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Sample records for lluis brotons carme

  1. Euroraha kasutamine on keeruline pallimäng / Lluis Riera Figueras ; interv. Toivo Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Figueras, Lluis Riera

    2003-01-01

    Lluis Riera Figueras, kes on Euroopa Komisjoni pealäbirääkija Eesti ja Euroopa Komisjoni vahelistel läbirääkimistel EL-ist Eestile eraldatava summa täpse jaotuse üle, vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad EL-i kandidaatriikide plaane struktuuriraha kasutamisel, struktuuriraha olemust, Eesti valmisolekut seda administreerida

  2. High-efficiency CARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratman, V.L.; Kol`chugin, B.D.; Samsonov, S.V.; Volkov, A.B. [Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The Cyclotron Autoresonance Maser (CARM) is a well-known variety of FEMs. Unlike the ubitron in which electrons move in a periodical undulator field, in the CARM the particles move along helical trajectories in a uniform magnetic field. Since it is much simpler to generate strong homogeneous magnetic fields than periodical ones for a relatively low electron energy ({Brit_pounds}{le}1-3 MeV) the period of particles` trajectories in the CARM can be sufficiently smaller than in the undulator in which, moreover, the field decreases rapidly in the transverse direction. In spite of this evident advantage, the number of papers on CARM is an order less than on ubitron, which is apparently caused by the low (not more than 10 %) CARM efficiency in experiments. At the same time, ubitrons operating in two rather complicated regimes-trapping and adiabatic deceleration of particles and combined undulator and reversed guiding fields - yielded efficiencies of 34 % and 27 %, respectively. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that high efficiency can be reached even for a simplest version of the CARM. In order to reduce sensitivity to an axial velocity spread of particles, a short interaction length where electrons underwent only 4-5 cyclotron oscillations was used in this work. Like experiments, a narrow anode outlet of a field-emission electron gun cut out the {open_quotes}most rectilinear{close_quotes} near-axis part of the electron beam. Additionally, magnetic field of a small correcting coil compensated spurious electron oscillations pumped by the anode aperture. A kicker in the form of a sloping to the axis frame with current provided a control value of rotary velocity at a small additional velocity spread. A simple cavity consisting of a cylindrical waveguide section restricted by a cut-off waveguide on the cathode side and by a Bragg reflector on the collector side was used as the CARM-oscillator microwave system.

  3. High frequency CARM driver for rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danly, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This CARM program has successfully demonstrated the first ever long-pulse CARM oscillator operation; these results demonstrate the potential of CARMs as an alternative source of millimeter waves to the gyrotron for ECRH plasma heating. The result of 1.8 MW at 27.8 GHz and 0.5 μs pulse width in the TE 11 mode represent a clear demonstration of the capabilities of the CARM oscillator for the production of high powers with large frequency upshift. It is hoped that this successful proof-of-principle demonstration.will lead to further development of the CARM as an ECRH source by the DOE Office of Fusion Energy, Development and Technology Division. This success is a direct outcome of this support of the Advanced Energy Projects Office of DOE in the form of this program. The CARM amplifier component of the program, although unsuccessful at obtaining CARM amplifier operation at 17 GHz, has succeeded by furthering the understanding of the limitations and difficulties that lie ahead for continued CARM amplifier development. The amplifier component of the program has successfully demonstrated a high power second and third harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier. Up to 5 MW of power at 17.1 GHz and >50dB gain have been obtained. These results should be viewed as an important contribution of this program to the development of viable microwave sources for powering the next linear collider. Indeed, the present gyro-amplifier, which resulted from this program, is presently being used in ongoing high-gradient accelerator research at MIT under a DOE High Energy Physics grant. As a result of both the oscillator and amplifier advances made during this program, the CARM and harmonic gyro-TWT have reached a significantly more mature level; their future role in specific applications of benefit to DOEs OFE and HEP offices may now be pursued

  4. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig [Jeollanamdo Forest Resources Research Institute, Naju 520-833 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Ho-jae [College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-741 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-hyun, E-mail: parksh@chonnam.ac.kr [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

  5. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-jae; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

  6. Differential CARM1 expression in prostate and colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Rang; Lee, Byung Kook; Park, Ra-Young; Nguyen, Nguyen Thi Xuan; Bae, Jeong A; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Jung, Chaeyong

    2010-01-01

    Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) functions as a transcriptional coactivator of androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling. Correspondingly, overexpression of CARM1 has been associated with the development of prostate cancer (PCa) and its progression to androgen-independent PCa. In our preliminary study, however, the promoting effects of CARM1, with regard to androgen-stimulated AR target gene expression were minimal. These results suggested that the AR target gene expression associated with CARM1 may result primarily from non-hormone dependent activity. The goal of this study was to confirm the pattern of expression of CARM1 in human tumors and determine the mechanism of action in CARM1 overexpressed tumors. Tissue microarray was used to determine the pattern of expression of CARM1 in human cancers by immunohistochemistry. CARM1 expression was also evaluated in prostate and colorectal surgical specimens and the clinical records of all cases were reviewed. In addition, a reporter transcription assay using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter was used to identify the signaling pathways involved in non-hormone-mediated signal activation associated with CARM1. The tissue microarray showed that CARM1 was particularly overexpressed in the colorectal cancers while CARM1 expression was not prevalent in the prostate and breast cancers. Further studies using surgical specimens demonstrated that CARM1 was highly overexpressed in 75% of colorectal cancers (49 out of 65) but not in the androgen-independent PCa. In addition, CARM1's coactivating effect on the entire PSA promoter was very limited in both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent PCa cells. These results suggest that there are other factors associated with CARM1 expression in PSA regulation. Indeed, CARM1 significantly regulated both p53 and NF-κB target gene transcription. The results of this study suggest that, in addition to its role in activation of steroid receptors

  7. Differential CARM1 Isoform Expression in Subcellular Compartments and among Malignant and Benign Breast Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shlensky

    Full Text Available Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1 is a coactivator for ERα and cancer-relevant transcription factors, and can methylate diverse cellular targets including histones. CARM1 is expressed in one of two alternative splice isoforms, full-length CARM1 (CARM1FL and truncated CARM1 (CARM1ΔE15. CARM1FL and CARM1ΔE15 function differently in transcriptional regulation, protein methylation, and mediation of pre-mRNA splicing in cellular models.To investigate the functional roles and the prognosis potential of CARM1 alternative spliced isoforms in breast cancer, we used recently developed antibodies to detect differential CARM1 isoform expression in subcellular compartments and among malignant and benign breast tumors.Immunofluorescence in MDA-MB-231 and BG-1 cell lines demonstrated that CARM1ΔE15 is the dominant isoform expressed in the cytoplasm, and CARM1FL is more nuclear localized. CARM1ΔE15 was found to be more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibition than CARM1FL, indicating that the truncated isoform may be the oncogenic form. Clinical cancer samples did not have significantly higher expression of CARM1FL or CARM1ΔE15 than benign breast samples at the level of mRNA or histology. Furthermore neither CARM1FL nor CARM1ΔE15 expression correlated with breast cancer molecular subtypes, tumor size, or lymph node involvement.The analysis presented here lends new insights into the possible oncogenic role of CARM1ΔE15. This study also demonstrates no obvious association of CARM1 isoform expression and clinical correlates in breast cancer. Recent studies, however, have shown that CARM1 expression correlates with poor prognosis, indicating a need for further studies of both CARM1 isoforms in a large cohort of breast cancer specimens.

  8. A Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Exposure Between the Mini C-Arm and the Standard C-Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Hummel, Willy A; de Jong, Tijmen; Mouës, Chantal M

    2018-04-01

    The use of intraoperative fluoroscopy has become mandatory in osseous hand surgery. Due to its overall practicality, the mini C-arm has gained popularity among hand surgeons over the standard C-arm. This study compares image quality and radiation exposure for patient and staff between the mini C-arm and the standard C-arm, both with flat panel technology. An observer-based subjective image quality study was performed using a contrast detail (CD) phantom. Five independent observers were asked to determine the smallest circles discernable to them. The results were plotted in a graph, forming a CD curve. From each curve, an image quality figure (IQF) was derived. A lower IQF equates to a better image quality. The patients' entrance skin dose was measured, and to obtain more information about the staff exposure dose, a perspex hand phantom was used. The scatter radiation was measured at various distances and angles relative to a central point on the detector. The IQF was significantly lower for the mini C-arm resulting in a better image quality. The patients' entrance dose was 10 times higher for the mini C-arm as compared with the standard C-arm, and the scatter radiation threefold. Due to its improved image quality and overall practicality, the mini C-arm is recommended for hand surgical procedures. To ensure that the surgeons' radiation exposure is not exceeding the safety limits, monitoring radiation exposure using mini C-arms with flat panel technology during surgery should be done in a future clinical study.

  9. Development of the OPESCOPE mobile C-arm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hisao; Kadowaki, Toshio; Shimizu, Yasumitsu

    1994-01-01

    A new mobile C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy system called the 'OPESCOPE' equipped with a CCD TV camera and high-definition Image Intensifier has been developed. All the cables for the I.I. and X-ray generator are held inside the C-arm to prevent interference with operation and the C-arm is locked electromagnetically. Moreover, the C-arm is spring counterbalanced in the vertical motion axis. These features enable smooth positioning and uncluttered operation. The X-ray generator uses a high-frequency inverter designed to assure noiseless operation and a compact size. With the new DFS-700 videoprocessor unit being combined, clearer, more informative images can be obtained. In addition to its inherent portability this unit can be upgraded in DSA function to allow angiographic examinations in the surgical theater. (author)

  10. Ray tracing reconstruction investigation for C-arm tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malalla, Nuhad A. Y.; Chen, Ying

    2016-04-01

    C-arm tomosynthesis is a three dimensional imaging technique. Both x-ray source and the detector are mounted on a C-arm wheeled structure to provide wide variety of movement around the object. In this paper, C-arm tomosynthesis was introduced to provide three dimensional information over a limited view angle (less than 180o) to reduce radiation exposure and examination time. Reconstruction algorithms based on ray tracing method such as ray tracing back projection (BP), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) were developed for C-arm tomosynthesis. C-arm tomosynthesis projection images of simulated spherical object were simulated with a virtual geometric configuration with a total view angle of 40 degrees. This study demonstrated the sharpness of in-plane reconstructed structure and effectiveness of removing out-of-plane blur for each reconstruction algorithms. Results showed the ability of ray tracing based reconstruction algorithms to provide three dimensional information with limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis.

  11. Nuclear AMPK regulated CARM1 stabilization impacts autophagy in aged heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chen; Yu, Lu; Xue, Han; Yang, Zheng; Yin, Yue; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Mai; Ma, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Senescence-associated autophagy downregulation leads to cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) participates in many cellular processes, including autophagy in mammals. However, the effect of CARM1 in aging-related cardiac autophagy decline remains undefined. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator in metabolism and autophagy, however, the role of nuclear AMPK in autophagy outcome in aged hearts still unclear. Hers we identify the correlation between nuclear AMPK and CARM1 in aging heart. We found that fasting could promote autophagy in young hearts but not in aged hearts. The CARM1 stabilization is markedly decrease in aged hearts, which impaired nucleus TFEB-CARM1 complex and autophagy flux. Further, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2(SKP2), responsible for CARM1 degradation, was increased in aged hearts. We further validated that AMPK dependent FoxO3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced in nucleus, the decreased nuclear AMPK-FoxO3 activity fails to suppress SKP2-E3 ubiquitin ligase. This loss of repression leads to The CARM1 level and autophagy in aged hearts could be restored through AMPK activation. Taken together, AMPK deficiency results in nuclear CARM1 decrease mediated in part by SKP2, contributing to autophagy dysfunction in aged hearts. Our results identified nuclear AMPK controlled CARM1 stabilization as a new actor that regulates cardiac autophagy. - Highlights: • AMPK-dependent CARM1 stabilization is an important nuclear mechanism in cardiac autophagy. • AMPK deficiency lead to SKP2-mediated decrease in CARM1. • AMPK–SKP2–CARM1 in the regulation of autophagy dysfunction in aged heart.

  12. Application of C-arm computed tomography in cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, J.; Rohkohl, C.; Lauritsch, G.; Rittger, H.; Meissner, O.

    2009-01-01

    C-arm computed tomography is currently being introduced into cardiac imaging and offers the potential for three-dimensional imaging of the cardiac anatomy within the interventional environment. This detailed view is necessary to support complex interventional strategies, such as transcutaneous valve replacement, interventional therapy of atrial fibrillation, implantation of biventricular pacemakers and assessment of myocardial perfusion. Currently, the major limitation of this technology is its insufficient temporal resolution which limits the visualization of fast moving parts of the heart. (orig.) [de

  13. C-arm guided closed reduction of zygomatic arch fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eo, Yoon Ki; Lee, Dong Kun; Kim, Jeong Sam; Jang, Young Il

    1999-01-01

    The zygomatic arch is structurally protruded and is easily fractured. The classic management of zygomatic arch fracture has been mentioned the Keen, Lothrop, Dingman and Alling and threaded K-wire. All of the above methods have advantages and disadvantages. To minimize the disadvantages, we performed threaded K-wire for the first time using C-arm image intensifier. The subjects were 16 patients with Knight North group II (Zygomatic arch fracture). Among them the C-arm was used in 12 patients and the operator used sensitivity general method in 4 patients and confirmed the operation by mobile X-ray equipment. In conclusion, both groups were satisfied surgically and cosmetically. Using the C-arm, actual image at the time operation was clear and satisfied, the surrounding tissue damage was minimized and at was more accurately completed. The operation time was shortened by 30 to 60 minutes proving it to be an efficient method. We suggest though that further studies be needed to evaluate the radiation effect on these patients

  14. En introduktion til CARM: The Conversation Analytic Role-Play Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Simon Bierring

    2014-01-01

    Dette working paper er en introduktion til og kort diskussion af workshopmetoden Conversation Analytic Role-Play Method (CARM), som er en metode udviklet til at afholde workshops på baggrund af resultater fra interaktionsanalyser. Artiklen er den første introduktion til CARM-metoden på dansk, og...

  15. Virtual Reality Aided Positioning of Mobile C-Arms for Image-Guided Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhou Shao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For the image-guided surgery, the positioning of mobile C-arms is a key technique to take X-ray images in a desired pose for the confirmation of current surgical outcome. Unfortunately, surgeons and patient often suffer the radiation exposure due to the repeated imaging when the X-ray image is of poor quality or not captured at a good projection view. In this paper, a virtual reality (VR aided positioning method for the mobile C-arm is proposed by the alignment of 3D surface model of region of interest and preoperative anatomy, so that a reference pose of the mobile C-arm with respect to the inside anatomy can be figured out from outside view. It allows a one-time imaging from the outside view to greatly reduce the additional radiation exposure. To control the mobile C-arm to the desired pose, the mobile C-arm is modeled as a robotic arm with a movable base. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the accuracy of appearance model and precision of mobile C-arm positioning. The appearance model was reconstructed with the average error of 2.16 mm. One-time imaging of mobile C-arm was achieved, and new modeling of mobile C-arm with 8 DoFs enlarges the working space in the operating room.

  16. Characterization of Vitis vinifera L. Cv. Carménère grape and wine proanthocyanidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Katherina; Kennedy, James A; Agosin, Eduardo

    2007-05-02

    A formal compositional study of the proanthocyanidins of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Carménère was conducted in this work. We first characterized the polymeric proanthocyanidins of Carménère skins, seeds, and wines. In addition, the wine astringency was analyzed and compared with Cabernet Sauvignon. Although Carménère wines had a higher proanthocyanidin concentration and mean degree of polymerization than Cabernet Sauvignon wines, the former wines were perceived as less astringent. The low seed/skin proportion in Carménère wines as compared to other varieties, as evidenced by the reduced number of seeds per berry and the higher amount of epigallocatechin subunits of Carménère wine proanthocyanidins, could explain this apparent paradox.

  17. Prostate implant reconstruction from C-arm images with motion-compensated tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Moradi, Mehdi; Wen, Xu; French, Danny; Lobo, Julio; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate localization of prostate implants from several C-arm images is necessary for ultrasound-fluoroscopy fusion and intraoperative dosimetry. The authors propose a computational motion compensation method for tomosynthesis-based reconstruction that enables 3D localization of prostate implants from C-arm images despite C-arm oscillation and sagging. Methods: Five C-arm images are captured by rotating the C-arm around its primary axis, while measuring its rotation angle using a protractor or the C-arm joint encoder. The C-arm images are processed to obtain binary seed-only images from which a volume of interest is reconstructed. The motion compensation algorithm, iteratively, compensates for 2D translational motion of the C-arm by maximizing the number of voxels that project on a seed projection in all of the images. This obviates the need for C-arm full pose tracking traditionally implemented using radio-opaque fiducials or external trackers. The proposed reconstruction method is tested in simulations, in a phantom study and on ten patient data sets. Results: In a phantom implanted with 136 dummy seeds, the seed detection rate was 100% with a localization error of 0.86 ± 0.44 mm (Mean ± STD) compared to CT. For patient data sets, a detection rate of 99.5% was achieved in approximately 1 min per patient. The reconstruction results for patient data sets were compared against an available matching-based reconstruction method and showed relative localization difference of 0.5 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: The motion compensation method can successfully compensate for large C-arm motion without using radio-opaque fiducial or external trackers. Considering the efficacy of the algorithm, its successful reconstruction rate and low computational burden, the algorithm is feasible for clinical use.

  18. Prostate implant reconstruction from C-arm images with motion-compensated tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Moradi, Mehdi; Wen, Xu; French, Danny; Lobo, Julio; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Fichtinger, Gabor [School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L-3N6 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T-1Z4 (Canada); Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z-1E6 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T-1Z4 (Canada); School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L-3N6 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate localization of prostate implants from several C-arm images is necessary for ultrasound-fluoroscopy fusion and intraoperative dosimetry. The authors propose a computational motion compensation method for tomosynthesis-based reconstruction that enables 3D localization of prostate implants from C-arm images despite C-arm oscillation and sagging. Methods: Five C-arm images are captured by rotating the C-arm around its primary axis, while measuring its rotation angle using a protractor or the C-arm joint encoder. The C-arm images are processed to obtain binary seed-only images from which a volume of interest is reconstructed. The motion compensation algorithm, iteratively, compensates for 2D translational motion of the C-arm by maximizing the number of voxels that project on a seed projection in all of the images. This obviates the need for C-arm full pose tracking traditionally implemented using radio-opaque fiducials or external trackers. The proposed reconstruction method is tested in simulations, in a phantom study and on ten patient data sets. Results: In a phantom implanted with 136 dummy seeds, the seed detection rate was 100% with a localization error of 0.86 {+-} 0.44 mm (Mean {+-} STD) compared to CT. For patient data sets, a detection rate of 99.5% was achieved in approximately 1 min per patient. The reconstruction results for patient data sets were compared against an available matching-based reconstruction method and showed relative localization difference of 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm. Conclusions: The motion compensation method can successfully compensate for large C-arm motion without using radio-opaque fiducial or external trackers. Considering the efficacy of the algorithm, its successful reconstruction rate and low computational burden, the algorithm is feasible for clinical use.

  19. Registration of 2D C-Arm and 3D CT Images for a C-Arm Image-Assisted Navigation System for Spinal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ju Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-Arm image-assisted surgical navigation system has been broadly applied to spinal surgery. However, accurate path planning on the C-Arm AP-view image is difficult. This research studies 2D-3D image registration methods to obtain the optimum transformation matrix between C-Arm and CT image frames. Through the transformation matrix, the surgical path planned on preoperative CT images can be transformed and displayed on the C-Arm images for surgical guidance. The positions of surgical instruments will also be displayed on both CT and C-Arm in the real time. Five similarity measure methods of 2D-3D image registration including Normalized Cross-Correlation, Gradient Correlation, Pattern Intensity, Gradient Difference Correlation, and Mutual Information combined with three optimization methods including Powell’s method, Downhill simplex algorithm, and genetic algorithm are applied to evaluate their performance in converge range, efficiency, and accuracy. Experimental results show that the combination of Normalized Cross-Correlation measure method with Downhill simplex algorithm obtains maximum correlation and similarity in C-Arm and Digital Reconstructed Radiograph (DRR images. Spine saw bones are used in the experiment to evaluate 2D-3D image registration accuracy. The average error in displacement is 0.22 mm. The success rate is approximately 90% and average registration time takes 16 seconds.

  20. Test results from the LLNL 250 GHz CARM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulke, B.; Caplan, M.; Bubp, D.; Houck, T.; Rogers, D.; Trimble, D.; VanMaren, R.; Westenskow, G.; McDermott, D.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Danly, B.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have completed the initial phase of a 250 GHz CARM experiment, driven by the 2 MeV, 1 kA, 30 ns induction linac at the LLNL ARC facility. A non-Brillouin, solid, electron beam is generated from a flux-threaded, thermionic cathode. As the beam traverses a 10 kG plateau produced by a superconducting magnet, ten percent of the beam energy is converted into rotational energy in a bifilar helix wiggler that produces a spiraling, 50 G, transverse magnetic field. The beam is then compressed to a 5 mm diameter as it drifts into a 30 kG plateau. For the present experiment, the CARM interaction region consisted of a single Bragg section resonator, followed by a smooth-bore amplifier section. Using high-pass filters, they have observed broadband output signals estimated to be at the several megawatt level in the range 140 to over 230 GHz. This is consistent with operation as a superradiant amplifier. Simultaneously, they also observed K a band power levels near 3 MW

  1. Test results from the LLNL 250 GHz CARM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulke, B.; Caplan, M.; Bubp, D.; Houck, T.; Rogers, D.; Trimble, D.; VanMaren, R.; Westenskow, G.; McDermott, D.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Danly, B.

    1991-05-01

    We have completed the initial phase of a 250 GHz CARM experiment, driven by the 2 MeV, 1 kA, 30 ns induction linac at the LLNL ARC facility. A non-Brillouin, solid, electron beam is generated from a flux-threaded, thermionic cathode. As the beam traverses a 10 kG plateau produced by a superconducting magnet, ten percent of the beam energy is converted into rotational energy in a bifilar helix wiggler that produces a spiraling, 50 G, transverse magnetic field. The beam is then compressed to a 5 mm diameter as it drifts into a 30 kG plateau. For the present experiment, the CARM interaction region consisted of a single Bragg section resonator, followed by a smooth-bore amplifier section. Using high-pass filters, we have observed broadband output signals estimated to be at the several megawatt level in the range 140 to over 230 GHz. This is consistent with operation as a superradiant amplifier. Simultaneously, we also observed K a band power levels near 3 MW

  2. CARM and harmonic gyro-amplifier experiments at 17 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menninger, W.L.; Danly, B.G.; Alberti, S.; Chen, C.; Rullier, J.L.; Temkin, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Cyclotron resonance maser amplifiers are possible sources for applications such as electron cyclotron resonance heating of fusion plasmas and driving high-gradient rf linear accelerators. For accelerator drivers, amplifiers or phase locked-oscillators are required. A 17 GHz cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier experiment and a 17 GHz third harmonic gyro-amplifier experiment are presently underway at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Using the SRL/MIT SNOMAD II introduction accelerator to provide a 380 kV, 180 A, 30 ns flat top electron beam, the gyro-amplifier experiment has produced 5 MW of rf power with over 50 dB of gain at 17 GHz. The gyro-amplifier operates in the TE 31 mode using a third harmonic interaction. Because of its high power output, the gyro-amplifier will be used as the rf source for a photocathode rf electron gun experiment also taking place at MIT. Preliminary gyro-amplifier results are presented, including measurement of rf power, gain versus interaction length, and the far-field pattern. A CARM experiment designed to operate in the TE 11 mode is also discussed

  3. Interventional C-arm tomosynthesis for vascular imaging: initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, David A.; Claus, Bernhard E. H.; Al Assad, Omar; Trousset, Yves; Riddell, Cyril; Avignon, Gregoire; Solomon, Stephen B.; Lai, Hao; Wang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    As percutaneous endovascular procedures address more complex and broader disease states, there is an increasing need for intra-procedure 3D vascular imaging. In this paper, we investigate C-Arm 2-axis tomosynthesis ("Tomo") as an alternative to C-Arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for workflow situations in which the CBCT acquisition may be inconvenient or prohibited. We report on our experience in performing tomosynthesis acquisitions with a digital angiographic imaging system (GE Healthcare Innova 4100 Angiographic Imaging System, Milwaukee, WI). During a tomo acquisition the detector and tube each orbit on a plane above and below the table respectively. The tomo orbit may be circular or elliptical, and the tomographic half-angle in our studies varied from approximately 16 to 28 degrees as a function of orbit period. The trajectory, geometric calibration, and gantry performance are presented. We overview a multi-resolution iterative reconstruction employing compressed sensing techniques to mitigate artifacts associated with incomplete data reconstructions. In this work, we focus on the reconstruction of small high contrast objects such as iodinated vasculature and interventional devices. We evaluate the overall performance of the acquisition and reconstruction through phantom acquisitions and a swine study. Both tomo and comparable CBCT acquisitions were performed during the swine study thereby enabling the use of CBCT as a reference in the evaluation of tomo vascular imaging. We close with a discussion of potential clinical applications for tomo, reflecting on the imaging and workflow results achieved.

  4. Measurements of surgeons' exposure to ionizing radiation dose during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Lee, Kyoung Min; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Boram; Kwon, Dae Gyu; Chung, Chin Youb

    2012-06-15

    Measurement of radiation dose from C-arm fluoroscopy during a simulated intraoperative use in spine surgery. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate scatter radiation doses to specific organs of surgeons during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy in spine surgery and to provide practical intraoperative guidelines. There have been studies that reported the radiation dose of C-arm fluoroscopy in various procedures. However, radiation doses to surgeons' specific organs during spine surgery have not been sufficiently examined, and the practical intraoperative radioprotective guidelines have not been suggested. Scatter radiation dose (air kerma rate) was measured during the use of a C-arm on an anthropomorphic chest phantom on an operating table. Then, a whole body anthropomorphic phantom was located besides the chest phantom to simulate a surgeon, and scatter radiation doses to specific organs (eye, thyroid, breast, and gonads) and direct radiation dose to the surgeon's hand were measured using 4 C-arm configurations (standard, inverted, translateral, and tube translateral). The effects of rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient and of a thyroid shield were also evaluated. Scatter radiation doses decreased as distance from the patient increased during C-arm fluoroscopy use. The standard and translateral C-arm configurations caused lower scatter doses to sensitive organs than inverted and tube translateral configurations. Scatter doses were highest for breast and lowest for gonads. The use of a thyroid shield and rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient reduced scatter radiation dose to the surgeon's thyroid and eyes. The direct radiation dose was at least 20 times greater than scatter doses to sensitive organs. The following factors could reduce radiation exposure during intraoperative use of C-arm; (1) distance from the patient, (2) C-arm configuration, (3) radioprotective equipments, (4) rotating the surgeons' eyes away from the patient, and (5) avoiding

  5. Optimal C-arm angulation during transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Accuracy of a rotational C-arm computed tomography based three dimensional heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veulemans, Verena; Mollus, Sabine; Saalbach, Axel; Pietsch, Max; Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Westenfeld, Ralf; Weese, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Balzer, Jan

    2016-10-26

    To investigate the accuracy of a rotational C-arm CT-based 3D heart model to predict an optimal C-arm configuration during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Rotational C-arm CT (RCT) under rapid ventricular pacing was performed in 57 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis as part of the pre-procedural cardiac catheterization. With prototype software each RCT data set was segmented using a 3D heart model. From that the line of perpendicularity curve was obtained that generates a perpendicular view of the aortic annulus according to the right-cusp rule. To evaluate the accuracy of a model-based overlay we compared model- and expert-derived aortic root diameters. For all 57 patients in the RCT cohort diameter measurements were obtained from two independent operators and were compared to the model-based measurements. The inter-observer variability was measured to be in the range of 0°-12.96° of angular C-arm displacement for two independent operators. The model-to-operator agreement was 0°-13.82°. The model-based and expert measurements of aortic root diameters evaluated at the aortic annulus ( r = 0.79, P optimal C-arm configuration, potentially simplifying current clinical workflows before and during TAVR.

  6. C-arm CT for planning and guidance of extrahepatic embolizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, F.K.; Meissner, O.A.; Meyer, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiological vascular embolizations are complex procedures that require exact imaging of the target region to facilitate safe and effective treatment. The purpose of this paper is to present the technique and feasibility of flat detector C-arm computed tomography (C-arm CT) for control and guidance of extrahepatic abdominal embolization procedures. C-arm CT images can provide important information on both vascular and cross-sectional anatomy of the target region, help in determining therapy endpoints and provide follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions.The cases presented demonstrate that C-arm CT images are beneficial for abdominal embolization procedures and facilitate precise treatment. (orig.) [de

  7. Josep Lluis Mateo Dieste, La hermandad hispano-marroquí. Polìtica y religión bajo el Protectorado español en Marruecos (1912-1956, Edicions Bellaterra, Barcelona, 2003, 507 pages, 5 cartes, 5 tableaux et 2 graphiques en annexe, un glossaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella Villasante Cervello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Le livre de Josep Lluis Mateo Dieste — issu de sa thèse, soutenue à l’Institut d’études européennes de Florence en 2002 — aborde un cas du colonialisme européen tardif qui reste assez mal connu, celui du Protectorat espagnol au Maroc, de 1912 à 1956 — territoire qui correspond aux actuelles Provinces du Rif et de l’Oriental. En arrière-plan de cette installation coloniale se trouve la perte par la monarchie espagnole de ses dernières possessions aux Amériques, l’île de Cuba et les Caraïbes, e...

  8. Marker detection evaluation by phantom and cadaver experiments for C-arm pose estimation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Teena; Hoßbach, Martin; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    C-arm fluoroscopy is used for guidance during several clinical exams, e.g. in bronchoscopy to locate the bronchoscope inside the airways. Unfortunately, these images provide only 2D information. However, if the C-arm pose is known, it can be used to overlay the intrainterventional fluoroscopy images with 3D visualizations of airways, acquired from preinterventional CT images. Thus, the physician's view is enhanced and localization of the instrument at the correct position inside the bronchial tree is facilitated. We present a novel method for C-arm pose estimation introducing a marker-based pattern, which is placed on the patient table. The steel markers form a pattern, allowing to deduce the C-arm pose by use of the projective invariant cross-ratio. Simulations show that the C-arm pose estimation is reliable and accurate for translations inside an imaging area of 30 cm x 50 cm and rotations up to 30°. Mean error values are 0.33 mm in 3D space and 0.48 px in the 2D imaging plane. First tests on C-arm images resulted in similarly compelling accuracy values and high reliability in an imaging area of 30 cm x 42.5 cm. Even in the presence of interfering structures, tested both with anatomy phantoms and a turkey cadaver, high success rates over 90% and fully satisfying execution times below 4 sec for 1024 px × 1024 px images could be achieved.

  9. Quantification of the gravity-dependent change in the C-arm image center for image compensation in fluoroscopic spinal neuronavigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, S; Abbasi, H R; Chin, S; Steinberg, G; Shahidi, R

    2001-01-01

    In the quest to develop a viable, frameless spinal navigation system, many researchers are utilizing the C-arm fluoroscope. However, there is a significant problem with the C-arm that must be quantified: the gravity-dependent sag effect resulting from the geometry of the C-arm and aggravated by the inequity of weight at each end of the C-arm. This study quantified the C-arm sag effect, giving researchers the protocol and data needed to develop a program that accounts for this distortion. The development of spinal navigation algorithms that account for the C-arm sag effect should produce a more accurate spinal navigation system.

  10. Measurements of surgeons' exposure to ionizing radiation dose: comparison of conventional and mini C-arm fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K H; Min, E; Chung, C Y; Jo, B C; Park, M S; Lee, K

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to measure the equivalent scattered radiation dose delivered to susceptible organs while simulating orthopaedic surgery using conventional and mini C-arm fluoroscopy. In addition, shielding effects on the thyroid, thymus, and gonad, and the direct exposure delivered to the patient's hands were also compared. A conventional and mini C-arms were installed in an operating room, and a hand and an operator phantom were used to simulate a patient's hand and a surgeon. Photoluminescence dosimeters were used to measure the equivalent dose by scattered radiation arriving at the thyroid, thymus, and gonad on a whole-body phantom in the position of the surgeon. Equivalent scattered radiation doses were measured in four groups: (1) unshielded conventional C-arm group; (2) unshielded mini C-arm group; (3) lead-shielded conventional C-arm group; and (4) lead-shielded mini C-arm group. Equivalent scattered radiation doses to the unshielded group were significantly lower in the mini C-arm group than those in the conventional C-arm group for all organs. The gonad in the lead-shielded conventional C-arm group showed the highest equivalent dose among operator-susceptible organs, and radiation dose was reduced by approximately 96% compared with that in the unshielded group. Scattered radiation was not detected in any susceptible organ in the lead-shielded mini C-arm group. The direct radiation dose to the hand phantom measured from the mini C-arm was significantly lower than that measured from the conventional C-arm. The results show that the equivalent scattered radiation dose to the surgeon's susceptible organs and the direct radiation dose to a patient's hand can be decreased significantly by using a mini C-arm rather than a conventional C-arm. However, protective lead garments, such as a thyroid shield and apron, should be applied to minimize radiation exposure to susceptible organs, even during use of mini C-arm fluoroscopy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. C-arm CT for chemo-embolization of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, P.E.; Firlbeck, G.; Meissner, O.A.; Wietholtz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Local efficacy of transarterial chemo-embolization (TACE) is enhanced if selective treatment is performed. Selectivity of TACE mainly depends on vascular anatomy but also on the identification and catheterization of tumor feeding arteries. Correlation of vascular territories and target tumor volume in angiographic projection images is more difficult if tumors are not hypervascularized and contrast of liver parenchyma is inhomogeneous. C-arm CT offers the option of selective perfusion imaging via tumor-feeding arteries. This allows the comparison of perfusion images and baseline cross-sectional imaging to evaluate if tumors are covered completely by local treatment and to change the catheter position if necessary. Furthermore the uptake of embolization material, such as lipiodol can be checked by C-arm CT. In a prospective study of 75 TACE of liver tumors and liver metastases we evaluated the appropriateness of 85 catheter positions ready for delivery by perfusion C-arm CT and compared the diagnostic confidence of angiography and perfusion C-arm CT in terms of judgment of correct catheter position for the planned treatment. Diagnostic confidence was improved by perfusion C-arm CT in 55% of cases and in 11 cases (13%) catheter positions were inappropriate and had to be corrected. The reasons for catheter repositioning were incomplete coverage of the target tumor by perfusion volume (mismatch) in 6 cases, inappropriate perfusion of adjacent liver parenchyma in 2 cases and non-selective tumor perfusion via collateral arteries in 3 cases. C-arm CT allowed sufficient visualization of uptake of lipiodol in all cases evaluated. The diagnostic benefit of C-arm CT increases if tumors are treated more selectively, are not strongly hypervascular, are located centrally and if the enhancement of liver parenchyma is inhomogeneous. C-arm CT causes additional working time and contrast load, which is relatively low compared to angiography. Radiation exposure of 151 μGy per C-arm

  12. Study on the method or reducing the operator's exposure dose from a C-Arm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Sik; Song, Jong Nam; Kim, Seung Ok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, C-Arm equipment is being used as we intend to verify the exposure dose on the operator by the scattering rays during the operation of the C-Arm equipment and to provide an effective method of reducing the exposure dose. Exposure dose is less than the Over Tube method utilizes the C-arm equipment Under Tube the scheme, The result showed that the exposure dose on the operator decreased with a thicker shield, and as the operator moved away from the center line. Moreover, as the research time prolongated, the exposure dose increased, and among the three affixed location of the dosimeter, the most exposure dose was measured at gonadal, then followed by chest and thyroid. However, in consideration of the relationship between the operator and the patient, the distance cannot be increased infinitely and the research time cannot be decreased infinitely in order to reduce the exposure dose. Therefore, by changing the thickness of the radiation shield, the exposure dose on the operator was able to be reduced. If you are using a C-Arm equipment discomfort during surgery because the grounds that the procedure is neglected and close to the dose of radiation shielding made can only increase. Because a separate control room cannot be used for the C-Arm equipment due to its characteristic, the exposure dose on the operator needs to be reduced by reinforcing the shield through an appropriate thickness of radiation shield devices, such as apron, etc. during a treatment

  13. Utility of intraoperative diagnostic C-arm angiography for management of high grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhikui Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The accurate and efficient localization of underlying vascular lesions is crucial for prompt and definitive treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. To demonstrate the utility and feasibility of intraoperative C-arm angiography in cerebrovascular emergencies, we report five cases of high grade SAH and/or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH where intraoperative diagnostic C-arm angiography was safely and effectively utilized. Initial evaluations of all patients included a non-contrast head CT scan, which was followed by urgent decompressive hemicraniectomy as a life-saving measure in the presence of markedly elevated intracranial pressure. Further diagnostic evaluations were performed intraoperatively using a multi-purpose C-arm angiography system. The C-arm angiography findings greatly aided the intraoperative planning and led to definitive treatments in four cases of SAH by elucidating the underlying neurovascular lesions. With this treatment strategy, two of the patients made moderately good recoveries from their SAH and/or ICH with a Glasgow outcome score (GOS of 4. Three of the patients expired despite maximal therapy mostly due to unfavorable presenting grade. These results suggest that C-arm angiography is a reasonable diagnostic and surgical planning tool for selected patients with high grade diffuse SAH who require immediate decompression.

  14. High frequency CARM driver for RF linacs. Progress report, Year 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danly, B.G.

    1990-01-01

    Progress during the first year of this program has been noteworthy in both theoretical and experimental areas. Substantial improvements to the MIT CARM codes have been carried out, and the code has been successfully benchmarked against other codes, linear theory, and experimental work. CARM amplifier phase stability has been studied theoretically and found to be significantly better than that of free-electron lasers or relativistic klystrons, provided the device is properly designed. Both multimode simulations and particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out to study mode competition effects between convectively unstable and absolutely unstable modes. Improvement of the Pierce-Wiggler code for modeling the beam formation prior to the interaction region has been carried out. Experimental designs for a long-pulse, modulator-driven CARM amplifier experiment which will be carried out by the end of this fiscal year have been mostly completed. Designs for an induction-linac-driven CARM amplifier experiment, which will be carried out by the end of Year II of this program,, have also been performed. Finally, a CARM oscillator experiment is presently underway at our facility

  15. Kaluza-Klein-Carmeli Metric from Quaternion-Clifford Space, Lorentz' Force, and Some Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianto V.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It was known for quite long time that a quaternion space can be generalized to a Clifford space, and vice versa; but how to find its neat link with more convenient metric form in the General Relativity theory, has not been explored extensively. We begin with a representation of group with non-zero quaternions to derive closed FLRW metric [1], and from there obtains Carmeli metric, which can be extended further to become 5D and 6D metric (which we propose to call Kaluza-Klein-Carmeli metric. Thereafter we discuss some plausible implications of this metric, beyond describing a galaxy’s spiraling motion and redshift data as these have been done by Carmeli and Hartnett [4, 5, 6]. In subsequent section we explain Podkletnov’s rotating disc experiment. We also note possible implications to quantum gravity. Further observations are of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  16. Angiography-based C-arm CT for the assessment of extrahepatic shunting before radioembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusner, Till Alexander; Hahn, S.; Forsting, M.; Antoch, G.; Hamami, M.E.; Poeppel, T.; Bockisch, A.; Ertle, J.; Hilgard, P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to retrospectively assess the accuracy of angiography-based C-arm CT for the detection of extrahepatic shunting before SIRT. Materials and methods: 30 patients (mean age: 64 ± 12 years) with hypervascularized hepatic tumors underwent hepatic angiography, coil embolization of gastrointestinal collaterals and 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT/CT before SIRT. Before MAA injection via a microcatheter from the intended treatment position, an angiography and angiography-based C-arm CT (XperCT trademark, Philips Healthcare) were acquired. Angiographies and XperCT trademark were performed from 48 microcatheter positions followed by MAA injections and MAA-SPECT/CT. MAA-SPECT/CT served as the reference standard for determining the accuracy of hepatic arteriography and C-arm CT for the detection of extrahepatic shunting. Results: MAA-SPECT/CT revealed extrahepatic shunting in 5 patients (17%). Hepatic arteriography yielded a true negative in 22 (73%), a false negative in 5 (17%), and an unclear result in 3 patients (10%). C-arm CT yielded a true positive in 3 (10%), true negative in 24 (80%), false positive in 1 (3%), and false negative in 2 patients (7%). The specificity and the NPV of hepatic arteriography for the detection of extrahepatic shunting were 88% and 81%, respectively. For C-arm CT the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for the detection of extrahepatic shunting were 60%, 96%, 75%, 92%, and 90%, respectively. Conclusion: C-arm CT offers additional information to angiography when assessing SIRT patients for extrahepatic shunting. More accurate detection of extrahepatic shunting may optimize the workflow in SIRT preparations by avoiding unnecessary repeat angiographies. (orig.)

  17. Reduced-dose C-arm computed tomography applications at a pediatric institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acord, Michael; Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Vatsky, Seth; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Reduced-dose C-arm computed tomography (CT) uses flat-panel detectors to acquire real-time 3-D images in the interventional radiology suite to assist with anatomical localization and procedure planning. To describe dose-reduction techniques for C-arm CT at a pediatric institution and to provide guidance for implementation. We conducted a 5-year retrospective study on procedures using an institution-specific reduced-dose protocol: 5 or 8 s Dyna Rotation, 248/396 projection images/acquisition and 0.1-0.17 μGy/projection dose at the detector with 0.3/0.6/0.9-mm copper (Cu) filtration. We categorized cases by procedure type and average patient age and calculated C-arm CT and total dose area product (DAP). Two hundred twenty-two C-arm CT-guided procedures were performed with a dose-reduction protocol. The most common procedures were temporomandibular and sacroiliac joint injections (48.6%) and sclerotherapy (34.2%). C-arm CT was utilized in cases of difficult percutaneous access in less common applications such as cecostomy and gastrostomy placement, foreign body retrieval and thoracentesis. C-arm CT accounted for between 9.9% and 80.7% of the total procedural DAP. Dose-reducing techniques can preserve image quality for intervention while reducing radiation exposure to the child. This technology has multiple applications within pediatric interventional radiology and can be considered as an adjunctive imaging tool in a variety of procedures, particularly when percutaneous access is challenging despite routine fluoroscopic or ultrasound guidance. (orig.)

  18. Design of an induction linac driven CARM [Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser] oscillator at 250 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.

    1990-01-01

    We present the design of a 250 GHz, 400 MW Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator driven by a 1 KA, 2 MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the ARC facility of LLNL. The oscillator circuit is designed as a feedback amplifier operating in the TE 11 mode at ten times cutoff terminated at each end with Bragg reflectors. Theory and cold test results are in good agreement for a manufactured Bragg reflector using 50 μm corrugations to ensure mode purity. The CARM is to be operational by February 1990. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Understanding the scatter radiation distribution during C-arm CT examination. A body phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimasa, Toshiyo; Kakimi, Akihiko; Takao, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Shohei; Katayama, Yutaka; Himoto, Daisuke; Izuta, Shinichiro; Ichida, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the scatter radiation distribution during C-arm CT examination in the interventional radiography (IVR) room to show the escaped area and the radiation protective method. The C-arm rotates 200deg in 5 s. The tube voltage was 90 kV, and the entrance dose to the detector was 0.36 μGy/frame during C-arm CT examination. The scattered doses were measured each 50 cm from the isocenter like a grid pattern. The heights of the measurement were 50, 100, and 150 cm from the floor. The maximum scattered doses were 38.23 ± 0.60 μGy at 50 cm, 43.86 ± 20 μGy at 100 cm, and 25.78 ± 0.37 μGy at 150 cm. The scatter radiation distribution at 100 cm was the highest scattered dose. The operator should protect their reproductive gland, thyroid, and lens. The scattered dose was low behind the C-arm body and the bed, so they will be able to become the escaped area for staff. (author)

  20. C-arm cone beam computed tomography needle path overlay for fluoroscopic guided vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alda L; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Chinndurai, Ponraj; Rohm, Esther; Hall, Andrew F; Wallace, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Retrospective review. To report our early clinical experience using C-arm cone beam computed tomography (C-arm CBCT) with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. C-arm CBCT is advanced three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat panel based angiography systems. The imaging information provided by C-arm CBCT allows for the acquisition and reconstruction of "CT-like" images in flat panel based angiography/interventional suites. As part of the evolution of this technology, enhancements allowing the overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real time fluoroscopy. We report our early clinical experience with C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 10 consecutive oncology patients who underwent vertebroplasty of 13 vertebral levels using C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance from November 2007 to December 2008. Procedural data including vertebral level, approach (transpedicular vs. extrapedicular), access (bilateral vs. unilateral) and complications were recorded. Technical success with the overlay technology was assessed based on accuracy which consisted of 4 measured parameters: distance from target to needle tip, distance from planned path to needle tip, distance from midline to needle tip, and distance from the anterior 1/3 of the vertebral body to needle tip. Success within each parameter required that the distance between the needle tip and parameter being evaluated be no more than 5 mm on multiplanar CBCT or fluoroscopy. Imaging data for 12 vertebral levels was available for review. All vertebral levels were treated using unilateral access and 9 levels were treated with an extrapedicular approach. Technical success rates were 92% for both distance from planned path and distance from midline to final needle tip, 100% when distance from needle tip to the anterior 1

  1. Intra-operative adjustment of standard planes in C-arm CT image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehler, Michael; Görres, Joseph; Franke, Jochen; Barth, Karl; Vetter, Sven Y; Grützner, Paul A; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo; Nabers, Diana

    2016-03-01

    With the help of an intra-operative mobile C-arm CT, medical interventions can be verified and corrected, avoiding the need for a post-operative CT and a second intervention. An exact adjustment of standard plane positions is necessary for the best possible assessment of the anatomical regions of interest but the mobility of the C-arm causes the need for a time-consuming manual adjustment. In this article, we present an automatic plane adjustment at the example of calcaneal fractures. We developed two feature detection methods (2D and pseudo-3D) based on SURF key points and also transferred the SURF approach to 3D. Combined with an atlas-based registration, our algorithm adjusts the standard planes of the calcaneal C-arm images automatically. The robustness of the algorithms is evaluated using a clinical data set. Additionally, we tested the algorithm's performance for two registration approaches, two resolutions of C-arm images and two methods for metal artifact reduction. For the feature extraction, the novel 3D-SURF approach performs best. As expected, a higher resolution ([Formula: see text] voxel) leads also to more robust feature points and is therefore slightly better than the [Formula: see text] voxel images (standard setting of device). Our comparison of two different artifact reduction methods and the complete removal of metal in the images shows that our approach is highly robust against artifacts and the number and position of metal implants. By introducing our fast algorithmic processing pipeline, we developed the first steps for a fully automatic assistance system for the assessment of C-arm CT images.

  2. Percutaneous sacroplasty with the use of C-arm flat-panel detector CT: technical feasibility and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Eun; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Joo Hyung; Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S.

    2011-01-01

    Sacroplasty for sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) has been performed mostly under computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy guidance. The purposes of this study are to describe technical tips and clinical outcomes of sacroplasty under C-arm flat panel detector CT (C-arm CT) guidance, and to compare the cement distributions shown on C-arm CT with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT). This study consisted of patients who underwent sacroplasty for SIF using C-arm CT from May 2006 to May 2009. Technical success was assessed in terms of cement filling and leakage. Clinical outcome was assessed at short-term (less than 1 month) and long-term (more than 1 month) follow-up using a four-grade patient satisfaction scale: poor, fair, good, and excellent. After sacroplasty, all patients underwent MDCT and three radiologists compared MDCT images with C-arm CT images in consensus, focusing on the cement distribution and cement leakage. Sacroplasties were performed on both sacral alae in all 8 patients (male:female = 2:6, mean age = 76.9, range = 63-82). The technical success rate was 100%. At short-term follow up, 6 patients (87.5%) reported significant improvement. Five patients (62.5%) were available for long-term follow-up and all 5 patients reported a reduced pain and an improved ability to ambulate. Using MDCT as the standard of reference, the cement distribution was visualized equally well by C-arm CT. Sacroplasty under C-arm CT showed excellent technical success and good clinical outcome. There was an excellent correlation between C-arm CT and MDCT in evaluating cement distribution and cement leakage. (orig.)

  3. Percutaneous sacroplasty with the use of C-arm flat-panel detector CT: technical feasibility and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Eun; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Joo Hyung; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Sacroplasty for sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) has been performed mostly under computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy guidance. The purposes of this study are to describe technical tips and clinical outcomes of sacroplasty under C-arm flat panel detector CT (C-arm CT) guidance, and to compare the cement distributions shown on C-arm CT with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT). This study consisted of patients who underwent sacroplasty for SIF using C-arm CT from May 2006 to May 2009. Technical success was assessed in terms of cement filling and leakage. Clinical outcome was assessed at short-term (less than 1 month) and long-term (more than 1 month) follow-up using a four-grade patient satisfaction scale: poor, fair, good, and excellent. After sacroplasty, all patients underwent MDCT and three radiologists compared MDCT images with C-arm CT images in consensus, focusing on the cement distribution and cement leakage. Sacroplasties were performed on both sacral alae in all 8 patients (male:female = 2:6, mean age = 76.9, range = 63-82). The technical success rate was 100%. At short-term follow up, 6 patients (87.5%) reported significant improvement. Five patients (62.5%) were available for long-term follow-up and all 5 patients reported a reduced pain and an improved ability to ambulate. Using MDCT as the standard of reference, the cement distribution was visualized equally well by C-arm CT. Sacroplasty under C-arm CT showed excellent technical success and good clinical outcome. There was an excellent correlation between C-arm CT and MDCT in evaluating cement distribution and cement leakage. (orig.)

  4. Scatter correction using a primary modulator on a clinical angiography C-arm CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Bastian; Berger, Martin; Maier, Andreas; Kachelrieß, Marc; Ritschl, Ludwig; Müller, Kerstin; Choi, Jang-Hwan; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2017-09-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) suffers from a large amount of scatter, resulting in severe scatter artifacts in the reconstructions. Recently, a new scatter correction approach, called improved primary modulator scatter estimation (iPMSE), was introduced. That approach utilizes a primary modulator that is inserted between the X-ray source and the object. This modulation enables estimation of the scatter in the projection domain by optimizing an objective function with respect to the scatter estimate. Up to now the approach has not been implemented on a clinical angiography C-arm CT system. In our work, the iPMSE method is transferred to a clinical C-arm CBCT. Additional processing steps are added in order to compensate for the C-arm scanner motion and the automatic X-ray tube current modulation. These challenges were overcome by establishing a reference modulator database and a block-matching algorithm. Experiments with phantom and experimental in vivo data were performed to evaluate the method. We show that scatter correction using primary modulation is possible on a clinical C-arm CBCT. Scatter artifacts in the reconstructions are reduced with the newly extended method. Compared to a scan with a narrow collimation, our approach showed superior results with an improvement of the contrast and the contrast-to-noise ratio for the phantom experiments. In vivo data are evaluated by comparing the results with a scan with a narrow collimation and with a constant scatter correction approach. Scatter correction using primary modulation is possible on a clinical CBCT by compensating for the scanner motion and the tube current modulation. Scatter artifacts could be reduced in the reconstructions of phantom scans and in experimental in vivo data. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Nonlinear theory of a cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier with outer-slotted-coaxial waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Chunrong; Ouyang Zhengbiao; Zhang Shichang; Zhang Huibo; Jin Jianbo; Lai Yingxin

    2005-01-01

    A self-consistent nonlinear theory for the outer-slotted-coaxial-waveguide cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier is presented, which includes the characteristic equation of the wave, coupling equation of the wave with the relativistic electron beam and the simulation model. The influences of the magnetic field, the slot depth and width are investigated. The interesting characteristic of the device is that the mode competition can be efficiently suppressed by slotting the outer wall of the coaxial waveguide. A typical example is given by the theoretical design of a 137 GHz outer-slotted-coaxial-waveguide CARM amplifier by utilizing an electron beam with a voltage of 90 kV, current of 50 A, velocity pitch angle of 0.85 and a magnetic field of 43.0 kG. The nonlinear simulation predicts a power of 467.9 kW, an electronic efficiency of 10.4% and a saturated gain of 46.7 dB, if the electron beam has no velocity spread. However, the axial velocity spread deteriorates the device; for example, if the axial velocity spread is 2%, the peak power decreases to 332.4 kW with an efficiency of 7.4% and a saturated gain of 45.22 dB. Simulation shows that the efficiency of the outer-slotted-coaxial-waveguide CARM amplifier may be increased from 10.4% to 29.6% by tapering the magnetic field

  6. C-arm computed tomography for transarterial chemoperfusion and chemo-embolization of thoracic lesions; Transarterielle Chemoperfusion und -embolisation thorakaler Neoplasmen mittels C-Arm CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Naguib, N.N.; Nour-Eldin, N.E.; Lehnert, T.; Mbalisike, E. [Klinikum der Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    To evaluate the role of C-arm CT for on-line fluoroscopy in regional transarterial chemoperfusion (TACP) and chemo-embolization (TPCE) of primary and secondary malignant thoracic lesions. From September 2008 to March 2009 a total of 31 patients (20 males and 11 females, average age: 61.7 years, range 22-84 years) with 53 thoracic malignant lesions from different origins (primary or secondary pulmonary carcinoma n=37, pleural mesothelioma n=16) were treated with TACP or TPCE using flat-detector CT (FD-CT). C-arm CT of the latest generation was used to localize the lesion before local chemotherapy (Artis Zeego, Siemens, Erlangen). For TACP a 220 rotation and a volume of 150 ml (ratio of 1:2 contrast/normal saline), delay 2 s and flow 12 ml/s was used. For TPCE a volume of 75 ml (ratio of 1:2 contrast/normal saline), delay 2 s and flow 3 ml/s was used. TPCE C-arm CT allowed the evaluation of the degree of perfusion of the tumor and the geographic areas of enhancement correlated with the post-interventional lipiodol uptake in MSCT. In TACP the intercostal arteries involved could be visualized and in 30% of interventions the catheter had to be repositioned for the following intervention. C-arm CT provides additional information on the vascular characteristics and perfusion of pulmonary lesions resulting in a change of interventional strategy in a relevant number of patients. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war die Evaluation der Wertigkeit der C-Arm CT fuer die online gesteuerte regionale transarterielle Chemoperfusion (TACP) und die transpulmonale Chemoembolisation (TPCE) primaerer und sekundaerer thorakaler Neoplasmen Von September 2008 bis Maerz 2009 wurden 31 Patienten (11 Frauen/20 Maenner, Durchschnittsalter 61,7 Jahre) mit 53 unterschiedlichen thorakalen Neoplasmen (primaere oder sekundaere Lungenkarzinome [n=37], Pleuramesotheliome [n=16]) mittels TACP oder TPCE unter Einsatz der Flachdetektortechnologie (FD-CT) behandelt. Alle Behandlungen erfolgten an einem C

  7. Study on the method or reducing the operator's exposure dose from a C-Arm system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Sik; Song, Jong Nam [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwangdong Universty International ST.Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, C-Arm equipment is being used as we intend to verify the exposure dose on the operator by the scattering rays during the operation of the C-Arm equipment and to provide an effective method of reducing the exposure dose. Exposure dose is less than the Over Tube method utilizes the C-arm equipment Under Tube the scheme, The result showed that the exposure dose on the operator decreased with a thicker shield, and as the operator moved away from the center line. Moreover, as the research time prolongated, the exposure dose increased, and among the three affixed location of the dosimeter, the most exposure dose was measured at gonadal, then followed by chest and thyroid. However, in consideration of the relationship between the operator and the patient, the distance cannot be increased infinitely and the research time cannot be decreased infinitely in order to reduce the exposure dose. Therefore, by changing the thickness of the radiation shield, the exposure dose on the operator was able to be reduced. If you are using a C-Arm equipment discomfort during surgery because the grounds that the procedure is neglected and close to the dose of radiation shielding made can only increase. Because a separate control room cannot be used for the C-Arm equipment due to its characteristic, the exposure dose on the operator needs to be reduced by reinforcing the shield through an appropriate thickness of radiation shield devices, such as apron, etc. during a treatment.

  8. Comparison of C-arm computed tomography and on-site quick cortisol assay for adrenal venous sampling: A retrospective study of 178 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chin-Chen; Lee, Bo-Ching; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Liu, Kao-Lang [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Wu, Vin-Cent [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Kuo-How [National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Taipei (China); Collaboration: on behalf of the TAIPAI Study Group

    2017-12-15

    To compare the performance of on-site quick cortisol assay (QCA) and C-arm computed tomography (CT) assistance on adrenal venous sampling (AVS) without adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. The institutional review board at our hospital approved this retrospective study, which included 178 consecutive patients with primary aldosteronism. During AVS, we used C-arm CT to confirm right adrenal cannulation between May 2012 and June 2015 (n = 100) and QCA for bilateral adrenal cannulation between July 2015 and September 2016 (n = 78). Successful AVS required a selectivity index (cortisol{sub adrenal} {sub vein}/cortisol{sub peripheral}) of ≥ 2.0 bilaterally. The overall success rate of C-arm CT-assisted AVS was 87%, which increased to 97.4% under QCA (P =.013). The procedure time (C-arm CT, 49.5 ± 21.3 min; QCA, 37.5 ± 15.6 min; P <.001) and radiation dose (C-arm CT, 673.9 ± 613.8 mGy; QCA, 346.4 ± 387.8 mGy; P <.001) were also improved. The resampling rate was 16% and 21.8% for C-arm CT and QCA, respectively. The initial success rate of the performing radiologist remained stable during the study period (C-arm CT 75%; QCA, 82.1%, P =.259). QCA might be superior to C-arm CT for improving the performance of AVS. (orig.)

  9. Informatics in radiology: use of a C-arm fluoroscopy simulator to support training in intraoperative radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Oliver Johannes; Dresing, Klaus; Wagner, Markus; Raab, Björn-Werner; Teistler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mobile image intensifier systems (C-arms) are used frequently in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery, especially in trauma and emergency settings, but image quality and radiation exposure levels may vary widely, depending on the extent of the C-arm operator's knowledge and experience. Current training programs consist mainly of theoretical instruction in C-arm operation, the physical foundations of radiography, and radiation avoidance, and are largely lacking in hands-on application. A computer-based simulation program such as that tested by the authors may be one way to improve the effectiveness of C-arm training. In computer simulations of various scenarios commonly encountered in the operating room, trainees using the virtX program interact with three-dimensional models to test their knowledge base and improve their skill levels. Radiographs showing the simulated patient anatomy and surgical implants are "reconstructed" from data computed on the basis of the trainee's positioning of models of a C-arm, patient, and table, and are displayed in real time on the desktop monitor. Trainee performance is signaled in real time by color graphics in several control panels and, on completion of the exercise, is compared in detail with the performance of an expert operator. Testing of this computer-based training program in continuing medical education courses for operating room personnel showed an improvement in the overall understanding of underlying principles of intraoperative radiography performed with a C-arm, with resultant higher image quality, lower overall radiation exposure, and greater time efficiency. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.313105125/-/DC1. Copyright © RSNA, 2011.

  10. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Adam S; Stayman, J Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L; Khanna, A Jay

    2014-01-01

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (∼40–80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4–2.2× over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ∼1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ∼1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose. (paper)

  11. CARM1 modulators affect epigenome of stem cells and change morphology of nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, M; Legartová, S; Suchánková, J; Milite, C; Castellano, S; Sbardella, G; Kozubek, S; Bártová, E

    2015-01-01

    CARM1 interacts with numerous transcription factors to mediate cellular processes, especially gene expression. This is important for the maintenance of ESC pluripotency or intervention to tumorigenesis. Here, we studied epigenomic effects of two potential CARM1 modulators: an activator (EML159) and an inhibitor (ellagic acid dihydrate, EA). We examined nuclear morphology in human and mouse embryonic stem cells (hESCs, mESCs), as well as in iPS cells. The CARM1 modulators did not function similarly in all cell types. EA decreased the levels of the pluripotency markers, OCT4 and NANOG, particularly in iPSCs, whereas the levels of these proteins increased after EML159 treatment. EML159 treatment of mouse ESCs led to decreased levels of OCT4 and NANOG, which was accompanied by an increased level of Endo-A. The same trend was observed for NANOG and Endo-A in hESCs affected by EML159. Interestingly, EA mainly changed epigenetic features of nucleoli because a high level of arginine asymmetric di-methylation in the nucleoli of hESCs was reduced after EA treatment. ChIP-PCR of ribosomal genes confirmed significantly reduced levels of H3R17me2a, in both the promoter region of ribosomal genes and rDNA encoding 28S rRNA, after EA addition. Moreover, EA treatment changed the nuclear pattern of AgNORs (silver-stained nucleolus organizer regions) in all cell types studied. In EA-treated ESCs, AgNOR pattern was similar to the pattern of AgNORs after inhibition of RNA pol I by actinomycin D. Together, inhibitory effect of EA on arginine methylation and effect on related morphological parameters was especially observed in compartment of nucleoli.

  12. Use of the mini C-arm for wrist fractures - Establishing a diagnostic reference level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G. J.; Pillai, A.; Gibson, S.

    2008-01-01

    The establishment of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for all typical radiological examinations became mandatory following the implementation of the Ionising Radiations (Medical Exposure) Regulations Act 2000. At present, there are no national dosage guidelines in the UK regarding use of fluoroscopy in orthopaedic trauma. The increasing popularity of the mini C-arm image intensifier amongst surgeons has led to concerns regarding use of ionizing radiation by personnel who have not been trained in radiation protection. It is therefore essential to have formal protocols for use of the mini C-arm to comply with the law and to maintain safe clinical practice. It is attempted to provide dose data for wrist fracture manipulations that may be used as a basis for setting a DRL for this procedure. Screening times were recorded for 80 wrist manipulations in a fracture clinic setting using a mini C-arm image intensifier. A DRL was set using the third quartile value for screening time. The median screening time for wrist fractures was 20 s with a range from 1 to 177 s. The third quartile value for screening time was 34 s. This value can be used as a provisional DRL for wrist fracture manipulations. The DRL is a quantitative guide for the optimisation of radiological protection. IR(ME)R 2000 states that if it is consistently exceeded by an individual operator or a piece of equipment, investigation and remedial action must be taken. We recommend that trauma units establish their own local DRLs for common procedures as made mandatory by legislation. (authors)

  13. The rotate-plus-shift C-arm trajectory. Part I. Complete data with less than 180° rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Fleischmann, Christof; Kuntz, Jan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the last decade, C-arm-based cone-beam CT became a widely used modality for intraoperative imaging. Typically a C-arm CT scan is performed using a circular or elliptical trajectory around a region of interest. Therefore, an angular range of at least 180° plus fan angle must be covered to ensure a completely sampled data set. However, mobile C-arms designed with a focus on classical 2D applications like fluoroscopy may be limited to a mechanical rotation range of less than 180° to improve handling and usability. The method proposed in this paper allows for the acquisition of a fully sampled data set with a system limited to a mechanical rotation range of at least 180° minus fan angle using a new trajectory design. This enables CT like 3D imaging with a wide range of C-arm devices which are mainly designed for 2D imaging. Methods: The proposed trajectory extends the mechanical rotation range of the C-arm system with two additional linear shifts. Due to the divergent character of the fan-beam geometry, these two shifts lead to an additional angular range of half of the fan angle. Combining one shift at the beginning of the scan followed by a rotation and a second shift, the resulting rotate-plus-shift trajectory enables the acquisition of a completely sampled data set using only 180° minus fan angle of rotation. The shifts can be performed using, e.g., the two orthogonal positioning axes of a fully motorized C-arm system. The trajectory was evaluated in phantom and cadaver examinations using two prototype C-arm systems. Results: The proposed trajectory leads to reconstructions without limited angle artifacts. Compared to the limited angle reconstructions of 180° minus fan angle, image quality increased dramatically. Details in the rotate-plus-shift reconstructions were clearly depicted, whereas they are dominated by artifacts in the limited angle scan. Conclusions: The method proposed here employs 3D imaging using C-arms with less than 180° rotation

  14. The rotate-plus-shift C-arm trajectory. Part I. Complete data with less than 180° rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Fleischmann, Christof [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustraße 31, Nürnberg 90451 (Germany); Kuntz, Jan, E-mail: j.kuntz@dkfz.de; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: In the last decade, C-arm-based cone-beam CT became a widely used modality for intraoperative imaging. Typically a C-arm CT scan is performed using a circular or elliptical trajectory around a region of interest. Therefore, an angular range of at least 180° plus fan angle must be covered to ensure a completely sampled data set. However, mobile C-arms designed with a focus on classical 2D applications like fluoroscopy may be limited to a mechanical rotation range of less than 180° to improve handling and usability. The method proposed in this paper allows for the acquisition of a fully sampled data set with a system limited to a mechanical rotation range of at least 180° minus fan angle using a new trajectory design. This enables CT like 3D imaging with a wide range of C-arm devices which are mainly designed for 2D imaging. Methods: The proposed trajectory extends the mechanical rotation range of the C-arm system with two additional linear shifts. Due to the divergent character of the fan-beam geometry, these two shifts lead to an additional angular range of half of the fan angle. Combining one shift at the beginning of the scan followed by a rotation and a second shift, the resulting rotate-plus-shift trajectory enables the acquisition of a completely sampled data set using only 180° minus fan angle of rotation. The shifts can be performed using, e.g., the two orthogonal positioning axes of a fully motorized C-arm system. The trajectory was evaluated in phantom and cadaver examinations using two prototype C-arm systems. Results: The proposed trajectory leads to reconstructions without limited angle artifacts. Compared to the limited angle reconstructions of 180° minus fan angle, image quality increased dramatically. Details in the rotate-plus-shift reconstructions were clearly depicted, whereas they are dominated by artifacts in the limited angle scan. Conclusions: The method proposed here employs 3D imaging using C-arms with less than 180° rotation

  15. A 250-GHz CARM [Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser] oscillator experiment driven by an induction linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.; Bubp, D.G.; McDermott, D.; Luhmann, N.

    1990-01-01

    A 250-GHz Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator has been designed and constructed and will be tested using a 1-kA, 2-MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the Accelerator Research Center (ARC) facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The oscillator circuit was made to operate in the TE 11 mode at ten times cutoff using waveguide Bragg reflectors to create an external cavity Q of 8000. Theory predicts cavity fill times of less than 30 ns (pulse length) and efficiencies approaching 20% is sufficiently low transverse electron velocity spreads are maintained (2%)

  16. An augmented reality C-arm for intraoperative assessment of the mechanical axis: a preclinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, Pascal; Brand, Alexander; Wang, Lejing; Euler, Ekkehard; Thaller, Peter; Navab, Nassir; Weidert, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Determination of lower limb alignment is a prerequisite for successful orthopedic surgical treatment. Traditional methods include the electrocautery cord, alignment rod, or axis board which rely solely on C-arm fluoroscopy navigation and are radiation intensive. To assess a new augmented reality technology in determining lower limb alignment. A camera-augmented mobile C-arm (CamC) technology was used to create a panorama image consisting of hip, knee, and ankle X-rays. Twenty-five human cadaver legs were used for validation with random varus or valgus deformations. Five clinicians performed experiments that consisted in achieving acceptable mechanical axis deviation. The applicability of the CamC technology was assessed with direct comparison to ground-truth CT. A t test, Pearson's correlation, and ANOVA were used to determine statistical significance. The value of Pearson's correlation coefficient R was 0.979 which demonstrates a strong positive correlation between the CamC and ground-truth CT data. The analysis of variance produced a p value equal to 0.911 signifying that clinician expertise differences were not significant with regard to the type of system used to assess mechanical axis deviation. All described measurements demonstrated valid measurement of lower limb alignment. With minimal effort, clinicians required only 3 X-ray image acquisitions using the augmented reality technology to achieve reliable mechanical axis deviation.

  17. Interventional heart wall motion analysis with cardiac C-arm CT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Maier, Andreas K; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Rohkohl, Christopher; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Today, quantitative analysis of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of the left ventricle (LV) cannot be performed directly in the catheter lab using a current angiographic C-arm system, which is the workhorse imaging modality for cardiac interventions. Therefore, myocardial wall analysis is completely based on the 2D angiographic images or pre-interventional 3D/4D imaging. In this paper, we present a complete framework to study the ventricular wall motion in 4D (3D+t) directly in the catheter lab. From the acquired 2D projection images, a dynamic 3D surface model of the LV is generated, which is then used to detect ventricular dyssynchrony. Different quantitative features to evaluate LV dynamics known from other modalities (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging) are transferred to the C-arm CT data. We use the ejection fraction, the systolic dyssynchrony index a 3D fractional shortening and the phase to maximal contraction (ϕ i, max ) to determine an indicator of LV dyssynchrony and to discriminate regionally pathological from normal myocardium. The proposed analysis tool was evaluated on simulated phantom LV data with and without pathological wall dysfunctions. The LV data used is publicly available online at https://conrad.stanford.edu/data/heart. In addition, the presented framework was tested on eight clinical patient data sets. The first clinical results demonstrate promising performance of the proposed analysis tool and encourage the application of the presented framework to a larger study in clinical practice. (paper)

  18. Radiation protection for an intraoperative X-ray source compared to C-arm fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Frank; Clausen, Sven; Jahnke, Anika; Steil, Volker; Wenz, Frederik [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bludau, Frederic; Obertacke, Udo [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Trauma Surgery; Suetterlin, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    2014-10-01

    Background: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) using the INTRABEAM {sup registered} system promises a flexible use regarding radiation protection compared to other approaches such as electron treatment or HDR brachytherapy with {sup 192}Ir or {sup 60}Co. In this study we compared dose rate measurements of breast- and Kypho-IORT with C-arm fluoroscopy which is needed to estimate radiation protection areas. Materials and Methods: C-arm fluoroscopy, breast- and Kypho-IORTs were performed using phantoms (silicon breast or bucket of water). Dose rates were measured at the phantom's surface, at 30 cm, 100 cm and 200 cm distance. Those measurements were confirmed during 10 Kypho-IORT and 10 breast-IORT patient treatments. Results: The measured dose rates were in the same magnitude for all three paradigms and ranges from 20 μSv/h during a simulated breast-IORT at two meter distance up to 64 mSv/h directly at the surface of a simulated Kypho-IORT. Those measurements result in a circle of controlled area (yearly doses > 6 mSv) for each paradigm of about 4 m ± 2 m. Discussion/Conclusions: All three paradigms show comparable dose rates which implies that the radiation protection is straight forward and confirms the flexible use of the INTRABEAM {sup registered} system. (orig.)

  19. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A New Tool in the Interventional Suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Santhosh; Irani, Farah Gillan; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Tan, Bien Soo

    2013-11-01

    C-arm Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is a technology that is being integrated into many of the newer angiography systems in the interventional suite. Due to its ability to provide cross sectional imaging, it has opened a myriad of opportunities for creating new clinical applications. We review the technical aspects, current reported clinical applications and potential benefits of this technology. Searches were made via PubMed using the string "CBCT", "Cone Beam CT", "Cone Beam Computed Tomography" and "C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomography". All relevant articles in the results were reviewed. CBCT clinical applications have been reported in both vascular and non-vascular interventions. They encompass many aspects of a procedure including preprocedural planning, intraprocedural guidance and postprocedural assessment. As a result, they have allowed the interventionalist to be safer and more accurate in performing image guided procedures. There are however several technical limitations. The quality of images produced is not comparable to conventional computed tomography (CT). Radiation doses are also difficult to quantify when compared to CT and fluoroscopy. CBCT technology in the interventional suite has contributed significant benefits to the patient despite its current limitations. It is a tool that will evolve and potentially become an integral part of imaging guidance for intervention.

  20. Three-dimensional C-arm CT-guided transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement: Feasibility, technical success and procedural time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Groezinger, Gerd; Maurer, Michael; Grosse, Ulrich; Horger, Marius; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Syha, Roland [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lauer, Ulrich M. [University of Tuebingen, Internal Medicine I, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious disease, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Establishment of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) constitutes a standard procedure in patients suffering from portal hypertension. The most difficult step in TIPS placement is blind puncture of the portal vein. This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional mapping of portal vein branches and targeted puncture of the portal vein. Twelve consecutive patients suffering from refractory ascites by liver cirrhosis were included in this retrospective study to evaluate feasibility, technical success and procedural time of C-arm CT-targeted puncture of the portal vein. As a control, 22 patients receiving TIPS placement with fluoroscopy-guided blind puncture were included to compare procedural time. Technical success could be obtained in 100 % of the study group (targeted puncture) and in 95.5 % of the control group (blind puncture). Appropriate, three-dimensional C-arm CT-guided mapping of the portal vein branches could be achieved in all patients. The median number of punctures in the C-arm CT-guided study group was 2 ± 1.3 punctures. Procedural time was significantly lower in the study group (14.8 ± 8.2 min) compared to the control group (32.6 ± 22.7 min) (p = 0.02). C-arm CT-guided portal vein mapping is technically feasible and a promising tool for TIPS placement resulting in a significant reduction of procedural time. (orig.)

  1. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  2. Radiation dose reduction and new image modalities development for interventional C-arm imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kai

    Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading health problems and causes of death in the US. Due to the minimally invasive nature of the evolution of image guided techniques, interventional radiological procedures are becoming more common and are preferred in treating many cardiovascular diseases and strokes. In addition, with the recent advances in hardware and device technology, the speed and efficacy of interventional treatment has significantly improved. This implies that more image modalities can be developed based on the current C-arm system and patients treated in interventional suites can potentially experience better health outcomes. However, during the treatment patients are irradiated with substantial amounts of ionizing radiation with a high dose rate (digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with 3muGy/frame and 3D cone beam CT image with 0.36muGy/frame for a Siemens Artis Zee biplane system) and/or a long irradiation time (a roadmapping image sequence can be as long as one hour during aneurysm embolization). As a result, the patient entrance dose is extremely high. Despite the fact that the radiation dose is already substantial, image quality is not always satisfactory. By default a temporal average is used in roadmapping images to overcome poor image quality, but this technique can result in motion blurred images. Therefore, reducing radiation dose while maintaining or even improving the image quality is an important area for continued research. This thesis is focused on improving the clinical applications of C-arm cone beam CT systems in two ways: (1) Improve the performance of current image modalities on the C-arm system. (2) Develop new image modalities based on the current system. To be more specific, the objectives are to reduce radiation dose for current modalities (e.g., DSA, fluoroscopy, roadmapping, and cone beam CT) and enable cone beam CT perfusion and time resolved cone beam CT angiography that can be used to diagnose and triage acute

  3. A high frequency, high power CARM proposal for the DEMO ECRH system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirizzi, Francesco; Spassovsky, Ivan; Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Dattoli, Giuseppe; Di Palma, Emanuele; Doria, Andrea; Gallerano, Gianpiero; Lampasi, Alessandro; Maffia, Giuseppe; Ravera, GianLuca; Sabia, Elio; Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio; Zito, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ECRH system for DEMO. • Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM) devices. • Relativistic electron beams. • Bragg reflectors. • High voltage pulse modulators. - Abstract: ECRH&CD systems are extensively used on tokamak plasmas due to their capability of highly tailored power deposition, allowing very localised heating and non-inductive current drive, useful for MHD and profiles control. The high electron temperatures expected in DEMO will require ECRH systems with operating frequency in the 200–300 GHz range, equipped with a reasonable number of high power (P ≥ 1 MW) CW RF sources, for allowing central RF power deposition. In this frame the ENEA Fusion Department (Frascati) is coordinating a task force aimed at the study and realisation of a suitable high power, high frequency reliable source.

  4. A high frequency, high power CARM proposal for the DEMO ECRH system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mirizzi@enea.it [Consorzio CREATE, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Spassovsky, Ivan [Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni – ENEA, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Ceccuzzi, Silvio [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Dattoli, Giuseppe; Di Palma, Emanuele; Doria, Andrea; Gallerano, Gianpiero [Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni – ENEA, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Lampasi, Alessandro; Maffia, Giuseppe; Ravera, GianLuca [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Sabia, Elio [Unità Tecnica Applicazioni delle Radiazioni – ENEA, C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio; Zito, Pietro [Unità Tecnica Fusione – ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ECRH system for DEMO. • Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM) devices. • Relativistic electron beams. • Bragg reflectors. • High voltage pulse modulators. - Abstract: ECRH&CD systems are extensively used on tokamak plasmas due to their capability of highly tailored power deposition, allowing very localised heating and non-inductive current drive, useful for MHD and profiles control. The high electron temperatures expected in DEMO will require ECRH systems with operating frequency in the 200–300 GHz range, equipped with a reasonable number of high power (P ≥ 1 MW) CW RF sources, for allowing central RF power deposition. In this frame the ENEA Fusion Department (Frascati) is coordinating a task force aimed at the study and realisation of a suitable high power, high frequency reliable source.

  5. Needle and catheter navigation using electromagnetic tracking for computer-assisted C-arm CT interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Markus; Hoheisel, Martin; Petzold, Ralf; Kalender, Willi A.; Krause, Ulrich H. W.

    2007-03-01

    Integrated solutions for navigation systems with CT, MR or US systems become more and more popular for medical products. Such solutions improve the medical workflow, reduce hardware, space and costs requirements. The purpose of our project was to develop a new electromagnetic navigation system for interventional radiology which is integrated into C-arm CT systems. The application is focused on minimally invasive percutaneous interventions performed under local anaesthesia. Together with a vacuum-based patient immobilization device and newly developed navigation tools (needles, panels) we developed a safe and fully automatic navigation system. The radiologist can directly start with navigated interventions after loading images without any prior user interaction. The complete system is adapted to the requirements of the radiologist and to the clinical workflow. For evaluation of the navigation system we performed different phantom studies and achieved an average accuracy of better than 2.0 mm.

  6. Upper ankle joint space detection on low contrast intraoperative fluoroscopic C-arm projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sarina; Schnetzke, Marc; Brehler, Michael; Swartman, Benedict; Vetter, Sven; Franke, Jochen; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nolden, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Intraoperative mobile C-arm fluoroscopy is widely used for interventional verification in trauma surgery, high flexibility combined with low cost being the main advantages of the method. However, the lack of global device-to- patient orientation is challenging, when comparing the acquired data to other intrapatient datasets. In upper ankle joint fracture reduction accompanied with an unstable syndesmosis, a comparison to the unfractured contralateral site is helpful for verification of the reduction result. To reduce dose and operation time, our approach aims at the comparison of single projections of the unfractured ankle with volumetric images of the reduced fracture. For precise assessment, a pre-alignment of both datasets is a crucial step. We propose a contour extraction pipeline to estimate the joint space location for a prealignment of fluoroscopic C-arm projections containing the upper ankle joint. A quadtree-based hierarchical variance comparison extracts potential feature points and a Hough transform is applied to identify bone shaft lines together with the tibiotalar joint space. By using this information we can define the coarse orientation of the projections independent from the ankle pose during acquisition in order to align those images to the volume of the fractured ankle. The proposed method was evaluated on thirteen cadaveric datasets consisting of 100 projections each with manually adjusted image planes by three trauma surgeons. The results show that the method can be used to detect the joint space orientation. The correlation between angle deviation and anatomical projection direction gives valuable input on the acquisition direction for future clinical experiments.

  7. Elevated Radiation Exposure Associated With Above Surface Flat Detector Mini C-Arm Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dennis P; Chapman, Talia; Williamson, Christopher; Tinsley, Brian; Ilyas, Asif M; Wang, Mark L

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to test the hypothesis that: (1) radiation exposure is increased with the intended use of Flat Surface Image Intensifier (FSII) units above the operative surface compared with the traditional below-table configuration; (2) this differential increases in a dose-dependent manner; and (3) radiation exposure varies with body part and proximity to the radiation source. A surgeon mannequin was seated at a radiolucent hand table, positioned for volar distal radius plating. Thermoluminescent dosimeters measured exposure to the eyes, thyroid, chest, hand, and groin, for 1- and 15-minute trials from a mini C-arm FSII unit positioned above and below the operating surface. Background radiation was measured by control dosimeters placed within the operating theater. At 1-minute of exposure, hand and eye dosages were significantly greater with the flat detector positioned above the table. At 15-minutes of exposure, hand radiation dosage exceeded that of all other anatomic sites with the FSII in both positions. Hand exposure was increased in a dose-dependent manner with the flat detector in either position, whereas groin exposure saw a dose-dependent only with the flat detector beneath the operating table. These findings suggest that the surgeon's hands and eyes may incur greater radiation exposure compared with other body parts, during routine mini C-arm FSII utilization in its intended position above the operating table. The clinical impact of these findings remains unclear, and future long-term radiation safety investigation is warranted. Surgeons should take precautions to protect critical body parts, particularly when using FSII technology above the operating with prolonged exposure time.

  8. Design and development of a Compact Aerial Radiation Monitoring System (CARMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, N.; Chaudhury, Probal; Padmanabhan, N.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    Operation of nuclear facilities, increasing usage of radioisotopes in industrial, scientific and medical applications and transport of nuclear and radioactive materials may have impact on the surrounding environment. There is thus a need to periodically monitor the environmental radiation background all over the country and particularly around the nuclear facilities for assessing any possible impact on the environment. Preparedness required for response to emergencies caused due to radiological/nuclear incidents/ accidents or due to radiological/nuclear terrorism also demands state of the art systems and methodology for quick assessment of radiological impact over large affected areas. In order to meet these requirements, a Compact Aerial Radiation Monitoring System (CARMS) has been designed and developed. This system is battery operated, portable and rugged for mobile radiation monitoring and can be placed in aerial platforms like helicopters or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for unattended operation. CARMS uses energy compensated multiple GM detectors for enhancing sensitivity and is attached with commercially available Global Positioning System (GPS) for online acquisition of positional coordinates with time. The AT89LV52 microcontroller used in the system tags the dose rate data with time and positional information and stores contiguously in a serial data memory for radiological mapping of the area surveyed using any mobile platform such as aircraft/train/boat/road vehicle. The system consumes ∼150 mA including the GPS at 12 V DC enabling ∼50 hours of continuous monitoring with a 7 Ah battery source. The system has been used in aerial, rail and road based environmental radiation surveys carried out at various places of the country. With PC support, the system can map the radiological status online onto the map of the area being surveyed to help decision-making on countermeasures during the survey. (author)

  9. TU-AB-204-02: Advances in C-Arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrig, R.

    2015-01-01

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  10. TU-AB-204-01: Advances in C-Arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.

    2015-01-01

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  11. TU-AB-204-01: Advances in C-Arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  12. TU-AB-204-02: Advances in C-Arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrig, R. [Stanford University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  13. Comparison of C-arm computed tomography and on-site quick cortisol assay for adrenal venous sampling: A retrospective study of 178 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Chen; Lee, Bo-Ching; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Huang, Kuo-How; Liu, Kao-Lang

    2017-12-01

    To compare the performance of on-site quick cortisol assay (QCA) and C-arm computed tomography (CT) assistance on adrenal venous sampling (AVS) without adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. The institutional review board at our hospital approved this retrospective study, which included 178 consecutive patients with primary aldosteronism. During AVS, we used C-arm CT to confirm right adrenal cannulation between May 2012 and June 2015 (n = 100) and QCA for bilateral adrenal cannulation between July 2015 and September 2016 (n = 78). Successful AVS required a selectivity index (cortisol adrenal vein /cortisol peripheral ) of ≥ 2.0 bilaterally. The overall success rate of C-arm CT-assisted AVS was 87%, which increased to 97.4% under QCA (P = .013). The procedure time (C-arm CT, 49.5 ± 21.3 min; QCA, 37.5 ± 15.6 min; P AVS. • Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is a technically challenging procedure. • C-arm CT and quick cortisol assay (QCA) are efficient for assisting AVS. • QCA might outperform C-arm CT in enhancing AVS performance.

  14. Utility of C-arm CT in overcoming challenges in patients undergoing Transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, Chinmay; Sreekumar, K. P.; Prabhu, Nirmal Kumar; Kannan, Rajesh R; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is the well-known treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma. Multiple digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisitions in different projections are required to identify difficult arterial feeders. Moreover, the tell-tale tumor blush can be obscured by proximity to lung base, small size of lesion, and breathing artifacts. C-arm CT is a revolutionary advancement in the intervention radiology suite that allows acquisition of data which can be reformatted in multiple planes and volume rendered incorporating both soft tissue and vascular information like multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). These images acquired during the TACE procedure can provide critical inputs for achieving a safe and effective therapy. This case series aims to illustrate the utility of C-arm CT in solving specific problems encountered while performing TACE

  15. On Carmeli's exotic use of the Lorentz transformation and on the velocity composition approach to special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Beauregard, O.C.

    1986-01-01

    As shown by Ramarkrishnan, the faithful mapping, in the sense of Lie groups, of the real line onto the finite segment -1 < u < + 1 is u = tanh A, from which follows the ''relativistic velocity composition law'' w = (u + v)/(1 + uv) and the Lorentz-Poincare' transformation formulas. Composition of translations is merely one application of this. Carmeli has shown that composition of rotations is another one. There may be still others

  16. Intraoperative imaging for patient safety and QA: detection of intracranial hemorrhage using C-arm cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Wang, Adam; Otake, Yoshito; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Xia, Xuewei; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2013-03-01

    Intraoperative imaging could improve patient safety and quality assurance (QA) via the detection of subtle complications that might otherwise only be found hours after surgery. Such capability could therefore reduce morbidity and the need for additional intervention. Among the severe adverse events that could be more quickly detected by high-quality intraoperative imaging is acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), conventionally assessed using post-operative CT. A mobile C-arm capable of high-quality cone-beam CT (CBCT) in combination with advanced image reconstruction techniques is reported as a means of detecting ICH in the operating room. The system employs an isocentric C-arm with a flat-panel detector in dual gain mode, correction of x-ray scatter and beam-hardening, and a penalized likelihood (PL) iterative reconstruction method. Performance in ICH detection was investigated using a quantitative phantom focusing on (non-contrast-enhanced) blood-brain contrast, an anthropomorphic head phantom, and a porcine model with injection of fresh blood bolus. The visibility of ICH was characterized in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitative evaluation of images by a neurosurgeon. Across a range of size and contrast of the ICH as well as radiation dose from the CBCT scan, the CNR was found to increase from ~2.2-3.7 for conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) to ~3.9-5.4 for PL at equivalent spatial resolution. The porcine model demonstrated superior ICH detectability for PL. The results support the role of high-quality mobile C-arm CBCT employing advanced reconstruction algorithms for detecting subtle complications in the operating room at lower radiation dose and lower cost than intraoperative CT scanners and/or fixedroom C-arms. Such capability could present a potentially valuable aid to patient safety and QA.

  17. Spine segmentation from C-arm CT data sets: application to region-of-interest volumes for spinal interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerger, C.; Lorenz, C.; Babic, D.; Hoppenbrouwers, J.; Homan, R.; Nachabe, R.; Racadio, J. M.; Grass, M.

    2017-03-01

    Spinal fusion is a common procedure to stabilize the spinal column by fixating parts of the spine. In such procedures, metal screws are inserted through the patients back into a vertebra, and the screws of adjacent vertebrae are connected by metal rods to generate a fixed bridge. In these procedures, 3D image guidance for intervention planning and outcome control is required. Here, for anatomical guidance, an automated approach for vertebra segmentation from C-arm CT images of the spine is introduced and evaluated. As a prerequisite, 3D C-arm CT images are acquired covering the vertebrae of interest. An automatic model-based segmentation approach is applied to delineate the outline of the vertebrae of interest. The segmentation approach is based on 24 partial models of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae which aggregate information about (i) the basic shape itself, (ii) trained features for image based adaptation, and (iii) potential shape variations. Since the volume data sets generated by the C-arm system are limited to a certain region of the spine the target vertebra and hence initial model position is assigned interactively. The approach was trained and tested on 21 human cadaver scans. A 3-fold cross validation to ground truth annotations yields overall mean segmentation errors of 0.5 mm for T1 to 1.1 mm for C6. The results are promising and show potential to support the clinician in pedicle screw path and rod planning to allow accurate and reproducible insertions.

  18. Developing low-dose C-arm CT imaging for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Cahill, Anne Marie [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Felice, Marc [University of Pennsylvania, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Laura [Computed Tomography Division, Siemens Healthcare Sector, Shanghai (China); Sarmiento, Marily [Siemens Medical Solutions, Angiography and X-ray Division, Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Manufacturers have provided C-arm CT imaging technologies for applications in interventional radiology in recent years. However, clinical imaging protocols and radiation doses have not been well studied or reported. The purpose of this study is to develop low-dose settings for clinically acceptable CT imaging of temporomandibular joint in interventional radiology suites, using a C-arm imaging angiography system. CT scans were performed with a flat-panel digital C-arm angiographic system on a 5-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. The CTDI was determined for various rotation times, dose settings and Cu filter selections. The CTDI values were compared with those of conventional low-dose CT for the same phantom. The effectiveness of using Cu filters to reduce dose was also investigated. Images were reviewed by a senior radiologist for clinical acceptance. The manufacturer's default setting gave an equivalent CTDI of 4.8 mGy. Optimizing the dose settings and adding copper filtration reduced the radiation dose by 94%. This represents a 50% reduction from conventional CT. Use of Cu filters and low-dose settings significantly reduced radiation dose from that of standard settings. This phantom study process successfully guided the clinical implementation of low-dose studies for all ages at our institution. (orig.)

  19. A robotic C-arm cone beam CT system for image-guided proton therapy: design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chiaho; Yao, Weiguang; Kidani, Takao; Tomida, Kazuo; Ozawa, Saori; Nishimura, Takenori; Fujisawa, Tatsuya; Shinagawa, Ryousuke; Merchant, Thomas E

    2017-11-01

    A ceiling-mounted robotic C-arm cone beam CT (CBCT) system was developed for use with a 190° proton gantry system and a 6-degree-of-freedom robotic patient positioner. We report on the mechanical design, system accuracy, image quality, image guidance accuracy, imaging dose, workflow, safety and collision-avoidance. The robotic CBCT system couples a rotating C-ring to the C-arm concentrically with a kV X-ray tube and a flat-panel imager mounted to the C-ring. CBCT images are acquired with flex correction and maximally 360° rotation for a 53 cm field of view. The system was designed for clinical use with three imaging locations. Anthropomorphic phantoms were imaged to evaluate the image guidance accuracy. The position accuracy and repeatability of the robotic C-arm was high (robotic CBCT system provides high-accuracy volumetric image guidance for proton therapy. Advances in knowledge: Ceiling-mounted robotic CBCT provides a viable option than CT on-rails for partial gantry and fixed-beam proton systems with the added advantage of acquiring images at the treatment isocentre.

  20. 2D-3D radiograph to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) registration for C-arm image-guided robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen Pei; Otake, Yoshito; Azizian, Mahdi; Wagner, Oliver J; Sorger, Jonathan M; Armand, Mehran; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-08-01

    C-arm radiographs are commonly used for intraoperative image guidance in surgical interventions. Fluoroscopy is a cost-effective real-time modality, although image quality can vary greatly depending on the target anatomy. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are sometimes available, so 2D-3D registration is needed for intra-procedural guidance. C-arm radiographs were registered to CBCT scans and used for 3D localization of peritumor fiducials during a minimally invasive thoracic intervention with a da Vinci Si robot. Intensity-based 2D-3D registration of intraoperative radiographs to CBCT was performed. The feasible range of X-ray projections achievable by a C-arm positioned around a da Vinci Si surgical robot, configured for robotic wedge resection, was determined using phantom models. Experiments were conducted on synthetic phantoms and animals imaged with an OEC 9600 and a Siemens Artis zeego, representing the spectrum of different C-arm systems currently available for clinical use. The image guidance workflow was feasible using either an optically tracked OEC 9600 or a Siemens Artis zeego C-arm, resulting in an angular difference of Δθ:∼ 30°. The two C-arm systems provided TRE mean ≤ 2.5 mm and TRE mean ≤ 2.0 mm, respectively (i.e., comparable to standard clinical intraoperative navigation systems). C-arm 3D localization from dual 2D-3D registered radiographs was feasible and applicable for intraoperative image guidance during da Vinci robotic thoracic interventions using the proposed workflow. Tissue deformation and in vivo experiments are required before clinical evaluation of this system.

  1. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of lung metastases from colorectal carcinoma under C-arm cone beam CT guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouyal, G; Pernot, S; Déan, C; Cholley, B; Scotté, F; Sapoval, M; Pellerin, O

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of lung metastases from colorectal carcinoma using C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. This single-center prospective observational study was performed from August 2013 to August 2016, and included consecutive patients referred for radiofrequency ablation of lung metastases from colorectal cancer. Radiofrequency ablation procedures were performed under C-arm CBCT guidance. Feasibility was assessed by probe accuracy placement, time to accurate placement and number of C-arm CBCT acquisitions to reach the target lesion. Safety was assessed by the report of adverse event graded using the common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE-V4.0). Efficacy was assessed by metastases response rate using RECIST 1.1 and 18 FDG-PET-CT tumor uptake at 6months. Fifty-four consecutive patients (32 men, 22 women) with a mean age of 63±8 (SD) years (range: 51-81years) with a total of 56 lung metastasis from colorectal metastases were treated in a single session. The mean tumor diameter was 25.6±4.5 (SD)mm (range: 17-31mm). Median time to insert the needle into the target lesion was 10min (range: 5-25min). Median number of needles repositioning and C-arm CBCT acquisition per patient was 1 (range: 0-3) and 4 (range: 3-6) respectively. The accuracy for radiofrequency ablation probe placement was 2±0.2 (SD)mm (range: 0-9mm). Pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement occurred in one patient (CTCAE-V4.0 grade 3). At 6months, all patients were alive with tumor response rate of -27% and had no significant activity on the 18 FDG-PET CT follow-up. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of lung metastases from colorectal cancer under C-arm CBCT guidance is feasible and safe, with immediate and short-term results similar to those obtained using conventional CT guidance. Copyright © 2017 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS

  2. Disruption of histone modification and CARM1 recruitment by arsenic represses transcription at glucocorticoid receptor-regulated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Fiona D; Krohmer, Lori J; Hamilton, Joshua W; Sheldon, Lynn A

    2009-08-26

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) found in the environment is one of the most significant and widespread environmental health risks in the U.S. and throughout the world. It is associated with a broad range of health effects from cancer to diabetes as well as reproductive and developmental anomalies. This diversity of diseases can also result from disruption of metabolic and other cellular processes regulated by steroid hormone receptors via aberrant transcriptional regulation. Significantly, exposure to iAs inhibits steroid hormone-mediated gene activation. iAs exposure is associated with disease, but is also used therapeutically to treat specific cancers complicating an understanding of iAs action. Transcriptional activation by steroid hormone receptors is accompanied by changes in histone and non-histone protein post-translational modification (PTM) that result from the enzymatic activity of coactivator and corepressor proteins such as GRIP1 and CARM1. This study addresses how iAs represses steroid receptor-regulated gene transcription. PTMs on histones H3 and H4 at the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-activated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter were identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis following exposure to steroid hormone+/-iAs. Histone H3K18 and H3R17 amino acid residues had significantly different patterns of PTMs after treatment with iAs. Promoter interaction of the coactivator CARM1 was disrupted, but the interaction of GRIP1, a p160 coactivator through which CARM1 interacts with a promoter, was intact. Over-expression of CARM1 was able to fully restore and GRIP1 partially restored iAs-repressed transcription indicating that these coactivators are functionally associated with iAs-mediated transcriptional repression. Both are essential for robust transcription at steroid hormone regulated genes and both are associated with disease when inappropriately expressed. We postulate that iAs effects on CARM1 and GRIP1 may underlie some

  3. Reinforcing the role of the conventional C-arm - a novel method for simplified distal interlocking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windolf Markus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The common practice for insertion of distal locking screws of intramedullary nails is a freehand technique under fluoroscopic control. The process is technically demanding, time-consuming and afflicted to considerable radiation exposure of the patient and the surgical personnel. A new concept is introduced utilizing information from within conventional radiographic images to help accurately guide the surgeon to place the interlocking bolt into the interlocking hole. The newly developed technique was compared to conventional freehand in an operating room (OR like setting on human cadaveric lower legs in terms of operating time and radiation exposure. Methods The proposed concept (guided freehand, generally based on the freehand gold standard, additionally guides the surgeon by means of visible landmarks projected into the C-arm image. A computer program plans the correct drilling trajectory by processing the lens-shaped hole projections of the interlocking holes from a single image. Holes can be drilled by visually aligning the drill to the planned trajectory. Besides a conventional C-arm, no additional tracking or navigation equipment is required. Ten fresh frozen human below-knee specimens were instrumented with an Expert Tibial Nail (Synthes GmbH, Switzerland. The implants were distally locked by performing the newly proposed technique as well as the conventional freehand technique on each specimen. An orthopedic resident surgeon inserted four distal screws per procedure. Operating time, number of images and radiation time were recorded and statistically compared between interlocking techniques using non-parametric tests. Results A 58% reduction in number of taken images per screw was found for the guided freehand technique (7.4 ± 3.4 (mean ± SD compared to the freehand technique (17.6 ± 10.3 (p p = 0.001. Operating time per screw (from first shot to screw tightened was on average 22% reduced by guided freehand (p = 0

  4. Image quality and localization accuracy in C-arm tomosynthesis-guided head and neck surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachar, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The image quality and localization accuracy for C-arm tomosynthesis and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance of head and neck surgery were investigated. A continuum in image acquisition was explored, ranging from a single exposure (radiograph) to multiple projections acquired over a limited arc (tomosynthesis) to a full semicircular trajectory (CBCT). Experiments were performed using a prototype mobile C-arm modified to perform 3D image acquisition (a modified Siemens PowerMobil). The tradeoffs in image quality associated with the extent of the source-detector arc (θ tot ), the number of projection views, and the total imaging dose were evaluated in phantom and cadaver studies. Surgical localization performance was evaluated using three cadaver heads imaged as a function of θ tot . Six localization tasks were considered, ranging from high-contrast feature identification (e.g., tip of a K-wire pointer) to more challenging soft-tissue delineation (e.g., junction of the hard and soft palate). Five head and neck surgeons and one radiologist participated as observers. For each localization task, the 3D coordinates of landmarks pinpointed by each observer were analyzed as a function of θ tot . For all tomosynthesis angles, image quality was highest in the coronal plane, whereas sagittal and axial planes exhibited a substantial decrease in spatial resolution associated with out-of-plane blur and distortion. Tasks involving complex, lower-contrast features demonstrated steeper degradation with smaller tomosynthetic arc. Localization accuracy in the coronal plane was correspondingly high, maintained to tot ∼30 deg. , whereas sagittal and axial localization degraded rapidly below θ tot ∼60 deg. . Similarly, localization precision was better than ∼1 mm within the coronal plane, compared to ∼2-3 mm out-of-plane for tomosynthesis angles below θ tot ∼45 deg. . An overall 3D localization accuracy of ∼2.5 mm was achieved with θ tot ∼ 90 deg. for most

  5. Arteries of the falciform ligament on C-arm CT hepatic arteriography: The hepatic falciform artery and the Sappey's superior artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Saebeom; Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, Jae Hwan; Cho, SooBeum; Kim, Minuk; Lee, Myungsu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Chun Gao [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nanjing, Jangsu (China)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate the prevalence, anatomy and distribution of the hepatic falciform artery (HFA) and Sappey's superior artery (SSA) using C-arm CT hepatic arteriography (C-arm CTHA). From January 2011 to December 2012, 220 patients who underwent C-arm CTHA during initial transarterial treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma were included in this retrospective study. The HFAs and SSAs prevalence and origin were evaluated using axial images of C-arm CTHA. A 5-point scale for HFAs and a 4-point scale for SSAs were used to designate the radiologically conspicuous arteries. The prevalences of the total HFAs and SSAs were 95 % (n=209) and 22 % (n=49), while those of radiologically conspicuous HFAs and SSAs were 62 % (n=137) and 10 % (n=22), respectively. Thirty HFAs (22 % of radiologically conspicuous HFAs and 14 % of the total study population) were distributed in the subcutaneous layer of the anterior abdominal wall, while the majority of SSAs ran through the superior part of the falciform ligament in the left-anterior direction and anastomosed with left inferior phrenic artery. Our study using C-arm CTHA revealed that the prevalence of the HFA is higher than the existing knowledge and proved the existence of the SSA radiologically for the first time. (orig.)

  6. Arteries of the falciform ligament on C-arm CT hepatic arteriography: The hepatic falciform artery and the Sappey's superior artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Saebeom; Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, Jae Hwan; Cho, SooBeum; Kim, Minuk; Lee, Myungsu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Zhou, Chun Gao

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence, anatomy and distribution of the hepatic falciform artery (HFA) and Sappey's superior artery (SSA) using C-arm CT hepatic arteriography (C-arm CTHA). From January 2011 to December 2012, 220 patients who underwent C-arm CTHA during initial transarterial treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma were included in this retrospective study. The HFAs and SSAs prevalence and origin were evaluated using axial images of C-arm CTHA. A 5-point scale for HFAs and a 4-point scale for SSAs were used to designate the radiologically conspicuous arteries. The prevalences of the total HFAs and SSAs were 95 % (n=209) and 22 % (n=49), while those of radiologically conspicuous HFAs and SSAs were 62 % (n=137) and 10 % (n=22), respectively. Thirty HFAs (22 % of radiologically conspicuous HFAs and 14 % of the total study population) were distributed in the subcutaneous layer of the anterior abdominal wall, while the majority of SSAs ran through the superior part of the falciform ligament in the left-anterior direction and anastomosed with left inferior phrenic artery. Our study using C-arm CTHA revealed that the prevalence of the HFA is higher than the existing knowledge and proved the existence of the SSA radiologically for the first time. (orig.)

  7. Application of C-arm computed tomography in cardiology; Kardiale Anwendung der C-Arm-Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Innenstadt, Abteilung fuer Kardiologie, Medizinische Poliklinik, Muenchen (Germany); Rohkohl, C. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Mustererkennung, Department Informatik, Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Forchheim (Germany); Lauritsch, G. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Forchheim (Germany); Rittger, H. [Krankenhaus Coburg, Abteilung fuer Kardiologie, Coburg (Germany); Meissner, O. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Forchheim (Germany); Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    C-arm computed tomography is currently being introduced into cardiac imaging and offers the potential for three-dimensional imaging of the cardiac anatomy within the interventional environment. This detailed view is necessary to support complex interventional strategies, such as transcutaneous valve replacement, interventional therapy of atrial fibrillation, implantation of biventricular pacemakers and assessment of myocardial perfusion. Currently, the major limitation of this technology is its insufficient temporal resolution which limits the visualization of fast moving parts of the heart. (orig.) [German] Durch die Entwicklung der C-Arm-Computertomographie- (CACT-)Angiographie ist es erstmals moeglich, waehrend einer Herzkatheteruntersuchung eine detaillierte dreidimensionale Darstellung der kardialen Anatomie zu erhalten. Derartige zusaetzliche Informationen koennten die Durchfuehrung der immer komplexer werdenden Strategien der interventionellen Kardiologie wirkungsvoll unterstuetzen. Hierzu zaehlen u. a. der transkutane Klappenersatz, die interventionelle Behandlung von Vorhofflimmern, die Implantation biventrikulaerer Schrittmacher sowie die Beurteilung der Myokardperfusion. Die derzeit groesste Limitation dieser Methode ist die relativ geringe zeitliche Aufloesung, die aufgrund der Bewegung des Herzens die Anwendung dieser Technologie einschraenkt. (orig.)

  8. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty: applicability of C-Arm CT for procedure guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, Jan B. [Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Renne, Julius; Wacker, Frank K.; Meyer, Bernhard C. [Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Hoeper, Marius M.; Olsson, Karen M. [Clinic for Pneumology, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the feasibility of and compare two C-Arm CT (CACT) guidance methods during balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA). Forty-two BPAs [27 CTEPH patients (nine males, 70 ± 14y)] targeting 143 pulmonary arteries were included. Twenty-two BPAs were guided by contrast-enhanced CACT acquired immediately before BPA (G3D). In another 20 BPAs (G2D), two orthogonal fluoroscopy images of the chest where acquired to compute a registration of a previously acquired CACT. Volume rendering-based graphic representations (VRT guidance) were generated indicating the origin and course of the vessels. Based on VRT guidance, the intervention was planned. Procedure durations and radiation exposure data were compared between the two groups (Wilcoxon test). The overall intervention time was approximately 2 h in both groups (p = 0.31). BPA was successfully performed in G3D 91 % and G2D 94 %. No significant difference was found concerning the mean dose area product (DAP) related to fluoroscopy (p = 0.38), while DAP related to DSA was slightly higher in G3D (p = 0.048). Overall, DAP was significantly higher in G3D (p = 0.002). The use of CACT for procedure guidance in patients undergoing BPA is feasible and accurate. Image fusion of a pre-acquired CACT can be used to decrease radiation exposure due to multiple BPA sessions. (orig.)

  9. Acquiring Multiview C-Arm Images to Assist Cardiac Ablation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallavollita Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CARTO XP is an electroanatomical cardiac mapping system that provides 3D color-coded maps of the electrical activity of the heart; however it is expensive and it can only use a single costly magnetic catheter for each patient intervention. Our approach consists of integrating fluoroscopic and electrical data from the RF catheters into the same image so as to better guide RF ablation, shorten the duration of this procedure, increase its efficacy, and decrease hospital cost when compared to CARTO XP. We propose a method that relies on multi-view C-arm fluoroscopy image acquisition for (1 the 3D reconstruction of the anatomical structure of interest, (2 the robust temporal tracking of the tip-electrode of a mapping catheter between the diastolic and systolic phases and (3 the 2D/3D registration of color coded isochronal maps directly on the 2D fluoroscopy image that would help the clinician guide the ablation procedure much more effectively. The method has been tested on canine experimental data.

  10. WE-EF-207-02: The Rotate-Plus-Shift C-Arm Trajectory: Theory and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, L; Kachelriess, M; Kuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed method enables the acquisition of a complete dataset for 3D reconstruction of C-Arm data using less than 180° rotation. Methods: Typically a C–arm cone–beam CT scan is performed using a circle–like trajectory around a region of interest. Therefore an angular range of at least 180° plus fan–angle must be covered to ensure a completely sampled data set. This fact defines some constraints on the geometry and technical specifications of a C–arm system, for example a larger C radius or a smaller C opening respectively. This is even more important for mobile C-arm devices which are typically used in surgical applications.To overcome these limitations we propose a new trajectory which requires only 180° minusfan–angle of rotation for a complete data set. The trajectory consists of three parts: A rotation of the C around a defined iso–center and two translational movements parallel to the detector plane at the begin and at the end of the rotation (rotate plus shift trajectory). This enables the acquisition of a completely sampled dataset using only 180° minus fan–angle of rotation. Results: For the evaluation of the method we show simulated and measured data. The results show, that the rotate plus shift scan yields equivalent image quality compared to the short scan which is assumed to be the gold standard for C-arm CT today. Compared to the pure rotational scan over only 165°, the rotate plus shift scan shows strong improvements in image quality. Conclusion: The proposed method makes 3D imaging using C–arms with less than 180° rotation range possible. This enables integrating full 3D functionality into a C- arm device without any loss of handling and usability for 2D imaging

  11. Evaluation of imaging quality for flat-panel detector based low dose C-arm CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Chang-Woo; Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young

    2015-01-01

    The image quality associated with the extent of the angle of gantry rotation, the number of projection views, and the dose of X-ray radiation was investigated in flat-panel detector (FPD) based C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for medical applications. A prototype CBCT system for the projection acquisition used the X-ray tube (A-132, Varian inc.) having rhenium-tungsten molybdenum target and flat panel a-Si X-ray detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian inc.) having a 397 x 298 mm active area with 388 μm pixel pitch and 1024 x 768 pixels in 2 by 2 binning mode. The performance comparison of X-ray imaging quality was carried out using the Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress (FDK) reconstruction algorithm between different conditions of projection acquisition. In this work, head-and-dental (75 kVp/20 mA) and chest (90 kVp/25 mA) phantoms were used to evaluate the image quality. The 361 (30 fps x 12 s) projection data during 360 deg. gantry rotation with 1 deg. interval for the 3D reconstruction were acquired. Parke weighting function were applied to handle redundant data and improve the reconstructed image quality in a mobile C-arm system with limited rotation angles. The reconstructed 3D images were investigated for comparison of qualitative image quality in terms of scan protocols (projection views, rotation angles and exposure dose). Furthermore, the performance evaluation in image quality will be investigated regarding X-ray dose and limited projection data for a FPD based mobile C-arm CBCT system. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of the dose distribution of dynamic conical conformal therapy using a C-arm mounted accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Keiichi; Aoki, Yukimasa; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2001-01-01

    Conformal radiation therapy, which is widely utilized in Japan as a standard, highly precise technique has limited advantage in dose confinement because of its coplanar beam entry. An improved form of conformal therapy is delivered by a linac mounted on a C-arm rotatable gantry. The linac head was designed to move along the C-arm with a maximum angle of 60 degrees. Simultaneous rotation of the gantry creates a Dynamic Conical irradiation technique. Dynamic Conical Conformal Therapy (Dyconic Therapy) was developed by combining the technique with continuous MLC motion based on beam's eye views of the target volume. Dose distributions were measured in a phantom using film densitometry and compared with conventional conformal radiation therapy. The measurements showed that the dose distribution conformed to the target shape identified by CT. In addition, the dose distribution for a cancer patient was evaluated through the use of DVHs generated by a treatment planning system. These measurements showed that the dose distribution along the patient's long axis conformed to the shape of the target volume. DVH analysis, however, did not indicate superiority of the present technique over the conventional technique. Angulation of the C-arm gantry allowed the primary beam to strike a larger area of the therapy room. This necessitated adding shielding to the walls and ceiling of the treatment room. It was confirmed that the leakage radiation was reduced to a negligible level by adding an iron plate 20 cm thick to several places on the side walls, by adding an iron plate 9 cm thick to several places on the ceiling, and by increasing the thickness of the concrete ceiling from 70 to 140 cm. The possible usefulness of Dyconic Therapy was confirmed. (author)

  13. Heel Effect: Dose Mapping And Profiling For Mobile C-Arm Fluoroscopy Unit Toshiba SXT-1000A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini Salleh; Mohd Khalid Matori; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Mohd Ramli Arshad; Shahrul Azlan Azizan; Mohd Firdaus Abdul Rahman; Md Khairusalih Md Zin

    2014-01-01

    Heel Effect is the well known phenomena in x-ray production. It contributes the effect to image formation and as well as scattered radiation. But there is paucity in the study related to heel effect. This study is for mapping and profiling the dose on the surface of water phantom by using mobile C-arm unit Toshiba SXT-1000A. Based on the result the dose profile is increasing up to about 57 % from anode to cathode bound of the irradiated area. This result and information can be used as a guide to manipulate these phenomena for better image quality and radiation safety for this specific and dedicated fluoroscopy unit. (author)

  14. 3D Deep Learning Angiography (3D-DLA) from C-arm Conebeam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, J C; Li, Y; Strother, C; Chen, G-H

    2018-05-01

    Deep learning is a branch of artificial intelligence that has demonstrated unprecedented performance in many medical imaging applications. Our purpose was to develop a deep learning angiography method to generate 3D cerebral angiograms from a single contrast-enhanced C-arm conebeam CT acquisition in order to reduce image artifacts and radiation dose. A set of 105 3D rotational angiography examinations were randomly selected from an internal data base. All were acquired using a clinical system in conjunction with a standard injection protocol. More than 150 million labeled voxels from 35 subjects were used for training. A deep convolutional neural network was trained to classify each image voxel into 3 tissue types (vasculature, bone, and soft tissue). The trained deep learning angiography model was then applied for tissue classification into a validation cohort of 8 subjects and a final testing cohort of the remaining 62 subjects. The final vasculature tissue class was used to generate the 3D deep learning angiography images. To quantify the generalization error of the trained model, we calculated the accuracy, sensitivity, precision, and Dice similarity coefficients for vasculature classification in relevant anatomy. The 3D deep learning angiography and clinical 3D rotational angiography images were subjected to a qualitative assessment for the presence of intersweep motion artifacts. Vasculature classification accuracy and 95% CI in the testing dataset were 98.7% (98.3%-99.1%). No residual signal from osseous structures was observed for any 3D deep learning angiography testing cases except for small regions in the otic capsule and nasal cavity compared with 37% (23/62) of the 3D rotational angiographies. Deep learning angiography accurately recreated the vascular anatomy of the 3D rotational angiography reconstructions without a mask. Deep learning angiography reduced misregistration artifacts induced by intersweep motion, and it reduced radiation exposure

  15. Online C-arm calibration using a marked guide wire for 3D reconstruction of pulmonary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Étienne; Miró, Joaquim; Duong, Luc

    2017-03-01

    3D reconstruction of vessels from 2D X-ray angiography is highly relevant to improve the visualization and the assessment of vascular structures such as pulmonary arteries by interventional cardiologists. However, to ensure a robust and accurate reconstruction, C-arm gantry parameters must be properly calibrated to provide clinically acceptable results. Calibration procedures often rely on calibration objects and complex protocol which is not adapted to an intervention context. In this study, a novel calibration algorithm for C-arm gantry is presented using the instrumentation such as catheters and guide wire. This ensures the availability of a minimum set of correspondences and implies minimal changes to the clinical workflow. The method was evaluated on simulated data and on retrospective patient datasets. Experimental results on simulated datasets demonstrate a calibration that allows a 3D reconstruction of the guide wire up to a geometric transformation. Experiments with patients datasets show a significant decrease of the retro projection error to 0.17 mm 2D RMS. Consequently, such procedure might contribute to identify any calibration drift during the intervention.

  16. An Optimized Spline-Based Registration of a 3D CT to a Set of C-Arm Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an algorithm for the rigid-body registration of a CT volume to a set of C-arm images. The algorithm uses a gradient-based iterative minimization of a least-squares measure of dissimilarity between the C-arm images and projections of the CT volume. To compute projections, we use a novel method for fast integration of the volume along rays. To improve robustness and speed, we take advantage of a coarse-to-fine processing of the volume/image pyramids. To compute the projections of the volume, the gradient of the dissimilarity measure, and the multiresolution data pyramids, we use a continuous image/volume model based on cubic B-splines, which ensures a high interpolation accuracy and a gradient of the dissimilarity measure that is well defined everywhere. We show the performance of our algorithm on a human spine phantom, where the true alignment is determined using a set of fiducial markers.

  17. Simultaneous 3D–2D image registration and C-arm calibration: Application to endovascular image-guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrović, Uroš [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Tržaška 25, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia and Cosylab, Control System Laboratory, Teslova ulica 30, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Pernuš, Franjo [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Tržaška 25, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Likar, Boštjan; Špiclin, Žiga, E-mail: ziga.spiclin@fe.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Tržaška 25, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia and Sensum, Computer Vision Systems, Tehnološki Park 21, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D–2D) image registration is a key to fusion and simultaneous visualization of valuable information contained in 3D pre-interventional and 2D intra-interventional images with the final goal of image guidance of a procedure. In this paper, the authors focus on 3D–2D image registration within the context of intracranial endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs), where the 3D and 2D images are generally acquired with the same C-arm system. The accuracy and robustness of any 3D–2D registration method, to be used in a clinical setting, is influenced by (1) the method itself, (2) uncertainty of initial pose of the 3D image from which registration starts, (3) uncertainty of C-arm’s geometry and pose, and (4) the number of 2D intra-interventional images used for registration, which is generally one and at most two. The study of these influences requires rigorous and objective validation of any 3D–2D registration method against a highly accurate reference or “gold standard” registration, performed on clinical image datasets acquired in the context of the intervention. Methods: The registration process is split into two sequential, i.e., initial and final, registration stages. The initial stage is either machine-based or template matching. The latter aims to reduce possibly large in-plane translation errors by matching a projection of the 3D vessel model and 2D image. In the final registration stage, four state-of-the-art intrinsic image-based 3D–2D registration methods, which involve simultaneous refinement of rigid-body and C-arm parameters, are evaluated. For objective validation, the authors acquired an image database of 15 patients undergoing cerebral EIGI, for which accurate gold standard registrations were established by fiducial marker coregistration. Results: Based on target registration error, the obtained success rates of 3D to a single 2D image registration after initial machine-based and

  18. Conceptual design of pulsed high voltage and high precision power supply for a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zito, Pietro; Maffia, Giuseppe; Lampasi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM). • This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS). • The conceptual design answers to the performances requested for CARM HVPS. • The pulse transformer parameters were estimated according to IEEE standards. • PWM PID-based controller has been optimized to follow very fast rectangular pulses. - Abstract: Due to the high electron temperature during the plasma burning, both a higher power (>1 MW) and a higher frequency (up to 300 GHz) are required for plasma heating in future fusion experiments like DEMO. For this task, ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) able to produce an electron radiation in synchronism with the electromagnetic field and to transfer the electron beam kinetic energy to the plasma. This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS) with the following technical characteristics: variable output voltage up to 700 kV; variable pulse length in the range 5–50 μs; overshoot < 2%; rise time < 1 μs; voltage accuracy (including drop, ripple and stability) <0.1%. This paper describes the conceptual design and the technical solutions adopted to achieve the performance requested for the CARM HVPS.

  19. Direct navigation on 3D rotational x-ray data acquired with a mobile propeller C-arm: accuracy and application in functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraats, Everine B van de; Carelsen, Bart; Fokkens, Wytske J; Boon, Sjirk N; Noordhoek, Niels; Niessen, Wiro J; Walsum, Theo van

    2005-01-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) rotational x-ray imaging has been combined with navigation technology, enabling direct 3D navigation for minimally invasive image guided interventions. In this study, phantom experiments are used to determine the accuracy of such a navigation set-up for a mobile C-arm with propeller motion. After calibration of the C-arm system, the accuracy is evaluated by pinpointing divots on a special-purpose phantom with known geometry. This evaluation is performed both with and without C-arm motion in between calibration and registration for navigation. The variation caused by each of the individual transformations in the calibration and registration process is also studied. The feasibility of direct navigation on 3D rotational x-ray images for functional endoscopic sinus surgery has been evaluated in a cadaver navigation experiment. Navigation accuracy was approximately 1.0 mm, which is sufficient for functional endoscopic sinus surgery. C-arm motion in between calibration and registration slightly degraded the registration accuracy by approximately 0.3 mm. Standard deviations of each of the transformations were in the range 0.15-0.31 mm. In the cadaver experiment, the navigation images were considered in good correspondence with the endoscopic images by an experienced ENT surgeon. Availability of 3D localization information provided by the navigation system was considered valuable by the ENT surgeon

  20. Conceptual design of pulsed high voltage and high precision power supply for a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) for plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.zito@enea.it; Maffia, Giuseppe; Lampasi, Alessandro

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM). • This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS). • The conceptual design answers to the performances requested for CARM HVPS. • The pulse transformer parameters were estimated according to IEEE standards. • PWM PID-based controller has been optimized to follow very fast rectangular pulses. - Abstract: Due to the high electron temperature during the plasma burning, both a higher power (>1 MW) and a higher frequency (up to 300 GHz) are required for plasma heating in future fusion experiments like DEMO. For this task, ENEA started a project to develop a cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) able to produce an electron radiation in synchronism with the electromagnetic field and to transfer the electron beam kinetic energy to the plasma. This facility requires an advanced pulsed high voltage power supply (HVPS) with the following technical characteristics: variable output voltage up to 700 kV; variable pulse length in the range 5–50 μs; overshoot < 2%; rise time < 1 μs; voltage accuracy (including drop, ripple and stability) <0.1%. This paper describes the conceptual design and the technical solutions adopted to achieve the performance requested for the CARM HVPS.

  1. Real-Time Verification of a High-Dose-Rate Iridium 192 Source Position Using a Modified C-Arm Fluoroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Takayuki, E-mail: nose-takayuki@nms.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nippon Medical School Tamanagayama Hospital, Tama (Japan); Chatani, Masashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan); Otani, Yuki [Department of Radiology, Kaizuka City Hospital, Kaizuka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kumita, Shinichirou [Department of Radiology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy misdeliveries can occur at any institution, and they can cause disastrous results. Even a patient's death has been reported. Misdeliveries could be avoided with real-time verification methods. In 1996, we developed a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification of an HDR Iridium 192 source position prevent these misdeliveries. This method provided excellent image quality sufficient to detect errors, and it has been in clinical use at our institutions for 20 years. The purpose of the current study is to introduce the mechanisms and validity of our straightforward C-arm fluoroscopic verification method. Methods and Materials: Conventional X-ray fluoroscopic images are degraded by spurious signals and quantum noise from Iridium 192 photons, which make source verification impractical. To improve image quality, we quadrupled the C-arm fluoroscopic X-ray dose per pulse. The pulse rate was reduced by a factor of 4 to keep the average exposure compliant with Japanese medical regulations. The images were then displayed with quarter-frame rates. Results: Sufficient quality was obtained to enable observation of the source position relative to both the applicators and the anatomy. With this method, 2 errors were detected among 2031 treatment sessions for 370 patients within a 6-year period. Conclusions: With the use of a modified C-arm fluoroscopic verification method, treatment errors that were otherwise overlooked were detected in real time. This method should be given consideration for widespread use.

  2. Radiation mapping of Jaipur city using compact aerial radiation monitoring system (CARMS) installed in mobile platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Amit; Chaudhury, Probal; Padmanabhan, N.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.; Thandra, Manu

    2010-01-01

    length of 100 km was covered and the average gamma dose rate recorded was 66.6 nGy/h with standard deviation of ± 4.4 nGy/h. The background gamma levels have been substantially constant in the area of survey. A small difference of 10 nSv/h in average values between CARMS and Gamma Tracer is observed. This is due to different energy compensation technique used and calibration methods related to mounting of detectors and their size. It can be said that through such exercises by mobile radiation monitoring being carried out periodically are very useful in generation of nationwide baseline radiation dose rate and any future deviations due to industrial/malevolent activities can be identified and emergency measures can be implemented

  3. Antiscatter grids in mobile C-arm cone-beam CT: Effect on image quality and dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, S.; Stayman, J.W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J.H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States); Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen, Bavaria 91052 (Germany); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States) and Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray scatter is a major detriment to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT). Existing geometries exhibit strong differences in scatter susceptibility with more compact geometries, e.g., dental or musculoskeletal, benefiting from antiscatter grids, whereas in more extended geometries, e.g., IGRT, grid use carries tradeoffs in image quality per unit dose. This work assesses the tradeoffs in dose and image quality for grids applied in the context of low-dose CBCT on a mobile C-arm for image-guided surgery. Methods: Studies were performed on a mobile C-arm equipped with a flat-panel detector for high-quality CBCT. Antiscatter grids of grid ratio (GR) 6:1-12:1, 40 lp/cm, were tested in ''body'' surgery, i.e., spine, using protocols for bone and soft-tissue visibility in the thoracic and abdominal spine. Studies focused on grid orientation, CT number accuracy, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in quantitative phantoms at constant dose. Results: There was no effect of grid orientation on possible gridline artifacts, given accurate angle-dependent gain calibration. Incorrect calibration was found to result in gridline shadows in the projection data that imparted high-frequency artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Increasing GR reduced errors in CT number from 31%, thorax, and 37%, abdomen, for gridless operation to 2% and 10%, respectively, with a 12:1 grid, while image noise increased by up to 70%. The CNR of high-contrast objects was largely unaffected by grids, but low-contrast soft-tissues suffered reduction in CNR, 2%-65%, across the investigated GR at constant dose. Conclusions: While grids improved CT number accuracy, soft-tissue CNR was reduced due to attenuation of primary radiation. CNR could be restored by increasing dose by factors of {approx}1.6-2.5 depending on GR, e.g., increase from 4.6 mGy for the thorax and 12.5 mGy for the abdomen without antiscatter grids to approximately 12 mGy and 30 mGy, respectively, with a high

  4. Task-driven orbit design and implementation on a robotic C-arm system for cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Jacobson, M.; Stayman, J. W.; Ehtiati, T.; Weiss, C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: This work applies task-driven optimization to the design of non-circular orbits that maximize imaging performance for a particular imaging task. First implementation of task-driven imaging on a clinical robotic C-arm system is demonstrated, and a framework for orbit calculation is described and evaluated. Methods: We implemented a task-driven imaging framework to optimize orbit parameters that maximize detectability index d'. This framework utilizes a specified Fourier domain task function and an analytical model for system spatial resolution and noise. Two experiments were conducted to test the framework. First, a simple task was considered consisting of frequencies lying entirely on the fz-axis (e.g., discrimination of structures oriented parallel to the central axial plane), and a "circle + arc" orbit was incorporated into the framework as a means to improve sampling of these frequencies, and thereby increase task-based detectability. The orbit was implemented on a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare). A second task considered visualization of a cochlear implant simulated within a head phantom, with spatial frequency response emphasizing high-frequency content in the (fy, fz) plane of the cochlea. An optimal orbit was computed using the task-driven framework, and the resulting image was compared to that for a circular orbit. Results: For the fz-axis task, the circle + arc orbit was shown to increase d' by a factor of 1.20, with an improvement of 0.71 mm in a 3D edge-spread measurement for edges located far from the central plane and a decrease in streak artifacts compared to a circular orbit. For the cochlear implant task, the resulting orbit favored complementary views of high tilt angles in a 360° orbit, and d' was increased by a factor of 1.83. Conclusions: This work shows that a prospective definition of imaging task can be used to optimize source-detector orbit and improve imaging performance. The method was implemented for execution of

  5. Study of factors controlling exposure dose and image quality of C-arm in operation room according to detector size of it (Mainly L-Spine AP study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chui, Sung Hyun; Jo, Hwang Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Woon Kwan; Song, Ha Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Time of operation has been reduced and accuracy of operation has been improved since C-arm, which offer real-time image of patient, was introduced in operation room. However, because of the contamination of patient, C-arm could not be used more appropriately. Therefore, this study is to know factors of controlling exposure dose, image quality and the exposed dose of health professional in operation room. Height of Wilson frame (bed for operation) was fixed at 130 cm. Then, Model 76-2 Phantom, which was set by assembling manual of Fluke Company, was set on the bed. Head/Spine Fluoroscopy AEC mode was set for exposure condition. According to detector size of C-arm, the absorbed dose per min was measured in the 7 steps OFD (cm) from 10 cm to 40 cm (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 cm). In each step of OFD, the absorbed dose per min of same diameter of collimation was measured. Moreover, using Nero MAX Model 8000, exposure dose per min was measured according to 3 step of distance from detector (20 cm, 60 cm, 100 cm). Finally, resolution was measured by CDRH Disc Phantom and magnification of each OFD was measured by aluminum stick bar. According to detector size of C-arm, difference of absorbed dose shows that the dose of 20 cm OFD is 1.750 times higher than the dose of 40 cm OFD. It means that the C-arm, which has smaller size of detector, shows the bigger difference of absorbed dose per min (p<0.05). In the difference of absorbed dose in the same step of OFD (from 20 cm to 40 cm), the absorbed dose of 9 inch detect or C-arm was 1.370 times higher than 12 inch' s (p<0.05). When OFD was set to 20 cm OFD, the absorbed dose of non-collimation case was approximately 0.816 times lower than the absorbed dose of collimation cases (p<0.05). When the distance was 20 cm from detector, exposed does includes first-ray and scatter-ray. When the distance was 60 cm and 100 cm from detector, exposed does includes just scatter-ray. So, there was the 2.200 times difference of absorbed

  6. C-arm flat detector computed tomography parenchymal blood volume imaging: the nature of parenchymal blood volume parameter and the feasibility of parenchymal blood volume imaging in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V.

    2015-01-01

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) measurements allow assessment of cerebral haemodynamics in the neurointerventional suite. This paper explores the feasibility of C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV imaging and the relationship between the C-arm CT PBV and the MR-PWI-derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) parameters in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Twenty-six patients with DCI following aneurysmal SAH underwent a research C-arm CT PBV scan using a biplane angiography system and contemporaneous MR-PWI scan as part of a prospective study. Quantitative whole-brain atlas-based volume-of-interest analysis in conjunction with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman tests was performed to explore the agreement between C-arm CT PBV and MR-derived CBV and CBF measurements. All patients received medical management, while eight patients (31 %) underwent selective intra-arterial chemical angioplasty. Colour-coded C-arm CT PBV maps were 91 % sensitive and 100 % specific in detecting the perfusion abnormalities. C-arm CT rPBV demonstrated good agreement and strong correlation with both MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF measurements; the agreement and correlation were stronger for MR-rCBF relative to MR-rCBV and improved for C-arm CT PBV versus the geometric mean of MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF. Analysis of weighted means showed that the C-arm CT PBV has a preferential blood flow weighting (∼60 % blood flow and ∼40 % blood volume weighting). C-arm CT PBV imaging is feasible in DCI following aneurysmal SAH. PBV is a composite perfusion parameter incorporating both blood flow and blood volume weightings. That PBV has preferential (∼60 %) blood flow weighting is an important finding, which is of clinical significance when interpreting the C-arm CT PBV maps, particularly in the setting of acute brain ischemia. (orig.)

  7. C-arm flat detector computed tomography parenchymal blood volume imaging: the nature of parenchymal blood volume parameter and the feasibility of parenchymal blood volume imaging in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V. [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) measurements allow assessment of cerebral haemodynamics in the neurointerventional suite. This paper explores the feasibility of C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV imaging and the relationship between the C-arm CT PBV and the MR-PWI-derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) parameters in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Twenty-six patients with DCI following aneurysmal SAH underwent a research C-arm CT PBV scan using a biplane angiography system and contemporaneous MR-PWI scan as part of a prospective study. Quantitative whole-brain atlas-based volume-of-interest analysis in conjunction with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman tests was performed to explore the agreement between C-arm CT PBV and MR-derived CBV and CBF measurements. All patients received medical management, while eight patients (31 %) underwent selective intra-arterial chemical angioplasty. Colour-coded C-arm CT PBV maps were 91 % sensitive and 100 % specific in detecting the perfusion abnormalities. C-arm CT rPBV demonstrated good agreement and strong correlation with both MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF measurements; the agreement and correlation were stronger for MR-rCBF relative to MR-rCBV and improved for C-arm CT PBV versus the geometric mean of MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF. Analysis of weighted means showed that the C-arm CT PBV has a preferential blood flow weighting (∼60 % blood flow and ∼40 % blood volume weighting). C-arm CT PBV imaging is feasible in DCI following aneurysmal SAH. PBV is a composite perfusion parameter incorporating both blood flow and blood volume weightings. That PBV has preferential (∼60 %) blood flow weighting is an important finding, which is of clinical significance when interpreting the C-arm CT PBV maps, particularly in the setting of acute brain ischemia. (orig.)

  8. Analysis the prospects of use of mobile X-ray diagnostic apparatus of the C-arm type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, N.N.; Mazurov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of using the mobile X-ray apparatus with the C-arm multi-positional support, equipped with a medium-frequency generator and roentgen image amplifier with a digital channel, and device for obtaining hard copies in the diagnostic, surgical and therapeutic practice, is shown and the basis requirements, imposed in various areas on the apparatus of this type (traumatology, orthopedics, hospital wards studies, X-ray endoscopy, X-ray operational units, intervention roentgenology, angiography), are formulated. The technical characteristics are presented and the operation of the national surgical mobile apparatus RTS-612 is described. The experience in the apparatus operation showed, that x-ray surgical complexes, meeting the requirements of the modern public health in the area of traumatology, orthopedics, cardiosurgery, endoscopy, urology and other areas, wherein the X-ray control during the operation is accomplished, may be created on its basis [ru

  9. Successful Localization and Surgical Removal of Ingested Sewing Needles Under Mini C-Arm Fluoroscopy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Jen Ma

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body ingestion is common, but ingestion of multiple sewing needles is rare. Most ingested sharp metallic bodies pass through the digestive tract spontaneously and patients can be managed conservatively. Sometimes, however, perforation develops and surgical treatment is necessary. It is hard to localize ingested sewing needles because they tend to scatter widely in the digestive tract and are impalpable manually. We report a psychiatric patient who ingested six sewing needles: one intact needle was found at the larynx, one had penetrated into the stomach, one was in the duodenum, one was in the cecum, one was broken into two pieces, and the final needle was broken into three pieces. All of the broken fragments were in the colon. The needle at the larynx was removed by a laryngoscope. Subsequently, we used mini C-arm fluoroscopy to localize the remaining needles and successfully removed all of them intraoperatively.

  10. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mory, Cyril, E-mail: cyril.mory@philips.com [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo [Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk [Philips Research, Röntgenstrasse 24–26, D-22335 Hamburg (Germany); Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado Denver, 12605 East 16th Avenue, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Rit, Simon [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Centre Léon Bérard, 28 rue Laënnec, F-69373 Lyon (France); Peyrin, Françoise [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); X-ray Imaging Group, European Synchrotron, Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, 28 Avenue du Doyen Jean Lépine, 69500 Bron (France)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  11. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mory, Cyril; Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo; Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk; Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D.; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise; Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection

  12. Accuracy of x-ray image-based 3D localization from two C-arm views: a comparison between an ideal system and a real device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brost, Alexander; Strobel, Norbert; Yatziv, Liron; Gilson, Wesley; Meyer, Bernhard; Hornegger, Joachim; Lewin, Jonathan; Wacker, Frank

    2009-02-01

    arm X-ray imaging devices are commonly used for minimally invasive cardiovascular or other interventional procedures. Calibrated state-of-the-art systems can, however, not only be used for 2D imaging but also for three-dimensional reconstruction either using tomographic techniques or even stereotactic approaches. To evaluate the accuracy of X-ray object localization from two views, a simulation study assuming an ideal imaging geometry was carried out first. This was backed up with a phantom experiment involving a real C-arm angiography system. Both studies were based on a phantom comprising five point objects. These point objects were projected onto a flat-panel detector under different C-arm view positions. The resulting 2D positions were perturbed by adding Gaussian noise to simulate 2D point localization errors. In the next step, 3D point positions were triangulated from two views. A 3D error was computed by taking differences between the reconstructed 3D positions using the perturbed 2D positions and the initial 3D positions of the five points. This experiment was repeated for various C-arm angulations involving angular differences ranging from 15° to 165°. The smallest 3D reconstruction error was achieved, as expected, by views that were 90° degrees apart. In this case, the simulation study yielded a 3D error of 0.82 mm +/- 0.24 mm (mean +/- standard deviation) for 2D noise with a standard deviation of 1.232 mm (4 detector pixels). The experimental result for this view configuration obtained on an AXIOM Artis C-arm (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany) system was 0.98 mm +/- 0.29 mm, respectively. These results show that state-of-the-art C-arm systems can localize instruments with millimeter accuracy, and that they can accomplish this almost as well as an idealized theoretical counterpart. High stereotactic localization accuracy, good patient access, and CT-like 3D imaging capabilities render state-of-the-art C-arm systems ideal devices for X

  13. Analysis of radiation risk to patients from intra-operative use of the mobile X-ray system (C-arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Sub Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate clinical applications of mobile C-arms and consequent radiation risk, to increase medical attention on radiation protection, and to provide basic data for safe radiation use in the operating room. Materials and Methods: In this study, a total of 374 surgical operations, conducted using a portable fluoroscopic X-ray system from January to March of 2013, were analyzed. Dose summaries produced by the General Electric C-arm and data elements in digital imaging and communications in the medicine header of Ziehm C-arm, fluoroscopy time were used to obtain dose-area product (DAP and effective dose. Corresponding mean and maximum values were calculated, and the resulting data on the frequency of application, fluoroscopy time, DAP, and effective dose were compared and analyzed in terms of surgical specialty and operation types. Results: Orthopedic surgery was the most frequent with 165 cases (44.1%. The highest DAP value and effective dose were found in liver transplant among surgical specialty fields, with mean values of 2.90 ± 3.76 mGy∙m 2 and 58 ± 75.2 mSv, respectively (P = 0.0001. The highest DAP value and effective dose were observed in intra-operative mesenteric portography among types of surgery, showing mean values of 2.90 ± 3.81 mGy∙m 2 and 58.03 ± 76.24 mSv, respectively (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Because DAP varies significantly across surgical specialties and types of operation, aggressive efforts to understand the effects of radiation dose is critical for radiation protection from intra-operative use of mobile C-arms.

  14. Evaluation of malrotation following intramedullary nailing in a femoral shaft fracture model: Can a 3D c-arm improve accuracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Austin J; Egol, Jonathan; Chang, Gregory; Davidovitch, Roy I; Konda, Sanjit

    2017-07-01

    Difficulty determining anatomic rotation following intramedullary (IM) nailing of the femur continues to be problematic for surgeons. Clinical exam and fluoroscopic imaging of the hip and knee have been used to estimate femoral version, but are inaccurate. We hypothesize that 3D c-arm imaging can be used to accurately measure femoral version following IM nailing of femur fractures to prevent rotational malreduction. A midshaft osteotomy was created in a femur Sawbone to simulate a transverse diaphyseal fracture. An intramedullary (IM) nail was inserted into the Sawbone femur without locking screws or cephalomedullary fixation. A goniometer was used to simulate four femoral version situations after IM nailing: 20° retroversion, 0° version, 15° anteversion, and 30° anteversion. In each simulated position, 3D c-arm imaging and, for comparison purposes, perfect lateral radiographs of the knee and hip were performed. The femoral version of each simulated 3D and fluoroscopic case was measured and the results were tabulated. The measured version from the 3D c-arm images was 22.25° retroversion, 0.66° anteversion, 19.53° anteversion, and 25.15° anteversion for the simulated cases of 20° retroversion, 0° version, 15° anteversion, and 30° anteversion, respectively. The lateral fluoroscopic views were measured to be 9.66° retroversion, 12.12° anteversion, 20.91° anteversion, and 18.77° anteversion for the simulated cases, respectively. This study demonstrates the utility of a novel intraoperative method to evaluate femur rotational malreduction following IM nailing. The use of 3D c-arm imaging to measure femoral version offers accuracy and reproducibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High-Resolution C-Arm CT and Metal Artifact Reduction Software: A Novel Imaging Modality for Analyzing Aneurysms Treated with Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, I; Kambayashi, Y; Ikemura, A; Abe, Y; Kan, I; Mohamed, A; Dahmani, C; Suzuki, T; Ishibashi, T; Takao, H; Urashima, M; Murayama, Y

    2016-02-01

    Combination of high-resolution C-arm CT and novel metal artifact reduction software may contribute to the assessment of aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel Metal Artifact Reduction prototype software combined with the currently available high spatial-resolution C-arm CT prototype implementation by using an experimental aneurysm model treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. Eight experimental aneurysms were created in 6 swine. Coil embolization of each aneurysm was performed by using a stent-assisted technique. High-resolution C-arm CT with intra-arterial contrast injection was performed immediately after the treatment. The obtained images were processed with Metal Artifact Reduction. Five neurointerventional specialists reviewed the image quality before and after Metal Artifact Reduction. Observational and quantitative analyses (via image analysis software) were performed. Every aneurysm was successfully created and treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. Before Metal Artifact Reduction, coil loops protruding through the stent lumen were not visualized due to the prominent metal artifacts produced by the coils. These became visible after Metal Artifact Reduction processing. Contrast filling in the residual aneurysm was also visualized after Metal Artifact Reduction in every aneurysm. Both the observational (P software. The combination of high-resolution C-arm CT and Metal Artifact Reduction enables differentiation of the coil mass, stent, and contrast material on the same image by significantly reducing the metal artifacts produced by the platinum coils. This novel image technique may improve the assessment of aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Intraprocedural blood volume measurement using C-arm CT as a predictor for treatment response of malignant liver tumours undergoing repetitive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Schaefer, Patrik; Lehnert, Thomas; Mbalisike, Emmanuel; Hammerstingl, Renate; Eichler, Katrin; Zangos, Stephan; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Ackermann, Hanns; Naguib, Nagy N.N.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility of measuring parenchymal blood volume (PBV) of malignant hepatic tumours using C-arm CT, test the changes in PBV following repeated transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and correlate these changes with the change in tumour size in MRI. 111 patients with liver malignancy were included. Patients underwent MRI and TACE in a 4- to 6-week interval. During intervention C-arm CT was performed. Images were post-processed to generate PBV maps. Blood volume data in C-arm CT and change in size in MRI were evaluated. The correlation between PBV and size was tested using Spearman rank test. Pre-interventional PBV maps showed a mean blood volume of 84.5 ml/1000 ml ± 62.0, follow-up PBV maps after multiple TACE demonstrated 61.1 ml/1000 ml ± 57.5. The change in PBV was statistically significant (p = 0.02). Patients with initial tumour blood volume >100 ml/1000 ml dropped 7.1 % in size and 47.2 % in blood volume; 50-100 ml/1000 ml dropped 4.6 % in size and 25.7 % in blood volume; and <50 ml/1000 ml decreased 2.8 % in size and increased 82.2 % in blood volume. PBV measurement of malignant liver tumours using C-arm CT is feasible. Following TACE PBV decreased significantly. Patients with low initial PBV show low local response rates and further increase in blood volume, whereas high initial tumour PBV showed better response to TACE. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of interpolation methods for surface-based motion compensated tomographic reconstruction for cardiac angiographic C-arm data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kerstin; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim [Pattern Recognition Lab, Department of Computer Science, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Zheng Yefeng; Wang Yang [Imaging and Computer Vision, Siemens Corporate Research, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Lauritsch, Guenter; Rohkohl, Christopher; Maier, Andreas K. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Schultz, Carl [Thoraxcenter, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3000 (Netherlands); Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: For interventional cardiac procedures, anatomical and functional information about the cardiac chambers is of major interest. With the technology of angiographic C-arm systems it is possible to reconstruct intraprocedural three-dimensional (3D) images from 2D rotational angiographic projection data (C-arm CT). However, 3D reconstruction of a dynamic object is a fundamental problem in C-arm CT reconstruction. The 2D projections are acquired over a scan time of several seconds, thus the projection data show different states of the heart. A standard FDK reconstruction algorithm would use all acquired data for a filtered backprojection and result in a motion-blurred image. In this approach, a motion compensated reconstruction algorithm requiring knowledge of the 3D heart motion is used. The motion is estimated from a previously presented 3D dynamic surface model. This dynamic surface model results in a sparse motion vector field (MVF) defined at control points. In order to perform a motion compensated reconstruction, a dense motion vector field is required. The dense MVF is generated by interpolation of the sparse MVF. Therefore, the influence of different motion interpolation methods on the reconstructed image quality is evaluated. Methods: Four different interpolation methods, thin-plate splines (TPS), Shepard's method, a smoothed weighting function, and a simple averaging, were evaluated. The reconstruction quality was measured on phantom data, a porcine model as well as on in vivo clinical data sets. As a quality index, the 2D overlap of the forward projected motion compensated reconstructed ventricle and the segmented 2D ventricle blood pool was quantitatively measured with the Dice similarity coefficient and the mean deviation between extracted ventricle contours. For the phantom data set, the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI) were also evaluated in 3D image space. Results: The quantitative evaluation of

  18. Evaluation of interpolation methods for surface-based motion compensated tomographic reconstruction for cardiac angiographic C-arm data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Zheng Yefeng; Wang Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Rohkohl, Christopher; Maier, Andreas K.; Schultz, Carl; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: For interventional cardiac procedures, anatomical and functional information about the cardiac chambers is of major interest. With the technology of angiographic C-arm systems it is possible to reconstruct intraprocedural three-dimensional (3D) images from 2D rotational angiographic projection data (C-arm CT). However, 3D reconstruction of a dynamic object is a fundamental problem in C-arm CT reconstruction. The 2D projections are acquired over a scan time of several seconds, thus the projection data show different states of the heart. A standard FDK reconstruction algorithm would use all acquired data for a filtered backprojection and result in a motion-blurred image. In this approach, a motion compensated reconstruction algorithm requiring knowledge of the 3D heart motion is used. The motion is estimated from a previously presented 3D dynamic surface model. This dynamic surface model results in a sparse motion vector field (MVF) defined at control points. In order to perform a motion compensated reconstruction, a dense motion vector field is required. The dense MVF is generated by interpolation of the sparse MVF. Therefore, the influence of different motion interpolation methods on the reconstructed image quality is evaluated. Methods: Four different interpolation methods, thin-plate splines (TPS), Shepard's method, a smoothed weighting function, and a simple averaging, were evaluated. The reconstruction quality was measured on phantom data, a porcine model as well as on in vivo clinical data sets. As a quality index, the 2D overlap of the forward projected motion compensated reconstructed ventricle and the segmented 2D ventricle blood pool was quantitatively measured with the Dice similarity coefficient and the mean deviation between extracted ventricle contours. For the phantom data set, the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI) were also evaluated in 3D image space. Results: The quantitative evaluation of all

  19. TU-FG-BRB-11: Design and Evaluation of a Robotic C-Arm CBCT System for Image-Guided Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C; Yao, W; Farr, J; Merchant, T [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Kidani, T; Tomida, K; Ozawa, S; Nishimura, T; Fujusawa, T; Shinagawa, R [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the design and performance of a ceiling-mounted robotic C-arm CBCT system for image-guided proton therapy. Methods: Uniquely different from traditional C-arm CBCT used in interventional radiology, the imaging system was designed to provide volumetric image guidance for patients treated on a 190-degree proton gantry system and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robotic patient positioner. The mounting of robotic arms to the ceiling rails, rather than gantry or nozzle, provides the flexibility in imaging locations (isocenter, iso+27cm in X, iso+100cm in Y) in the room and easier upgrade as technology advances. A kV X-ray tube and a 43×43cm flat panel imager were mounted to a rotating C-ring (87cm diameter), which is coupled to the C-arm concentrically. Both C-arm and the robotic arm remain stationary during imaging to maintain high position accuracy. Source-to-axis distance and source-to-imager distance are 100 and 150cm, respectively. A 14:1 focused anti-scatter grid and a bowtie filer are used for image acquisition. A unique automatic collimator device of 4 independent blades for adjusting field of view and reducing patient dose has also been developed. Results: Sub-millimeter position accuracy and repeatability of the robotic C-arm were measured with a laser tracker. High quality CBCT images for positioning can be acquired with a weighted CTDI of 3.6mGy (head in 200° full fan mode: 100kV, 20mA, 20ms, 10fps)-8.7 mGy (pelvis in 360° half fan mode: 125kV, 42mA, 20ms, 10fps). Image guidance accuracy achieved <1mm (3D vector) with automatic 3D-3D registration for anthropomorphic head and pelvis phantoms. Since November 2015, 22 proton therapy patients have undergone daily CBCT imaging for 6 DOF positioning. Conclusion: Decoupled from gantry and nozzle, this CBCT system provides a unique solution for volumetric image guidance with half/partial proton gantry systems. We demonstrated that daily CBCT can be integrated into proton therapy for pre

  20. TU-FG-BRB-11: Design and Evaluation of a Robotic C-Arm CBCT System for Image-Guided Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C; Yao, W; Farr, J; Merchant, T; Kidani, T; Tomida, K; Ozawa, S; Nishimura, T; Fujusawa, T; Shinagawa, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and performance of a ceiling-mounted robotic C-arm CBCT system for image-guided proton therapy. Methods: Uniquely different from traditional C-arm CBCT used in interventional radiology, the imaging system was designed to provide volumetric image guidance for patients treated on a 190-degree proton gantry system and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robotic patient positioner. The mounting of robotic arms to the ceiling rails, rather than gantry or nozzle, provides the flexibility in imaging locations (isocenter, iso+27cm in X, iso+100cm in Y) in the room and easier upgrade as technology advances. A kV X-ray tube and a 43×43cm flat panel imager were mounted to a rotating C-ring (87cm diameter), which is coupled to the C-arm concentrically. Both C-arm and the robotic arm remain stationary during imaging to maintain high position accuracy. Source-to-axis distance and source-to-imager distance are 100 and 150cm, respectively. A 14:1 focused anti-scatter grid and a bowtie filer are used for image acquisition. A unique automatic collimator device of 4 independent blades for adjusting field of view and reducing patient dose has also been developed. Results: Sub-millimeter position accuracy and repeatability of the robotic C-arm were measured with a laser tracker. High quality CBCT images for positioning can be acquired with a weighted CTDI of 3.6mGy (head in 200° full fan mode: 100kV, 20mA, 20ms, 10fps)-8.7 mGy (pelvis in 360° half fan mode: 125kV, 42mA, 20ms, 10fps). Image guidance accuracy achieved <1mm (3D vector) with automatic 3D-3D registration for anthropomorphic head and pelvis phantoms. Since November 2015, 22 proton therapy patients have undergone daily CBCT imaging for 6 DOF positioning. Conclusion: Decoupled from gantry and nozzle, this CBCT system provides a unique solution for volumetric image guidance with half/partial proton gantry systems. We demonstrated that daily CBCT can be integrated into proton therapy for pre

  1. Time-resolved C-arm cone beam CT angiography (TR-CBCTA) imaging from a single short-scan C-arm cone beam CT acquisition with intra-arterial contrast injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinsheng; Garrett, John W.; Li, Ke; Wu, Yijing; Johnson, Kevin; Schafer, Sebastian; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2018-04-01

    Time-resolved C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) angiography (TR-CBCTA) images can be generated from a series of CBCT acquisitions that satisfy data sufficiency condition in analytical image reconstruction theory. In this work, a new technique was developed to generate TR-CBCTA images from a single short-scan CBCT data acquisition with contrast media injection. The reconstruction technique enabling this application is a previously developed image reconstruction technique, synchronized multi-artifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON). In this new application, the acquired short-scan CBCT projection data were sorted into a union of several sub-sectors of view angles and each sub-sector of view angles corresponds to an individual image volume to be reconstructed. The SMART-RECON method was then used to jointly reconstruct all of these individual image volumes under two constraints: (1) each individual image volume is maximally consistent with the measured cone-beam projection data within the corresponding view angle sector and (2) the nuclear norm of the image matrix is minimized. The difference between these reconstructed individual image volumes is used to generated the desired subtracted angiograms. To validate the technique, numerical simulation data generated from a fractal tree angiogram phantom were used to quantitatively study the accuracy of the proposed method and retrospective in vivo human subject studies were used to demonstrate the feasibility of generating TR-CBCTA in clinical practice.

  2. A comparison of entrance skin dose delivered by clinical angiographic c-arms using the real-time dosimeter: the MOSkin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorpe, Nathan K.; Cutajar, Dean; Lian, Cheryl; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Pitney, Mark; Friedman, Daniel; Perevertaylo, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Coronary angiography is a procedure used in the diagnosis and intervention of coronary heart disease. The procedure is often considered one of the highest dose diagnostic procedures in clinical use. Despite this, there is minimal use of dosimeters within angiographic catheterisation laboratories due to challenges resulting from their implementation. The aim of this study was to compare entrance dose delivery across locally commissioned c-arms to assess the need for real-time dosimetry solutions during angiographic procedures. The secondary aim of this study was to establish a calibration method for the MOSkin dosimeter that accurately produces entrance dose values from the clinically sampled beam qualities and energies. The MOSkin is a real-time dosimeter used to measure the skin dose delivered by external radiation beams. The suitability of the MOSkin for measurements in the angiographic catheterisation laboratory was assessed. Measurements were performed using a 30 × 30 × 30cm 3 PMMA phantom positioned at the rotational isocenter of the c-arm gantry. The MOSkin calibration factor was established through comparison of the MOSkin response to EBT2 film response. Irradiation of the dosimeters was performed using several clinical beam qualities ranging in energy from 70 to 105 kVp. A total of four different interventional c-arm machines were surveyed and compared using the MOSkin dosimeter. The phantom was irradiated from a normal angle of incidence using clinically relevant protocols, field sizes and source to image detector distance values. The MOSkin was observed to be radiotranslucent to the c-arm beam in all clinical environments. The MOSkin response was reproducible to within 2 % of the average value across repeated measurements for each beam setting. There were large variations in entrance dose delivery to the phantom between the different c-arm machines with the highest observed cine-acquisition entrance dose rate measuring 326 % higher than the lowest

  3. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Kaelin, Pascal; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Dietrich, Tobias J. [Balgrist University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Scholz, Rosemarie; Koehler, Christoph; Elsaesser, Thilo [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Business Area Advanced Therapies, Forchheim (Germany); Le Corroller, Thomas [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, Marseille (France); Radiology Department, APHM, Marseille (France)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between κ = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. (orig.)

  4. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Kaelin, Pascal; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav; Dietrich, Tobias J.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Koehler, Christoph; Elsaesser, Thilo; Le Corroller, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between κ = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. (orig.)

  5. A Fast, Accurate and Easy to Implement Method for Pose Recognition of an Intramedullary Nail using a Tracked C-arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Esfandiari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A C-arm is a mobile X-ray device that is frequently used during orthopaedic surgeries. It consists of a semi-circular, arc-shaped arm that holds an X-ray transmitter at one end and an X-ray detector at the other. Intramedullary nail (IM nail fixation is a popular orthopaedic surgery in which a metallic rod is placed into the patient's fractured bone (femur or tibia and fixed using metal screws. The main challenge of IM-nail fixation surgery is to achieve the X-ray shot in which the distal holes of the IM nail appear as circles (desired view so that the surgeon can easily insert the screws. Although C-arm X-ray devices are routinely used in IM-nail fixation surgeries, the surgeons or radiation technologists (rad-techs usually use it in a trial-and-error manner. This method raises both radiation exposure and surgery time. In this study, we have designed and developed an IM-nail distal locking navigation technique that leads to more accurate and faster screw placement with a lower radiation dose and a minimum number of added steps to the operation to make it more accepted within the orthopaedic community. The specific purpose of this study was to develop and validate an automated technique for identifying the current pose of the IM nail relative to the C-arm. An accuracy assessment was performed to test the reliability of the navigation results. Translational accuracy was demonstrated to be better than 1 mm, roll and pitch rotations better than 2° and yaw rotational accuracy better than 2–5° depending on the separate angle. Computation time was less than 3.5 seconds.

  6. Extended ellipse-line-ellipse trajectory for long-object cone-beam imaging with a mounted C-arm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Noo, Frédéric; Lauritsch, Günter; Dennerlein, Frank; Mao, Yanfei; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports show that three-dimensional cone-beam (CB) imaging with a floor-mounted (or ceiling-mounted) C-arm system has become a valuable tool in interventional radiology. Currently, a circular short scan is used for data acquisition, which inevitably yields CB artifacts and a short coverage in the direction of the patient table. To overcome these two limitations, a more sophisticated data acquisition geometry is needed. This geometry should be complete in terms of Tuy’s condition and should allow continuous scanning, while being compatible with the mechanical constraints of mounted C-arm systems. Additionally, the geometry should allow accurate image reconstruction from truncated data. One way to ensure such a feature is to adopt a trajectory that provides full R-line coverage within the field-of-view (FOV). An R-line is any segment of line that connects two points on a source trajectory, and the R-line coverage is the set of points that belong to an R-line. In this work, we propose a novel geometry called the extended ellipse-line-ellipse (ELE) for long-object imaging with a mounted C-arm system. This trajectory is built from modules consisting of two elliptical arcs connected by a line. We demonstrate that the extended ELE can be configured in many ways so that full R-line coverage is guaranteed. Both tight and relaxed parametric settings are presented. All results are supported by extensive mathematical proofs provided in appendices. Our findings make the extended ELE trajectory attractive for axially-extended FOV imaging in interventional radiology. (paper)

  7. Ultra-high resolution C-Arm CT arthrography of the wrist: Radiation dose and image quality compared to conventional multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werncke, Thomas, E-mail: Werncke.Thomas@mh-hannover.de [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Sonnow, Lena; Meyer, Bernhard C. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Lüpke, Matthias [University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Institute for General Radiology and Medical Physics, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover (Germany); Hinrichs, Jan; Wacker, Frank K.; Falck, Christian von [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Objective: Objective of this phantom and cadaveric study was to compare the effective radiation dose (ED) and image quality (IQ) between C-arm computed tomography (CACT) using an ultra-high resolution 1 × 1 binning with a standard 16-slice CT (MDCT) arthrography of the wrist. Methods: ED was determined with thermoluminescence dosimetry using an anthropomorphic phantom and different patient positions. Imaging was conducted in 10 human cadaveric wrists after tri-compartmental injection of diluted iodinated contrast material and a wire phantom. IQ of MDCT was compared with CACT reconstructed with a soft (CACT1) and sharp (CACT2) kernel. High and low contrast resolution was determined. Three radiologists assessed IQ of wrist structures and occurrence of image artifacts using a 5-point Likert scale. Results: ED of MDCT was comparable to standard CACT (4.3 μSv/3.7 μSv). High contrast resolution was best for CACT2, decreased to CACT1 and MDCT. Low contrast resolution increased between CACT2 and MDCT (P < 0.001). IQ was best for CACT2 (1.3 ± 0.5), decreased to CACT1 (1.9 ± 0.6) and MDCT (3.5 ± 0.6). Non-compromising artifacts were only reported for CACT. Conclusions: The results of this phantom and cadaveric study indicate that ultra-high resolution C-Arm CT arthrography of the wrist bears the potential to outperform MDCT arthrography in terms of image quality and workflow at the cost of mildly increasing image artifacts while radiation dose to the patient is comparably low for both, MDCT and C-Arm CT.

  8. Application of C-arm CT-guided targeted puncturing technique in performing non-vascular interventional biopsy or interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhen; Han Xinwei; Jiao Dechao; Ren Jianzhuang; Su Yu; Ye Hui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to investigate the clinical value of C-arm CT-guided targeted puncturing technique in performing non, vascular interventional biopsy or interventional therapy. Methods: Thirty, one patients, who were encountered in authors' hospital during the period from July 2010 to September 2010, were involved in this study. C-arm CT-guided percutaneous targeted puncturing biopsy or interventional therapy was performed in all 31 patients. All patients had complete clinical data. The complications and positive rate of biopsy were recorded and analyzed. Results: Under C-arm CT-guidance, percutaneous interventional therapy was carried out in 13 patients. The interventional procedures included radiofrequency ablation therapy for hepatic cellular carcinoma (n=2), pelvic abscess draining (n=1), hepatic abscess draining (n=1), ethanol injection for liver cancer (n=4), sclerotic therapy with ethanol injection for renal cyst (n=2), sclerotic therapy with ethanol injection for liver cyst (n=2) and catheter-indwelling drainage for pancreatic pseudocyst (n=1). percutaneous interventional biopsy was performed in the remaining 18 cases, including liver (n=4), lung (n=7), mediastinum (n=2), bone and soft tissue (n=4) and neck mass (n=1). All the procedures were successfully accomplished, no technique, related complications occurred during the operation. For biopsy examination in 18 cases, the positive rate was 94.4% (17/18) and false, negative results was seen in one case with lung lesion. Conclusion: The percutaneous targeted puncturing technique with C, arm CT-guidance combines the advantages of both CT scanning and fluoroscopy. The use of real, time road, mapping function can effectively guide the puncturing and therapeutic management, which can not only optimize the workflow, save the operation time, but also improve the success rate and technical safety. Therefore, it is of great value to popularize this targeted puncturing technique. (authors)

  9. Imaging-guided thoracoscopic resection of a ground-glass opacity lesion in a hybrid operating room equipped with a robotic C-arm CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chen-Ping; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Fang, Hsin-Yueh; Chao, Yin-Kai

    2017-05-01

    The intraoperative identification of small pulmonary nodules through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery remains challenging. Although preoperative CT-guided nodule localization is commonly used to detect tumors during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), this approach carries inherent risks. We report the case of a patient with stage I lung cancer presenting as an area of ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the right upper pulmonary lobe. He successfully underwent a single-stage, CT-guided localization and removal of the pulmonary nodule within a hybrid operating room (OR) equipped with a robotic C-arm.

  10. Real-time, ray casting-based scatter dose estimation for c-arm x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnewaini, Zaid; Langer, Eric; Schaber, Philipp; David, Matthias; Kretz, Dominik; Steil, Volker; Hesser, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Dosimetric control of staff exposure during interventional procedures under fluoroscopy is of high relevance. In this paper, a novel ray casting approximation of radiation transport is presented and the potential and limitation vs. a full Monte Carlo transport and dose measurements are discussed. The x-ray source of a Siemens Axiom Artix C-arm is modeled by a virtual source model using single Gaussian-shaped source. A Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation determines the radiation transport from the source to compute scatter from the patient, the table, the ceiling and the floor. A phase space around these scatterers stores all photon information. Only those photons are traced that hit a surface of phantom that represents medical staff in the treatment room, no indirect scattering is considered; and a complete dose deposition on the surface is calculated. To evaluate the accuracy of the approximation, both experimental measurements using Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of dose depositing for different tube angulations of the C-arm from cranial-caudal angle 0° and from LAO (Left Anterior Oblique) 0°-90° are realized. Since the measurements were performed on both sides of the table, using the symmetry of the setup, RAO (Right Anterior Oblique) measurements were not necessary. The Geant4-Monte Carlo simulation agreed within 3% with the measured data, which is within the accuracy of measurement and simulation. The ray casting approximation has been compared to TLD measurements and the achieved percentage difference was -7% for data from tube angulations 45°-90° and -29% from tube angulations 0°-45° on the side of the x-ray source, whereas on the opposite side of the x-ray source, the difference was -83.8% and -75%, respectively. Ray casting approximation for only LAO 90° was compared to a Monte Carlo simulation, where the percentage differences were between 0.5-3% on the side of the x-ray source where the highest dose

  11. C-arm cone-beam CT virtual navigation-guided percutaneous mediastinal mass biopsy: Diagnostic accuracy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungjin [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Aerospace Medical Group, Air Force Education and Training Command, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To assess the usefulness of C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) virtual navigation-guided percutaneous mediastinal mass biopsy in terms of diagnostic accuracy and complication rates. Seventy-eight CBCT virtual navigation-guided percutaneous mediastinal mass biopsies were performed in 75 patients (M:F, 38:37; mean age, 48.55 ± 18.76 years). The procedural details, diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and complication rate were investigated. Mean lesion size was 6.80 ± 3.08 cm, skin-to-target distance was 3.67 ± 1.80 cm, core needle biopsy rate was 96.2 % (75/78), needle indwelling time was 9.29 ± 4.34 min, total procedure time was 13.26 ± 5.29 min, number of biopsy specimens obtained was 3.13 ± 1.02, number of CBCTs performed was 3.03 ± 0.68, rate of lesion border discrimination from abutting mediastinal structures on CBCT was 26.9 % (21/78), technical success rate was 100 % (78/78), estimated effective dose was 5.33 ± 4.99 mSv, and the dose area product was 12,723.68 ± 10,665.74 mGy.cm{sup 2}. Among the 78 biopsies, 69 were malignant, 7 were benign and 2 were indeterminate. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancies were 97.1 % (67/69), 100 % (7/7) and 97.4 % (74/76), respectively, with a complication rate of 3.85 % (3/78), all of which were small pneumothoraces. CBCT virtual navigation-guided biopsy is a highly accurate and safe procedure for the evaluation of mediastinal lesions. (orig.)

  12. C-arm flat detector computed tomography: the technique and its applications in interventional neuro-radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Nagaraja, Sanjoy; Byrne, James V.

    2010-01-01

    Flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) is an imaging tool that generates three-dimensional (3-D) volumes from data obtained during C-arm rotation using CT-like reconstruction algorithms. The technique is relatively new and, at current levels of performance, lags behind conventional CT in terms of image quality. However, the advantage of its availability in the interventional room has prompted neuro-radiologists to identify clinical settings where its role is uniquely beneficial. We performed a search of the online literature databases to identify studies reporting experience with FDCT in interventional neuro-radiology. The studies were systematically reviewed and their findings grouped according to specific clinical situation addressed. FDCT images allow detection of procedural complications, evaluation of low-radiopacity stents and assessment of endosaccular coil packing in intra-cranial aneurysms. Additional roles are 3-D angiography that provides an accurate depiction of vessel morphology with low concentrations of radiographic contrast media and a potential for perfusion imaging due to its dynamic scanning capability. A single scan combining soft tissue and angiographic examinations reduces radiation dose and examination time. Ongoing developments in flat detector technology and reconstruction algorithms are expected to further enhance its performance and increase this range of applications. FDCT images provide useful information in neuro-interventional setting. If current research confirms its potential for assessing cerebral haemodynamics by perfusion scanning, the combination would redefine it as an invaluable tool for interventional neuro-radiology procedures. This facility and its existing capabilities of parenchymal and angiographic imaging would also extend its use to the triage of acute stroke patients. (orig.)

  13. Camera-augmented mobile C-arm (CamC): A feasibility study of augmented reality imaging in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Heide, Anna Maria; Fallavollita, Pascal; Wang, Lejing; Sandner, Philipp; Navab, Nassir; Weidert, Simon; Euler, Ekkehard

    2018-04-01

    In orthopaedic trauma surgery, image-guided procedures are mostly based on fluoroscopy. The reduction of radiation exposure is an important goal. The purpose of this work was to investigate the impact of a camera-augmented mobile C-arm (CamC) on radiation exposure and the surgical workflow during a first clinical trial. Applying a workflow-oriented approach, 10 general workflow steps were defined to compare the CamC to traditional C-arms. The surgeries included were arbitrarily identified and assigned to the study. The evaluation criteria were radiation exposure and operation time for each workflow step and the entire surgery. The evaluation protocol was designed and conducted in a single-centre study. The radiation exposure was remarkably reduced by 18 X-ray shots 46% using the CamC while keeping similar surgery times. The intuitiveness of the system, its easy integration into the surgical workflow, and its great potential to reduce radiation have been demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A practical method for three-dimensional reconstruction of joints using a C-arm system and shift-and-add algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Senhu; Jiang Huabei

    2005-01-01

    Currently, radiography with C-arm systems is playing a major role in the assessment of arthritis. However, the radiographic two-dimensional projection images of joints often interfere with physicians' efforts to better understand and measure the structure changes of joints due to the overlap of bone structures at different depths. An accurate, low-cost, and practical three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction approach of joints will be beneficial in diagnosing arthritis. Toward this end, a novel method is developed in this paper based on a C-arm system. The idea is to apply the shift-and-add algorithm (commonly used in digital tomosynthesis) on the segmented projection images at multiple angles, which results in accurate reconstruction of the 3D structures of joints. The method provides a new solution to precisely distinguish objects from blurring background. The proposed method has been tested and evaluated on simulated cylinders, a chicken bone phantom with known structure, and an in vivo human index finger. The results are demonstrated and discussed

  15. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyung Cha, Bo [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Keedong [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae, E-mail: sarim@keri.re.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Young [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80–120 kVp, and different current (10–50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  16. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-01-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80–120 kVp, and different current (10–50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally

  17. Comparison of C-arm Computed Tomography and Digital Subtraction Angiography in Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, Jan B., E-mail: hinrichs.jan@mh-hannover.de; Marquardt, Steffen, E-mail: marquardt.steffen@mh-hannover.de; Falck, Christian von, E-mail: falck.christian.von@mh-hannover.de [Hannover Medical School, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, German Center for Lung Research (DZL) (Germany); Hoeper, Marius M., E-mail: hoeper.marius@mh-hannover.de; Olsson, Karen M., E-mail: olsson.karen@mh-hannover.de [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Pneumology, German Center for Lung Research (DZL) (Germany); Wacker, Frank K., E-mail: wacker.frank@mh-hannover.de; Meyer, Bernhard C., E-mail: meyer.bernhard@mh-hannover.de [Hannover Medical School, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, German Center for Lung Research (DZL) (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility and diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced, C-arm computed tomography (CACT) of the pulmonary arteries compared to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients suffering from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).MaterialsFifty-two patients with CTEPH underwent ECG-gated DSA and contrast-enhanced CACT. Two readers (R1, R2) independently evaluated pulmonary artery segments and their sub-segmental branching using DSA and CACT for optimal image quality. Afterwards, the diagnostic findings, i.e., intraluminal filling defects, stenosis, and occlusion, were compared. Inter-modality and inter-observer agreement was calculated, and subsequently consensus reading was done and correlated to a reference standard representing the overall consensus of both modalities. Fisher’s exact test and Cohen’s Kappa were applied.ResultsA total of 1352 pulmonary segments were evaluated, of which 1255 (92.8 %) on DSA and 1256 (92.9 %) on CACT were rated to be fully diagnostic. The main causes of the non-diagnostic image quality were motion artifacts on CACT (R1:37, R2:78) and insufficient contrast enhancement on DSA (R1:59, R2:38). Inter-observer agreement was good for DSA (κ = 0.74) and CACT (κ = 0.75), while inter-modality agreement was moderate (R1: κ = 0.46, R2: κ = 0.47). Compared to the reference standard, the inter-modality agreement for CACT was excellent (κ = 0.96), whereas it was inferior for DSA (κ = 0.61) due to the higher number of abnormal consensus findings read as normal on DSA.ConclusionCACT of the pulmonary arteries is feasible and provides additional information to DSA. CACT has the potential to improve the diagnostic work-up of patients with CTEPH and may be particularly useful prior to surgical or interventional treatment.

  18. Relation between Seed Appearance and Phenolic Maturity: A Case Study Using Grapes cv. Carménère Relación entre Apariencia de Semillas y Madurez Fenólica: Un Estudio de Caso usando Uvas cv. Carménère

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Fredes

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensory evaluation of grapes (Vitis vinifera L. plays a key role in determining the harvest time in grapevine varieties. The harvest time of cv. Carménère is one of the latest of Chile. During the season 2007-2008, the evolution of the appearance of ‘Carménère’ seeds was evaluated as a harvest criterion, comparing it with the chemical and phenolic ripening. The samples were obtained from an organic vineyard located in Curicó Valley, Chile. Starting at 16 ºBrix, 100 seed berries samples were collected weekly from medium vigor vines in order to register photographically the ventral and dorsal sides of each seed. In addition to the seed tannins percentage, the extractable anthocyanins, total anthocyanins and total polyphenols index, as well as the titratable acidity, soluble solids and pH were registered. A color wheel of seed coat with a description of 12 digital colors was proposed for this cultivar. When the color number exceeded 10 (very dark brown, the soluble solids had already reached 24 ºBrix 1 month earlier. Two inverse correlations between seed coat color vs. seed phenols percentage and vs. total polyphenol index were found. The proper phenolic maturation (maximum anthocyanins and minimum seed tannins percentage occurred 177 d post flowering. The observation of seed coat color can be a reliable, simple and low-cost parameter to determine the correct ripeness of phenols in ‘Carménère’ grapevines.La evaluación sensorial de uvas (Vitis vinifera L. juega un rol clave en la determinación de la fecha de cosecha en los últimos estados de la maduración de la baya. La cosecha del cv. Carménère es una de las últimas en Chile. Durante la temporada 2007-2008, la evolución de la apariencia de semillas ‘Carménère’ fue evaluada como un criterio de cosecha, comparándola con la madurez química y fenólica. Las muestras fueron obtenidas desde una viña orgánica localizada en el valle de Curicó, Chile. Se colectaron

  19. Scattered radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in using mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit: Which position is riskiest?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salleh, H.; Matori, M. K.; Isa, M. J. M. [Agensi Nuklear Malaysia, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Samat, S. B. [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Cataractogenesis is something to be concerned by radiologist and radiographer who work extensively in fluoroscopy. The increasing use of fluoroscopy or interventional fluoroscopy has to come with safety awareness on scattered radiation risk for staff performing the procedure. This study is looking into the radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in fluoroscopy using the mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit. The Toshiba SXT-1000A and Alderson Rando phantom were used in this study. Based on the results, it is found clearly that over couch (OC) procedure is riskier than under couch (UC) procedure. The cathode bound area is clearly riskier than anode bound area especially for UC procedure. More doses (at least +1,568 % of safest position) are received by the lens of the eyes for staff standing at the cathode bound area especially the position opposite to the x-ray tube.

  20. Scattered radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in using mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit: Which position is riskiest?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salleh, H.; Matori, M. K.; Isa, M. J. M.; Samat, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cataractogenesis is something to be concerned by radiologist and radiographer who work extensively in fluoroscopy. The increasing use of fluoroscopy or interventional fluoroscopy has to come with safety awareness on scattered radiation risk for staff performing the procedure. This study is looking into the radiation risk to the lens of the eyes for staff involved in fluoroscopy using the mobile C-arm fluoroscopy unit. The Toshiba SXT-1000A and Alderson Rando phantom were used in this study. Based on the results, it is found clearly that over couch (OC) procedure is riskier than under couch (UC) procedure. The cathode bound area is clearly riskier than anode bound area especially for UC procedure. More doses (at least +1,568 % of safest position) are received by the lens of the eyes for staff standing at the cathode bound area especially the position opposite to the x-ray tube

  1. Radiation exposure to operating staff during rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Boris, E-mail: boris.schell@googlemail.com [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Heidenreich, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.heidenreich@roentgen-consult.de [Röntgen-Consult Company, Schulhausstrasse 37, 79199 Kirchzarten (Germany); Heidenreich, Monika, E-mail: info@roentgen-consult.de [Röntgen-Consult Company, Schulhausstrasse 37, 79199 Kirchzarten (Germany); Eichler, Katrin, E-mail: k.eichler@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Thalhammer, Axel, E-mail: axel.thalhammer@kgu.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Naeem, Naguib Nagy Naguib, E-mail: nagynnn@yahoo.com [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Vogl, Thomas Josef, E-mail: T.Vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Zangos, Stefan, E-mail: Zangos@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiation exposure for operating personel associated with rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam CT. Materials and methods: Using a dedicated angiography-suite, 2D and 3D examinations of the liver were performed on a phantom to generate scattered radiation. Exposure was measured with a dosimeter at predefined heights (eye, thyroid, breast, gonads and knee) at the physician's location. Analysis included 3D procedures with a field of view (FOV) of 24 cm × 18 cm (8 s/rotation, 20 s/rotation and 5 s/2 rotations), and 47 cm × 18 cm (16 s/2 rotations) and standard 2D angiography (10 s, FOV 24 cm × 18 cm). Results: Measurements showed the highest radiation dose at the eye and thyroid level. In comparison to 2D-DSA (3.9 μSv eye-exposure), the 3D procedures caused an increased radiation exposure both in standard FOV (8 s/rotation: 28.0 μSv, 20 s/rotation: 79.3 μSv, 5 s/2 rotations: 32.5 μSv) and large FOV (37.6 μSv). Proportional distributions were measured for the residual heights. With the use of lead glass, irradiation of the eye lens was reduced to 0.2 μSv (2D DSA) and 10.6 μSv (3D technique with 20 s/rotation). Conclusion: Rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam applications significantly increase radiation exposure to the attending operator in comparison to 2D angiography. Our study indicates that the physician should wear protective devices and leave the examination room when performing 3D examinations.

  2. Radiation exposure to operating staff during rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Boris; Heidenreich, Ralf; Heidenreich, Monika; Eichler, Katrin; Thalhammer, Axel; Naeem, Naguib Nagy Naguib; Vogl, Thomas Josef; Zangos, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the radiation exposure for operating personnel associated with rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam CT. Using a dedicated angiography-suite, 2D and 3D examinations of the liver were performed on a phantom to generate scattered radiation. Exposure was measured with a dosimeter at predefined heights (eye, thyroid, breast, gonads and knee) at the physician's location. Analysis included 3D procedures with a field of view (FOV) of 24 cm × 18 cm (8s/rotation, 20s/rotation and 5s/2 rotations), and 47 cm×18 cm (16s/2 rotations) and standard 2D angiography (10s, FOV 24 cm×18 cm). Measurements showed the highest radiation dose at the eye and thyroid level. In comparison to 2D-DSA (3.9 μSv eye-exposure), the 3D procedures caused an increased radiation exposure both in standard FOV (8s/rotation: 28.0 μSv, 20s/rotation: 79.3 μSv, 5s/2 rotations: 32.5 μSv) and large FOV (37.6 μSv). Proportional distributions were measured for the residual heights. With the use of lead glass, irradiation of the eye lens was reduced to 0.2 μSv (2D DSA) and 10.6 μSv (3D technique with 20s/rotation). Rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam applications significantly increase radiation exposure to the attending operator in comparison to 2D angiography. Our study indicates that the physician should wear protective devices and leave the examination room when performing 3D examinations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation exposure to operating staff during rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Boris; Heidenreich, Ralf; Heidenreich, Monika; Eichler, Katrin; Thalhammer, Axel; Naeem, Naguib Nagy Naguib; Vogl, Thomas Josef; Zangos, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiation exposure for operating personel associated with rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam CT. Materials and methods: Using a dedicated angiography-suite, 2D and 3D examinations of the liver were performed on a phantom to generate scattered radiation. Exposure was measured with a dosimeter at predefined heights (eye, thyroid, breast, gonads and knee) at the physician's location. Analysis included 3D procedures with a field of view (FOV) of 24 cm × 18 cm (8 s/rotation, 20 s/rotation and 5 s/2 rotations), and 47 cm × 18 cm (16 s/2 rotations) and standard 2D angiography (10 s, FOV 24 cm × 18 cm). Results: Measurements showed the highest radiation dose at the eye and thyroid level. In comparison to 2D-DSA (3.9 μSv eye-exposure), the 3D procedures caused an increased radiation exposure both in standard FOV (8 s/rotation: 28.0 μSv, 20 s/rotation: 79.3 μSv, 5 s/2 rotations: 32.5 μSv) and large FOV (37.6 μSv). Proportional distributions were measured for the residual heights. With the use of lead glass, irradiation of the eye lens was reduced to 0.2 μSv (2D DSA) and 10.6 μSv (3D technique with 20 s/rotation). Conclusion: Rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam applications significantly increase radiation exposure to the attending operator in comparison to 2D angiography. Our study indicates that the physician should wear protective devices and leave the examination room when performing 3D examinations.

  4. Comparison of Radiation Exposure during Endovascular Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease with Flat-Panel Detectors on Mobile C-arm versus Fixed Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillou, Marie; Maurel, Blandine; Necib, Hatem; Vent, Pierre-Alexandre; Costargent, Alain; Chaillou, Philippe; Gouëffic, Yann; Kaladji, Adrien

    2018-02-01

    Flat-panel detectors on mobile C-arm (MC-arm) systems are currently challenging fixed C-arm (FC-arm) systems used in hybrid operating rooms. MC-arm systems offer an alternative to FC-arm systems in the endovascular treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) but their efficiency has not been evaluated comparatively. Two series of patients undergoing arteriography with intention to treat were included. Each series consisted of 2 nonrandomized groups: an MC-arm group and an FC-arm group. Series 1 evaluated exposure to the patient (MC-arm, n = 113; FC-arm, n = 206) while series 2 evaluated exposure to patients and also health care personnel (MC-arm, n = 24; FC-arm, n = 76). The primary end points for evaluating exposure were air kerma (AK, in mGy) for patients and effective dose for health care personnel (in μSv). After adjustment for the effect of body mass index (analysis of covariance test), AK was found to be lower in the MC-arm group than in the FC-arm group (124.1 ± 142 vs. 173.3 ± 248.7, P = 0.025). There was no difference between the groups with regard to effective dose recorded for senior surgeons or for operating room nurses. However, a higher effective dose was recorded by the MC-arm group external dosimeter for the trainee resident and for nurse anesthetists. In endovascular treatment of lower limb PAD, use of an FC-arm system is associated with more radiation exposure to the patient than an MC-arm system. However, this type of imaging system does not appear to affect exposure to health care personnel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mobile C-arm cone-beam CT for guidance of spine surgery: Image quality, radiation dose, and integration with interventional guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, S.; Nithiananthan, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States); Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21239 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 and Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: A flat-panel detector based mobile isocentric C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been developed to allow intraoperative 3D imaging with sub-millimeter spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Image quality and radiation dose were evaluated in spinal surgery, commonly relying on lower-performance image intensifier based mobile C-arms. Scan protocols were developed for task-specific imaging at minimum dose, in-room exposure was evaluated, and integration of the imaging system with a surgical guidance system was demonstrated in preclinical studies of minimally invasive spine surgery. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed as a function of kilovolt (peak) (80-120 kVp) and milliampere second using thoracic and lumbar spine dosimetry phantoms. In-room radiation exposure was measured throughout the operating room for various CBCT scan protocols. Image quality was assessed using tissue-equivalent inserts in chest and abdomen phantoms to evaluate bone and soft-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio as a function of dose, and task-specific protocols (i.e., visualization of bone or soft-tissues) were defined. Results were applied in preclinical studies using a cadaveric torso simulating minimally invasive, transpedicular surgery. Results: Task-specific CBCT protocols identified include: thoracic bone visualization (100 kVp; 60 mAs; 1.8 mGy); lumbar bone visualization (100 kVp; 130 mAs; 3.2 mGy); thoracic soft-tissue visualization (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 4.3 mGy); and lumbar soft-tissue visualization (120 kVp; 460 mAs; 10.6 mGy) - each at (0.3 x 0.3 x 0.9 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Alternative lower-dose, lower-resolution soft-tissue visualization protocols were identified (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 5.1 mGy) for the lumbar region at (0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Half-scan orbit of the C-arm (x-ray tube traversing under the table) was dosimetrically advantageous (prepatient attenuation) with a nonuniform dose distribution ({approx}2 x higher at the entrance side than at isocenter

  6. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pal, Saikat; Beaupré, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  7. Volume CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile, isocentric C-arm: Pre-clinical investigation in guidance of minimally invasive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewerdsen, J.H.; Moseley, D.J.; Burch, S.; Bisland, S.K.; Bogaards, A.; Wilson, B.C.; Jaffray, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    A mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) has been modified in our laboratory to include a large area flat-panel detector (in place of the x-ray image intensifier), providing multi-mode fluoroscopy and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) imaging capability. This platform represents a promising technology for minimally invasive, image-guided surgical procedures where precision in the placement of interventional tools with respect to bony and soft-tissue structures is critical. The image quality and performance in surgical guidance was investigated in pre-clinical evaluation in image-guided spinal surgery. The control, acquisition, and reconstruction system are described. The reproducibility of geometric calibration, essential to achieving high three-dimensional (3D) image quality, is tested over extended time scales (7 months) and across a broad range in C-arm angulation (up to 45 deg.), quantifying the effect of improper calibration on spatial resolution, soft-tissue visibility, and image artifacts. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the precision of 3D localization (viz., fiber optic probes within a vertebral body) and effect of lateral projection truncation (limited field of view) on soft-tissue detectability in image reconstructions. Pre-clinical investigation was undertaken in a specific spinal procedure (photodynamic therapy of spinal metastases) in five animal subjects (pigs). In each procedure, placement of fiber optic catheters in two vertebrae (L1 and L2) was guided by fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT. Experience across five procedures is reported, focusing on 3D image quality, the effects of respiratory motion, limited field of view, reconstruction filter, and imaging dose. Overall, the intraoperative cone-beam CT images were sufficient for guidance of needles and catheters with respect to bony anatomy and improved surgical performance and confidence through 3D visualization and verification of transpedicular trajectories and tool placement

  8. MO-DE-207A-06: ECG-Gated CT Reconstruction for a C-Arm Inverse Geometry X-Ray System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slagowski, JM; Dunkerley, DAP [MA Speidel, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain ECG-gated CT images from truncated projection data acquired with a C-arm based inverse geometry fluoroscopy system, for the purpose of cardiac chamber mapping in interventional procedures. Methods: Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system with a scanned multisource x-ray tube and a photon-counting detector mounted to a C-arm. In the proposed method, SBDX short-scan rotational acquisition is performed followed by inverse geometry CT (IGCT) reconstruction and segmentation of contrast-enhanced objects. The prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) framework was adapted for IGCT reconstruction to mitigate artifacts arising from data truncation and angular undersampling due to cardiac gating. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm was evaluated in numerical simulations of truncated and non-truncated thorax phantoms containing a dynamic ellipsoid to represent a moving cardiac chamber. The eccentricity of the ellipsoid was varied at frequencies from 1–1.5 Hz. Projection data were retrospectively sorted into 13 cardiac phases. Each phase was reconstructed using IGCT-PICCS, with a nongated gridded FBP (gFBP) prior image. Surface accuracy was determined using Dice similarity coefficient and a histogram of the point distances between the segmented surface and ground truth surface. Results: The gated IGCT-PICCS algorithm improved surface accuracy and reduced streaking and truncation artifacts when compared to nongated gFBP. For the non-truncated thorax with 1.25 Hz motion, 99% of segmented surface points were within 0.3 mm of the 15 mm diameter ground truth ellipse, versus 1.0 mm for gFBP. For the truncated thorax phantom with a 40 mm diameter ellipse, IGCT-PICCS surface accuracy measured 0.3 mm versus 7.8 mm for gFBP. Dice similarity coefficient was 0.99–1.00 (IGCT-PICCS) versus 0.63–0.75 (gFBP) for intensity-based segmentation thresholds ranging from 25–75% maximum contrast. Conclusions: The

  9. C-arm CT-guided renal arterial embolisation followed by radiofrequency ablation for treatment of patients with unresectable renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, X.-H.; Li, Y.-S.; Han, X.-W.; Wang, Y.-L.; Jiao, D.-C.; Li, T.-F.; Chen, P.-F.; Fang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore the value of using flat detector (FD) equipped angiographic C-arm CT (CACT) systems in treating unresectable renal cell carcinoma (RCC) by selective renal arterial embolisation (RAE) followed by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RAE-RFA). Materials and methods: A total of 28 patients who were not candidates for surgery were enrolled. The average size of tumours was 6.7±2.2 cm (range 4.1–9.6 cm). Twenty-eight tumours were treated with CACT-guided RFA, 5–7 days after CACT-guided RAE. Results: CACT-guided RAE-RFA was technically successful in all patients. Tumour enhancement disappeared after a single RAE-RFA session in 20 patients, after two RAE-RFA sessions in four patients and after three RAE-RFA sessions in the other four patients. One patient died of lung metastasis and haematuria 13 months after RAE-RFA, and another patient died of pulmonary heart disease 23 months after repeat RAE-RFA. In the 26 living patients, tumours remained controlled during a mean follow-up period of 27 months and showed significant reduction in tumour size (6.7±2.2 cm to 3.9±1.7 cm, p<0.01). There were no significant changes in creatinine levels or urea nitrogen concentrations before and after the last RAE-RFA (p>0.05). There were no serious complications during and after the procedure. Conclusion: CACT-guided RAE followed by RFA appears to be a safe and effective technique for treating patients with inoperable RCC. - Highlights: • Selective RAE combined with RFA (RAE-RFA) is used to treat unresectable RCC. • We assessed the C-arm CT (CACT) based needle guidance system to perform RAE-RFA. • Tumors were controlled and reduced in size following CACT-guided RAE-RFA. • No significant changes in renal function occurred post-CACT-guided RAE-RFA. • CACT-guided RAE-RFA for treating RCC appears to be a safe and effective technique.

  10. WE-AB-BRA-08: Correction of Patient Motion in C-Arm Cone-Beam CT Using 3D-2D Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouadah, S; Jacobson, M; Stayman, JW; Siewerdsen, JH; Ehtiati, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) is subject to artifacts arising from patient motion during the fairly long (∼5–20 s) scan times. We present a fiducial free method to mitigate motion artifacts using 3D-2D image registration that simultaneously corrects residual errors in geometric calibration. Methods: A 3D-2D registration process was used to register each projection to DRRs computed from the 3D image by maximizing gradient orientation (GO) using the CMA-ES optimizer. The resulting rigid 6 DOF transforms were applied to the system projection matrices, and a 3D image was reconstructed via model-based image reconstruction (MBIR, which accommodates the resulting noncircular orbit). Experiments were conducted using a Zeego robotic C-arm (20 s, 200°, 496 projections) to image a head phantom undergoing various types of motion: 1) 5° lateral motion; 2) 15° lateral motion; and 3) 5° lateral motion with 10 mm periodic inferior-superior motion. Images were reconstructed using a penalized likelihood (PL) objective function, and structural similarity (SSIM) was measured for axial slices of the reconstructed images. A motion-free image was acquired using the same protocol for comparison. Results: There was significant improvement (p 0.99, indicating near identity to the motion-free reference. The point spread function (PSF) measured from a wire in the phantom was restored to that of the reference in each case. Conclusion: The 3D-2D registration method provides a robust framework for mitigation of motion artifacts and is expected to hold for applications in the head, pelvis, and extremities with reasonably constrained operative setup. Further improvement can be achieved by incorporating multiple rigid components and non-rigid deformation within the framework. The method is highly parallelizable and could in principle be run with every acquisition. Research supported by National Institutes of Health Grant No. R01-EB-017226 and academic

  11. WE-AB-BRA-08: Correction of Patient Motion in C-Arm Cone-Beam CT Using 3D-2D Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouadah, S; Jacobson, M; Stayman, JW; Siewerdsen, JH [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ehtiati, T [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) is subject to artifacts arising from patient motion during the fairly long (∼5–20 s) scan times. We present a fiducial free method to mitigate motion artifacts using 3D-2D image registration that simultaneously corrects residual errors in geometric calibration. Methods: A 3D-2D registration process was used to register each projection to DRRs computed from the 3D image by maximizing gradient orientation (GO) using the CMA-ES optimizer. The resulting rigid 6 DOF transforms were applied to the system projection matrices, and a 3D image was reconstructed via model-based image reconstruction (MBIR, which accommodates the resulting noncircular orbit). Experiments were conducted using a Zeego robotic C-arm (20 s, 200°, 496 projections) to image a head phantom undergoing various types of motion: 1) 5° lateral motion; 2) 15° lateral motion; and 3) 5° lateral motion with 10 mm periodic inferior-superior motion. Images were reconstructed using a penalized likelihood (PL) objective function, and structural similarity (SSIM) was measured for axial slices of the reconstructed images. A motion-free image was acquired using the same protocol for comparison. Results: There was significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the SSIM of the motion-corrected (MC) images compared to uncorrected images. The SSIM in MC-PL images was >0.99, indicating near identity to the motion-free reference. The point spread function (PSF) measured from a wire in the phantom was restored to that of the reference in each case. Conclusion: The 3D-2D registration method provides a robust framework for mitigation of motion artifacts and is expected to hold for applications in the head, pelvis, and extremities with reasonably constrained operative setup. Further improvement can be achieved by incorporating multiple rigid components and non-rigid deformation within the framework. The method is highly parallelizable and could in principle be run with every

  12. Variación cultural, técnicas y procedimientos estilísticos a propósito de las autotraducciones al castellano de Carme Riera / Cultural variation, techniques and stylistic procedures used by Carme Riera to Spanish self-translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Cotoner Cerdó

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El propósito de este artículo es hacer un repaso de las técnicas y procedimientos estilísticos que la escritora Carme Riera utiliza al traspasar sus propias obras desde el original catalán al castellano. La intención de causar un mismo efecto estético en un nuevo público lector en lengua castellana hace que la autora se sienta absolutamente libre para modificar, adaptar, modular, ampliar o suprimir el texto original. Riera considera sus traducciones solo como ejercicio de recreación. Desde esa perspectiva, sus recreaciones consiguen seducir también al público lector hispano, al tiempo que reflejan una de las características esenciales de su obra: la visión poliédrica de la realidad, ya que sus autotraducciones guardan una estrecha correspondencia con la pluralidad de cosmovisiones inherente a la diversidad de lenguas. Sus procedimientos pueden ser a veces discutibles, pero el resultado final desemboca en una nueva y enriquecedora mirada.Summary: The purpose of this article is to survey the techniques and stylistic procedures used by the writer Carme Riera to transfer her own work from the original Catalan to Spanish. The process of seeking to create the same aesthetic impact on a new Spanish readership has the effect of liberating the author, enabling her to modify, adapt, vary, enlarge or omit passages of the original text. Riera considers translation only as an exercise in recreation. As a product of this perspective, her recreations are not only successful in captivating a Spanish readership but also reflect one of the essential characteristics of her work: a multifaceted vision of reality, since her self-translations are a close parallel to the multiplicity of world views inherent in the diversity of languages. Her procedures may at times be questionable, but they lead to a new and enriching final standpoint.

  13. Personal Writing Goes Public: Social Commentary on Women’s Lives in Carme Riera’s Temps d’una espera / Lo personal sale al público: comentario social sobre la situación de la mujer en Temps d’una espera de Carme Riera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novia Pagone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In Carme Riera‟s personal writing she expresses her own opinions directly as she confronts some of the challenges women continue to face in contemporary society. In this study, we explore one of Riera‟s more personal and autobiographical works —Temps d’una espera— with the hope of gaining a better understanding of the self-mediation that occurs in the writing of autobiographical texts. I argue that by going public with her private writing, Riera helped to illuminate the struggles of at least one sector of Catalan life during the late 20th century, and by doing so she provides readers with important social commentary on the situation of women and their position in the public sphere.Resumen: En la escritura personal de Carme Riera ella expresa sus propias opiniones de una manera directa, al enfrentarse con algunos de los desafíos que siguen siendo cuestiones importantes en la vida de la mujer hoy en día. En este estudio, exploramos una de las obras más personales y autobiográficas de Riera, Temps d’una espera, con el propósito de entender mejor la auto-mediación que ocurre en el acto de escribir los textos autobiográficos. Demostraré que, al publicar su escritura personal, Riera ayudó a iluminar la lucha de por lo menos un sector de la vida catalana durante las últimas décadas del siglo XX, y que por lo tanto ella proporciona a los lectores un comentario social importante sobre la situación de la mujer y su posición en la esfera pública.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of C-arm CT during selective transcatheter angiography for hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with intravenous contrast-enhanced, biphasic, dynamic MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashihara, Hiroki; Osuga, Keigo; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Nakamoto, Atsushi; Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Maeda, Noboru; Hori, Masatoshi; Kim, Tonsok; Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    This study was aimed to compare the accuracy, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of C-arm CT (CACT) during selective transcatheter angiography with those of multidetector CT (MDCT) in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this prospective study, 30 patients (mean age, 73 years) with unresectable HCC were examined with CACT before chemoembolisation. Images of a combination of CACT during arterial portography (CACTAP) and dual-phase CACT during hepatic arteriography (CACTHA) was obtained and images of intravenous contrast-enhanced, biphasic, dynamic, MDCT was also obtained beforehand. Three blinded observers independently reviewed CACT and MDCT. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by the alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (AFROC) method. Sensitivities and positive predictive values (PPV) were analyzed with the paired t-test. In the mean area under the AFROC curve (Az), there was no significant difference between MDCT and CACT (MDCT, mean Az value, 0.83; CACT, 0.85, respectively) (P = 0.32). There was also no significant difference between the two techniques in sensitivity (MDCT, mean 0.65; CACT, 0.60) and PPV (MDCT, mean 0.98; CACT, 0.97) (P = 0.40, P = 0.68, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of CACT was equivalent to that of biphasic CT in the diagnosis of HCC. (orig.)

  15. Effect of metal artifact reduction software on image quality of C-arm cone-beam computed tomography during intracranial aneurysm treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yukiko; Yamauchi, Keita; Asano, Takahiko; Otani, Katharina; Iwama, Toru

    2018-01-01

    Background and purpose C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has the drawback that image quality is degraded by artifacts caused by implanted metal objects. We evaluated whether metal artifact reduction (MAR) prototype software can improve the subjective image quality of CBCT images of patients with intracranial aneurysms treated with coils or clips. Materials and methods Forty-four patients with intracranial aneurysms implanted with coils (40 patients) or clips (four patients) underwent one CBCT scan from which uncorrected and MAR-corrected CBCT image datasets were reconstructed. Three blinded readers evaluated the image quality of the image sets using a four-point scale (1: Excellent, 2: Good, 3: Poor, 4: Bad). The median scores of the three readers of uncorrected and MAR-corrected images were compared with the paired Wilcoxon signed-rank and inter-reader agreement of change scores was assessed by weighted kappa statistics. The readers also recorded new clinical findings, such as intracranial hemorrhage, air, or surrounding anatomical structures on MAR-corrected images. Results The image quality of MAR-corrected CBCT images was significantly improved compared with the uncorrected CBCT image ( p software improved image quality of CBCT images degraded by metal artifacts.

  16. A novel removable shield attached to C-arm units against scattered X-rays from a patient's side

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hiroshige [Hokkaido Social Insurance Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kanazawa University, Department of Quantum Medical Technology, Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Koshida, Kichiro; Matsubara, Kosuke [Kanazawa University, School of Health Sciences, College of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Ishigamori, Osamu [Hokkaido Social Insurance Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    We invented a drape-like shield against scattered X-rays that can safely come into contact with medical equipment or people during fluoroscopically guided procedures. The shield can be easily removed from a C-arm unit using one hand. We evaluated the use of the novel removable shield during the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedure. We measured the dose rate of scattered X-rays around endoscopists with and without this removable shield and surveyed the occupational doses to the ERCP staff. We also examined the endurance of the shield. The removable shield reduced the dose rate of scattered X-rays to one-tenth and reduced the monthly dose to an endoscopist by at least two-fifths. For 2.5 years, there was no damage to the shield and no loosening of the seam. The bonding of the hook-and-loop fasteners did not weaken, although the powerful double-sided tapes made especially for plastic did. The removable shield can reduce radiation exposure to the ERCP staff and may contribute to reducing the exposure to the eye lenses of operators. It would also be possible to expand its use to other fluoroscopically guided procedures besides ERCP because it is a light, simple, and useful device. (orig.)

  17. C-Arm Computed Tomography-Assisted Adrenal Venous Sampling Improved Right Adrenal Vein Cannulation and Sampling Quality in Primary Aldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung Hyun; Hong, Namki; Han, Kichang; Kang, Sang Wook; Lee, Cho Rok; Park, Sungha; Rhee, Yumie

    2018-05-04

    Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is a gold standard for subtype classification of primary aldosteronism (PA). However, this procedure has a high failure rate because of the anatomical difficulties in accessing the right adrenal vein. We investigated whether C-arm computed tomography-assisted AVS (C-AVS) could improve the success rate of adrenal sampling. A total of 156 patients, diagnosed with PA who underwent AVS from May 2004 through April 2017, were included. Based on the medical records, we retrospectively compared the overall, left, and right catheterization success rates of adrenal veins during the periods without C-AVS (2004 to 2010, n=32) and with C-AVS (2011 to 2016, n=134). The primary outcome was adequate bilateral sampling defined as a selectivity index (SI) >5. With C-AVS, the rates of adequate bilateral AVS increased from 40.6% to 88.7% (PAVS was an independent predictor of adequate bilateral sampling in the multivariate model (odds ratio, 9.01; PAVS improved the overall success rate of AVS, possibly as a result of better catheterization of right adrenal vein. Copyright © 2018 Korean Endocrine Society.

  18. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.; Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E.; Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R.; Birk, E.; Atar, E.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  19. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A. [Soreq NRC, Radiation Protection Domain (Israel); Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel); Birk, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Atar, E., E-mail: elia@clalit.org.il [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  20. C-arm cone-beam CT combined with a new electromagnetic navigation system for guidance of percutaneous needle biopsies. Initial clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kickuth, R.; Reichling, C.; Bley, T.; Hahn, D.; Ritter, C.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of C-arm fluoroscopic cone-beam computed tomography (CACT) in combination with a new electromagnetic tracking (EMT) system for needle guidance during percutaneous biopsies. 53 patients were referred for biopsy of thoracic (n = 19) and abdominal (n = 34) lesions. CT-like images of the anatomical region of interest (ROI) were generated using a flat panel-based angiographic system. These images were transmitted to an EMT system. A coaxial puncture needle with a sensor in its tip was connected with the navigation system and tracked into an electromagnetic field created via a field generator. Data generated within this field were merged with the CACT images. On a monitor both the anatomical ROI and needle tip position were displayed to enable precise needle insertion into the target. Through the coaxial needle, biopsy specimens for the histologic evaluation were extracted. Number of representative biopsy samples, number of core biopsies/patient, total procedure time, dose-area product, fluoroscopic time, and complications were recorded. 53 CACT/EMT-guided biopsy procedures were performed, 48 of which (91 %) yielded representative tissue samples. Four core biopsies were obtained from each patient. 40 (75 %) lesions were malignant and 13 (25 %) lesions were benign. The total procedure time was 9 ± 5 min (range, 3 - 23 min), fluoroscopic time was 0.8 ± 0.4 min (range, 0.4 - 2 min). The mean dose-area product (cGy cm 2 ) was 7373 (range, 895 - 26 904). The rate of complications (1 pneumothorax, 2 hemoptyses) was 6 %. CACT combined with EMT appears to be a feasible and effective technique for the guidance of percutaneous biopsies with a low rate of therapeutically relevant complications.

  1. Comparison of Manual and Automated Preprocedural Segmentation Tools to Predict the Annulus Plane Angulation and C-Arm Positioning for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Veulemans

    Full Text Available Preprocedural manual multi-slice-CT-segmentation tools (MSCT-ST define the gold standard for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. They are able to predict the perpendicular line of the aortic annulus (PPL and to indicate the corresponding C-arm angulation (CAA. Fully automated planning-tools and their clinical relevance have not been systematically evaluated in a real world setting so far.The study population consists of an all-comers cohort of 160 consecutive TAVR patients with a drop out of 35 patients for technical and anatomical reasons. 125 TAVR patients underwent preprocedural analysis by manual (M-MSCT and fully automated MSCT-ST (A-MSCT. Method-comparison was performed for 105 patients (Cohort A. In Cohort A, CAA was defined for each patient, and accordance within 10° between M-MSCT and A-MSCT was considered adequate for concept-proof (95% in LAO/RAO; 94% in CRAN/CAUD. Intraprocedural CAA was defined by repetitive angiograms without utilizing the preprocedural measurements. In Cohort B, intraprocedural CAA was established with the use of A-MSCT (20 patients. Using preprocedural A-MSCT to indicate the corresponding CAA, the levels of contrast medium (ml and radiation exposure (cine runs were reduced in Cohort B compared to Cohort A significantly (23.3±10.3 vs. 35.3 ±21.1 ml, p = 0.02; 1.6±0.7 vs. 2.4±1.4 cine runs; p = 0.02 and trends towards more safety in valve-positioning could be demonstrated.A-MSCT-analysis provides precise preprocedural information on CAA for optimal visualization of the aortic annulus compared to the M-MSCT gold standard. Intraprocedural application of this information during TAVR significantly reduces the levels of contrast and radiation exposure.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01805739.

  2. C-arm cone-beam CT combined with a new electromagnetic navigation system for guidance of percutaneous needle biopsies. Initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickuth, R.; Reichling, C.; Bley, T.; Hahn, D.; Ritter, C. [University Hospital of Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of C-arm fluoroscopic cone-beam computed tomography (CACT) in combination with a new electromagnetic tracking (EMT) system for needle guidance during percutaneous biopsies. 53 patients were referred for biopsy of thoracic (n = 19) and abdominal (n = 34) lesions. CT-like images of the anatomical region of interest (ROI) were generated using a flat panel-based angiographic system. These images were transmitted to an EMT system. A coaxial puncture needle with a sensor in its tip was connected with the navigation system and tracked into an electromagnetic field created via a field generator. Data generated within this field were merged with the CACT images. On a monitor both the anatomical ROI and needle tip position were displayed to enable precise needle insertion into the target. Through the coaxial needle, biopsy specimens for the histologic evaluation were extracted. Number of representative biopsy samples, number of core biopsies/patient, total procedure time, dose-area product, fluoroscopic time, and complications were recorded. 53 CACT/EMT-guided biopsy procedures were performed, 48 of which (91 %) yielded representative tissue samples. Four core biopsies were obtained from each patient. 40 (75 %) lesions were malignant and 13 (25 %) lesions were benign. The total procedure time was 9 ± 5 min (range, 3 - 23 min), fluoroscopic time was 0.8 ± 0.4 min (range, 0.4 - 2 min). The mean dose-area product (cGy cm{sup 2}) was 7373 (range, 895 - 26 904). The rate of complications (1 pneumothorax, 2 hemoptyses) was 6 %. CACT combined with EMT appears to be a feasible and effective technique for the guidance of percutaneous biopsies with a low rate of therapeutically relevant complications.

  3. Treatment of recurrent patellar dislocation via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wang, Hongbo; He, Yun; Si, Yu; Zhou, Hongyu; Wang, Xin

    2018-06-01

    Recurrent patellar dislocations were treated via knee arthroscopy combined with C-arm fluoroscopy, and reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligaments. Between October 2013 and March 2017, 52 cases of recurrent patellar dislocation [27 males and 25 females; age, 16-47 years (mean, 21.90 years)] were treated. Arthroscopic exploration was performed and patellofemoral joint cartilage injuries were repaired. It was subsequently determined whether it was necessary to release the lateral patellofemoral support belt. Pre-operative measurements were used to decide whether tibial tubercle osteotomy was required. Medial patellofemoral ligaments were reconstructed using autologous semitendinosus tendons. Smith and Nephew model 3.5 line anchors were used to double-anchor the medial patellofemoral margin. On the femoral side, the medial patellofemoral ligament was fixed using 7-cm, absorbable, interfacial compression screws. All cases were followed for 1-40 months (average, 21 months). The Q angle, tibial tuberosity trochlear groove distance, Insall-Salvati index, patellofemoral angle, lateral patellofemoral angle and lateral shift were evaluated on X-Ray images using the picture archiving and communication system. Subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) knee joint functional scores and Lysholm scores were recorded. Post-operative fear was absent, and no patellar re-dislocation or re-fracture was noted during follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patellofemoral angle (0.22±4.23°), lateral patellofemoral angle (3.44±1.30°), and lateral shift (0.36+0.14°) differed significantly from the pre-operative values (all, Ppatellofemoral ligament was effective.

  4. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Cohen, D; Bruckheimer, E; Bachar, G N; Konstantinovsky, R; Birk, E; Atar, E

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT. Effective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms. The effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590% for upper lung, 639 and 525% for mid-lung, and 461 and 251% for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762% for liver and 513 and 608% for kidney biopsies. Based on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  5. Metallic artifacts from internal scaphoid fracture fixation screws: comparison between C-arm flat-panel, cone-beam, and multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstaedt, Tim; Morsbach, Fabian; Calcagni, Maurizio; Vich, Magdalena; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Alkadhi, Hatem; Runge, Val M; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare image quality and extent of artifacts from scaphoid fracture fixation screws using different computed tomography (CT) modalities and radiation dose protocols. Imaging of 6 cadaveric wrists with artificial scaphoid fractures and different fixation screws was performed in 2 screw positions (45° and 90° orientation in relation to the x/y-axis) using multidetector CT (MDCT) and 2 flat-panel CT modalities, C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT), the latter 2 with low and standard radiation dose protocols. Mean cartilage attenuation and metal artifact-induced absolute Hounsfield unit changes (= artifact extent) were measured. Two independent radiologists evaluated different image quality criteria using a 5-point Likert-scale. Interreader agreements (Cohen κ) were calculated. Mean absolute Hounsfield unit changes and quality ratings were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Artifact extent was significantly smaller for MDCT and standard-dose FPCT compared with CBCT low- and standard-dose acquisitions (all P 0.05). Both MDCT and FPCT standard-dose protocols showed equal ratings for screw bone interface, fracture line, and trabecular bone evaluation (P = 0.06, 0.2, and 0.2, respectively) and performed significantly better than FPCT low- and CBCT low- and standard-dose acquisitions (all P < 0.05). Good interreader agreement was found for image quality comparisons (Cohen κ = 0.76-0.78). Both MDCT and FPCT standard-dose acquisition showed comparatively less metal-induced artifacts and better overall image quality compared with FPCT low-dose and both CBCT acquisitions. Flat-panel CT may provide sufficient image quality to serve as a versatile CT alternative for postoperative imaging of internally fixated wrist fractures.

  6. C-Arm computed tomography adds diagnostic information in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and a positive V/Q SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, Jan B.; Werncke, Thomas; Kaireit, Till [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; and others

    2017-01-15

    To determine if C-Arm computed tomography (CACT) has added diagnostic value in patients suffering from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) with a positive mismatch pattern in ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT). 28 patients (23 men, 5 women, 62±18 years) with CTEPH who had undergone SPECT, followed by CACT and right heart catheterization (RHC) were included. Two independent readers reviewed SPECT and CACT. Findings indicating CTEPH and their location (segmental or sub-segmental) were identified (V/Q mismatch in SPECT and vascular pathologies in CACT). Inter-modality agreement was calculated (Cohen's Kappa). Findings were scored on a 3-point-scale. The sum of the score (pulmonary artery CTEPH severity score (PACSS)) was calculated for each patient and imaging modality, correlated to RHC (spearman's correlation) and compared to the final therapeutic decision of the CTEPH board (including the consensus of SPECT, selective pulmonary DSA and CACT). Overall, 504 pulmonary artery segments were assessed in SPECT and CACT. SPECT had identified 266/504 (53%) arterial segments without and 238/504 (47%) segments with a V/Q mismatch indicating CTEPH. CACT detected 131/504 (26%) segments without abnormal findings and 373/504 (74%) segments with findings indicating CTEPH. Inter-modality agreement was fair (k=0.38). PACSS of CACT correlated mildly significantly with the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPmean; rho=0.48, p=0.01), while SPECT missed significance (rho=0.32, p=0.1). Discrepant findings were mostly attributed to a higher frequency of sub-segmental pulmonary arterial pathologies on CACT (145 sub-segmental findings indicating CTEPH) rated as normal on SPECT. In patients with CTEPH, contrast-enhanced CACT detects additional findings with a better correlation to the severity of PAPmean than V/Q SPECT. CACT indicates abnormalities even in segments without V/Q abnormalities.

  7. Ressenya a Carme Llanes, L’obrador de Pere Nicolau, L’estil gòtic internacional a València (1390- 1408, València, Publicacions de la Universitat de València, 2014, pp. 312, ISBN: 978-84-370-9561-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Chismol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review to Carme Llanes, L’obrador de Pere Nicolau, L’estil gòtic internacional a València (1390-1408, València, Publicacions de la Universitat de València, 2014, pp. 312, ISBN: 978-84-370-9561-5

  8. [Case-control study on needle-knife to cut off the medial branch of the lumbar posterior ramus under C-arm guiding for the treatment of low back pain caused by lumbar facet osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Di; Xu, Wei-xing; Ding, Wei-Guo; Guo, Qiao-Feng; Ma, Gou-ping; Zhu, Wei-min

    2013-03-01

    To study the clinical efficacy of needle-knife to cut off the medial branch of the lumbar posterior ramus under C-arm guiding to treat low back pain caused by lumbar facet osteoarthritis. From July 2009 to June 2011, 60 patients with low back pain caused by lumbar facet osteoarthritis were reviewed,including 34 males and 26 females, ranging in age from 39 to 73 years old,averaged 61.9 years old; the duration of the disease ranged from 6 to 120 months, with a mean of 18.9 months. All the patients were divided into two groups, 30 patients (18 males and 12 females, ranging in age from 39 to 71 years old, needle-knife group) were treated with needle-knife to cut off medial branch of the lumbar posterior ramus under C -arm guiding and the other 30 patients(16 males and 14 females, ranging in age from 41 to 73 years old, hormone injection group) were treated with hormone injection in lumbar facet joint under C-arm guiding. The preoperative JOA scores and the scores at the 1st, 12th and 26th weeks after treatment were analyzed. Before treatment,the JOA scores between the two groups had no significant difference (P= 0.479); after 1 week of treatment, the JOA scores between the two groups had significant difference (P= 0.040), the improvement rate of hormone injection group was superior than that of the needle-knife group,which were (58.73+/-18.20)% in needle-knife group and (71.10+/-22.19)% in hormone injection group; after 12 weeks of treatment, the JOA scores between the two groups had no significant difference(P=0.569), and the improvement rate between the two groups had no significant difference,which were (50.09+/-19.33)% in the needle-knife group and (48.70+/-18.36)%) in the hormone injection group; after 26 weeks of treatment,the JOA scores between the two groups had significant difference (P=0.000), the improvement rate of hormone injection group was superior than that of the needle-knife group,which were (48.56+/-28.24)% in needle-knife group and (15

  9. Ultra-high-resolution C-arm flat-detector CT angiography evaluation reveals 3-fold higher association rate for sporadic intracranial cavernous malformations and developmental venous anomalies: a retrospective study in consecutive 58 patients with 60 cavernous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocak, Burak [Aksaray State Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aksaray (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman; Kocer, Naci; Islak, Civan [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Oz, Buge; Bakkaloglu, Dogu Vuralli [Istanbul University, Department of Pathology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Isler, Cihan [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2017-06-15

    The imaging and surgical literature has confusing association rates for the association between sporadic intracranial cavernous malformations (CMs) and developmental venous anomalies (DVAs). In this study, our purpose was to determine the association rate using ultra-high-resolution C-arm flat-detector CT angiography (FDCTA) and compare it with literature. Fifty-eight patients with 60 sporadic intracranial CMs that underwent an FDCTA study were included in our retrospective study. Re-evaluation of radiological data was performed based on the criteria defined by authors. Isotropic volumetric reconstructions with ultra-high resolution (voxel size of 102 μm{sup 3} for initial; 67 μm{sup 3} and 32 μm{sup 3} for further evaluation) were used for assessment. Sixteen patients underwent surgery for excision of their CMs. Fifty-one of all patients (87.9 %) were associated with a DVA. Undefined local venous structures (UD-LVSs) were observed in the remaining 7 patients (12.1 %). The strength of interobserver agreement was excellent [kappa(k) coefficient = 0.923]. Ultra-high-resolution FDCTA evaluation of CMs and DVAs reveals 3-fold higher association rate compared to the literature. FDCTA for patients with sporadic CMs could help identify the associated DVAs that remained undetected or unclear with other imaging modalities, which can be useful in decision-making processes, planning surgery, and during operation. (orig.)

  10. Review of ostrich ( Struthio carmelis ) production and its adaptability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It can digest high levels of fiber. During breeding season, onset of which depends on location, females lay about 50-100 eggs of 2.0-3.0 kg depending on type of habitat. In the wild, female and male both incubate the eggs during the day and night respectively, for about 42 days. Good number of ostrich can be found living in ...

  11. Artifact reduction of different metallic implants in flat detector C-arm CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, S-C; Wu, C-C; Lin, C-J; Guo, W-Y; Luo, C-B; Chang, F-C; Chang, C-Y

    2014-07-01

    Flat detector CT has been increasingly used as a follow-up examination after endovascular intervention. Metal artifact reduction has been successfully demonstrated in coil mass cases, but only in a small series. We attempted to objectively and subjectively evaluate the feasibility of metal artifact reduction with various metallic objects and coil lengths. We retrospectively reprocessed the flat detector CT data of 28 patients (15 men, 13 women; mean age, 55.6 years) after they underwent endovascular treatment (20 coiling ± stent placement, 6 liquid embolizers) or shunt drainage (n = 2) between January 2009 and November 2011 by using a metal artifact reduction correction algorithm. We measured CT value ranges and noise by using region-of-interest methods, and 2 experienced neuroradiologists rated the degrees of improved imaging quality and artifact reduction by comparing uncorrected and corrected images. After we applied the metal artifact reduction algorithm, the CT value ranges and the noise were substantially reduced (1815.3 ± 793.7 versus 231.7 ± 95.9 and 319.9 ± 136.6 versus 45.9 ± 14.0; both P metallic objects and various sizes of coil masses. The rater study achieved an overall improvement of imaging quality and artifact reduction (85.7% and 78.6% of cases by 2 raters, respectively), with the greatest improvement in the coiling group, moderate improvement in the liquid embolizers, and the smallest improvement in ventricular shunting (overall agreement, 0.857). The metal artifact reduction algorithm substantially reduced artifacts and improved the objective image quality in every studied case. It also allowed improved diagnostic confidence in most cases. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. CARM1 Modulators Affect Epigenome of Stem Cells and Change Morphology of Nucleoli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franěk, Michal; Legartová, Soňa; Suchánková, Jana; Milite, C.; Castellano, S.; Sbardella, G.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 5 (2015), s. 769-782 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/10/1022; GA ČR GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR GA13-07822S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : arginine methyltransferase 1 * histone deacetylase inhibitors * gene-expression * pyrazole inhibitors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  13. Perfusion imaging in the peripheral vasculature using interventional C-arm systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giordano, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    In peripheral revascularization procedures, an obstructed vessel is unblocked to restore the blood flow to the tissue. Currently, treatment assessment is carried out by angiography which allows only for a qualitative inspection of the blood flow in arteries. Periprocedural assessment of tissue

  14. C-arm fluoroscopy: a reliable modality for retrieval of foreign bodies in the maxillofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandyan, Deepak; Nandakumar, N; Qayyumi, Burhanuddin N; Kumar, Santosh

    2013-11-01

    The anatomic complexity of the maxillofacial region makes the retrieval of foreign bodies a daunting task for the maxillofacial Surgeon. Moreover the inability of 2-dimensional imaging to precisely locate foreign bodies makes it challenging. The anatomic proximity of critical structures and esthetic considerations limits the access and thus poses a greater challenge for the surgeon in cases of foreign body retrieval. Hereby we propose a simple technique and a case report to support, the retrieval of small (mobile C arm Fluoroscopy and a needle triangulation method to precisely locate a loosened miniplate screw in the mandibular angle region.

  15. Rotational micro-CT using a clinical C-arm angiography gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, V.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Ionita, C. N.; Keleshis, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2008-01-01

    Rotational angiography (RA) gantries are used routinely to acquire sequences of projection images of patients from which 3D renderings of vascular structures are generated using Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithms. However, these systems have limited resolution ( 10 lp/mm) but to date have relied either on rotating object imaging or small bore geometry for small animal imaging, and thus are not used for clinical imaging. The authors report here the development and use of a 3D rotational micro-angiography (RMA) system created by mounting a micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) [35 μm pixel, resolution >10 lp/mm, field of view (FOV)=3.6 cm] on a standard clinical FPD-based RA gantry (Infinix, Model RTP12303J-G9E, Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tustin, CA). RA image sequences are obtained using the MAF and reconstructed. To eliminate artifacts due to image truncation, lower-dose (compared to MAF acquisition) full-FOV (FFOV) FPD RA sequences (194 μm pixel, FOV=20 cm) were also obtained to complete the missing data. The RA gantry was calibrated using a helical bead phantom. To ensure high-quality high-resolution reconstruction, the high-resolution images from the MAF were aligned spatially with the lower-dose FPD images, and the pixel values in the FPD image data were scaled to match those of the MAF. Images of a rabbit with a coronary stent placed in an artery in the Circle of Willis were obtained and reconstructed. The MAF images appear well aligned with the FPD images (average correlation coefficient before and after alignment: 0.65 and 0.97, respectively) Greater details without any visible truncation artifacts are seen in 3D RMA (MAF-FPD) images than in those of the FPD alone. The FWHM of line profiles of stent struts (100 μm diameter) are approximately 192±21 and 313±38 μm for the 3D RMA and FPD data, respectively. In addition, for the dual-acquisition 3D RMA, FFOV FPD data need not be of the highest quality, and thus may be acquired at lower dose compared to a standard FPD acquisition. These results indicate that this system could provide the basis for high resolution images of regions of interest in patients with a reduction in the integral dose compared to the standard FPD approach.

  16. Calibration of a C-arm X-ray system for its use in tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Paraiso Labora, Martín

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a procedure that allows the administration of a high dose of ionizing radiation directly on the tumor bed just after the surgery. The main advantage with respect to external radiotherapy (RT) is that it allows exposing the tumor bed at maximum avoiding radiation on surrounding healthy tissue. The first tool for IORT planning was developed by GMV in collaboration with the imaging group at Gregorio Marañón Hospital inside a line of research devoted to IORT....

  17. Moderna mimo centra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnídková, Vendula

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 4 (2017), s. 242-244 ISSN 0042-4544 Institutional support: RVO:68378033 Keywords : modern architecture * Josep Lluis Sert * Fondation Maeght Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture , Cultural Heritage

  18. Ansiedad ante el aprendizaje de la lengua inglesa y El viaje del inglés de Carme Riera / Anxiety before the learning of the english language and El viaje del inglés of Carme Riera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Delicado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En la novela El viaje del inglés (2006 Carmen Riera plasma con fina ironía una carencia nacional: la dificultad, de todos conocida, que ha supuesto en España y desde hace tiempo el aprendizaje de idiomas y, en concreto, de la lengua inglesa. Todo ello a través del personaje de Laura Prats, joven frustrada por su falta de dominio del inglés, quien acaba matando a Mrs. Grose, la enajenada profesora nativa del curso al que asiste en Inglaterra. Entre evocaciones a The Turning of the screw, el film Psicosis y diferentes teorías psicoanalíticas, la novela provoca en el lector la sensación de desorientación que demasiados españoles sienten al estar en contacto con otras lenguas, en especial la inglesa.Summary: In the so called novel El viaje del inglés (2006 Carmen Riera reflects with fine sarcasm on a domestic gap: the renowned Spanish inability to face the acquisition of foreign languages, specially the English learning. All that through the character of Laura Prats, the young woman frustrated with her unconstructive language achievements, who ends up killing the native instructor of the course that she attends in England to improve her English. Among evocations from The Turning of the screw, the film Psicosis and several psychoanalytical theories, the novel generates in the reader the feeling of disorientation that too many Spaniards suffer when facing contact with other languages.

  19. Obtención de carmín de cochinilla aplicando hidrólisis enzimática

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Cueva, Tula Norma; Inga Cueva, Tula Norma

    2012-01-01

    El consumo de colorantes sintéticos como aditivos en la industria alimentaria, está siendo cada vez restringido, por las entidades reguladoras en aseguramiento, saneamiento en alimentos, debido a sus efectos toxicológicos, entre los que se encuentra el colorante rojo sintético azoico FD&C Red No. 2, conocido como Amaranto o E 123, (código alimentario según la Unión Europea), utilizados para dar color rojo a alimentos y cosméticos, siendo prohibido su consumo desde 1976 por la Administración d...

  20. Carmes Polytechnique, Housing in the Heart of Paris Energy renovation of a social housing estate in Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Horn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The architecture offices Atelier de la Seine and Rethink have been commissioned with the engineers Pouget Consultants by the social landlord Paris Habitat for the extensive renovation of a social housing estate in the historic centre of Paris. The estate has been built in 1930 and integrates a part of the former college of the Lombard build in the 17th century. It belongs to the social housing typology 'Habitations à Bon Marché (HBM' constructed between1894 and 1949. This typology is generally characterized by its integration in its urban context and an apparent brick facade. The renovation project includes a focus on the reduction of the energy consumption. An important subject, as of the total number of 4.6 millions of social housing in France more than 50 % have been build before 1975 (before the first thermal regulation and many are still considered energy-intensive.

  1. "At CERN, the infrastructures come second to the people behind them"

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The daily responsibilities of Lluis Miralles Verge, Head of the GS Department since August 2013, range from overseeing the CERN "master plan" and the construction of new buildings and infrastructures to managing the Organization's roads and access to its different sites. However, he stresses that none of this is as fundamental to the smooth running of the Laboratory as the people behind the services concerned.   Lluis Miralles Verge. Lluis Miralles worked as an engineer with the ATLAS collaboration and with various Spanish institutions before arriving at CERN last year (see CV), so he was no stranger to the complexities of working in a scientific environment. That is not to say that CERN did not hold any surprises for him! "When I took up the post of GS Department Leader I quickly realised just how complex the day-to-day running of a laboratory like CERN can be", he says. "My department alone comprises experts in logistics, project managem...

  2. ENPA valis uueks esimeheks de Puigi / Andres Herkel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Herkel, Andres, 1962-

    2008-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Hiiu Leht 22. jaan., lk. 2. Meie Maa 24. jaan. lk. 2. Euroopa Nõukogu parlamentaarne assamblee valis oma uueks presidendiks Hispaania sotsialisti Lluis Maria de Puigi. Briti konservatiivide ja Ühtse Venemaa koostööst, mida juhib Mihhail Margelov

  3. International Conference of Defects in Semiconductors (19th), ICDS, Held in Aveiro, Portugal on July 21-25, 1997, Pt. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-23

    Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa, 243-01, Japan. t present address: University of Tokyo, Institute for Industrial Science, 7-22-1 Roppongi...Lluis Sole i Sabaris 1-3, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain. 3CNM, "Instituto de Microelectrönica de Madrid", Isaac Newton 8, Parque Tecnologico de Madrid, E

  4. A new method for obtaining mesenchymal stem cells in children with burn injury: Tibial bone marrow aspiration by using the C-arm guidance scopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bozkurt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of stem cell therapies is a trending topic in plastic surgery and fat tissue is the most commonly used stem cell source. Stem cell injection has become popular in the treatment of burn wound, especially in the late term scar modulation. However, insufficient amounts of fat tissue in the pediatric age group is a major limitation. The present study reports the utilization of tibial bone marrow aspiration as a source of mesenchymal stem cells in the pediatric age group with the simultaneous usage of x-ray examination to avoid epiphyseal damage. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(1.000: 56-57

  5. Laser Guidance in C-Arm Cone-Beam CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma Reduces Fluoroscopy Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroes, Maarten W., E-mail: Maarten.Kroes@radboudumc.nl; Busser, Wendy M. H.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeTo assess whether laser guidance can reduce fluoroscopy and procedure time of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablations of osteoid osteoma compared to freehand CBCT guidance.Materials and Methods32 RF ablations were retrospectively analyzed, 17 laser-guided and 15 procedures using the freehand technique. Subgroup selection of 18 ablations in the hip–pelvic region with a similar degree of difficulty was used for a direct comparison. Data are presented as median (ranges).ResultsComparison of all 32 ablations resulted in fluoroscopy times of 365 s (193–878 s) for freehand and 186 s (75–587 s) for laser-guided procedures (p = 0.004). Corresponding procedure times were 56 min (35–97 min) and 52 min (30–85 min) (p = 0.355). The subgroup showed comparable target sizes, needle path lengths, and number of scans between groups. Fluoroscopy times were lower for laser-guided procedures, 215 s (75–413 s), compared to 384 s (193–878 s) for freehand (p = 0.012). Procedure times were comparable between groups, 51 min (30–72 min) for laser guidance and 58 min (35–79 min) for freehand (p = 0.172).ConclusionAdding laser guidance to CBCT-guided osteoid osteoma RF ablations significantly reduced fluoroscopy time without increasing procedure time.Level of EvidenceLevel 4, case series.

  6. Practical dose point-based methods to characterize dose distribution in a stationary elliptical body phantom for a cone-beam C-arm CT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan, E-mail: jhchoi21@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Constantin, Dragos [Microwave Physics R& E, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Ganguly, Arundhuti; Girard, Erin; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Morin, Richard L. [Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Dixon, Robert L. [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To propose new dose point measurement-based metrics to characterize the dose distributions and the mean dose from a single partial rotation of an automatic exposure control-enabled, C-arm-based, wide cone angle computed tomography system over a stationary, large, body-shaped phantom. Methods: A small 0.6 cm{sup 3} ion chamber (IC) was used to measure the radiation dose in an elliptical body-shaped phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The IC was placed at 23 well-distributed holes in the central and peripheral regions of the phantom and dose was recorded for six acquisition protocols with different combinations of minimum kVp (109 and 125 kVp) and z-collimator aperture (full: 22.2 cm; medium: 14.0 cm; small: 8.4 cm). Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were carried out to generate complete 2D dose distributions in the central plane (z = 0). The MC model was validated at the 23 dose points against IC experimental data. The planar dose distributions were then estimated using subsets of the point dose measurements using two proposed methods: (1) the proximity-based weighting method (method 1) and (2) the dose point surface fitting method (method 2). Twenty-eight different dose point distributions with six different point number cases (4, 5, 6, 7, 14, and 23 dose points) were evaluated to determine the optimal number of dose points and their placement in the phantom. The performances of the methods were determined by comparing their results with those of the validated MC simulations. The performances of the methods in the presence of measurement uncertainties were evaluated. Results: The 5-, 6-, and 7-point cases had differences below 2%, ranging from 1.0% to 1.7% for both methods, which is a performance comparable to that of the methods with a relatively large number of points, i.e., the 14- and 23-point cases. However, with the 4-point case, the performances of the two methods decreased sharply. Among the 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-point cases, the 7-point case (1.0% [±0.6%] difference) and the 6-point case (0.7% [±0.6%] difference) performed best for method 1 and method 2, respectively. Moreover, method 2 demonstrated high-fidelity surface reconstruction with as few as 5 points, showing pixelwise absolute differences of 3.80 mGy (±0.32 mGy). Although the performance was shown to be sensitive to the phantom displacement from the isocenter, the performance changed by less than 2% for shifts up to 2 cm in the x- and y-axes in the central phantom plane. Conclusions: With as few as five points, method 1 and method 2 were able to compute the mean dose with reasonable accuracy, demonstrating differences of 1.7% (±1.2%) and 1.3% (±1.0%), respectively. A larger number of points do not necessarily guarantee better performance of the methods; optimal choice of point placement is necessary. The performance of the methods is sensitive to the alignment of the center of the body phantom relative to the isocenter. In body applications where dose distributions are important, method 2 is a better choice than method 1, as it reconstructs the dose surface with high fidelity, using as few as five points.

  7. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. Part I. Numerical model-based optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keil, Andreas; Besier, Thor F; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J; Beaupré, Gary S; Maier, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Human subjects in standing positions are apt to show much more involuntary motion than in supine positions. The authors aimed to simulate a complicated realistic lower body movement using the four-dimensional (4D) digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom. The authors also investigated fiducial marker-based motion compensation methods in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) space. The level of involuntary movement-induced artifacts and image quality improvement were investigated after applying each method. An optical tracking system with eight cameras and seven retroreflective markers enabled us to track involuntary motion of the lower body of nine healthy subjects holding a squat position at 60° of flexion. The XCAT-based knee model was developed using the 4D XCAT phantom and the optical tracking data acquired at 120 Hz. The authors divided the lower body in the XCAT into six parts and applied unique affine transforms to each so that the motion (6 degrees of freedom) could be synchronized with the optical markers' location at each time frame. The control points of the XCAT were tessellated into triangles and 248 projection images were created based on intersections of each ray and monochromatic absorption. The tracking data sets with the largest motion (Subject 2) and the smallest motion (Subject 5) among the nine data sets were used to animate the XCAT knee model. The authors defined eight skin control points well distributed around the knees as pseudo-fiducial markers which functioned as a reference in motion correction. Motion compensation was done in the following ways: (1) simple projection shifting in 2D, (2) deformable projection warping in 2D, and (3) rigid body warping in 3D. Graphics hardware accelerated filtered backprojection was implemented and combined with the three correction methods in order to speed up the simulation process. Correction fidelity was evaluated as a function of number of markers used (4-12) and marker distribution in three scenarios. Average optical-based translational motion for the nine subjects was 2.14 mm (± 0.69 mm) and 2.29 mm (± 0.63 mm) for the right and left knee, respectively. In the representative central slices of Subject 2, the authors observed 20.30%, 18.30%, and 22.02% improvements in the structural similarity (SSIM) index with 2D shifting, 2D warping, and 3D warping, respectively. The performance of 2D warping improved as the number of markers increased up to 12 while 2D shifting and 3D warping were insensitive to the number of markers used. The minimum required number of markers for 2D shifting, 2D warping, and 3D warping was 4-6, 12, and 8, respectively. An even distribution of markers over the entire field of view provided robust performance for all three correction methods. The authors were able to simulate subject-specific realistic knee movement in weight-bearing positions. This study indicates that involuntary motion can seriously degrade the image quality. The proposed three methods were evaluated with the numerical knee model; 3D warping was shown to outperform the 2D methods. The methods are shown to significantly reduce motion artifacts if an appropriate marker setup is chosen.

  8. Combined Fluoroscopy- and CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Biopsy Using a C-Arm Cone-Beam CT System: Comparison with Fluoroscopy-Guided Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Joo Yeon; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Shim, Sung Shine; Lim, Soo Mee [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of combined fluoroscopy- and CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy (FC-TNB) using a cone beam CT system in comparison to fluoroscopy-guided TNB (F-TNB). We retrospectively evaluated 74 FC-TNB cases (group A) and 97 F-TNB cases (group B) to compare their respective diagnostic accuracies according to the size and depth of the lesion, as well as complications, procedure time, and radiation dose. The sensitivity for malignancy and diagnostic accuracy for small (< 30 mm in size) and deep ({>=} 50 mm in depth) lesions were higher in group A (91% and 94%, 92% and 94%) than in group B (73% and 81%, 84% and 88%), however not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Concerning lesions {>=} 30 mm in size and < 50 mm in depth, both groups displayed similar results (group A, 91% and 92%, 80% and 87%: group B, 90% and 92%, 86% and 90%). Pneumothorax occurred 26% of the time in group A and 14% for group B. The mean procedure time and patient skin dose were significantly higher in group A (13.6 {+-} 4.0 minutes, 157.1 {+-} 76.5 mGy) than in group B (9.0 {+-} 3.5 minutes, 21.9 {+-} 15.2 mGy) (p < 0.05). Combined fluoroscopy- and CT-guided TNB allows the biopsy of small (< 30 mm) and deep lesions ({>=} 50 mm) with high diagnostic accuracy and short procedure times, whereas F-TNB is still a useful method for large and superficial lesions with a low radiation dose

  9. Los Crímenes de la Mano Carmesí. Del Corto al Largometraje

    OpenAIRE

    Ger Nogarol, Sara

    2017-01-01

    La protagonista, la Maya, té malsons tan reals que l'espanten, sobretot perquè estan relacionats amb uns assassinats que s'estan cometent a la seva ciutat. Això podria atribuir-se a la sobtada depressió de la Maya per la mort del seu germà, en Noel. La protagonista decideix investigar sobre la mort d'aquest i sobre els seus somnis premonitoris, però no estarà sola, comptarà amb la peculiar ajuda de la inspectora Hillary Marcuse. La protagonista, Maya, sufre unas pesadillas tan reales que l...

  10. Can C-arm cone-beam CT detect a micro-embolic effect after TheraSphere radioembolization of neuroendocrine and carcinoid liver metastasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Olivier; Lin, MingDe; Bhagat, Nikhil; Shao, Wenbo; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres is a therapy that is used for hepatic tumors. 20-30 μm microspheres loaded with Y90 are supposedly occluding tumor vessels at the capillary level. Then, these spheres deliver high-dose radiation to the tumor. However, this theoretical embolic effect has never been appreciated in imaging. Dual-Phase cone-beam computed tomography (DPCBCT) is a multi-phasic intra-procedural scan that uses only one contrast media injection to visualize early (feeding vessel) and delayed (capillary level) tumor enhancement. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a micro-embolic effect induced by TheraSpheres® (MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) at the capillary level by using DPCBCT imaging. 14 patients with 72 carcinoid or neuroendocrine tumors were treated with radioembolization, and all underwent DPCBCT (Allura Xper, Philips Healthcare) imaging before and immediately after radioembolization with TheraSpheres®. Tumor enhancement was measured in each phase by drawing a region of interest within the tumors. 72 tumors were evaluated: average tumor density in the early arterial phase was 241 and 230 Hounsfield units (HU) (pTheraSpheres® injection indicates that there is an appreciable microembolic effect at the tumor capillary bed level.

  11. Congenital Anorectal Malformation Severity Does Not Predict Severity of Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jara E.; Liem, Eryn T.; Elzenga, Nynke J.; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Trzpis, Monika; Broens, Paul M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHDs) in patients with mild or severe congenital anorectal malformations (CARMs), and whether all patients with CARM need pediatric cardiology screening. Study design We included 129 patients with CARM born between 2004 and 2013, and

  12. A new building for testing magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    A ceremony to mark the laying of the foundation stone of Building 311, which will house a magnetic measurement laboratory, took place on 22 September.   Olaf Dunkel, head of the Building 311 project, José Miguel Jiménez, head of the Technology Department, and Lluis Miralles, head of the Site Management and Buildings Department, during the ceremony for the laying of the foundation stone of Building 311. Lluis Miralles, head of the Site Management and Buildings Department, José Miguel Jiménez, head of the Technology Department, Roberto Losito, head of the Engineering Department, and Simon Baird, head of the Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit, officially laid the foundation stone of Building 311 during a ceremony on Thursday, 22 September. Situated beside the water tower, the building will house a magnetic measurement laboratory for the Technology Department. With a floor space of around 1400 square metres, it will comprise a...

  13. Revision, uptake and coding issues related to the open access Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) versions 8, 9 and 10.1

    OpenAIRE

    Orchard, John; Rae, Katherine; Brooks, John; H?gglund, Martin; Til, Lluis; Wales, David; Wood, Tim

    2010-01-01

    John Orchard1, Katherine Rae1, John Brooks2, Martin Hägglund3, Lluis Til4, David Wales5, Tim Wood61Sports Medicine at Sydney University, Sydney NSW Australia; 2Rugby Football Union, Twickenham, England, UK; 3Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4FC Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 5Arsenal FC, Highbury, England, UK; 6Tennis Australia, Melbourne, Vic, AustraliaAbstract: The Orchard Sports Injury Classification Sys...

  14. Congenital Anorectal Malformation Severity Does Not Predict Severity of Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Jara E; Liem, Eryn T; Elzenga, Nynke J; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Trzpis, Monika; Broens, Paul M A

    2016-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHDs) in patients with mild or severe congenital anorectal malformations (CARMs), and whether all patients with CARM need pediatric cardiology screening. We included 129 patients with CARM born between 2004 and 2013, and referred to University Medical Center Groningen. Recto-perineal and recto-vestibular fistulas were classified as mild CARMs, all others as severe. Significant patent foramen ovale, secundum atrial septal defect, and small ventricular septum defect were classified as minor CHDs, all others as major. Of 129 patients with CARM, 67% had mild CARM, 33% severe CARM, and 17% were additionally diagnosed with CHD. CHDs were distributed equally in patients with mild or severe CARMs. Patients with multiple congenital abnormalities were more frequently diagnosed with CHD (n = 16, 36%) than patients without multiple congenital malformations (n = 5, 9%, P = .001). Patients with CARM diagnosed with CHD using pediatric cardiac echo screening were younger than 3 months of age at diagnosis. Earlier general pediatric examinations missed 7 (50%) children with mild and 4 (50%) with severe CHDs. The severity of CARM could predict neither prevalence nor severity of CHD. More than one-half of CHDs were missed during the first physical examination. No new CHDs were found in patients older than 3 months of age at the time CARMs were diagnosed. We recommend screening all patients with CARM younger than 3 months of age for CHD at the time CARM is diagnosed. Preoperative echocardiography should be the rule in children younger than 3 months of age and with multiple congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 enhances transcriptional activity of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 long terminal repeat through direct interaction with Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lu, Hanxin; Cho, Won-Kyung; Park, Hyeon Ung; Pise-Masison, Cynthia; Brady, John N

    2006-10-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1), which methylates histone H3 and other proteins such as p300/CBP, is positively involved in the regulation of Tax transactivation. First, transfection studies demonstrated that overexpression of CARM1 wild-type protein resulted in increased Tax transactivation of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR). In contrast, transfection of a catalytically inactive CARM1 methyltransferase mutant did not enhance Tax transactivation. CARM1 facilitated Tax transactivation of the CREB-dependent cellular GEM promoter. A direct physical interaction between HTLV-1 Tax and CARM1 was demonstrated using in vitro glutathione S-transferase-Tax binding assays, in vivo coimmunoprecipitation, and confocal microscopy experiments. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the activated HTLV-1 LTR promoter showed the association of CARM1 and methylated histone H3 with the template DNA. In vitro, Tax facilitates the binding of CARM1 to the transcription complex. Together, our data provide evidence that CARM1 enhances Tax transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR through a direct interaction between CARM1 and Tax and this binding promotes methylation of histone H3 (R2, R17, and R26).

  16. Reduced Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for JP-8 Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montgomery, Christopher J; Cannon, S. M; Mawid, M. A; Sekar, B

    2002-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, six different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for JP-8 combustion have been generated...

  17. Depression of the Thoracolumbar Posterior Vertebral Body on the Estimation of Cement Leakage in Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Depression of the thoracolumbar posterior vertebral body may be informative for the estimation of cement location on C-arm images. To reduce type-B leakage, DCPW should be made longer than DBCV on C-arm images for safety during PVP or PKP.

  18. Image quality analysis of vibration effects In C-arm-flat panel X-ray imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeren, R.M.; Kroon, J.N.; With, de P.H.N.

    2011-01-01

    The motion of C-arm scanning X-ray systems may result in vibrations of the imaging sub-system. In this paper, we connect C-arm system vibrations to Image Quality (IQ) deterioration for 2D angiography and 3D cone beam X-ray imaging, using large Flat Panel detectors. Vibrations will affect the

  19. Underdiagnosis of Mild Congenital Anorectal Malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jara E.; Trzpis, Monika; Broens, Paul M. A.

    Objective: To determine whether the frequency and severity of congenital anorectal malformations (CARMs) differs by sex. Study design: We included 129 patients (0-319 weeks old) diagnosed with CARMs, who had been referred to our Department of Pediatric Surgery between 2004 and 2013. Rectoperineal

  20. A new transport hub

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s new Mobility Centre, allowing you to switch easily from one mode of transport to another, has just been officially opened.   Inauguration of the CERN Mobility Centre by Martin Steinacher, Director for Finance and Human Resources, and Lluis Miralles, Head of the SMB department. CERN’s new Mobility Centre, on the car park next to the Globe of Science and Innovation was officially opened on Tuesday, 22 March. The centre brings together all of CERN’s transport options in a single location. "Our aim is to create an intermodal hub where CERN users and personnel can switch from one mode of transport to another, and from CERN transport to public transport," explains Lluis Miralles, head of the Site Management and Buildings (SMB) department. The Mobility Centre incorporates the CERN bike and car rental services, the self-service car- and bike-sharing schemes, and SIXT car rental facilities (for long-distance journeys). It is located right ne...

  1. Curso básico de didáctica de las ciencias enseñanza secundaria profesorado de ciencias en formación y en activo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Patricia Gallego Torres

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Este escrito presenta una reseña del libro escrito por los investigadores: Jaime Carrascosa Alís, Josep Lluís Domenech, Joaquín Martínez Torregrosa, Luis Osuna García y Rafaela Verdú Carbonell y con ISBN: 978-84-616-9964-3. Basic course teaching science secondary education science teachers in training and active This paper presents a book review written by researchers: Jaime Carrascosa Alis, Josep Lluis Domenech, Joaquín Martínez Torregrosa, Luis Osuna García and Verdú Carbonell and Rafaela ISBN: 978-84-616-9964-3 Básico ciências curso de ensino ensino secundário professores de ciências em formação e active Este trabalho apresenta uma resenha do livro escrito por pesquisadores: Jaime Carrascosa Alis, Josep Lluis Domenech, Joaquín Martínez Torregrosa, Luis Osuna García e Verdú Carbonell e Rafaela ISBN: 978-84-616-9964-3

  2. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of isolated modules of the mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Cura, Vincent; Hassenboehler, Pierre; Moras, Dino; Cavarelli, Jean, E-mail: cava@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [IGBMC (Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire), Département de Biologie et Génomique Structurales, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, Illkirch, F-67404 (France); INSERM, U596, Illkirch, F-67400 (France); CNRS, UMR7104, Illkirch, F-67400 (France); Université Louis Pasteur, Faculté des Sciences de la Vie, Strasbourg, F-67000 (France)

    2007-04-01

    Isolated modules of mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 encompassing the protein arginine N-methyltransferase catalytic domain have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected and have enabled determination of the structures by multiple isomorphous replacement using anomalous scattering. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) plays a crucial role in gene expression as a coactivator of several nuclear hormone receptors and also of non-nuclear receptor systems. Its recruitment by the transcriptional machinery induces protein methylation, leading to chromatin remodelling and gene activation. CARM1{sub 28–507} and two structural states of CARM1{sub 140–480} were expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of CARM1{sub 28–507} belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.0, c = 125.3 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and contain one monomer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of CARM1{sub 28–507} was solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and anomalous scattering methods. Crystals of apo CARM1{sub 140–480} belong to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 99.0, c = 207.4 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.7 Å resolution and contain two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of CARM1{sub 140–480} in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine belong to space P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 98.65, c = 206.08 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution and contain four monomers in the asymmetric unit. The structures of apo and holo CARM1{sub 140–480} were solved by molecular-replacement techniques from the structure of CARM1{sub 28–507}.

  3. virtX - a computer based system for training the intrasurgical use of mobile image intensifier systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pretschner, Dietrich Peter

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Currently the correct intrasurgical positioning and adjustment of mobile X-ray image intensifiers (C-arm can be learned theoretically through the use of textbooks, the practical training with the device itself suffers from the lack of visual feedback, i.e. radiographs corresponding to the adjustment of the C-arm. This leads to the question, whether the training of correct operation and adjustment of a C-arm in different operation scenarios can be supported by a C-arm simulation system being part of a CBT system (Computer Based Training. Methods: In co-operation with physicians from accident surgery and radiology the computer-based training system virtX was developed. virtX confronts the user with different exercises of C-arm adjustment and evaluates their execution and the results. These tasks can be created with the help of an authoring tool and can be accomplished by the trainee in different modes: a pure virtual mode and a combined virtual-real mode. In the pure virtual mode the user controls the virtual C-arm in a virtual operating theatre via the graphic-interactive virtX user interface. In the virtual-real mode however the position and orientation of a real C-arm are detected and mapped onto the virtual C-arm. At any time during the completion of an exercise the user can produce a close-to-reality, virtual radiograph and can control all parameters, like the positions of the apertures, X-ray intensity, etc. virtX was used on a three-day course for OR personnel with 120 participants and evaluated using questionnaires.Results: 79 of the participants returned a questionnaire. The average age of the 62 female and 15 male participants (two n.s. was 34 ± 9 years, their professional experience was 8.3 ± 7.6 years. 18 persons (23% indicated to work occasionally with a C-arm, 61 (77% worked regularly with it. Over 83% of the interviewed participants considered virtX a useful addition to the conventional C-arm training

  4. A computational environment for creating and testing reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, C.J.; Swensen, D.A.; Harding, T.V.; Cremer, M.A.; Bockelie, M.J. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)

    2002-02-01

    This paper describes software called computer assisted reduced mechanism problem solving environment (CARM-PSE) that gives the engineer the ability to rapidly set up, run and examine large numbers of problems comparing detailed and reduced (approximate) chemistry. CARM-PSE integrates the automatic chemical mechanism reduction code CARM and the codes that simulate perfectly stirred reactors and plug flow reactors into a user-friendly computational environment. CARM-PSE gives the combustion engineer the ability to easily test chemical approximations over many hundreds of combinations of inputs in a multidimensional parameter space. The demonstration problems compare detailed and reduced chemical kinetic calculations for methane-air combustion, including nitrogen oxide formation, in a stirred reactor and selective non-catalytic reduction of NOx, in coal combustion flue gas.

  5. Clinical usefulness of hemoencephalography beyond the neurofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Álvarez, Frederic; TIMONEDA-GALLART,CARME; SERRA-SALA,MIREIA

    2016-01-01

    Mireia Serra-Sala,1–3 Carme Timoneda-Gallart,1–3 Frederic Pérez-Álvarez1,2,4 1Fundació Carme Vidal NeuroPsicoPedagogia, 2Institut Recerca Qualitat de Vida Universitat de Girona, 3Facultat Educació Psychology University of Girona, 4Pediatric and Behavioral Neurology, University Hospital Doctor Josep Trueta, Girona, Spain Aim: Hemoencephalography (HEG) is an emerging procedure for clinical application in attention-deficit hyperac...

  6. The Association between Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Subgroups in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger; Subhi, Yousif

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis.......To evaluate potential differences in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin in subtypes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and in patients in Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging (CARMS) group 5 with or without subretinal fibrosis....

  7. Accuracy of electromagnetic tracking with a prototype field generator in an interventional OR setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boe, Lars Eirik; Leira, Haakon Olav; Tangen, Geir Arne; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Amundsen, Tore; Langoe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have studied the accuracy and robustness of a prototype electromagnetic window field generator (WFG) in an interventional radiology suite with a robotic C-arm. The overall purpose is the development of guidance systems combining real-time imaging with tracking of flexible instruments for bronchoscopy, laparoscopic ultrasound, endoluminal surgery, endovascular therapy, and spinal surgery. Methods: The WFG has a torus shape, which facilitates x-ray imaging through its centre. The authors compared the performance of the WFG to that of a standard field generator (SFG) under the influence of the C-arm. Both accuracy and robustness measurements were performed with the C-arm in different positions and poses. Results: The system was deemed robust for both field generators, but the accuracy was notably influenced as the C-arm was moved into the electromagnetic field. The SFG provided a smaller root-mean-square position error but was more influenced by the C-arm than the WFG. The WFG also produced smaller maximum and variance of the error. Conclusions: Electromagnetic (EM) tracking with the new WFG during C-arm based fluoroscopy guidance seems to be a step forward, and with a correction scheme implemented it should be feasible.

  8. Neonatal pressure ulcers: prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Molina P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pablo García-Molina,1,2 Alba Alfaro-López,1 Sara María García-Rodríguez,1 Celia Brotons-Payá,1 Mari Carmen Rodríguez-Dolz,1,2 Evelin Balaguer-López1,2 1Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, 2Research Group of Pediatric Nutrition, INCLIVA Foundation, Valencia, Spain Abstract: Health professionals should be prepared to respond to the needs of hospitalized neonates. The health team must consider multiple situations, where the neonate is at risk of having an adverse effect. One of the main interventions that health professionals must practice when interacting with hospitalized newborns is skin care. Neonates often suffer from diaper rash or intravenous drugs extravasation. Recently, hospitalized neonates and especially those in an unstable clinical situation are also at a risk of developing pressure ulcers. The presence of a pressure ulcer in a neonate can lead to serious problems to survival (eg, sepsis, clinical instability. This is the reason why, with this literature review, we attempt to answer questions from health professionals caring for neonates about the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Keywords: infant, pressure ulcer, treatment, prevention, wound, assessment

  9. Valorar y seleccionar documentos. Qué es y cómo se hace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Amorós Vidal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Las primeras instituciones españolas que contaron con comisiones evaluación o calificación de documentos fueron el Ayuntamiento de Zaragoza (1990 y la Generalitat de Catalunya (1991. Elena Rivas Palá, es archivera del Ayuntamiento de Zaragoza y miembro Mesa de Trabajo de Archivos de la Administración Local; Lluis Cermeno Martorell es archivero de la Generalitat y, desde su constitución, secretario de la Comisión Nacional de Acceso, Valoración y Selección Documental catalana. Los dos autores han estado vinculados a distintos comités de la Asociación Española de Normalización y Certificación (AENOR y me consta que Elena Rivas ha impartido numerosos cursos sobre el tema, casi desde que puso en marcha la Comisión de Valoración de su ayuntamiento.

  10. Precise X-ray and video overlay for augmented reality fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Lejing; Fallavollita, Pascal; Navab, Nassir

    2013-01-01

    The camera-augmented mobile C-arm (CamC) augments any mobile C-arm by a video camera and mirror construction and provides a co-registration of X-ray with video images. The accurate overlay between these images is crucial to high-quality surgical outcomes. In this work, we propose a practical solution that improves the overlay accuracy for any C-arm orientation by: (i) improving the existing CamC calibration, (ii) removing distortion effects, and (iii) accounting for the mechanical sagging of the C-arm gantry due to gravity. A planar phantom is constructed and placed at different distances to the image intensifier in order to obtain the optimal homography that co-registers X-ray and video with a minimum error. To alleviate distortion, both X-ray calibration based on equidistant grid model and Zhang's camera calibration method are implemented for distortion correction. Lastly, the virtual detector plane (VDP) method is adapted and integrated to reduce errors due to the mechanical sagging of the C-arm gantry. The overlay errors are 0.38±0.06 mm when not correcting for distortion, 0.27±0.06 mm when applying Zhang's camera calibration, and 0.27±0.05 mm when applying X-ray calibration. Lastly, when taking into account all angular and orbital rotations of the C-arm, as well as correcting for distortion, the overlay errors are 0.53±0.24 mm using VDP and 1.67±1.25 mm excluding VDP. The augmented reality fluoroscope achieves an accurate video and X-ray overlay when applying the optimal homography calculated from distortion correction using X-ray calibration together with the VDP.

  11. Acute toxicity profile in prostate cancer with conventional and hypofractionated treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Zulliani, Giseli Correa; Stefano, Eduardo Jose; Silva, Lucas Bernardes Godoy da; Silva, Bruna Bueno da; Crempe, Yuri Bonicelli; Martins, Vinicius Spazzapan; Ferrari, Ricardo Jose Rambaiolo; Pólo, Mariana Colbachini; Rossi, Bruno Thiago; Suguikawa, Elton

    2013-01-01

    To compare the acute toxicities in radical treatment of prostate cancer between conventional schedule (C-ARM) with 78 Gy/39 fractions and hypofractionation conformal treatment (H-ARM) with 69 Gy/23 fractions. This prospective double arm study consisted of 217 patients with prostate cancer, 112 in H-ARM and 105 in C-ARM arm. C-ARM received conventional six- field conformal radiotherapy with 78 Gy in 39 fractions while H-ARM received hypofractionation with 69 Gy in 23 fractions. Weekly assessment of acute reactions was done during treatment and with one, and 3 months using RTOG scale. Univariated analysis was performed to evaluate differences between the incidences of acute reaction in the treatment arms. Variables with p value less than 0.1 were included in the multivariated logistic regression. There was no difference between H-ARM versus C-ARM for severity and incidence in genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity. During the treatment comparing H-ARM with C-ARM no differences was observed for GI toxicity (grade 0–3; H-ARM = 45.5%, 34%, 18.7% and 1.8% versus C-ARM = 47.6%, 35.2%, 17.2% and 0). For acute GU toxicity no difference was detected between H-ARM (grade 0–3; 22.3%, 54.5%, 18.7% and 4.5%) and C-ARM (grade 0–3; 25.8%, 53.3%, 17.1% and 3.8%). At the 3- months follow-up, persistent Grade > =2 acute GU and GI toxicity were 2.5% and 1.8% in H-ARM versus 5.7% and 3% in C-ARM (p > 0.05). In univariated and multivariated analyses, there was not any dosimetric predictor for GI and GU toxicity. Our data demonstrate that hypofractionated radiotherapy achieving high biological effective dose using conformal radiotherapy is feasible for prostate cancer, being well tolerated with minimal severe acute toxicity

  12. Tracker-on-C for cone-beam CT-guided surgery: evaluation of geometric accuracy and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Otake, Y.; Uneri, A.; Schafer, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Nithiananthan, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Khanna, A. J.; Reh, D. D.; Gallia, G. L.; Taylor, R. H.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional surgical tracking configurations carry a variety of limitations in line-of-sight, geometric accuracy, and mismatch with the surgeon's perspective (for video augmentation). With increasing utilization of mobile C-arms, particularly those allowing cone-beam CT (CBCT), there is opportunity to better integrate surgical trackers at bedside to address such limitations. This paper describes a tracker configuration in which the tracker is mounted directly on the Carm. To maintain registration within a dynamic coordinate system, a reference marker visible across the full C-arm rotation is implemented, and the "Tracker-on-C" configuration is shown to provide improved target registration error (TRE) over a conventional in-room setup - (0.9+/-0.4) mm vs (1.9+/-0.7) mm, respectively. The system also can generate digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the perspective of a tracked tool ("x-ray flashlight"), the tracker, or the C-arm ("virtual fluoroscopy"), with geometric accuracy in virtual fluoroscopy of (0.4+/-0.2) mm. Using a video-based tracker, planning data and DRRs can be superimposed on the video scene from a natural perspective over the surgical field, with geometric accuracy (0.8+/-0.3) pixels for planning data overlay and (0.6+/-0.4) pixels for DRR overlay across all C-arm angles. The field-of-view of fluoroscopy or CBCT can also be overlaid on real-time video ("Virtual Field Light") to assist C-arm positioning. The fixed transformation between the x-ray image and tracker facilitated quick, accurate intraoperative registration. The workflow and precision associated with a variety of realistic surgical tasks were significantly improved using the Tracker-on-C - for example, nearly a factor of 2 reduction in time required for C-arm positioning, reduction or elimination of dose in "hunting" for a specific fluoroscopic view, and confident placement of the x-ray FOV on the surgical target. The proposed configuration streamlines the integration of C-arm

  13. The radiation dose dilemma in the hybrid operating room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, QMB

    2016-01-01

    The of the hybrid Operation room (an operation room combined with advanced radiological X-ray equipment) is gaining popularity, as it is now the preferred room to perform (complex) endovascular aortic procedures. The fixed C-arms equipped in these rooms make it possible to gain very high image

  14. De Dietse vertaling der 'scala sacre communionis van ioannes maubernus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persijn, Anne Jacob

    1960-01-01

    Toen ik mij destijds, bij het zoeken naar een dissertatie onderwerp uit de middeleeuwse mystiek, tot Prof. Dr. Titus Brandsma O. Carm. te Nijmegen wendde. om zijn advies hierin te horen, schoof hij me, in de ontvangkamer van Huize 'Carmell, Doddendaal 8, de catalogus IIFoto's van Middelnederlandsche

  15. Sharp foreign body ingestion by a young girl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Riyadh Mohamad Hasan

    2017-06-09

    Jun 9, 2017 ... Sharp foreign body ingestion by a young girl. Riyadh Mohamad Hasan. University of Baghdad ... ray imaging and retrieved with the aid of C-arm fluoroscope at a laparotomy. Her postoperative period ... In our patient the foreign bodies were long sharp ones (sewing needles). Foreign body ingestion can be ...

  16. Arhitektuuriuudised / Karen Jagodin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jagodin, Karen, 1982-

    2006-01-01

    Richard Rogersi Madridi lennujaam, prantsuse arhitektide odavad mudelmajad, jaapani arhitektide lükandseintega eramu nn. räästamaja, Saksamaal korraldatud multifunktsionaalsete ühiselamu/hostelitubade arhitektuurikonkursi tulemustest, arhitekt Carme Pinose kontorihoone Torre Cube Mehhikos, Sean Godselli projekteeritud eramu Austraalias, arhitektuuribüroo Alphaville projekteeritud eramu Jaapanis, Stefan Hauseri (kunstnikunimega Placed To Ride) projekteeritud Malmö rulapark

  17. Sectional localization of a small hepatocellular carcinoma in the right hepatic lobe by computed tomography: Comparison between the conventional and portal vein tracing methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Chun-Gao [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jongro-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology, Nanjing (China); Chung, Jin Wook; Hur, Saebeom; Lee, Myungsu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Jae, Hwan Jun; Yin, Yong-Hu; Kim, Young Il [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jongro-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sang-bu [Dongnam Institution of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Baik Hwan [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of the conventional and portal vein tracing methods in the right hepatic lobe in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). This retrospective study included patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions in the right hepatic lobe who underwent multiphasic MDCT and C-arm CT hepatic arteriography (C-arm CTHA) for chemoembolization. The accuracies of the conventional and portal vein tracing methods were evaluated using C-arm CTHA as the gold standard. A total of 147 patients with 205 HCC nodules were included. The C-arm CTHA could identify all the tumour-feeding arteries and consequently demonstrated that 120 lesions were located in the anterior section, 78 in the posterior section, and 7 in the border zone. The accuracy rates of conventional vs. portal vein tracing methods were 71.7 % vs. 98.3 % for the anterior section lesions, 67.9 % vs. 96.2 % for the posterior section, and 28.6 % vs. 57.1 % for the border zone. The portal vein tracing method was more accurate than the conventional method (P<0.001). The portal vein tracing method should be used for sectional localization of HCCs in the right lobe, because it predicts the location more accurately than the conventional method. (orig.)

  18. Mobile 3D rotational X-ray: comparison with CT in sinus surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelsen, B.; Bakker, N.H.; Boon, S.N.; Fokkens, W.J.; Freling, N.J.M.; Noordhoek, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    Clinical evaluation of a 3D rotational X-ray (3D-RX) system, comprising a modified Philips BV Pulsera C-arm system and a Philips 3D-RA workstation, demonstrates good diagnostic accuracy in functional endoscopic sinus surgery

  19. Structural and Functional Impacts of ER Coactivator Sequential Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Zhao; Feng, Qin; Chou, Chao-Kai; Pintilie, Grigore D; Shen, Hong; Foulds, Charles E; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina; Ludtke, Steven J; Schmid, Michael F; Hung, Mien-Chie; Chiu, Wah; O'Malley, Bert W

    2017-09-07

    Nuclear receptors recruit multiple coactivators sequentially to activate transcription. This "ordered" recruitment allows different coactivator activities to engage the nuclear receptor complex at different steps of transcription. Estrogen receptor (ER) recruits steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3) primary coactivator and secondary coactivators, p300/CBP and CARM1. CARM1 recruitment lags behind the binding of SRC-3 and p300 to ER. Combining cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure analysis and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that there is a close crosstalk between early- and late-recruited coactivators. The sequential recruitment of CARM1 not only adds a protein arginine methyltransferase activity to the ER-coactivator complex, it also alters the structural organization of the pre-existing ERE/ERα/SRC-3/p300 complex. It induces a p300 conformational change and significantly increases p300 HAT activity on histone H3K18 residues, which, in turn, promotes CARM1 methylation activity on H3R17 residues to enhance transcriptional activity. This study reveals a structural role for a coactivator sequential recruitment and biochemical process in ER-mediated transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reliability model analysis and primary experimental evaluation of laser triggered pulse trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Debiao; Yang Xinglin; Li Yuan; Li Jin

    2012-01-01

    High performance pulse trigger can enhance performance and stability of the PPS. It is necessary to evaluate the reliability of the LTGS pulse trigger, so we establish the reliability analysis model of this pulse trigger based on CARMES software, the reliability evaluation is accord with the statistical results. (authors)

  1. Evaluation the treatment outcomes of intracapsular femoral neck fractures with closed or open reduction and internal fixation by screw in 18-50-year-old patients in Isfahan from Nov 2010 to Nov 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javdan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that femoral neck fracture is associated with several complications, especially if open reduction was necessary. So, the surgical method and necessary equipments such as radiolucent bed, C-ARM machine, and implant cannulated screw set should be considered.

  2. Afican Health Sciences Vol 9 No 2.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    consciousness, posture, motor function, deep tendon reflexes and abnormal movements. A detailed neurologic examination using a standardised questionnaire was performed by ..... Dec;85(6):718-22. 26. Carme B, Bouquety JC, Plassart H. Mortality and sequelae due to cerebral malaria in African children in Brazzaville,.

  3. Using conversation analysis in data-driven aviation training with large-scale qualitative datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuccio, William A.; Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to a growing body of work related to the Conversation Analytic Role-play Method (CARM) by studying the primary flight instruction environment to create training interventions related to radio communications and flight instruction practices. Framed in the context of conversa...

  4. Revision, uptake and coding issues related to the open access Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS versions 8, 9 and 10.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Orchard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available John Orchard1, Katherine Rae1, John Brooks2, Martin Hägglund3, Lluis Til4, David Wales5, Tim Wood61Sports Medicine at Sydney University, Sydney NSW Australia; 2Rugby Football Union, Twickenham, England, UK; 3Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4FC Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 5Arsenal FC, Highbury, England, UK; 6Tennis Australia, Melbourne, Vic, AustraliaAbstract: The Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS is one of the world’s most commonly used systems for coding injury diagnoses in sports injury surveillance systems. Its major strengths are that it has wide usage, has codes specific to sports medicine and that it is free to use. Literature searches and stakeholder consultations were made to assess the uptake of OSICS and to develop new versions. OSICS was commonly used in the sports of football (soccer, Australian football, rugby union, cricket and tennis. It is referenced in international papers in three sports and used in four commercially available computerised injury management systems. Suggested injury categories for the major sports are presented. New versions OSICS 9 (three digit codes and OSICS 10.1 (four digit codes are presented. OSICS is a potentially helpful component of a comprehensive sports injury surveillance system, but many other components are required. Choices made in developing these components should ideally be agreed upon by groups of researchers in consensus statements.Keywords: sports injury classification, epidemiology, surveillance, coding

  5. 29 September 2015 - Vice-President of the Government of Spain S. Sáenz de Santamaría in the ATLAS visitor centre, the Synchrocyclotron, the Data Centre visit point and the LHC magnet facility with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Were also present from Spain: Sra. Carmen Vela, Secretaria de Estado de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación, Sr. D. Bernardo de Sicart Escoda Embajador de España en Berna, Sra. Da Ana Menéndez Pérez, Embajadora Representante Permanente de España ante Naciones Unidas y OOII con sede en Ginebra, Sra. Da María Pico Directora del Gabinete de la Vicepresidenta and Sr. D. Miguel Temboury Redondo Subsecretario de Economía y Competitividad. And from CERN: Dr Maria Alandes Pradillo, Information Technology Department, Dr Maria Barroso-Lopez Deputy Group Leader, IT-PES, Dr Frédérick Bordry, Director of Accelerators and Technology, Dr Borja Fernandez Adiego Engineering Department, Prof. Maria Jose Garcia Borge ISOLDE Collaboration Spokesperson, Dr Fabiola Gianotti Director-General elect 2016-2020, Mr Frédéric Hemmer Information Technology Department Head, Prof. Mario Martinez, Spanish Scientific Delegate to CERN Council Mr Guillermo Merino Fernandez, Technology Department Mr Lluis Miralles, General Infrast...

  6. CERN welcomes the Spanish Vice-President

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    On 29 September, CERN had the pleasure of welcoming the Vice-President of the Government of Spain, Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría, for a visit of the Laboratory.   From left to right: Lluis Miralles (Head of the General Infrastructure Services department), Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría (Vice-President of the Government of Spain) and José Miguel Jiménez (Head of the Technology department).   The Vice-President was accompanied by Carmen Vela, Spanish Secretary of State for Research, Development and Innovation, Bernardo de Sicart Escoda, Ambassador of Spain to Switzerland, and Ana Menéndez Pérez, Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations and International Organizations in Geneva. Their tour started at LHC Point 1, where CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer welcomed them and gave them an introduction to CERN's activities. Jos&ea...

  7. 9th Transgenic Technology Meeting (TT2010) in Berlin, Germany: a meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Thomas L; Sobieszczuk, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The first Transgenic Technology (TT) Meeting was organized in 1999 by Johannes Wilbertz, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden as a regional meeting. The TT Meetings continued in this way, constantly gathering additional practitioners of transgenic methodologies until the breakthrough in 2005 when the 6th TT Meeting in Barcelona, Spain, hosted by Lluis Montoliu (Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Madrid, Spain), generated the momentum to establish the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). Since 2006, the ISTT has continued to promote the TT Meetings and provide its membership with a forum to discuss best practices and new methods in the field. The TT2010 Meeting was held at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (Berlin, Germany). Participation at the TT2010 Meeting exceeded the registration capacity and set a new attendance record. Session topics included methods for the generation of rat and mouse models of human disease, fundamental and advanced topics in rodent embryonic stem cells, and the newest transgenic technologies. Short presentations from selected abstracts were of especial interest. Roundtable discussions on transgenic facility establishment and cryoarchiving of mouse lines were favorably received. Students, technical staff, and professors participated in numerous discussions and came away with practical methods and new ideas for research.

  8. Microwave discharge electrodeless lamps (MDEL). III. A novel tungsten-triggered MDEL device emitting VUV and UVC radiation for use in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Miura, Takashi; Kajitani, Masatsugu; Serpone, Nick

    2008-03-01

    Exposure to low doses of the xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA) and to the hormonal 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) herbicide, an environmental endocrine disruptor, can have serious health consequences such as the induction of mammary gland ductal hyperplasias and carcinoma (LaChapelle et al., Reprod. Toxicol., 2007, 23, 20; Murray et al., Reprod. Toxicol., 2007, 23, 383). To the extent that these toxins are present in wastewaters (Donald et al., Sci. Total Environ. 1999, 231, 173; Brotons et al., Environ. Health Perspect. 1994, 103, 608; Olea et al., Environ. Health Perspect. 1996, 104, 298; Biles et al., J. Agric. Food Chem. 1997, 45, 3541; Markey et al., J. Steroid Biochem. Mol. Biol., 2003, 83, 235), we examined their oxidative destruction in aqueous media by a novel light source. A tungsten-triggered microwave discharge electrodeless lamp (W-MDEL) was fabricated for possible use in wastewater treatment using vacuum UV-transparent quartz in which a tungsten trigger, also embedded in quartz, was attached to the MDEL to aid in the self-ignition of the lamp on irradiation at low microwave power levels. The quantity of mercury gas in the W-MDEL was optimized by monitoring the continuous radiation and peak intensities of the emitted light in the vacuum UV (VUV) and UVC regions. The usefulness of the W-MDEL device was assessed through the degradation of 2,4-D and BPA in air-equilibrated aqueous media and in oxygen-saturated aqueous media. Enhanced degradation of these two xenoestrogenic toxins was achieved by increasing the number of W-MDEL devices while keeping constant the microwave radiation feeding each W-MDEL lamp. This novel lamp provides an additional light source in the photooxidation of environmental contaminants without the need for a metal-oxide photocatalyst. Under our conditions, process dynamics using the W-MDEL light source are greater than with the more conventional photochemical methods that employ low-pressure Hg arc electrode lamps in synthetic

  9. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  10. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially...... kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified...... as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human...

  11. THE WORK PROCESS IN RADIOLOGICAL NURSING: INVISIBILITY OFIONIZING RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Melo,Juliana Almeida Coelho de; Gelbcke,Francine Lima; Huhn,Andrea; Vargas,Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Qualitative descriptive and exploratory research, performed with 20 nursing professionals working in a general radiology unit and surgery center with the "C-arm" equipment, and the hemodynamics unit of a southern Brazilian teaching hospital. Aim was to analyze the dimensions of the work process for radiological technology nurse professionals. This paper made clear that radiological technologies are outside nursing, which leads to the invisibility of ionizing radiation, leading to ina...

  12. A standardized and safe method of sterile field maintenance during intra-operative horizontal plane fluoroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaska Serge C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intra-operative fluoroscopy for orthopaedic procedures frequently involves imaging in the horizontal plane, which requires the lower portion of the C-arm (x-ray tube to be rotated from an unsterile zone (beneath the table into the sterile field. To protect the integrity of the sterile field the C-arm must be draped repeatedly throughout the surgical case. The current, un-standardized, practice employs draping procedures which violate the Association of peri-Operative Registered Nurses (AORN Standards and Recommended Practices, waste time and material, and pose an increased risk for surgical site infection. Presentation of the hypothesis Use of a novel sterile C-arm drape (C-armor that maintains the integrity of the sterile field, will improve operating room efficiency and reduce surgical site infection risk factors. This reduction in risk factors may potentially reduce surgical site infections in orthopaedic surgical cases requiring repeated horizontal x-ray imaging. Testing the Hypothesis Savings in time and material and the reduction in surgical site infection risk factors afforded by using C-armor are intuitive to those skilled in the practice of orthopaedic surgery. Testing for a reduction in the number of microorganisms introduced to the surgical site by improved C-arm draping would be challenging due to the multiple confounding factors during a surgical operation. Determination of an absolute reduction in surgical site infections may be possible, but will require accounting for many confounding variables and a large study sample in order to achieve statistical significance. Implications of the Hypothesis Improved intraoperative workflow, healthcare savings and a reduction in surgical site infection risk factors will be achieved by utilizing a standardized and safe method of sterile field maintenance during intra-operative horizontal plane fluoroscopy.

  13. Induction linac driven relativistic klystron and cyclotron autoresonance maser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, D.L.; Birx, D.L.; Danly, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper design and experimental results are presented from two high power microwave generation experiments utilizing a high repetition rate induction linac generated electron beam. A relativistic klystron has generated more than 100 MW microwave pulses in X-band for 50 ns without pulse shortening or breakdown. design studies for the first cyclotron autoresonance maser (CARM) amplifier using an induction linac electron beam are also presented

  14. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  15. Detection of tibial condylar fractures using 3D imaging with a mobile image amplifier (Siemens ISO-C-3D): Comparison with plain films and spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsianos, D.; Rock, C.; Wirth, S.; Linsenmaier, U.; Brandl, R.; Fischer, T.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.; Euler, E.; Mutschler, W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze a prototype mobile C-arm 3D image amplifier in the detection and classification of experimental tibial condylar fractures with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR). Method: Human knee specimens (n=22) with tibial condylar fractures were examined with a prototype C-arm (ISO-C-3D, Siemens AG), plain films (CR) and spiral CT (CT). The motorized C-arm provides fluoroscopic images during a 190 orbital rotation computing a 119 mm data cube. From these 3D data sets MP reconstructions were obtained. All images were evaluated by four independent readers for the detection and assessment of fracture lines. All fractures were classified according to the Mueller AO classification. To confirm the results, the specimens were finally surgically dissected. Results: 97% of the tibial condylar fractures were easily seen and correctly classified according to the Mueller AO classification on MP reconstruction of the ISO-C-3D. There is no significant difference between ISO-C and CT in detection and correct classification of fractures, but ISO-CD-3D is significant by better than CR. (orig.) [de

  16. Mifepristone 5 mg versus 10 mg for emergency contraception: double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbonell JL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Josep Lluis Carbonell,1 Ramon Garcia,2 Adriana Gonzalez,2 Andres Breto,2 Carlos Sanchez2 1Mediterranea Medica Clinic, Valencia, Spain; 2Eusebio Hernandez Gynecology and Obstetrics Teaching Hospital, Havana, Cuba Purpose: To estimate the efficacy and safety of 5 mg and 10 mg mifepristone for emergency contraception up to 144 hours after unprotected coitus. Methods: This double-blind randomized clinical trial was carried out at Eusebio Hernandez Hospital (Havana, Cuba. A total of 2,418 women who requested emergency contraception after unprotected coitus received either 5 mg or 10 mg mifepristone. The variables for assessing efficacy were the pregnancies that occurred and the fraction of pregnancies that were prevented. Other variables assessed were the side effects of mifepristone, vaginal bleeding, and changes in the date of the following menstruation. Results: There were 15/1,206 (1.2% and 9/1,212 (0.7% pregnancies in the 5 mg and 10 mg group, respectively (P=0.107. There were 88% and 93% prevented pregnancies in the 5 mg and 10 mg group, respectively. The side effect profiles were similar in both groups. Delayed menstruation ≥7 days was experienced by 4.9% and 11.0% of subjects in the 5 mg and 10 mg group, respectively (P=0.001. There was a significant high failure rate for women weighing >75 kg in the 5 mg group. Conclusion: It would be advisable to use the 10 mg dose of mifepristone for emergency contraception as there was a trend suggesting that the failure rate of the larger dose was lower. Keywords: mifepristone, emergency contraception

  17. Targeted 2D/3D registration using ray normalization and a hybrid optimizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Joyoni; Napel, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    X-ray images are often used to guide minimally invasive procedures in interventional radiology. The use of a preoperatively obtained 3D volume can enhance the visualization needed for guiding catheters and other surgical devices. However, for intraoperative usefulness, the 3D dataset needs to be registered to the 2D x-ray images of the patient. We investigated the effect of targeting subvolumes of interest in the 3D datasets and registering the projections with C-arm x-ray images. We developed an intensity-based 2D/3D rigid-body registration using a Monte Carlo-based hybrid algorithm as the optimizer, using a single view for registration. Pattern intensity (PI) and mutual information (MI) were two metrics tested. We used normalization of the rays to address the problems due to truncation in 3D necessary for targeting. We tested the algorithm on a C-arm x-ray image of a pig's head and a 3D dataset reconstructed from multiple views of the C-arm. PI and MI were comparable in performance. For two subvolumes starting with a set of initial poses from +/-15 mm in x, from +/-3 mm (random), in y and z and +/-4 deg in the three angles, the robustness was 94% for PI and 91% for MI, with accuracy of 2.4 mm (PI) and 2.6 mm (MI), using the hybrid algorithm. The hybrid optimizer, when compared with a standard Powell's direction set method, increased the robustness from 59% (Powell) to 94% (hybrid). Another set of 50 random initial conditions from [+/-20] mm in x,y,z and [+/-10] deg in the three angles, yielded robustness of 84% (hybrid) versus 38% (Powell) using PI as metric, with accuracies 2.1 mm (hybrid) versus 2.0 mm (Powell)

  18. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  19. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors

  20. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency neurotomy in cervical spine: sonoanatomic study of a new technique in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.-H.; Kang, C.H.; Lee, S.-H.; Derby, R.; Yang, S.N.; Lee, J.E.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, S.S.; Lee, J.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To develop an ultrasound-guided technique for radiofrequency (RF) cervical medial branch neurotomy and to validate the accuracy of this new method. Materials and methods: Five non-embalmed, fresh cadavers were used; three male and two female cadavers with a median age at death of 67.2 years (range 50-84 years). This study was conducted in two parts. First, two of the cadavers were used to define the sonographic target point for RF cervical medial branch neurotomy using high-resolution ultrasound (12 to 5 MHz). The needles were guided to five consecutive cervical medial branches in the cadavers under ultrasound guidance. Subsequently, the position of the ultrasound-guided needle was verified using C-arm fluoroscopy. Ultrasound-guided RF neurotomy was performed to the C5 medial branches in all five cadavers. In the three cadavers not used in the first part of the study, ultrasound-guided RF neurotomy without C-arm fluoroscopic confirmation was performed to the C3-C7 medial branches. The accuracy of neurotomy was assessed by pathological examination of the cervical medial branches obtained through cadaver dissection. Results: In all five cadavers, the sonographic target point was identified in all C3-C7 segments with the 12 to 5 MHz linear transducer. In all 20 needle placements for the first and second cadavers, C-arm fluoroscopy validated proper needle tip positions. In all five cadavers, successful neurotomy was pathologically confirmed in 30 of 34 cervical medial branches. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided cervical medial branch neurotomy was successfully performed in 30 of 34 cervical medial branches in five cadavers. However, before eliminating fluoroscopic validation of final needle tip positioning, the technique should be validated in symptomatic patients

  1. Placement of iliosacral screws using 3D image-guided (O-Arm) technology and Stealth Navigation: comparison with traditional fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologis, A A; Burch, S; Pekmezci, M

    2016-05-01

    We compared the accuracy, operating time and radiation exposure of the introduction of iliosacral screws using O-arm/Stealth Navigation and standard fluoroscopy. Iliosacral screws were introduced percutaneously into the first sacral body (S1) of ten human cadavers, four men and six women. The mean age was 77 years (58 to 85). Screws were introduced using a standard technique into the left side of S1 using C-Arm fluoroscopy and then into the right side using O-Arm/Stealth Navigation. The radiation was measured on the surgeon by dosimeters placed under a lead thyroid shield and apron, on a finger, a hat and on the cadavers. There were no neuroforaminal breaches in either group. The set-up time for the O-Arm was significantly longer than for the C-Arm, while total time for placement of the screws was significantly shorter for the O-Arm than for the C-Arm (p = 0.001). The mean absorbed radiation dose during fluoroscopy was 1063 mRad (432.5 mRad to 4150 mRad). No radiation was detected on the surgeon during fluoroscopy, or when he left the room during the use of the O-Arm. The mean radiation detected on the cadavers was significantly higher in the O-Arm group (2710 mRem standard deviation (sd) 1922) than during fluoroscopy (11.9 mRem sd 14.8) (p Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:696-702. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Technique for Targeting Arteriovenous Malformations Using Frameless Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristov, Dimitre; Liu, Lina; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Moore, Teri; Sarmiento, Marily; Chang, Steve D.; Dodd, Robert; Marks, Michael; Do, Huy M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To integrate three-dimensional (3D) digital rotation angiography (DRA) and two-dimensional (2D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging into a targeting methodology enabling comprehensive image-guided robotic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: DRA geometric integrity was evaluated by imaging a phantom with embedded markers. Dedicated DSA acquisition modes with preset C-arm positions were configured. The geometric reproducibility of the presets was determined, and its impact on localization accuracy was evaluated. An imaging protocol composed of anterior-posterior and lateral DSA series in combination with a DRA run without couch displacement between acquisitions was introduced. Software was developed for registration of DSA and DRA (2D-3D) images to correct for: (a) small misalignments of the C-arm with respect to the estimated geometry of the set positions and (b) potential patient motion between image series. Within the software, correlated navigation of registered DRA and DSA images was incorporated to localize AVMs within a 3D image coordinate space. Subsequent treatment planning and delivery followed a standard image-guided robotic radiosurgery process. Results: DRA spatial distortions were typically smaller than 0.3 mm throughout a 145-mm x 145-mm x 145-mm volume. With 2D-3D image registration, localization uncertainties resulting from the achievable reproducibility of the C-arm set positions could be reduced to about 0.2 mm. Overall system-related localization uncertainty within the DRA coordinate space was 0.4 mm. Image-guided frameless robotic radiosurgical treatments with this technique were initiated. Conclusions: The integration of DRA and DSA into the process of nidus localization increases the confidence with which radiosurgical ablation of AVMs can be performed when using only an image-guided technique. Such an approach can increase patient comfort, decrease time pressure on clinical and

  3. Factors affecting residency rank-listing: A Maxdiff survey of graduating Canadian medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forgie Melissa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, graduating medical students consider many factors, including geographic, social, and academic, when ranking residency programs through the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS. The relative significance of these factors is poorly studied in Canada. It is also unknown how students differentiate between their top program choices. This survey study addresses the influence of various factors on applicant decision making. Methods Graduating medical students from all six Ontario medical schools were invited to participate in an online survey available for three weeks prior to the CaRMS match day in 2010. Max-Diff discrete choice scaling, multiple choice, and drop-list style questions were employed. The Max-Diff data was analyzed using a scaled simple count method. Data for how students distinguish between top programs was analyzed as percentages. Comparisons were made between male and female applicants as well as between family medicine and specialist applicants; statistical significance was determined by the Mann-Whitney test. Results In total, 339 of 819 (41.4% eligible students responded. The variety of clinical experiences and resident morale were weighed heavily in choosing a residency program; whereas financial incentives and parental leave attitudes had low influence. Major reasons that applicants selected their first choice program over their second choice included the distance to relatives and desirability of the city. Both genders had similar priorities when selecting programs. Family medicine applicants rated the variety of clinical experiences more importantly; whereas specialty applicants emphasized academic factors more. Conclusions Graduating medical students consider program characteristics such as the variety of clinical experiences and resident morale heavily in terms of overall priority. However, differentiation between their top two choice programs is often dependent on social/geographic factors

  4. Blinde Mimesis. Über Ordo und Kontingenz in der literaturgeschichtlichen Traditionsbildung (Horaz und Petron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Paul Schwindt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available me truncus illapsus cerebro / sustulerat, nisi Faunus ictum / dextra levasset, Mercurialium / custos virorum.(Hor. carm. 2, 17, 27–30... et ipse Trimalchio capillatus caduceum tenebat Minervaque ducente Romam intrabat.(Petron. 29, 3Es ist zuweilen das Schicksal besonders gut erforschter Texte, daß sie im System der Bezüge, der Quellen und Verweise, das die gelehrte Erklärung über, neben und unter ihnen errichtet hat (Hyper-, Para-, Prae- oder Subtext, zu verschwimmen, konturlos zu werden, ...

  5. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  6. Radiology equipment maintenance and contract procurement in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    Radiology equipment maintenance has a similar financial value to new device acquisition over the lifetime of the device. Comprehensive style contracts are dominant largely due to their ease of use and the potential to control budgetary costs, but costs are high. Creative procurement solutions can offer better value. The corrective portion of comprehensive contracts is estimated to be between 50% (Mobile C-Arm) to 92% (CT), which equates to $29.4 million; 80% of the total contract costs within the research population of this study. Many organizations could free up cash by better managing their maintenance costs, potentially creating funding opportunities for new equipment.

  7. Use-related risk analysis for medical devices based on improved FMEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Shuai, Ma; Wang, Zhu; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    In order to effectively analyze and control use-related risk of medical devices, quantitative methodologies must be applied. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive technique for error detection and risk reduction. In this article, an improved FMEA based on Fuzzy Mathematics and Grey Relational Theory is developed to better carry out user-related risk analysis for medical devices. As an example, the analysis process using this improved FMEA method for a certain medical device (C-arm X-ray machine) is described.

  8. Aplicación de productos derivados del insecto Dactylopius coccus Costa (Homóptera, Dactylopiidae Aplicación de productos derivados del insecto Dactylopius coccus Costa (Homóptera, Dactylopiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Vargas Rodríguez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available   Nowadays many industries want to replace synthetic dyes by natural, due to its harmful effects and the high contamination of the environment. Dactylopius coccus Costa (cochi­neal is an insect to obtain natural products that are used as dyes. The aim of this study was to promote the application of cochineal and the products derivates of these insect, in the dyeing of cotton fabric and in the coloration of a lipstick bullet at the laboratory. Was applied to the aqueous extract of cochineal on cotton fabric, obtaining homogeneous colors, with average values in the CIELab scale of: 43.81±0.33 L*, 44.64±0.15 a* y -4.03±0.55 b*. It also was applied the carmine pigment in the elaboration of a lipstick bullet, was obtai­ned consistent color with the following average values on the CIELab scale: 13.25±3.62 L*, 4.80±1.41 a* y -0.23±0.84 b*. Actualmente muchas industrias buscan sustituir los colorantes sintéticos por naturales, debido a su efecto nocivo y a la alta contaminación del medio ambiente. Del insecto Dactylopius coccus Costa (grana carmín se obtienen productos naturales que se pueden usar como colorantes, por lo que el objetivo de este trabajo fue difundir la aplicación del insecto grana carmín y los productos derivados del mismo en el teñido de una tela de algodón y en la coloración de una bala labial a nivel laboratorio. Al aplicar el extracto acuoso de la grana carmín sobre la tela de algodón, se consiguieron colores homogéneos, con valores promedio en la escala CIELab de: 43.81±0.33 L*, 44.64±0.15 a* y -4.03±0.55 b*. Asimismo al aplicar el pigmento laca carmín en la elaboración de una bala labial se lograron colores uniformes con los siguientes valores promedio en la escala CIELab: 13.25±3.62 L*, 4.80±1.41 a* y -0.23±0.84 b*.

  9. Extração de acido carminico e analise por cromatografia liquida de alta eficiencia

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto Nogueira Carvalho

    1996-01-01

    Resumo: A preocupação dos consumidores com o uso de substâncias artificiais em alimentos tem aumentado muito nos últimos anos e feito com que os fabricantes procurem substitutos para os corantes artificiais ainda utilizados. O carmim de cochonilha, nome dado ao complexo de alumínio e cálcio do ácido carmínico (ácido 7- b - D - glicopiranosil - 9, 10 - diidro - 3, 5, 6, 8 - tetraidroxil - 1 - metil - 9, 10 - dioxo - 2 - antracenocarboxílico), extraído das fêmeas da cochonilha (Dactylopius cocc...

  10. Comportamiento electroquímico de colorantes antraquinónicos en solución de solventes orgánicos

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Suárez, Jaime Fernando; Caram, José Alberto; Mirífico, María Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Se analizaron las condiciones en que varios colorantes antraquinónicos Alizarina (ALZ), Purpurina (PP) y Ácido Carmínico (AC) pueden ser transformados electroquímicamente por voltamperometría cíclica. Se observo numerosos procesos electrorreducción y electro-oxidación en condiciones neutras, ácidas y básicas en varios disolventes. Para el sistema ALZ/DMF, se propone un mecanismo probable. El número, la corriente y el potencial de los procesos observados pueden ser racionalizados sobre la base...

  11. CARMINIC ACID EXTRACTION FROM USING COCHINEAL CLEANER TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Erazo, Erazo; Cárdenas Ruiz, R.; Woolcott Hurtado, J.; y Caso Huamaní, J. C.; J., M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new process for the extraction of carminic acid (ACAR) from cochineal using mass- separating agent R300 (MSA R300) and an organic solvent with affinity only with the ACAR. En este trabajo se presenta un nuevo procedimiento para la extracción de ácido carmínico (ACAR) a partir de la cochinilla utilizando un agente de separación másico R300 (MSA R300) y un solvente orgánico con afinidad sólo con el ACAR.

  12. Comportamiento electroquímico de colorantes antraquinónicos, azul de metileno, y compuestos afines en solución de solventes no-acuosos

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Suárez, Jaime Fernando

    2017-01-01

    El trabajo realizado en esta Tesis doctoral pretende contribuir a la electroquímica orgánica, particularmente, en el campo del comportamiento electroquímico de colorantes en solución de solventes no acuosos. Se estudia por voltamperometría cíclica (VC) el comportamiento de los colorantes azul de metileno, alizarina, purpurina, ácido carmínico, quinalizarina y rojo de alizarina S, y además un precursor para la síntesis de colorantes indigoides, la isatina. El comportamiento electroquímico de l...

  13. APLICACIÓN DE LA FOTOCATÁLISIS OXIDATIVA CON ZnO Y LUZ SOLAR PARA EL TRATAMIENTO DE AGUA CONTAMINADA CON COLORANTES INDUSTRIALES

    OpenAIRE

    ORTIZ ROMERO, DERLY DAVID

    2016-01-01

    RESUMEN El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo aplicar la fotocatálisis oxidativa con ZnO como fotocatalizador y luz solar para el tratamiento de agua contaminada con colorantes industriales. Para este fin; se validaron las técnicas analíticas necesarias para efectuar la investigación en los colorantes Amarillo Oro K–2R, Ácido Carmínico y Rodamina B; los métodos mostraron respuesta lineal, sensible y precisa para los tres colorantes; asimismo se realizó monitorización de la intensidad de...

  14. Bedside Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Using Portable X-Ray in Acute Severe Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushikesh Shah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute cholangitis require emergent biliary decompression. Those who are hemodynamically unstable on vasopressor support and mechanical ventilation are too critically ill to move outside of the intensive care unit. This prohibits performing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in the endoscopy unit. Fluoroscopic guidance is required to confirm deep biliary cannulation during ERCP. There are a few reported cases of bedside ERCP using portable C-arm fluoroscopy unit or ultrasound guided cannulation. We present a unique case of life-saving emergent bedside ERCP in a severely ill patient with cholangitis and septic shock, using simple portable X-ray to confirm biliary cannulation.

  15. Securing an OTL-HNS residency: how competitive is it? Comparing medical student perceptions to actual Canadian statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay-Rivest, E; Varma, N; Scott, G M; Manoukian, J J; Desrosiers, M; Vaccani, J P; Nguyen, L H P

    2017-02-27

    The residency match is an important event in an aspiring physician's career. Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (OTL-HNS) is a surgical specialty that has enjoyed high numbers of applicants to its residency programs. However, recent trends in Canada show a decline in first-choice applicants to several surgical fields. Factors thought to influence a medical student's choice include role models, career opportunities and work-life balance. The notion of perceived competitiveness is a factor that has not yet been explored. This study sought to compare competitiveness of OTL-HNS, as perceived by Canadian medical students to residency match statistics published yearly by CaRMS (Canadian Residency Matching Service), with the hope of informing future decisions of surgical residency programs. An electronic survey was created and distributed to all medical students enrolled in the 17 Canadian medical schools. After gathering demographic information, students were asked to rank what they perceived to be the five most competitive disciplines offered by CaRMS. They were also asked to rank surgical specialties from most to least competitive. Publically available data from CaRMS was then collected and analyzed to determine actual competitiveness of admissions to Canadian OTL-HNS residency programs. 1194 students, from first to fourth year of medical school, completed the survey. CaRMS statistics over the period from 2008 to 2014 demonstrated that the five most competitive specialties were Plastic Surgery, Dermatology, Ophthalmology, Emergency Medicine and OTL-HNS. Among surgical disciplines, OTL-HNS was third most competitive, where on average 72% of students match to their first-choice discipline. When students were questioned, 35% ranked OTL-HNS amongst the top five most competitive. On the other hand 72%, 74% and 80% recognized Opthalmology, Dermatology and Plastic Surgery as being among the five most competitive, respectively. We found that fourth-year medical students

  16. CT scan-guided percutaneous osteosynthesis of a complex, multifocal fracture of the pelvic girdle in a 14-year-old adolescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Pierre-Thomas; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie; Caudal, Amandine; El Hayek, Tony; Amoretti, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We report on a 14-year-old girl with minimally displaced pelvic girdle and acetabular roof fracture following motor vehicle trauma, treated percutaneously under CT and C-arm fluoroscopic guidance by an interventional radiologist. After informed consent from the patient's parents, under surgical aseptic conditions and under general anesthesia, three screws were positioned adequately under dual guidance by a radiologist and without immediate or long-term complication. The patient was mobilized 48 h after the procedure and resumed normal activities after 1 month. Even though the technique has been described before on adults, to our knowledge this is the first time it has been described on a pediatric patient. (orig.)

  17. Pengaruh Dividend Initiations dan Dividend Cut/Omissions terhadap Return Saham di Bursa Efek Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Dwi Ari Ambarwati

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates market reactions to initiations and cut/omissions of cash dividend payment. Consistent with prior literature, the result of this research tend to support the propositions that shareholders make considerable use of the information implicit in dividend announcement. Shareholders react positively significant to the dividend initiations announcement and negatively significant to the dividend cut/omissions announcement. A multiple regression model is formulated to identify the factors that contribute significantly to the capital gain (loss suffered by shareholders when firm decide to initiate (cut/omit dividend. Result indicate that, in conformity with the information content hypothesis, the shareholders’s respond to dividend initiations significantly depends on  the firm size and the cumulative return movement (CARM in the preceding period. Whereas, the shareholders’s re¬spond to dividend cut/omissions significantly depends on the cumulative return movement (CARM in the preced¬ing period and risk/corrected beta of the firm at alpha 1% and 5%.Keywords: Signaling hypothesis, Dividend initiations, dividend cut/omissions

  18. Research on Crowdsourcing Emergency Information Extraction of Based on Events' Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Jizhou; Ma, Weijun; Mao, Xi

    2018-01-01

    At present, the common information extraction method cannot extract the structured emergency event information accurately; the general information retrieval tool cannot completely identify the emergency geographic information; these ways also do not have an accurate assessment of these results of distilling. So, this paper proposes an emergency information collection technology based on event framework. This technique is to solve the problem of emergency information picking. It mainly includes emergency information extraction model (EIEM), complete address recognition method (CARM) and the accuracy evaluation model of emergency information (AEMEI). EIEM can be structured to extract emergency information and complements the lack of network data acquisition in emergency mapping. CARM uses a hierarchical model and the shortest path algorithm and allows the toponomy pieces to be joined as a full address. AEMEI analyzes the results of the emergency event and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of the event framework. Experiments show that event frame technology can solve the problem of emergency information drawing and provides reference cases for other applications. When the emergency disaster is about to occur, the relevant departments query emergency's data that has occurred in the past. They can make arrangements ahead of schedule which defense and reducing disaster. The technology decreases the number of casualties and property damage in the country and world. This is of great significance to the state and society.

  19. [Intraoperative augmented reality visualization. Current state of development and initial experiences with the CamC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidert, S; Wang, L; von der Heide, A; Navab, N; Euler, E

    2012-03-01

    The intraoperative application of augmented reality (AR) has so far mainly taken place in the field of endoscopy. Here, the camera image of the endoscope was augmented by computer graphics derived mostly from preoperative imaging. Due to the complex setup and operation of the devices, they have not yet become part of routine clinical practice. The Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm (CamC) that extends a classic C-arm by a video camera and mirror construction is characterized by its uncomplicated handling. It combines its video live stream geometrically correct with the acquired X-ray. The clinical application of the device in 43 cases showed the strengths of the device in positioning for X-ray acquisition, incision placement, K-wire placement, and instrument guidance. With its new function and the easy integration into the OR workflow of any procedure that requires X-ray imaging, the CamC has the potential to become the first widely used AR technology for orthopedic and trauma surgery.

  20. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the antioxidant and prooxidant activity of phenolic compounds obtained from grape (Vitis vinifera) pomace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotoras, Milena; Vivanco, Herman; Melo, Ricardo; Aguirre, María; Silva, Evelyn; Mendoza, Leonora

    2014-12-16

    The antioxidant and/or prooxidant ability of extracts obtained from wine waste were analyzed using in vitro and in vivo assays. Cyclic voltammetry was used as the in vitro assay to determine the antioxidant and/or prooxidant properties and, the in vivo effect on mycelial growth of the fungus Botrytis cinerea was evaluated. In addition, the prooxidant activity was evaluated by intracellular oxidation of compound 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in B. cinerea. The extracts used in this study were obtained from grape pomace of Cabernet Sauvignon, Carménère and Syrah varieties from the Misiones de Rengo Vineyard by simple extraction, using methanol/HCl 1% (v/v), ethanol 70% (v/v), or Soxhlet extraction. According to the results obtained, gallic acid was the most represented phenolic compound independent of grape variety and extraction method. In addition, vanillic acid; protocatechuic acid, syringic acid, quercetin and kaempferol were found in the extracts. From this study it was possible concluded that, depending of the method of extraction of the grape residues and the grape variety (Cabernet Sauvignon, Carménère and Syrah), the extracts showed antioxidant and/or prooxidant activity. However, no correlation can be established between the anodic oxidation potentials of the extracts and their effect on the fungus B. cinerea.

  1. TECNOLOGÍAS PARA LA DECOLORACIÓN DE TINTES ÍNDIGO E ÍNDIGO CARMÍN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUZ QUINTERO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Los tratamientos de agua residual textil con los tintes índigo e índigo carmín son muy complejos y variados. La eficiencia varía de acuerdo al método empleado. Este artículo revisa las diferentes tecnologías de tratamiento para la remoción de índigo e índigo carmín; eficiencias de remoción, cultivos empleados, sistemas de procesos, factores operacionales, entre otros aspectos, con el fin de establecer criterios para seleccionar el mejor proceso de tratamiento y conocer los alcances de la investigación en la decoloración de índigo. La revisión comienza con el proceso de fijación en el teñido de índigo y luego describe los estudios de tratamiento de efluente con índigo a escala laboratorio y a gran escala. Existen tecnologías físicoquímicas, químicas, físicas y biológicas para la decoloración de agua con índigo. La elección del tratamiento está en función de la calidad de agua del efluente, el uso, los costos de la tecnología, ventajas y desventajas.

  2. 3D roadmap in neuroangiography: technique and clinical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederman, Michael; Andersson, T.; Babic, D.; Homan, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first clinical results obtained with a novel technique: the three-dimensional [3D] roadmap. The major difference from the standard 2D digital roadmap technique is that the newly developed 3D roadmap is based on a rotational angiography acquisition technique with the two-dimensional [2D] fluoroscopic image as an overlay. Data required for an accurate superimposition of the previously acquired 3D reconstructed image on the interactively made 2D fluoroscopy image, in real time, are stored in the 3D workstation and constitute the calibration dataset. Both datasets are spatially aligned in real time; thus, the 3D image is accurately superimposed on the 2D fluoroscopic image regardless of any change in C-arm position or magnification. The principal advantage of the described roadmap method is that one contrast injection allows the C-arm to be positioned anywhere in the space and allows alterations in the distance between the x-ray tube and the image intensifier as well as changes in image magnification. In the clinical setting, the 3D roadmap facilitated intravascular neuronavigation with concurrent reduction of procedure time and use of contrast medium. (orig.)

  3. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide Versus Radiotherapy Alone In Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme - An Experience at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S; Pandit, P N; Kishor, K

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (WHO grade IV glioma) still remains a dreadful diagnosis in oncology with the median survival ranging between 12 to 17 months, despite the recent advances in its management. It is the most common malignant primary tumour in adults(13). The standard of care is Maximal Safe Resection followed by Concomitant ChemoRadiotherapy. During the period 2006 to 2010 at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital (PMCH) in India, a study was conducted on 37 newly diagnosed GBM cases in which the control-arm (c-arm) received Conventional Radiotherapy (60Gy/30#) only whereas the study arm (s-arm) received Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide. The median survival was 15.4 months in the s-arm as compared to 12.4 months in the c-arm. The OS showed a significant improvement with p-value of 0.05 and PFS also showed a benefit with a p-value of 0.005. The results were encouraging with improvement in OS as well as PFS in the s-arm and were at par with the other similar studies conducted in different parts of the world.

  4. In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluation of the Antioxidant and Prooxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds Obtained from Grape (Vitis vinifera Pomace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Cotoras

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and/or prooxidant ability of extracts obtained from wine waste were analyzed using in vitro and in vivo assays. Cyclic voltammetry was used as the in vitro assay to determine the antioxidant and/or prooxidant properties and, the in vivo effect on mycelial growth of the fungus Botrytis cinerea was evaluated. In addition, the prooxidant activity was evaluated by intracellular oxidation of compound 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA in B. cinerea. The extracts used in this study were obtained from grape pomace of Cabernet Sauvignon, Carménère and Syrah varieties from the Misiones de Rengo Vineyard by simple extraction, using methanol/HCl 1% (v/v, ethanol 70% (v/v, or Soxhlet extraction. According to the results obtained, gallic acid was the most represented phenolic compound independent of grape variety and extraction method. In addition, vanillic acid; protocatechuic acid, syringic acid, quercetin and kaempferol were found in the extracts. From this study it was possible concluded that, depending of the method of extraction of the grape residues and the grape variety (Cabernet Sauvignon, Carménère and Syrah, the extracts showed antioxidant and/or prooxidant activity. However, no correlation can be established between the anodic oxidation potentials of the extracts and their effect on the fungus B. cinerea.

  5. A practical laboratory study simulating the percutaneous lumbar transforaminal epidural injection: training model in fresh cadaveric sheep spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslu, Husnu

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory training models are essential for developing and refining treatment skills before the clinical application of surgical and invasive procedures. A simple simulation model is needed for young trainees to learn how to handle instruments, and to perform safe lumbar transforaminal epidural injections. Our aim is to present a model of a fresh cadaveric sheep lumbar spine that simulates the lumbar transforaminal epidural injection. The material consists of a 2-year-old fresh cadaveric sheep spine. A 4-step approach was designed for lumbar transforaminal epidural injection under C-arm scopy. For the lumbar transforaminal epidural injection, the fluoroscope was adjusted to get a proper oblique view while the material was stabilized in a prone position. The procedure then begin, using the C-arm guidance scopy. The model simulates well the steps of standard lumbar transforaminal epidural injections in the human spine. The cadaveric sheep spine represents a good method for training and it simulates fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injection procedures performed in the human spine.

  6. Estructura de autocorrelación espacial de la actividad comercial en los municipios de la Región de Murcia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana María Vivo Molina

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo, se realiza una aproximación al estudio de la dependencia entre variable económica y localización espacial aplicando la metodología de la Teoría de las Variables Regionalizadas (TVR. En particular, nos centraremos en la localización de actividades económico-comerciales de los municipios de la Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia (CARM. Aplicando métodos estadísticos para la reducción de datos que nos permiten eliminar información redundante, detectamos estructuras latentes en el desarrollo económico-comercial dentro de los municipios de la CARM. La metodología TVR nos permite constatar la presencia de correlación espacial, considerando los municipios de la Región de Murcia georeferenciados dentro del plano topográfico, en las estructuras latentes detectadas.

  7. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D–2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM = 0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE = 0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional

  8. Detecting medication errors in the New Zealand pharmacovigilance database: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunac, Desireé L; Tatley, Michael V

    2011-01-01

    Despite the traditional focus being adverse drug reactions (ADRs), pharmacovigilance centres have recently been identified as a potentially rich and important source of medication error data. To identify medication errors in the New Zealand Pharmacovigilance database (Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring [CARM]), and to describe the frequency and characteristics of these events. A retrospective analysis of the CARM pharmacovigilance database operated by the New Zealand Pharmacovigilance Centre was undertaken for the year 1 January-31 December 2007. All reports, excluding those relating to vaccines, clinical trials and pharmaceutical company reports, underwent a preventability assessment using predetermined criteria. Those events deemed preventable were subsequently classified to identify the degree of patient harm, type of error, stage of medication use process where the error occurred and origin of the error. A total of 1412 reports met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed, of which 4.3% (61/1412) were deemed preventable. Not all errors resulted in patient harm: 29.5% (18/61) were 'no harm' errors but 65.5% (40/61) of errors were deemed to have been associated with some degree of patient harm (preventable adverse drug events [ADEs]). For 5.0% (3/61) of events, the degree of patient harm was unable to be determined as the patient outcome was unknown. The majority of preventable ADEs (62.5% [25/40]) occurred in adults aged 65 years and older. The medication classes most involved in preventable ADEs were antibacterials for systemic use and anti-inflammatory agents, with gastrointestinal and respiratory system disorders the most common adverse events reported. For both preventable ADEs and 'no harm' events, most errors were incorrect dose and drug therapy monitoring problems consisting of failures in detection of significant drug interactions, past allergies or lack of necessary clinical monitoring. Preventable events were mostly related to the prescribing and

  9. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional calibration is not feasible

  10. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D–2D image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Siewerdsen, J H; Ehtiati, T

    2016-01-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  11. Real-time image guidance in laparoscopic liver surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenngott, Hannes G.; Wagner, Martin; Gondan, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic liver surgery is particularly challenging owing to restricted access, risk of bleeding and lack of haptic feedback. Navigation systems have the potential to improve information on the exact position of intrahepatic tumors, and thus facilitate oncological resection....... This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a commercially available augmented reality (AR) guidance system employing intraoperative robotic C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for laparoscopic liver surgery. Methods: A human liver-like phantom with sixteen target fiducials was used to evaluate...... the Syngo iPilot® AR system. Subsequently, the system was used for the laparoscopic resection of a hepatocellular carcinoma in segment 7 of a 50-year-old male patient. Results: In the phantom experiment the AR system showed a mean target registration error of 0.96 mm ± 0.52 mm with a maximum error of 2...

  12. The magazine feminal: photography and visualization of the feminine contribution to the educational reform in Catalonia 1907-1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat SUREDA GARCIA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Barcelona, between 1907 and 1917, a monthly feminine supplement called Feminal run by Carme Karr i Alfonsetti was published in the magazine Ilustració Catalana. Feminal systematically resorted to photographs to round off its reports on current affairs. The orientation Karr sets the publication responds to the ideas of conservative feminism that advocate for a greater public presence of women, without ceasing to be a wife and a mother, by modernizing their education. These aims are framed in and committed to the broad Regenerationist programme promoted by the Catalan industrial bourgeoisie at the time, with education as one of its main axes. In this article we analyse the role of photographs in reinforcing the modernizing discourse of education.

  13. Navigation-aided visualization of lumbosacral nerves for anterior sacroiliac plate fixation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Masaki; Nishii, Takashi; Sakai, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2014-06-01

    Anterior sacroiliac joint plate fixation for unstable pelvic ring fractures avoids soft tissue problems in the buttocks; however, the lumbosacral nerves lie in close proximity to the sacroiliac joint and may be injured during the procedure. A 49 year-old woman with a type C pelvic ring fracture was treated with an anterior sacroiliac plate using a computed tomography (CT)-three-dimensional (3D)-fluoroscopy matching navigation system, which visualized the lumbosacral nerves as well as the iliac and sacral bones. We used a flat panel detector 3D C-arm, which made it possible to superimpose our preoperative CT-based plan on the intra-operative 3D-fluoroscopic images. No postoperative complications were noted. Intra-operative lumbosacral nerve visualization using computer navigation was useful to recognize the 'at-risk' area for nerve injury during anterior sacroiliac plate fixation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Robust methods for automatic image-to-world registration in cone-beam CT interventional guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, H.; Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time surgical navigation relies on accurate image-to-world registration to align the coordinate systems of the image and patient. Conventional manual registration can present a workflow bottleneck and is prone to manual error and intraoperator variability. This work reports alternative means of automatic image-to-world registration, each method involving an automatic registration marker (ARM) used in conjunction with C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT). The first involves a Known-Model registration method in which the ARM is a predefined tool, and the second is a Free-Form method in which the ARM is freely configurable. Methods: Studies were performed using a prototype C-arm for CBCT and a surgical tracking system. A simple ARM was designed with markers comprising a tungsten sphere within infrared reflectors to permit detection of markers in both x-ray projections and by an infrared tracker. The Known-Model method exercised a predefined specification of the ARM in combination with 3D-2D registration to estimate the transformation that yields the optimal match between forward projection of the ARM and the measured projection images. The Free-Form method localizes markers individually in projection data by a robust Hough transform approach extended from previous work, backprojected to 3D image coordinates based on C-arm geometric calibration. Image-domain point sets were transformed to world coordinates by rigid-body point-based registration. The robustness and registration accuracy of each method was tested in comparison to manual registration across a range of body sites (head, thorax, and abdomen) of interest in CBCT-guided surgery, including cases with interventional tools in the radiographic scene. Results: The automatic methods exhibited similar target registration error (TRE) and were comparable or superior to manual registration for placement of the ARM within ∼200 mm of C-arm isocenter. Marker localization in projection data was robust across all

  15. Prospective evaluation of MR overlay on real-time fluoroscopy for percutaneous extremity biopsies of bone lesions visible on MRI but not on CT in children in the interventional radiology suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Vatsky, Seth; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Zhu, Xiaowei; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Setser, Randolph M. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often provides better visualization of bone marrow abnormalities than computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy, but bone biopsies are usually performed using conventional CT or, more recently, C-arm CT guidance. Biopsies of bone lesions solely visible on MRI are often challenging to localize and require the operator to review the MRI on a separate console to correlate with MRI anatomical landmarks during the biopsy. The MR overlay technique facilitates such biopsies in the angiographic suite by allowing the pre-procedural 3-D MRI to be overlaid on intraprocedural 2-D fluoroscopy. This study describes our initial experience with the MR overlay technique in the angiography suite during pediatric percutaneous extremity bone biopsies of lesions visible on MRI but not on CT or fluoroscopy and demonstrates its utility in relevant clinical cases. (orig.)

  16. Removal of a Wire Brush Bristle from the Hypopharynx Using Suspension, Microscope, and Fluoroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Naunheim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wire brush bristles are an increasingly recognized hazard that can present as a foreign body in the aerodigestive tract. Due to their small size and tendency to become embedded in surrounding tissue, these small metallic bristles present a unique operative challenge to otolaryngologists. Here we present a case of a 40-year-old woman who underwent endoscopic extraction of a wire bristle from the posterior pharyngeal wall using suspension, microscopy, and C-arm fluoroscopy. We believe this is the first published case of an endoscopic removal of a buried foreign body in the hypopharynx using these methods of localization concurrently. By leveraging multiple techniques for visualization, surgeons can avoid open exploration while ensuring complete removal of the object. Additionally, this case highlights the importance of regulatory oversight and consumer awareness of the hazards of grill brushes.

  17. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in the Field of Interventional Oncology of the Liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bapst, Blanche, E-mail: blanchebapst@hotmail.com; Lagadec, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.lagadec@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France); Breguet, Romain, E-mail: romain.breguet@hcuge.ch [University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Vilgrain, Valérie, E-mail: Valerie.vilgrain@bjn.aphp.fr; Ronot, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.ronot@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France)

    2016-01-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that provides computed tomographic images using a rotational C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector as part of the Angiography suite. The aim of this technique is to provide additional information to conventional 2D imaging to improve the performance of interventional liver oncology procedures (intraarterial treatments such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy, and percutaneous tumor ablation). CBCT provides accurate tumor detection and targeting, periprocedural guidance, and post-procedural evaluation of treatment success. This technique can be performed during intraarterial or intravenous contrast agent administration with various acquisition protocols to highlight liver tumors, liver vessels, or the liver parenchyma. The purpose of this review is to present an extensive overview of published data on CBCT in interventional oncology of the liver, for both percutaneous ablation and intraarterial procedures.

  18. Prospective evaluation of MR overlay on real-time fluoroscopy for percutaneous extremity biopsies of bone lesions visible on MRI but not on CT in children in the interventional radiology suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Vatsky, Seth; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Zhu, Xiaowei; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie; Setser, Randolph M.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often provides better visualization of bone marrow abnormalities than computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy, but bone biopsies are usually performed using conventional CT or, more recently, C-arm CT guidance. Biopsies of bone lesions solely visible on MRI are often challenging to localize and require the operator to review the MRI on a separate console to correlate with MRI anatomical landmarks during the biopsy. The MR overlay technique facilitates such biopsies in the angiographic suite by allowing the pre-procedural 3-D MRI to be overlaid on intraprocedural 2-D fluoroscopy. This study describes our initial experience with the MR overlay technique in the angiography suite during pediatric percutaneous extremity bone biopsies of lesions visible on MRI but not on CT or fluoroscopy and demonstrates its utility in relevant clinical cases. (orig.)

  19. Development of a quality assurance protocol for peripheral subtraction imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, C.; Murphy, D.; O'Hare, N.

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral subtraction scanning is used to trace the blood vessels of upper and lower extremities. In some modern C-arm fluoroscopy systems this function is performed automatically. In this mode the system is programmed to advance and stop in a series of steps taking a mask image at each point. The system then repeats each step after the contrast agent has been injected, and produces a DSA image at each point. Current radiographic quality assurance protocols do not address this feature. This note reviews methods of measuring system vibration while images are being acquired in automated peripheral stepping. The effect on image quality pre- and post-image processing is assessed. Results show that peripheral stepping DSA does not provide the same degree of image quality as static DSA. In examining static test objects, the major cause of the reduction in image quality is misregistration due to vibration of the image intensifier during imaging. (author)

  20. Thermal Epiphysiodesis Made with RFA. A New Treatment for LLD?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Rahbek, Ole; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans

    at two ablation sites (lateral and medial) identified using a C-arm. Under general anesthesia, a probe was inserted and the ablation performed. T1, T2 and water content MR images were obtained right after the procedure; 12 weeks later for 6 animals, and 6 months later for the last 2 ones. The length......Thermal Epiphysiodesis Made with Radio Frequency Ablation, RFA in a Porcine Model Shiguetomi-Medina JM, Rahbek O, Stødkilde-Jørgensen H, Møller-Madsen B Introduction Anisomelia is often treated with epiphysiodesis. Epiphysiodesis has become the most commonly used procedure for leg length...... methods. These results show that this technique can arrest growth in a safe and effective way. However, studies must be performed to obtain more evidence of both the safety and effectiveness of the procedure....

  1. Il «pulvis et umbra» oraziano in alcuni poeti latini tardoantichi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Castelnuovo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available L’affermazione di Orazio pulvis et umbra sumus (Carm. 4.7.16 ha lasciato un’impronta nei poeti successivi? Scopo dell’articolo è analizzare l’influenza di un tale verso su tre autori tardoantichi: Ausonio, Paolino di Nola e Venanzio Fortunato. Essi si rifanno al modello in modi differenti: se Ausonio si limita a riprodurre il verso di Orazio, Paolino, invece, riprende i termini pulvis et umbra aggiungendovi sine Christo, per mettere in luce la diversità fra la visione pagana e la sua concezione di vita rinnovata dalla conversione. Inoltre, echi dalle Scritture nei due passi di Paolino e di Venanzio portano a una ricchezza di significato dovuta all’incontro fra la tradizione classica e quella biblica. Un’appendice tenta di rispondere alla domanda su quale testo del Salterio conoscesse Paolino.

  2. A characteristic of angiographic cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Tadashi; Take, Toshio; Nakazawa, Yasuo; Kinouchi, Katsunori

    2009-01-01

    Angiographic cone-beam CT, called DynaCT by SIEMENS, is a 3D imaging tool reconstructed from projection data by a rotational C-arm with a flat panel detector. It can visualize low-contrast objects such as soft tissue or small vessels as well as high-contrast structures such as enhanced vessels or bone. We need to understand its image characteristics and dose distribution during 200 degree rotation around a patient. In this research, we evaluated fundamental characteristics and dose effectiveness for optimized clinical images. DynaCT, including soft tissue information and isochronal voxel data along the z-axis, could provide enough CT-like image quality for interventional radiology (IVR) use. In addition, evaluation of accumulated dose distribution helped us to predict and avoid the occurrence of radiodermatitis. Thus, DynaCT is useful as a support and navigation tool for IVR. (author)

  3. Analysis of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in vitro using classification association rule mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqi; Wang, Yanbo Justin; Bañares-Alcántara, René; Coenen, Frans; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, data mining is used to analyze the data on the differentiation of mammalian Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), aiming at discovering known and hidden rules governing MSC differentiation, following the establishment of a web-based public database containing experimental data on the MSC proliferation and differentiation. To this effect, a web-based public interactive database comprising the key parameters which influence the fate and destiny of mammalian MSCs has been constructed and analyzed using Classification Association Rule Mining (CARM) as a data-mining technique. The results show that the proposed approach is technically feasible and performs well with respect to the accuracy of (classification) prediction. Key rules mined from the constructed MSC database are consistent with experimental observations, indicating the validity of the method developed and the first step in the application of data mining to the study of MSCs.

  4. Motorization of a surgical microscope for intra-operative navigation and intuitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, M; Schweikard, A

    2010-09-01

    During surgical procedures, various medical systems, e.g. microscope or C-arm, are used. Their precise and repeatable manual positioning can be very cumbersome and interrupts the surgeon's work flow. Robotized systems can assist the surgeon but they require suitable kinematics and control. However, positioning must be fast, flexible and intuitive. We describe a fully motorized surgical microscope. Hardware components as well as implemented applications are specified. The kinematic equations are described and a novel control concept is proposed. Our microscope combines fast manual handling with accurate, automatic positioning. Intuitive control is provided by a small remote control mounted to one of the surgical instruments. Positioning accuracy and repeatability are system assists the surgeon, so that he can position the microscope precisely and repeatedly without interrupting the clinical workflow. The combination of manual und automatic control guarantees fast and flexible positioning during surgical procedures. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Intraoperative digital angiography: Peripheral vascular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, K.; Reifsteck, J.E.; Binet, E.F.; Fleisher, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative digital angiography is the procedure of choice for the peripheral vascular surgeon who wishes to evaluate his results before terminating anesthesia. Two operating suites at the John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital are equipped with permanent ceiling-mounted Philips C-arm fluoroscopes and share an ADAC 4100 digital angiographic system. In the last 18 months, 40 peripheral vascular intraoperative digital angiographic procedures have been performed, in all but two cases using direct arterial puncture. In 65% of cases, the intraoperative study showed no significant abnormality. In 12.5%, minor abnormalities not requiring reoperation were seen. In 22.5% of cases, the intraoperative digital angiogram revealed a significant abnormality requiring immediate operative revision. None of the patients who underwent reoperation experienced postoperative sequelae. Intraoperative digital angiography is useful in identifying complications of peripheral vascular operations

  6. Obtenção e avaliação da estabilidade de carmim de cochonilha (Dactylopius coccus)

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Martins

    1997-01-01

    Resumo: Neste trabalho foi obtido um corante natural, de coloração vermelha, a partir do inseto denominado cochonilha (Dactylopius coccus Costa). Para a obtenção do corante foram analisados vários fatores: pH, tempo e concentração de reagentes. Procurou-se através da variação dos fatores se obter um corante de coloração visualmente igual ao comercial e com alto teor de pigmento. O corante foi obtido sob as formas de pó e líquido. O teor médio de ácido carmínico obtido no carmim foi de 57,35%,...

  7. WASTE REDUCTION IN CARMINIC ACID PRODUCTION BY APPLYING PINCH TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Erazo E., Raymundo; Cárdenas R., Jorge L.; Woolcott H., Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated approach to the design and analisis of heat exchanger networrks (HEN) Is outlined. A case study is used, carminic acid,, to illustrate this integrated approach, to emphasize the economy of 60% energy with respect to convectional process. Se esbozó un análisis de integración de energía por aproximación para el diseño y análisis de una red de transferencia de calor (HEN). Se utilizó un caso estudio, ácido carmínico, para ilustrar esta vía de integración por aproximación y resal...

  8. Radiation exposure during ureteroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, D.H.; Cubler-Goodman, A.

    1990-01-01

    Use of fluoroscopy during ureteroscopy increases the risk of radiation exposure to the urologist and patient. Radiation entrance dosages were measured at skin level in 37 patients, and at the neck, trunk and finger of the urologist, and neck and trunk of the circulating nurse. Radiation exposure time was measured in 79 patients, and was related to the purpose of the procedure and the type of ureteroscope used, whether rigid or flexible. Exposure could be minimized by decreasing the fluoroscopy time. A portable C-arm fluoroscopy unit with electronic imaging and last image hold mode should be used to minimize exposure time. Lead aprons and thyroid shields should be used by the urologist and other personnel in the endoscopy room

  9. Maximum Likelihood-Based Methods for Target Velocity Estimation with Distributed MIMO Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxin Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation problem for target velocity is addressed in this in the scenario with a distributed multi-input multi-out (MIMO radar system. A maximum likelihood (ML-based estimation method is derived with the knowledge of target position. Then, in the scenario without the knowledge of target position, an iterative method is proposed to estimate the target velocity by updating the position information iteratively. Moreover, the Carmér-Rao Lower Bounds (CRLBs for both scenarios are derived, and the performance degradation of velocity estimation without the position information is also expressed. Simulation results show that the proposed estimation methods can approach the CRLBs, and the velocity estimation performance can be further improved by increasing either the number of radar antennas or the information accuracy of the target position. Furthermore, compared with the existing methods, a better estimation performance can be achieved.

  10. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Orthopedic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H; Elzaki, A.; Sam, A.K.; Sulieman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The number of orthopedic procedures requiring the use of the fluoroscopic guidance has increased over the recent years. Consequently the patient exposed to un avoidable radiation doses. The aim of the current study was to evaluate patient radiation dose during these procedures.37 patients under went dynamic hip screw (DHS) and dynamic cannulated screw (DCS) were evaluated using calibrated Thermolumincent Dosimeters (TLDs), under carm fluoroscopic machines ,in three centers in Khartoum-Sudan. The mean Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was 7.9 m Gy per procedure. The bone marrow and gonad organ exposed to significant doses. No correlation was found between ESD and Body Mass Index (BMI), or patient weight. Well correlation was found between kilo voltage applied and ESD. Orthopedic surgeries delivered lower radiation dose to patients than cardiac catheterization or hysterosalpingraphy (HSG) procedures. More study should be implemented to follow radiation dose before surgery and after surgery

  11. Der Lebenszyklus von Porphyrostromium obscurum (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmann, P.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the sexuality and the heteromorphous life cycle of Erythrotrichia ciliaris provided decisive criteria for the establishment of the genus Erythrotrichopeltis (Kornmann, 1984). This genus was transferred by Wynne (1986) to Porphyrostromium Trevisan 1848. In the present study Erythrotrichia obscura, the original species of Berthold's (1882) classical observations on the sexuality of this genus, is incorporated to Porphyrostromium. Previously regarded as synonyms, Porphyrostromium ciliare (Carm. ex Harv.) Wynne and P. obscurum (Berth.) nov. comb. proved to be distinct species, differing both in the filamentous and in the peltoid phases of their life cycle. The relationship between P. ciliare and P. boryanum (Montagne) Trevisan, type species of the genus, may only be elucidated by future investigations on the basis of field collected material.

  12. CT scan-guided percutaneous osteosynthesis of a complex, multifocal fracture of the pelvic girdle in a 14-year-old adolescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagne, Pierre-Thomas; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie; Caudal, Amandine; El Hayek, Tony; Amoretti, Nicolas [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Nice (France)

    2014-08-15

    We report on a 14-year-old girl with minimally displaced pelvic girdle and acetabular roof fracture following motor vehicle trauma, treated percutaneously under CT and C-arm fluoroscopic guidance by an interventional radiologist. After informed consent from the patient's parents, under surgical aseptic conditions and under general anesthesia, three screws were positioned adequately under dual guidance by a radiologist and without immediate or long-term complication. The patient was mobilized 48 h after the procedure and resumed normal activities after 1 month. Even though the technique has been described before on adults, to our knowledge this is the first time it has been described on a pediatric patient. (orig.)

  13. Caracterització dels materials i de la tècnica pictòrica

    OpenAIRE

    Rocabayera Viñas, Rosa

    2004-01-01

    Aquest estudi està basat en l’aplicació de diverses tècniques analítiques i instrumentals, amb la finalitat de determinar la tècnica pictòrica i els materials de la pintura de la Mare de Déu del Carme intercedint a favor de les ànimes del purgatori. D’aquesta manera es pot establir la forma de treballar del pintor i deduir les seves característiques artístiques. També és important per tal de comprendre les alteracions observades, ajudar a determinar-ne les causes i decidir el procés de restau...

  14. Un cas d’athéisme spirituel aux Pays-Bas espagnols : les Dix Lamentations de Jérôme Gratien (1611

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Houdard

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Il ne s’agira pas de présenter « l’athéisme spirituel », mais un cas, voire une catégorie d’athéisme, explicitement désignée comme « athéisme spirituel » par le carme espagnol Jérôme Gratien de la Mère de Dieu dans son ouvrage Les Dix lamentations du misérable état des athéistes de notre temps qui paraît en espagnol à Bruxelles en 1611. « Les athéistes spirituels ou perfectistes » constituent la cinquième des 7 espèces d’athéisme, que l’ouvrage se donne pour mission de décrire, pour les éradi...

  15. Approximate truncation robust computed tomography—ATRACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennerlein, Frank; Maier, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We present an approximate truncation robust algorithm to compute tomographic images (ATRACT). This algorithm targets at reconstructing volumetric images from cone-beam projections in scenarios where these projections are highly truncated in each dimension. It thus facilitates reconstructions of small subvolumes of interest, without involving prior knowledge about the object. Our method is readily applicable to medical C-arm imaging, where it may contribute to new clinical workflows together with a considerable reduction of x-ray dose. We give a detailed derivation of ATRACT that starts from the conventional Feldkamp filtered-backprojection algorithm and that involves, as one component, a novel original formula for the inversion of the two-dimensional Radon transform. Discretization and numerical implementation are discussed and reconstruction results from both, simulated projections and first clinical data sets are presented. (paper)

  16. Real-time fluoroscopic needle guidance in the interventional radiology suite using navigational software for percutaneous bone biopsies in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Srinivasan, Abhay; Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Vatsky, Seth; Zhu, Xiaowei; Keller, Marc S.; Cahill, Anne Marie [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Setser, Randolph M. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States); Hwang, Tiffany J. [University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Girard, Erin [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Navigational software provides real-time fluoroscopic needle guidance for percutaneous procedures in the Interventional Radiology (IR) suite. We describe our experience with navigational software for pediatric percutaneous bone biopsies in the IR suite and compare technical success, diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose and procedure time with that of CT-guided biopsies. Pediatric bone biopsies performed using navigational software (Syngo iGuide, Siemens Healthcare) from 2011 to 2016 were prospectively included and anatomically matched CT-guided bone biopsies from 2008 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed with institutional review board approval. C-arm CT protocols used for navigational software-assisted cases included institution-developed low-dose (0.1/0.17 μGy/projection), regular-dose (0.36 μGy/projection), or a combination of low-dose/regular-dose protocols. Estimated effective radiation dose and procedure times were compared between software-assisted and CT-guided biopsies. Twenty-six patients (15 male; mean age: 10 years) underwent software-assisted biopsies (15 pelvic, 7 lumbar and 4 lower extremity) and 33 patients (13 male; mean age: 9 years) underwent CT-guided biopsies (22 pelvic, 7 lumbar and 4 lower extremity). Both modality biopsies resulted in a 100% technical success rate. Twenty-five of 26 (96%) software-assisted and 29/33 (88%) CT-guided biopsies were diagnostic. Overall, the effective radiation dose was significantly lower in software-assisted than CT-guided cases (3.0±3.4 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.02). The effective dose difference was most dramatic in software-assisted cases using low-dose C-arm CT (1.2±1.8 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.001) or combined low-dose/regular-dose C-arm CT (1.9±2.4 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.04), whereas effective dose was comparable in software-assisted cases using regular-dose C-arm CT (6.0±3.5 vs. 6.6±7.7 mSv, P=0.7). Mean procedure time was significantly lower for software-assisted cases (91±54 vs. 141±68 min, P=0

  17. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  18. CAVAREV-an open platform for evaluating 3D and 4D cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim; Lauritsch, Guenter; Keil, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction of cardiac vasculature, e.g. the coronary arteries, using C-arm CT (rotational angiography) is an active and challenging field of research. There are numerous publications on different reconstruction techniques. However, there is still a lack of comparability of achieved results for several reasons: foremost, datasets used in publications are not open to public and thus experiments are not reproducible by other researchers. Further, the results highly depend on the vasculature motion, i.e. cardiac and breathing motion patterns which are also not comparable across publications. We aim to close this gap by providing an open platform, called Cavarev (CArdiac VAsculature Reconstruction EValuation). It features two simulated dynamic projection datasets based on the 4D XCAT phantom with contrasted coronary arteries which was derived from patient data. In the first dataset, the vasculature undergoes a continuous periodic motion. The second dataset contains aperiodic heart motion by including additional breathing motion. The geometry calibration and acquisition protocol were obtained from a real-world C-arm system. For qualitative evaluation of the reconstruction results, the correlation of the morphology is used. Two segmentation-based quality measures are introduced which allow us to assess the 3D and 4D reconstruction quality. They are based on the spatial overlap of the vasculature reconstruction with the ground truth. The measures enable a comprehensive analysis and comparison of reconstruction results independent from the utilized reconstruction algorithm. An online platform (www.cavarev.com) is provided where the datasets can be downloaded, researchers can manage and publish algorithm results and download a reference C++ and Matlab implementation.

  19. Focal spot size reduction using asymmetric collimation to enable reduced anode angles with a conventional angiographic x-ray tube for use with high resolution detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2017-03-01

    The high-resolution requirements for neuro-endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) necessitate the use of a small focal-spot size; however, the maximum tube output limits for such small focal-spot sizes may not enable sufficient x-ray fluence after attenuation through the human head to support the desired image quality. This may necessitate the use of a larger focal spot, thus contributing to the overall reduction in resolution. A method for creating a higher-output small effective focal spot based on the line-focus principle has been demonstrated and characterized. By tilting the C-arm gantry, the anode-side of the x-ray field-of-view is accessible using a detector placed off-axis. This tilted central axis diminishes the resultant focal spot size in the anode-cathode direction by the tangent of the effective anode angle, allowing a medium focal spot to be used in place of a small focal spot with minimal losses in resolution but with increased tube output. Images were acquired of two different objects at the central axis, and with the C-arm tilted away from the central axis at 1° increments from 0°-7°. With standard collimation settings, only 6° was accessible, but using asymmetric extended collimation a maximum of 7° was accessed for enhanced comparisons. All objects were positioned perpendicular to the anode-cathode direction and images were compared qualitatively. The increasing advantage of the off-axis focal spots was quantitatively evidenced at each subsequent angle using the Generalized Measured-Relative Object Detectability metric (GM-ROD). This anode-tilt method is a simple and robust way of increasing tube output for a small field-of-view detector without diminishing the overall apparent resolution for neuro-EIGIs.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR for small hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma and the concordance rate of Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jae Seok; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yu, Mi Hye; Lee, Dong Ho; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-01-01

    To assess diagnostic accuracy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR for small hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) detected by C-arm CT and concordance rate of Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS). In this retrospective study, we recruited 4,544 patients suspected of having HCC underwent C-arm CT from November 2008 to May 2013. Among these patients, gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR was performed in 167 patients with HCC (n = 379; 257 > 1 cm, 122 ≤ 1 cm). HCC was confirmed by MR, CT, or follow-up images. Two radiologists graded likelihood of HCC and assessed MR features. Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis was performed. All HCCs were evaluated concordance rate of LI-RADS. Mean JAFROC figure of merit for large (>1-cm) HCC was 0.948, while that for small HCC was 0.787 with fair agreement (κ = 0.409). Mean sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) were 91% and 90% for large HCC versus 63.0% and 79% for small HCC, respectively. Seventeen of 122 small HCCs (13.9%) were not visible on MR. Among 379 HCCs, 99 met LR-5, and 259 met LR-4. Common features for small HCC included arterial enhancement (81.9%), hepatobiliary phase hypointensity (80.3%), and delayed washout (72.9%). Diagnostic accuracy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging for small, hypervascular HCCs (Mean figure of merit = 0.787) was still low compared with large HCC (Mean figure of merit = 0.948). LR-5 and LR-4 covered 94% (358/379) of the HCCs.

  1. SU-G-TeP2-12: IROCHouston and MDAPL SRS Anthropomorphic Phantom Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineu, A; Kry, S; Alvarez, P; Hernandez, N; Nguyen, T; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of SRS phantom irradiations Methods: Anthropomorphic SRS head phantoms were sent to institutions participating in NCI sponsored SRS clinical trials and institutions interested in verifying SRS treatment delivery. The phantom shell was purchased from Phantom Laboratory and altered to house dosimetry and imaging inserts. The imaging insert has 1.9 cm diameter spherical target. The dosimetry insert holds two TLD capsules and radiochromic film in the coronal and sagittal planes through the center of the target. Institutions were asked to image, plan and treat the phantom as they would an SRS patient. GammaKnife, CyberKnife and c-arm accelerator institutions were asked to cover the target with 15 Gy, 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Following these guidelines and typical planning protocols for these three types of machines gives roughly 30 Gy to the center of the target for all units. Submission of the DICOM digital data set was required for analysis. Criteria of 5% for TLD results and 85% of pixels passing 5%/3mm gamma analysis were applied beginning in 2013. Results: The phantom was analyzed 269 times between the beginning of 2013 to present. The pass rate is 81%. Nineteen of the irradiation results failed only the TLD criteria, 19 failed only the film criteria and 12 failed both. Irradiations included 32 CyberKnife 23 GammaKnife, 3 TomoTherapy and 211 c-arm units. Planning systems included Eclipse, Ergo, GammaPlan, Hi-Art, iPlan, Monaco, MultiPlan, Pinnacle, RayStation, XiO and XKnife. Irradiations that were not accompanied with DICOM data were not included in this analysis. Conclusion: The phantom is a valuable end-to-end test used to independently verify the accuracy of SRS treatment delivery. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  2. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  3. Percutaneous vertebroplasty with the rotational fluoroscopy imaging technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Wlderk, Andrea; Cirelli, Carlo; D' Adamo, Alessandro; Fanelli, Fabrizio [University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Unit, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of the rotational angiography unit (RAU) as a single technique to guide percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP). Twenty-five consecutive patients (35 vertebral bodies, 20 lumbar and 15 thoracic) were treated using RA fluoroscopy. Using a state-of-the-art flat-panel angiographer (Artis zee, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), rotational acquisitions were obtained in all patients for immediate post-procedure 2D/3D reconstructions. Pre- and postoperative back pain was assessed with the visual analog scale (VAS). Fluoroscopy time, patient radiation dose exposure, technical success, mean procedure time, mean number of rotational acquisitions and procedural complications were recorded. All features were compared with a historical cohort of patients (N = 25) who underwent PVP under CT and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy guidance. In all cases, safe and accurate control of the needle insertion and bone-cement injection was successfully obtained with high-quality fluoroscopy images. One cement leakage was detected in the RAU group, and two leakages were detected in the CT and C-arm fluoroscopy group. Technical features were significantly different between the two groups (RAU vs. CT): mean procedure time: 38.2 min vs. 60.2 min (p = 0.02); median fluoroscopy time: 14.58 and 4.58 min (p = 0.02); median number of rotational acquisitions: 5 vs. 10 (p = 0.02); mean patient dose: 6 ± 1.3 mSv vs. 23 ± 1.3 mSv (p = 0.02). There were minor complications (pain, small hematoma) in two patients (8%) in the study group and three cases (12%) in the control group. RAU guidance is an effective and safe technique for performing PVP because it reduces the procedural time and radiation exposure. (orig.)

  4. Adaptation of pelage color and pigment variations in Israeli subterranean blind mole rats, Spalax ehrenbergi [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Singaravelan

    Full Text Available Concealing coloration in rodents is well established. However, only a few studies examined how soil color, pelage color, hair-melanin content, and genetics (i.e., the causal chain synergize to configure it. This study investigates the causal chain of dorsal coloration in Israeli subterranean blind mole rats, Spalax ehrenbergi.We examined pelage coloration of 128 adult animals from 11 populations belonging to four species of Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies (Spalax galili, Spalax golani, Spalax carmeli, and Spalax judaei and the corresponding coloration of soil samples from the collection sites using a digital colorimeter. Additionally, we quantified hair-melanin contents of 67 animals using HPLC and sequenced the MC1R gene in 68 individuals from all four mole rat species.Due to high variability of soil colors, the correlation between soil and pelage color coordinates was weak and significant only between soil hue and pelage lightness. Multiple stepwise forward regression revealed that soil lightness was significantly associated with all pelage color variables. Pelage color lightness among the four species increased with the higher southward aridity in accordance to Gloger's rule (darker in humid habitats and lighter in arid habitats. Darker and lighter pelage colors are associated with darker basalt and terra rossa, and lighter rendzina soils, respectively. Despite soil lightness varying significantly, pelage lightness and eumelanin converged among populations living in similar soil types. Partial sequencing of the MC1R gene identified three allelic variants, two of which were predominant in northern species (S. galili and S. golani, and the third was exclusive to southern species (S. carmeli and S. judaei, which might have caused the differences found in pheomelanin/eumelanin ratio.Darker dorsal pelage in darker basalt and terra rossa soils in the north and lighter pelage in rendzina and loess soils in the south reflect the combined results of

  5. Fluoroscopic radiation exposure: are we protecting ourselves adequately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffler, C Edward; Ilyas, Asif M

    2015-05-06

    While traditional intraoperative fluoroscopy protection relies on thyroid shields and aprons, recent data suggest that the surgeon's eyes and hands receive more exposure than previously appreciated. Using a distal radial fracture surgery model, we examined (1) radiation exposure to the eyes, thyroid, chest, groin, and hands of a surgeon mannequin; (2) the degree to which shielding equipment can decrease exposure; and (3) how exposure varies with fluoroscopy unit size. An anthropomorphic model was fit with radiation-attenuating glasses, a thyroid shield, an apron, and gloves. "Exposed" thermoluminescent dosimeters overlaid the protective equipment at the eyes, thyroid, chest, groin, and index finger while "shielded" dosimeters were placed beneath the protective equipment. Fluoroscopy position and settings were standardized. The mini-c-arm milliampere-seconds were fixed based on the selection of the kilovolt peak (kVp). Three mini and three standard c-arms scanned a model of the patient's wrist continuously for fifteen minutes each. Ten dosimeter exposures were recorded for each c-arm. Hand exposure averaged 31 μSv/min (range, 22 to 48 μSv/min), which was 13.0 times higher than the other recorded exposures. Eye exposure averaged 4 μSv/min, 2.2 times higher than the mean thyroid, chest, and groin exposure. Gloves reduced hand exposure by 69.4%. Glasses decreased eye exposure by 65.6%. There was no significant difference in exposure between mini and standard fluoroscopy. Surgeons' hands receive the most radiation exposure during distal radial plate fixation under fluoroscopy. There was a small but insignificant difference in mean exposure between standard fluoroscopy and mini-fluoroscopy, but some standard units resulted in lower exposure than some mini-units. On the basis of these findings, we recommend routine protective equipment to mitigate exposure to surgeons' hands and eyes, in addition to the thyroid, chest, and groin, during fluoroscopy procedures

  6. Volume-of-change cone-beam CT for image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Stayman, J Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Schafer, Sebastian; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Khanna, A Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) can provide intraoperative 3D imaging capability for surgical guidance, but workflow and radiation dose are the significant barriers to broad utilization. One main reason is that each 3D image acquisition requires a complete scan with a full radiation dose to present a completely new 3D image every time. In this paper, we propose to utilize patient-specific CT or CBCT as prior knowledge to accurately reconstruct the aspects of the region that have changed by the surgical procedure from only a sparse set of x-rays. The proposed methods consist of a 3D–2D registration between the prior volume and a sparse set of intraoperative x-rays, creating digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the registered prior volume, computing difference images by subtracting DRRs from the intraoperative x-rays, a penalized likelihood reconstruction of the volume of change (VOC) from the difference images, and finally a fusion of VOC reconstruction with the prior volume to visualize the entire surgical field. When the surgical changes are local and relatively small, the VOC reconstruction involves only a small volume size and a small number of projections, allowing less computation and lower radiation dose than is needed to reconstruct the entire surgical field. We applied this approach to sacroplasty phantom data obtained from a CBCT test bench and vertebroplasty data with a fresh cadaver acquired from a C-arm CBCT system with a flat-panel detector. The VOCs were reconstructed from a varying number of images (10–66 images) and compared to the CBCT ground truth using four different metrics (mean squared error, correlation coefficient, structural similarity index and perceptual difference model). The results show promising reconstruction quality with structural similarity to the ground truth close to 1 even when only 15–20 images were used, allowing dose reduction by the factor of 10–20. (paper)

  7. Influence of a combined CT/C-arm system on periprocedural workflow and procedure times in mechanical thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Johannes; Schönenberger, Silvia; Herweh, Christian; Pham, Mirko; Nagel, Simon; Ringleb, Peter Arthur; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Möhlenbruch, Markus Alfred

    2017-09-01

    To achieve the fastest possible workflow in ischaemic stroke, we developed a CT/C-arm system, which allows imaging and endovascular treatment on the same patient table. This prospective, monocentric trial was conducted between October 2014 and August 2016. Patients received stroke imaging and mechanical thrombectomy under general anaesthesia (GA) or conscious sedation (CS) using our combined setup comprising a CT-scanner and a mobile C-arm X-ray device. Primary endpoint was time between stroke imaging and groin puncture. We compared periprocedural workflow and procedure times with the literature and a matched patient cohort treated with a biplane angiographic system before installation of the CT/C-arm system. In 50 patients with acute ischaemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation, comparable recanalization rates were achieved by using the CT/C-arm setup (TICI2b-3:CT/C-arm-GA: 85.7%; CT/C-arm-CS: 90.9%; Angiosuite: 78.6%; p = 0.269) without increasing periprocedural complications. Elimination of patient transport resulted in a significant reduction of the time between stroke imaging and groin puncture: median, min (IQR): CT/C-arm-GA: 43 (35-52); CT/C-arm-CS: 39 (28-49); Angiosuite: 64 (48-74); p < 0.0001. The combined CT/C-arm system allows comparable recanalization rates as a biplane angiographic system and accelerates the start of the endovascular stroke treatment. • The CT/C-arm setup reduces median time from stroke imaging to groin puncture. • Mechanical thrombectomy using a C-arm device is feasible without increasing peri-interventional complications. • The CT/C-arm setup might be a valuable fallback solution for emergency procedures. • The CT/C-arm setup allows immediate control CT images during and after treatment.

  8. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: X-ray tube imaging performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracken, John A.; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation.

  9. Real-time three dimensional CT and MRI to guide interventions for congenital heart disease and acquired pulmonary vein stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharos, Patcharapong; Setser, Randolph M; Bradley-Skelton, Sharon; Prieto, Lourdes R

    2017-10-01

    To validate the feasibility and spatial accuracy of pre-procedural 3D images to 3D rotational fluoroscopy registration to guide interventional procedures in patients with congenital heart disease and acquired pulmonary vein stenosis. Cardiac interventions in patients with congenital and structural heart disease require complex catheter manipulation. Current technology allows registration of the anatomy obtained from 3D CT and/or MRI to be overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Thirty patients scheduled for interventional procedures from 12/2012 to 8/2015 were prospectively recruited. A C-arm CT using a biplane C-arm system (Artis zee, VC14H, Siemens Healthcare) was acquired to enable 3D3D registration with pre-procedural images. Following successful image fusion, the anatomic landmarks marked in pre-procedural images were overlaid on live fluoroscopy. The accuracy of image registration was determined by measuring the distance between overlay markers and a reference point in the image. The clinical utility of the registration was evaluated as either "High", "Medium" or "None". Seventeen patients with congenital heart disease and 13 with acquired pulmonary vein stenosis were enrolled. Accuracy and benefit of registration were not evaluated in two patients due to suboptimal images. The distance between the marker and the actual anatomical location was 0-2 mm in 18 (64%), 2-4 mm in 3 (11%) and >4 mm in 7 (25%) patients. 3D3D registration was highly beneficial in 18 (64%), intermediate in 3 (11%), and not beneficial in 7 (25%) patients. 3D3D registration can facilitate complex congenital and structural interventions. It may reduce procedure time, radiation and contrast dose.

  10. The effect of hip positioning on the projected femoral neck-shaft angle: a modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhashyam, Abhiram R; Rodriguez, Edward K; Appleton, Paul; Wixted, John J

    2018-04-03

    The femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) is used to restore normal hip geometry during hip fracture repair. Femoral rotation is known to affect NSA measurement, but the effect of hip flexion-extension is unknown. The goals of this study were to determine and test mathematical models of the relationship between hip flexion-extension, femoral rotation and NSA. We hypothesized that hip flexion-extension and femoral rotation would result in NSA measurement error. Two mathematical models were developed to predict NSA in varying degrees of hip flexion-extension and femoral rotation. The predictions of the equations were tested in vitro using a model that varied hip flexion-extension while keeping rotation constant, and vice versa. The NSA was measured from an AP radiograph obtained with a C-arm. Attributable measurement error based on hip positioning was calculated from the models. The predictions of the model correlated well with the experimental data (correlation coefficient = 0.82 - 0.90). A wide range of patient positioning was found to result in less than 5-10 degree error in the measurement of NSA. Hip flexion-extension and femoral rotation had a synergistic effect in measurement error of the NSA. Measurement error was minimized when hip flexion-extension was within 10 degrees of neutral. This study demonstrates that hip flexion-extension and femoral rotation significantly affect the measurement of the NSA. To avoid inadvertently fixing the proximal femur in varus or valgus, the hip should be positioned within 10 degrees of neutral flexion-extension with respect to the C-arm to minimize positional measurement error. N/A, basic science study.

  11. TU-AB-204-04: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, J.

    2015-01-01

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  12. TU-AB-204-00: Advances in Cone-Beam CT and Emerging Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  13. TU-AB-204-00: Advances in Cone-Beam CT and Emerging Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  14. TU-AB-204-04: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, J. [University of California Davis School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  15. TU-AB-204-03: Advances in CBCT for Orhtopaedics and Bone Health Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W. [Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  16. TU-AB-204-03: Advances in CBCT for Orhtopaedics and Bone Health Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbijewski, W.

    2015-01-01

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  17. Evaluation of a miniature electromagnetic position tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, Johann; Figl, Michael; Kollmann, Christian; Bergmann, Helmar; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    The advent of miniaturized electromagnetic digitizers opens a variety of potential clinical applications for computer aided interventions using flexible instruments; endoscopes or catheters can easily be tracked within the body. With respect to the new applications, the systematic distortions induced by various materials such as closed metallic loops, wire guides, catheters, and ultrasound scan heads were systematically evaluated in this paper for a new commercial tracking system. We employed the electromagnetic tracking system Aurora trade mark sign (Mednetix/CH, NDI/Can); data were acquired using the serial port of a PC running SuSE Linux 7.1 (SuSE, Gmbh, Nuernberg). Objects introduced into the digitizer volume included wire loops of different diameters, wire guides, optical tracking tools, an ultrasonic (US) scan head, an endoscope with radial ultrasound scan head and various other objects used in operating rooms and interventional suites. Beyond this, we determined the influence of a C-arm fluoroscopy unit. To quantify the reliability of the system, the miniaturized sensor was mounted on a nonmetallic measurement rack while the transmitter was fixed at three different distances within the digitizer range. The tracker was shown to be more sensitive to distortions caused by materials close to the emitter (average distortion error 13.6 mm±16.6 mm for wire loops positioned at a distance between 100 mm and 200 mm from the emitter). Distortions caused by materials near the sensor (distances smaller than 100 mm) are small (typical error 2.2 mm±1.9 mm). The C-arm fluoroscopy unit caused considerable distortions and limits the reliability of the tracker (distortion error 18.6 mm±24.9 mm). Distortions resulting from the US scan head are high at distances smaller than about 100 mm from the emitter. The distortions also increase when the scan head is positioned horizontally and close to the sensor (average error 4.1 mm±1.5 mm when the scan head is positioned within a

  18. Error analysis of marker-based object localization using a single-plane XRII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habets, Damiaan F.; Pollmann, Steven I.; Yuan, Xunhua; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The role of imaging and image guidance is increasing in surgery and therapy, including treatment planning and follow-up. Fluoroscopy is used for two-dimensional (2D) guidance or localization; however, many procedures would benefit from three-dimensional (3D) guidance or localization. Three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) using a C-arm mounted x-ray image intensifier (XRII) can provide high-quality 3D images; however, patient dose and the required acquisition time restrict the number of 3D images that can be obtained. C-arm based 3D CT is therefore limited in applications for x-ray based image guidance or dynamic evaluations. 2D-3D model-based registration, using a single-plane 2D digital radiographic system, does allow for rapid 3D localization. It is our goal to investigate - over a clinically practical range - the impact of x-ray exposure on the resulting range of 3D localization precision. In this paper it is assumed that the tracked instrument incorporates a rigidly attached 3D object with a known configuration of markers. A 2D image is obtained by a digital fluoroscopic x-ray system and corrected for XRII distortions (±0.035 mm) and mechanical C-arm shift (±0.080 mm). A least-square projection-Procrustes analysis is then used to calculate the 3D position using the measured 2D marker locations. The effect of x-ray exposure on the precision of 2D marker localization and on 3D object localization was investigated using numerical simulations and x-ray experiments. The results show a nearly linear relationship between 2D marker localization precision and the 3D localization precision. However, a significant amplification of error, nonuniformly distributed among the three major axes, occurs, and that is demonstrated. To obtain a 3D localization error of less than ±1.0 mm for an object with 20 mm marker spacing, the 2D localization precision must be better than ±0.07 mm. This requirement was met for all investigated nominal x-ray exposures at 28 cm FOV, and

  19. Conversion of helical tomotherapy plans to step-and-shoot IMRT plans--Pareto front evaluation of plans from a new treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Kristoffer; Ceberg, Crister; Engström, Per; Benedek, Hunor; Nilsson, Per; Knöös, Tommy

    2011-06-01

    The resulting plans from a new type of treatment planning system called SharePlan have been studied. This software allows for the conversion of treatment plans generated in a TomoTherapy system for helical delivery, into plans deliverable on C-arm linear accelerators (linacs), which is of particular interest for clinics with a single TomoTherapy unit. The purpose of this work was to evaluate and compare the plans generated in the SharePlan system with the original TomoTherapy plans and with plans produced in our clinical treatment planning system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on C-arm linacs. In addition, we have analyzed how the agreement between SharePlan and TomoTherapy plans depends on the number of beams and the total number of segments used in the optimization. Optimized plans were generated for three prostate and three head-and-neck (H&N) cases in the TomoTherapy system, and in our clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) used for IMRT planning with step-and-shoot delivery. The TomoTherapy plans were converted into step-and-shoot IMRT plans in SharePlan. For each case, a large number of Pareto optimal plans were created to compare plans generated in SharePlan with plans generated in the Tomotherapy system and in the clinical TPS. In addition, plans were generated in SharePlan for the three head-and-neck cases to evaluate how the plan quality varied with the number of beams used. Plans were also generated with different number of beams and segments for other patient cases. This allowed for an evaluation of how to minimize the number of required segments in the converted IMRT plans without compromising the agreement between them and the original TomoTherapy plans. The plans made in SharePlan were as good as or better than plans from our clinical system, but they were not as good as the original TomoTherapy plans. This was true for both the head-and-neck and the prostate cases, although the differences between the plans for the latter were

  20. Depression of the Thoracolumbar Posterior Vertebral Body on the Estimation of Cement Leakage in Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Jia, Pu; Bao, Li; Feng, Fei; Yang, He; Li, Jin-Jun; Tang, Hai

    2015-12-05

    The cross-section of thoracolumbar vertebral body is kidney-shaped with depressed posterior boundary. The anterior wall of the vertebral canal is separated from the posterior wall of the vertebral body on the lateral X-ray image. This study was designed to determine the sagittal distance between the anterior border of the vertebral canal and the posterior border of the vertebral body (DBCV) and to analyze the potential role of DBCV in the estimation of cement leakage during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) or percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP). We retrospectively recruited 233 patients who had osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and were treated with PVP or PKP. Computed tomography images of T11-L2 normal vertebrae were measured to obtain DBCV. The distance from cement to the posterior wall of the vertebral body (DCPW) of thoracolumbar vertebrae was measured from C-arm images. The selected vertebrae were divided into two groups according to DCPW, with the fracture levels, fracture grades and leakage rates of the two groups compared. A relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve was applied to determine whether the DCPW difference can be used to estimate the degree of cement leakage. The data were processed by statistical software SPSS version 21.0 using independent sample t-test and Chi-square tests. The maximum DBCV was 6.40 mm and the average DBCV was 3.74 ± 0.95 mm. DBCV appeared to be longer in males than in females, but the difference was not statistically significant. The average DCPW of type-B leakage vertebrae (2.59 ± 1.20 mm) was shorter than that of other vertebrae (7.83 ± 2.38 mm, P 6.40 mm for type-C and type-S, but much higher for type-B. ROC curve revealed that DCPW only has a predictive value for type-B leakage (area under the curve: 0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.95-0.99, P DBCV on C-arm images for safety during PVP or PKP.

  1. [Evaluation of radiation exposure of personnel in an orthopaedic and trauma operation theatre using the new real-time dosimetry system "dose aware"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M C; Strauss, A; Pflugmacher, R; Nähle, C P; Pennekamp, P H; Burger, C; Wirtz, D C

    2014-08-01

    There is a positive correlation between operation time and staff exposure to radiation during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy. Due to harmful effects of exposure to long-term low-dose radiation for both the patient and the operating team it should be kept to a minimum. AIM of this study was to evaluate a novel dosimeter system called Dose Aware® (DA) enabling radiation exposure feedback of the personal in an orthopaedic and trauma operation theatre in real-time. Within a prospective study over a period of four month, DA was applied by the operation team during 104 orthopaedic and trauma operations in which the C-arm fluoroscope was used in 2D-mode. During ten operation techniques, radiation exposure of the surgeon, the first assistant, the theatre nurse and the anaesthesiologist was evaluated. Seventy-three operations were analysed. The surgeon achieved the highest radiation exposure during dorsolumbar spinal osteosynthesis, kyphoplasty and screw fixation of sacral fractures. The first assistant received a higher radiation exposure compared to the surgeon during plate osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures (157 %), intramedullary nailing of pertrochanteric fractures (143 %) and dorsolumbar spinal osteosynthesis (240 %). During external fixation of ankle fractures (68 %) and screw fixation of sacral fractures (66 %) radiation exposure of the theatre nurse exceeded 50 % of the surgeon's radiation exposure. During plate osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures (157 %) and intramedullary splinting of clavicular fractures (115 %), the anaesthesiologist received a higher radiation exposure than the surgeon. The novel dosimeter system DA provides real-time radiation exposure feedback of the personnel in an orthopaedic and trauma operation theatre for the first time. Data of this study demonstrate that radiation exposure of the personnel depends on the operation type. The first assistant, the theatre nurse and the anaesthesiologist might be

  2. Time Demand and Radiation Dose in 3D-Fluoroscopy-based Navigation-assisted 3D-Fluoroscopy-controlled Pedicle Screw Instrumentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balling, Horst

    2018-05-01

    Prospective single-center cohort study to record additional time requirements and radiation dose in navigation-assisted O-arm-controlled pedicle screw (PS) instrumentations. The aim of this study was to evaluate amount of extra-time and radiation dose for navigation-assisted PS instrumentations of the thoracolumbosacral spine using O-arm 3D-real-time-navigation (O3DN) compared to non-navigated spinal procedures (NNSPs) with a single C-arm and postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan for controlling PS positions. 3D-navigation is reported to enhance PS insertion accuracy. But time-consuming navigational steps and considerable additional radiation doses seem to limit this modern technique's attraction. A detailed analysis of additional time demand and extra-radiation dose in 3D-navigated spine surgery is not provided in literature, yet. From February 2011 through July 2015, 306 consecutive posterior instrumentations were performed in vertebral levels T10-S1 using O3DN for PS insertion. The duration of procedure-specific navigational steps of the overall collective (I) and the last cohort of 50 consecutive O3DN-surgeries (II) was compared to the average duration of analogous surgical steps in 100 consecutive NNSP using a single C-arm. 3D-radiation dose (dose-length-product, DLP) of navigational and postinstrumentation O-arm scans in group I and II was compared to the average DLP of 100 diagnostic lumbar CT scans. The average presurgical time from patient positioning on the operating table to skin incision was 46.2 ± 10.1 minutes (O3DN, I) and 40.6 ± 9.8 minutes (O3DN, II) versus 30.6 ± 8.3 minutes (NNSP) (P demand of 13.0 minutes compared to NNSP, and with a total DLP below that of a diagnostic lumbar CT scan (P ≈ 0.81). 4.

  3. Feasibility of extreme dose escalation for glioblastoma multiforme using 4π radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Dan; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Yu, Victoria Y; Kaprealian, Tania; Kupelian, Patrick; Selch, Michael; Lee, Percy; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) frequently recurs at the same location after radiotherapy. Further dose escalation using conventional methods is limited by normal tissue tolerance. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy has recently emerged as a new potential method to deliver highly conformal radiation dose using the C-arm linacs. We aim to study the feasibility of very substantial GBM dose escalation while maintaining normal tissue tolerance using 4π. 11 GBM patients previously treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT/RapidArc) on the NovalisTx™ platform to a prescription dose of either 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were included. All patients were replanned with 30 non-coplanar beams using a 4π radiotherapy platform, which inverse optimizes both beam angles and fluence maps. Four different prescriptions were used including original prescription dose and PTV (4πPTV PD ), 100 Gy to the PTV and GTV (4πPTV 100Gy ), 100 Gy to the GTV only while maintaining prescription dose to the rest of the PTV (4πGTV 100Gy ), and a 5 mm margin expansion plan (4πPTV PD+5mm ). OARs included in the study are the normal brain (brain – PTV), brainstem, chiasm, spinal cord, eyes, lenses, optical nerves, and cochleae. The 4π plans resulted in superior dose gradient indices, as indicated by >20% reduction in the R50, compared to the clinical plans. Among all of the 4π cases, when compared to the clinical plans, the maximum and mean doses were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by a range of 47.01-98.82% and 51.87-99.47%, respectively, or unchanged (p > 0.05) for all of the non-brain OARs. Both the 4πPTV PD and 4π GTV 100GY plans reduced the mean normal brain mean doses. 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy substantially increases the dose gradient outside of the PTV and better spares critical organs. Dose escalation to 100 Gy to the GTV or additional margin expansion while meeting clinical critical organ dose constraints is feasible. 100 Gy to the PTV result in higher normal brain doses but may

  4. Equivalent (uniform) square field sizes of flattening filter free photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Various types of treatment units, such as CyberKnife, TomoTherapy and C-arm linear accelerators (LINACs) are operated using flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. Their reference dosimetry, however, is currently based on codes of practice that provide data which were primarily developed and tested for high-energy photon beams with flattening filter (WFF). The aim of this work was to introduce equivalent uniform square field sizes of FFF beams to serve as a basis of a unified reference dosimetry procedure applicable to all aforementioned FFF machines. For this purpose, in-house determined experimental data together with published data of the ratio of doses at depths of 20 cm and 10 cm in water (D 20,10) were used to characterize the depth dose distribution of 6 and 10 MV WFF and FFF beams. These data were analyzed for field sizes ranging from 2  ×  2 cm2 to 40  ×  40 cm2. A scatter function that takes the lateral profiles of the individual beams into account was fitted to the experimental data. The lateral profiles of the WFF beams were assumed to be uniform, while those of the FFF beams were approximated using fourth or sixth order polynomials. The scatter functions of the FFF beams were recalculated using a uniform lateral profile (the same as the physical profile of the WFF beams), and are henceforth denoted as virtual uniform FFF beams (VUFFF). The field sizes of the VUFFF beams having the same scatter contribution as the corresponding FFF beams at a given field size were defined as the equivalent uniform square field (EQUSF) size. Data from four different LINACs with 18 different beams in total, as well as a CyberKnife beam, were analyzed. The average values of EQUSFs over all investigated LINACs of the conventional 10  ×  10 cm2 reference fields of 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams for C-arm LINACs and machine-specific reference fields for CyberKnife and TomoTherapy were 9.5 cm, 9 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.5 cm respectively. The

  5. Hamlet à l’épreuve des librettistes Hamlet: Standing the Test of Librettists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Guinle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available On ne peut pas demander à un livret l’opéra de reproduire exactement le texte de l’ouvrage dont il s’inspire. Les prétendues « faiblesses » des livrets se justifient par le fait qu’ils n’existent que pour être mis en musique. Dans quelques rares cas où le livret suit à la lettre le texte d’origine (Francis Poulenc, Dialogues des Carmélites, la musique suit le contour des mots, mais, d’ordinaire, la musique pallie le manque de poéticité des livrets. Cela paraît particulièrement le cas dans les opéras du XIXe siècle. En conséquence, il semble impossible de parler des livrets sans prendre la musique en considération. Dans le cas d’Hamlet, comment les librettistes ont-ils abordé le texte ? Où peut-on retrouver la tragédie de Shakespeare dans l’opéra d’Ambroise Thomas ? Quelle lumière l’opéra apporte-t-il sur la réception de Shakespeare au XIXe siècle ? Voilà quelques questions auxquelles cet article tentera de répondre.An opera libretto cannot be expected to reproduce the exact text of the literary or dramatic work on which it is based. The so-called “weaknesses” of the libretti may be accounted for by the fact that they are meant to be set to music. In some rare cases, where the libretto uses part of the original text (like Francis Poulenc’s Dialogues des Carmélites, the music closely follows the shape of the words, but usually it fulfills a poetical aspect lacking in the text. This seems particularly true when we consider 19th century opera. This implies that it is impossible to deal with the libretti without taking the music into account. In the case of Hamlet, what is the librettists’ approach? Where is Shakespeare’s tragedy to be found in Ambroise Thomas’s opera? What light does the opera shed on the reception of Shakespeare in the 19th century? These are the questions this article tries to answer.

  6. Template-based CTA to x-ray angio rigid registration of coronary arteries in frequency domain with automatic x-ray segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Timur; Unal, Gozde [Sabanci University, Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir [Computer Aided Medical Procedures (CAMP), Technical University of Munich, Garching, 85748 (Germany); Degertekin, Muzaffer [Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul 34752 (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: A key challenge for image guided coronary interventions is accurate and absolutely robust image registration bringing together preinterventional information extracted from a three-dimensional (3D) patient scan and live interventional image information. In this paper, the authors present a novel scheme for 3D to two-dimensional (2D) rigid registration of coronary arteries extracted from preoperative image scan (3D) and a single segmented intraoperative x-ray angio frame in frequency and spatial domains for real-time angiography interventions by C-arm fluoroscopy.Methods: Most existing rigid registration approaches require a close initialization due to the abundance of local minima and high complexity of search algorithms. The authors' method eliminates this requirement by transforming the projections into translation-invariant Fourier domain for estimating the 3D pose. For 3D rotation recovery, template Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRR) as candidate poses of 3D vessels of segmented computed tomography angiography are produced by rotating the camera (image intensifier) around the DICOM angle values with a specific range as in C-arm setup. The authors have compared the 3D poses of template DRRs with the segmented x-ray after equalizing the scales in three domains, namely, Fourier magnitude, Fourier phase, and Fourier polar. The best rotation pose candidate was chosen by one of the highest similarity measures returned by the methods in these domains. It has been noted in literature that frequency domain methods are robust against noise and occlusion which was also validated by the authors' results. 3D translation of the volume was then recovered by distance-map based BFGS optimization well suited to convex structure of the authors' objective function without local minima due to distance maps. A novel automatic x-ray vessel segmentation was also performed in this study.Results: Final results were evaluated in 2D projection space for

  7. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping University, Linkoeping (Sweden); Pattern Recognition Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054, Erlangen (Germany); Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Siemens AG Healthcare, Forchheim 91301 (Germany); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8

  8. Clinical usefulness of hemoencephalography beyond the neurofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra-Sala M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mireia Serra-Sala,1–3 Carme Timoneda-Gallart,1–3 Frederic Pérez-Álvarez1,2,4 1Fundació Carme Vidal NeuroPsicoPedagogia, 2Institut Recerca Qualitat de Vida Universitat de Girona, 3Facultat Educació Psychology University of Girona, 4Pediatric and Behavioral Neurology, University Hospital Doctor Josep Trueta, Girona, Spain Aim: Hemoencephalography (HEG is an emerging procedure for clinical application in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and other disorders, regardless of age. It is available to any research group for its relative simplicity and low cost and is a useful tool for assessing prefrontal-dependent functions. Older teenagers pose peculiarities in the prefrontal maturation, and we aim to establish HEG patterns that might have clinical applicability. Methods: The HEG patterns of 70 university students (56 women and 14 men, 21–48 years old, mean 31.84, SD 10.65, standard error of mean 0.31 were compared with those of 59 adolescents – 13–14-year-old secondary education students, 28 females and 31 males. The HEG patterns were obtained in response to the observation of shocking, unpleasant, and pleasant pictures. We use one-way and two-way analysis of variance to disentangle the differences between groups. All effects were analyzed with F-tests. Results: In all cases, university students and adolescents showed a decrease in prefrontal activity, indicative of differences in the emotional inner networks between groups, which are responsible for security–insecurity processing. Compared with university students, adolescents showed statistically significant differences in decreased activity in very unpleasant (shocking tests that demand increased security–insecurity processing. Adolescents showed lower decrease. In addition, adolescents, compared with university subjects, did not show statistically significantly decreased HEG activity compared with the baseline in very unpleasant tests. Conclusion: Teens showed

  9. El (reconocimiento de la madre en La mitad del alma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J. Schumm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: La mitad del alma de Carme Riera, en que C rememora a su madre, enfatiza la importancia del reconocimiento de las mujeres en la memoria histórica. Desde el mito griego de Atena, quien ignoraba a su madre Metis, la sociedad patriarcal ha excluido a la madre, lo cual promete que la hija conlleve negación también, según Amber Jacobs en On Matricide. Jacobs observa que en La Oresteia hay crímenes sancionados contra las mujeres, las hijas están deprimidas, existe incesto contra la hija, la reproducción familiar se paraliza, toda la sociedad sufre y la hija se desperdicia también cuando la madre es menospreciada. Jacobs afirma que este desprecio de la madre que transcurría en los mitos griegos continúa en la sociedad y la psicología hoy en día. En esta novela de Riera, la hija protagonista, quien desconoce a su madre, sufre de un estado depresivo, la falta de creatividad y una conexión demasiado fuerte con su padre, semejante a lo que Jacobs observa en los mitos, pero la escritura de C sobre su madre la integrará en la consciencia y mejorará la situación de la hija y, últimamente, la de toda la civilización.Summary: Carme Riera‟s La mitad del alma, in which C recollects her mother, emphasizes the importance of the recognition of women in historic memory. Ever since the Greek myth of Athena, who was ignorant of the existence of her mother, Metis, patriarchal society has excluded the mother, a fact which promises that the daughter will also experience negation, according to Amber Jacobs in On Matricide. Jacobs observes that in La Oresteia there are sanctioned crimes against women, the daughters are depressed, there is incest against the daughter, she is dishonored, family reproduction stops, and all of society suffers when the mother is not appreciated. Jacobs affirms that the distain of the mother that took place in Greek myths continues in society and psychology today. In this novel by Riera, the protagonist/daughter, who

  10. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold

  11. Template-based CTA to x-ray angio rigid registration of coronary arteries in frequency domain with automatic x-ray segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksoy, Timur; Unal, Gozde; Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir; Degertekin, Muzaffer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A key challenge for image guided coronary interventions is accurate and absolutely robust image registration bringing together preinterventional information extracted from a three-dimensional (3D) patient scan and live interventional image information. In this paper, the authors present a novel scheme for 3D to two-dimensional (2D) rigid registration of coronary arteries extracted from preoperative image scan (3D) and a single segmented intraoperative x-ray angio frame in frequency and spatial domains for real-time angiography interventions by C-arm fluoroscopy.Methods: Most existing rigid registration approaches require a close initialization due to the abundance of local minima and high complexity of search algorithms. The authors' method eliminates this requirement by transforming the projections into translation-invariant Fourier domain for estimating the 3D pose. For 3D rotation recovery, template Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRR) as candidate poses of 3D vessels of segmented computed tomography angiography are produced by rotating the camera (image intensifier) around the DICOM angle values with a specific range as in C-arm setup. The authors have compared the 3D poses of template DRRs with the segmented x-ray after equalizing the scales in three domains, namely, Fourier magnitude, Fourier phase, and Fourier polar. The best rotation pose candidate was chosen by one of the highest similarity measures returned by the methods in these domains. It has been noted in literature that frequency domain methods are robust against noise and occlusion which was also validated by the authors' results. 3D translation of the volume was then recovered by distance-map based BFGS optimization well suited to convex structure of the authors' objective function without local minima due to distance maps. A novel automatic x-ray vessel segmentation was also performed in this study.Results: Final results were evaluated in 2D projection space for patient data; and

  12. Reinforcing the role of the conventional C-arm--a novel method for simplified distal interlocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windolf, Markus; Schroeder, Josh; Fliri, Ladina; Dicht, Benno; Liebergall, Meir; Richards, R Geoff

    2012-01-25

    The common practice for insertion of distal locking screws of intramedullary nails is a freehand technique under fluoroscopic control. The process is technically demanding, time-consuming and afflicted to considerable radiation exposure of the patient and the surgical personnel. A new concept is introduced utilizing information from within conventional radiographic images to help accurately guide the surgeon to place the interlocking bolt into the interlocking hole. The newly developed technique was compared to conventional freehand in an operating room (OR) like setting on human cadaveric lower legs in terms of operating time and radiation exposure. The proposed concept (guided freehand), generally based on the freehand gold standard, additionally guides the surgeon by means of visible landmarks projected into the C-arm image. A computer program plans the correct drilling trajectory by processing the lens-shaped hole projections of the interlocking holes from a single image. Holes can be drilled by visually aligning the drill to the planned trajectory. Besides a conventional C-arm, no additional tracking or navigation equipment is required.Ten fresh frozen human below-knee specimens were instrumented with an Expert Tibial Nail (Synthes GmbH, Switzerland). The implants were distally locked by performing the newly proposed technique as well as the conventional freehand technique on each specimen. An orthopedic resident surgeon inserted four distal screws per procedure. Operating time, number of images and radiation time were recorded and statistically compared between interlocking techniques using non-parametric tests. A 58% reduction in number of taken images per screw was found for the guided freehand technique (7.4 ± 3.4) (mean ± SD) compared to the freehand technique (17.6 ± 10.3) (p < 0.001). Total radiation time (all 4 screws) was 55% lower for the guided freehand technique compared to conventional freehand (p = 0.001). Operating time per screw (from first

  13. Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for hydrocarbon fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, C.J.; Cremer, M.A.; Heap, M.P.; Chen, J-Y.; Westbrook, C.K.; Maurice, L.Q.

    1999-01-01

    Using CARM (Computer Aided Reduction Method), a computer program that automates the mechanism reduction process, a variety of different reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for ethylene and n-heptane have been generated. The reduced mechanisms have been compared to detailed chemistry calculations in simple homogeneous reactors and experiments. Reduced mechanisms for combustion of ethylene having as few as 10 species were found to give reasonable agreement with detailed chemistry over a range of stoichiometries and showed significant improvement over currently used global mechanisms. The performance of reduced mechanisms derived from a large detailed mechanism for n-heptane was compared to results from a reduced mechanism derived from a smaller semi-empirical mechanism. The semi-empirical mechanism was advantageous as a starting point for reduction for ignition delay, but not for PSR calculations. Reduced mechanisms with as few as 12 species gave excellent results for n-heptane/air PSR calculations but 16-25 or more species are needed to simulate n-heptane ignition delay

  14. Clinical accuracy of three-dimensional fluoroscopy (IsoC-3D)-assisted upper thoracic pedicle screw insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ito, Yasuo; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Shiozaki, Yasuyuki; Mazaki, Tetsuro; Tomioka, Masao; Tanaka, Masato

    2010-01-01

    Correct screw placement is especially difficult in the upper thoracic vertebrae. At the cervicothoracic junction (C7-T2), problems can arise because of the narrowness of the pedicle and the difficulty of using a lateral image intensifier there. Other upper thoracic vertebrae (T3-6) pose a problem for screw insertion also because of the narrower pedicle. We inserted 154 pedicle screws into 78 vertebrae (C7 to T6) in 38 patients. Screws were placed using intraoperative data acquisition by an isocentric C-arm fluoroscope (Siremobile Iso-C3D) and computer navigation. Out of 90 pedicle screws inserted into 45 vertebrae between C7 and T2, 87 of the 90 (96.7%) screws were classified as grade 1 (no perforation). Of 64 pedicle screws inserted into 33 vertebrae between T3 and T6, 61 of 64 (95.3%) screws were classified as grade 1. In this study, we reduced pedicle screw misplacement at the level of the C7 and upper thoracic (T1-6) vertebrae using the three-dimensional fluoroscopy navigation system. (author)

  15. A nonsingular rotating black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2015-01-01

    The spacetime singularities in classical general relativity are inevitable, as predicated by the celebrated singularity theorems. However, it is a general belief that singularities do not exist in Nature and that they are the limitations of the general relativity. In the absence of a welldefined quantum gravity, models of regular black holes have been studied. We employ a probability distribution inspired mass function m(r) to replace the Kerr black hole mass M to represent a nonsingular rotating black hole that is identified asymptotically (r >> k, k > 0 constant) exactly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and as the Kerr black hole when k = 0. The radiating counterpart renders a nonsingular generalization of Carmeli's spacetime as well as Vaidya's spacetime, in the appropriate limits. The exponential correction factor changing the geometry of the classical black hole to remove the curvature singularity can also be motivated by quantum arguments. The regular rotating spacetime can also be understood as a black hole of general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics. (orig.)

  16. LOS PROGRAMAS DE CUALIFICACIÓN PROFESIONAL INICIAL: UNA VISIÓN PANORÁMICA SOBRE LAS MODALIDADES Y PERFILES PROFESIONALES EN LA REGIÓN DE MURCIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Teresa González González

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lo largo de este artículo se abordan algunas cuestiones relacionadas con el Programa de Cualificación Profesional Inicial (PCPI. En el primer y segundo apartado del artículo se realiza una breve caracterización de este programa destinado a alumnos en situación de riesgo de exclusión educativa, así como del escenario educativo en el que se plantea. En el tercero se ofrecen datos sobre los perfiles profesionales de los PCPI que se están desarrollando en la Comunidad de la Región de Murcia (CARM. Tales datos derivan de una investigación más amplia sobre este programa y fueroobtenidos de la página web de la Consejería de Educación, y analizados una vez que se ordenaron y agruparon según modalidades de PCPI, perfiles profesionales, y centros educativos ayuntamientos u otras entidades que los imparten.El análisis realizado pone de manifiesto que no existe un patrón que caracterice la distribución de PCPI según perfiles profesionales. Éstos no se circunscriben a una u otra modalidad de PCPI como tampoco quedan ligados a la actividad económica y empresarial de las zonas en la que se...

  17. Simple New Screw Insertion Technique without Extraction for Broken Pedicle Screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Jin-Sang; Park, Jong-Tae

    2018-05-01

    Spinal transpedicular screw fixation is widely performed. Broken pedicle screw rates range from 3%-7.1%. Several techniques have been described for extraction of broken pedicle screws. However, most of these techniques require special instruments. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. No special instruments or drilling in an adjacent pedicle are required. We used a high-speed air drill with a round burr. With C-arm fluoroscopy guidance, the distal fragment of a broken pedicle screw was palpated using free-hand technique through the screw entry hole. A high-speed air drill with a round burr (not a diamond burr) was inserted through the hole. Drilling began slowly and continued until enough space was obtained for new screw insertion. Using this space, we performed new pedicle screw fixation medially alongside the distal fragment of the broken pedicle screw. We performed the insertion with a previously used entry hole and pathway in the pedicle. The same size pedicle screw was used. Three patients were treated with this modified technique. New screw insertion was successful in all cases after partial drilling of the distal broken pedicle screw fragment. There were no complications, such as screw loosening, dural tears, or root injury. We describe a simple, modified technique for management of broken pedicle screws without extraction. This technique is recommended in patients who require insertion of a new screw. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Extracorporeal shock waves lithotripsy versus retrograde ureteroscopy: is radiation exposure a criterion when we choose which modern treatment to apply for ureteric stones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Pricop

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare two major urological procedures in terms of patient exposure to radiation. We evaluated 175 patients, that were subjected to retrograde ureteroscopy (URS and extracorporeal shock waves lithotripsy (ESWL for lumbar or pelvic ureteral lithiasis, at two urological departments. The C-arm Siemens (produced in 2010 by Siemens AG, Germany was used for ureteroscopy. The radiological devices of the lithotripters used in this study in the two clinical centers had similar characteristics. We evaluated patient exposure to ionizing radiation by using a relevant parameter, the air kerma-area product (PKA; all values in cGy cm2, calculated from the radiation dose values recorded by the fluoroscopy device. PKA depends on technical parameters that change due to anatomical characteristics of each case examined, such as body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, and stone location. For the patients subjected to ESWL for lumbar ureteral lithiasis the mean of PKA (cGy cm2 was 509 (SD=180, while for those treated for pelvic ureteral lithiasis the mean of PKA was 342 (SD=201. In the URS group for lumbar ureteral lithiasis, the mean of PKA (cGy cm2 was 892 (SD=436, while for patients with pelvic ureteral lithiasis, the mean of PKA was 601 (SD=429. The patients treated by URS had higher exposure to ionizing radiation dose than patients treated by ESWL. The risk factors of higher radiation doses were obesity, exposure time, and localization of the stones.

  19. Single-Session Hematoma Removal and Transcranial Coil Embolization for a Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Technical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Yosuke; Sato, Kenichi; Endo, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-08-01

    Patients with cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (CS dAVFs) with cortical venous varix are indicated for aggressive treatment because of the associated risk for intracranial hemorrhage. We present a case of surgical transvenous embolization in an 84-year-old woman with CS dAVF who presented with massive intracerebral hematoma. Cerebral angiograms revealed the dural AVF drained only into the superficial middle cerebral vein. Because an emergent mass reduction and prevention of rebleeding were necessary, single-session hematoma removal and transcranial embolization of a CS dAVF were performed in the neurosurgical operating room, using a mobile C-arm fluoroscopy. After the right frontotemporal craniotomy, intracerebral hematoma was removed and coil packing of the affected cavernous sinus was successfully performed via the dilated superficial middle cerebral vein. The transcortical vein approach enables occlusion of CS dAVF with isolated cortical venous drainage and may be a valuable alternative approach for some cases needed emergency craniotomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluoroscopy-guided lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid for patients in whom a blind beside approach is difficult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chee, Choong Guen; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eu Gene; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the rates of technical success, clinical success, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our hospital, and informed consent was waived. Ninety-six procedures on 60 consecutive patients performed July 2008 to December 2013 were evaluated. The patients were referred for the fluoroscopy-guided procedure due to failed attempts at a bedside approach, a history of lumbar surgery, difficulty cooperating, or obesity. Fluoroscopy-guided lumbar drainage procedures were performed in the lateral decubitus position with a midline puncture of L3/4 in the interspinous space. The catheter tip was positioned at the T12/L1 level, and the catheter was visualized on contrast agent-aided fluoroscopy. A standard angiography system with a rotatable C-arm was used. The definitions of technical success, clinical success, and complications were defined prior to the study. The technical and clinical success rates were 99.0% (95/96) and 89.6% (86/96), respectively. The mean hospital stay for an external lumbar drain was 4.84 days. Nine cases of minor complications and eight major complications were observed, including seven cases of meningitis, and one retained catheter requiring surgical removal. Fluoroscopy-guided external lumbar drainage is a technically reliable procedure in difficult patients with failed attempts at a bedside procedure, history of lumbar surgery, difficulties in cooperation, or obesity.

  1. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Puthenpurayil John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. [1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10-70 s and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15-100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  2. Staff lens doses in interventional urology. A comparison with interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Sanchez, R M; Resel, L E; Moreno, J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate radiation doses to the lens of urologists during interventional procedures and to compare them with values measured during interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery. The measurements were carried out in a surgical theatre using a mobile C-arm system and electronic occupational dosimeters (worn over the lead apron). Patient and staff dose measurements were collected in a sample of 34 urology interventions (nephrolithotomies). The same dosimetry system was used in other medical specialties for comparison purposes. Median and 3rd quartile values for urology procedures were: patient doses 30 and 40 Gy cm 2 ; personal dose equivalent Hp(10) over the apron (μSv/procedure): 393 and 848 (for urologists); 21 and 39 (for nurses). Median values of over apron dose per procedure for urologists resulted 18.7 times higher than those measured for radiologists and cardiologists working with proper protection (using ceiling suspended screens) in catheterisation laboratories, and 4.2 times higher than the values measured for vascular surgeons at the same hospital. Comparison with passive dosimeters worn near the eyes suggests that dosimeters worn over the apron could be a reasonable conservative estimate for ocular doses for interventional urology. Authors recommend that at least the main surgeon uses protective eyewear during interventional urology procedures. (paper)

  3. SV40 Assembly In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariella Oppenheim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Simian virus 40 (SV40 capsid is a T = 7d icosahedral lattice ∼45 nm in diameter surrounding the ∼5 kb circular minichromosome. The outer shell is composed of 360 monomers of the major capsid protein VP1, tightly bound in 72 pentamers. VP1 is a jellyroll β-barrel, with extending N- and C-terminal arms. The N-terminal arms bind DNA and face the interior of the capsid. The flexible C-arms tie together the 72 pentamers in three distinct kinds of interactions, thus facilitating the formation of a T = 7 icosahedron from identical pentameric building blocks. Assembly in vivo was shown to occur by addition of capsomers around the DNA. We apply a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches to study SV40 assembly. Our in vivo and in vitro studies suggest the following model: one or two capsomers bind at a high affinity to ses, the viral DNA encapsidation signal, forming the nucleation centre for assembly. Next, multiple capsomers attach concomitantly, at lower affinity, around the minichromosome. This increases their local concentration facilitating rapid, cooperative assembly reaction. Formation of the icosahedron proceeds either by gradual addition of single pentamers to the growing shell or by concerted assembly of pentamer clusters.

  4. Effect of a School-Based Intervention on Nutritional Knowledge and Habits of Low-Socioeconomic School Children in Israel: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Kaufman-Shriqui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Early social and economic deprivation, associated with poor nutrition and physical inactivity, may lead to adverse health trajectories. A cluster-randomized controlled-trial examining the effect of a school-based comprehensive intervention on nutrition knowledge, eating habits, and behaviors among low socioeconomic status (LSES school-aged children was performed. LSES school-aged children (4–7 years and their mothers were recruited from 11 schools, located in one town. The intervention was implemented on three levels: children, mothers, and teachers. The intervention (IArm included nutrition classes for children, mothers, and teachers and physical activity (PA classes for children; the control (CArm received PA only. Interventions were conducted by professional personnel, who were trained during in a two-day session to deliver the specific program in schools. Family data were obtained by parental interviews. Food knowledge observations, packed lunch records, and anthropometric measurements were obtained in school at baseline, six months, and at the end of the school year. Of 258 children enrolled, 220 (87.6% completed the six-month program. Only children in the IArm improved their nutrition knowledge and eating-habits and increased food variety and fruit and vegetable consumption, quality score of packed lunches (p < 0.001 for all, habitual water drinking increased (p = 0.02, and decreased sweet-drink consumption (p = 0.05. A school-based comprehensive nutrition intervention targeting LSES population improved eating habits, nutritional knowledge, and healthier packed lunches.

  5. var. puiggarianum (Batrachospermales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecilia Gauna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Se coleccionó Batrachospermum atrum var. puiggarianum por primera vez en la provincia de Buenos Aires. La identificación de las muestras se basó en el análisis de la morfología microscópica y en el número cromosómico de cada una de las generaciones de su ciclo de vida bajo cultivo. Los talos se estudiaron con microscopio óptico, y la cariología, por medio de la técnica de carmín acético. El ciclo de vida presentó tres generaciones: una gametofítica haploide, una carposporófitica diploide que originó la última fase Chantransia diploide. Los talos gametófitos estuvieron formados por verticilos separados por zonas internodales, cada uno de ellos constituidos por ramas primarias densamente comprimidas. Entre éstas se observaron ramas portadoras de espermatangios y de carpogonios. Las zonas internodales estuvieron constituidas por células corticales y axiales. Los carposporófitos ovoideos estuvieron formados por filamentos gonimoblásticos portadores de carposporangios terminales. El estado Chantransia se caracterizó por presentar filamentos cortos con pocas células. El material estudiado presentó un número haploide n = 4 y diploide 2n = 8.

  6. Properties of the ellipse-line-ellipse trajectory with asymmetrical variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijia; Noo, Frédéric; Maier, Andreas; Lauritsch, Guenter

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional cone-beam (CB) imaging using a multi-axis floor-mounted (or ceiling-mounted) C-arm system has become an important tool in interventional radiology. This success motivates new developments to improve image quality. One direction in which advancement is sought is the data acquisition geometry and related CB artifacts. Currently, data acquisition is performed using the circular short-scan trajectory, which yields limited axial coverage and also provides incomplete data for accurate reconstruction. To improve the image quality, as well as to increase the coverage in the longitudinal direction of the patient, we recently introduced the ellipse- line-ellipse trajectory and showed that this trajectory provides full R-line coverage within the field-of-view, which is a key property for accurate reconstruction from truncated data. An R-line is any segment of line that connects two source positions. Here, we examine how the application of asymmetrical variations to the definition of the ELE trajectory impacts the R-line coverage. This question is significant to understand how much flexibility can be used in the implementation of the ELE trajectory, particularly to adapt the scan to patient anatomy and imaging task of interest. Two types of asymmetrical variations, called axial and angular variations, are investigated.

  7. Prospects for development of powerful, highly efficient, relativistic gyrodevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusinovich, G.S.; Granatstein, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    For various applications the required parameters of sources of powerful microwave radiation lie far beyond the capabilities of existing tubes. This provokes an interest in reconsidering basic principles of relevant microwave sources in order to search for alternative concepts in their development. One of the most promising devices in the short-wavelength region of microwaves is the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM). During the last decade, two important varieties of CRMs have been distinguished, namely, gyrotrons, which operate at frequencies close to cut-off, and cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), which operate at frequencies far from cut-off. When the axial phase velocity of the wave in properly adjusted to the beam voltage and electron pitch-ratio, the efficiency of relativistic CRMs may be high (≥50%). The method of optimizing efficiency based on a partial compensation of the shift in the relativistic electron cyclotron frequency by the change in the Doppler term can be, in principle, accompanied by a corresponding profiling of the external magnetic field and/or the wave phase velocity in a slightly irregular waveguide. These methods can be used in such relativistic CRMs as relativistic gyrotrons, gyroklystrons, gyro-traveling-wave-tubes and gyrotwistrons. The most important point is their sensitivity to a spread in electron parameters. As the beam voltage grows, the operation becomes more sensitive. However, at relatively low voltages such devices are quite tolerant to electron velocity spread

  8. Ellagic Acid-Changed Epigenome of Ribosomal Genes and Condensed RPA194-Positive Regions of Nucleoli in Tumour Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legartová, S; Sbardella, G; Kozubek, S; Bártová, E

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of ellagic acid (EA) on the morphology of nucleoli and on the pattern of major proteins of the nucleolus. After EA treatment of HeLa cells, we observed condensation of nucleoli as documented by the pattern of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs). EA also induced condensation of RPA194-positive nucleolar regions, but no morphological changes were observed in nucleolar compartments positive for UBF1/2 proteins or fibrillarin. Studied morphological changes induced by EA were compared with the morphology of control, non-treated cells and with pronounced condensation of all nucleolar domains caused by actinomycin D (ACT-D) treatment. Similarly as ACT-D, but in a lesser extent, EA induced an increased number of 53BP1-positive DNA lesions. However, the main marker of DNA lesions, γH2AX, was not accumulated in body-like nuclear structures. An increased level of γH2AX was found by immunofluorescence and Western blots only after EA treatment. Intriguingly, the levels of fibrillarin, UBF1/2 and γH2AX were increased at the promoters of ribosomal genes, while 53BP1 and CARM1 levels were decreased by EA treatment at these genomic regions. In the entire genome, EA reduced H3R17 dimethylation. Taken together, ellagic acid is capable of significantly changing the nucleolar morphology and protein levels inside the nucleolus.

  9. The first clinical treatment with kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM): A real-time image guidance method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keall, Paul J.; Aun Ng, Jin; O'Brien, Ricky

    2015-01-01

    on September 16, 2014. Methods: KIM uses current and prior 2D x-ray images to estimate the 3D target position during cancer radiotherapy treatment delivery. KIM software was written to process kilovoltage (kV) images streamed from a standard C-arm linear accelerator with a gantry-mounted kV x-ray imaging...... system. A 120° pretreatment kV imaging arc was acquired to build the patient-specific 2D to 3D motion correlation. The kV imager was activated during the megavoltage (MV) treatment, a dual arc VMAT prostate treatment, to estimate the 3D prostate position in real-time. All necessary ethics, legal......, and regulatory requirements were met for this clinical study. The quality assurance processes were completed and peer reviewed. Results: During treatment, a prostate position offset of nearly 3 mm in the posterior direction was observed with KIM. This position offset did not trigger a gating event. After...

  10. Basics principles of flat detector computed tomography (FD-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakou, Y.; Struffert, T.; Doerfler, A.; Kalender, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Flat detectors (FDs) have been developed for use in radiography and fluoroscopy to replace standard X-ray film, film-screen combinations and image intensifiers (II). In comparison to X-ray film and II, FD technology offers higher dynamic range, dose reduction, fast digital readout and the possibility for dynamic acquisitions of image series, yet keeping to a compact design. It appeared logical to employ FD designs also for computed tomography (CT) imaging. FDCT has meanwhile become widely accepted for interventional and intra-operative imaging using C-arm systems. Additionally, the introduction of FD technology was a milestone for soft-tissue CT imaging in the interventional suite which was not possible with II systems in the past. This review focuses on technical and performance issues of FD technology and its wide range of applications for CT imaging. FDCT is not aimed at challenging standard clinical CT as regards to the typical diagnostic examinations, but it has already proven unique for a number of dedicated CT applications offering distinct practical advantages, above all the availability of immediate CT imaging during an intervention. (orig.) [de

  11. Flat-detector computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, T.; Doerfler, A.

    2009-01-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range than available with film-screen and phosphor luminescence, radiography flat detector technology is now widely accepted for neuroangiographic imaging. Especially flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT), which uses rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology, is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. As ''angiographic CT'' FD-CT may be helpful in many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures, e.g. intracranial stenting for cerebrovascular stenoses, stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms and embolization of arteriovenous malformations. By providing morphologic, CT-like images of the brain within the angiography suite FD-CT allows rapid visualization of periprocedural hemorrhaging and may thus improve rapid complication management without the need of patient transfer. In addition, myelography and postmyelographic FD-CT imaging can be carried out using a single modality. Spinal interventions, such as kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty might also benefit from FD-CT. Imaging of the temporal bone may also develop into an important field of FD-CT. This paper briefly reviews the technical principles of FD technology and the potential applications in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology. (orig.) [de

  12. Ordinary Cannulated Compression Screws or Headless Cannulated Compression Screws? A Synthetic Bone Biomechanical Research in the Internal Fixation of Vertical Femoral Neck Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baokun Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study is to verify whether the headless cannulated compression screw (HCCS has higher biomechanical stability than the ordinary cannulated compression screw (OCCS in the treatment of vertical femoral neck fractures. Materials and Methods. 30 synthetic femur models were equally divided into 2 groups, with 50°, 60°, and 70° Pauwels angle of femoral neck fracture, under 3D printed guiding plates and C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. The femur molds were fixed with three parallel OCCSs as OCCS group and three parallel HCCSs as HCCS group. All specimens were tested for compressive strength and maximum load to failure with a loading rate of 2 mm/min. Results. The result showed that there was no significant difference with the compressive strength in the Pauwels angle of 50° and 60°. However, we observed that the maximum load to failure with the Pauwels angle of 50°, 60°, and 70° and the compressive strength with 70° of HCCS group showed better performance than the OCCS group. Conclusion. HCCS performs with better biomechanical stability than OCCS in the treatment of vertical femoral neck fracture, especially with the Pauwels angle of 70°.

  13. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I–IV. Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6 in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses.

  14. 3D treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng B; Li, Sicong

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems have evolved and become crucial components of modern radiation therapy. The systems are computer-aided designing or planning softwares that speed up the treatment planning processes to arrive at the best dose plans for the patients undergoing radiation therapy. Furthermore, the systems provide new technology to solve problems that would not have been considered without the use of computers such as conformal radiation therapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The 3D treatment planning systems vary amongst the vendors and also the dose delivery systems they are designed to support. As such these systems have different planning tools to generate the treatment plans and convert the treatment plans into executable instructions that can be implemented by the dose delivery systems. The rapid advancements in computer technology and accelerators have facilitated constant upgrades and the introduction of different and unique dose delivery systems than the traditional C-arm type medical linear accelerators. The focus of this special issue is to gather relevant 3D treatment planning systems for the radiation oncology community to keep abreast of technology advancement by assess the planning tools available as well as those unique "tricks or tips" used to support the different dose delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Trial of finger contamination reduction of the operator in nerve block treatment. Comparison of over- and under-table systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hajime; Okabe, Keigo; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    Fluoroscopy-guided intervention of the lumbar spine, such as nerve block, plays an important role in the management of disc hernia patients. However, irradiation of operators' fingers remains a problem even with careful collimation and operation, especially when performed by non-radiologists. We compared the irradiation doses of under-table and over-table fluoroscopy systems, and we discuss the most advantageous method of reducing irradiation. The effectiveness and conditions of use of lead protection gloves were also evaluated. Skin dose was monitored using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and an electronic dose meter. The skin doses of over- and under-table fluoroscopy were compared using C-arm fluoroscopy. Finger irradiation dose with 0.03 mmPb protection gloves was also measured. The under-table method reduced skin dose by 95% compared with the over-table method. Thicker PMMA resulted in a higher rate of irradiation reduction. Protection gloves reduced radiation dose by half, although this reduction was cancelled when automatic brightness control (ABC) was utilized. Under-tube fluoroscopy was superior to over-tube fluoroscopy in reducing irradiation to the fingers. (author)

  16. The impact of x-ray tube configuration on the eye lens and extremity doses received by cardiologists in electrophysiology room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J; Zmyślony, M; Bissinger, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of the x-ray tube configuration on the radiation doses to eye lens and extremities of cardiologists performing pacemaker implantation procedures in electrophysiology laboratory. The measurements were performed on one, widely used, portable C-arm system, first with x-ray tube mounted above the patient table and image intensifier below it and then on a reinstalled (but essentially the same) system with under-table x-ray tube configuration. Thermoluminescent dosimeters, placed in various positions near the eye lens, on the hands and ankle, were used during every procedure. The comparison of doses received by cardiologists after changing the x-ray tube configuration from over- to under-table shows statistically significant dose reduction (p < 0.009) for the eye lens closest to the x-ray tube, left finger, left wrist, while for the ankle a dose increase is observed. The corresponding over- to under-table x-ray tube median dose ratios are 4.1 for the right eye, 4.8 for the left finger, 3.0 for left wrist and, finally, 0.13 for the right ankle. Systems with under-table x-ray tube are preferable from a radiation protection point of view. The observed significant increase in doses to the legs should be partially compensated by the use of a protective lead curtain. (note)

  17. State-of-the-art of high power gyro-devices and free electron masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumm, M.

    1993-10-01

    At present, gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. 140 GHz gyrotrons with output power P out = 0.58 MW, pulse length τ = 2.0 s and efficiency η = 34% are commercially available. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver P out = 40 kW with τ = 40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz (η ≥ 4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in material processing and plasma chemistry. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with the following parameters: f ≥ 28 GHz, P out = 10-30 kW, CW, η ≥ 30%. This paper reports on achievements and problems related to the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotrons for long pulse or CW operation and describes the microwave technological pecularities of the different development steps. In addition, this work gives a short overview of the present development of gyrotrons for technological applications, quasi-optical gyrotrons, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), gyro-klystrons, gyro-TWT amplifiers, gyro-BWO's and free electron masers (FEMs). The most impressive FEM output parameters are: P out = 2 GW, τ = 20 ns, η = 13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and P out = 15 kW, τ = 20 μs, η = 5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). (orig.) [de

  18. Orbital Wall Reconstruction with Two-Piece Puzzle 3D Printed Implants: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Maurice Y.; Büttner, Michael; Vercruysse, Herman; Wauters, Lauri; Beerens, Maikel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a technique for secondary reconstruction of traumatic orbital wall defects using titanium implants that act as three-dimensional (3D) puzzle pieces. We present three cases of large defect reconstruction using implants produced by Xilloc Medical B.V. (Maastricht, the Netherlands) with a 3D printer manufactured by LayerWise (3D Systems; Heverlee, Belgium), and designed using the biomedical engineering software programs ProPlan and 3-Matic (Materialise, Heverlee, Belgium). The smaller size of the implants allowed sequential implantation for the reconstruction of extensive two-wall defects via a limited transconjunctival incision. The precise fit of the implants with regard to the surrounding ledges and each other was confirmed by intraoperative 3D imaging (Mobile C-arm Systems B.V. Pulsera, Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, the Netherlands). The patients showed near-complete restoration of orbital volume and ocular motility. However, challenges remain, including traumatic fat atrophy and fibrosis. PMID:26889349

  19. Does prone repositioning before posterior fixation produce greater lordosis in lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yson, Sharon C; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Santos, Edward R G; Luna, Jeffrey T P; Polly, David W

    2014-10-01

    Retrospective comparative radiographic review. To determine if lateral to prone repositioning before posterior fixation confers additional operative level lordosis in lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedures. In a review of 56 consecutive patients who underwent LLIF, there was no statistically significant change in segmental lordosis from lateral to prone once a cage is in place. The greatest lordosis increase was observed after cage insertion. We reviewed 56 consecutive patients who underwent LLIF in the lateral position followed by posterior fixation in the prone position. Eighty-eight levels were fused. Disk space angle was measured on intraoperative C-arm images, and change in operative level segmental lordosis brought about by each of the following was determined: (1) cage insertion, (2) prone repositioning, and (3) posterior instrumentation. Paired t test was used to determine significance (α=0.05). Mean lordosis improvement brought about by cage insertion was 2.6 degrees (P=0.00005). There was a 0.1 degree mean lordosis change brought about by lateral to prone positioning (P=0.47). Mean lordosis improvement brought about by posterior fixation, including rod compression, was 1.0 degree (P=0.03). In LLIF procedures, the largest increase in operative level segmental lordosis is brought about by cage insertion. Further lordosis may be gained by placing posterior fixation, including compressive maneuvers. Prone repositioning after cage placement does not produce any incremental lordosis change. Therefore, posterior fixation may be performed in the lateral position without compromising operative level sagittal alignment.

  20. Closed reduction of displaced or dislocated mandibular condyle fractures in children using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Nam, D H

    2015-10-01

    Most surgeons agree that closed treatment provides the best results for condylar fractures in children. Nevertheless, treatment of the paediatric mandibular condyle fracture that is severely displaced or dislocated is controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes following the treatment of displaced or dislocated condylar fractures in children using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction. This procedure can strengthen the advantage of closed reduction and make up for the shortcomings of open reduction. From March 1, 2005 to December 25, 2011, 11 children aged between 4 and 12 years with displaced or dislocated mandibular condyle fractures were treated using threaded Kirschner wire and external rubber traction under portable C-arm fluoroscopy. All patients had unilateral displaced or dislocated condylar fractures. The follow-up period ranged from 24 to 42 months (mean 29.3 months). Normal occlusion and pain-free function of the temporomandibular joint, without deviation or limitation of jaw opening, was achieved in all patients. This closed reduction technique in displaced or dislocated condylar fractures in children offers a reliable solution in preventing the unfavourable sequelae of closed treatment and the open technique, such as altered morphology, functional disturbances, and facial nerve damage. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenolic composition and mouthfeel characteristics resulting from blending Chilean red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Peña-Neira, Alvaro; Avilés-Gálvez, Pamela; Medel-Marabolí, Marcela; Del Barrio-Galán, Rubén; López-Solís, Remigio; Canals, Joan Miquel

    2014-03-15

    The blending of wine is a common practice in winemaking to improve certain characteristics that are appreciated by consumers. The use of some cultivars may contribute phenolic compounds that modify certain characteristics in blended wines, particularly those related to mouthfeel. The aim of this work was to study the effect of Carménère, Merlot and Cabernet Franc on the phenolic composition, proanthocyanidin profile and mouthfeel characteristics of Cabernet Sauvignon blends. Significant differences in chemical composition were observed among the monovarietal wines. Separation using Sep-Pak C₁₈ cartridges revealed differences in the concentration but not in the proportion of various proanthocyanidins. Blending reduced polyphenol concentration differences among the various monovarietal wines. Although no major overall differences were observed after blending the monovarietal wines, this oenological practice produced clear differences in mouthfeel characteristics in such a way that the quality of the perceived astringency was different. This study showed that the use of a particular wine variety (Cabernet Sauvignon) in a higher proportion in wine blending produced blends that were less differentiable from the monovarietal wine, owing to a suppression effect, producing an apparent standardization of the wines regarding chemical composition. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Los Cactos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Paredes Antonio

    1942-12-01

    Full Text Available El Cacto Cactus es uno de los géneros de plantas de la familia de las Cacteas Nopaleas que contiene muchas especies y variedades todas de formas extrañas, propias de la América intertropical y que habitan en los climas fríos y templados, en terrenos secos y estériles, desde el norte de Méjico hasta la Patagonia. Algunos cactos se cultivan por sus frutos que son sanosy sabrosos, otros como plantas ornamentales en los parques y jardines, otros como auxiliares para la industria, como los nopales en los que se cría la Cochinilla, insecto de la familia de los Hemípteros que produce la laca o carmín, materia colorante indispensable en la pintura al óleo y la acuarela, y por último, hoy están en moda y se cultivan con esmero una gran variedad de diminutos cactos exóticosque se mantienen sobre arena húmeda en pequeñas maceteras de porcelana, en los lugares más visibles de las habitaciones.

  3. Endosymbiotic microorganisms of scale insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Rosenblueth

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parte del éxito evolutivo y ecológico de los insectos se atribuye a las bacterias y hongos asociados a ellos queamplían sus capacidades metabólicas o les permiten resistir estrés o parasitosis. Las asociaciones posiblemente seoriginaron hace cientos de millones de años y el resultado es una interdependencia que, en algunos casos, insectoy bacteria no pueden existir separadamente, lo que ha llevado a una reducción significativa de los genomas de lossimbiontes bacterianos y a la transferencia por vía materna de éstos a la progenie. Recientemente, el estudio delos simbiontes de insectos ha cobrado gran interés y se han identificado algunas de sus funciones biológicas dentrode los hospederos. Los insectos escama o cochinillas se alimentan de la savia de las plantas, por lo que requierensimbiontes para compensar las deficiencias de su dieta, rica en carbono pero pobre en compuestos nitrogenados.Algunas de las plagas más agresivas de los cultivos agrícolas son los insectos escama. En este artículo revisamos lossimbiontes de la cochinilla del carmín y de la laca, de gran interés comercial y artesanal. En las cochinillas que seestudiaron encontramos diversas comunidades microbianas con la capacidad de sintetizar aminoácidos, vitaminas,fijar nitrógeno o reciclar los productos de desecho del metabolismo nitrogenado.

  4. Maria-Mercè Marçal, autora de contes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Riera

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article Carme Riera talks about Marçal as a short-story writer, aspect of the author which is less discussed than her poems and novels, but, according to Riera, not at all insignificant. She discusses the three short stories Marçal wrote for adults: Joc de màscares, El retorn and Tronatrons (unpublished. Riera refers to the game of intertextualtity in Marçal’s work; Joc de màscares, which takes Riera´s novel, Te deix, amor, la mar com a penyora, as a starting point, and Tronatrons, which Riera feels could well be intended to pay a tribute to Víctor Català, whose work was well-known by Marçal. Finally, the author of this article talks about the importance of the recurring motif of the mirror in Marçal´s work, both in her poetry and novels.

  5. High Power Microwave Tubes: Basics and Trends, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Vishal; Basu, B. N.

    2018-01-01

    Volume 2 of the book begins with chapter 6, in which we have taken up conventional MWTs (such as TWTs, klystrons, including multi-cavity and multi-beam klystrons, klystron variants including reflex klystron, IOT, EIK, EIO and twystron, and crossed-field tubes, namely, magnetron, CFA and carcinotron). In chapter 7, we have taken up fast-wave tubes (such as gyrotron, gyro-BWO, gyro-klystron, gyro-TWT, CARM, SWCA, hybrid gyro-tubes and peniotron). In chapter 8, we discuss vacuum microelectronic tubes (such as klystrino module, THz gyrotron and clinotron BWO); plasma-assisted tubes (such as PWT, plasma-filled TWT, BWO, including PASOTRON, and gyrotron); and HPM (high power microwave) tubes (such as relativistic TWT, relativistic BWO, RELTRON (variant of relativistic klystron), relativistic magnetron, high power Cerenkov tubes including SWO, RDG or orotron, MWCG and MWDG, bremsstrahlung radiation type tube, namely, vircator, and M-type tube MILO). In Chapter 9, we provide handy information about the frequency and power ranges of common MWTs, although more such information is provided at relevant places in the rest of the book as and where necessary. Chapter 10 is an epilogue that sums up the authors' attempt to bring out the various aspects of the basics of and trends in high power MWTs.

  6. Rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach after cone beam CT-guided lung biopsy: effect on pneumothorax rate in 1,191 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the effect of rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach on the incidence of pneumothorax and drainage catheter placement due to pneumothorax in C-arm Cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) of lung lesions. From May 2011 to December 2012, 1227 PTNBs were performed in 1191 patients with a 17-gauge coaxial needle. 617 biopsies were performed without (conventional-group) and 610 with rapid-rollover approach (rapid-rollover-group). Overall pneumothorax rates and incidences of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement were compared between two groups. There were no significant differences in overall pneumothorax rates between conventional and rapid-rollover groups (19.8 % vs. 23.1 %, p = 0.164). However, pneumothorax rate requiring drainage catheter placement was significantly lower in rapid-rollover-group (1.6 %) than conventional-group (4.2 %) (p = 0.010). Multivariate analysis revealed male, age > 60, bulla crossed, fissure crossed, pleura to target distance > 1.3 cm, emphysema along needle tract, and pleural punctures ≥ 2 were significant risk factors of pneumothorax (p < 0.05). Regarding pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement, fissure crossed, bulla crossed, and emphysema along needle tract were significant risk factors (p < 0.05), whereas rapid-rollover approach was an independent protective factor (p = 0.002). The rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach significantly reduced the rate of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement after CBCT-guided PTNB. (orig.)

  7. Phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity of pomaces from four grape varieties (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cerda-Carrasco, Aarón; López-Solís, Remigio; Nuñez-Kalasic, Hugo; Peña-Neira, Álvaro; Obreque-Slier, Elías

    2015-05-01

    Phenolic compounds are widely distributed secondary metabolites in plants usually conferring them with unique taste, flavour and health-promoting properties. In fruits of Vitis vinifera L., phenolic composition is highly dependent on grape variety. Differential extraction of these compounds from grapes during winemaking is critically associated with wine quality. By-products of winemaking, such as grape pomace, can contain significant amounts of polyphenols. However, information concerning the varietal effect on wine grape pomace is scarce. In this study, pomaces from Sauvignon Blanc (SB), Chardonnay (CH), Cabernet Sauvignon (CS) and Carménère (CA) grape varieties were characterized spectroscopically and by HPLC-DAD analysis. White grape pomaces (SB and CH) presented higher antioxidant capacities and higher contents of total phenols and total proanthocyanidins compared with red grape pomaces (CS and CA), whereas the latter showed much higher anthocyanin levels and colour intensities. Concentrations of monomeric proanthocyanidins and low-molecular-weight phenols in the four grape pomace varieties were significantly different. Grape pomaces from four varieties showed high but diverse contents of polyphenols and antioxidant capacities. Thus grape pomaces represent an important potential source of polyphenols, which could be useful for nutritional and/or pharmacological purposes. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Comparison of Morphine and Tramadol in Transforaminal Epidural Injections for Lumbar Radicular Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Transforaminal epidural steroid injections are known to reduce inflammation by inhibiting synthesis of various proinflammatory mediators and have been used increasingly. The anti-inflammatory properties of opioids are not as fully understood but apparently involve antagonism sensory neuron excitability and pro-inflammatory neuropeptide release. To date, no studies have addressed the efficacy of transforaminal epidural morphine in patients with radicular pain, and none have directly compared morphine with a tramadol for this indication. The aim of this study was to compare morphine and tramadol analgesia when administered via epidural injection to patients with lumbar radicular pain. Methods A total of 59 patients were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups and followed for 3 months after procedure. Each patient was subjected to C-arm guided transforaminal epidural injection (TFEI) of an affected nerve root. As assigned, patients received either morphine sulfate (2.5 mg/2.5 ml) or tramadol (25 mg/0.5 ml) in combination with 0.2% ropivacaine (1 ml). Using numeric rating scale was subsequently rates at 2 weeks and 3 months following injection for comparison with baseline. Results Both groups had significantly lower mean pain scores at 2 weeks and at 3 months after treatment, but outcomes did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusions TFEI of an opioid plus local anesthetic proved effective in treating radicular pain. Although morphine surpassed tramadol in pain relief scores, the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:23862000

  9. Flat-Panel Computed Tomography (DYNA-CT) in Neuroradiology. From High-Resolution Imaging of Implants to One-Stop-Shopping for Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, A; Gölitz, P; Engelhorn, T; Kloska, S; Struffert, T

    2015-10-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range, flat-panel detector technology has meanwhile got widely accepted in the neuroradiological community. Especially flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) using rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. By providing CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize hemorrhage and may thus improve complication management without the need of patient transfer. As "Angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures and for noninvasive monitoring and follow-up. In addition, spinal interventions and high-resolution imaging of the temporal bone might also benefit from FD-CT. Finally, using novel dynamic perfusion and angiographic protocols, FD-CT may provide functional information on brain perfusion and vasculature with the potential to replace standard imaging in selected acute stroke patients.

  10. Catheter visualisation in MR tomography: first animal experimental experiences with field inhomogeneity catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Glowinski, A.; Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Vaals, J.J. van; Hurtak, W.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a new developed field inhomogeneity catheter for interventional MR imaging in vivo. Materials and methods: Three different prototypes of a field inhomogeneity catheter were investigated in 6 pigs. The catheters were introduced in Seldinger technique via the femoral vessels over a guide wire on an interventional MR system (Philips Gyroscan NT combined with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit [Philips BV 212[). Catheters were placed in veins and arteries. The catheter position was controlled by a fast gradient echo sequence (Turbo Field Echo [TEF[). Results: Catheters were introduced over a guide wire without complications in all cases. Using the field inhomogeneity concept, catheters were easily visualised in the inferior vena cava and the aorta by the fast gradient echo technique on MR in all cases. Although aortic branches were successfully cannulated, the catheters were not displayed by the TFE technique due to the complex and tortuous anatomy. All animals survived the experiments without complications. Conclusion: MR guided visualisation of a field inhomogeneity catheter is a simple concept which can be realised on each MR scanner and may allow intravascular MR guided interventions in future. (orig.) [de

  11. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  12. Study of spatial resolution in three-dimensional rotational angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoki, Takuya; Nasada, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Kazuma; Umehara, Takayoshi

    2006-01-01

    In interventional radiology (IVR) of cerebral aneurysms, it is important to understand the form and physical relationships between the cerebral aneurysm and the surrounding vessels. However, because the vessels in the head area are highly complex, it can be difficult to comprehend the structure using conventional angiography. Therefore, three-dimensional rotational angiography (3D-RA) has been used in recent years. This article discusses studies of the spatial resolution of 3D-RA. We reconstructed 3D-RA of an acrylic slit phantom (slit widths: 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5 mm) and examined spatial resolution by visual evaluation and profile curves. When the slit phantom was arranged to avoid the effect of beam hardening, the spatial resolution of 3D-RA was found to be as high as 0.75 mm. When the slit phantom was placed orthogonal to the rotational axis of the C-arm, the spatial resolution of 3D-RA was decreased because of the cone angle effect of X-rays. However, it was considered within the allowable range for clinical study. Consequently, 3D-RA is valuable in IVR. (author)

  13. Multi-modal imaging, model-based tracking, and mixed reality visualisation for orthopaedic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Bernhard; Tateno, Keisuke; Johnson, Alex; Fotouhi, Javad; Osgood, Greg; Tombari, Federico; Navab, Nassir

    2017-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons are still following the decades old workflow of using dozens of two-dimensional fluoroscopic images to drill through complex 3D structures, e.g. pelvis. This Letter presents a mixed reality support system, which incorporates multi-modal data fusion and model-based surgical tool tracking for creating a mixed reality environment supporting screw placement in orthopaedic surgery. A red–green–blue–depth camera is rigidly attached to a mobile C-arm and is calibrated to the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging space via iterative closest point algorithm. This allows real-time automatic fusion of reconstructed surface and/or 3D point clouds and synthetic fluoroscopic images obtained through CBCT imaging. An adapted 3D model-based tracking algorithm with automatic tool segmentation allows for tracking of the surgical tools occluded by hand. This proposed interactive 3D mixed reality environment provides an intuitive understanding of the surgical site and supports surgeons in quickly localising the entry point and orienting the surgical tool during screw placement. The authors validate the augmentation by measuring target registration error and also evaluate the tracking accuracy in the presence of partial occlusion. PMID:29184659

  14. Measurement of bio-impedance with a smart needle to confirm percutaneous kidney access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D J; Sinkov, V A; Roberts, W W; Allaf, M E; Patriciu, A; Jarrett, T W; Kavoussi, L R; Stoianovici, D

    2001-10-01

    The traditional method of percutaneous renal access requires freehand needle placement guided by C-arm fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, or computerized tomography. This approach provides limited objective means for verifying successful access. We developed an impedance based percutaneous Smart Needle system and successfully used it to confirm collecting system access in ex vivo porcine kidneys. The Smart Needle consists of a modified 18 gauge percutaneous access needle with the inner stylet electrically insulated from the outer sheath. Impedance is measured between the exposed stylet tip and sheath using Model 4275 LCR meter (Hewlett-Packard, Sunnyvale, California). An ex vivo porcine kidney was distended by continuous gravity infusion of 100 cm. water saline from a catheter passed through the parenchyma into the collecting system. The Smart Needle was gradually inserted into the kidney to measure depth precisely using a robotic needle placement system, while impedance was measured continuously. The Smart Needle was inserted 4 times in each of 4 kidneys. When the needle penetrated the distended collecting system in 11 of 16 attempts, a characteristic sharp drop in resistivity was noted from 1.9 to 1.1 ohm m. Entry into the collecting system was confirmed by removing the stylet and observing fluid flow from the sheath. This characteristic impedance change was observed only at successful entry into the collecting system. A characteristic sharp drop in impedance signifies successful entry into the collecting system. The Smart Needle system may prove useful for percutaneous kidney access.

  15. Supine vs decubitus lateral patient positioning in vertebral fracture assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggiosi, Margaret Anne; Finigan, Judith; Peel, Nicola; Eastell, Richard; Ferrar, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    In vertebral fracture assessment (VFA), lateral scans are obtained with the patient positioned supine (C-arm densitometers) or lateral decubitus (fixed-arm densitometers). We aimed to determine the impact of positioning on image quality and fracture definition. We performed supine and decubitus lateral VFA in 50 postmenopausal women and used the algorithm-based qualitative method to identify vertebral fractures. We compared the 2 techniques for the identification of fractures (kappa analysis) and compared the numbers of unreadable vertebrae (indiscernible endplates) and vertebrae that were projected obliquely (Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test). The kappa score for agreement between the VFA techniques (to identify women with vertebral fractures) was 0.84 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.99), and for agreement with fracture assessments made from radiographs, kappa was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.57-0.94) for both supine and decubitus lateral VFA. There were more unreadable vertebrae with supine lateral (48 vertebrae in supine lateral compared with 14 in decubitus lateral; p=0.001), but oblique projection was less common (93 vertebrae compared with 145 in decubitus lateral; p=0.002). We conclude that there were significantly different projection effects with supine and decubitus lateral VFA, but these differences did not influence the identification of vertebral fractures in our study sample. Copyright © 2012 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Erythrotrichopeltis, eine neue Gattung der Erythropeltidaceae (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmann, P.

    1984-06-01

    In culture experiments Erythropeltis discigera (Berth.) Schmitz and Erythrotrichia discigera Berth. proved to be heteromorphous stages in the life history of the same entity, incorporated into the new genus Erythrotrichopeltis. There is no obligate alternation of generations, the peltoid and the trichoid phase both propagate asexually by monospores. In addition, the trichoid phase releases spermatia in abundance, while carpogonia cannot be distinguished from vegetative cells. Thus far, the present statements are in full accordance with Berthold's observations, made at Naples more than 100 years ago, which have, however, recently been challenged. Moreover, the cultivation experiments made supplement Berthold's results as to the post fertilization process. A few days after the appearance of spermatia, peltoid plants are met with among the filamentous ones: they obviously originate from carpospores. The transition of the peltoid to the trichoid phase, at first observed accidentally in 3-month old moribund cultures, was reconstructed on more than one occasion by designed experiments. This study was started with discoid plants isolated from crude cultures of sublitoral algae from Helgoland (North Sea). Neither Erythrotrichia discigera Berth. nor Erythropeltis discigera (Berth.) Schmitz were ever found in the field around Helgoland. Recognized by Batters to be identical with Bangia ciliaris Carmichael, the name of the typical representative of the new genus is Erythrotrichopeltis ciliaris (Carm. ex Harv. in Hook.) nov. comb.

  17. On the question of 3D seed reconstruction in prostate brachytherapy: the determination of x-ray source and film locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Zaider, Marco; Worman, Michael; Cohen, Gilad

    2004-01-01

    Inaccuracy in seed placement during permanent prostate implants may lead to significant dosimetric deviations from the intended plan. In two recent publications (Todor et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2031-48, Todor et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1153-71), methodology was described for identifying intraoperatively the positions of seeds already implanted, thus allowing re-optimization of the treatment plan and correcting for such seed misplacement. Seed reconstruction is performed using fluoroscopic images and an important (and non-trivial) component of this approach is the ability to accurately determine the position of the gantry relative to the treatment volume. We describe the methodology for acquiring this information, based on the known geometry of six markers attached to the ultrasound probe. This method does not require the C-arm unit to be isocentric and films can be taken with the gantry set at any arbitrary position. This is significant because the patient positioning on the operating table (in the lithotomy position) restricts the range of angles at which films can be taken to a quite narrow (typically ±10 0 ) interval and, as a general rule, the closer the angles the larger the uncertainty in the seed location reconstruction along the direction from the x-ray source to the film. (note)

  18. 3-Dimensional printing guide template assisted percutaneous vertebroplasty: Technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Lin, JiSheng; Yang, Yong; Xu, JunChuan; Fei, Qi

    2018-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is currently considered as an effective treatment for pain caused by acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture. Recently, puncture-related complications are increasingly reported. It's important to find a precise technique to reduce the puncture-related complications. We report a case and discussed the novel surgical technique with step-by-step operating procedures, to introduce the precise PVP assisted by a 3-dimensional printing guide template. Based on the preoperative CT scan and infrared scan data, a well-designed individual guide template could be established in a 3-dimensional reconstruction software and printed out by a 3-dimensional printer. In real operation, by matching the guide template to patient's back skin, cement needles' insertion orientation and depth were easily established. Only 14 times C-arm fluoroscopy with HDF mode (total exposure dose was 4.5 mSv) were required during the procedure. The operation took only 17 min. Cement distribution in the vertebral body was very good without any puncture-related complications. Pain was significantly relieved after surgery. In conclusion, the novel precise 3-dimensional printing guide template system may allow (1) comprehensive visualization of the fractured vertebral body and the individual surgical planning, (2) the perfect fitting between skin and guide template to ensure the puncture stability and accuracy, and (3) increased puncture precision and decreased puncture-related complications, surgical time and radiation exposure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On-the-fly augmented reality for orthopedic surgery using a multimodal fiducial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andress, Sebastian; Johnson, Alex; Unberath, Mathias; Winkler, Alexander Felix; Yu, Kevin; Fotouhi, Javad; Weidert, Simon; Osgood, Greg; Navab, Nassir

    2018-04-01

    Fluoroscopic x-ray guidance is a cornerstone for percutaneous orthopedic surgical procedures. However, two-dimensional (2-D) observations of the three-dimensional (3-D) anatomy suffer from the effects of projective simplification. Consequently, many x-ray images from various orientations need to be acquired for the surgeon to accurately assess the spatial relations between the patient's anatomy and the surgical tools. We present an on-the-fly surgical support system that provides guidance using augmented reality and can be used in quasiunprepared operating rooms. The proposed system builds upon a multimodality marker and simultaneous localization and mapping technique to cocalibrate an optical see-through head mounted display to a C-arm fluoroscopy system. Then, annotations on the 2-D x-ray images can be rendered as virtual objects in 3-D providing surgical guidance. We quantitatively evaluate the components of the proposed system and, finally, design a feasibility study on a semianthropomorphic phantom. The accuracy of our system was comparable to the traditional image-guided technique while substantially reducing the number of acquired x-ray images as well as procedure time. Our promising results encourage further research on the interaction between virtual and real objects that we believe will directly benefit the proposed method. Further, we would like to explore the capabilities of our on-the-fly augmented reality support system in a larger study directed toward common orthopedic interventions.

  20. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion: a clinical observation of 30 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Weidong; Li Yazhou; Cao Wei; Yang Wei; Zhang Peng; Wang Zhimin; Wu Zhiqun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effects and safety of radiofrequency thermocoagulation in treating the lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion. Methods: Thirty patients with lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion, whose diagnoses were confirmed by clinical manifestations and CT findings, were involved in this study. The needle was punctured to the target point of the diseased intervertebral space under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. After the testing of sensory nerve, motor nerve and temperature was made, the target needles were heated until the nerve radiofrequency temperature meter reached the point of 92 degree C. This point of temperature was held for 100 seconds and the procedure was repeated for four cycles. Results: Six months after the treatment, all patients showed an obvious improvement in VAS, which decreased from 7.83 ± 0.33 before operation to 2.37 ± 0.48 after treatment (P < 0.05). According to the modified Macnab therapeutic evaluation criteria, excellent result was seen in 9, good result in 12, fair result in 5 and poor result in 4 cases, with a total effective rate of 86.7%. No serious complications occurred in all patients. Conclusion: Radiofrequency thermocoagulation is an effective and safe method for the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion. (authors)

  1. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  2. Plasmon-enhanced absorption in a metal nanoparticles and photosynthetic molecules hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiyuan; Govorov, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Photosystem I from cyanobacteria is one of nature's most efficient light harvesting complexes, converting light energy into electronic energy with a quantum yield of 100% and an energy yield about 58%. It is very attractive to the nanotechnology community because of its nanoscale dimensions and excellent optoelectronic properties. This protein has the potential to be utilized in devices such as solar cells, electric switches, photo-detectors, etc. However, there is one limiting factor for potential applications of a single monolayer of these photosynthetic proteins. One monolayer absorbs less than 1% of sunlight's energy, despite their excellent optoelectronic properties. Recently, experiments [1] have been conducted to enhance light absorption with the assistance of metal nanoparticles as artificial antenna for the photosystem I. Here, we present a theoretical description of the strong plasmon-assisted interactions between the metal nanoparticles and the optical dipoles of the reaction centers observed in the experiments. The resonance and off-resonance plasmon effects enhance the electromagnetic fields around the photosystem-I molecules and, in this way, lead to enhanced absorption. [4pt] [1] I. Carmeli, I. Lieberman, L. Kraversky, Zhiyuan Fan, A. O. Govorov, G. Markovich, and S. Richter, submitted.

  3. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography and multi-slice computed tomography in temporal bone imaging for surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erovic, Boban M; Chan, Harley H L; Daly, Michael J; Pothier, David D; Yu, Eugene; Coulson, Chris; Lai, Philip; Irish, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) imaging is the standard imaging technique for temporal bone diseases, whereas cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is a very fast imaging tool with a significant less radiation dose compared with conventional CT. We hypothesize that a system for intraoperative cone-beam CT provides comparable image quality to diagnostic CT for identifying temporal bone anatomical landmarks in cadaveric specimens. Cross-sectional study. University tertiary care facility. Twenty cadaveric temporal bones were affixed into a head phantom and scanned with both a prototype cone-beam CT C-arm and multislice helical CT. Imaging performance was evaluated by 3 otologic surgeons and 1 head and neck radiologist. Participants were presented images in a randomized order and completed landmark identification questionnaires covering 21 structures. CBCT and multislice CT have comparable performance in identifying temporal structures. Three otologic surgeons indicated that CBCT provided statistically equivalent performance for 19 of 21 landmarks, with CBCT superior to CT for the chorda tympani and inferior for the crura of the stapes. Subgroup analysis showed that CBCT performed superiorly for temporal bone structures compared with CT. The radiologist rated CBCT and CT as statistically equivalent for 18 of 21 landmarks, with CT superior to CBCT for the crura of stapes, chorda tympani, and sigmoid sinus. CBCT provides comparable image quality to conventional CT for temporal bone anatomical sites in cadaveric specimens. Clinical applications of low-dose CBCT imaging in surgical planning, intraoperative guidance, and postoperative assessment are promising but require further investigation.

  5. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone.[1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10–70 s) and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15–100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:26929479

  6. ¿Qué estamos enseñando con los libros de texto? La electricidad y la electrónica de tecnología en 3º ESO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de Pro Chereguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo trata de dar respuestas al interrogante: ¿Qué estamos enseñando con los libros de texto en Educación Secundaria Obligatoria? En primer lugar, revisamos los trabajos realizados sobre estos materiales en España y, a pesar de la importancia que tienen en nuestro sistema educativo, no hemos encontrado muchos que se hayan ocupado de aquellos que se elaboraron durante la Reforma LOE. Nos centramos en algunos elementos que consideramos fundamentales en estos recursos didácticos: la estructura de las lecciones y los tipos de contenidos (conceptos, procedimientos y actitudes a través del análisis de las actividades de aprendizaje planteadas por seis libros de texto de editoriales conocidas, relativas al bloque "Electricidad y electrónica" de Tecnología de 3º ESO, y su adecuación o no a la normativa vigente en la CARM. Los resultados muestran algunas de las carencias y deficiencias existentes, y que los libros de texto, en general, no se acomodan a lo que marca el currículum oficial.

  7. ¿Qué estamos enseñando con los libros de texto? La electricidad y la electrónica de Tecnología en 3º ESO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de Pro Chereguini

    Full Text Available Este trabajo trata de dar respuestas al interrogante: ¿Qué estamos enseñando con los libros de texto en Educación Secundaria Obligatoria? En primer lugar, revisamos los trabajos realizados sobre estos materiales en España y, a pesar de la importancia que tienen en nuestro sistema educativo, no hemos encontrado muchos quese hayan ocupado de aquellos que se elaboraron durante la Reforma LOE. Nos centramos en algunos elementos que consideramos fundamentales en estos recursos didácticos: la estructura de las lecciones y los tipos de contenidos (conceptos, procedimientos y actitudes a través del análisis de las actividades de aprendizajeplanteadas por seis libros de texto de editoriales conocidas, relativas al bloque “Electricidad y electrónica” de Tecnología de 3º ESO, y su adecuación o no a la normativa vigente en la CARM. Los resultados muestran algunas de las carencias y deficiencias existentes, y que los libros de texto, en general, no se acomodan a lo que marca el currículum oficial.

  8. Endovascular Extraction of a Needle from the Internal Carotid Artery: A Novel Approach to a Controversial Dental Misadventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurintano, Jonathan P.; Somerville, Jessica; Sebelik, Merry; Hoit, Daniel; Michael, L. Madison; Shires, Courtney B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective  To review the literature concerning the management of dental needles broken off into the deep spaces of the neck, to report what we believe is the first case of a fractured dental needle migrating into the jugular foramen, and the unconventional use of endovascular intervention to retrieve the needle fragment. Design  Case report with review of literature. Setting  Academic tertiary care center. Participants  Intervention was performed by the otolaryngology–head and neck surgery, vascular surgery, and neurovascular interventional radiology teams. Results  Transoral exploration, including palatal split and exposure of the poststyloid parapharyngeal space with C-arm image guidance, was unable to retrieve the broken needle, which traversed the internal carotid lumen with the distal end entering the jugular foramen. Through endovascular intervention, the neurovascular interventional radiology team captured the proximal end of the needle and retrieved it through the femoral artery. The patient recovered uneventfully. Conclusion  Fracture and loss of oral injection needles remain a persistent and preventable problem. This case demonstrates a novel, minimally invasive, well-tolerated, and successful method to extract a fractured needle that migrated into the lumen of the internal carotid artery at the level of the skull base. PMID:28845380

  9. Comparison of Different Approaches for Measuring Tibial Cartilage Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease affecting bones and cartilage especially in the human knee. In this context, cartilage thickness is an indicator for knee cartilage health. Thickness measurements are performed on medical images acquired in-vivo. Currently, there is no standard method agreed upon that defines a distance measure in articular cartilage. In this work, we present a comparison of different methods commonly used in literature. These methods are based on nearest neighbors, surface normal vectors, local thickness and potential field lines. All approaches were applied to manual segmentations of tibia and lateral and medial tibial cartilage performed by experienced raters. The underlying data were contrast agent-enhanced cone-beam C-arm CT reconstructions of one healthy subject’s knee. The subject was scanned three times, once in supine position and two times in a standing weight-bearing position. A comparison of the resulting thickness maps shows similar distributions and high correlation coefficients between the approaches above 0.90. The nearest neighbor method results on average in the lowest cartilage thickness values, while the local thickness approach assigns the highest values. We showed that the different methods agree in their thickness distribution. The results will be used for a future evaluation of cartilage change under weight-bearing conditions.

  10. A Fully Sensorized Cooperative Robotic System for Surgical Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Arriaga, Saúl; Vargas, José Emilio; Ramos, Juan M.; Aceves, Marco A.; Gorrostieta, Efren; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-01-01

    In this research a fully sensorized cooperative robot system for manipulation of needles is presented. The setup consists of a DLR/KUKA Light Weight Robot III especially designed for safe human/robot interaction, a FD-CT robot-driven angiographic C-arm system, and a navigation camera. Also, new control strategies for robot manipulation in the clinical environment are introduced. A method for fast calibration of the involved components and the preliminary accuracy tests of the whole possible errors chain are presented. Calibration of the robot with the navigation system has a residual error of 0.81 mm (rms) with a standard deviation of ±0.41 mm. The accuracy of the robotic system while targeting fixed points at different positions within the workspace is of 1.2 mm (rms) with a standard deviation of ±0.4 mm. After calibration, and due to close loop control, the absolute positioning accuracy was reduced to the navigation camera accuracy which is of 0.35 mm (rms). The implemented control allows the robot to compensate for small patient movements. PMID:23012551

  11. Radiological mapping of Bhubaneswar city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.S.; Patra, R.P.; Murali, S.; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Vidya Sagar, D; Patra, P.

    2015-01-01

    The radiological mapping of Bhubaneswar city was carried as a part of emergency preparedness program intended to generate the countrywide radiation field baseline data for various routes and major cities. The study was effected using various state of art monitoring systems both Online and Offline dose rate data monitoring instruments such as Compact Aerial Radiation Monitoring System (CARMS), Gamma Tracer (GT), μR survey meter, Identi-finder. The instruments/systems were installed with special care to minimize the radiation shielding effect due to vehicle surfaces in light motor vehicle. During survey the dose rate along with GPS data were recorded and spectra were taken whenever elevated radiation level was observed. The data on dose rate using survey meter were recorded manually. The data on dose rate at important places is tabulated and it was observed that the dose rate in Bhubaneswar city ranged between 90-130 nSvh -1 . Detailed survey was carried out around Lingraj pond and the spectra were recorded. The results on analysis confirmed the presence of 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K attributed to elevated radiation levels. (author)

  12. Residual motion compensation in ECG-gated interventional cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwemmer, C; Müller, K; Hornegger, J; Rohkohl, C; Lauritsch, G

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of cardiac vasculature from angiographic C-arm CT (rotational angiography) data is a major challenge. Motion artefacts corrupt image quality, reducing usability for diagnosis and guidance. Many state-of-the-art approaches depend on retrospective ECG-gating of projection data for image reconstruction. A trade-off has to be made regarding the size of the ECG-gating window. A large temporal window is desirable to avoid undersampling. However, residual motion will occur in a large window, causing motion artefacts. We present an algorithm to correct for residual motion. Our approach is based on a deformable 2D–2D registration between the forward projection of an initial, ECG-gated reconstruction, and the original projection data. The approach is fully automatic and does not require any complex segmentation of vasculature, or landmarks. The estimated motion is compensated for during the backprojection step of a subsequent reconstruction. We evaluated the method using the publicly available CAVAREV platform and on six human clinical datasets. We found a better visibility of structure, reduced motion artefacts, and increased sharpness of the vessels in the compensated reconstructions compared to the initial reconstructions. At the time of writing, our algorithm outperforms the leading result of the CAVAREV ranking list. For the clinical datasets, we found an average reduction of motion artefacts by 13 ± 6%. Vessel sharpness was improved by 25 ± 12% on average. (paper)

  13. Residual motion compensation in ECG-gated interventional cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, C.; Rohkohl, C.; Lauritsch, G.; Müller, K.; Hornegger, J.

    2013-06-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of cardiac vasculature from angiographic C-arm CT (rotational angiography) data is a major challenge. Motion artefacts corrupt image quality, reducing usability for diagnosis and guidance. Many state-of-the-art approaches depend on retrospective ECG-gating of projection data for image reconstruction. A trade-off has to be made regarding the size of the ECG-gating window. A large temporal window is desirable to avoid undersampling. However, residual motion will occur in a large window, causing motion artefacts. We present an algorithm to correct for residual motion. Our approach is based on a deformable 2D-2D registration between the forward projection of an initial, ECG-gated reconstruction, and the original projection data. The approach is fully automatic and does not require any complex segmentation of vasculature, or landmarks. The estimated motion is compensated for during the backprojection step of a subsequent reconstruction. We evaluated the method using the publicly available CAVAREV platform and on six human clinical datasets. We found a better visibility of structure, reduced motion artefacts, and increased sharpness of the vessels in the compensated reconstructions compared to the initial reconstructions. At the time of writing, our algorithm outperforms the leading result of the CAVAREV ranking list. For the clinical datasets, we found an average reduction of motion artefacts by 13 ± 6%. Vessel sharpness was improved by 25 ± 12% on average.

  14. Low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder joint: technique, indications, and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.-F.; Thelen, M.; Loew, R.; Runkel, M.; Zoellner, J.

    2003-01-01

    In the age of cost containment and urgent reductions in health care expenditures, new options have to be explored to satisfy both diagnostic requirements and economic limitations. The introduction of low-field MR systems for assessment of joint disorders seemed to be an option for lower costs. The purpose of this article is to summarize available experiences with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with respect to image quality and diagnostic accuracy in detecting labral and rotator cuff lesions. Up to now, there has been only a limited number of studies available dealing with low-field MR arthrography of the glenohumeral joint. They reveal that, despite a minor image quality in comparison with high-field imaging, low-field MR arthrography of the shoulder allows for sufficient evaluation of intra- and extra-articular structures in the detection of major abnormalities such as glenohumeral instability or rotator cuff disease. Furthermore, open-configured MR scanners enable kinematic studies: Besides the analysis of normal motion, pathological findings in patients with instabilities and impingement syndrome can be delineated. They further offer the possibility for performing MR imaging-guided arthrography of the shoulder. This was first described using an open C-arm scanner with a vertically oriented magnetic field so that MR arthrography may be performed in one setting. (orig.)

  15. Influence of a combined CT/C-arm system on periprocedural workflow and procedure times in mechanical thrombectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaff, Johannes; Herweh, Christian; Pham, Mirko; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Moehlenbruch, Markus Alfred [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Schoenenberger, Silvia; Nagel, Simon; Ringleb, Peter Arthur [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To achieve the fastest possible workflow in ischaemic stroke, we developed a CT/C-arm system, which allows imaging and endovascular treatment on the same patient table. This prospective, monocentric trial was conducted between October 2014 and August 2016. Patients received stroke imaging and mechanical thrombectomy under general anaesthesia (GA) or conscious sedation (CS) using our combined setup comprising a CT-scanner and a mobile C-arm X-ray device. Primary endpoint was time between stroke imaging and groin puncture. We compared periprocedural workflow and procedure times with the literature and a matched patient cohort treated with a biplane angiographic system before installation of the CT/C-arm system. In 50 patients with acute ischaemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation, comparable recanalization rates were achieved by using the CT/C-arm setup (TICI2b-3:CT/C-arm-GA: 85.7%; CT/C-arm-CS: 90.9%; Angiosuite: 78.6%; p = 0.269) without increasing periprocedural complications. Elimination of patient transport resulted in a significant reduction of the time between stroke imaging and groin puncture: median, min (IQR): CT/C-arm-GA: 43 (35-52); CT/C-arm-CS: 39 (28-49); Angiosuite: 64 (48-74); p < 0.0001. The combined CT/C-arm system allows comparable recanalization rates as a biplane angiographic system and accelerates the start of the endovascular stroke treatment. (orig.)

  16. Further evidence for the case against neuropsychoanalysis: How Yovell, Solms, and Fotopoulou's response to our critique confirms the irrelevance and harmfulness to psychoanalysis of the contemporary neuroscientific trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blass, Rachel B; Carmeli, Zvi

    2015-12-01

    In their paper "The case for neuropsychoanalysis" Yovell, Solms, and Fotopoulou (2015) respond to our critique of neuropsychoanalysis (Blass & Carmeli, 2007), setting forth evidence and arguments which, they claim, demonstrate why neuroscience is relevant and important for psychoanalysis and hence why dialogue between the fields is necessary. In the present paper we carefully examine their evidence and arguments and demonstrate how and why their claim is completely mistaken. In fact, Yovell, Solms, and Fotopoulou's paper only confirms our position on the irrelevance and harmfulness to psychoanalysis of the contemporary neuroscientific trend. We show how this trend perverts the essential nature of psychoanalysis and of how it is practiced. The clinical impact and its detrimental nature is highlighted by discussion of clinical material presented by Yovell et al (2015). In the light of this we argue that the debate over neuropsychoanalysis should be of interest to all psychoanalysts, not only those concerned with biology or interdisciplinary dialogue. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  17. El factor espacial como determinante de la obesidad en la Región de Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Hernández, Fernando Ant.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La obesidad es uno de los problemas de salud más graves y de más rápido crecimiento en los países desarrollados. Esta enfermedad afecta a un gran porcentaje de la población, abarcando a todas las edades, sexos y condiciones sociales. La prevalencia de la obesidad ha aumentado y continúa incrementándose de forma alarmante en nuestra sociedad, adquiriendo proporciones epidémicas. El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo analizar los factores desencadenantes de la obesidad en la Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia, prestando especial interés a aquellos factores que presentan una componente espacial. Para llevara a cabo este estudio epidemiológico se ha realizado una encuesta a 741 individuos en toda la Región, en la que se recoge información tanto de hábitos de vida saludables como medidas antropométricas de los individuos. Los resultados del análisis apuntan a la importancia del factor espacial en la obesidad y presentando el mapa de obesidad de la CARM.

  18. A case report on bilateral partial breast irradiation using SAVI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloi, Aime M., E-mail: agloi@stvgb.org [Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent Hospital, Green Bay, WI (United States); Buchanan, Robert [Southeast Alabama Medical Center, Radiation Oncology Department, Dothan, AL 36301 (United States); Nuskind, Jeff; Zuge, Corrie; Goettler, Anndrea [Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent Hospital, Green Bay, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    To assess dosimetric parameters in a case study where bilateral accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is delivered using a strut-adjusted volume implant (SAVI) device. A 59-year-old female received APBI in both breasts over 5 days, with fractions of 3.4 Gy twice daily. A Vac-lok system was used for immobilization, and a C-arm was used for daily imaging. We generated dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the brachytherapy plans to derive several important biologic factors. We calculated the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), and tumor control probability (TCP) using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters {alpha} = 0.3 Gy{sup -1}, {alpha}/{beta} = 4 Gy, n = 0.1, and m = 0.3. In addition, we assessed the dose homogeneity index (DHI), overdose index, and dose nonuniformity ratio. D95 was >95% and V150 was <50 mL for both breasts. The DHIs were 0.469 and 0.512 for the left and right breasts, respectively. The EUDs (normalized to 3.4 Gy b.i.d.) were 33.53 and 29.10 Gy. The TCPs were estimated at 99.2% and 99.9%, whereas the NTCP values were 4.2% and 2.57%. In this clinical case, we were able to quantify the dosimetric parameters of an APBI treatment performed with a SAVI device.

  19. Radiographic measurement of bone mineral: reviewing dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, L.H.; van Doorn, T.

    1995-01-01

    Radiographic methods of bone mineral measurement have been reviewed, with particular emphasis on the methods of Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). Features of the three major brands of DEXA equipment available in Australasia have been summarised. Radiation hazard is considered to be small, with patient effective doses of the order of a few microSieverts. In vivo measurement precision of the order of 1% is achievable for PA scans of the lumbar spine. Lateral scans can achieve measurement precision of the order of 4%. Recent technological developments using X-ray fan beams and multi element detector arrays on C-arm devices have resulted in faster scan times, higher resolution images, and an ability to perform PA and lateral scanning without the need to reposition the patient. Accuracy of DEXA is dependent upon specific instrumentation and data reduction algorithms, but results generally correlate well with ashed bone measurements. Major sources of inaccuracy include inhomogeneous distributions of fat, and machine specific factors such as edge detection algorithms. Lack of absolute inter unit comparability may cause difficulties in clinical practice. 88 refs., 5 figs

  20. X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Willi A

    2006-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  1. Reviews of recent publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth Mermann-Jozwiak and Nancy Sullivan. Conversations with Mexican American Writers: Languages and Literatures in the Borderlands by Tanya González Barbara Mennel. The Representation of Masochism and Queer Desire in Film and Literature by Amy Gates-Young David Damrosch. How to Read World Literature by Lisabeth Hock Maria DiFrancesco. Feminine Agency and Transgression in Post-Franco Spain: Generational Becoming in the Narratives of Carme Riera, Cristina Fernández Cubas and Mercedes Abad by Maryanne L. Leone Jennifer Wawrzinek. Ambiguous Subjects: Dissolution and Metamorphosis in the Postmodern Sublime by Claudine Fisher Maria Cristina Fumagalli. Caribbean Perspectives on Modernity: Returning Medusa’s Gaze by Laurence M. Porter Macedonio Fernández. The Museum of Eterna’s Novel by Todd S. Garth Russell West-Pavlov. Space in Theory: Kristeva, Foucault, Deleuze by Zoe Petropoulou Maria Beville. Gothic-postmodernism: Voicing the Terrors of Postmodernity by Terri Engnoth Sharae Deckard. Paradise Discourse, Imperialism, and Globalization: Exploiting Eden by Miguel González-Abellás Sangeeta Ray. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak: In Other Words by Cybelle H. McFadden

  2. Percutaneous vertebroplasty: an experimental study in adult corpses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shicheng; Teng Gaojun; Zeng Shuilin; Guo Jinhe; Fang Wen; Zhu Guangyu; Liu Zhentian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the key technique factors and the mechanisms of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP). Methods: PMMA was classified into three groups according to the ratio of powder/liquid as 1:1, 3:2 and 2:1. Polymerizing process in vitro was measured respectively in each group, which included 10 samples. Twenty vertebrae from T12-L4 in 4 adult corpses were randomly distributed into 2 groups. In one group, PVP was performed under monitoring by combined CT and C-arm X-ray machines. All vertebrae were dissected into individual vertebra and the ultimate compressive strength was measured in double-blind tests. Results: The period of the polymerizing process and the temperature changes during the polymerizing among 3 groups with different ratio of powder/liquid were significantly different. The ratio of 3/2 was the proper regimen for injection. Punctures were successfully reached in one set of puncture in all vertebrae but one, with 4.5 ml of PMMA in average injected in each vertebra. Pre-vertebral leakage of PMMA was demonstrated in 4 of 20 vertebrae. The ultimate compressive strength increased in 38% in the experimental group compared with that of the control group. Conclusions: Proper ratio of powder/liquid and injection time of PMMA is the key technique for PVP. The puncture route of trans-arch of vertebra is accessible for PVP. It is proven in this study that the ultimate compressive strength of vertebra enhances greatly after PVP

  3. Influence of a combined CT/C-arm system on periprocedural workflow and procedure times in mechanical thrombectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfaff, Johannes; Herweh, Christian; Pham, Mirko; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Moehlenbruch, Markus Alfred; Schoenenberger, Silvia; Nagel, Simon; Ringleb, Peter Arthur

    2017-01-01

    To achieve the fastest possible workflow in ischaemic stroke, we developed a CT/C-arm system, which allows imaging and endovascular treatment on the same patient table. This prospective, monocentric trial was conducted between October 2014 and August 2016. Patients received stroke imaging and mechanical thrombectomy under general anaesthesia (GA) or conscious sedation (CS) using our combined setup comprising a CT-scanner and a mobile C-arm X-ray device. Primary endpoint was time between stroke imaging and groin puncture. We compared periprocedural workflow and procedure times with the literature and a matched patient cohort treated with a biplane angiographic system before installation of the CT/C-arm system. In 50 patients with acute ischaemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation, comparable recanalization rates were achieved by using the CT/C-arm setup (TICI2b-3:CT/C-arm-GA: 85.7%; CT/C-arm-CS: 90.9%; Angiosuite: 78.6%; p = 0.269) without increasing periprocedural complications. Elimination of patient transport resulted in a significant reduction of the time between stroke imaging and groin puncture: median, min (IQR): CT/C-arm-GA: 43 (35-52); CT/C-arm-CS: 39 (28-49); Angiosuite: 64 (48-74); p < 0.0001. The combined CT/C-arm system allows comparable recanalization rates as a biplane angiographic system and accelerates the start of the endovascular stroke treatment. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of Patients' X-ray Exposure in 146 Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Tim-Ole; Reinhardt, Martin; Fuchs, Jochen; Gosch, Dieter; Surov, Alexey; Stumpp, Patrick; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2017-09-01

    significantly extends FT, but has little effect on the overall dose of the intervention. Due to the significantly higher X-ray exposure, the use of a CBCT as well as PRG-placements using CT should be limited to clinically absolutely necessary exceptions with strict indication. Key Points   · Fluoroscopically-guided PRG placements are interventions with low X-ray exposure.. · X-ray exposure from fluoroscopy is lower using flat panel detector systems as compared to image intensifier systems.. · The concomitant placement of an oro- or nasogastric probe extends the fluoroscopy time.. · Gastric probe placement is worthwhile to prevent the premature use of the significantly radiation-intensive CT.. · The use of the C-arm CT or the CT increases the beam exposure by 26 or 33 times, respectively.. · The PRG placement using C-arm CT and CT should only be performed in exceptional cases.. Citation Format · Petersen TO, Reinhardt M, Fuchs J et al. Analysis of Patients' X-ray Exposure in 146 Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomies. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 820 - 827. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Rotational IMRT techniques compared to fixed gantry IMRT and Tomotherapy: multi-institutional planning study for head-and-neck cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutters Gerd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments enable to deliver rotational IMRT with standard C-arm gantry based linear accelerators. This upcoming treatment technique was benchmarked in a multi-center treatment planning study against static gantry IMRT and rotational IMRT based on a ring gantry for a complex parotid gland sparing head-and-neck technique. Methods Treatment plans were created for 10 patients with head-and-neck tumours (oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx using the following treatment planning systems (TPS for rotational IMRT: Monaco (ELEKTA VMAT solution, Eclipse (Varian RapidArc solution and HiArt for the helical tomotherapy (Tomotherapy. Planning of static gantry IMRT was performed with KonRad, Pinnacle and Panther DAO based on step&shoot IMRT delivery and Eclipse for sliding window IMRT. The prescribed doses for the high dose PTVs were 65.1Gy or 60.9Gy and for the low dose PTVs 55.8Gy or 52.5Gy dependend on resection status. Plan evaluation was based on target coverage, conformity and homogeneity, DVHs of OARs and the volume of normal tissue receiving more than 5Gy (V5Gy. Additionally, the cumulative monitor units (MUs and treatment times of the different technologies were compared. All evaluation parameters were averaged over all 10 patients for each technique and planning modality. Results Depending on IMRT technique and TPS, the mean CI values of all patients ranged from 1.17 to 2.82; and mean HI values varied from 0.05 to 0.10. The mean values of the median doses of the spared parotid were 26.5Gy for RapidArc and 23Gy for VMAT, 14.1Gy for Tomo. For fixed gantry techniques 21Gy was achieved for step&shoot+KonRad, 17.0Gy for step&shoot+Panther DAO, 23.3Gy for step&shoot+Pinnacle and 18.6Gy for sliding window. V5Gy values were lowest for the sliding window IMRT technique (3499 ccm and largest for RapidArc (5480 ccm. The lowest mean MU value of 408 was achieved by Panther DAO, compared to 1140 for sliding window IMRT. Conclusions All

  6. Rotational IMRT techniques compared to fixed gantry IMRT and Tomotherapy: multi-institutional planning study for head-and-neck cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiezorek, Tilo; Schubert, Kai; Wagner, Daniela; Wendt, Thomas G; Brachwitz, Tim; Georg, Dietmar; Blank, Eyck; Fotina, Irina; Habl, Gregor; Kretschmer, Matthias; Lutters, Gerd; Salz, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments enable to deliver rotational IMRT with standard C-arm gantry based linear accelerators. This upcoming treatment technique was benchmarked in a multi-center treatment planning study against static gantry IMRT and rotational IMRT based on a ring gantry for a complex parotid gland sparing head-and-neck technique. Treatment plans were created for 10 patients with head-and-neck tumours (oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx) using the following treatment planning systems (TPS) for rotational IMRT: Monaco (ELEKTA VMAT solution), Eclipse (Varian RapidArc solution) and HiArt for the helical tomotherapy (Tomotherapy). Planning of static gantry IMRT was performed with KonRad, Pinnacle and Panther DAO based on step&shoot IMRT delivery and Eclipse for sliding window IMRT. The prescribed doses for the high dose PTVs were 65.1Gy or 60.9Gy and for the low dose PTVs 55.8Gy or 52.5Gy dependend on resection status. Plan evaluation was based on target coverage, conformity and homogeneity, DVHs of OARs and the volume of normal tissue receiving more than 5Gy (V 5Gy ). Additionally, the cumulative monitor units (MUs) and treatment times of the different technologies were compared. All evaluation parameters were averaged over all 10 patients for each technique and planning modality. Depending on IMRT technique and TPS, the mean CI values of all patients ranged from 1.17 to 2.82; and mean HI values varied from 0.05 to 0.10. The mean values of the median doses of the spared parotid were 26.5Gy for RapidArc and 23Gy for VMAT, 14.1Gy for Tomo. For fixed gantry techniques 21Gy was achieved for step&shoot+KonRad, 17.0Gy for step&shoot+Panther DAO, 23.3Gy for step&shoot+Pinnacle and 18.6Gy for sliding window. V 5Gy values were lowest for the sliding window IMRT technique (3499 ccm) and largest for RapidArc (5480 ccm). The lowest mean MU value of 408 was achieved by Panther DAO, compared to 1140 for sliding window IMRT. All IMRT delivery technologies with their associated TPS

  7. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: An improved method of image guidance for lung tumor biopsies could help reduce the high rate of false negatives. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of the scanning-beam digital tomography system (SBDX) for providing real-time 3D tomographic reconstructions for target verification. The unique geometry of the system requires trade-offs between patient dose, imaging field of view (FOV), and tomographic angle.Methods: Tomosynthetic angle as a function of tumor-to-detector distance was calculated. Monte Carlo Software (PCXMC) was used to calculate organ doses and effective dose for source-to-detector distances (SDDs) from 90 to 150 cm, patient locations with the tumor at 20 cm from the source to 20 cm from the detector, and FOVs centered on left lung and right lung as well as medial and distal peripheries of the lungs. These calculations were done for two systems, a SBDX system and a GE OEC-9800 C-arm fluoroscopic unit. To evaluate the dose effect of the system geometry, results from PCXMC were calculated using a scan of 300 mAs for both SBDX and fluoroscopy. The Rose Criterion was used to find the fluence required for a tumor SNR of 5, factoring in scatter, air-gap, system geometry, and patient position for all models generated with PCXMC. Using the calculated fluence for constant tumor SNR, the results from PCXMC were used to compare the patient dose for a given SNR between SBDX and fluoroscopy.Results: Tomographic angle changes with SDD only in the region near the detector. Due to their geometry, the source array and detector have a peak tomographic angle for any given SDD at a source to tumor distance that is 69.7% of the SDD assuming constant source and detector size. Changing the patient location in order to increase tomographic angle has a significant effect on organ dose distribution due to geometrical considerations. With SBDX and fluoroscopy geometries, the dose to organs typically changes in an opposing manner with changing patient

  8. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yoon, Sungwon [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Krishna, Ganesh [Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Mountain View, California 94040 (United States); Wilfley, Brian [Triple Ring Technologies, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An improved method of image guidance for lung tumor biopsies could help reduce the high rate of false negatives. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of the scanning-beam digital tomography system (SBDX) for providing real-time 3D tomographic reconstructions for target verification. The unique geometry of the system requires trade-offs between patient dose, imaging field of view (FOV), and tomographic angle.Methods: Tomosynthetic angle as a function of tumor-to-detector distance was calculated. Monte Carlo Software (PCXMC) was used to calculate organ doses and effective dose for source-to-detector distances (SDDs) from 90 to 150 cm, patient locations with the tumor at 20 cm from the source to 20 cm from the detector, and FOVs centered on left lung and right lung as well as medial and distal peripheries of the lungs. These calculations were done for two systems, a SBDX system and a GE OEC-9800 C-arm fluoroscopic unit. To evaluate the dose effect of the system geometry, results from PCXMC were calculated using a scan of 300 mAs for both SBDX and fluoroscopy. The Rose Criterion was used to find the fluence required for a tumor SNR of 5, factoring in scatter, air-gap, system geometry, and patient position for all models generated with PCXMC. Using the calculated fluence for constant tumor SNR, the results from PCXMC were used to compare the patient dose for a given SNR between SBDX and fluoroscopy.Results: Tomographic angle changes with SDD only in the region near the detector. Due to their geometry, the source array and detector have a peak tomographic angle for any given SDD at a source to tumor distance that is 69.7% of the SDD assuming constant source and detector size. Changing the patient location in order to increase tomographic angle has a significant effect on organ dose distribution due to geometrical considerations. With SBDX and fluoroscopy geometries, the dose to organs typically changes in an opposing manner with changing patient

  9. Analysis of patients' X-ray exposure in 146 percutaneous radiologic gastrostomies; Analyse der Strahlenexposition fuer Patienten bei 146 perkutanen radiologischen Gastrostomien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Tim-Ole; Reinhardt, Martin; Fuchs, Jochen; Gosch, Dieter; Surov, Alexey; Stumpp, Patrick; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael [Univ. Hospital Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-09-15

    intervention. Due to the significantly higher X-ray exposure, the use of a CBCT as well as PRG-placements using CT should be limited to clinically absolutely necessary exceptions with strict indication. Key Points: Fluoroscopically-guided PRG placements are interventions with low X-ray exposure. X-ray exposure from fluoroscopy is lower using flat panel detector systems as compared to image intensifier systems. The concomitant placement of an oro- or nasogastric probe extends the fluoroscopy time. Gastric probe placement is worthwhile to prevent the premature use of the significantly radiation-intensive CT. The use of the C-arm CT or the CT increases the beam exposure by 26 or 33 times, respectively. The PRG placement using C-arm CT and CT should only be performed in exceptional cases.

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 77: Implanted Brachythearpy Seed Movement due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage

  11. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Ronald K; Leipsic, Jonathon; Wood, David; Moore, Teri; Toggweiler, Stefan; Willson, Alex; Gurvitch, Ronen; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John G

    2012-04-01

    Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities, including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3-dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. Forty patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR at St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada, were evaluated. All underwent preimplant 3DA and 68% underwent preimplant MDCT. Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions were generated from images of a C-arm rotational aortic root angiogram during breath-hold, rapid ventricular pacing, and injection of 32 mL contrast medium at 8 mL/s. Two independent operators prospectively predicted perpendicular valve projections. The implant angle was chosen at the discretion of the physician performing TAVR. The angles from 3DA, from MDCT, the implant angle, and the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis view were compared. The shortest distance from the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis projection to the regression line of predicted perpendicular projections was calculated. All but 1 patient had adequate image quality for reproducible angle predictions. There was a significant correlation between 3DA and MDCT for prediction of perpendicular valve projections (r=0.682, Pregression line of predicted angles to the postdeployment prosthesis view was 5.1±4.6° for 3DA and 7.9±4.9° for MDCT (P=0.01). Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions and MDCT are safe, practical, and accurate imaging modalities for identifying the optimal perpendicular valve deployment projection during TAVR.

  12. AS VIOLAÇÕES SOFRIDAS PELO POVO KRENAK E O DANO CAUSADO AO PROJETO DE VIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Medeiros Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo versa sobre as violações cometidas pelo Regime Militar ao povo Krenak e o possível dano ao projeto de vida. Conceituando esta espécie de dano como violação de direitos humanos, irá discorrer sobre a criação da Guarda Rural Indígena (GRIN, a instalação do presídio indígena em suas terras chamado “Reformatório Krenak” e o deslocamento forçado para outro centro de detenção indígena, denominado fazenda Guarani, no município de Carmésia/MG. Procurará se demonstrar que as ações cometidas a este povo, pelo Estado Brasileiro, devem ser reparadas também por atingir o modo e a expectativa de vida que possuíam a época. Para melhor identificar estes danos causados, o trabalho recorrerá à peça inicial da Ação Civil Pública nº 64483-95.2015.4.01.3800, impetrada pelo Ministério Público Federal, que trata das violações sofridas pelos Krenak e o Relatório da Comissão Nacional da Verdade, Volume II. Também se demostrará que a Corte Interamericana de Direitos Humanos já vem entendendo que este tipo de dano deve ser reparado.

  13. High-resolution 3D X-ray imaging of intracranial nitinol stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoeren, Rudolph M.; With, Peter H.N. de; Soederman, Michael; Kroon, Johannes N.; Roijers, Ruben B.; Babic, Drazenko

    2012-01-01

    To assess an optimized 3D imaging protocol for intracranial nitinol stents in 3D C-arm flat detector imaging. For this purpose, an image quality simulation and an in vitro study was carried out. Nitinol stents of various brands were placed inside an anthropomorphic head phantom, using iodine contrast. Experiments with objects were preceded by image quality and dose simulations. We varied X-ray imaging parameters in a commercially interventional X-ray system to set 3D image quality in the contrast-noise-sharpness space. Beam quality was varied to evaluate contrast of the stents while keeping absorbed dose below recommended values. Two detector formats were used, paired with an appropriate pixel size and X-ray focus size. Zoomed reconstructions were carried out and snapshot images acquired. High contrast spatial resolution was assessed with a CT phantom. We found an optimal protocol for imaging intracranial nitinol stents. Contrast resolution was optimized for nickel-titanium-containing stents. A high spatial resolution larger than 2.1 lp/mm allows struts to be visualized. We obtained images of stents of various brands and a representative set of images is shown. Independent of the make, struts can be imaged with virtually continuous strokes. Measured absorbed doses are shown to be lower than 50 mGy Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). By balancing the modulation transfer of the imaging components and tuning the high-contrast imaging capabilities, we have shown that thin nitinol stent wires can be reconstructed with high contrast-to-noise ratio and good detail, while keeping radiation doses within recommended values. Experimental results compare well with imaging simulations. (orig.)

  14. SU-E-I-55: The Contribution to Skin Dose Due to Scatter From the Patient Table and the Head Holder During Fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, N; Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine contributions to skin dose due to scatter from the table and head holder used during fluoroscopy, and also to explore alternative design material to reduce the scatter dose. Methods: Measurements were made of the primary and scatter components of the xray beam exiting the patient table and a cylindrical head holder used on a Toshiba Infinix c-arm unit as a function of kVp for the various beam filters on the machine and for various field sizes. The primary component of the beam was measured in air with the object placed close to the x-ray tube with an air gap between it and a 6 cc parallel-plate ionization chamber and with the beam collimated to a size just larger than the chamber. The primary plus scatter radiation components were measured with the object moved to a position in the beam next to the chamber for larger field sizes. Both sets of measurements were preformed while keeping the source-to-chamber distance fixed. The scatter fraction was estimated by taking the ratio of the difference between the two measurements and the reading that included both primary and scatter. Similar measurements were also made for a 2.3 cm thick Styrofoam block which could substitute for the patient support. Results: The measured scatter fractions indicate that the patient table as well as the head holder contributes an additional 10–16% to the patient entrance dose depending on field size. Forward scatter was reduced with the Styrofoam block so that the scatter fraction was about 4–5%. Conclusion: The results of this investigation demonstrated that scatter from the table and head holder used in clinical fluoroscopy contribute substantially to the skin dose. The lower contribution of scatter from Styrofoam suggests that there is an opportunity to redesign patient support accessories to reduce the skin dose. Partial support from NIH grant R01EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation Equipment Grant

  15. Endoscopic management of traumatic posterior urethral stricture: early results and followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, M C; Kumar, M; Kapoor, R

    1997-01-01

    We assessed the outcome of core through internal urethrotomy for traumatic posterior urethral stricture, and reviewed the followup results of these patients. During the last 4 years 13 patients with a stricture up to 2 cm. long underwent core through internal urethrotomy with C-arm fluoroscopy guidance and an orientation in 2 planes. Retrograde urethrotomy was performed and an 18F Foley catheter was left indwelling for 4 weeks, after which urethrotomy was repeated. All patients were advised to perform clean intermittent self-catheterization for urethral calibration and dilation. Outcome was defined as class 1-3 patients who required 2 or fewer urethrotomies with clean intermittent self-catheterization discontinued after the primary procedure, class 2-5 who required 2 or fewer urethrotomies with clean intermittent self-catheterization and class 3-5 who required 3 or more urethrotomies. Of the 13 patients 8 (61%) did well after a mean followup of 17.7 months. The 3 patients with a class 1 outcome did well, while 2 of 5 with a class 2 outcome required repeat urethrotomy during followup. Of the 5 patients (39%) with a class 3 outcome in whom core through internal urethrotomy failed 3 required open surgery and 2 were lost to followup. Recurrence rate was 69% at 3 months and 25% at 12 months after the initial procedure. No patient was incontinent at last followup. Two patients had significant hematuria postoperatively, which resolved with conservative treatment. Endoscopic treatment should be considered the first line procedure for all post-traumatic posterior urethral strictures. The morbidity of open surgery can be avoided in 61% of patients. Hospital stay, loss of work, morbidity and related complications are also markedly decreased with endoscopic therapy.

  16. Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevargez, Athour; Groenemeyer, Dietrich H.W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with spinal tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients (25 men, 16 women; age range, 46-82 years) with nonresectable primary or secondary tumor involvement of the spine unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy received RFA treatment. Two radiofrequency ablation systems, one with a cool-tip electrode and one with an expandable electrode catheter, were used. Both systems work impedance controlled with a power output of 150- 200 W. Each coagulation cycle lasted 12-15 min depending on tumor impedance. Several single RFA cycles of 15 min each were used for overlapping RFAs in tumors with diameters of more than 3 cm. Temperature was kept between 50 deg. C and 120 deg. C and was chosen according to spinal cord distance and patient heat tolerance during the ablation. Multi-slice computed tomography (CT) combined with C-arm fluoroscopy guided the intervention. Efficacy outcomes were assessed after about 6 weeks, 6 months, and more than 6 months using standardized questionnaires and indices regarding tumor pain, pain disability, functional activities, quality of life, neurological status, and tumor progression. Results: RFA significantly reduced tumor-induced pain within 6 weeks, improved daily activities, and maintained quality of life. Mean time to tumor progression was 730 ± 54 days (Kaplan-Meier estimate). No RFA-associated complications were reported. Conclusion: RFA of primary and secondary spinal tumors, which were unresponsive to chemo- and radiotherapy and prone to progression, is a safe, resource-saving, and highly effective percutaneous technique in patients with nonresectable spinal tumors

  17. Observation of femoral and tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament by using conventional CT and transparent 3D-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masayuki; Tsukuda, Koichiro; Yasojima, Nobutoshi; Oota, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Presented are image data acquisitioned by the volume rendering (VR)-3D-CT and authors' transparent (T)-3D-CT to depict the bone contour, of medial intercondylar ridge (MIR) and posterior intercodylar fossa (PIF) at femoral and tibial insertion, respectively, of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) as those data are helpful for planning the reconstruction surgery of PCL and for confirming the femoral PCL insertion by using the C-arm during operation. Helical scanning is conducted with GE MD-CT (64DAS) to reconstruct VR-3D-CT image with the workstation ZIO's ZIO900M Quadra and T-3D-CT image, by reducing the opacity by pixel exclusion of the intraosseous lumen. MIR is observed in all 70 normal knees tested in VR-3D-CT and the bifurcate ridge, in 15 knees among them. In T-3D-CT image, distance data of the origin of MIR from Blumensaat's line and the angle of MIR and bone axis are calculated and presented. In VR-3D-CT and T-3D-CT images of PIF from 20 knees, actual measures of PIF slope angle (degree), PIF area ratio to joint surface (JS) (%), distance from JS to centers of anterolateral (AL) and posterolateral (PM) slopes (mm), and from medial and lateral JS to PIF posterior border (mm), and distance ratios of PM and AL to medial and lateral tibia, respectively, (%) are calculated and presented. Findings are: MIR originates at 45% distal point of Blumensaat's line; the articular line crosses with PIF at its center in T-3D-CT sagittal plane; centers of tibial AL and PM exist at the middle of frontal plane, and at 1.00 and 5.5 mm, respectively, distal points of JS of sagittal plane. The PIF data are rather comparable to those obtained in cadavers reported in 3 literatures and the present procedure is concluded to be valid. (author)

  18. Histogram-driven cupping correction (HDCC) in CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, Y.; Meyer, M.; Lapp, R.; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Typical cupping correction methods are pre-processing methods which require either pre-calibration measurements or simulations of standard objects to approximate and correct for beam hardening and scatter. Some of them require the knowledge of spectra, detector characteristics, etc. The aim of this work was to develop a practical histogram-driven cupping correction (HDCC) method to post-process the reconstructed images. We use a polynomial representation of the raw-data generated by forward projection of the reconstructed images; forward and backprojection are performed on graphics processing units (GPU). The coefficients of the polynomial are optimized using a simplex minimization of the joint entropy of the CT image and its gradient. The algorithm was evaluated using simulations and measurements of homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms. For the measurements a C-arm flat-detector CT (FD-CT) system with a 30×40 cm2 detector, a kilovoltage on board imager (radiation therapy simulator) and a micro-CT system were used. The algorithm reduced cupping artifacts both in simulations and measurements using a fourth-order polynomial and was in good agreement to the reference. The minimization algorithm required less than 70 iterations to adjust the coefficients only performing a linear combination of basis images, thus executing without time consuming operations. HDCC reduced cupping artifacts without the necessity of pre-calibration or other scan information enabling a retrospective improvement of CT image homogeneity. However, the method can work with other cupping correction algorithms or in a calibration manner, as well.

  19. Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography of the Foot in Critical Limb Ischemia: A New Dimension in Revascularization Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jens, Sjoerd, E-mail: s.jens@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lucatelli, Pierleone, E-mail: pierleone.lucatelli@gmail.com [' Sapienza' University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Koelemay, Mark J. W., E-mail: m.j.koelemaij@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A., E-mail: h.a.marquering@amc.uva.nl; Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the additional value of three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA) of the foot compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Technique. For 3DRA, the C-arm was placed in the propeller position with the foot in an isocentric position. The patient's unaffected foot was positioned in a footrest outside the field of view. For correct timing of 3DRA, the delay from contrast injection in the popliteal artery at the level of knee joint to complete pedal arterial enhancement was assessed using DSA. With this delay, 3DRA was started after injection of 15 ml contrast. Imaging of the 3DRA could directly be reconstructed and visualized.Materials and MethodsPatients undergoing 3DRA of the foot were prospectively registered. DSA and 3DRA images were scored separately for arterial patency and presence of collaterals. Treatment strategies were proposed based on DSA with and without the availability of 3DRA. Results. Eleven patients underwent 3DRA of the foot. One 3DRA was not included because the acquisition was focused on the heel instead of the entire foot. Diagnostic quality of 3DRA was good in all ten patients. 3DRA compared with DSA showed additional patent arteries in six patients, patent plantar arch in three patients, and collaterals between the pedal arteries in five patients. Additional information from 3DRA resulted in a change of treatment strategy in six patients. Conclusion, 3DRA of the foot contains valuable additional real-time information to better guide peripheral vascular interventions in patients with CLI and nonhealing tissue lesions.

  20. Correction of patient motion in cone-beam CT using 3D-2D registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Jacobson, M.; Stayman, J. W.; Ehtiati, T.; Weiss, C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly common in guidance of interventional procedures, but can be subject to artifacts arising from patient motion during fairly long (~5-60 s) scan times. We present a fiducial-free method to mitigate motion artifacts using 3D-2D image registration that simultaneously corrects residual errors in the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of geometric calibration. The 3D-2D registration process registers each projection to a prior 3D image by maximizing gradient orientation using the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer. The resulting rigid transforms are applied to the system projection matrices, and a 3D image is reconstructed via model-based iterative reconstruction. Phantom experiments were conducted using a Zeego robotic C-arm to image a head phantom undergoing 5-15 cm translations and 5-15° rotations. To further test the algorithm, clinical images were acquired with a CBCT head scanner in which long scan times were susceptible to significant patient motion. CBCT images were reconstructed using a penalized likelihood objective function. For phantom studies the structural similarity (SSIM) between motion-free and motion-corrected images was  >0.995, with significant improvement (p  values of uncorrected images. Additionally, motion-corrected images exhibited a point-spread function with full-width at half maximum comparable to that of the motion-free reference image. Qualitative comparison of the motion-corrupted and motion-corrected clinical images demonstrated a significant improvement in image quality after motion correction. This indicates that the 3D-2D registration method could provide a useful approach to motion artifact correction under assumptions of local rigidity, as in the head, pelvis, and extremities. The method is highly parallelizable, and the automatic correction of residual geometric calibration errors provides added benefit that could be valuable in routine use.

  1. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  2. Hybrid treatment of tandem, common carotid/innominate artery and ipsilateral carotid bifurcation stenoses by simultaneous, retrograde proximal stenting and eversion carotid endarterectomy: Preliminary results of a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pizzardi, Giulia; Pasqua, Rocco; Frezzotti, Francesca; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Macrina, Francesco; Calio', Francesco

    2018-04-01

    Tandem stenoses of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and proximal, ipsilateral common carotid artery (CCA) or innominate artery can be treated with a hybrid approach, combining conventional carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and retrograde stenting of the proximal stenosis, through surgical exposure of the carotid bifurcation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of combining eversion CEA with retrograde CCA/innominate artery stenting. From January 2015 to July 2017, 7 patients, 6 men of a mean age of 72 years (range 59-83 years) underwent simultaneous, retrograde stenting of the proximal CCA/innominate artery and an eversion CEA of the ipsilateral ICA, through surgical exposure of the carotid bifurcation, for severe tandem stenoses. The proximal stenosis involved the left proximal CCA in 4 patients, the proximal innominate artery in 2 patients and the right CCA in one patient. The procedure was performed under general anesthesia in a conventional operating room equipped with a mobile C-arm. A covered, balloon expandable stent was deployed over the proximal stenosis via a 6-F sheath directly introduced into the proximal CCA through the obliquely transected carotid bulb. After removing the sheath, debris were flushed through the carotid bulb and eversion CEA completed the procedure. Study endpoints were: postoperative stroke/mortality rate, cardiac mortality and morbidity, peripheral nerve injury, cervical hematoma, overall late survival, freedom from ipsilateral stroke and patency of arterial reconstruction. No postoperative mortality or neurologic morbidity was observed in any patient. Cervical hematomas and peripheral nerve injuries were likewise absent. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, all the patients were alive, free from neurologic events of new onset and free from restenosis. Combined proximal stenting and eversion CEA for tandem lesions seems a valid treatment, with the advantages of eversion CEA over other techniques of carotid bifurcation

  3. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-02: Neurovascular 4D Parametric Imaging Using Co-Registration of Biplane DSA Sequences with 3D Vascular Geometry Obtained From Cone Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramoniam, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S; Ionita, C [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Centre, SUNY at Buffalo (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To create 4D parametric images using biplane Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) sequences co-registered with the 3D vascular geometry obtained from Cone Beam-CT (CBCT). Methods: We investigated a method to derive multiple 4D Parametric Imaging (PI) maps using only one CBCT acquisition. During this procedure a 3D-DSA geometry is stored and used subsequently for all 4D images. Each time a biplane DSA is acquired, we calculate 2D parametric maps of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT), Mean Transit Time (MTT) and Time to Peak (TTP). Arterial segments which are nearly parallel with one of the biplane imaging planes in the 2D parametric maps are co-registered with the 3D geometry. The values in the remaining vascular network are found using spline interpolation since the points chosen for co-registration on the vasculature are discrete and remaining regions need to be interpolated. To evaluate the method we used a patient CT volume data set for 3D printing a neurovascular phantom containing a complete Circle of Willis. We connected the phantom to a flow loop with a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. Contrast media was injected with an automatic injector at 10 ml/sec. Images were acquired with a Toshiba Infinix C-arm and 4D parametric image maps of the vasculature were calculated. Results: 4D BAT, MTT, and TTP parametric image maps of the Circle of Willis were derived. We generated color-coded 3D geometries which avoided artifacts due to vessel overlap or foreshortening in the projection direction. Conclusion: The software was tested successfully and multiple 4D parametric images were obtained from biplane DSA sequences without the need to acquire additional 3D-DSA runs. This can benefit the patient by reducing the contrast media and the radiation dose normally associated with these procedures. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  4. TH-AB-BRB-05: Using a Research Real-Time Control Interface to Go Beyond Dynamic MLC Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nill, S. [The Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  5. TH-AB-BRB-00: Research Opportunities with Digital Linear Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  6. TH-AB-BRB-02: ET-Reloaded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  7. TH-AB-BRB-01: Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristov, D. [Stanford University Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  8. TH-AB-BRB-04: Quality Assurance for Advanced Digital Linac Implementations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, V.

    2016-01-01

    Current state-of-the art digital C-arm medical linear accelerators are capable of delivering radiation treatments with high level of automation, which affords coordinated motions of gantry, couch, and multileaf collimator (MLC) with dose rate modulations. The new machine capacity has shown the potential to bring substantially improved radiation dosimetry and/or delivery efficiency to many challenging diseases. Combining an integrated beam orientation optimization algorithm with automated machine navigation, markedly improved dose conformity has been achieved using 4ρ therapy. Trajectory modulated radiation therapy (TMAT) can be used to deliver highly conformal dose to partial breast or to carve complex dose distribution for therapy involving extended volumes such as total marrow and total lymph node treatment. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) not only overcomes the deficiencies of conventional electron therapy in dose conformity and homogeneity but also achieves so without patient-specific shields. The combination of MLC and couch tracking provides improved motion management of thoracic and abdominal tumors. A substantial body of work has been done in these technological advances for clinical translation. The proposed symposium will provide a timely review of these exciting opportunities. Learning Objectives: Recognize the potential of using digitally controlled linacs for clinically significant improvements in delivered dose distributions for various treatment sites. Identify existing approaches to treatment planning, optimization and delivery for treatment techniques utilizing the advanced functions of digital linacs and venues for further development and improvement. Understand methods for testing and validating delivery system performance. Identify tools available on current delivery systems for implementation and control for such treatments. Obtain the update in clinical applications, trials and regulatory approval. K. Sheng, NIH U19AI067769, NIH R43

  9. Emerging technologies in stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Wang, Lei; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) stems from the initial developments of intra-cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Despite similarity in their names and clinical goals of delivering a sufficiently high tumoricidal dose, maximal sparing of the surrounding normal tissues and a short treatment course, SBRT technologies have transformed from the early days of body frame-based treatments with X-ray verification to primarily image-guided procedures with cone-beam CT or stereoscopic X-ray systems and non-rigid body immo-bilization. As a result of the incorporation of image-guidance systems and multi-leaf col-limators into mainstream linac systems, and treatment planning systems that have also evolved to allow for routine dose calculations to permit intensity modulated radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), SBRT has disseminated rapidly in the community to manage many disease sites that include oligometastases, spine lesions, lung, prostate, liver, renal cell, pelvic tumors, and head and neck tumors etc. In this article, we review the physical principles and paradigms that led to the widespread adoption of SBRT practice as well as technical caveats specific to individual SBRT technologies. From the perspective of treatment delivery, we categorically described (I) C-arm linac-based SBRT technologies; (II) robotically manipulated X-band CyberKnife® technology; and (III) emerging specialized systems for SBRT that include integrated MRI-linear accelerators and the imaged-guided Gamma Knife Perfexion Icon system with expanded multi-isocenter treatments of skull-based tumors, head-and-neck and cervical-spine lesions.

  10. Mobile radiation monitoring of Mumbai and it's suburb through various road routes by using state-of-the-art radiation monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divkar, J.K.; Chatterjee, M.K.; Patil, S.S.; Sharma, Ranjit; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of environmental radiation in different parts of the country is being periodically carried out with an objective to establish the countrywide baseline dose rate data. The task of quick assessment of impact due to any large-scale radiological emergencies in public domain involves reliable and quick monitoring of dose rate levels using mobile monitoring techniques. In order to achieve higher accuracy and more confidence in measured values, various state-of-the-art monitoring systems are used for mapping a large area. It enables collection and processing of data for rapid and correct evaluation of the situation. The evaluation of measured data from the different systems provides comparable results. This paper describes the radiation mapping of Mumbai and its suburbs carried out through different road routes by installing state-of-the art monitoring systems like CARMS, PMGSS, gamma tracers and micro-R survey meters in a light motor vehicle with the objective of assessing the background radiation level of Mumbai city including Mumbai Suburb, Navi Mumbai and Thane, tagging each data with the positional coordinates and also to detect and locate the presence of orphan sources, if any. The average of measured dose rate levels of Mumbai and Mumbai Suburbs, Navi Mumbai and Thane are 53.3±9.1 nGy.h -1 , 50.9±10.0 nGy.h -1 and 52.1±10.8 nGy.h -1 respectively with maximum ∼ 160 nGy.h -l due to presence of high concentration of 40 K at some locations. (author)

  11. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  12. Does fluoroscopy improve outcomes in paediatric forearm fracture reduction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menachem, S.; Sharfman, Z.T.; Perets, I.; Arami, A.; Eyal, G.; Drexler, M.; Chechik, O.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the radiographic results of paediatric forearm fracture reduced with and without fluoroscopic enhancement to investigate whether fractures reduced under fluoroscopic guidance would have smaller residual deformities and lower rates of re-reduction and surgery. Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted comparing paediatric patients with acute forearm fracture in two trauma centres. Demographics and radiographic data from paediatric forearm fractures treated in Trauma Centre A with the aid of a C-arm fluoroscopy were compared to those treated without fluoroscopy in Trauma Centre B. Re-reduction, late displacement, post-reduction deformity, and need for surgical intervention were compared between the two groups. Results: The cohort included 229 children (175 boys and 54 girls, mean age 9.41±3.2 years, range 1–16 years) with unilateral forearm fractures (83 manipulated with fluoroscopy and 146 without). Thirty-four (15%) children underwent re-reduction procedures in the emergency department. Fifty-three (23%) children had secondary displacement in the cast, of which 18 were operated on, 20 were re-manipulated, and the remaining 15 were kept in the cast with an acceptable deformity. Twenty-nine additional children underwent operation for reasons other than secondary displacement. There were no significant differences in re-reduction and surgery rates or in post-reduction deformities between the two groups. Conclusion: The use of fluoroscopy during reduction of forearm fractures in the paediatric population apparently does not have a significant effect on patient outcomes. Reductions performed without fluoroscopy were comparably accurate in correcting deformities in both coronal and sagittal planes. - Highlights: • Compared outcomes of pediatric forearm fracture reduction with and without fluoroscopy. • The use of fluoroscopy during reduction of forearm fractures in the pediatric population apparently does not have a

  13. Percutaneous chemical lumbar sympathectomy for buerger's disease: Results in 147 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Kothari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and clinical outcome of percutaneous chemical lumbar sympathectomy (PCLS in Buerger's disease (thromboangiitis obliterans [TAO]. Design: This was a retrospective comparative study. Methods: TAO patients who underwent PCLS in surgery department of a teaching hospital in Central India. Diagnosis of TAO was made on clinical grounds and color Doppler study. PCLS was done under image guidance after amputation of gangrene or before if a clear line of demarcation was lacking. After PCLS, patients were followed up on next day and after 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Outcome monitored were improvement in rest pain (using visual analog scale and healing of ischemic ulcers. Results: All patients were males, chronic bidi smokers, mostly in the third decade of life. All had involvement of lower limbs either ischemic rest pain or ischemic ulcers or gangrene of toes/forefoot. A total of 167 PCLS (20 bilateral were performed on 147 TAO patients from June 2008 to January 2016. Imaging modalities were computed tomography scan (n = 67, digital X-ray (n = 50, and C-arm fluoroscopy (n = 50. Success rate for chemical neurolysis was > 82%. Excellent long-lasting rest pain relief was obtained in > 80% patients. Ulcer healing was seen in majority of patients. Large number of limbs (103/167 had gangrene of toe/multiple toes/part of forefoot. Those with patent popliteal artery fared better. Conclusions: PCLS can provide safe and efficient treatment for rest pain and healing of ischemic ulcers in TAO.

  14. A surgical navigation system for non-contact diffuse optical tomography and intraoperative cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Michael J.; Muhanna, Nidal; Chan, Harley; Wilson, Brian C.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-02-01

    A freehand, non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system has been developed for multimodal imaging with intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) during minimally-invasive cancer surgery. The DOT system is configured for near-infrared fluorescence imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) using a collimated 780 nm laser diode and a nearinfrared CCD camera (PCO Pixelfly USB). Depending on the intended surgical application, the camera is coupled to either a rigid 10 mm diameter endoscope (Karl Storz) or a 25 mm focal length lens (Edmund Optics). A prototype flatpanel CBCT C-Arm (Siemens Healthcare) acquires low-dose 3D images with sub-mm spatial resolution. A 3D mesh is extracted from CBCT for finite-element DOT implementation in NIRFAST (Dartmouth College), with the capability for soft/hard imaging priors (e.g., segmented lymph nodes). A stereoscopic optical camera (NDI Polaris) provides real-time 6D localization of reflective spheres mounted to the laser and camera. Camera calibration combined with tracking data is used to estimate intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) lens parameters. Source/detector boundary data is computed from the tracked laser/camera positions using radiometry models. Target registration errors (TRE) between real and projected boundary points are ~1-2 mm for typical acquisition geometries. Pre-clinical studies using tissue phantoms are presented to characterize 3D imaging performance. This translational research system is under investigation for clinical applications in head-and-neck surgery including oral cavity tumour resection, lymph node mapping, and free-flap perforator assessment.

  15. SU-E-I-55: The Contribution to Skin Dose Due to Scatter From the Patient Table and the Head Holder During Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, N; Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine contributions to skin dose due to scatter from the table and head holder used during fluoroscopy, and also to explore alternative design material to reduce the scatter dose. Methods: Measurements were made of the primary and scatter components of the xray beam exiting the patient table and a cylindrical head holder used on a Toshiba Infinix c-arm unit as a function of kVp for the various beam filters on the machine and for various field sizes. The primary component of the beam was measured in air with the object placed close to the x-ray tube with an air gap between it and a 6 cc parallel-plate ionization chamber and with the beam collimated to a size just larger than the chamber. The primary plus scatter radiation components were measured with the object moved to a position in the beam next to the chamber for larger field sizes. Both sets of measurements were preformed while keeping the source-to-chamber distance fixed. The scatter fraction was estimated by taking the ratio of the difference between the two measurements and the reading that included both primary and scatter. Similar measurements were also made for a 2.3 cm thick Styrofoam block which could substitute for the patient support. Results: The measured scatter fractions indicate that the patient table as well as the head holder contributes an additional 10–16% to the patient entrance dose depending on field size. Forward scatter was reduced with the Styrofoam block so that the scatter fraction was about 4–5%. Conclusion: The results of this investigation demonstrated that scatter from the table and head holder used in clinical fluoroscopy contribute substantially to the skin dose. The lower contribution of scatter from Styrofoam suggests that there is an opportunity to redesign patient support accessories to reduce the skin dose. Partial support from NIH grant R01EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation Equipment Grant.

  16. Flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Willi A.; Kyriakou, Yiannis

    2007-01-01

    Flat-panel detectors or, synonymously, flat detectors (FDs) have been developed for use in radiography and fluoroscopy with the defined goal to replace standard X-ray film, film-screen combinations and image intensifiers by an advanced sensor system. FD technology in comparison to X-ray film and image intensifiers offers higher dynamic range, dose reduction, fast digital readout and the possibility for dynamic acquisitions of image series, yet keeping to a compact design. It appeared logical to employ FD designs also for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Respective efforts date back a few years only, but FD-CT has meanwhile become widely accepted for interventional and intra-operative imaging using C-arm systems. FD-CT provides a very efficient way of combining two-dimensional (2D) radiographic or fluoroscopic and 3D CT imaging. In addition, FD technology made its way into a number of dedicated CT scanner developments, such as scanners for the maxillo-facial region or for micro-CT applications. This review focuses on technical and performance issues of FD technology and its full range of applications for CT imaging. A comparison with standard clinical CT is of primary interest. It reveals that FD-CT provides higher spatial resolution, but encompasses a number of disadvantages, such as lower dose efficiency, smaller field of view and lower temporal resolution. FD-CT is not aimed at challenging standard clinical CT as regards to the typical diagnostic examinations; but it has already proven unique for a number of dedicated CT applications, offering distinct practical advantages, above all the availability of immediate CT imaging in the interventional suite or the operating room. (orig.)

  17. Usability of Smartphones for dose alerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaireit, T.; Stamm, G.; Wacker, F.K.; Hoeschen, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Smartphone apps for measuring ionizing radiation use the capability of (CMOS) camera chips to detect not only perceivable light but also electromagnetic wave radiation. The present study evaluates the accuracy of hardware and software and defines possible applications for the detection of X-ray radiation fields. Materials and Methods: 2 apps and 2 different devices were tested in comparison with a calibrated ionization chamber and a personal electronic dosimeter. A calibration curve was determined for dose rates between 12 700 μSv/h and 5.7 μSv/h generated by a C-arm system. Results: The measured scattered radiation produced by an Alderson-Rando phantom ranged from 117 μSv/h (at a distance of 2 m) to 5910 μSv/h (at a distance of 0.3 m) and was 1.4 times less than the values of the ionization chamber. The exposure rate for the operator's thyroid was within 4200 - 4400 μSv/h. We found a strong dependence of the measurements on the angulation of the Smartphone, especially for short distances from the phantom (at a distance of 0.3 m, a 45 rotation downwards in a vertical direction caused a decrease from 3000 μSv/h to 972 μSv/h, while an upwards rotation resulted in an increase to 5000 μSv/h). For a distance of 1 m, this effect was remarkably smaller. Conclusion: Smartphones can be used to detect ionizing radiation but showed limited accuracy and are heavily dependent on the angulation of the device. Qualitative measurements and utilization for dose alerts are possible. (orig.)

  18. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in very elderly patients (Age 75 and Over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Çelik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL is a minimally invasive method used safely in surgical treatment of kidney stones in the world. The first PNL surgery performed in our clinic in March 1998 and first PNL surgery was performed in June 2000 over the age of seventy which was bilaterally side. In our study, PNL operations performed for 75 years and older patients were examined. Methods: PNL operations were performed under the general anesthesia. After cystoscopy in the supine position, ureteral catheter was inserted accompanied by C-arm fluoroscopy. Afterwards, patients were taken prone position then we entered into the kidney with a metal needle with fluoroscopic on. We dilated the entrance with Amplatzer renal dilatators set until the 30 F. After the procedure, the nephrostomy catheter was placed in the renal sheath. 4 mm residual fragments after the PNL operation were accepted as clinically insignificant stone residues (CIRF. Results: 3003 PNL procedures were performed between dates March 1998 - December 2014 in total 16 years. 28 patients of total were 75 years and over. 29 PNL surgeries performed to these patients, including one bilateral PNL procedure. Mean age was 79.36 years (75-88. Twenty (74% of the patients were concluded stone free. 2 patients had tubeless PNL surgery. There was no another complication. Conclusion: PNL is a minimally invasive method has became advantageous according to open surgery because of higher safety, lower complication rates, shorter hospitalization stay, more patient comfort and higher stone free rates. PNL is a safe and effective method in the surgical treatment of urinary tract stone diseases.

  19. State-of-the-art of high power gyro-devices and free electron masers 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumm, M.

    1995-04-01

    At present, gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. 140 GHz gyrotrons with output power P out =0.54 MW, pulse length τ=3.0 s and efficiency η=42% are commercially available. Total efficiencies around 50% have been achieved using single-stage depressed collectors. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver P out =40 kW with τ=40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz (η≥4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in material processing and plasma chemistry. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with the following parameters: f≥24 GHz, P out =10-50 kW, CW, η≥30%. This paper reports on achievements and problems related to the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotrons for long pulse or CW operation and describes the microwave technological pecularities of the different development steps. In addition, this work gives a short overview of the present development of gyrotrons for technological applications, relativistic gyrotrons, quasi-optical gyrotrons, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), gyro klystrons, gyro-TWT amplifiers, gyrotwystron amplifiers, gyro-BWO's, peniotrons and free electron masers (FEMs). The most impressive FEM output parameters are: P out =2 GW, τ=20 ns, η=13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and P out =15 kW, τ=20 μs, η=5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). (orig.) [de

  20. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Kay, I [Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset

  1. They live in the land down under: thyroid function and basal metabolic rate in the Blind Mole Rat, Spalax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Aaron; Nevo, Eviatar; Cohen, Keren; Sotnichenko, Nick; Hercbergs, Aleck; Band, Mark; Davis, Paul J; Ellis, Martin; Ashur-Fabian, Osnat

    2014-01-01

    The Israeli blind subterranean mole rat (Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies) lives in sealed underground burrows under extreme, hypoxic conditions. The four Israeli Spalax allospecies have adapted to different climates, the cool-humid (Spalax galili, 2 n = 52 chromosomes), semihumid (S. golani, 2 n = 54) north regions, warm-humid (S. carmeli, 2 n = 58) central region and the warm-dry S. judaei, 2 n = 60) southern regions. A dramatic interspecies decline in basal metabolic rate (BMR) from north to south, even after years of captivity, indicates a genetic basis for this BMR trait. We examined the possibility that the genetically-conditioned interspecies BMR difference was expressed via circulating thyroid hormone. An unexpected north to south increase in serum free thyroxine (FT4) and total 3, 5, 3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) (p BMR measurements. The increases in serum FT4 and T3 were symmetrical, so that the T3:FT4 ratio - interpretable as an index of conversion of T4 to T3 in nonthyroidal tissues - did not support relative decrease in production of T3 as a contributor to BMR. Increased north-to-south serum FT4 and T3 levels also correlated negatively with hemoglobin/hematocrit. North-to-south adaptations in spalacids include decreased BMR and hematocrit/hemoglobin in the face of increasing thyroid hormone levels, arguing for independent control of hormone secretion and BMR/hematocrit/hemoglobin. But the significant inverse relationship between thyroid hormone levels and BMR/hematocrit/hemoglobin is also consistent with a degree of cellular resistance to thyroid hormone action that protects against hormone-induced increase in oxygen consumption in a hostile, hypoxic environment.

  2. Use of a vegetable model as a training tool for PCNL puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Maneesh; Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Training residents to perform a PCNL puncture is hampered by the non-availability of a good inanimate model that can be used for demonstration and practice. The ethics of surgical training during actual surgeries is being questioned and the role of simulation is increasingly important. Virtual reality trainers, however, are prohibitively expensive and the use of animal models is fraught with regulatory and ethical concerns. We have devised a model that can be used to teach the concept of depth perception during a PCNL puncture. A bottle gourd was used to mimic the posterior abdominal wall. Cotton pledgets dipped in intravenous contrast were fitted into 4 mm holes made at staggered levels in the bottle gourd which was strapped onto the operating table with the cotton pledgets facing away from the surgeon. Surgeons with varying degrees of experience made fluoroscopy-guided punctures onto the cotton pledgets. We recorded the time taken for puncture in seconds and the distance of the needle exit site from the center of the cotton ball. Speed was measured by recording the fluoroscopy time in seconds on the C-arm. Accuracy was documented by using a Vernier caliper to measure the distance from the edge of the target to the actual puncture. One second of fluoroscopy time and 0.1 mm distance were each given one point. The total points accumulated over a set of 10 punctures was added to give a total score. Longer fluoroscopy times and inaccurate punctures resulted in higher scores. A surgeon with more than 1000 PCNLs to his credit had a score of 99. The average score of five residents was 555. The bottle gourd model provides an ethically acceptable, inexpensive, easy to replicate model that can be used to train residents in the PCNL puncture.

  3. Artificial Neural Network to Predict Vine Water Status Spatial Variability Using Multispectral Information Obtained from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Tomas; Ortega-Farías, Samuel; Moreno, Miguel Angel; Bardeen, Matthew

    2017-10-30

    Water stress, which affects yield and wine quality, is often evaluated using the midday stem water potential (Ψ stem ). However, this measurement is acquired on a per plant basis and does not account for the assessment of vine water status spatial variability. The use of multispectral cameras mounted on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is capable to capture the variability of vine water stress in a whole field scenario. It has been reported that conventional multispectral indices (CMI) that use information between 500-800 nm, do not accurately predict plant water status since they are not sensitive to water content. The objective of this study was to develop artificial neural network (ANN) models derived from multispectral images to predict the Ψ stem spatial variability of a drip-irrigated Carménère vineyard in Talca, Maule Region, Chile. The coefficient of determination (R²) obtained between ANN outputs and ground-truth measurements of Ψ stem were between 0.56-0.87, with the best performance observed for the model that included the bands 550, 570, 670, 700 and 800 nm. Validation analysis indicated that the ANN model could estimate Ψ stem with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.1 MPa, root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.12 MPa, and relative error (RE) of -9.1%. For the validation of the CMI, the MAE, RMSE and RE values were between 0.26-0.27 MPa, 0.32-0.34 MPa and -24.2-25.6%, respectively.

  4. ECG-gated interventional cardiac reconstruction for non-periodic motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Lauritsch, Günter; Biller, Lisa; Hornegger, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    The 3-D reconstruction of cardiac vasculature using C-arm CT is an active and challenging field of research. In interventional environments patients often do have arrhythmic heart signals or cannot hold breath during the complete data acquisition. This important group of patients cannot be reconstructed with current approaches that do strongly depend on a high degree of cardiac motion periodicity for working properly. In a last year's MICCAI contribution a first algorithm was presented that is able to estimate non-periodic 4-D motion patterns. However, to some degree that algorithm still depends on periodicity, as it requires a prior image which is obtained using a simple ECG-gated reconstruction. In this work we aim to provide a solution to this problem by developing a motion compensated ECG-gating algorithm. It is built upon a 4-D time-continuous affine motion model which is capable of compactly describing highly non-periodic motion patterns. A stochastic optimization scheme is derived which minimizes the error between the measured projection data and the forward projection of the motion compensated reconstruction. For evaluation, the algorithm is applied to 5 datasets of the left coronary arteries of patients that have ignored the breath hold command and/or had arrhythmic heart signals during the data acquisition. By applying the developed algorithm the average visibility of the vessel segments could be increased by 27%. The results show that the proposed algorithm provides excellent reconstruction quality in cases where classical approaches fail. The algorithm is highly parallelizable and a clinically feasible runtime of under 4 minutes is achieved using modern graphics card hardware.

  5. Radiation doses in endoscopic interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Paraskeva, K.; Mathou, N.; Aggelogiannopoulou, P.; Triantopoulou, C.; Karagianis, J.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Paspatis, G.; Voudoukis, E.; Athanasopoulos, N.; Lydakis, I.; Scotiniotis, H.; Georgopoulos, P.; Finou, P.; Kadiloru, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Extensive literature exists on patient radiation doses in various interventional procedures. This does not stand for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) where the literature is very limited. This study compares patient dose during ERCP procedures performed with different types of X-ray systems. Methods and Materials: Four hospitals participated in the study with the following X-ray systems: A) X-ray conventional system (X-ray tube over table), 137 pts, B) X-ray conventional system (X-ray tube under table), 114 pts, C) C-arm system, 79 pts, and D) angiography system, 57 pts. A single experienced endoscopist performed the ERCP in each hospital. Kerma Area Product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (T) and total number of X-ray films (F) were collected. Results: Median patient dose was 6.2 Gy.cm 2 (0.02-130.2 Gy.cm 2 ). Medium linear correlation between KAP and T (0.6) and F (0.4) were observed. Patient doses were 33 % higher than the reference value in UK (4.15 Gy.cm 2 with a sample of 6089 patients). Median KAP for each hospital was: A) 3.1, B) 9.2, C) 3.9 and D) 6.2 Gy.cm 2 . Median T was: A) 2.6, B) 4.1, C) 2.8 and D) 3.4 min. Median F was: A) 2, B) 7, C) 2 and D) 2 films. Conclusion: Patient radiation dose during ERCP depends on: a) fluoroscopy time and films taken, b) the type of the X-ray system used, with the C arm and the conventional over the couch systems carrying the lower patient radiation dose and the angiography system the higher. (authors)

  6. Retrograde or antegrade double-pigtail stent placement for malignant ureteric obstruction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uthappa, M.C.; Cowan, N.C.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the optimum approach for double-pigtail stent placement in malignant ureteric obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrograde stent placement was attempted in a consecutive series of patients presenting with malignant ureteric obstruction. If retrograde stent placement was unsuccessful, percutaneous nephrostomy was performed immediately followed by elective antegrade stent placement. Identical digital C-arm fluoroscopy for image-guidance and conditions for anaesthesia and analgesia were employed for both retrograde and antegrade procedures. Identical 8 Fr (20-26 cm) double-pigtail hydrophilic coated stents were used for each approach. RESULTS: Retrograde placement was attempted in 50 ureters in 30 patients {19 male, 11 female, average age 61.4 yr (range 29-90 yr)} over a 24-month period. The success rate for retrograde ureteric stent placement was 50% (n=25/50). Technical failures were due to failure to identify the ureteric orifice (n=22), failure to cross the stricture (n=1), failure to pass the stent (n=1) and failure to pass a 4 Fr catheter (n=1). Antegrade placement was attempted in 25 ureters with a success rate of 96% (n=24/25). Failure in the one case was due to inability to cross an upper third stricture secondary to pyeloureteritis cystica. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that retrograde route should be the initial approach if imaging shows no involvement of ureteric orifice (UO), when nephrostomy is technically very difficult or in cases of solitary kidney. The antegrade route is preferred if imaging shows tumour occlusion of the UO or if there is a tight stricture very close to the uretero-vesical junction (UVJ) making purchase within the ureter difficult for crossing the stricture

  7. Usability of Smartphones for dose alerts; Smartphones jetzt noch smarter? Moeglichkeit des Einsatzes als 'Dosiswarner'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaireit, T.; Stamm, G.; Wacker, F.K. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Hoeschen, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Neuherberg (Germany). Abt. Medizinische Strahlenphysik und Diagnostik

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Smartphone apps for measuring ionizing radiation use the capability of (CMOS) camera chips to detect not only perceivable light but also electromagnetic wave radiation. The present study evaluates the accuracy of hardware and software and defines possible applications for the detection of X-ray radiation fields. Materials and Methods: 2 apps and 2 different devices were tested in comparison with a calibrated ionization chamber and a personal electronic dosimeter. A calibration curve was determined for dose rates between 12 700 {mu}Sv/h and 5.7 {mu}Sv/h generated by a C-arm system. Results: The measured scattered radiation produced by an Alderson-Rando phantom ranged from 117 {mu}Sv/h (at a distance of 2 m) to 5910 {mu}Sv/h (at a distance of 0.3 m) and was 1.4 times less than the values of the ionization chamber. The exposure rate for the operator's thyroid was within 4200 - 4400 {mu}Sv/h. We found a strong dependence of the measurements on the angulation of the Smartphone, especially for short distances from the phantom (at a distance of 0.3 m, a 45 rotation downwards in a vertical direction caused a decrease from 3000 {mu}Sv/h to 972 {mu}Sv/h, while an upwards rotation resulted in an increase to 5000 {mu}Sv/h). For a distance of 1 m, this effect was remarkably smaller. Conclusion: Smartphones can be used to detect ionizing radiation but showed limited accuracy and are heavily dependent on the angulation of the device. Qualitative measurements and utilization for dose alerts are possible. (orig.)

  8. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-02: Neurovascular 4D Parametric Imaging Using Co-Registration of Biplane DSA Sequences with 3D Vascular Geometry Obtained From Cone Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramoniam, A; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S; Ionita, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create 4D parametric images using biplane Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) sequences co-registered with the 3D vascular geometry obtained from Cone Beam-CT (CBCT). Methods: We investigated a method to derive multiple 4D Parametric Imaging (PI) maps using only one CBCT acquisition. During this procedure a 3D-DSA geometry is stored and used subsequently for all 4D images. Each time a biplane DSA is acquired, we calculate 2D parametric maps of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT), Mean Transit Time (MTT) and Time to Peak (TTP). Arterial segments which are nearly parallel with one of the biplane imaging planes in the 2D parametric maps are co-registered with the 3D geometry. The values in the remaining vascular network are found using spline interpolation since the points chosen for co-registration on the vasculature are discrete and remaining regions need to be interpolated. To evaluate the method we used a patient CT volume data set for 3D printing a neurovascular phantom containing a complete Circle of Willis. We connected the phantom to a flow loop with a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. Contrast media was injected with an automatic injector at 10 ml/sec. Images were acquired with a Toshiba Infinix C-arm and 4D parametric image maps of the vasculature were calculated. Results: 4D BAT, MTT, and TTP parametric image maps of the Circle of Willis were derived. We generated color-coded 3D geometries which avoided artifacts due to vessel overlap or foreshortening in the projection direction. Conclusion: The software was tested successfully and multiple 4D parametric images were obtained from biplane DSA sequences without the need to acquire additional 3D-DSA runs. This can benefit the patient by reducing the contrast media and the radiation dose normally associated with these procedures. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  9. Augmented reality: a new tool to improve surgical accuracy during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy? Preliminary in vitro and in vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teber, Dogu; Guven, Selcuk; Simpfendörfer, Tobias; Baumhauer, Mathias; Güven, Esref Oguz; Yencilek, Faruk; Gözen, Ali Serdar; Rassweiler, Jens

    2009-08-01

    Use of an augmented reality (AR)-based soft tissue navigation system in urologic laparoscopic surgery is an evolving technique. To evaluate a novel soft tissue navigation system developed to enhance the surgeon's perception and to provide decision-making guidance directly before initiation of kidney resection for laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN). Custom-designed navigation aids, a mobile C-arm capable of cone-beam imaging, and a standard personal computer were used. The feasibility and reproducibility of inside-out tracking principles were evaluated in a porcine model with an artificially created intraparenchymal tumor in vitro. The same algorithm was then incorporated into clinical practice during LPN. Evaluation of a fully automated inside-out tracking system was repeated in exactly the same way for 10 different porcine renal units. Additionally, 10 patients underwent retroperitoneal LPNs under manual AR guidance by one surgeon. The navigation errors and image-acquisition times were determined in vitro. The mean operative time, time to locate the tumor, and positive surgical margin were assessed in vivo. The system was able to navigate and superpose the virtually created images and real-time images with an error margin of only 0.5 mm, and fully automated initial image acquisition took 40 ms. The mean operative time was 165 min (range: 135-195 min), and mean time to locate the tumor was 20 min (range: 13-27 min). None of the cases required conversion to open surgery. Definitive histology revealed tumor-free margins in all 10 cases. This novel AR tracking system proved to be functional with a reasonable margin of error and image-to-image registration time. Mounting the pre- or intraoperative imaging properties on real-time videoendoscopic images in a real-time manner will simplify and increase the precision of laparoscopic procedures.

  10. Percutaneous vertebroplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with intraosseous cystic cavity phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shicheng; Teng Gaojun; Deng Gang; Fang Wen; Guo Jinhe; Zhu Guangyu; Li Guozao; Shen Zhiping; Ding Huijuan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the key technique, short term clinical efficacy and degree of changes in vertebral body height for percutaneous vertebroplasty in treating patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures containing intraosseous cystic cavity phenomena. Methods: Thirty two vertebrae of painful compression fractures with intraosseous vacuum sign occurring in 27 patients were identified from 326 percutaneous vertebroplasties performed in 207 patients during 4 years. PVP was performed under C-arm fluoroscopy guidance only with local anesthesia. Intaosseous venography was performed on each vertebra by hand injection with non-ionic contrast agent, with CT monitoring after PMMA injection for the PMMA distribution in the vertebrae and looking for leakage. The heights of 32 vertebral bodies were measured before and after the vertebroplasty. The efficacy of PVP was evaluated during the follow-up. Results: The successful rate of PVP was 100%. Main appearance of vertebral venography showed cystic cavity-like, stasis of contrast medium within the marrow space of the fractured vertebra. 6.8 ml of PMMA in average was injected into each vertebra. CR, PR and NR were obtained respectively 66.7%, 18.5%, 14.8% mm centrally and 0.06 mm posteriorly. The heights restoration of vertebrae anteriorly and centrally were significantly different (P 0.05). No serious complications related to the technique occurred, except 3 cases with asymptomatic PMMA leakage around vertebrae demonstrated by CT. Conclusions: Significant pain relief and vertebral height restoration by PVP in the treatment of patients with painful vertebral compression fractures accompanied by intraosseous cysticavitary change, are promising with low-rate of PMMA leakage. The basic successful mechanism lies on the proper complete PMMA filling predicting through venography. (authors)

  11. The preparation of teaching simulation system of endovascular intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yiming; Wang Jie; Shi Haibin; Jin Xijun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish a teaching simulation system of endovascular intervention and to evaluate its application in clinical teaching practice. Methods: The vascular model, which had quite similar diameter and length to that of human arteries, was prepared with glass tubes of different diameters. Stainless steel tubes were cut and welded to manufacture the brackets of an operation bed and a C-arm, and then the above parts together with flat were assembled into the operation bed module. Fixed camera, computer and footswitch were assembled into the image module. The above three modules were integrated into the teaching simulation system of endovascular intervention. With the help of this system, the principal endovascular intervention manipulations were imitatively exercised. Results: The vascular model had the same proportions as in normal human subjects. The operation bed module could be moved in two dimensions. The image module could capture multiple and differently formatted images as well as dynamic images in different sizes. Also, this system carried the image-frozen function, which was just the same as last image hold function of DSA. This simulation system could imitate the basic manipulations of many kinds of endovascular interventions, such as the hepatic artery catheterization, carotid artery catheterization, the performing of looping-technique in uterine artery, etc. Conclusion: The simulation system can imitate many principal endovascular manipulations, and can distinctly display the relationship of the vascular anatomy and interventional instruments with their imaging shadows. Therefore, this simulation system has a promising prospect of being able to be used in the clinical teaching program concerning vascular interventional manipulations. (authors)

  12. RAZOR: A Phase II Open Randomized Trial of Screening Plus Goserelin and Raloxifene Versus Screening Alone in Premenopausal Women at Increased Risk of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Anthony; Ashcroft, Linda; Fallowfield, Lesley; Eccles, Diana M; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ward, Ann; Brentnall, Adam R; Dowsett, Mitchell; Cuzick, Jack M; Greenhalgh, Rosemary; Boggis, Caroline; Motion, Jamie; Sergeant, Jamie C; Adams, Judith; Evans, D Gareth

    2018-01-01

    Background: Ovarian suppression in premenopausal women is known to reduce breast cancer risk. This study aimed to assess uptake and compliance with ovarian suppression using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue, goserelin, with add-back raloxifene, as a potential regimen for breast cancer prevention. Methods: Women at ≥30% lifetime risk breast cancer were approached and randomized to mammographic screening alone (C-Control) or screening in addition to monthly subcutaneous injections of 3.6 mg goserelin and continuous 60 mg raloxifene daily orally (T-Treated) for 2 years. The primary endpoint was therapy adherence. Secondary endpoints were toxicity/quality of life, change in bone density, and mammographic density. Results: A total of 75/950 (7.9%) women approached agreed to randomization. In the T-arm, 20 of 38 (52%) of women completed the 2-year period of study compared with the C-arm (27/37, 73.0%). Dropouts were related to toxicity but also the wish to have established risk-reducing procedures and proven chemoprevention. As relatively few women completed the study, data are limited, but those in the T-arm reported significant increases in toxicity and sexual problems, no change in anxiety, and less cancer worry. Lumbar spine bone density declined by 7.0% and visually assessed mammographic density by 4.7% over the 2-year treatment period. Conclusions: Uptake is somewhat lower than comparable studies with tamoxifen for prevention with higher dropout rates. Raloxifene may preserve bone density, but reduction in mammographic density reversed after treatment was completed. Impact: This study indicates that breast cancer risk reduction may be possible using LHRH agonists, but reducing toxicity and preventing bone changes would make this a more attractive option. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(1); 58-66. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. The CREST Simulation Development Process: Training the Next Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Robert M

    2017-04-01

    The challenges of training and assessing endourologic skill have driven the development of new training systems. The Center for Research in Education and Simulation Technologies (CREST) has developed a team and a methodology to facilitate this develop