasmonic nanoantennas coupled to an optically absorptive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate can generate >micrometre per second fluid convection. Crucially, the ITO distributes thermal energy created by the nanoantennas generating an order of magnitude increase in convection velocities compared with nanoantennas on a SiO2 base layer. In addition, the plasmonic array alters absorption in the ITO, causing a deviation from Beer-Lambert absorption that results in an optimum ITO thickness for a given system. This work elucidates the role of convection in plasmonic optical trapping and particle assembly, and opens up new avenues for controlling fluid and mass transport on the micro- and nanoscale.

  15. What favors convective aggregation and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Caroline; Bony, Sandrine

    2015-07-01

    The organization of convection is ubiquitous, but its physical understanding remains limited. One particular type of organization is the spatial self-aggregation of convection, taking the form of cloud clusters, or tropical cyclones in the presence of rotation. We show that several physical processes can give rise to self-aggregation and highlight the key features responsible for it, using idealized simulations. Longwave radiative feedbacks yield a "radiative aggregation." In that case, sufficient spatial variability of radiative cooling rates yields a low-level circulation, which induces the upgradient energy transport and radiative-convective instability. Not only do vertically integrated radiative budgets matter but the vertical profile of cooling is also crucial. Convective aggregation is facilitated when downdrafts below clouds are weak ("moisture-memory aggregation"), and this is sufficient to trigger aggregation in the absence of longwave radiative feedbacks. These results shed some light on the sensitivity of self-aggregation to various parameters, including resolution or domain size.

  16. Improved inhaled air quality at reduced ventilation rate by control of airflow interaction at the breathing zone with lobed jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Spilak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled air quality at a reduced supply of clean air was studied by controlling the airflow interaction at the breathing zone of a person using lobed jets as part of personalized ventilation (PV). Experiments were performed in a full-scale test room at 23°C (73.4°F) with a breathing thermal manikin...... seated at a workstation, with realistic free-convection flow around the body and a normal breathing cycle. The air in the room was mixed with tracer gas R134a. Clean air was supplied isothermally from three nozzles with circular, four-leafed clover, and six-edged star openings of 0.025 m (0.08 ft...... over the interaction between the inserted jets and the free convection flow was efficient. Over 80% clean PV air was measured in inhalation. The worst performing nozzle was the four-leafed clover: its best performance yielded 23% clean air inhalation, at the shortest distance and the highest velocity...

  17. Antartic observations of plasma convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the use of whistler duct tracking as a diagnostic for the behaviour of plasma in the plasmasphere. As a setting for the results given in the thesis, a broad review is presented which embraces pertinent aspects of previous experimental and theoretical studies of the plasmasphere. From a study of 24 hours of continuous whistler data recorded at Sanae, (L = 3,98), it is shown that associated with quiet magnetic conditions (Av Ksub(p)=1), there exists two plasmasphere bulges centred on about 1700 and 0100 UT. There is evidence that these plasmasphere bulge structures are part of a ground-state or reference base drift pattern. Electric field measurements provide some evidence that quiet time plasmasphere drift behaviour is controlled by the internal ionospheric current systems of dynamo origin, rather than being controlled by magnetospheric convection. Finally, this thesis describes an application of the whistler duct tracking technique to whistler data recorded simultaneously at two ground-based stations (Sanae (L = 3,98) and Halley (L = 4,23)). The identification of common whistler components on each station's data set provides a means of estimating the lifetimes of the associated whistler ducts. Duct lifetimes of as little as 30 minutes are found. Such short lived ducts have important implications for current theories of duct formation

  18. Dynamics of acoustic-convective drying of sunflower cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics of drying sunflower cake by a new acoustic-convective method has been studied. Unlike the conventional (thermal-convective) method, the proposed method allows moisture to be extracted from porous materials without applying heat to the sample to be dried. Kinetic curves of drying by the thermal-convective and acoustic-convective methods were obtained and analyzed. The advantages of the acoustic-convective extraction of moisture over the thermal-convective method are discussed. The relaxation times of drying were determined for both drying methods. An intermittent drying mode which improves the efficiency of acoustic-convective extraction of moisture is considered.

  19. CONVECTION IN CONDENSIBLE-RICH ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, F. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pierrehumbert, R. T., E-mail: fding@uchicago.edu [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO{sub 2} is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  20. A model of the solar cycle driven by the dynamo action of the global convection in the solar convection zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamo equation which represents the longitudinally averaged magnetohydrodynamical action of the global convection influenced by the rotation in the solar convection zone is solved numerically to simulate the solar cycle as an initial boundary-value problem. The radial and latitudinal structure of the dynamo action is parametrized in accordance with the structure of the rotation, and of the global convection especially in such a way as to represent the presence of the two cells of the regeneration action in the radial direction in which the action has opposite signs, which is typical of the regeneration action of the global convection. A nonlinear process is included by assuming that part of the magnetic field energy is dissipated when the magnetic field strength exceeds some critical value; the formation of active regions and subsequent dissipations are thus simulated. By adjusting the parameters within a reasonable range, oscillatory solutions are obtained to simulate the solar cycle with the period of the right order of magnitude and with the patterns of evolution of the latitudinal distribution of the toroidal component of the magnetic field similar to the observed Butterfly Diagram of sunspots. The evolution of the latitudinal distribution of the radial component of the magnetic field shows patterns similar to the Butterfly Diagram, but having two branches of different polarity in each hemisphere. The development of the radial structure of the magnetic field associated with the solar cycle is presented. The importance of the poleward migrating branch of the Butterfly Diagram is emphasized in relation to the relative importance of the role of the latitudinal and radial shears of the differential rotation

  1. The anterior temporal lobes support residual comprehension in Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Holly; Zahn, Roland; Keidel, James L; Binney, Richard J; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2014-03-01

    Wernicke's aphasia occurs after a stroke to classical language comprehension regions in the left temporoparietal cortex. Consequently, auditory-verbal comprehension is significantly impaired in Wernicke's aphasia but the capacity to comprehend visually presented materials (written words and pictures) is partially spared. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of written word and picture semantic processing in Wernicke's aphasia, with the wider aim of examining how the semantic system is altered after damage to the classical comprehension regions. Twelve participants with chronic Wernicke's aphasia and 12 control participants performed semantic animate-inanimate judgements and a visual height judgement baseline task. Whole brain and region of interest analysis in Wernicke's aphasia and control participants found that semantic judgements were underpinned by activation in the ventral and anterior temporal lobes bilaterally. The Wernicke's aphasia group displayed an 'over-activation' in comparison with control participants, indicating that anterior temporal lobe regions become increasingly influential following reduction in posterior semantic resources. Semantic processing of written words in Wernicke's aphasia was additionally supported by recruitment of the right anterior superior temporal lobe, a region previously associated with recovery from auditory-verbal comprehension impairments. Overall, the results provide support for models in which the anterior temporal lobes are crucial for multimodal semantic processing and that these regions may be accessed without support from classic posterior comprehension regions.

  2. The auroral and ionospheric flow signatures of dual lobe reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Imber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first substantial evidence for the occurrence of dual lobe reconnection from ionospheric flows and auroral signatures. The process of dual lobe reconnection refers to an interplanetary magnetic field line reconnecting with lobe field lines in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Two bursts of sunward plasma flow across the noon portion of the open/closed field line boundary (OCB, indicating magnetic flux closure at the dayside, were observed in SuperDARN radar data during a period of strongly northward IMF. The OCB is identified from spacecraft, radar backscatter, and auroral observations. In order for dual lobe reconnection to take place, we estimate that the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle must be within ±10° of zero (North. The total flux crossing the OCB during each burst is small (1.8% and 0.6% of the flux contained within the polar cap for the two flows. A brightening of the noon portion of the northern auroral oval was observed as the clock angle passed through zero, and is thought to be due to enhanced precipitating particle fluxes due to the occurrence of reconnection at two locations along the field line. The number of solar wind protons captured by the flux closure process was estimated to be ~2.5×1030 (4 tonnes by mass, sufficient to populate the cold, dense plasma sheet observed following this interval.

  3. Grooves on the occipital lobe of Indian brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaria, K K

    1984-01-01

    The existence of a groove on the occipital lobe formed by the dural venous sinus or ridge has only rarely been described in the past. As observed in this study such grooves are either unilateral or bilateral and their incidence is very high in Indian brains. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6490537

  4. Metabolic changes in occipital lobe epilepsy with automatisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong H Wong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Some studies suggest that the pattern of glucose hypometabolism relates not only to the ictal-onset zone, but also reflects seizure propagation. We investigated metabolic changes in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE that may reflect propagation of ictal discharge during seizures with automatisms.Methods: Fifteen patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery for intractable OLE and had undergone interictal Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET between 1994 and 2004 were divided into two groups (with and without automatisms during seizure. Significant regions of hypometabolism were identified by comparing 18F-FDG-PET results from each group with 16 healthy controls by using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 2.Key Findings: Significant hypometabolism was confined largely to the epileptogenic occipital lobe in the patient group without automatisms. In patients with automatisms, glucose hypometabolism extended from the epileptogenic occipital lobe into the ipsilateral temporal lobe.Significance: We identified a distinctive hypometabolic pattern that was specific for OLE patients with automatisms during a seizure. This finding supports the postulate that seizure propagation is a cause of glucose hypometabolism beyond the region of seizure onset.

  5. Grooves on the occipital lobe of Indian brains.

    OpenAIRE

    Bisaria, K K

    1984-01-01

    The existence of a groove on the occipital lobe formed by the dural venous sinus or ridge has only rarely been described in the past. As observed in this study such grooves are either unilateral or bilateral and their incidence is very high in Indian brains.

  6. Metabolic changes in occipital lobe epilepsy with automatisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chong H; Mohamed, Armin; Wen, Lingfeng; Eberl, Stefan; Somerville, Ernest; Fulham, Michael; Bleasel, Andrew F

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that the pattern of glucose hypometabolism relates not only to the ictal-onset zone but also reflects seizure propagation. We investigated metabolic changes in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) that may reflect propagation of ictal discharge during seizures with automatisms. Fifteen patients who had undergone epilepsy surgery for intractable OLE and had undergone interictal Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) between 1994 and 2004 were divided into two groups (with and without automatisms during seizure). Significant regions of hypometabolism were identified by comparing (18)F-FDG-PET results from each group with 16 healthy controls by using statistical parametric mapping. Significant hypometabolism was confined largely to the epileptogenic occipital lobe in the patient group without automatisms. In patients with automatisms, glucose hypometabolism extended from the epileptogenic occipital lobe into the ipsilateral temporal lobe. We identified a distinctive hypometabolic pattern that was specific for OLE patients with automatisms during a seizure. This finding supports the postulate that seizure propagation is a cause of glucose hypometabolism beyond the region of seizure onset.

  7. Lung lobe torsion in dogs: 22 cases (1981-1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neath, P J; Brockman, D J; King, L G

    2000-10-01

    To identify breed disposition, postoperative complications, and outcome in dogs with lung lobe torsion. Retrospective study. 22 client-owned dogs. Information on signalment; history; clinical findings; results of clinicopathologic testing, diagnostic imaging, and pleural fluid analysis; surgical treatment; intra- and postoperative complications; histologic findings; and outcome were obtained from medical records. All 22 dogs had pleural effusion; dyspnea was the most common reason for examination. Fifteen dogs were large deep-chested breeds; 5 were toy breeds. Afghan Hounds were overrepresented, compared with the hospital population. One dog was euthanatized without treatment; the remaining dogs underwent exploratory thoracotomy and lung lobectomy. Eleven dogs recovered from surgery without complications, but 3 of these later died of thoracic disease. Four dogs survived to discharge but had clinically important complications within 2 months, including chylothorax, mediastinal mesothelioma, gastric dilatation, and a second lung lobe torsion. Six dogs died or were euthanatized within 2 weeks after surgery because of acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, septic shock, pneumothorax, or chylothorax. Chylothorax was diagnosed in 8 of the 22 dogs, including 4 Afghan Hounds. Results suggest that lung lobe torsion is rare in dogs and develops most frequently in large deep-chested dogs, particularly Afghan Hounds. Other predisposing causes were not identified, but an association with chylothorax was evident, especially in Afghan Hounds. Prognosis for dogs with lung lobe torsion was fair to guarded.

  8. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  9. Bi‑lobed Perirectal Epidermoid Cyst: An Unusual Cause of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of hematochezia and a bi-lobed cystic tumor on pelvic. MRI. We successfully resected the tumor via the posterior ... The only abnormal finding on clinical examination was a ... There was an absence of the uterus ... bleeding. Symptoms of dyschezia and hematochezia may also be due to cyst inflammation or infection while ...

  10. Surgical anatomy of the pyramidal lobe and its significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    33:35-37. 10. Harjeet A, Shani D, Jit I, Aggarwal AK. Shape, measurements and weight of the thyroid gland in northwest Indians. Surg Radiol Anat 2004;26:91-95. TABLE III. INVOLVEMENT OF THE PYRAMIDAL LOBE IN VARIOUS THYROID ...

  11. Auditory temporal processing in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavasani, Azam Navaei; Mohammadkhani, Ghassem; Motamedi, Mahmoud; Karimi, Leyla Jalilvand; Jalaei, Shohreh; Shojaei, Fereshteh Sadat; Danesh, Ali; Azimi, Hadi

    2016-07-01

    Auditory temporal processing is the main feature of speech processing ability. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, despite their normal hearing sensitivity, may present speech recognition disorders. The present study was carried out to evaluate the auditory temporal processing in patients with unilateral TLE. The present study was carried out on 25 patients with epilepsy: 11 patients with right temporal lobe epilepsy and 14 with left temporal lobe epilepsy with a mean age of 31.1years and 18 control participants with a mean age of 29.4years. The two experimental and control groups were evaluated via gap-in-noise and duration pattern sequence tests. One-way ANOVA was run to analyze the data. The mean of the threshold of the GIN test in the control group was observed to be better than that in participants with LTLE and RTLE. Also, it was observed that the percentage of correct responses on the DPS test in the control group and in participants with RTLE was better than that in participants with LTLE. Patients with TLE have difficulties in temporal processing. Difficulties are more significant in patients with LTLE, likely because the left temporal lobe is specialized for the processing of temporal information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Memory Functions following Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambaque, Isabelle; Dellatolas, Georges; Fohlen, Martine; Bulteau, Christine; Watier, Laurence; Dorfmuller, Georg; Chiron, Catherine; Delalande, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Surgical treatment appears to improve the cognitive prognosis in children undergoing surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The beneficial effects of surgery on memory functions, particularly on material-specific memory, are more difficult to assess because of potentially interacting factors such as age range, intellectual level,…

  13. The neurobiology of cognitive disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brian; Lin, Jack J.; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and especially memory disruption is a major complicating feature of the epilepsies. In this review we begin with a focus on the problem of memory impairment in temporal lobe epilepsy. We start with a brief overview of the early development of knowledge regarding the anatomic substrates of memory disorder in temporal lobe epilepsy, followed by discussion of the refinement of that knowledge over time as informed by the outcomes of epilepsy surgery (anterior temporal lobectomy) and the clinical efforts to predict those patients at greatest risk of adverse cognitive outcomes following epilepsy surgery. These efforts also yielded new theoretical insights regarding the function of the human hippocampus and a few examples of these insights are touched on briefly. Finally, the vastly changing view of temporal lobe epilepsy is examined including findings demonstrating that anatomic abnormalities extend far outside the temporal lobe, cognitive impairments extend beyond memory function, with linkage of these distributed cognitive and anatomic abnormalities pointing to a new understanding of the anatomic architecture of cognitive impairment in epilepsy. Challenges remain in understanding the origin of these cognitive and anatomic abnormalities, their progression over time, and most importantly, how to intervene to protect cognitive and brain health in epilepsy. PMID:21304484

  14. Memory, Metamemory and Their Dissociation in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Charlotte E.; Andres, Pilar; Broks, Paul; Noad, Rupert; Sadler, Martin; Coker, Debbie; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2010-01-01

    Patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) present with memory difficulties. The aim of the current study was to determine to what extent these difficulties could be related to a metamemory impairment. Fifteen patients with TLE and 15 matched healthy controls carried out a paired-associates learning task. Memory recall was measured at intervals of…

  15. Multidetector CT evaluation of potential right lobe living donors for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Saied Abdelgawad

    Multidetector CT evaluation of potential right lobe living donors for liver transplantation. Mohamed Saied Abdelgawad *, Osama L. El-Abd. National Liver Institute, El-Menoufiya University, Shebein El-Koom, Alexandria, Egypt. Received 4 June 2011; accepted 18 June 2011. KEYWORDS. Liver transplantation;. Multidetector ...

  16. Complications after mesial temporal lobe surgery via inferiortemporal gyrus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Fernando L; Reintjes, Stephen; Garcia, Hermes G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the complications associated with the inferior temporal gyrus approach to anterior mesial temporal lobe resection for temporal lobe epilepsy. This retrospective study examined complications experienced by 483 patients during the 3 months after surgery. All surgeries were performed during 1998-2012 by the senior author (F.L.V.). A total of 13 complications (2.7%) were reported. Complications were 8 delayed subdural hematomas (1.6%), 2 superficial wound infections (0.4%), 1 delayed intracranial hemorrhage (0.2%), 1 small lacunar stroke (0.2%), and 1 transient frontalis nerve palsy (0.2%). Three patients with subdural hematoma (0.6%) required readmission and surgical intervention. One patient (0.2%) with delayed intracranial hemorrhage required readmission to the neuroscience intensive care unit for observation. No deaths or severe neurological impairments were reported. Among the 8 patients with subdural hematoma, 7 were older than 40 years (87.5%); however, this finding was not statistically significant (p = 0.198). The inferior temporal gyrus approach to mesial temporal lobe resection is a safe and effective method for treating temporal lobe epilepsy. Morbidity and mortality rates associated with this procedure are lower than those associated with other neurosurgical procedures. The finding that surgical complications seem to be more common among older patients emphasizes the need for early surgical referral of patients with medically refractory epilepsy.

  17. Bilingualism Alters Children's Frontal Lobe Functioning for Attentional Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Maria M.; Hu, Xiao-Su; Satterfield, Teresa; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2017-01-01

    Bilingualism is a typical linguistic experience, yet relatively little is known about its impact on children's cognitive and brain development. Theories of bilingualism suggest that early dual-language acquisition can improve children's cognitive abilities, specifically those relying on frontal lobe functioning. While behavioral findings present…

  18. A Numerical Study of Nonlinear Nonhydrostatic Conditional Symmetric Instability in a Convectively Unstable Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seman, Charles J.

    1994-06-01

    Nonlinear nonhydrostatic conditional symmetric instability (CSI) is studied as an initial value problem using a two-dimensional (y, z)nonlinear, nonhydrostatic numerical mesoscale/cloud model. The initial atmosphere for the rotating, baroclinic (BCF) simulation contains large convective available potential energy (CAPE). Analytical theory, various model output diagnostics, and a companion nonrotating barotropic (BTNF) simulation are used to interpret the results from the BCF simulation. A single warm moist thermal initiates convection for the two 8-h simulations.The BCF simulation exhibited a very intricate life cycle. Following the initial convection, a series of discrete convective cells developed within a growing mesoscale circulation. Between hours 4 and 8, the circulation grew upscale into a structure resembling that of a squall-line mesoscale convective system (MCS). The mesoscale updrafts were nearly vertical and the circulation was strongest on the baroclinically cool side of the initial convection, as predicted by a two-dimensional Lagrangian parcel model of CSI with CAPE. The cool-side mesoscale circulation grew nearly exponentially over the last 5 h as it slowly propagated toward the warm air. Significant vertical transport of zonal momentum occurred in the (multicellular) convection that developed, resulting in local subgeostrophic zonal wind anomalies aloft. Over time, geostrophic adjustment acted to balance these anomalies. The system became warm core, with mesohigh pressure aloft and mesolow pressure at the surface. A positive zonal wind anomaly also formed downstream from the mesohigh.Analysis of the BCF simulation showed that convective momentum transport played a key role in the evolution of the simulated MCS, in that it fostered the development of the nonlinear CSI on mesoscale time scales. The vertical momentum transport in the initial deep convection generated a subgeostrophic zonal momentum anomaly aloft; the resulting imbalance in pressure

  19. Tensor viscosity method for convection in numerical fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukowicz, J.K.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    A new method, called the tensor viscosity method, is described for differencing the convective terms in multidimensional numerical fluid dynamics. The method is the proper generalization to two or three dimensions of interpolated donor cell differencing in one dimension, and is designed to achieve numerical stability with minimal numerical damping. It is a single-step method that is distinguished by simplicity and case of implementation, even in the case of an arbitrary non-rectangular mesh. It should therefore be useful in finite-element as well as finite-difference formulations

  20. Numerical study of natural convection in porous media (metals) using Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, C.Y., E-mail: c.y.zhao@warwick.ac.u [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Dai, L.N.; Tang, G.H.; Qu, Z.G.; Li, Z.Y. [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2010-10-15

    A thermal lattice BGK model with doubled populations is proposed to simulate the two-dimensional natural convection flow in porous media (porous metals). The accuracy of this method is validated by the benchmark solutions. The detailed flow and heat transfer at the pore level are revealed. The effects of pore density (cell size) and porosity on the natural convection are examined. Also the effect of porous media configuration (shape) on natural convection is investigated. The results showed that the overall heat transfer will be enhanced by lowering the porosity and cell size. The square porous medium can have a higher heat transfer performance than spheres due to the strong flow mixing and more surface area.

  1. Vertical natural convection: application of the unifying theory of thermal convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, C.S.; Ooi, A.; Lohse, Detlef; Chung, D.

    2015-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulations of vertical natural convection at Rayleigh numbers 1.0×10 5 –1.0×10 9 and Prandtl number 0.709 support a generalised applicability of the Grossmann–Lohse (GL) theory, which was originally developed for horizontal natural (Rayleigh–Bénard) convection. In

  2. Remote infarct of the temporal lobe with coexistent hippocampal sclerosis in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, Jordan M; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    In patients undergoing surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis remains the most commonly observed pathology. In addition to hippocampal sclerosis, 5% to 30% of these resections on magnetic resonance imaging contain a second independently epileptogenic lesion, commonly referred to as dual pathology. A second etiology of seizure activity, as seen in dual pathology, may serve as an important cause of treatment failure in striving for post-operative seizure control. Dual pathology, consisting of hippocampal sclerosis and a remote infarct of the adjacent cortex, has been rarely reported. Cases of pathologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis diagnosed between January 2000 and December 2012 (n = 349) were reviewed, and 7 cases of coexistent infarct (2%) formed the study group. Seven individuals (mean age, 29years; range, 5-47 years) with a mean epilepsy duration of 12.5years (3.3-25 years) and a mean pre-surgery frequency of 15 seizures per week (range, 0.5-56 seizures/week) were followed up postoperatively for a mean duration of 64months (range, 3-137 months). Pathologically, the most common form of hippocampal sclerosis observed was International League against Epilepsy type Ib or severe variant (n = 4). Four of the six individuals with post-surgery follow-up were seizure free at last encounter. The reported incidence of dual pathology, including hippocampal sclerosis and remote infarct, is low (2% in the present study) but may indicate a slightly increased risk of developing hippocampal sclerosis in the setting of a remote infarct. Surgical intervention for such cases anecdotally appears effective in achieving seizure control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. One-dimensional model of oxygen transport impedance accounting for convection perpendicular to the electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainka, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Computacao Cientifica (LNCC), CMC 6097, Av. Getulio Vargas 333, 25651-075 Petropolis, RJ, Caixa Postal 95113 (Brazil); Maranzana, G.; Thomas, A.; Dillet, J.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee (LEMTA), Universite de Lorraine, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); LEMTA, CNRS, 2, avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2012-10-15

    A one-dimensional (1D) model of oxygen transport in the diffusion media of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is presented, which considers convection perpendicular to the electrode in addition to diffusion. The resulting analytical expression of the convecto-diffusive impedance is obtained using a convection-diffusion equation instead of a diffusion equation in the case of classical Warburg impedance. The main hypothesis of the model is that the convective flux is generated by the evacuation of water produced at the cathode which flows through the porous media in vapor phase. This allows the expression of the convective flux velocity as a function of the current density and of the water transport coefficient {alpha} (the fraction of water being evacuated at the cathode outlet). The resulting 1D oxygen transport impedance neglects processes occurring in the direction parallel to the electrode that could have a significant impact on the cell impedance, like gas consumption or concentration oscillations induced by the measuring signal. However, it enables us to estimate the impact of convection perpendicular to the electrode on PEMFC impedance spectra and to determine in which conditions the approximation of a purely diffusive oxygen transport is valid. Experimental observations confirm the numerical results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Calculation of lobe mixer flow with reynolds stress model. Oryoku hoteishiki model ni yoru lobe mixer ryu no suchi keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Arakawa, Chuichi; Tagori, Tetsuo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan) Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1990-02-25

    It is considered that exhaust gas energy of turbofan engine is partly collected to realize the improvement of propulsion efficiency together with the reduction of noise appeared by the change in velocity distribution of exhaust gas flow. Then Lobe mixer was studied and its effectiveness was widely recognized, however the development of more realistic prediction method of exhaust nozzle system including Lobe mixer, is not completed yet. The stress equation model with low Reynolds Number which is easily used by the expansion of Launder Reece Rodi model in three dimension coordinate system was newly constructed. Applicability of the stress equation in more complicated flow field was greatly improved. While the above model was applied to Lobe mixer system, then the qualitative reproduction of mixing process accompanied with flow around Lobe and longitudinal eddy of core or bi-pass flow, was realized. There is room for improvement of pressure strain correlation term and behavior of Reynolds stress very close by wall surface in this model. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Temporal lobe epilepsy: etiology, fisiopathogeny and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaux, Ruben P.

    2003-01-01

    The seizures constitute one of the first causes of consultation in neurology and medical emergencies in all etary groups. The partial seizures are the most frequent form of clinical presentation specially those originated in the temporal lobes. In this revision article the author offers an update of the fisiopathogeny, the etiology and MRI findings in temporal epilepsy, and actualizes concepts derived from basic sciences. Selected cases of frequent pathologic causes contribute to illustrate this paper. In the physiopathology of the generalized seizures, alterations of the nets or thalamus cortical neuronal circuits and anomaly in the ionic canals functions have been demonstrated; in the partial seizures, particularly in the Mesial Temporal Sclerosis, alterations in the conformation of excitatory neo circuits have been verified. There are evidences of specific genetic seizures that express or appear sometime after birth, and others acquired, in which there is a variable time lapse between the action of a determined noxa and the installation of the clinical status, which suggest the existence of an epileptogenic mechanism as a gradual process in its development, and open a promissory field of investigation in search of preventive therapies. In many cases of acquired lesions seizures are related to the excitotoxicity mediated by glutamate as a possible trigger of the process. Besides, neuronal division has been demonstrated in the hippocampus, which could explain a neurogenic mechanism in the development of the seizures. The pathologic molecular findings in cortical malformations and the function of the glial cells in the neuronal homeostasis, contribute with data that sustain the neuro genesis of the seizures. The MRI provides a valuable information in Mesial Temporal Sclerosis, CNS tumoral lesions, neuronal migration disorders, vascular malformation, trauma and infections. Conclusion. The knowledge derived from areas as molecular biology, genetic and

  6. Convective transport resistance in the vitreous humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Sadhal, Satwindar; Ratanakijsuntorn, Komsan; Moats, Rex; Tang, Yang; Hughes, Patrick; Robinson, Michael; Lee, Susan

    2012-11-01

    It has been established by MRI visualization experiments that the convection of nanoparticles and large molecules with high rate of water flow in the vitreous humor will experience resistance, depending on the respective permeabilities of the injected solute. A set of experiments conducted with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany) and 30 nm gadolinium-based particles (Gado CELLTrackTM, Biopal, Worcester, MA) as MRI contrast agents showed that the degree of convective transport in this Darcy-type porous medium varies between the two solutes. These experiments consisted of injecting a mixture of the two (a 30 μl solution of 2% Magnevist and 1% nanoparticles) at the middle of the vitreous of an ex vivo whole bovine eye and subjecting the vitreous to water flow rate of 100 μl/min. The water (0.9% saline solution) was injected at the top of the eye, and was allowed to drain through small slits cut at the bottom of the eyeball. After 50 minutes of pumping, MRI images showed that the water flow carried the Gd-DTPA farther than the nanoparticles, even though the two solutes, being mixed, were subjected to the same convective flow conditions. We find that the convected solute lags the water flow, depending on the solute permeability. The usual convection term needs to be adjusted to allow for the filtration effect on the larger particles in the form (1- σ) u . ∇ c with important implications for the modeling of such systems.

  7. Global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics models of AGB stars. Effects of convection and radial pulsations on atmospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, B.; Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with increasing spatial resolution reveal new layers of complexity of atmospheric processes on a variety of scales. Aims: To analyze the physical mechanisms that cause asymmetries and surface structures in observed images, we use detailed 3D dynamical simulations of AGB stars; these simulations self-consistently describe convection and pulsations. Methods: We used the CO5BOLD radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce an exploratory grid of global "star-in-a-box" models of the outer convective envelope and the inner atmosphere of AGB stars to study convection, pulsations, and shock waves and their dependence on stellar and numerical parameters. Results: The model dynamics are governed by the interaction of long-lasting giant convection cells, short-lived surface granules, and strong, radial, fundamental-mode pulsations. Radial pulsations and shorter wavelength, traveling, acoustic waves induce shocks on various scales in the atmosphere. Convection, waves, and shocks all contribute to the dynamical pressure and, thus, to an increase of the stellar radius and to a levitation of material into layers where dust can form. Consequently, the resulting relation of pulsation period and stellar radius is shifted toward larger radii compared to that of non-linear 1D models. The dependence of pulsation period on luminosity agrees well with observed relations. The interaction of the pulsation mode with the non-stationary convective flow causes occasional amplitude changes and phase shifts. The regularity of the pulsations decreases with decreasing gravity as the relative size of convection cells increases. The model stars do not have a well-defined surface. Instead, the light is emitted from a very extended inhomogeneous atmosphere with a complex dynamic pattern of high-contrast features. Conclusions: Our models self-consistently describe convection, convectively generated acoustic noise, fundamental-mode radial

  8. Pulmonary microRNA profiling: implications in upper lobe predominant lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David A; Nymon, Amanda B; Ringelberg, Carol S; Lesseur, Corina; Hazlett, Haley F; Howard, Louisa; Marsit, Carmen J; Ashare, Alix

    2017-01-01

    Numerous pulmonary diseases manifest with upper lobe predominance including cystic fibrosis, smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and tuberculosis. Zonal hypoxia, characteristic of these pulmonary maladies, and oxygen stress in general is known to exert profound effects on various important aspects of cell biology. Lung macrophages are major participants in the pulmonary innate immune response and regional differences in macrophage responsiveness to hypoxia may contribute in the development of lung disease. MicroRNAs are ubiquitous regulators of human biology and emerging evidence indicates altered microRNA expression modulates respiratory disease processes. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the epigenetic and cellular mechanisms influencing regional differences in lung disease by investigating effect of hypoxia on regional microRNA expression in the lung. All studies were performed using primary alveolar macrophages ( n  = 10) or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid ( n  = 16) isolated from human subjects. MicroRNA was assayed via the NanoString nCounter microRNA assay. Divergent molecular patterns of microRNA expression were observed in alternate lung lobes, specifically noted was disparate expression of miR-93 and miR-4454 in alveolar macrophages along with altered expression of miR-451a and miR-663a in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Gene ontology was used to identify potential downstream targets of divergent microRNAs. Targets include cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, molecules that could have a significant impact on pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Our findings show variant regional microRNA expression associated with hypoxia in alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid in the lung-upper vs lower lobe. Future studies should address whether these specific microRNAs may act intracellularly, in a paracrine/endocrine manner to direct the innate immune response or may ultimately be involved in pulmonary host-to-pathogen trans

  9. Physiological Modeling of Responses to Upper vs Lower Lobe Lung Volume Reduction in Homogeneous Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arschang eValipour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: In clinical trials, homogeneous emphysema patients have responded well to upper lobe volume reduction but not lower lobe volume reduction. Materials/Methods: To understand the physiological basis for this observation, a computer model was developed to simulate the effects of upper and lower lobe lung volume reduction on RV/TLC and lung recoil in homogeneous emphysema.Results: Patients with homogeneous emphysema received either upper or lower lobe volume reduction therapy based on findings of radionucleotide scintigraphy scanning. CT analysis of lobar volumes showed that patients undergoing upper (n=18; -265 mL/site and lower lobe treatment (n=11; -217 mL/site experienced similar reductions in lung volume. However, only upper lobe treatment improved FEV1 (+11.1±14.7% vs -4.4±15.8% and RV/TLC (-5.4± 8.1% vs -2.4±8.6%. Model simulations provided an unexpected explanation for this response. Increases in transpulmonary pressure subsequent to volume reduction increased RV/TLC in upper lobe alveoli, while caudal shifts in airway closure decreased RV/TLC in lower lobe alveoli. Upper lobe treatment, which eliminates apical alveoli with high RV/TLC values, lowers the average RV/TLC of the lung. Conversely, lower lobe treatment, which eliminates caudal alveoli with low RV/TLC values, has less effect. Conclusions: Lower lobe treatment in homogeneous emphysema is uniformly less effective than upper lobe treatment.

  10. The Structural Plasticity of White Matter Networks Following Anterior Temporal Lobe Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Duncan, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy…

  11. Apis mellifera octopamine receptor 1 (AmOA1) expression in antennal lobe networks of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinakevitch, Irina T.; Smith, Adrian N.; Locatelli, Fernando; Huerta, Ramon; Bazhenov, Maxim; Smith, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) underlies reinforcement during appetitive conditioning in the honey bee and fruit fly, acting via different subtypes of receptors. Recently, antibodies raised against a peptide sequence of one honey bee OA receptor, AmOA1, were used to study the distribution of these receptors in the honey bee brain (Sinakevitch et al., 2011). These antibodies also recognize an isoform of the AmOA1 ortholog in the fruit fly (OAMB, mushroom body OA receptor). Here we describe in detail the distribution of AmOA1 receptors in different types of neurons in the honey bee and fruit fly antennal lobes. We integrate this information into a detailed anatomical analysis of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), uni- and multi-glomerular projection neurons (uPNs, and mPNs) and local interneurons (LNs) in glomeruli of the antennal lobe. These neurons were revealed by dye injection into the antennal nerve, antennal lobe, medial and lateral antenno-protocerbral tracts (m-APT and l-APT), and lateral protocerebral lobe (LPL) by use of labeled cell lines in the fruit fly or by staining with anti-GABA. We found that ORN receptor terminals and uPNs largely do not show immunostaining for AmOA1. About seventeen GABAergic mPNs leave the antennal lobe through the ml-APT and branch into the LPL. Many, but not all, mPNs show staining for AmOA1. AmOA1 receptors are also in glomeruli on GABAergic processes associated with LNs. The data suggest that in both species one important action of OA in the antennal lobe involves modulation of different types of inhibitory neurons via AmOA1 receptors. We integrated this new information into a model of circuitry within glomeruli of the antennal lobes of these species. PMID:24187534

  12. Convective mixing in helium white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclair, G.; Fontaine, G.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions under which convective mixing episodes take place between the helium envelopes and the underlying carbon layers in helium-rich white dwarfs are investigated. It is found that, for essentially any value of the initial helium content less than the maximum mass a helium convection zone can have, mixing does occur, and leads, in the vast majority of cases, to an almost pure carbon superficial composition. Mixing products that show only traces of carbon while retaining helium-dominated envelopes are possible only if the initial helium content is quite close to the maximum possible mass of the helium convection zone. In the presence of turbulence, this restriction could be relaxed, however, and the helium-rich lambda4670 stars may possibly be explained in this fashion

  13. Rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection subject to harmonically forced flow reversals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, B.J.; Kunnen, R.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent flow in a cylindrical Rayleigh–B´enard convection cell which can be modified considerably in case rotation is included in the dynamics. By incorporating the additional effects of an Euler force, i.e., effects induced by nonconstant rotation rates, a remarkably strong

  14. Rotating turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard convection subject to harmonically forced flow reversals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Kunnen, Rudie P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of turbulent flow in a cylindrical Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell which can be modified considerably in case rotation is included in the dynamics. By incorporating the additional effects of an Euler force, i.e., effects induced by non-constant rotation rates, a remarkably strong

  15. Seizures beget seizures in temporal lobe epilepsies: the boomerang effects of newly formed aberrant kainatergic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crepel, Valérie; Represa, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Do temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures in adults promote further seizures? Clinical and experimental data suggest that new synapses are formed after an initial episode of status epilepticus, however their contribution to the transformation of a naive network to an epileptogenic one has been debated. Recent experimental data show that newly formed aberrant excitatory synapses on the granule cells of the fascia dentate operate by means of kainate receptor-operated signals that are not present on naive granule cells. Therefore, genuine epileptic networks rely on signaling cascades that differentiate them from naive networks. Recurrent limbic seizures generated by the activation of kainate receptors and synapses in naive animals lead to the formation of novel synapses that facilitate the emergence of further seizures. This negative, vicious cycle illustrates the central role of reactive plasticity in neurological disorders.

  16. Visual interhemispheric communication and callosal connections of the occipital lobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Callosal connections of the occipital lobes, coursing in the splenium of the corpus callosum, have long been thought to be crucial for interactions between the cerebral hemispheres in vision in both experimental animals and humans. Yet the callosal connections of the temporal and parietal lobes appear to have more important roles than those of the occipital callosal connections in at least some high-order interhemispheric visual functions. The partial intermixing and overlap of temporal, parietal and occipital callosal connections within the splenium has made it difficult to attribute the effects of splenial pathological lesions or experimental sections to splenial components specifically related to select cortical areas. The present review describes some current contributions from the modern techniques for the tracking of commissural fibers within the living human brain to the tentative assignation of specific visual functions to specific callosal tracts, either occipital or extraoccipital. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Occipital lobe epilepsy with fear as leading ictal symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehl, Bernhard; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Lanz, Michael; Brandt, Armin; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Ictal fear is a semiological feature which is commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Here, we describe fear as a leading symptom in cryptogenic occipital lobe epilepsy. In a patient with negative MRI findings, intracranial EEG recordings documented a strict correlation between habitual ictal anxiety attacks and both spontaneous and stimulation-induced epileptic activity in a right occipital epileptogenic area with subsequent spreading to the symptomatogenic zone in the amygdala. Circumscribed occipital topectomy led to seizure freedom. Episodes of non-epileptic fear ceased shortly afterwards. This report provides insight into pathways of propagation of epileptic activity, illustrates different etiologies of pathologic fear and underlines the importance of ictal EEG recordings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pulmonary sequestrations of the upper lobe in children: Three presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffel, J.C.; Bernard, C.; Didier, F.; Bretagne, M.C.; Gautry, P.; Olive, D.; Prevot, J.; Pernot, C.; Hopital des Enfants, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy; Hopital des Enfants, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy; Hopital des Enfants, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestrations are congenital abnormalities where nonfunctioning lung tissue receives its vascular supply from the systemic circulation (thoracic or abdominal aorta). It is necessary to establish the diagnosis in childhood when the lesions are uncomplicated. The authors present three cases of sequestration of the apex (2 extralobar and 1 atypical) with the main clinical and radiological features. Sequestrations in the upper lobe are rare, and the usual site is the left lower lobe. Plain X-rays show a dense opacity, sometimes with an air-fluid level: angiography is currently the best mean for definitive diagnosis; however, computed tomography will probably be very useful in the future. Differential diagnosis includes tumours of the superior mediastinum (neurogenic tumours, digestive duplication, bronchogenic cysts, pheochromocytoma and hydatid cysts). (orig.) [de

  19. Amusia After Right Temporoparietal Lobe Infarction: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyun-Joon; Moon, Hyun Im; Pyun, Sung-Bom

    2016-10-01

    Which brain regions participate in musical processing remains controversial. During singing and listening a familiar song, it is necessary to retrieve information from the long-term memory. However, the precise mechanism involved in musical processing is unclear. Amusia is impaired perception, understanding, or production of music not attributable to disease of the peripheral auditory pathways or motor system. We report a case of a 36-year-old right-handed man who lost the ability to discriminate or reproduce rhythms after a right temporoparietal lobe infarction. We diagnosed him as an amusic patient using the online version of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA). This case report suggests that amusia could appear after right temporoparietal lobe infarction. Further research is needed to elucidate the dynamic musical processing mechanism and its associated neural structures.

  20. Bilingualism Alters Children's Frontal Lobe Functioning for Attentional Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Maria M.; Hu, Xiao-Su; Satterfield, Teresa; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2017-01-01

    Bilingualism is a typical linguistic experience, yet relatively little is known about its impact on children's cognitive and brain development. Theories of bilingualism suggest early dual-language acquisition can improve children's cognitive abilities, specifically those relying on frontal lobe functioning. While behavioral findings present much conflicting evidence, little is known about its effects on children's frontal lobe development. Using functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), the findings suggest that Spanish-English bilingual children (n=13, ages 7-13) had greater activation in left prefrontal cortex during a non-verbal attentional control task relative to age-matched English monolinguals. In contrast, monolinguals (n=14) showed greater right prefrontal activation than bilinguals. The present findings suggest early bilingualism yields significant changes to the functional organization of children's prefrontal cortex for attentional control and carry implications for understanding how early life experiences impact cognition and brain development. PMID:26743118

  1. Frontal lobe epilepsy may present as myoclonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Won; Yi, Sang Doe; Motamedi, Gholam K

    2010-04-01

    We describe a patient with seizures arising from right anterior-inferior frontal lobe presenting as myoclonic epilepsy. A 19-year-old man had experienced frequent paroxysmal bilateral myoclonic jerks involving his upper arms, shoulders, neck, and upper trunk since the age of 10. His baseline EEG showed intermittent right frontal spikes, and his ictal EEG showed rhythmic sharp theta discharges in the same area. MRI revealed cortical dysplasia in the right inferior frontal gyrus, and ictal-interictal SPECT analysis by SPM showed increased signal abnormality in this region. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) showed defects in fasciculi in the same area. These findings suggest that frontal lobe epilepsy should be considered in some patients with myoclonic seizures. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute Infantile Encephalopathy Predominantly Affecting The Frontal Lobes (AIEF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raha, Sarbani; Udani, Vrajesh

    2012-12-01

    Acute Infantile Encephalopathy Predominantly Affecting the Frontal Lobes (AIEF) is a relatively recent described entity. This article includes case reports of two patients who had bifrontal involvement during acute febrile encephalopathy. Case 1 describes a 1-y-old boy who presented with hyperpyrexia and dialeptic seizures. Imaging revealed significant bilateral frontal lobe involvement while serology proved presence of Influenza B infection. Over a period of one wk, he recovered with significant cognitive decline and perseveratory behavior. Another 6-y-old boy presented with language and behavioral problems suggestive of frontal dysfunction after recovering from prolonged impairment of consciousness following a convulsive status epilepticus. Bilateral superior frontal lesions with gyral swelling was evident on neuroimaging. These cases are among the very few cases of AIEF described in recent literature and the article also reviews this unique subtype of acute encephalopathy.

  3. Natural Convective Heat Transfer from Narrow Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    Natural Convective Heat Transfer from Narrow Plates deals with a heat transfer situation that is of significant practical importance but which is not adequately dealt with in any existing textbooks or in any widely available review papers. The aim of the book is to introduce the reader to recent studies of natural convection from narrow plates including the effects of plate edge conditions, plate inclination, thermal conditions at the plate surface and interaction of the flows over adjacent plates. Both numerical and experimental studies are discussed and correlation equations based on the results of these studies are reviewed.

  4. Might electrical earthing affect convection of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budrikis, Z.L.

    1982-01-01

    Partial convection of light by moving media was predicted by Fresnel and verified by Fizeau, Zeeman and others. It is accepted as an important argument in favour of the Special Theory of Relativity. The suggestion is made here that the convection is partial only when the propagating medium is moved with respect to its electrically earthed surroundings and that it would be total if an earthed shield was co-moving with the medium. This is based on a reinterpretation of Maxwell's equations wherein they are seen as macroscopic relationships that are in each case valid only in respect of a particular inertial frame of reference, the local electrical earth frame. (Auth.)

  5. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Aage, Niels

    stabilised finite elements implemented in a parallel multiphysics analysis and optimisation framework DFEM [1], developed and maintained in house. Focus is put on control of the temperature field within the solid structure and the problems can therefore be seen as conjugate heat transfer problems, where heat...... conduction governs in the solid parts of the design domain and couples to convection-dominated heat transfer to a surrounding fluid. Both loosely coupled and tightly coupled problems are considered. The loosely coupled problems are convection-diffusion problems, based on an advective velocity field from...

  6. Lattice BGK simulation of natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Ohashi, Hirotada; Akiyama, Mamoru

    1995-01-01

    Recently a new thermal lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook fluid model was suggested by the authors. In this study, this new model was applied into the numerical simulation of natural convection, namely the Rayleigh Benard flow. The critical number for the onset of convective phenomenon was numerically measured and compared with that of theoretical prediction. A gravity dependent deviation was found in the numerical simulation, which is explained as an unavoidable consequence of the incorporation of gravity force in the lattice BGK system. (author)

  7. Comparing convective heat fluxes derived from thermodynamics to a radiative-convective model and GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Chirag; Renner, Maik; Kleidon, Axel

    2015-04-01

    The convective transport of heat and moisture plays a key role in the climate system, but the transport is typically parameterized in models. Here, we aim at the simplest possible physical representation and treat convective heat fluxes as the result of a heat engine. We combine the well-known Carnot limit of this heat engine with the energy balances of the surface-atmosphere system that describe how the temperature difference is affected by convective heat transport, yielding a maximum power limit of convection. This results in a simple analytic expression for convective strength that depends primarily on surface solar absorption. We compare this expression with an idealized grey atmosphere radiative-convective (RC) model as well as Global Circulation Model (GCM) simulations at the grid scale. We find that our simple expression as well as the RC model can explain much of the geographic variation of the GCM output, resulting in strong linear correlations among the three approaches. The RC model, however, shows a lower bias than our simple expression. We identify the use of the prescribed convective adjustment in RC-like models as the reason for the lower bias. The strength of our model lies in its ability to capture the geographic variation of convective strength with a parameter-free expression. On the other hand, the comparison with the RC model indicates a method for improving the formulation of radiative transfer in our simple approach. We also find that the latent heat fluxes compare very well among the approaches, as well as their sensitivity to surface warming. What our comparison suggests is that the strength of convection and their sensitivity in the climatic mean can be estimated relatively robustly by rather simple approaches.

  8. Bifurcation and stability of forced convection in tightly coiled ducts: multiplicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liqiu; Pang, Ophelia; Cheng Lin

    2005-01-01

    A numerical study is made on the fully developed bifurcation structure of the forced convection in tightly coiled ducts of square cross-section. In addition to the examination of structural changes of three known solution branches found in loosely coiled ducts, three new solution branches are found. These new branches are isolated from the three known branches. The flows on these new branches are in a symmetric 4-cell state, a symmetric 8-cell state, an asymmetric 2-cell state, an asymmetric 5-cell state, an asymmetric 7-cell state, or an asymmetric 8-cell structure

  9. The lateralising significance of hypergraphia in temporal lobe epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, JKA; Robertson, MM; Trimble, MR

    1982-01-01

    Six patients with hypergraphia and epilepsy are presented and their clinical features compared with other patients reported in the literature. It is suggested that hypergraphia occurs more frequently in patients with right-sided non-dominant temporal lobe lesions, in contrast for example to the schizophreniform presentation of left-sided lesions. Other features of psychopathology possibly associated with non-dominant lesions, including elation, hypereligiosity and déjà vu experiences, are als...

  10. Neurobehavioral Management of Behavioral Anomalies in Frontal Lobe Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Shahzadi; Rajender, Gaurav; Sharma, Vibha; Singh, Tej Bahadur

    2009-01-01

    Neurobehavioral approach uses behavioral paradigm towards comprehensive rehabilitation by identifying the neurological or neuropsychological constraints that can interfere with learning and behavior of an individual. The present case study highlights the role of functional skills approach in neurobehavioral management towards cognitive rehabilitation to manage behavioral deficits in a 55-year-old man with nicotine dependence having frontal lobe lesions owing to gliosis of fronto-temporal brai...

  11. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral vie...

  12. Temporal lobe deficits in murderers: EEG findings undetected by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzke-Kopp, L M; Raine, A; Buchsbaum, M; LaCasse, L

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates electroencephalography (EEG) and positron emission tomography (PET) in the same subjects. Fourteen murderers were assessed by using both PET (while they were performing the continuous performance task) and EEG during a resting state. EEG revealed significant increases in slow-wave activity in the temporal, but not frontal, lobe in murderers, in contrast to prior PET findings that showed reduced prefrontal, but not temporal, glucose metabolism. Results suggest that resting EEG shows empirical utility distinct from PET activation findings.

  13. Frontal Lobe Tuberculoma: A Clinical and Imaging Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Alemayehu, Tinsae; Ergete, Wondwossen; Abebe, Workeabeba

    2017-01-01

    Background Pediatric nervous system tuberculomas are usually infra-tentorial and multiple. A frontal lobe location is rare. Case Details We report a 10 year-old boy who presented with a chronic headache and episodes of loss of consciousness. He had no signs of primary pulmonary tuberculosis and a diagnosis of frontal tuberculoma was made upon a post-operative biopsy. He improved following treatment with anti-tubercular drugs. Conclusion Tuberculosis should be considered in children with a chr...

  14. Glutamate metabolism in temporal lobe epilepsy as revealed by dynamic proton MRS following the infusion of [U13-C] glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnik-Olson, Brenda L; Ding, Daniel; Howe, John; Shah, Amul; Losey, Travis

    2017-10-01

    Focal metabolic dysfunction commonly observed in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and is associated with the development of medical intractability and neurocognitive deficits. It has not been established if this dysfunction is due to cell loss or biochemical dysfunction in metabolic pathways. To explore this question, dynamic 1 H MRS following an infusion of [U 13 - C] glucose was performed to measure glutamate (Glu) metabolism. Subjects (n=6) showed reduced Glu levels (ptemporal lobe (MTL) compared with controls (n=4). However, the rate of 13 C incorporation into Glu did not differ between those with epilepsy and controls (p=0.77). This suggests that reduced Glu concentrations in the region of the seizure focus are not due to disruptions in metabolic pathways, but may instead be due to neuronal loss or simplification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Image-guided, direct convective delivery of glucocerebrosidase for neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonser, R R; Schiffman, R; Robison, R A; Butman, J A; Quezado, Z; Walker, M L; Morrison, P F; Walbridge, S; Murray, G J; Park, D M; Brady, R O; Oldfield, E H

    2007-01-23

    To determine if convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of glucocerebrosidase could be used to treat targeted sites of disease progression in the brain and brainstem of a patient with neuronopathic Gaucher disease while monitoring enzyme distribution using MRI. A CED paradigm in rodents (n = 8) and primates (n = 5) that employs co-infusion of a surrogate MRI tracer (gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid [Gd-DTPA]) with glucocerebrosidase to permit real-time monitoring of distribution was developed. The safety and feasibility of this delivery and monitoring paradigm were evaluated in a patient with type 2 Gaucher disease. Animal studies revealed that real-time, T1-weighted, MRI of Gd-DTPA accurately tracked enzyme distribution during CED. Targeted perfusion of clinically affected anatomic sites in a patient with neuronopathic Gaucher disease (frontal lobe and brainstem) with glucocerebrosidase was successfully performed. Real-time MRI revealed progressive and complete filling of the targeted region with enzyme and Gd-DTPA infusate. The patient tolerated the infusions without evidence of toxicity. Convection-enhanced delivery can be used to safely perfuse large regions of the brain and brainstem with therapeutic levels of glucocerebrosidase. Co-infused imaging surrogate tracers can be used to monitor and control the distribution of therapeutic agents in vivo. Patients with neuronopathic Gaucher disease and other intrinsic CNS disorders may benefit from a similar treatment paradigm.

  16. Medial temporal lobe damage impairs representation of simple stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Warren

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Medial temporal lobe damage in humans is typically thought to produce a circumscribed impairment in the acquisition of new enduring memories, but recent reports have documented deficits even in short-term maintenance. We examined possible maintenance deficits in a population of medial temporal lobe amnesics, with the goal of characterizing their impairments as either representational drift or outright loss of representation over time. Patients and healthy comparisons performed a visual search task in which the similarity of various lures to a target was varied parametrically. Stimuli were simple shapes varying along one of several visual dimensions. The task was performed in two conditions, one presenting a sample target simultaneously with the search array and the other imposing a delay between sample and array. Eye-movement data collected during search revealed that the duration of fixations to items varied with lure-target similarity for all participants, i.e., fixations were longer for items more similar to the target. In the simultaneous condition, patients and comparisons exhibited an equivalent effect of similarity on fixation durations. However, imposing a delay modulated the effect differently for the two groups: in comparisons, fixation duration to similar items was exaggerated; in patients, the original effect was diminished. These findings indicate that medial temporal lobe lesions subtly impair short-term maintenance of even simple stimuli, with performance reflecting not the complete loss of the maintained representation but rather a degradation or progressive drift of the representation over time.

  17. Decreased astroglial monocarboxylate transporter 4 expression in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Niu, Le; Shen, Ming-Zhi; Gao, Lei; Wang, Chao; Li, Jie; Song, Li-Jia; Tao, Ye; Meng, Qiang; Yang, Qian-Li; Gao, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Hua

    2014-10-01

    Efflux of monocaroxylates like lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies from astrocytes through monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4) supplies the local neuron population with metabolic intermediates to meet energy requirements under conditions of increased demand. Disruption of this astroglial-neuron metabolic coupling pathway may contribute to epileptogenesis. We measured MCT4 expression in temporal lobe epileptic foci excised from patients with intractable epilepsy and in rats injected with pilocarpine, an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Cortical MCT4 expression levels were significantly lower in TLE patients compared with controls, due at least partially to MCT4 promoter methylation. Expression of MCT4 also decreased progressively in pilocarpine-treated rats from 12 h to 14 days post-administration. Underexpression of MCT4 in cultured astrocytes induced by a short hairpin RNA promoted apoptosis. Knockdown of astrocyte MCT4 also suppressed excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) expression. Reduced MCT4 and EAAT1 expression by astrocytes may lead to neuronal hyperexcitability and epileptogenesis in the temporal lobe by reducing the supply of metabolic intermediates and by allowing accumulation of extracellular glutamate.

  18. MRI lesion and epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Kazumi; Yagi, Kazuichi; Mihara, Tadahiro; Tottori, Takayasu; Watanabe, Yutaka; Seino, Masakazu

    1989-01-01

    The spatial relationship between a circumscribed lesion in the temporal lobe detected by MRI and an epileptogenic focus identified by ictal depth EEG along with a correlation of the MRI lesion with neuropathological findings were investigated in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy but without any focal lesion on CT. Four parameters (an areal ratio of the temporal lobe against the hemisphere, area and calculated T1, T2 values of the hippocampus) were used to determine the abnormal MRI side. An agreement was reached in 67-72% of 18 patients between the abnormal values of the hippocampal area and of calculated T1, T2 and the side of the epileptogenic focus. In 14 of 17 patients, typical hippocampal sclerosis was demonstrated in resected tissue in accordance with the MRI lesions (atrophy and/or prolonged T2 of hippocampus). These results imply: 1)MRI abnormality thus defined may, if not all, indicate the side of the epileptogenic focus, and 2)also the presence of hippocampal sclerosis. It was emphasized that the MRI lesion would be a usable instrument to explore the causal relationship of hippocampal sclerosis to a generation of epileptogenic lesions as well as for presurgical evalution. (author)

  19. Emotional reactions in patients after frontal lobe stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Zlatan; Stojanović, Sanja Vukadinović

    2015-09-01

    Emotional reactions have been documented after tumor lesions and the other damages of the brain. The aim of this paper was to examine the correlation between frontal lobe lesions and emotional reactions in patients with stroke. The research included 118 patients after stroke. Lesion localization was defined on computed axial tomography records, whereas the area and perimeter of lesion were measured by AutoCAD 2004 software. Examinations by means of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and Depression (HRSA and HRSD) were carried out 11-40 days after stroke. Statistic data were processed by simple linear/nonlinear regression, Cox's and the generalized linear model. A higher frequency of emotional reactions, i.e. anxiety, was determined in women after stroke (p = 0.024). A negative correlation between the lesion size and the intensity of anxiety manifestations was determined (Spearman's r = -0.297; p = 0.001). Anxiety was more frequent in patients with frontal lobe lesions in the dominant hemisphere (interaction: frontal lesion * hand dominant hemisphere, p = 0.017). Also, HRSD score values showed the tendency for lesser decline in case of greater frontal lobe lesions in relation to lesions of other regions of prosencephalon (interaction: frontal lesion * lesion area, p = 0.001). The results of this study indicate the correlation between evolutionary younger structures of the central nervous system and emotional reactions of man. Therefore, it is necessary to undertake proper early psychopharmacotherapy in the vulnerable group of patients.

  20. The evolution of Sf. Gheorghe (Danube asymmetric deltaic lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred VESPREMEANU-STROE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The wave asymmetric Sf. Gheorghe lobe is the only active in the Danube delta where river mouth bar (and the associated barrier islands and spits continuously deployed a cyclic development for almost two millennia. During first stage, the Sf. Gheorghe distributary had a small discharge (with an order of magnitude lower than present which after that experienced a rapid increase in consequence of the successive avulsions of Împuţita (southern distributary of Sulina arm and Dunavăţ distributaries. Our morphological analyses together with the newly obtained chronology, revealed the multiple ridgesets structure of Sf. Gheorghe deltaic lobe. In fact, all ridgesets (10 follow a common morphodynamic pattern characterized by the cyclic succession of three stages: i subaqueous mouth bar development, ii barrier island emergence, iii barrier spit phase with several secondary spits derived from an updrift trunk ridge. The size of each ridgeset increased exponentially with every new cycle due to the constant lengthening of the coastline as the downdrift side of the lobe advances seaward through a series of progressively larger similar quadrilaterals, yielding to a constant enlargment of the delta front size. 

  1. The secondary lobe as anatomic landmark for different pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spina, Juan C.; Spina, Juan C. h; Rolnik, Maria C.; Lema, Carlos; Venditi, Julio; Magarinos, Gabriel

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the spectrum of pathological findings in the pulmonary parenchyma, based on the knowledge of the secondary lobe and its components. The evaluation was made using high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and compared with the histopathological findings. By definition, the secondary lobe is the small portion of pulmonary tissue separated by septa of connective tissue and supplied by 2-5 or more terminal bronchioles according to their central or peripheral location. Different disorders may become evident as a consequence of : 1) Bronchiolar obstruction (transient or definitive); 2) Intra-alveolar or wall involvement; 3) Involvement of the support tissue; 4) Involvement of the vascular or lymphatic structures. The etiology may be idiopathic, infectious, due to inhalation, neoplastic, allergic, due to collagen diseases, secondary to drug administration and/or post-transplantation. The evaluation of the secondary lobe components, with fine section HRCT, is the dynamic method of choice for the characterisation of pulmonary diseases, and allows to perform earlier and more precise differential diagnoses, when correlated with the clinical findings. The addition of sections during expiration to the routine study is paramount to underscore perfusion disturbances, which may remain undiagnosed during deep inspiration. The goal of this study is to review some of these disorders in which HRCT may be very useful and to correlate our observations with the histopathological findings. (author)

  2. Explicit memory and implicit memory in occipital lobe stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Wang, JiHua; Feng, Lei; Wang, MeiHong; Li, Xiu; Hu, JiaYun; Wang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Occipital stroke patients mainly showed cortical blindness and unilateral vision loss; memory is generally reserved. Recent reports from neuroimaging show the occipital lobe may be involved in the processing of implicit memory (IM), especially the perception type of IM processing. In this study, we explored the explicit memory (EM) and IM damage in occipital lobe stroke patients. A total of 25 occipital strokes and 29 years of age, educational level equivalent healthy controls (HCs), evaluated by using immediate recall, delayed recall, recognition for EM tasks, picture identification, and category exemplar generation for IM tasks. There was no significant difference between occipital stroke patients and HCs in EM tasks and category exemplar generation task. In the picture identification task, occipital lobe stroke group score was poorer than HC group, the results were statistically significant, but in the pictures identify rate, occipital stroke patients and normal control group had no significant difference. The occipital stroke patients may have IM damage, primarily damage the perception type of IM priming effects, which was unrelated with their cortical blindness. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impairments in proverb interpretation following focal frontal lobe lesions☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick; Shallice, Tim; Robinson, Gail; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Turner, Martha; Woollett, Katherine; Bozzali, Marco; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The proverb interpretation task (PIT) is often used in clinical settings to evaluate frontal “executive” dysfunction. However, only a relatively small number of studies have investigated the relationship between frontal lobe lesions and performance on the PIT. We compared 52 patients with unselected focal frontal lobe lesions with 52 closely matched healthy controls on a proverb interpretation task. Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including a fluid intelligence task (Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices). Lesions were firstly analysed according to a standard left/right sub-division. Secondly, a finer-grained analysis compared the performance of patients with medial, left lateral and right lateral lesions with healthy controls. Thirdly, a contrast of specific frontal subgroups compared the performance of patients with medial lesions with patients with lateral frontal lesions. The results showed that patients with left frontal lesions were significantly impaired on the PIT, while in patients with right frontal lesions the impairments approached significance. Medial frontal patients were the only frontal subgroup impaired on the PIT, relative to healthy controls and lateral frontal patients. Interestingly, an error analysis indicated that a significantly higher number of concrete responses were found in the left lateral subgroup compared to healthy controls. We found no correlation between scores on the PIT and on the fluid intelligence task. Overall our results suggest that specific regions of the frontal lobes contribute to the performance on the PIT. PMID:23850600

  4. Impairments in proverb interpretation following focal frontal lobe lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick; Shallice, Tim; Robinson, Gail; MacPherson, Sarah E; Turner, Martha; Woollett, Katherine; Bozzali, Marco; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    The proverb interpretation task (PIT) is often used in clinical settings to evaluate frontal "executive" dysfunction. However, only a relatively small number of studies have investigated the relationship between frontal lobe lesions and performance on the PIT. We compared 52 patients with unselected focal frontal lobe lesions with 52 closely matched healthy controls on a proverb interpretation task. Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including a fluid intelligence task (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices). Lesions were firstly analysed according to a standard left/right sub-division. Secondly, a finer-grained analysis compared the performance of patients with medial, left lateral and right lateral lesions with healthy controls. Thirdly, a contrast of specific frontal subgroups compared the performance of patients with medial lesions with patients with lateral frontal lesions. The results showed that patients with left frontal lesions were significantly impaired on the PIT, while in patients with right frontal lesions the impairments approached significance. Medial frontal patients were the only frontal subgroup impaired on the PIT, relative to healthy controls and lateral frontal patients. Interestingly, an error analysis indicated that a significantly higher number of concrete responses were found in the left lateral subgroup compared to healthy controls. We found no correlation between scores on the PIT and on the fluid intelligence task. Overall our results suggest that specific regions of the frontal lobes contribute to the performance on the PIT. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Recovery of visual-field defects after occipital lobe infarction: a perimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebisoy, Mehmet; Çelebisoy, Neşe; Bayam, Ece; Köse, Timur

    2011-06-01

    To assess the temporal course of homonymous visual-field defects due to occipital lobe infarction, by using automated perimetry. 32 patients with ischaemic infarction of the occipital lobe were studied prospectively, using a Humphrey Visual Field Analyser II. The visual field of each eye was divided into central, paracentral and peripheral zones. The mean visual sensitivity of each zone was calculated and used for the statistical analysis. The results of the initial examination, performed within 2 weeks of stroke, were compared with the results of the sixth-month control. The lesions were assigned to the localisations, optic radiation, striate cortex, occipital pole and occipital convexity, by MRI. A statistically significant improvement was noted, especially for the lower quadrants. Lesions of the occipital pole and convexity were not significantly associated with visual-field recovery. However, involvement of the striate cortex and extensive lesions involving all the areas studied was significantly associated with poor prognosis. Homonymous visual-field defects in our patients improved within 6 months. Restoration of the lower quadrants and especially the peripheral zones was noted. Incomplete damage to the striate cortex, which has a varying pattern of vascular supply, could explain this finding. Magnification factor theory, which is the increment of the receptive-field size of striate cortex cells with visual-field eccentricity, may explain the more significant improvement in the peripheral zones.

  6. Pathology-Based Approach to Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Pharmacoresistant Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinoni, Matteo; Berti, Pier Paolo; Marucci, Gianluca; Rubboli, Guido; Volpi, Lilia; Riguzzi, Patrizia; Marliani, Federica; Toni, Francesco; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo; Michelucci, Roberto; Baruzzi, Agostino; Giulioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common cause of drug-resistant medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Structural abnormalities such as HS, granule cell pathology (GCP), and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) have been classified histopathologically, possibly allowing a more accurate assessment of prognostic seizure and neuropsychologic outcomes. We correlated seizure outcome with comprehensive temporal lobe pathologic findings, identified according to the most recent classification systems of HS, GCP, and FCD. All the 83 patients who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for drug-resistant MTLE and with a proven diagnosis of HS between April 2001 and May 2014 were collected. Patients were divided in 2 main groups: 1) isolated HS with/without GCP (HS +/- GCP); and 2) HS associated with FCD with/without GCP (HS+FCD +/- GCP). Patients were followed up at least 1 year, and seizure outcome was reported in accordance with Engel classification. Group I: HS +/- GCP: Statistical analysis confirmed a better outcome in HS + GCP patients than in HS-no GCP (P epilepsy surgery might improve the interpretation of the results, could predict which cases will enjoy a better seizure outcome, and could help to the comprehension of the causes of failures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The spatial distribution of magnetospheric convection electric fields at ionospheric altitudes: a review. 1. Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudal, G.; Blanc, M.

    1983-01-01

    The different techniques used for the study of the large-scale pattern of magnetospheric convection in the auroral zone are reviewed, with particular emphasis on incoherent and coherent scatter radars. For each technique, typical results are presented that illustrate its most important contributions to our knowledge of plasma convection at ionospheric altitudes, and its main advantages, limitations, and typical spatial and temporal coverage are described. Based upon the results gathered to date, the main features of the convection pattern are presented, namely: the double cell system and its asymmetry depending in particular on the Bsub(y) component of the IMF, the Harang discontinuity and its latitudinal dependence, the dayside throat, the attenuation of convection toward lower latitudes and its reversal at the polar cap boundary. The most interesting problems still open include the establishment of a quantitative model of the latitudinal variation of the electric field intensity at the planetary scale. Others entail separating universal time and local time effects in the field variations. Longitude variations have not yet been evaluated, and the characteristic signature of substorms has not been clearly separated from mere global modulations of the intensity of convection. Global coordinated campaigns, taking advantage of the best that each measurement technique has to offer to achieve the spatial and temporal coverage needed, are the only possible way to attack these problems

  8. Modified Laser Flash Method for Thermal Properties Measurements and the Influence of Heat Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Zhu, Shen; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2003-01-01

    The study examined the effect of natural convection in applying the modified laser flash method to measure thermal properties of semiconductor melts. Common laser flash method uses a laser pulse to heat one side of a thin circular sample and measures the temperature response of the other side. Thermal diffusivity can be calculations based on a heat conduction analysis. For semiconductor melt, the sample is contained in a specially designed quartz cell with optical windows on both sides. When laser heats the vertical melt surface, the resulting natural convection can introduce errors in calculation based on heat conduction model alone. The effect of natural convection was studied by CFD simulations with experimental verification by temperature measurement. The CFD results indicated that natural convection would decrease the time needed for the rear side to reach its peak temperature, and also decrease the peak temperature slightly in our experimental configuration. Using the experimental data, the calculation using only heat conduction model resulted in a thermal diffusivity value is about 7.7% lower than that from the model with natural convection. Specific heat capacity was about the same, and the difference is within 1.6%, regardless of heat transfer models.

  9. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Andalsvik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0–4.5 mV m−1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP, Φ (Boyle = 115 kV during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME, choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz By By polarity of the ICME magnetic field, a clear indication of a nightside source.

  10. Comparison of scale analysis and numerical simulation for saturated zone convective mixing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Scale analysis can be used to predict a variety of quantities arising from natural systems where processes are described by partial differential equations. For example, scale analysis can be applied to estimate the effectiveness of convective missing on the dilution of contaminants in groundwater. Scale analysis involves substituting simple quotients for partial derivatives and identifying and equating the dominant terms in an order-of-magnitude sense. For free convection due to sidewall heating of saturated porous media, scale analysis shows that vertical convective velocity in the thermal boundary layer region is proportional to the Rayleigh number, horizontal convective velocity is proportional to the square root of the Rayleigh number, and thermal boundary layer thickness is proportional to the inverse square root of the Rayleigh number. These scale analysis estimates are corroborated by numerical simulations of an idealized system. A scale analysis estimate of mixing time for a tracer mixing by hydrodynamic dispersion in a convection cell also agrees well with numerical simulation for two different Rayleigh numbers. Scale analysis for the heating-from-below scenario produces estimates of maximum velocity one-half as large as the sidewall case. At small values of the Rayleigh number, this estimate is confirmed by numerical simulation. For larger Rayleigh numbers, simulation results suggest maximum velocities are similar to the sidewall heating scenario. In general, agreement between scale analysis estimates and numerical simulation results serves to validate the method of scale analysis. Application is to radioactive repositories

  11. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations; Convection thermique turbulente: panaches et fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, M

    2007-10-15

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  12. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. High Ra, high Pr convection with viscosity gradients. Weak upward flow through mesh. Top fluid more viscous. Unstable layer Instability Convection.

  13. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with convective boundary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. January 2016 physics pp. 3–17. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with ... fluid over a flat plate subjected to convective surface condition. ... the steady laminar boundary layer flow over a permeable plate with a convective boundary.

  14. Seizure frequency correlates with loss of dentate gyrus GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Paul S.; Abrams, Emily; Wen, Xiling

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy occurs in one of 26 people. Temporal lobe epilepsy is common and can be difficult to treat effectively. It can develop after brain injuries that damage the hippocampus. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms involving the hippocampal dentate gyrus have been proposed. This study evaluated a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy to test which pathological changes in the dentate gyrus correlate with seizure frequency and help prioritize potential mechanisms for further study. FVB mice (n = 127) that had experienced status epilepticus after systemic treatment with pilocarpine 31–61 days earlier were video-monitored for spontaneous, convulsive seizures 9 hr/day every day for 24–36 days. Over 4,060 seizures were observed. Seizure frequency ranged from an average of one every 3.6 days to one every 2.1 hr. Hippocampal sections were processed for Nissl stain, Prox1-immunocytochemistry, GluR2-immunocytochemistry, Timm stain, glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunocytochemistry, glutamic acid decarboxylase in situ hybridization, and parvalbumin-immunocytochemistry. Stereological methods were used to measure hilar ectopic granule cells, mossy cells, mossy fiber sprouting, astrogliosis, and GABAergic interneurons. Seizure frequency was not significantly correlated with the generation of hilar ectopic granule cells, the number of mossy cells, the extent of mossy fiber sprouting, the extent of astrogliosis, or the number of GABAergic interneurons in the molecular layer or hilus. Seizure frequency significantly correlated with the loss of GABAergic interneurons in or adjacent to the granule cell layer, but not with the loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. These findings prioritize the loss of granule cell layer interneurons for further testing as a potential cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:28425097

  15. Seizure frequency correlates with loss of dentate gyrus GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Paul S; Abrams, Emily; Wen, Xiling

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy occurs in one of 26 people. Temporal lobe epilepsy is common and can be difficult to treat effectively. It can develop after brain injuries that damage the hippocampus. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms involving the hippocampal dentate gyrus have been proposed. This study evaluated a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy to test which pathological changes in the dentate gyrus correlate with seizure frequency and help prioritize potential mechanisms for further study. FVB mice (n = 127) that had experienced status epilepticus after systemic treatment with pilocarpine 31-61 days earlier were video-monitored for spontaneous, convulsive seizures 9 hr/day every day for 24-36 days. Over 4,060 seizures were observed. Seizure frequency ranged from an average of one every 3.6 days to one every 2.1 hr. Hippocampal sections were processed for Nissl stain, Prox1-immunocytochemistry, GluR2-immunocytochemistry, Timm stain, glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunocytochemistry, glutamic acid decarboxylase in situ hybridization, and parvalbumin-immunocytochemistry. Stereological methods were used to measure hilar ectopic granule cells, mossy cells, mossy fiber sprouting, astrogliosis, and GABAergic interneurons. Seizure frequency was not significantly correlated with the generation of hilar ectopic granule cells, the number of mossy cells, the extent of mossy fiber sprouting, the extent of astrogliosis, or the number of GABAergic interneurons in the molecular layer or hilus. Seizure frequency significantly correlated with the loss of GABAergic interneurons in or adjacent to the granule cell layer, but not with the loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. These findings prioritize the loss of granule cell layer interneurons for further testing as a potential cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Convection and mass loss through the chromosphere of Betelgeuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Betelgeuse is well suited for detailed study of the mass loss process in a massive red supergiant. We have engaged in a multi-scale, multi-color study to trace the ejected material from the photosphere to the interstellar medium, and understand its chemical evolution {formation of molecules and dust}. Infrared interferometry already gave us a detailed image of the photosphere, compatible with large convective cells. Adaptive optics spectro-imaging {1.0-2.2 microns} allowed us to detect the presence of the CN molecule and mass loss plume structures up to at least 6 R*. At larger distances, we observed silicate-rich dust in thermal IR {8-20 microns}. From the surface to 100 R*, we therefore have a continuous coverage with multicolor imagery. The chromosphere lies at a key location, between the photosphere and the molecular envelope. As shown by STIS spatially resolved spectroscopy {Lobel & Dupree 2001}, it contains rising and falling gases. Such structure is supported by our 3D modeling of the convection. In order to probe the dynamics of the envelope and its relation to photospheric spots and mass loss plumes, we propose to obtain UV imaging with STIS at 3 epochs to complement our coordinated ground-based effort as well as the earlier HST UV snapshots. We will use this imagery to correlate structures at different radii and temperatures, and to explore the time-scales of evolution. With the support of our 3D models, this information will answer specific questions including deciding between convective and polar explanations for bright spots and plumes. Our infrared imaging observations will be repeated contemporaneously with the requested HST/STIS images.

  17. Estimation of the effect of thermal convection and casing on the temperature regime of boreholes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppelbaum, L V; Kutasov, I M

    2011-01-01

    In a vertical borehole, free heat convection arises when the temperature gradient equals or exceeds the so-called critical gradient. The critical temperature gradient is expressed through the critical Rayleigh number and depends on two parameters: (a) the ratio of formation (casings) to fluid (gas) conductivities (λ f /λ) and (b) the convective parameter of the fluid. Both these parameters depend on the temperature (depth). An empirical equation for the critical Rayleigh number as a function of the ratio λ f /λ is suggested. For the 0–100 °C range, empirical equations for convective parameters of water and air are proposed. The analysis of the published results of field investigations in deep boreholes and modelling shows that the temperature disturbances caused by thermal convection do not exceed 0.01–0.05 °C. Thus, in deep wells the temperature deviations due to thermal convection are usually within the accuracy of the temperature surveys. However, due to convection cells the geothermal gradient cannot be determined with sufficient accuracy for short well sections. In shallow boreholes the effect of thermal convection is more essential (up to 3–5 °C). To reduce the effect of convection on the temperature regime in shallow observational wells, it is necessary to reduce the diameter of the wellbores and use well fillers (fluids and gases) with low values of the convective parameters. The field observations and numerical calculations indicate that the distorting effect due to casing pipes is small and its influence is localized to the ends of the pipes, and this effect is independent of time. (topical review)

  18. Lateral convection and diffusion of sediment in straight rivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bo; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    and a higher level of turbulence at the channel centre, than in the near bank zones, which means that the ability to support suspended sediment will decrease from the channel centre. The two turbulence models give different estimates for the lateral transport, which mainly are caused by turbulence generated......The lateral transport of suspended sediment in a straight river cross section with a parabolic shaped bed is studied be use of a k-e and a full Reynolds stress turbulence model. Due to depth variations a lateral transport of suspended sediment is generated. This is mainly caused by the slopping bed...... secondary flow cells in the Reynolds stress model. The flow cells make zones with alternately high and low sediment concentration, and thereby much higher local gradients in the lateral direction. Both models found a net inward lateral transport. The transport by convection was found more dominant than...

  19. An infinite-dimensional model of free convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iudovich, V.I. (Rostovskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Rostov-on-Don (USSR))

    1990-12-01

    An infinite-dimensional model is derived from the equations of free convection in the Boussinesq-Oberbeck approximation. The velocity field is approximated by a single mode, while the heat-conduction equation is conserved fully. It is shown that, for all supercritical Rayleigh numbers, there exist exactly two secondary convective regimes. The case of ideal convection with zero viscosity and thermal conductivity is examined. The averaging method is used to study convection regimes at high Reynolds numbers. 10 refs.

  20. Biosynthesis and release of beta-endorphin-, N-acetyl beta-endorphin-, beta-endorphin-(1-27)-, and N-acetyl beta-endorphin-(1-27)-like peptides by rat pituitary neurointermediate lobe: beta-endorphin is not further processed by anterior lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liotta, A.S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Krieger, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    Continuous labeling and pulse-chase techniques were employed to study the synthesis and secretion of multiple forms of immunoreactive beta-endorphin by cultured dispersed rat anterior lobe cells and intact neurointermediate pituitary lobe. Intact neurointermediate lobes incorporated radiolabeled amino acids into four to six forms of immunoreactive beta-endorphin. Four of these forms were physicochemically similar to authentic beta-endorphin, N-acetylated beta-endorphin, beta-endorphin-(1-27), and N-acetylated beta-endorphin-(1-27). Pulse-chase studies indicated that a beta-lipotropin-like molecule served as a metabolic intermediate for a beta-endorphin-like molecule. As beta-endorphin-like material accumulated in the cell, some of it was N-acetylated (approximately 18% at 2 hr chase and approximately 65% at 18 hr chase). At later chase times, beta-endorphin-(1-27)- and N-acetylated beta-endorphin-(1-27)-like peptides were the predominant molecular species detected. All endorphin forms were detected in unlabeled tissue maintained in culture or tissue continuously labeled for 72 hr and were released into the medium under basal, stimulatory (10(-8) M norepinephrine), or inhibitory (10(-7) M dopamine) incubation conditions. In all cases, beta-endorphin-(1-27)-like species were the predominant forms (more than 70% of total) present in the cells and released into the medium. In contrast, approximately 90% of radiolabeled immunoreactive beta-endorphin extracted from anterior lobe cells and medium similarly incubated appeared to represent the authentic beta-endorphin molecule. Continuous labeling (72 hr) revealed the beta-lipotropin/beta-endorphin molar ratio to be approximately 4. We conclude that, in anterior lobe, most of the beta-endorphin is not processed further and is released intact, while in neurointermediate lobe, it serves as a biosynthetic intermediate

  1. Education: DNA replication using microscale natural convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priye, Aashish; Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-12-07

    There is a need for innovative educational experiences that unify and reinforce fundamental principles at the interface between the physical, chemical, and life sciences. These experiences empower and excite students by helping them recognize how interdisciplinary knowledge can be applied to develop new products and technologies that benefit society. Microfluidics offers an incredibly versatile tool to address this need. Here we describe our efforts to create innovative hands-on activities that introduce chemical engineering students to molecular biology by challenging them to harness microscale natural convection phenomena to perform DNA replication via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Experimentally, we have constructed convective PCR stations incorporating a simple design for loading and mounting cylindrical microfluidic reactors between independently controlled thermal plates. A portable motion analysis microscope enables flow patterns inside the convective reactors to be directly visualized using fluorescent bead tracers. We have also developed a hands-on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) exercise based on modeling microscale thermal convection to identify optimal geometries for DNA replication. A cognitive assessment reveals that these activities strongly impact student learning in a positive way.

  2. Free convection film flows and heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Deyi

    2010-01-01

    Presents development of systematic studies for hydrodynamics and heat and mass transfer in laminar free convection, accelerating film boiling and condensation of Newtonian fluids, and accelerating film flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids. This book provides a system of analysis models with a developed velocity component method.

  3. Penetrative convection at high Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth; Wettlaufer, John S.

    2018-04-01

    We study penetrative convection of a fluid confined between two horizontal plates, the temperatures of which are such that a temperature of maximum density lies between them. The range of Rayleigh numbers studied is Ra=[0.01 ,4 ]106,108 and the Prandtl numbers are Pr=1 and 11.6. An evolution equation for the growth of the convecting region is obtained through an integral energy balance. We identify a new nondimensional parameter, Λ , which is the ratio of temperature difference between the stable and unstable regions of the flow; larger values of Λ denote increased stability of the upper stable layer. We study the effects of Λ on the flow field using well-resolved lattice Boltzmann simulations and show that the characteristics of the flow depend sensitively upon it. For the range Λ = , we find that for a fixed Ra the Nusselt number, Nu, increases with decreasing Λ . We also investigate the effects of Λ on the vertical variation of convective heat flux and the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. Our results clearly indicate that in the limit Λ →0 the problem reduces to that of the classical Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  4. Radiative-convective equilibrium model intercomparison project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Allison A.; Reed, Kevin A.; Satoh, Masaki; Stevens, Bjorn; Bony, Sandrine; Ohno, Tomoki

    2018-03-01

    RCEMIP, an intercomparison of multiple types of models configured in radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE), is proposed. RCE is an idealization of the climate system in which there is a balance between radiative cooling of the atmosphere and heating by convection. The scientific objectives of RCEMIP are three-fold. First, clouds and climate sensitivity will be investigated in the RCE setting. This includes determining how cloud fraction changes with warming and the role of self-aggregation of convection in climate sensitivity. Second, RCEMIP will quantify the dependence of the degree of convective aggregation and tropical circulation regimes on temperature. Finally, by providing a common baseline, RCEMIP will allow the robustness of the RCE state across the spectrum of models to be assessed, which is essential for interpreting the results found regarding clouds, climate sensitivity, and aggregation, and more generally, determining which features of tropical climate a RCE framework is useful for. A novel aspect and major advantage of RCEMIP is the accessibility of the RCE framework to a variety of models, including cloud-resolving models, general circulation models, global cloud-resolving models, single-column models, and large-eddy simulation models.

  5. Vortex statistics in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The vortices emerging in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water at Rayleigh number Ra=6.0×108 are investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and by direct numerical simulation. The so-called Q criterion is used to detect the vortices from velocity fields. This

  6. Phenomenology of convection-parameterization closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-I. Yano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Closure is a problem of defining the convective intensity in a given parameterization. In spite of many years of efforts and progress, it is still considered an overall unresolved problem. The present article reviews this problem from phenomenological perspectives. The physical variables that may contribute in defining the convective intensity are listed, and their statistical significances identified by observational data analyses are reviewed. A possibility is discussed for identifying a correct closure hypothesis by performing a linear stability analysis of tropical convectively coupled waves with various different closure hypotheses. Various individual theoretical issues are considered from various different perspectives. The review also emphasizes that the dominant physical factors controlling convection differ between the tropics and extra-tropics, as well as between oceanic and land areas. Both observational as well as theoretical analyses, often focused on the tropics, do not necessarily lead to conclusions consistent with our operational experiences focused on midlatitudes. Though we emphasize the importance of the interplays between these observational, theoretical and operational perspectives, we also face challenges for establishing a solid research framework that is universally applicable. An energy cycle framework is suggested as such a candidate.

  7. Oscillatory Convection in Rotating Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Vincent; Grannan, Alex; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments in a aspect ratio Γ = 2 cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr = 0 . 023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number varies from E = 4 ×10-5 to 4 ×10-6 and the Rayleigh number varies from Ra = 3 ×105 to 2 ×107 . Using heat transfer and temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes develop, coexisting with the inertial oscillatory modes in the bulk. When the strength of the buoyancy increases further, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr = 1 planetary and stellar dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, convection driven dynamo action in low Pr fluids can differ substantively than that occurring in typical Pr = 1 numerical models. Our results also suggest that low wavenumber, wall modes may be dynamically and observationally important in liquid metal dynamo systems. We thank the NSF Geophysics Program for support of this project.

  8. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  9. A 'backward' free-convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, H.K.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper the cooling of a low-heat-resistance sheet that moves downwards is considered. The free-convective velocities are assumed to be much larger than the velocity of the sheet. As a result the motion of the fluid is mainly towards the point where the sheet enters the system and a ‘backward’

  10. Natural convection inside an irregular porous cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Jorge I. LLagostera; Trevisan, Osvair Vidal

    1990-01-01

    Natural convection flow induced by heating from below in a irregular porous cavity is investigated numerically. The influence of the modified Rayleigh number and geometric ratios on heat transfer and fluid flow is studied. Global and local Nusselt for Rayleigh numbers covering the range 0 - 1600 and for several geometric ratios. The fluid flow and the temperature field are illustrated by contour maps. (author)

  11. Preserving Symmetry in Convection-Diffusion Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Veldman, A.E.P.; Drikakis, D.; Geurts, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    We propose to perform turbulent flow simulations in such manner that the difference operators do have the same symmetry properties as the corresponding differential operators. That is, the convective operator is represented by a skew-symmetric difference operator and the diffusive operator is

  12. Theories for convection in stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, Aa.

    1976-02-01

    A discussion of the fundamental differences between laboratory convection in a stellar atmosphere is presented. The shortcomings of laterally homogeneous model atmospheres are analysed, and the extent to which these shortcoming are avoided in the two-component representation is discussed. Finally a qualitative discussion on the scaling properties of stellar granulation is presented. (Auth.)

  13. Terminal project heat convection in thin cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Corona, J.

    1992-01-01

    Heat convection in thin cylinders and analysis about natural convection for straight vertical plates, and straight vertical cylinders submersed in a fluid are presented some works carry out by different authors in the field of heat transfer. In the part of conduction, deduction of the equation of heat conduction in cylindrical coordinates by means of energy balance in a control volume is presented. Enthalpy and internal energy are used for the outlining of the equation and finally the equation in its vectorial form is obtained. In the convection part development to calculate the Nusselt number for a straight vertical plate by a forces analysis, an energy balance and mass conservation over a control volume is outlined. Several empiric correlations to calculate the Nusselt number and its relations with other dimensionless numbers are presented. In the experimental part the way in which a prototype rode is assembled is presented measurements of temperatures attained in steady state and in free convection for working fluids as air and water are showed in tables. Also graphs of Nusselt numbers obtained in the experimental way through some empiric correlations are showed (Author)

  14. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  15. Dentate gyrus expression of nestin-immunoreactivity in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, L; Konopka, H; Escobar, E; Acuña, A; Oddo, S; Solís, P; Seoane, E; Kochen, S

    2015-04-01

    Granule cells pathology in dentate gyrus, have received considerable attention in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the nestin (an intermediate filament protein expressed by newly formed cells), immunoreactivity (IR) in granular cells layers of hippocampal tissue extirpated during epilepsy surgical procedure, in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Hippocampal sections of 16 patients with hippocampal sclerosis and drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy were processed using immunoperoxidase with antibody to nestin. Archival material from 8 normal post-mortem hippocampus, were simultaneously processed. Reactive area for nestin-IR, the total number of positive nestin cells per field (20×), and the MGV (mean gray value) was determined by computerized image analysis (ImageJ), and compared between groups. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Nestin-IR cells were found in granule cells layers of both controls and patients. Larger reactive somas (p gyrus may reflect changes in dentate gyrus neuroplasticity associated to chronic temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Further studies are required to determine the clinical implications on memory an emotional alterations such as depression. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  17. Novel Natural Convection Heat Sink Design Concepts From First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES by Derek E. Fletcher June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Garth Hobson Second Reader...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NOVEL NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...CONVECTION HEAT SINK DESIGN CONCEPTS FROM FIRST PRINCIPLES Derek E. Fletcher Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S., Southwestern

  18. International symposium on transient convective heat transfer: book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The international symposium on convective heat transfer was held on 19-23 August 1996, in Cesme, Izmir, Turkey. The spesialists discussed forced convection, heat exchangers, free convection and multiphase media and phase change at the meeting. Almost 53 papers were presented in the meeting

  19. Basal melting driven by turbulent thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbanipour Esfahani, Babak; Hirata, Silvia C.; Berti, Stefano; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2018-05-01

    Melting and, conversely, solidification processes in the presence of convection are key to many geophysical problems. An essential question related to these phenomena concerns the estimation of the (time-evolving) melting rate, which is tightly connected to the turbulent convective dynamics in the bulk of the melt fluid and the heat transfer at the liquid-solid interface. In this work, we consider a convective-melting model, constructed as a generalization of the Rayleigh-Bénard system, accounting for the basal melting of a solid. As the change of phase proceeds, a fluid layer grows at the heated bottom of the system and eventually reaches a turbulent convection state. By means of extensive lattice-Boltzmann numerical simulations employing an enthalpy formulation of the governing equations, we explore the model dynamics in two- and three-dimensional configurations. The focus of the analysis is on the scaling of global quantities like the heat flux and the kinetic energy with the Rayleigh number, as well as on the interface morphology and the effects of space dimensionality. Independently of dimensionality, we find that the convective-melting system behavior shares strong resemblances with that of the Rayleigh-Bénard one, and that the heat flux is only weakly enhanced with respect to that case. Such similarities are understood, at least to some extent, considering the resulting slow motion of the melting front (with respect to the turbulent fluid velocity fluctuations) and its generally little roughness (compared to the height of the fluid layer). Varying the Stefan number, accounting for the thermodynamical properties of the material, also seems to have only a mild effect, which implies the possibility of extrapolating results in numerically delicate low-Stefan setups from more convenient high-Stefan ones. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the geophysically relevant problem of modeling Arctic ice melt ponds.

  20. Convective mass transfer around a dissolving bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat, Jerome; Grandemange, Mathieu; Poulain, Cedric

    2017-11-01

    Heat or mass transfer around an evaporating drop or condensing vapor bubble is a complex issue due to the interplay between the substrate properties, diffusion- and convection-driven mass transfer, and Marangoni effects, to mention but a few. In order to disentangle these mechanisms, we focus here mainly on the convective mass transfer contribution in an isothermal mass transfer problem. For this, we study the case of a millimetric carbon dioxide bubble which is suspended under a substrate and dissolved into pure liquid water. The high solubility of CO2 in water makes the liquid denser and promotes a buoyant-driven flow at a high (solutal) Rayleigh number (Ra˜104 ). The alteration of p H allows the concentration field in the liquid to be imaged by laser fluorescence enabling us to measure both the global mass flux (bubble volume, contact angle) and local mass flux around the bubble along time. After a short period of mass diffusion, where the boundary layer thickens like the square root of time, convection starts and the CO2 is carried by a plume falling at constant velocity. The boundary layer thickness then reaches a plateau which depends on the bubble cross section. Meanwhile the plume velocity scales like (dV /d t )1 /2 with V being the volume of the bubble. As for the rate of volume loss, we recover a constant mass flux in the diffusion-driven regime followed by a decrease in the volume V like V2 /3 after convection has started. We present a model which agrees well with the bubble dynamics and discuss our results in the context of droplet evaporation, as well as high Rayleigh convection.

  1. Large-eddy simulation of maritime deep tropical convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Bogenschutz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study represents an attempt to apply Large-Eddy Simulation (LES resolution to simulate deep tropical convection in near equilibrium for 24 hours over an area of about 205 x 205 km2, which is comparable to that of a typical horizontal grid cell in a global climate model. The simulation is driven by large-scale thermodynamic tendencies derived from mean conditions during the GATE Phase III field experiment. The LES uses 2048 x 2048 x 256 grid points with horizontal grid spacing of 100 m and vertical grid spacing ranging from 50 m in the boundary layer to 100 m in the free troposphere. The simulation reaches a near equilibrium deep convection regime in 12 hours. The simulated vertical cloud distribution exhibits a trimodal vertical distribution of deep, middle and shallow clouds similar to that often observed in Tropics. A sensitivity experiment in which cold pools are suppressed by switching off the evaporation of precipitation results in much lower amounts of shallow and congestus clouds. Unlike the benchmark LES where the new deep clouds tend to appear along the edges of spreading cold pools, the deep clouds in the no-cold-pool experiment tend to reappear at the sites of the previous deep clouds and tend to be surrounded by extensive areas of sporadic shallow clouds. The vertical velocity statistics of updraft and downdraft cores below 6 km height are compared to aircraft observations made during GATE. The comparison shows generally good agreement, and strongly suggests that the LES simulation can be used as a benchmark to represent the dynamics of tropical deep convection on scales ranging from large turbulent eddies to mesoscale convective systems. The effect of horizontal grid resolution is examined by running the same case with progressively larger grid sizes of 200, 400, 800, and 1600 m. These runs show a reasonable agreement with the benchmark LES in statistics such as convective available potential energy, convective inhibition

  2. Free convection in fissured rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbreau, A.; Coudrain, A; Goblet, P.; Hosanski, J.M.; Ledoux, E.

    1981-01-01

    This work is a part of the evaluation of the thermal disturbance due to a deep radioactive waste repository, and of the radionuclide migration which might occur. The water movement due to byoyancy effects, as well as the movement of particles brought away by this movement, are studied. A mathematical model is proposed, and used in a computer code. The model results are compared with those of a laboratory experiment using a Hele-Shaw cell, and of a small scale migration test on a naturally fractured granite block

  3. Heat Transport Enhancement of Turbulent Thermal Convection by Inserted Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Zhang, Lu

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study on the heat transport properties of turbulent Rayleigh Benard Convection (RBC) in a rectangular cell with two types of 3D-printed structures inserted inside. The first one splits the original rectangular cell into 60 identical sub cells whose aspect ratio is 1:1:10 (length, width, height). The second one splits the cell into 30 sub cells, each with a 1:2:10 aspect ratio and a baffle in the center. We find that for large Rayleigh numbers (Ra), the Nusselt numbers (Nu) of both structures increase compared with that of the empty rectangular cell. An enhancement in Nu as much as 20% is found for the second type of insertion at Rayleigh number 2 ×109 . Moreover, the Nu-Ra scaling shows a transition with both geometries. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement within a single sub unit indicates that the transition may be related to the laminar to turbulent transition in flow field. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) confirm the experimental results. Our results demonstrate the potential in using insertions to enhance passive heat transfer. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council (RGC) of HKSAR (Nos. CUHK404513 and CUHK14301115).

  4. A continuous and prognostic convection scheme based on buoyancy, PCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérémy, Jean-François; Piriou, Jean-Marcel

    2016-04-01

    A new and consistent convection scheme (PCMT: Prognostic Condensates Microphysics and Transport), providing a continuous and prognostic treatment of this atmospheric process, is described. The main concept ensuring the consistency of the whole system is the buoyancy, key element of any vertical motion. The buoyancy constitutes the forcing term of the convective vertical velocity, which is then used to define the triggering condition, the mass flux, and the rates of entrainment-detrainment. The buoyancy is also used in its vertically integrated form (CAPE) to determine the closure condition. The continuous treatment of convection, from dry thermals to deep precipitating convection, is achieved with the help of a continuous formulation of the entrainment-detrainment rates (depending on the convective vertical velocity) and of the CAPE relaxation time (depending on the convective over-turning time). The convective tendencies are directly expressed in terms of condensation and transport. Finally, the convective vertical velocity and condensates are fully prognostic, the latter being treated using the same microphysics scheme as for the resolved condensates but considering the convective environment. A Single Column Model (SCM) validation of this scheme is shown, allowing detailed comparisons with observed and explicitly simulated data. Four cases covering the convective spectrum are considered: over ocean, sensitivity to environmental moisture (S. Derbyshire) non precipitating shallow convection to deep precipitating convection, trade wind shallow convection (BOMEX) and strato-cumulus (FIRE), together with an entire continental diurnal cycle of convection (ARM). The emphasis is put on the characteristics of the scheme which enable a continuous treatment of convection. Then, a 3D LAM validation is presented considering an AMMA case with both observations and a CRM simulation using the same initial and lateral conditions as for the parameterized one. Finally, global

  5. Intrinsic controls on the range of volumes, morphologies, and dimensions of submarine lobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prélat, A.; Covault, J. A.; Hodgson, D. M.; Fildani, A.; Flint, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine lobe dimensions from six different systems are compared: 1) the exhumed Permian Fan 3 lobe complex of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa; 2) the modern Amazon fan channel-mouth lobe complex, offshore Brazil; 3) a portion of the modern distal Zaïre fan, offshore Angola/Congo; 4) a Pleistocene fan of the Kutai basin, subsurface offshore Indonesia; 5) the modern Golo system, offshore east Corsica, France; and 6) a shallow subsurface lobe complex , offshore Nigeria. These six systems have significantly different source-to-sink configurations (shelf dimension and slope topography), sediment supply characteristics (available grain size range and supply rate), tectonic settings, (palaeo) latitude, and delivery systems. Despite these differences, lobe deposits share similar geometric and dimensional characteristics. Lobes are grouped into two distinct populations of geometries that can be related to basin floor topography. The first population corresponds to areally extensive but thin lobes (average width 14 km × length 35 km × thickness 12 m) that were deposited onto low relief basin floor areas. Examples of such systems include the Tanqua Karoo, the Amazon, and the Zaïre systems. The second population corresponds to areally smaller but thicker lobes (average width 5 km × length 8 km × thickness 30 m) that were deposited into settings with higher amplitude of relief, like in the Corsican trough, the Kutai basin, and offshore Nigeria. The two populations of lobe types, however, share similar volumes (a narrow range around 1 or 2 km 3), which suggests that there is a control to the total volume of sediment that individual lobes can reach before they shift to a new locus of deposition. This indicates that the extrinsic processes control the number of lobes deposited per unit time rather than their dimensions. Two alternative hypotheses are presented to explain the similarities in lobe volumes calculated from the six very different systems. The first states that

  6. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianying; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Xiaohua; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yanfang; Peng, Juyi; Zhang, Kerang

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  7. Proton MR spectroscopy in patients with acute temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M; Smith, J K; Kwock, L

    2001-01-01

    Decreases in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) as seen by proton MR spectroscopy are found in hippocampal sclerosis, and elevated levels of lipids/lactate have been observed after electroconvulsive therapy. Our purpose was to determine whether increased levels of lipids/lactate are found in patients with acute seizures of hippocampal origin. Seventeen patients with known temporal lobe epilepsy underwent proton MR spectroscopy of the mesial temporal lobes within 24 hours of their last seizure. Four of them were restudied when they were seizure-free. Five healthy individuals were used as control subjects. All MR spectroscopy studies were obtained using a single-voxel technique with TEs of 135 and 270. The relationship between the presence of lipids/lactate and seizures was tested using Fisher's exact test. Mean and standard deviations for NAA/creatine (Cr) were obtained in the hippocampi in patients with seizures on initial and follow-up studies and these values were compared with those in the control subjects. Seizure lateralization was obtained in 15 patients. Of the 17 seizure locations that involved hippocampi, 16 showed lipids/lactate by proton MR spectroscopy. Of the 13 hippocampi not directly affected by seizures, 10 showed no lipids/lactate and three showed lipids/lactate. The relationship between lipids/lactate and seizure location was confirmed. A comparison of NAA/Cr ratios for the involved hippocampi with those in control subjects showed significant differences on initial MR spectroscopy; however, no significant difference was found between acute and follow-up NAA/Cr ratios in hippocampi affected by seizures. Lipids/lactate were present in the hippocampi of patients with acute seizures and decreased when the patients were seizure-free. Thus, lipids/lactate may be a sensitive marker for acute temporal lobe seizures.

  8. Emotional reactions in patients after frontal lobe stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Emotional reactions have been documented after tumor lesions and the other damages of the brain. The aim of this paper was to examine the correlation between frontal lobe lesions and emotional reactions in patients with stroke. Methods. The research included 118 patients after stroke. Lesion localization was defined on computed axial tomography records, whereas the area and perimeter of lesion were measured by AutoCAD 2004 software. Examinations by means of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and Depression (HRSA and HRSD were carried out 11-40 days after stroke. Statistic data were processed by simple linear/nonlinear regression, Cox's and the generalized linear model. Results. A higher frequency of emotional reactions, i.e. anxiety, was determined in women after stroke (p = 0.024. A negative correlation between the lesion size and the intensity of anxiety manifestations was determined (Spearman’s r = -0.297; p = 0.001. Anxiety was more frequent in patients with frontal lobe lesions in the dominant hemisphere (interaction: frontal lesion * hand dominant hemisphere, p = 0.017. Also, HRSD score values showed the tendency for lesser decline in case of greater frontal lobe lesions in relation to lesions of other regions of prosencephalon (interaction: frontal lesion * lesion area, p = 0.001. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate the correlation between evolutionary younger structures of the central nervous system and emotional reactions of man. Therefore, it is necessary to undertake proper early psychopharmacotherapy in the vulnerable group of patients.

  9. Diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi; Iio, Masaaki.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography(PET) was performed in 18 temporal lobe epileptics. About 20 mCi of 11 C-glucose was perorally administered to the patients and 30 minutes later scanning was started when the transport of 11 C-glucose from blood to the brain tissue reached equilibrium. At the level of 25mm above orbitomeatal line, the slice image of the temporal lobe shows a relatively high metabolic oval ring involving the amygdala, hippocapal formation and the hippocampal gyrus medially and the T 1 , T 2 and T 3 neocortices laterally in normal subjects. The epileptic focus, when detected on PET images, was observed as a defect in this oval ring. In 15(83.3%) out of 18 cases, the location of epileptic focus was confirmed as a low metabolic defect. This diagnosis rate was higher than that of other focal epilepsy by PET study. The locations of foci were devided into three types: mesial (5 cases), lateral (4 cases) and combined (6 cases). The seizure symptoms of the patients were analyzed in terms of the correspondence to the focus types. The results showed that automatism and pseudoabsence had a close relation to the mesial and combined types and psychical, vertiginous or visual seizures correlated to the combined and lateral types. Visceral or motor seizures were induced equally by any focus types. These facts suggested that automatism and pseudoabsence were correlated with the mesial organs such as the amygdala and hippocampus and psychical, vertiginous or visual seizures had origin in lateral neocortices. Visceral or motor seizures were supposed to be the results of the spread from the temporal focus to the adjacent structures. It was concluded that PET was very useful in localization diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. In surgical treatment of epilepsy, in which the knowledge of the exact extent of epileptic foci is strongly demanded, PET study will offer invaluable data to the strategy of operation and foreseeing its prognosis. (author)

  10. Temporal lobe epilepsy: analysis of patients with dual pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova, V; Markand, O; Worth, R

    2004-02-01

    To determine the frequency and types of dual pathology in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and to analyze the clinical manifestations and surgical outcome. A total of 240 patients with TLE underwent temporal resections following a comprehensive pre-surgical evaluation. Thirty-seven (15.4%) of these had hippocampal sclerosis (HS) or temporal lobe gliosis in association with another lesion (dual pathology). Eighteen of 37 patients with dual pathology had heterotopia of the temporal lobe, nine had cortical dysplasia, four had cavernous angiomas or arteriovenous malformations, one had a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, one had a contusion and four patients had cerebral infarctions in childhood. 68.5% had abnormal head magnetic resonance imagings, 91.3% had abnormal positron emission tomography scans, and 96% had abnormal ictal SPECT. The intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP) showed impaired memory of the epileptogenic side in 72% of the patients. Twenty patients had left and 17 had right-sided en bloc temporal resections, including the lesion and mesial temporal structures. Twenty-six (70.2%) became seizure-free, eight (21.6%) had rare seizures, two (5.4%) had worthwhile seizure reduction and one (2.7%) had no improvement (range of follow-up 1-16 years, mean = 7.4 years). 15.4% had dual pathology. The dual pathology was almost exclusively seen in patients whose lesions were congenital, or occurred early in life, suggesting that the hippocampus is more vulnerable and more readily develops HS in early childhood. Resections, including the lateral and mesial temporal structures led to a favorable outcome with no mortality and little morbidity.

  11. Differences in the neural correlates of frontal lobe tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Teruyuki; Kato, Yuka; Imai, Ayu; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kaeko; Yamada, Kei; Narumoto, Jin

    2018-01-01

    The Executive Interview (EXIT25), the executive clock-drawing task (CLOX1), and the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) are used to assess executive function at the bedside. These tests assess distinct psychometric properties. The aim of this study was to examine differences in the neural correlates of the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB based on magnetic resonance imaging. Fifty-eight subjects (30 with Alzheimer's disease, 10 with mild cognitive impairment, and 18 healthy controls) participated in this study. Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the brain regions correlated with the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB scores. Age, gender, and years of education were included as covariates. Statistical thresholds were set to uncorrected P-values of 0.001 at the voxel level and 0.05 at the cluster level. The EXIT25 score correlated inversely with the regional grey matter volume in the left lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann areas 6, 9, 44, and 45). The CLOX1 score correlated positively with the regional grey matter volume in the right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11) and the left supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40). The FAB score correlated positively with the regional grey matter volume in the right precentral gyrus (Brodmann area 6). The left lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann area 9) and the right lateral frontal lobe (Brodmann area 46) were identified as common brain regions that showed association with EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB based only a voxel-level threshold. The results of this study suggest that the EXIT25, CLOX1, and FAB may be associated with the distinct neural correlates of the frontal cortex. © 2018 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  12. Are the dimensions of submarine lobe systems independent of allogenic factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prélat, A.; Covault, J. A.; Hodgson, D. M.; Fildani, A.; Flint, S. S.

    2010-05-01

    Submarine lobe dimensions from six different systems are compared: 1) the exhumed Permian Fan 3 lobe complex of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa; 2) the modern Amazon fan channel-mouth lobe complex, offshore Brazil; 3) a portion of the modern distal Zaïre fan, offshore Angola / Congo; 4) a Pleistocene fan of the Kutai Basin, subsurface offshore Indonesia; 5) the modern Golo system, offshore east Corsica, France; and 6) a lobe complex deposited in the shallow subsurface, offshore Nigeria. These six systems have significantly different source-to-sink configurations (shelf dimension and slope topography), sediment supply characteristics (calibre and rate), tectonic settings, (palaeo) latitude, and delivery systems. Despite these differences, the lobe deposits share similar geometric and dimensional characteristics. Lobes are grouped into two distinct populations of geometries that can be related to basin-floor topography. The first population corresponds to areally extensive but thin lobes (average width 14 km × length 35 km × thickness 12 m) that were deposited onto low relief basin floor areas, like the Tanqua Karoo, the Amazon and the Zaïre systems. The second population corresponds to areally smaller but thicker lobes (average width 5 km × length 8 km × thickness 30 m) that were deposited into settings with higher amplitude of relief, like in the Corsican trough, the Kutai basin, and offshore Nigeria. Basin floor topography confining the lobes can be very subtle, and only occur on one side of the system. The two populations of lobe types, however, share similar volumes, in the order of 1 or 2 km3. The largest lobes are observed in the Zaïre fan, where the average lobe volume reaches 3.3 km3 and the smallest lobes are observed in the Corsican trough where the average lobe volume is 0.4 km3. This variation in lobe volume is minor when compared to the variation observed in present-day up-dip drainage systems, which provide sediment to the deep-water depositional

  13. Anelastic Models of Fully-Convective Stars: Differential Rotation, Meridional Circulation and Residual Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix; Browning, Matthew; Miesch, Mark; Featherstone, Nicholas A.

    2018-01-01

    Low-Mass stars are typically fully convective, and as such their dynamics may differ significantly from sun-like stars. Here we present a series of 3D anelastic HD and MHD simulations of fully convective stars, designed to investigate how the meridional circulation, the differential rotation, and residual entropy are affected by both varying stellar parameters, such as the luminosity or the rotation rate, and by the presence of a magnetic field. We also investigate, more specifically, a theoretical model in which isorotation contours and residual entropy (σ‧ = σ ‑ σ(r)) are intrinsically linked via the thermal wind equation (as proposed in the Solar context by Balbus in 2009). We have selected our simulation parameters in such as way as to span the transition between Solar-like differential rotation (fast equator + slow poles) and ‘anti-Solar’ differential rotation (slow equator + fast poles), as characterised by the convective Rossby number and △Ω. We illustrate the transition from single-celled to multi-celled MC profiles, and from positive to negative latitudinal entropy gradients. We show that an extrapolation involving both TWB and the σ‧/Ω link provides a reasonable estimate for the interior profile of our fully convective stars. Finally, we also present a selection of MHD simulations which exhibit an almost unsuppressed differential rotation profile, with energy balances remaining dominated by kinetic components.

  14. Investigation of a natural convection in a small slot using a finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schira, P.; Guenther, C.; Mueller, U.

    1984-07-01

    Experimental results by Koster who studied natural convection processes in slender Hele-Shaw cells are simulated with an existing two-dimensional natural convection code. This investigation yields the following results: The basic model of the calculations, which assumes a constant temperature across the gap (smallest extent of the Hele-Shaw cell) and thus without heat exchange with the Plexiglas windows, leads to an underestimation of the experimentally obtained critical Rayleigh numbers (onset of convection, onset of oscillatory convection) by one order of magnitude and an overestimation of the nondimensional period compared to experimental findings. Another version of the code, which permits heat exchange with the windows reveals an overestimation of the critical Rayleigh numbers and smaller dimensionless periods than the experiments. By these two different approaches a twoside bounding the Koster's experiments are achieved. As the modified version overestimates the real heat transfer from and to the windows it may be concluded that using a suitably adapted heat transfer coefficient for the thermal coupling of the fluid and the windows numerical simulation would also reproduce quantitatively the results of Koster. The reason for the break down of the steady flow solution and the onset of transient flow was studied numerically by examining a model proposed by Howard. At this time no really satisfying answer to this question is available. (orig./GL) [de

  15. Hydrodynamic theory of convective transport across a dynamically stabilized diffuse boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhauser, H.

    1983-09-01

    The diffuse boundary layer between miscible liquids is subject to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities if the heavy fluid is supported by the light one. The resulting rapid interchange of the liquids can be suppressed by enforcing vertical oscillations on the whole system. This dynamic stabilization is incomplete and produces some peculiar novel transport phenomena such as decay off the density profile into several steps, periodic peeling of density sheets of the boundary layer and the appearance of steady vortex flow. The theory presented in this paper identifies the basic mechanism as formation of convective cells leading to enhanced diffusion, and explains previous experimental results with water and ZnJ 2 -solutions. A nonlinear treatment of the stationary convective flow problem gives the saturation amplitude of the ground mode and provides an upper bound for the maximum convective transport. The hydrodynamic model can be used for visualizing similar transport processes in the plasma of toroidal confinement devices such as sawtooth oscillations in soft disruptions of tokamak discharges and anomalous diffusion by excitation of convective cells. The latter process is investigated here in some detail, leading to the result that the maximum possible transport is of the order of Bohm diffusion. (orig.)

  16. Anton's Syndrome due to Bilateral Ischemic Occipital Lobe Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukić, Sanela; Sinanović, Osman; Zonić, Lejla; Hodžić, Renata; Mujagić, Svjetlana; Smajlović, Edina

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with Anton's syndrome (i.e., visual anosognosia with confabulations), who developed bilateral occipital lobe infarct. Bilateral occipital brain damage results in blindness, and patients start to confabulate to fill in the missing sensory input. In addition, the patient occasionally becomes agitated and talks to himself, which indicates that, besides Anton's syndrome, he might have had Charles Bonnet syndrome, characterized by both visual loss and hallucinations. Anton syndrome, is not so frequent condition and is most commonly caused by ischemic stroke. In this particular case, the patient had successive bilateral occipital ischemia as a result of massive stenoses of head and neck arteries.

  17. Déjà Experiences in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Illman, Nathan A.; Butler, Chris R.; Souchay, Celine; Moulin, Chris J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, déjà vu has been linked to seizure activity in temporal lobe epilepsy, and clinical reports suggest that many patients experience the phenomenon as a manifestation of simple partial seizures. We review studies on déjà vu in epilepsy with reference to recent advances in the understanding of déjà vu from a cognitive and neuropsychological standpoint. We propose a decoupled familiarity hypothesis, whereby déjà vu is produced by an erroneous feeling of familiarity which is not in ...

  18. Recurrent diarrhea as a manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Murai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A woman with temporal lobe epilepsy manifesting with repeated episodes of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness is reported. A 63-year-old, right-handed female presented with chief complaints of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness for almost three decades. The first attack occurred in her 30s, and similar attacks repeated several times in a year. Her attacks comprised abrupt abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, sudden emergence of old memories relating to when she had played with her brother in her childhood, and loss of consciousness during defecation. She had no convulsion or automatism and fully recovered in a few minutes. Every time she was transferred to emergency hospital by ambulance, she had examinations such as blood test, head computed tomography, electrocardiogram, abdominal ultrasound, and electroencephalography (EEG, but no specific diagnosis was made. On admission to our hospital, vital signs, neurological examination, and blood tests did not show abnormal findings. During long-term video-EEG monitoring for 40 h, she had no habitual event. Interictal EEG showed intermittent irregular delta waves and sharp regional transients in the left anterio-midtemporal area. Sharp transients were not as outstanding from background activities as to be defined as epileptiform discharges, but they were reproducible in morphology and distribution and appeared not only in sleep but also in wakefulness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Single-photon emission computed tomography showed a decrease of blood flow in the left frontal and temporal lobes. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—III showed a decline of verbal comprehension. We concluded that the patient was suffering from partial epilepsy originating from the left temporal lobe. Carbamazepine markedly improved her seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy can manifest with diverse autonomic symptoms and signs. Abdominal sensations often herald the onset of epileptic seizures

  19. Wideband Low Side Lobe Aperture Coupled Patch Phased Array Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduval, Dhruva

    Low profile printed antenna arrays with wide bandwidth, high gain, and low Side Lobe Level (SLL) are in great demand for current and future commercial and military communication systems and radar. Aperture coupled patch antennas have been proposed to obtain wide impedance bandwidths in the past. Aperture coupling is preferred particularly for phased arrays because of their advantage of integration to other active devices and circuits, e.g. phase shifters, power amplifiers, low noise amplifiers, mixers etc. However, when designing such arrays, the interplay between array performance characteristics, such as gain, side lobe level, back lobe level, mutual coupling etc. must be understood and optimized under multiple design constraints, e.g. substrate material properties and thicknesses, element to element spacing, and feed lines and their orientation and arrangements with respect to the antenna elements. The focus of this thesis is to investigate, design, and develop an aperture coupled patch array with wide operating bandwidth (30%), high gain (17.5 dBi), low side lobe level (20 dB), and high Forward to Backward (F/B) ratio (21.8 dB). The target frequency range is 2.4 to 3 GHz given its wide application in WLAN, LTE (Long Term Evolution) and other communication systems. Notwithstanding that the design concept can very well be adapted at other frequencies. Specifically, a 16 element, 4 by 4 planar microstrip patch array is designed using HFSS and experimentally developed and tested. Starting from mutual coupling minimization a corporate feeding scheme is designed to achieve the needed performance. To reduce the SLL the corporate feeding network is redesigned to obtain a specific amplitude taper. Studies are conducted to determine the optimum location for a metallic reflector under the feed line to improve the F/B. An experimental prototype of the antenna was built and tested validating and demonstrating the performance levels expected from simulation predictions

  20. Behaviors and transitions along the path to magnetostrophic convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannan, A. M.; Vogt, T.; Horn, S.; Hawkins, E. K.; Aggarwal, A.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The generation of magnetic fields in planetary and stellar interiors are believed to be controlled primarily by turbulent convection constrained by Coriolis and Lorentz forces in their electrically conducting fluid layers. Yet relatively few laboratory experiments are capable of investigating the different regimes of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic convection. In this work, we perform one laboratory experiment in a cylinder at a fixed heat flux using the liquid metal gallium in order to investigate, sequentially: Rayleigh-Bènard convection without any imposed constraints, magnetoconvection with a Lorentz constraint imposed by vertical magnetic field, rotating convection with a Coriolis constraint imposed by rotation, and finally the magnetostrophic convective regime where both Coriolis and Lorentz are imposed and equal. Using an array of internal and external temperature probes, we show that each regime along the path to magnetostrophic convection is unique. The behaviors and transitions in the dominant modes of convection as well as their fundamental frequencies and wavenumbers are investigated.