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Sample records for livermore security console

  1. The Livermore Security Console system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Console system contains multiple, redundant workstations that enable operator to monitor alarms, assess incidents, and dispatch field personnel. Each workstation is heavily computerized and incorporates automatic video switching and recording, integrated radio and telephone communications, and an advanced high-resolution map and incident-display system. Operation of the workstation is closely integrated with the map display system, allowing an operators to readily pan and zoom. Objects of security interest are overlaid on the map using color. Access to alarm sensor information, entry-control device status, and the closed-circuit television system is obtained by zooming into an area and selecting the appropriate icons or symbols on the maps. Control menus are overlaid on the map. Several large databases have been closely integrated with the map display system, providing access to information such as telephone numbers and building or room occupants. An expert system is currently being integrated with the map display system. Object state changes are interpreted by a rule-based inference engine. Incidents are overlaid on the map

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy quarter ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the details of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and securities program. This program is focused on developing new technology, such as x- and gamma-ray spectrometry, for measurement of special nuclear materials. This program supports the Office of Safeguards and Securities in the following five areas; safeguards technology, safeguards and decision support, computer security, automated physical security, and automated visitor access control systems.

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Safeguards and Security quarterly progress report ending March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.; Davis, G.; Johnson, D.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.

    1996-04-01

    LLNL carries out safeguards and security activities for DOE Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) and other organizations within and outside DOE. LLNL is supporting OSS in 6 areas: safeguards technology, safeguards and materials accountability, computer security--distributed systems, complex-wide access control, standardization of security systems, and information technology and security center. This report describes the activities in each of these areas.

  4. Systems analysis of a security alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiff, A.

    1975-01-01

    When the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory found that its security alarm system was causing more false alarms and maintenance costs than LLL felt was tolerable, a systems analysis was undertaken to determine what should be done about the situation. This report contains an analysis of security alarm systems in general and ends with a review of the existing Security Alarm Control Console (SACC) and recommendations for its improvement, growth and change. (U.S.)

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.; Mansur, D.L.; Davis, G.

    1993-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 1993 (July through September, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: Safeguards Technology, Safeguard System Studies, Computer Security, DOE Automated Physical Security and DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Strauch, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 1997 (October through December, 1996). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in four areas: (1) safeguards technology; (2) safeguards and material accountability; (3) computer security--distributed systems; and (4) physical and personnel security support. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these four areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  7. Game Consoles - Are they secure?

    OpenAIRE

    Myrmo, Halvar

    2007-01-01

    NORSK: De nye spillkonsollene og håndholdte maskinene som finnes på markedet i dag er designet med tanke på Internett og flerspiller muligheter. De er også designet for å vare i mange år og for å være koblet til Internett 24 timer i døgnet. Denne kombinasjonen av regnekraft og tilkoblingsmuligheter kan gjøre spillkonsoller ett lukrativt mål for virus, trojanere, botnet, spam og annen ondsinnet programvare. Eiere av datamaskiner begynner sakte men sikkert å lære at de trenger...

  8. Aerial radiological survey of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (Livermore, California)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1977-10-01

    An airborne radiological survey was conducted during August 1975 over several selected sites in the vicinity of Livermore, California. These sites included the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Sandia Livermore Laboratories, LLL Site 300, the Livermore Municipal Golf Course, and the City of Livermore's sewage treatment plant. The radiation results were processed specifically for man-made gamma ray activity. All elevated man-made activity observed during the aerial survey was contained within the site boundaries of the three DOE facilities

  9. New operator's console recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    This article described a software module that automatically records images being shown on multiple HMI or SCADA operator's displays. Videos used for monitoring activities at industrial plants can be combined with the operator console videos and data from a process historian. This enables engineers, analysts or investigators to see what is occurring in the plant, what the operator is seeing on the HMI screen, and all relevant real-time data from an event. In the case of a leak at a pumping station, investigators could watch plant video taken at a remote site showing fuel oil creeping across the floor, real-time data being acquired from pumps, valves and the receiving tank while the leak is occurring. The video shows the operator's HMI screen as well as the alarm screen that signifies the leak detection. The Longwatch Operator's Console Recorder and Video Historian are used together to acquire data about actual plant plant management because they show everything that happens during an event. The Console Recorder automatically retrieves and replays operator displays by clicking on a time-based alarm or system message. Play back of video feed is a valuable tool for training and analysis purposes, and can help mitigate insurance and regulatory issues by eliminating uncertainty and conjecture. 1 fig.

  10. Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A., B

    2008-07-31

    Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected

  11. Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, A.

    2008-01-01

    Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected

  12. LINCS: Livermore's network architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Octopus, a local computing network that has been evolving at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for over fifteen years, is currently undergoing a major revision. The primary purpose of the revision is to consolidate and redefine the variety of conventions and formats, which have grown up over the years, into a single standard family of protocols, the Livermore Interactive Network Communication Standard (LINCS). This standard treats the entire network as a single distributed operating system such that access to a computing resource is obtained in a single way, whether that resource is local (on the same computer as the accessing process) or remote (on another computer). LINCS encompasses not only communication but also such issues as the relationship of customer to server processes and the structure, naming, and protection of resources. The discussion includes: an overview of the Livermore user community and computing hardware, the functions and structure of each of the seven layers of LINCS protocol, the reasons why we have designed our own protocols and why we are dissatisfied by the directions that current protocol standards are taking

  13. CONSOL`s perspective on CCT deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, F.P.; Statnick, R.M. [CONSOL Inc., Library, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The principal focus of government investment in Clean Coal Technology must be to serve the interests of the US energy consumer. Because of its security of supply and low cost, coal will continue to be the fuel of choice in the existing domestic electricity generating market. The ability of coal to compete for new generating capacity will depend largely on natural gas prices and the efficiency of coal and gas-fired generating options. Furthermore, potential environmental regulations, coupled with utility deregulation, create a climate of economic uncertainty that may limit future investment decisions favorable to coal. Therefore, the federal government, through programs such as CCT, should promote the development of greenfield and retrofit coal use technology that improves generating efficiency and meets environmental requirements for the domestic electric market.

  14. Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bleuel, Darren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, Micah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soltz, Ron [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tonchev, Anton [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-05

    The Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS) will generate intense photon and neutron beams to address important gaps in the study of radionuclide science that directly impact Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Forensics, and Nuclear Material Detection. The co-location of MeV-scale neutral and photon sources with radiochemical analytics provides a unique facility to meet current and future challenges in nuclear security and nuclear science.

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Johnson, D.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.

    1996-10-01

    The paper describes tasks undertaken in each of the following areas: Safeguards technology program (STP); Safeguards and material accountability (SMA); Computer security, distributed systems; Complex-wide access control system (CWAC); and Standardization of security systems (SSS). The STP develops advanced, nondestructive analysis technology for measurement of special nuclear materials. Work focuses on R and D relating to X- and gamma-ray spectrometry and to development of computer codes for interpreting the spectral data obtained by these techniques. The SMA is concerned with four areas: insider protection; material accountability; planning and evaluation; and information security. The Computer Security Technology Center provides expertise and solutions to the many information security problems present in today`s computer systems and networks. Incidents of intrusions, computer viruses, the purposeful replacement of legitimate software for illegal purposes, and similar acts are being addressed by the creation of security software, the delivery of incident response expertise, and research and development into secure systems. The purpose of the CWAC is to develop an approach that will allow visitors to use their DOE standard badge in access control systems throughout the DOE complex. The purpose of the SSS project is to support the standardization of security systems to meet DOE orders and requirements, and to support the DOE in offering relevant security technology and capabilities to Federal standardization efforts.

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dibley, V. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doman, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heidecker, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumamoto, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Veseliza, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Henry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Armstrong, Dave [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, Rick G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, Nicholas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, Steven J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fish, Craig [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dibley, Valerie R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doman, Jennifer L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, Allen R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heidecker, Kelly R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hollister, Rod K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumamoto, Gene [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, Donald H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nelson, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, Heather L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, Lisa E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, Crystal A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, Alison A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, Anthony M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, Kent R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, Jim S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-19

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  18. Mobile console at PS the MCR

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    A mobile console was designed and constructed which can call upon all the applications programs available at the Main Control Room (Annual Report 1982 p. 96, Fig. 7). Daniele Dumollard sits at the console.

  19. Consolation in the aftermath of robberies resembles post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä; Bernasco, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Post-aggression consolation is assumed to occur in humans as well as in chimpanzees. While consolation following peer aggression has been observed in children, systematic evidence of consolation in human adults is rare. We used surveillance camera footage of the immediate aftermath of nonfatal...... to be consoled. Furthermore, we show that high levels of threat during the robbery increased the likelihood of receiving consolation afterwards. These patterns resemble post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees and suggest that emotions of empathic concern are involved in consolation across humans...... and chimpanzees....

  20. Final Stage Development of Reactor Console Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Idris Taib; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2013-01-01

    The Reactor Console Simulator PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor was developed since end of 2011 and now in the final stage of development. It is will be an interactive tool for operator training and teaching of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor. Behavior and characteristic for reactor console and reactor itself can be evaluated and understand. This Simulator will be used as complement for actual present reactor console. Implementation of human system interface (HSI) is using computer screens, keyboard and mouse. Multiple screens are used to match the physical of present reactor console. LabVIEW software are using for user interface and mathematical calculation. Polynomial equation based on control rods calibration data as well as operation parameters record was used to calculate and estimated reactor console parameters. The capabilities in user interface, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics can be expanded and explored to simulation as well as modeling for New Reactor Console, Research Reactor and Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2008-04-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that

  2. Consolation in the aftermath of robberies resembles post-aggression consolation in chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Liebst, Lasse Suonperä; Bernasco, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Post-aggression consolation is assumed to occur in humans as well as in chimpanzees. While consolation following peer aggression has been observed in children, systematic evidence of consolation in human adults is rare. We used surveillance camera footage of the immediate aftermath of nonfatal...

  3. Environmental restoration at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziagos, J.P.; Bainer, R.W.; Dresen, M.D.; Hoffman, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Ground water beneath Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) near Livermore California, contains 19 compounds in concentrations exceeding regulatory standards. These include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), dissolved fuel hydrocarbons, free product gasoline, cadmium, chromium, lead, and tritium. VOCs are the most widespread hazardous materials in the ground water, covering an area of about 1.4 square miles. The other compounds occur sporadically around the site. The LLNL site was added to the National Priorities (Superfund) List in 1987. This paper describes the technology developed at LLNL to remediate soil and ground water contamination. Included in this paper are methods in which site characterization has been aided by using a drilling technique developed at LLNL to evaluate the vertical distribution of VOCs in multiple water-bearing zones in single borehole. The paper also describes the development and implementation of a comprehensive three-step program to investigate and evaluate potential sources of hazardous materials in soil and ground water

  4. Master Console System Monitoring and Control Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    The Master Console internship during the spring of 2013 involved the development of firing room displays at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This position was with the Master Console Product Group (MCPG) on the Launch Control System (LCS) project. This project is responsible for the System Monitoring and Control (SMC) and Record and Retrieval (R&R) of launch operations data. The Master Console is responsible for: loading the correct software into each of the remaining consoles in the firing room, connecting the proper data paths to and from the launch vehicle and all ground support equipment, and initializing the entire firing room system to begin processing. During my internship, I developed a system health and status display for use by Master Console Operators (MCO) to monitor and verify the integrity of the servers, gateways, network switches, and firewalls used in the firing room.

  5. Distributed radiation protection console system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhokra, R.S.; Deshpande, V.K.; Mishra, H.; Rajeev, K.P.; Thakur, Bipla B.; Munj, Niket

    2004-01-01

    Radiation exposure control is one of the most important aspects in any nuclear facility . It encompasses continuous monitoring of the various areas of the facility to detect any increase in the radiation level and/or the air activity level beyond preset limits and alarm the O and M personnel working in these areas. Detection and measurement of radiation level and the air activity level is carried out by a number of monitors installed in the areas. These monitors include Area Gamma Monitors, Continuous Air Monitors, Pu-In-Air Monitors, Criticality Monitors etc. Traditionally, these measurements are displayed and recorded on a Central Radiation Protection Console(CRPC), which is located in the central control room of the facility. This methodology suffers from the shortcoming that any worker required to enter a work area will have to inquire about the radiation status of the area either from the CRPC or will get to know the same directly from the installed only after entering the area. This shortcoming can lead to avoidable delays in attending to the work or to unwanted exposure. The authors have designed and developed a system called Distributed Radiation Protection Console (DRPC) to overcome this shortcoming. A DRPC is a console which is located outside the entrance of a given area and displays the radiation status of the area. It presents to health physicist and the plant operators a graphic over-view of the radiation and air activity levels in the particular area of the plant. It also provides audio visual annunciation of the alarm status. Each radioactive area in a nuclear facility will have its own DRPC, which will receive as its inputs the analog and digital signals from radiation monitoring instruments installed in the area and would not only show those readings on its video graphic screen but will also provide warning messages and instructions to the personnel entering the active areas. The various DRPCs can be integrated into a Local Area Network, where the

  6. Environmental management assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA. LLNL is operated by the University of California (UC) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Major programs at LLNL include research, development, and test activities associated with the nuclear design aspects of the nuclear weapons life cycle and related national security tasks; inertial confinement fusion; magnetic fusion energy; biomedical and environmental research; laser isotope separation; energy-related research; beam research physics; and support to a variety of Defense and other Federal agencies. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from management and operating contractor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; DOE Oakland Operations Office; and DOE Headquarters Program Offices, including the Office of Defense Programs, Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Nuclear Energy, and the Office of Energy Research. The onsite portion was conducted in June 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit. The goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission using systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE's environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The Environmental Management Assessment of LLNL revealed that LLNL's environmental program is exemplary within the DOE complex and that all levels of LLNL management and staff consistently exhibit a high level of commitment to achieve environmental excellence

  7. Reactor console replacement at Washington State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, Thomas A.

    1978-01-01

    A replacement reactor console was installed in 1977 at the W.S.U. 1 MW TRIGA-fueled reactor as the final step in an instrumentation upgrade program. The program was begun circa 1972 with the design, construction and installation of various systems and equipment. Major instruments were installed in the existing console and tested in the course of reactor operation. The culmination of the program was the installation of a cubicle designed and constructed to house the updated instrumentation. (author)

  8. Comparing the da Vinci si single console and dual console in teaching novice surgeons suturing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusco, Salvatore; Jackson, Tiffany; Advincula, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery is often taught with the surgical mentor at the surgeon console and the trainee at the patient's bedside. The da Vinci dual console (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, California) allows a surgical mentor to teach with both the mentor and the trainee working at a surgeon console simultaneously. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the dual console versus the single console for teaching medical students robotic tasks. Forty novice medical students were randomized to either the da Vinci single-console or dual-console group and were taught 4 knot-tying techniques by a surgical mentor. The students were timed while performing the tasks. No statistically significant differences in mean task times were observed between the single- and dual-console groups: interrupted stitch with a 2-handed knot (300 seconds for single vs 294 seconds for dual, P=.59), interrupted stitch with a 1-handed knot (198 seconds for single vs 212 seconds for dual, P=.88), figure-of-8 stitch with a 2-handed knot (261 seconds for single vs 219 seconds for dual, P=.20), and figure-of-8 stitch with a 1-handed knot (200 seconds for single vs 199 seconds for dual, P=.53). No significant difference was observed in performance time when teaching knot-tying techniques to medical students using the da Vinci dual console compared with the single console. More research needs to be performed on the utility of the da Vinci dual console in surgical training.

  9. Livermore pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    The Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) has served a dual purpose since 1958--as an instrument for fundamental research and as a tool for measurement and calibration. Our early efforts centered on neutron-diffraction, fission, and capture gamma-ray studies. During the 1960's it was used for extensive calibration work associated with radiochemical and physical measurements on nuclear-explosive tests. Since 1970 the principal applications have been for trace-element measurements and radiation-damage studies. Today's research program is dominated by radiochemical studies of the shorter-lived fission products and by research on the mechanisms of radiation damage. Trace-element measurement for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is the major measurement application today

  10. Master Console System Monitoring and Control Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    The Master Console internship during the summer of 2013 involved the development of firing room displays and support applications at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This position was with the Master Console Product Group (MCPG) on the Launch Control System (LCS) project. This project is responsible for the System Monitoring and Control (SMC) and Record and Retrieval (R&R) of launch operations data. The Master Console is responsible for: loading the correct software into each of the remaining consoles in the firing room, connecting the proper data paths to and from the launch vehicle and all ground support equipment, and initializing the entire firing room system to begin processing. During my internship, I created control scripts using the Application Control Language (ACL) to analyze the health and status of Kennedy Ground Control System (KGCS) programmable logic controllers (PLCs). This application provides a system health and status display I created with summarized data for use by Master Console Operators (MCO) to monitor and verify the integrity of KGCS subsystems.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosene, C. A.; Jones, H. E.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites-the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,'' and DOE Order 458.1, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.''

  13. C-TIC Console Operator's User Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The C-TIC Console Operator's User Manual is designed to assist the operator at : the Corridor Transportation Information Center with the navigation and use of : the application programs in the C-TIC. This document will concentrate solely on : the ext...

  14. Consolation through music : A survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanser, W.E.; ter Bogt, T.F.M.; van den Tol, A.J.M.; Mark, R.E.; Vingerhoets, A.J.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Even though music is widely used as a source of solace, the question as to how and why music offers consolation remains largely unexplored. The aims of the present study are as follows: (a) to compare listening to music versus other self-soothing behaviors, (b) to explore when music is used as a

  15. Development of Reactor Console Simulator for PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Nufarhana Ayuni Joha; Mohd Sabri Minhat

    2012-01-01

    The Reactor Console Simulator will be an interactive tool for operator training and teaching of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor. Behaviour and characteristic for reactor console and reactor itself can be evaluated and understand. This Simulator will be used as complement for actual present reactor console. Implementation of man-machine interface is using computer screens, keyboard and mouse. Multiple screens are used to match the physical of present reactor console. LabVIEW software are using for user interface and mathematical calculation. Polynomial equation based on control rods calibration data as well as operation parameters record was used to calculate the estimated reactor console parameters. (author)

  16. Database Tool for Master Console Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Sean

    2018-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) launch control system for the Orion capsule and Space Launch System, the next generation manned rocket currently in development. This large system requires highly trained and knowledgeable personnel. Master Console Operators (MCO) are currently working on familiarizing themselves with any possible scenario that they may encounter. An intern was recruited to help assist them with creating a tool to use for the process.

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bertoldo, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Blake, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buscheck, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Byrne, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerruti, S. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bish, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fratanduono, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Grayson, A. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacQueen, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montemayor, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ottaway, H. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Paterson, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Revelli, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swanson, K. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Terrill, A. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wegrecki, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, K. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-29

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosene, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, H. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  19. Protection planning and risk management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.S.; Altman, W.D.; Hockert, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Effective safeguards and security management begins with comprehensive strategic planning that synthesizes protection objectives, threat information, existing protection capabilities, consequences of protection failure, and the costs and impacts of safeguards changes into cost effective protection strategies that adequately address credible threats. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a structured risk management approach to safeguards and security planning that is designed to lead to protection strategies that are cost effective, meet the intent of Department of Energy (DOE) orders, balance protection needs with programmatic priorities, and acknowledge a level of residual risks that is not cost effective to eliminate. This risk management approach to safeguards decision making was used to develop the first DOE-approved Master Safeguards and Security Agreement (MSSA) that addresses all security interests at a major facility including: special nuclear material, classified information and materials, computer and communication security, and other DOE property. This risk management approach also provides the strategic basis for day-to-day management of the LLNL security program as well as the integration of safeguards program upgrades

  20. Estimating the energy use of high definition games consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, A.; Mayers, K.; France, C.; Koomey, J.

    2013-01-01

    As the energy use of games consoles has risen, due to increased ownership and use and improved performance and functionality, various governments have shown an interest in ways to improve their energy efficiency. Estimates of console energy use vary widely between 32 and 500 kWh/year. Most such estimates are unreliable as they are based on incorrect assumptions and unrepresentative data. To address the shortcomings of existing estimates of console energy use, this study collates, normalises and analyses available data for power consumption and usage. The results show that the average energy use of high definition games consoles (sold between 2005 and 2011 inclusive) can be estimated at 102 kWh/year, and 64 kWh/year for new console models on sale in early 2012. The calculations herein provide representative estimates of console energy use during this period, including a breakdown of the relative contribution of different usage modes. These results could be used as a baseline to evaluate the potential energy savings from efficiency improvements in games consoles, and also to assess the potential effectiveness of any proposed energy efficiency standards. Use of accurate data will help ensure the implementation of the most effective efficiency policies and standards. - Highlights: • Estimates of games console energy use vary significantly. • New energy use estimates calculated for high definition games consoles. • Consoles currently on sale use 37% less energy than earlier models. • Gaming accounts for over 50% of console energy use. • Further research regarding console usage is needed, particularly inactive time

  1. Livermore Site Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Plan, May 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mertesdorf, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan describes the measures that are taken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Livermore Site in Livermore, California, to prevent, control, and handle potential spills from aboveground containers that can contain 55 gallons or more of oil.

  2. Livermore Big Trees Park Soil Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConachie, W.A.; Failor, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will sample and analyze soil in the Big Trees Park area in Livermore, California, to determine if the initial level of plutonium (Pu) in a soil sample taken by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in September 1993 can be confirmed. Nineteen samples will be collected and analyzed: 4 in the area where the initial EPA sample was taken, 2 in the nearby Arroyo Seco, 12 in scattered uncovered soil areas in the park and nearby school, and 1 from the sandbox of a nearby apartment complex. Two quality control (QC) samples (field duplicates of the preceding samples) win also be collected and analyzed. This document briefly describes the purpose behind the sampling, the sampling rationale, and the methodology

  3. Environmental Monitoring Plan, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.

    1992-06-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. 61 refs

  4. The Livermore X-ray Laser Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    I will report on the status of x-ray laser development and its applications at Livermore. I will review some of our recent results and comment on where our future research is headed including plans for developing a compact x-ray laser users facility. Finally, I will briefly summarize the results of an X-ray Laser Applications Workshop that was held in San Francisco in January 1992

  5. Environmental report 1997, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentzner, H.L.; Morris, J.C.; Harrach, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental program activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1997. This report accurately summarizes the results of environmental monitoring, compliance, impacts assessment, and the restoration program at LLNL. It features individual chapters on monitoring of air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation. It also contains chapters on site overview, environmental program information, radiological dose assessment, and quality assurance

  6. Superconductor development program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.

    1978-01-01

    Winding of a Nb--Ti test coil at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is nearly complete. The conductor in this coil operates in a maximum field of 7.5 T and provides the 2-T field required by the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Nb 3 Sn multifilamentary conductors, made using the ''bronze'' technique, appear capable of providing the higher fields needed by commercial reactors

  7. Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment

  8. Environmental report 1996, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentzner, H.L.; Napolitano, M.M.; Harrach, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental program activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1996. This report accurately summarizes the results of environmental monitoring, compliance, impacts assessment, and the restoration program at LLNL. It features individual chapters on monitoring of air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation. It also contains chapters on site overview, environmental program information, radiological dose assessment, and quality assurance

  9. Software for physical start-up console

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbet, L.; Suchy, R.

    1991-01-01

    The physical start-up console comprises an PC AT-based control unit equipped with an 80386 processor, and information input/output units. The basic functions to be fulfilled by the control unit software include data acquisition related to the following parameters: neutron physics properties of the reactor core (neutron fluxes recorded by ionization chambers and reactivity recorded by a digital reactimeter), positions of the reactor core control elements (by the digital position meter) and reactor core control measurements, and technological quantities requisite for evaluating physical start-up tests. The measured and calculated data are shown on the control unit display. The setup of the data acquisition system and of user programs is dealt with, and characteristics of the user processes are briefly described. (Z.S.)

  10. Beam diagnostic system for SSC on HIRFL central console

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guixu; Wang Zhen; Huang Tuanhua

    1998-01-01

    The SSC ion beam diagnostic system on the console of HIRFL in institute of modern physics is presented. The information between console and diagnostic system can be transferred via DECnet communication. The central computer for HIRFL console is VAX-8350, the working computer of diagnostic system is changed from IBM PC/XT to COMPAQ 486, and the operating program is rewritten from FORTRAN to C. In order to communicate information, DECnet TTT function is put into both programs on the VAX and PC

  11. Risk management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.; Strait, R.S.

    1993-10-01

    Managing risks at a large national laboratory presents a unique set of challenges. These challenges include the management of a broad diversity of activities, the need to balance research flexibility against management control, and a plethora of requirements flowing from regulatory and oversight bodies. This paper will present the experiences of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in risk management and in dealing with these challenges. While general risk management has been practiced successfully by all levels of Laboratory management, this paper will focus on the Laboratory's use of probabilistic safety assessment and prioritization techniques and the integration of these techniques into Laboratory operations

  12. Nuclear physics and heavy element research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, Mark A; Ahle, L E; Becker, J A; Bernshein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Burke, J T; Dashdorj, D; Henderson, R A; Hurst, A M; Kenneally, Jacqueline M; Lesher, S R; Moody, K J; Nelson, S L; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Scielzo, N D; Shaughnessy, D A; Sheets, S A; Stoeffl, W; Stoyer, N J [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore (United States)

    2009-12-31

    This paper highlights some of the current basic nuclear physics research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The work at LLNL concentrates on investigating nuclei at the extremes. The Experimental Nuclear Physics Group performs research to improve our understanding of nuclei, nuclear reactions, nuclear decay processes and nuclear astrophysics; an expertise utilized for important laboratory national security programs and for world-class peer-reviewed basic research.

  13. Livermore intense neutron source: design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.; Anderson, J.D.; Booth, R.; Logan, C.M.; Osher, J.E.

    1975-07-01

    The Lawrence Livermore laboratory proposes to build an irradiation facility containing several 14 MeV T(d,n) neutron sources for materials damage experimentation. A source strength of 4 x 10 13 n/s can be produced with 400 keV D + beam on the tritium in titanium target system now used on the Livermore Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS). To produce the desired source strength an accelerator which can deliver 150 mA of 400 keV D + ions must be built. For the target to remain within the time-temperature regime of the present system it must have a diameter of 46 cm and rotate at 5000 rpm. With a beam spot 1 cm fwhm the useful target lifetime is expected to be the 100 hours typical of the present system. A maximum flux of 1.5 x 10 13 n/cm 2 s will be attainable over a sample 1 mm thick by 8 mm in diameter. (U.S.)

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Security CFO Processes Functional Management Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, A; Sampson, D; Thomas, B; Mendez, M

    2008-06-12

    The scope of the Functional Management Assessment of the CFO included a review of the CFO Organizational Structure, including deployed financial services and the division of responsibilities and internal controls between CFO and other organizations that perform financial functions across the Laboratory. In addition, the assessment team solicited input from end users and reviewers. Three issues discussed are: ISSUE 1: Financial activities and cash transactions are occurring outside the CFO organization. Approximately $200M of non-purchase order spending occurs in seven areas outside CFO control (travel, relocation, special disbursements, IPO, legal, risk management, and freight). NIF financial services have not been integrated into the CFO organization and operate outside CFO control. Business risks--There is no single point of financial accountably; Currently within the CFO and Business and Operations organizations there is a lack of clarity of roles and responsibilities for financial activities; Financial talent within the laboratory is fragmented; and Inefficiencies exist based on the current structure; An example of the above business risks associated with organizational structure can be observed in the process for reimbursement of relocation costs to employees. Currently, Human Resources and Travel both administer portions of an employee's relocation. Costs are reviewed for compliance with FAR travel guidelines and for compliance with the offer letter but there is no financial review for allowability of costs nor is there a single point where the total relocation costs are reviewed. Through the e-pay system the check is processed by the CFO organization but there is no review by that organization. ISSUE 2: Impact of involuntary separation on current and future activities. 3 risks are: (1) Loss of internal controls--with the upcoming involuntary reductions there will be a loss of personnel with institutional knowledge which will increase the risk of losing internal control on some processes. The organization needs to be cognizant of this risk and take measures to minimize financial risk and ensure on-going A-123 compliance. (2) Project Costing Implementation (PCI) delay--the implementation of PCI is key to achieving integration and reporting of financial data. Presently, business analysts spend half of their time collecting and compiling data and 94% of the labs financial management reports are created using spreadsheets. Currently, the PCI project is on schedule but the involuntary reductions may result in loss of support in this area. (3) Financial Performance Milestones not met--for FY-08 there are fixed, base and stretch financial performance milestones for the laboratory. With reductions in staff the risk of missing key milestones increases. ISSUE 3: Strategically growing the Work for Others (WFO) Portfolio. A key objective of the laboratory is to increase WFO. Greater reliance on WFO will result in additional funding sources and increase the number of control points and financial activities to be monitored thus increasing the level of financial complexity at the lab. The CFO organization should work now to improve controls and processes to accommodate these changes. In particular the following areas should be focused on: (1) Cost reporting needs to be streamlined; (2) Cost Transfer controls need to be increased; and (3) Timely monitoring and close out of contracts needs occur.

  15. vVICTORIA Console Development: Design and Fabrication of VICTORIA Console Emulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    successful set-up and readiness to conduct experimentation on facets of new Combat System concept development including equipment capabilities, system...émulateurs, faits de bois, de plastiques et de métaux légers, ont été fabriqués selon les données matérielles et les spécifications des consoles actuelles...mise sur pied du laboratoire d’évaluation de la capacité vVictoria et assureront que celui-ci est prêt pour les essais de nouveaux concepts de système

  16. Security force effectiveness and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaton, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    No one would propose ineffective security forces. Applied technology always has, as its purpose, to increase effectiveness. Evidence exists, however, that poorly conceived or executed technological solutions can actually do more harm than good. The author argues for improved human factor considerations in physical security applied technology -- especially in the area of security console operations

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H E; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S J; Coty, J D; Dibley, V R; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; MacQueen, D H; Wegrecki, A M; Armstrong, D H; Brigdon, S L; Heidecker, K R; Hollister, R K; Khan, H N; Lee, G S; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L E; Salvo, V J; Schwartz, W W; Terusaki, S H; Wilson, K R; Woods, J M; Yimbo, P O; Gallegos, G M; Terrill, A A; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Blake, R G; Woollett, J S; Kumamoto, G

    2011-09-14

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.llnl.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2010: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff

  18. High-voltage test stand at Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the present design and future capability of the high-voltage test stand for neutral-beam sources at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The stand's immediate use will be for testing the full-scale sources (120 kV, 65 A) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. It will then be used to test parts of the sustaining source system (80 kV, 85 A) being designed for the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility. Following that will be an intensive effort to develop beams of up to 200 kV at 20 A by accelerating negative ions. The design of the test stand features a 5-MVA power supply feeding a vacuum tetrode that is used as a switch and regulator. The 500-kW arc supply and the 100-kW filament supply for the neutral-beam source are battery powered, thus eliminating one or two costly isolation transformers

  19. Magnetic mirror fusion research at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    An overall view is given of progress and plans for pressing forward with mirror research at Livermore. No detail is given on any one subject, and many interesting investigations being carried out at University laboratories in the U.S. that augment and support efforts at Livermore are omitted

  20. Surgical bedside master console for neurosurgical robotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Jumpei; Kenmotsu, Hajime; Takagi, Motoki; Hori, Tatsuya; Miyagi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Hideo; Kajita, Yasukazu; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We are currently developing a neurosurgical robotic system that facilitates access to residual tumors and improves brain tumor removal surgical outcomes. The system combines conventional and robotic surgery allowing for a quick conversion between the procedures. This concept requires a new master console that can be positioned at the surgical bedside and be sterilized. The master console was developed using new technologies, such as a parallel mechanism and pneumatic sensors. The parallel mechanism is a purely passive 5-DOF (degrees of freedom) joystick based on the author's haptic research. The parallel mechanism enables motion input of conventional brain tumor removal surgery with a compact, intuitive interface that can be used in a conventional surgical environment. In addition, the pneumatic sensors implemented on the mechanism provide an intuitive interface and electrically isolate the tool parts from the mechanism so they can be easily sterilized. The 5-DOF parallel mechanism is compact (17 cm width, 19cm depth, and 15cm height), provides a 505,050 mm and 90° workspace and is highly backdrivable (0.27N of resistance force representing the surgical motion). The evaluation tests revealed that the pneumatic sensors can properly measure the suction strength, grasping force, and hand contact. In addition, an installability test showed that the master console can be used in a conventional surgical environment. The proposed master console design was shown to be feasible for operative neurosurgery based on comprehensive testing. This master console is currently being tested for master-slave control with a surgical robotic system.

  1. Modern operator's consoles for accelerator control at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, P.; Cahill, K.; Peters, R.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1991-01-01

    Since the construction of the Tevatron the Fermilab accelerator complex has been controlled from operator's consoles based on PDP-11 computers and interaction with display hardware via Camac. In addition the Linac has been controllable from microprocessor-based local consoles. The new generation of console devices is based on VAXstation computers, networked by Ethernet and Token Ring, and utilizing the X-windows protocol. Under X the physical display (server) can be driven by any network node, and need not be part of the console computer (client). This allows great flexibility in configuring display devices - with X-terminals, Unix workstations, and Macintoshes all having been utilized. Over half of the 800 application programs on the system have been demonstrated to work properly in the new environment. The modern version of a Linac local console runs in a Macintosh. These are networked via Token Ring to Linac local control stations. They provide color graphics and a hard copy capability which was previously lacking

  2. 76 FR 28305 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Livermore, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... E airspace at Livermore, CA, to accommodate aircraft using new Instrument Landing System (ILS... surface of the earth. * * * * * AWP CA E5 Livermore, CA [Amended] Livermore Municipal Airport, CA (Lat. 37...

  3. Where can I find consolation? A theoretical analysis of the meaning of consolation as experienced by job in the Book of Job in the Hebrew Bible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxberg, Åsa; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael; da Silva, António Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the meaning of consolation as experienced by Job in the Book of Job and as presented in literature and how consolation relates to suffering and care. The study's theoretical design applied Ricoeur's view on phenomenology and hermeneutics. The resulting themes were as follows: consolation that is present, that originates in confrontation, that keeps suffering at a distance, that does not alleviate suffering, that originates in experience from giving comfort, and that facilitates a change of perspective. The authentic and caring consolation accepts the sufferer's incomprehensible "otherness" but however provides no answers about how to console.

  4. Study of a Piezo-Thermo-Elastic Materials Console

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamza madjid berrabah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this work, analytical expressions were determined for the stresses through the thickness of a composite beam submitted to electrical excitation. In the second part of this study we are interested in the theory of elasticity, which is used to obtain exact solutions of piezo-thermo-elastic consoles gradually coupled evaluated under different loads. These solutions are used to identify the piezoelectric parameter and thermal coefficients of the materials. In addition, numerical results are obtained for the analysis of the loaded console by two different types of loading. In this study we show also that changing the linear thermal parameters of the material does not affect the distribution of the stress and the induction of the beam. However it affetcs the components of the deformation, electric field, the displacement and the electric potential of the console.

  5. The new nuclear microprobe at Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.L.; Bench, G.S.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Morse, D.H.; Bach, P.R.; Pontau, A.E.

    1994-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new nuclear microprobe beamline. This beamline is located on the LLNL 10 MV tandem accelerator and can be used for multidisciplinary research using PIXE, PIGE, energy loss tomography, or IBS techniques. Distinctive features of the beamline include incorporation of magnet power supplies into the accelerator control system, computer controlled object and image slits, automated target positioning to sub-micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and observation. Mitigation of vibrations was accomplished with vibration isolators and a rigid beamline design while integral beamline shielding was used to shield from stray magnetic fields. Available detectors include a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer, a High-Purity Germanium detector (HPGe), a Lithium-Drifted Silicon X-Ray detector (SiLi), and solid state surface barrier detectors. Along with beamline performance, results from recent measurements on determination of trace impurities in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) super conducting wire strand, determination of Ca/Sr ratios in seashells, and determination of minor and trace element concentrations in sperm cells are presented

  6. LLNL Livermore site Groundwater Surveillance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 establishes environ-mental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations to assume compliance with federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations; Federal Executive Orders; and internal DOE policies. ne DOE Order contains requirements and guidance for environmental monitoring programs, the objectives of which are to demonstrate compliance with legal and regulatory requirements imposed by federal, state, and local agencies; confirm adherence to DOE environmental protection polices; and support environmental management decisions. The environmental monitoring programs consist of two major activities: (1) measurement and monitoring of effluents from DOE operations, and (2) surveillance through measurement, monitoring, and calculation of the effects of those operations on the environment and public health. The latter concern, that of assessing the effects, if any, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations and activities on on-site and off-site surface waters and groundwaters is addressed by an Environmental Surveillance Program being developed by LLNL. The Groundwater Surveillance Plan presented here has been developed on a sitespecific basis, taking into consideration facility characteristics, applicable regulations, hazard potential, quantities and concentrations of materials released, the extent and use of local water resources, and specific local public interest and concerns

  7. Seismic strengthening of building 111 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eli, M.; Coats, D.; Freeland, G.; Kamath, M.

    1991-01-01

    Since being designed and constructed in the late 1960s, the Director's Building (Building 111) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been evaluated for 1988 seismic criteria and has been upgraded to withstand a major earthquake in the Livermore area. During and immediately after a large earthquake in the Livermore area, Building 111 occupants would be able to exit safely without loss of life. Building 111 itself would be severely damaged, but would not collapse. Highlights of the seismic upgrade design criteria and of the design, analyses, and construction that resulted are presented in this paper

  8. Seismic evaluation of critical facilities at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.C.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of critical facilities at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) are being evaluated for severe earthquake loading. Facilities at Livermore, Site-300 and the Nevada Test Site are included in this study. These facilities are identified, the seismic criteria used for the analysis are indicated, the various methods used for structural analysis are discussed and a summary of the results of facilities analyzed to date are presented

  9. Laser fusion experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of some of the important dates in the experimental fusion program at Livermore. A few of the parameters of the laser systems which are being used for these experiments are mentioned. Some information about specialized diagnostics which have been developed at the Livermore Laboratory for these experiments is described. The focusing arrangements for each of the systems are discussed. Experiments both on planar targets and on targets for laser fusion are described

  10. Livermore Big Trees Park: 1998 summary results; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, G; MacQueen, D; Surano, K

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes work conducted in 1998 by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to determine the extent and origin of plutonium at concentrations above background levels at Big Trees Park in the city of Livermore. This summary includes the project background and sections that explain the sampling, radiochemical and data analysis, and data interpretation. This report is a summary report only and is not intended as a rigorous technical or statistical analysis of the data

  11. Lending Video Game Consoles in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    This paper will outline the process and discussions undertaken at the University of Denver's University Libraries to implement a lending service providing video game consoles. Faculty and staff at the University Libraries decided to pursue the new lending service, though not a traditional library offering, to support the needs of a video game…

  12. A mobile console for local access to accelerator control systems.

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    Microprocessors were installed as auxiliary crate controllers (ACCs) in the CAMAC interface of control systems for various accelerators. The same ACC was also at the hearth of a stand-alone system in the form of a mobile console. This was also used for local access to the control systems for tests and development work (Annual Report 1981, p. 80, Fig. 10).

  13. Play, Create, Share? Console Gaming, Player Production and Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli Sotamaa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital games have been frequently used to illustrate the new organisational frameworks that are based on persuading users to carry out tasks and assignments not traditionally associated with them. However coined, ‘user-innovation’ (von Hippel, 2005, ‘crowdsourcing’ (Howe, 2008 or ‘pro-am revolution’ (Leadbeater and Miller, 2004, contemporary examples of this phenomena always include digital games. A closer look at the recent open innovation manifestos reveals that the oft-cited examples come almost entirely from PC games while console games remain mostly non-existent in these texts. It is clear that PC and console games differ both in use and in the cultures they create (Taylor, 2007. Equally, the technological and economic backgrounds of the market sectors have their differences (Kerr, 2006.The concept of LittleBigPlanet, a console game inherently dependent on player production, challenges the neat binary of some much cited arguments about tethered appliances. The first set of research questions rises from this observation. What are the technical and economic constraints and affordances the console as a platform uses to position the productive activities of players? How do these differ from the forms of player production typical of PC gaming (see Sotamaa, 2007a; and Sotamaa, 2007b?

  14. Remarks on forensically interesting Sony Playstation 3 console features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugs, Gunnar; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals with forensically interesting features of the Sony Playstation 3 game console. The construction and the internal structure are analyzed more precisely. Interesting forensic features of the operating system and the file system are presented. Differences between a PS3 with and without jailbreak are introduced and possible forensic attempts when using an installed Linux are discussed.

  15. Motion sickness and postural sway in console video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffregen, Thomas A; Faugloire, Elise; Yoshida, Ken; Flanagan, Moira B; Merhi, Omar

    2008-04-01

    We tested the hypotheses that (a) participants might develop motion sickness while playing "off-the-shelf" console video games and (b) postural motion would differ between sick and well participants, prior to the onset of motion sickness. There have been many anecdotal reports of motion sickness among people who play console video games (e.g., Xbox, PlayStation). Participants (40 undergraduate students) played a game continuously for up to 50 min while standing or sitting. We varied the distance to the display screen (and, consequently, the visual angle of the display). Across conditions, the incidence of motion sickness ranged from 42% to 56%; incidence did not differ across conditions. During game play, head and torso motion differed between sick and well participants prior to the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness. The results indicate that console video games carry a significant risk of motion sickness. Potential applications of this research include changes in the design of console video games and recommendations for how such systems should be used.

  16. Serving the Nation for Fifty Years: 1952 - 2002 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], Fifty Years of Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been making history and making a difference. The outstanding efforts by a dedicated work force have led to many remarkable accomplishments. Creative individuals and interdisciplinary teams at the Laboratory have sought breakthrough advances to strengthen national security and to help meet other enduring national needs. The Laboratory's rich history includes many interwoven stories -- from the first nuclear test failure to accomplishments meeting today's challenges. Many stories are tied to Livermore's national security mission, which has evolved to include ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons without conducting nuclear tests and preventing the proliferation and use of weapons of mass destruction. Throughout its history and in its wide range of research activities, Livermore has achieved breakthroughs in applied and basic science, remarkable feats of engineering, and extraordinary advances in experimental and computational capabilities. From the many stories to tell, one has been selected for each year of the Laboratory's history. Together, these stories give a sense of the Laboratory -- its lasting focus on important missions, dedication to scientific and technical excellence, and drive to made the world more secure and a better place to live.

  17. Console Game-Based Pedagogy: A Study of Primary and Secondary Classroom Learning through Console Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Jennifer S.; Howells, Cathrin; Cranmer, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this research project was to identify the educational benefits of console game-based learning in primary and secondary schools. The project also sought to understand how the benefits of educational gaming could transfer to other settings. For this purpose, research was carried out in classrooms in Scotland to explore learning…

  18. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document

  19. The advanced main control console for next japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, A.; Ito, K.; Yokoyama, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the improvement of main control room designing in a nuclear power plant is to reduce operators' workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. In order to satisfy such requirements, the design of main control board applied to Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type nuclear power plant has been continuously modified and improved. the Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Utilities (Electric Power Companies) and Mitsubishi Group have developed an advanced main control board (console) reflecting on the study of human factors, as well as using a state of the art electronics technology. In this report, we would like to introduce the configuration and features of the Advanced Main Control Console for the practical application to the next generation PWR type nuclear power plants including TOMARI No.3 Unit of Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc. (author)

  20. Use of Game Console for Rehabilitation of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Özgönenel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD predisposes to falls due to postural instability and decreased coordination. Postural and coordination exercises could ameliorate the incoordination and decrease falls. Aims: In this study, we explored the efficiency of a game console as an adjunct to an exercise program in treating incoordination in patients with PD. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: In this single-blind, prospective clinical trial, rehabilitation with the Xbox (Microsoft; Washington, USA game console was used as an adjunct to a standard rehabilitation program. Thirty-three patients with PD at stages 1-3 were enrolled in the study. All patients received the threetimes weekly exercise program and electrotherapy to back and hip extensors for 5 weeks. Study patients played catch the ball and obstacle games on the Xbox in addition to the standard exercise program. Patients were evaluated based on the scores from the Timed Up-and-Go Test, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS, and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-II (UPDRS-II. Post-treatment scores were compared between groups. Results: Thirty-three patients were enrolled in the study (15 in the game-console group, and 18 controls. Patients in both groups had improvements in all scores. The end-oftreatment scores were significantly better in the study group compared to the control group in all parameters: UPDRS (10±5 versus 16±6, p=0.002, BBS (53±4 versus 47±8, p=0.004, and TUG (11±4 seconds versus 20±8 seconds, p<0.001. Conclusion: Game-exercise with a game-console was noted to be a significant adjunct to the rehabilitation program in patients with PD in this study.

  1. Mentoring console improves collaboration and teaching in surgical robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Eric J; Miller, Brian E; Kumar, Rajesh; Hasser, Christopher J; Coste-Maniere, Eve; Talamini, Mark A; Aurora, Alexander A; Schenkman, Noah S; Marohn, Michael R

    2006-10-01

    One of the most significant limitations of surgical robots has been their inability to allow multiple surgeons and surgeons-in-training to engage in collaborative control of robotic surgical instruments. We report the initial experience with a novel two-headed da Vinci surgical robot that has two collaborative modes: the "swap" mode allows two surgeons to simultaneously operate and actively swap control of the robot's four arms, and the "nudge" mode allows them to share control of two of the robot's arms. The utility of the mentoring console operating in its two collaborative modes was evaluated through a combination of dry laboratory exercises and animal laboratory surgery. The results from surgeon-resident collaborative performance of complex three-handed surgical tasks were compared to results from single-surgeon and single-resident performance. Statistical significance was determined using Student's t-test. Collaborative surgeon-resident swap control reduced the time to completion of complex three-handed surgical tasks by 25% compared to single-surgeon operation of a four-armed da Vinci (P nudge mode was particularly useful for guiding a resident's hands during crucially precise steps of an operation (such as proper placement of stitches). The da Vinci mentoring console greatly facilitates surgeon collaboration during robotic surgery and improves the performance of complex surgical tasks. The mentoring console has the potential to improve resident participation in surgical robotics cases, enhance resident education in surgical training programs engaged in surgical robotics, and improve patient safety during robotic surgery.

  2. Trend of computer-based console for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajima, Tsunetaka; Serizawa, Michiya

    1975-01-01

    The amount of informations to be watched by the operators in the central operation room increased with the increase of the capacity of nuclear power generation plants, and the necessity of computer-based consoles, in which the informations are compiled and the rationalization of the interface between the operators and the plants is intended by introducing CRT displays and process computers, became to be recognized. The integrated monitoring and controlling system is explained briefly by taking Dungeness B Nuclear Power Station in Britain as a typical example. This power station comprises two AGRs, and these two plants can be controlled in one central control room, each by one man. Three computers including stand-by one are installed. Each computer has the core memory of 16 K words (24 bits/word), and 4 magnetic drums of 256 K words are installed as the external memory. The peripheral equipments are 12 CRT displays, 6 typewriters, high speed tape reader and tape punch for each plant. The display and record of plant data, the analysis, display and record of alarms, the control of plants including reactors, and post incident record are assigned to the computers. In Hitachi Ltd. in Japan, the introduction of color CRTs, the developments of operating consoles, new data-accessing method, and the consoles for maintenance management are in progress. (Kako, I.)

  3. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    In 1979, the annual average airborne gross beta activity in Livermore Valley air samples was 2.6 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, or less than half the average observed in 1978. There were no atmospheric nuclear shots in 1979; therefore, fission products seen in the January air filters are probably a result of residual activity from the December 14, 1978 nuclear test in China. Airborne 238 U concentrations at Site 300 were higher than those at Livermore because of the depleted uranium used in high-explosive tests at the Site. However, these concentrations were well below the standards set by DOE. The average annual beryllium concentrations were less than 1% of the appropriate standard at both the Laboratory perimeter and Site 300. Water samples collected in the Livermore Valley and at Site 300 exhibit gross beta and tritium activities within the ranges previously observed in these areas. Tritium analyses were made on well-water-samples collected near the Livermore Water Reclamation Plant (LWRP). As was found during the 1977 and 1978 surveys, the highest tritium values were detected in wells west of the plant near Arroyo Las Positas; however all concentrations were well below the standards set by DOE. As a means of evaluating the possible impact of Laboratory effluents on locally grown foodstuff, the tritium content of Livermore Valley wines was compared with values from other California and European wines. The tritium levels in Livermore Valley wines were found to be within the range in both European wines and surface waters throughout the world and somewhat higher than those in California wines. Assessments of the calculated radiation dose to an individual from the environmental concentrations listed demonstrates that the dose contribution from Laboratory operations in 1979 was small compared with the dose received locally from natural sources

  4. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (including the Site 300 area), Livermore, California, conducted from February 26 to April 5, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Programs at LLNL. LLNL is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE), and is a multi-program, mission-oriented institution engaged in fundamental and applied research programs that require a multidisciplinary approach. 1 fig.

  5. Livermore Site Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellah, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Griffin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mertesdorf, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-21

    This Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan describes the measures that are taken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Livermore Site in Livermore, California, to prevent, control, and handle potential spills from aboveground containers that can contain 55 gallons or more of oil. This SPCC Plan complies with the Oil Pollution Prevention regulation in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR), Part 112 (40 CFR 112) and with 40 CFR 761.65(b) and (c), which regulates the temporary storage of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This Plan has also been prepared in accordance with Division 20, Chapter 6.67 of the California Health and Safety Code (HSC 6.67) requirements for oil pollution prevention (referred to as the Aboveground Petroleum Storage Act [APSA]), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order No. 436.1. This SPCC Plan establishes procedures, methods, equipment, and other requirements to prevent the discharge of oil into or upon the navigable waters of the United States or adjoining shorelines for aboveground oil storage and use at the Livermore Site.

  6. Accelerator safety program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed accelerator safety standard for the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is given. All accelerators will comply with this standard when it is included in the LLL Health and Safety Manual. The radiation alarm and radiation safety system for a radiography facility are also described

  7. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D

  8. LIP: The Livermore Interpolation Package, Version 1.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, F. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-04

    This report describes LIP, the Livermore Interpolation Package. LIP was totally rewritten from the package described in [1]. In particular, the independent variables are now referred to as x and y, since it is a general-purpose package that need not be restricted to equation of state data, which uses variables ρ (density) and T (temperature).

  9. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes

  10. High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.

    1981-06-01

    High energy laser facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are described, with special emphasis on their use for equation of state investigations using laser-generated shockwaves. Shock wave diagnostics now in use are described. Future Laboratory facilities are also discussed

  11. Control console for the X-ray room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia H, J.M.; Aguilar B, M.A.; Torres B, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    It is presented the design and construction of Control console for the X-ray room of Metrology Center for ionizing radiations at National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). This system controls the positioning of 6 different filters for an X-ray beam. Also it controls a shutter which blockades the beam during periods established by user, these periods can be fixed from hours until tenth of second. The shutter opening periods, as well as the X-ray beam filter are establish and monitoring from a Personal computer outside of room. (Author)

  12. Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

  13. Control console conceptual design for sheet type fuels of Triga Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eko Priyono; Kurnia Wibowo; Anang Susanto

    2016-01-01

    The control console conceptual design for sheet type fuel of TRIGA Mark-II reactor has been made. The control console conceptual design was made with refer study result of instrument and control system which is used in BATAN'S reactor i.e TRIGA-2000 Bandung, TRIGA Yogyakarta and MPR-30 Serpong. The control console conceptual design was made by using AutoCad software. The control console conceptual design reactor for sheet type fuel of TRIGA Mark-II reactor consist of 5 segments that is 3 segments for placing the computer monitors, 1 segment for placing bargraph displays and recorders and 1 segment for placing panel meters. There are the door on front and back position at each segment for enter and out devices in the console. The control console conceptual design is also equipped by the table along in front of console for placing reactor panel control and for writing, 3 drawers for 3 keyboards. The dimension of console will refer control room size and the components will be placed on console which will be detailed in detail design if this conceptual design has been approved. (author)

  14. Network Security Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-27

    performing SQL generation and result-set binding, inserting acquired security events into the database and gathering the requested data for Console scene...objects is also auto-generated by a VBA script. Built into the auto-generated table access objects are the preferred join paths between tables. This...much of the Server itself) never have to deal with SQL directly. This is one aspect of laying the groundwork for supporting RDBMSs from multiple vendors

  15. Accommodative load from handheld game consoles in kindergarten children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, T; Miyao, M; Ishigaki, H; Shiraiwa, Y; Ishihara, S; Furuta, M; Kondo, T; Toyoshima, H

    2001-07-01

    We analyzed and compared the visual accommodation of kindergarten children who were gazing fixedly at images from three different sources: Nintendo Game Boy DMG-01(TM) (non-backlit type game console: NBGC), NEC PC EnginePI-TG6(TM) (color backlit-type game console: CBGC) and a cartoon drawing (drawing). Subjects for the experiment were 13 4- to 5-year-old kindergarten children. The contrast ratios were, in the order, 1.1 (NBGC), 3.1 (drawing), and 3.4 (CBGC). These values show that the contrast of the NBGC screen was considerably lower than the others. The mean accommodative power increased when looking at all three types of image: a drawing (1.75±0.52 D; mean±S.D.), CBGC (1.82±0.61 D), and NBGC (2.26±0.50 D). Compared with the other 2 targets, NBGC required stronger accommodation, indicating that the legibility of the NBGC was poor. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for the values of accommodation for each type of target. There were significant differences among the 3 targets (p<0.01). Significant differences were seen between NBGC and drawings (p<0.01) and NBGC and CBGC (p<0.05) using paired Scheffe test, but not between CBGC and drawings. This supports the finding that the legibility of NBGC is low due to dark and low contrast screens with poor resolution.

  16. Re-envisioning the operator consoles for Dhruva control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, S.; Sridharan, P.; Nair, P.M.; Diwakar, M.P.; Gohel, N.; Pithawa, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    Control Room design is undergoing rapid changes with the progressive adoption of computerization and Automation. Advances in man-machine interfaces have further accelerated this trend. This paper presents the design and main features of Operator consoles (OC) for Dhruva control room developed using new technologies. The OCs have been designed so as not to burden the operator with information overload but to help him quickly assess the situation and timely take appropriate steps. The consoles provide minimalistic yet intuitive interfaces, context sensitive navigation, display of important information and progressive disclosure of situation based information. The use of animations, 3D graphics, and real time trends with the benefit of hardware acceleration to provide a resolution independent rich user experience. The use of XAML, an XML based Mark-up Language for User Interface definition and C for application logic resulted in complete separation of visual design, content, and logic. This also resulted in a workflow where separate teams could work on the UI and the logic of an application. The introduction of Model View View-Model has led to more testable and maintainable software. (author)

  17. Completion of Launch Director Console Project and Other Support Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinrock, Joshua G.

    2018-01-01

    There were four projects that I was a part of working on during the spring semester of 2018. This included the completion of the Launch Director Console (LDC) project and the completion and submission of a Concept of Operations (ConOps) document for the Record and Playback System (RPS) at the Launch Control Center (LCC), as well as supporting the implementation of a unit in RPS known as the CDP (Communication Data Processor). Also included was my support and mentorship of a High School robotics team that is sponsored by Kennedy Space Center. The LDC project is an innovative workstation to be used by the launch director for the future Space Launch System program. I worked on the fabrication and assembly of the final console. The ConOps on RPS is a technical document for which I produced supporting information and notes. All of this was done in the support of the IT Project Management Office (IT-F). The CDP is a subsystem that will eventually be installed in and operated by RPS.

  18. Automatic generation of computer programs servicing TFTR console displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, H.

    1983-01-01

    A number of alternatives were considered in providing programs to support the several hundred displays required for control and monitoring of TFTR equipment. Since similar functions were performed, an automated method of creating programs was suggested. The complexity of a single program servicing as many as thirty consoles mitigated against that approach. Similarly, creation of a syntactic language while elegant, was deemed to be too time consuming, and had the disadvantage of requiring a working knowledge of the language on a programming level. It was elected to pursue a method of generating an individual program to service a particular display. A feasibility study was conducted and the Control and Monitor Display Generator system (CMDG) was developed. A Control and Monitor Display Service Program (CMDS) provides a means of performing monitor and control functions for devices associated with TFTR subsystems, as well as other user functions, via TFTR Control Consoles. This paper discusses the specific capabilities provided by CMDS in a usage context, as well as the mechanics of implementation

  19. Ambient environmental radiation monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Toy, A.J.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry is the principal means of measuring ambient γ radiation at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. These dosimeters are used at 12 perimeter locations and 41 locations in the off-site vicinity of the Laboratory, and are exchanged quarterly. Control dosimeters are stored in a 75-mm-thick lead shield located out-of-doors to duplicate temperature cycling of field dosimeters. Effect of dosimeter response to radiation in the shield is determined each quarter. Calibration irradiations are made midway through the exposure cycle to compensate for signal fading. Terrestrial exposure rates calculated from the activities of naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and potassium in Livermore Valley soils vary from 3 to 7 μR/hr. Local inferred exposure rates from cosmic radiation are approximately 4 μR/hr. TLD measurements are in good agreement with these data. Off-site and site perimeter data are compared, and differences related to Laboratory operations are discussed

  20. Safety analysis report for packaging Lawrence Livermore Laboratories shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.

    1975-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratories shipping containers were designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in transporting weapons and nuclear components. The design for the containers was evaluated to show compliance with applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. Computational procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the containers relative to the standards for the normal conditions of transport. A full-scale container test model was destructively tested to verify compliance with the standards for the accident conditions. The results of the analytical evaluations and the tests demonstrate that the design for the Lawrence Livermore Laboratories shipping containers is in compliance with the applicable regulations

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs

  2. Waste minimization activities in the Materials Fabrication Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    The mission of the Materials Fabrication Division (MFD) is to provide fabrication services and technology in support of all programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). MFD involvement is called for when fabrication activity requires levels of expertise, technology, equipment, process development, hazardous processes, security, or scheduling that is typically not commercially available. Customers are encouraged to utilize private industry for fabrication activity requiring routine processing or for production applications. Our waste minimization (WM) program has been directed at source reduction and recycling in concert with the working definition of waste minimization used by EPA. The principal focus of WM activities has been on hazardous wastes as defined by RCRA, however, all pollutant emissions into air, water and land are being considered as part of the program. The incentives include: (1) economics, (2) regulatory conformance, (3) public image and (4) environmental concern. This report discusses the waste minimization program at LLNL

  3. Manufacturing of neutral beam sources at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, E.D.; Duffy, T.J.; Harter, G.A.; Holland, E.D.; Kloos, W.A.; Pastrone, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Over 50 neutral beam sources (NBS) of the joint Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL)/Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) design have been manufactured, since 1973, in the LLL Neutral Beam Source Facility. These sources have been used to provide start-up and sustaining neutral beams for LLL mirror fusion experiments, including 2XIIB, TMX, and Beta II. Experimental prototype 20-kV and 80-kV NBS have also been designed, built, and tested for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

  4. Large aperture harmonic conversion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, G.J.; Johnson, B.C.; Hildum, J.S.; G. J. Linford is now with Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching, Federal Republic of Germany)

    1982-01-01

    Large aperture harmonic conversion experiments to 2ω (532 nm), 3ω (355 nm), and 4ω (266 nm) on the Argus laser at the Livermore National Laboratory are described. Harmonically converted energies of up to 346 J have been generated at external conversion efficiencies of 83%. A discussion of the harmonic conversion experiments and a brief summary of enhanced 2ω and 3ω inertial confinement fusion target performances are provided

  5. Large aperture harmonic conversion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J.; Johnson, B.C.; Hildum, J.S.; Martin, W.E.; Snyder, K.; Boyd, R.D.; Smith, W.L.; Vercimak, C.L.; Eimerle, D.; Hunt, J.T.

    1982-10-15

    Large aperture harmonic conversion experiments to 2..omega.. (532 nm), 3..omega.. (355 nm), and 4..omega.. (266 nm) on the Argus laser at the Livermore National Laboratory are described. Harmonically converted energies of up to 346 J have been generated at external conversion efficiencies of 83%. A discussion of the harmonic conversion experiments and a brief summary of enhanced 2..omega.. and 3..omega.. inertial confinement fusion target performances are provided.

  6. Overview of the Livermore electron beam ion trap project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Behar, E.; Boyce, K.R.; Brown, G.V.; Chen, H.; Gendreau, K.C.; Graf, A.; Gu, M.-F.; Harris, C.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kelley, R.L.; Lepson, J.K.; May, M.J.; Neill, P.A.; Pinnington, E.H.; Porter, F.S.; Smith, A.J.; Stahle, C.K.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Tillotson, A.; Thorn, D.B.; Traebert, E.; Wargelin, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Livermore electron beam ion trap facility has recently been moved to a new location within LLNL, and new instrumentation was added, including a 32-pixel microcalorimeter. The move was accompanied by a shift of focus toward in situ measurements of highly charged ions, which continue with increased vigor. Overviews of the facility, which includes EBIT-I and SuperEBIT, and the research projects are given, including results from optical spectroscopy, QED, and X-ray line excitation measurements

  7. Co-Evolution of Mobile Language Learning: Going Global with Games Consoles in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, Akiko; Narumi-Munro, Fumiko; Alexander, Wilma; Parker, Helen; Yamauchi, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Game consoles have been adopted as a learning platform in school education. However, there is a scarcity of studies examining the utility of games consoles with built-in WiFi as affordable learning platforms in universities. This paper contributes to knowledge about the capacity of the Nintendo DSi to create new learning spaces mediated and…

  8. Clay mineralogy of selected borehole sediments from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.; Peifer, D.W.; Rood, C.K.

    1992-04-01

    Smectite, 90 to 100% interstratified illite-smectite, chlorate, and kaolinite are identified in boreholes drilled in fluvial and alluvial fan deposits of the Plio-Pleistocene Livermore Formation in the vicinity of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe studies indicate the clays persist through 150 ft of gravels, sands, silts, and mudstones of the vadose zone to total drilling depths of 200 ft in the saturated zone. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that true clays (layer silicate only) comprise between 2 and 15 modal percent of the Livermore Formation. Authigenic and detrital smectite, 90% interlayered illite-smectite, and chlorate persist throughout the stratigraphic section; kaolinite occurs only in the upper 100 ft of the section and is absent below. Smectite comprises between 60 to 90% of the true (layer silicate only) clay fraction. Illite and kaolinite±chlorite abundances fluctuate between 10 to 30% and 10 to 20% of this fraction, respectively. Authigenic smectite, illite, and chlorate crystallize together with detrital phases; the authigenic component increases with depth. The relative percentages of clay minerals define unique mineralogical intervals, which can be correlated between boreholes. Pervasive microfractures and interconnected porosity are inherent in the finer sediments; the microfractures typically are 1 mm or less in width and are variably spaced. Voids and microfractures are conspicuously lined by clays. Porosity for the argillaceous sediments ranges between 23 and 40%; Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) specific surface area decreases variably from 40 m 2 /g near the surface to 15 m 2 /g at the 115-ft depth. Within the pelitic matrix, iron, iron-titanium, chromium, and manganese oxides are pervasive

  9. Climate consoles: Pieces in the puzzle of climate change adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bachelet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Conservation Biology Institute (CBI has been developing web applications to centralize and serve credible and usable information that allows natural resource managers, as well as the general public, to better understand the challenges posed by on-going environmental change. In particular CBI has designed a series of climate consoles that provide natural resource managers the most recent 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Program (CMIP5 climate projections, landscape intactness, and soil sensitivity for a series of reporting units over the western United States. The publically available web sites were refined based on feedback from a variety of users. In this paper, we describe each of the tools developed as open-source applications and provide details of their infrastructure in the hope they can be used and possibly modified by a wider audience. They were designed to be used as stepping-stones towards planning effective climate change adaptation strategies.

  10. EBR-II fuel handling console digital upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.G.; Wiege, D.D.; Christensen, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    The main fuel handling console and control system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are being upgraded to a computerized system using high-end workstations for the operator interface and a programmable logic controller (PLC) for the control system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics will be provided for the operator which will show the relative position of under-sodium fuel handling equipment. This equipment is operated remotely with no means of directly viewing the transfer. This paper describes various aspects of the modification including reasons for the upgrade, capabilities the new system provides over the old control system, philosophies and rationale behind the new design, testing and simulation work, diagnostic features, and the advanced graphics techniques used to display information to the operator

  11. A personal computer based console monitor for a TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieke, Phillip E.; Hood, William E.; Razvi, Junaid

    1990-01-01

    Numerous improvements have been made to the Mark F facility to provide a minimum reactor down time, giving a high reactor availability. A program was undertaken to enhance the monitoring capabilities of the instrumentation and control system on this reactor. To that end, a personal computer based console monitoring system has been developed, installed in the control room and is operational to provide real-time monitoring and display of a variety of reactor operating parameters. This system is based on commercially available hardware and an applications software package developed internally at the GA facility. It has (a) assisted the operator in controlling reactor parameters to maintain the high degree of power stability required during extended runs with thermionic devices in-core, and (b) provided data trending and archiving capabilities on all monitored channels to allow a post-mortem analysis to be performed on any of the monitored parameters

  12. Leveraging Game Consoles for the Delivery of TBI Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Taryn; Mastaglio, Thomas; Shen, Yuzhong; Walker, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Military personnel are at a greater risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI) than the civilian population. In addition, the increase in exposure to explosives, i.e. , improvised explosive devices, in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, along with more effective body armor, has resulted in far more surviving casualties suffering from TBI than in previous wars. This effort presents the results of a feasibility study and early prototype of a brain injury rehabilitation delivery system (BIRDS). BIRDS is designed to provide medical personnel treating TBI with a capability to prescribe game activities for patients to execute using a commercially available game console, either in a clinical setting or in their homes. These therapeutic activities will contribute to recovery or remediation of the patients' cognitive dysfunctions. Solutions such as this that provide new applications for existing platforms have significant potential to address the growing incidence of TBI today.

  13. The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

  14. Electricity consumption and energy savings potential of video game consoles in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hittinger, E.; Mullins, K.A.; Azevedo, I.L. [Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Total energy consumption of video game consoles has grown rapidly in the past few decades due to rapid increases in market penetration, power consumption of the devices, and increasing usage driven by new capabilities. Unfortunately, studies investigating the energy impacts of these devices have been limited and potential responses, such as ENERGY STAR requirements, have been difficult to define and implement. We estimate that the total electricity consumption of video game consoles in the US was around 11 TWh in 2007 and 16 TWh in 2010 (approximately 1 % of US residential electricity consumption), an increase of almost 50 % in 3 years. However, any estimate of total game console energy consumption is highly uncertain, and we have determined that the key uncertainty is the unknown consumer behavior with regards to powering down the system after use. Even under this uncertainty, we demonstrate that the most effective energy-saving modification is incorporation of a default auto power down feature, which could reduce electricity consumption of game consoles by 75 % (10 TWh reduction of electricity in 2010), saving consumers over USD 1 billion annually in electricity bills. We conclude that using an auto power down feature for game consoles is at least as effective for reducing energy consumption as implementing a strict set of energy efficiency improvements for the devices, is much easier to implement given the nature of the video game console industry, and could be applied retroactively to currently deployed consoles through firmware updates.

  15. Electromagnetic wiggler technology development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Burns, M.J.; Christensen, T.C.; Coffield, F.E.; Kulke, B.; Prosnitz, D.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    As a part of the program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in induction-linac free-electron laser (IFEL) research, we are conducting a variety of activities addressing the unique requirements imposed on IFEL wiggler systems. We are actively developing improved dc iron-core electromagnetic wiggler designs to attain higher peak fields, greater tunability, and lower random error levels. We are pursuing specialized control systems, such as magnetic-field and beam-position controllers, which can relax requirements on the wiggler itself. We are also pursuing basic studies to establish the effect of radiation on permanent magnets

  16. Stabilization of plutonium bearing residues at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, M.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (US DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has plutonium holdings including metal, oxide and residue materials, all of which need stabilization of some type. Residue materials include calcined ash, calcined precipitates, pyrochemical salts, glove box sweepings, metallurgical samples, graphite, and pyrochemical ceramic crucibles. These residues are typical of residues stored throughout the US DOE plutonium sites. The stabilization process selected for each of these residues requires data on chemical impurities, physical attributes, and chemical forms of the plutonium. This paper outlines the characterization and stabilization of LLNL ash residues, pyrochemical salts, and graphite

  17. Pyrochemical processing automation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, D.K.; Domning, E.E.; Seivers, R.

    1991-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a fully automated system for pyrochemical processing of special nuclear materials (SNM). The system utilizes a glove box, an automated tilt-pour furnace (TPF), an IBM developed gantry robot, and specialized automation tooling. All material handling within the glove box (i.e., furnace loading, furnace unloading, product and slag separation, and product packaging) is performed automatically. The objectives of the effort are to increase process productivity, decrease operator radiation, reduce process wastes, and demonstrate system reliability and availability. This paper provides an overview of the automated system hardware, outlines the overall operations sequence, and discusses the current status

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seismic yield determination for the NPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recorded seismic signals from the Non-Proliferation experiment at the Nevada Test Site on September 22, 1993, at seismic stations near Mina, Nevada; Kanab Utah; Landers, California; and Elko, Nevada. Yields were calculated from these recorded seismic amplitudes at the stations using statistical amplitude- yield regression curves from earlier nuclear experiments performed near the Non-Proliferation experiment. The weighted seismic yield average using these amplitudes is 1.9 kt with a standard deviation of 19%. The calibrating experiments were nuclear, so this yield is equivalent to a 1.9-kt nuclear experiment.

  19. 1987 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, T.K.

    1988-04-01

    Sandia National Labortories conduct various research activities related to Department of Energy interests which have the potential for release of hazardous materials or radionuclides to the environment. A strict environmental control program places maximum emphasis on limiting releases. The environmental monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and augmented by Sandia is designed to measure the performance of the environmental controls. The program includes analysis of air, water, soil, vegetation, sewer effluent, ground water, and foodstuffs for various toxic, hazardous, or radioactive materials. Based on these studies, the releases of materials of concern at Sandia during 1987 were well below applicable Department of Energy standards. 8 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  20. Bonobos respond to distress in others: consolation across the age spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanna Clay

    Full Text Available How animals respond to conflict provides key insights into the evolution of socio-cognitive and emotional capacities. Evidence from apes has shown that, after social conflicts, bystanders approach victims of aggression to offer stress-alleviating contact behavior, a phenomenon known as consolation. This other-orientated behavior depends on sensitivity to the other's emotional state, whereby the consoler acts to ameliorate the other's situation. We examined post-conflict interactions in bonobos (Pan paniscus to identify the determinants of consolation and reconciliation. Thirty-six semi-free bonobos of all ages were observed at the Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary, DR Congo, using standardized Post-conflict/Matched Control methods. Across age and sex classes, bonobos consoled victims and reconciled after conflicts using a suite of affiliative and socio-sexual behaviors including embracing, touching, and mounting. Juveniles were more likely to console than adults, challenging the assumption that comfort-giving rests on advanced cognitive mechanisms that emerge only with age. Mother-reared individuals were more likely to console than orphans, highlighting the role of rearing in emotional development. Consistent with previous studies, bystanders were more likely to console relatives or closely bonded partners. Effects of kinship, affiliation and rearing were similarly indicated in patterns of reconciliation. Nearby bystanders were significantly more likely to contact victims than more distal ones, and consolation was more likely in non-food contexts than during feeding. The results did not provide convincing evidence that bystander contacts served for self-protection or as substitutes for reconciliation. Overall, results indicate that a suite of social, developmental and contextual factors underlie consolation and reconciliation in bonobos and that a sensitivity to the emotions of others and the ability to provide appropriate consolatory behaviors emerges

  1. Bonobos respond to distress in others: consolation across the age spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Zanna; de Waal, Frans B M

    2013-01-01

    How animals respond to conflict provides key insights into the evolution of socio-cognitive and emotional capacities. Evidence from apes has shown that, after social conflicts, bystanders approach victims of aggression to offer stress-alleviating contact behavior, a phenomenon known as consolation. This other-orientated behavior depends on sensitivity to the other's emotional state, whereby the consoler acts to ameliorate the other's situation. We examined post-conflict interactions in bonobos (Pan paniscus) to identify the determinants of consolation and reconciliation. Thirty-six semi-free bonobos of all ages were observed at the Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary, DR Congo, using standardized Post-conflict/Matched Control methods. Across age and sex classes, bonobos consoled victims and reconciled after conflicts using a suite of affiliative and socio-sexual behaviors including embracing, touching, and mounting. Juveniles were more likely to console than adults, challenging the assumption that comfort-giving rests on advanced cognitive mechanisms that emerge only with age. Mother-reared individuals were more likely to console than orphans, highlighting the role of rearing in emotional development. Consistent with previous studies, bystanders were more likely to console relatives or closely bonded partners. Effects of kinship, affiliation and rearing were similarly indicated in patterns of reconciliation. Nearby bystanders were significantly more likely to contact victims than more distal ones, and consolation was more likely in non-food contexts than during feeding. The results did not provide convincing evidence that bystander contacts served for self-protection or as substitutes for reconciliation. Overall, results indicate that a suite of social, developmental and contextual factors underlie consolation and reconciliation in bonobos and that a sensitivity to the emotions of others and the ability to provide appropriate consolatory behaviors emerges early in development.

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a ''no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs.

  4. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory 1976 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; Wong, K.M.; Willes, E.H.; White, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The average airborne gross beta activity from air filters collected during the first three quarters of 1976 was 2.2 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, about half of the average level observed during 1975. However, the atmospheric nuclear tests by the Peoples Republic of China on September 26 and November 17 elevated the fourth quarter values sufficiently to raise the annual average gross beta concentration to 7.6 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, higher than the 1975 average. Airborne 238 U concentrations at Site 300 were higher than those at Livermore perimeters because of the use of depleted uranium (a byproduct of 235 U enrichment) at the site. These uranium concentrations were well below the standards set by ERDA. Both Laboratory perimeter and Site 300 annual average airborne beryllium concentrations were less than 0.002% of the appropriate standard. Soil samples collected in the off-site vicinity of the Laboratory and at Site 300 were analyzed for plutonium. There were negligible changes from the levels previously reported. Water samples collected within the Livermore Valley and Site 300 exhibited gross beta and tritium activities within the ranges previously observed in these areas. Samples of vegetation, milk, and tissues from jackrabbits on the site were also assayed for radioactivity. Measurements were made of Be in air samples and heavy metals in liquid wastes

  5. Earthquake safety program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeland, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Within three minutes on the morning of January 24, 1980, an earthquake and three aftershocks, with Richter magnitudes of 5.8, 5.1, 4.0, and 4.2, respectively, struck the Livermore Valley. Two days later, a Richter magnitude 5.4 earthquake occurred, which had its epicenter about 4 miles northwest of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although no one at the Lab was seriously injured, these earthquakes caused considerable damage and disruption. Masonry and concrete structures cracked and broke, trailers shifted and fell off their pedestals, office ceilings and overhead lighting fell, and bookcases overturned. The Laboratory was suddenly immersed in a site-wide program of repairing earthquake-damaged facilities, and protecting our many employees and the surrounding community from future earthquakes. Over the past five years, LLNL has spent approximately $10 million on its earthquake restoration effort for repairs and upgrades. The discussion in this paper centers upon the earthquake damage that occurred, the clean-up and restoration efforts, the seismic review of LLNL facilities, our site-specific seismic design criteria, computer-floor upgrades, ceiling-system upgrades, unique building seismic upgrades, geologic and seismologic studies, and seismic instrumentation. 10 references

  6. Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoldo, N; Hunter, S; Fertig, R; Laguna, G; MacQueen, D

    2004-01-01

    A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These loW--power sensors are supported by a central command center (CCC) and transmit measurement data back to the CCC computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio and computer based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. The RTRAM network has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions

  7. 78 FR 32690 - Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-752] Certain Gaming and Entertainment... importation of certain gaming and entertainment consoles, related software, and components thereof by reason... violation of [[Page 32691

  8. 9-J N AGBO-BOOK REVIEW-EXISTENCE AND CONSOLATION-FT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    Every culture and people have made attempts to address this question, since ... morality, life, relativism, death, immortality, comparative philosophy, et cetera . ... concept of humanity on the ground of the necessity of consolation, we speak of.

  9. Nuclear power plant human computer interface design incorporating console simulation, operations personnel, and formal evaluation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, C.; Edwards, R.M.; Goldberg, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    New CRT-based information displays which enhance the human machine interface are playing a very important role and are being increasingly used in control rooms since they present a higher degree of flexibility compared to conventional hardwired instrumentation. To prototype a new console configuration and information display system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), an iterative process of console simulation and evaluation involving operations personnel is being pursued. Entire panels including selector switches and information displays are simulated and driven by plant dynamical simulations with realistic responses that reproduce the actual cognitive and physical environment. Careful analysis and formal evaluation of operator interaction while using the simulated console will be conducted to determine underlying principles for effective control console design for this particular group of operation personnel. Additional iterations of design, simulation, and evaluation will then be conducted as necessary

  10. Local system for control by console-mobile crane for russian depository of fissionable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshchenko, V.G.; Kapustin, V.N.; Zinina, N.V.; Derbyshev, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Description of crane of console-mobile type used for transportation of fissionable materials in depository with local control system is represented. Local control system realizes program control in real time [ru

  11. Overview and forensic investigation approaches of the gaming console Sony PlayStation Portable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Stephan; Schön, Ralph; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the forensically interesting features of the Sony PlayStation Portable game console. The construction and the internal structure are analyzed precisely and interesting forensic features of the operating system and the file system are presented.

  12. Selection of input devices and controls for modern process control consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfuss, O.; Zimmermann, R.

    1975-06-01

    In modern process control consoles man-machine communication is realized more and more by computer driven CRT displays, the most efficient communication system today. This paper describes the most important input devices and controls for such control consoles. A certain number of facts are given, which should be considered during the selection. The aptitude of the described devices for special tasks is discussed and recommendations are given for carrying out a selection. (orig.) [de

  13. Keeping the Game Alive: Evaluating Strategies for the Preservation of Console Video Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Guttenbrunner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Interactive fiction and video games are part of our cultural heritage. As original systems cease to work because of hardware and media failures, methods to preserve obsolete video games for future generations have to be developed. The public interest in early video games is high, as exhibitions, regular magazines on the topic and newspaper articles demonstrate. Moreover, games considered to be classic are rereleased for new generations of gaming hardware. However, with the rapid development of new computer systems, the way games look and are played changes constantly. When trying to preserve console video games one faces problems of classified development documentation, legal aspects and extracting the contents from original media like cartridges with special hardware. Furthermore, special controllers and non-digital items are used to extend the gaming experience making it difficult to preserve the look and feel of console video games.This paper discusses strategies for the digital preservation of console video games. After a short overview of console video game systems, there follows an introduction to digital preservation and related work in common strategies for digital preservation and preserving interactive art. Then different preservation strategies are described with a specific focus on emulation. Finally a case study on console video game preservation is shown which uses the Planets preservation planning approach for evaluating preservation strategies in a documented decision-making process. Experiments are carried out to compare different emulators as well as other approaches, first for a single console video game system, then for different console systems of the same era and finally for systems of all eras. Comparison and discussion of results show that, while emulation works very well in principle for early console video games, various problems exist for the general use as a digital preservation alternative. We show what future work

  14. Evaluating games console electricity use : technologies and policy options to improve energy efficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Amanda E.

    2016-01-01

    Energy efficiency regulations and standards are increasingly being used as an approach to reduce the impact of appliances on climate change. Each new generation of games consoles is significantly different to the last and their cumulative electricity use has risen due to improved performance and functionality and increasing sales. As a result, consoles have been identified in the EU, US and Australia as a product group with the potential for significant electricity savings. However, there is ...

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory laser-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goals of the Laser-Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are to produce well-diagnosed, high-gain, laser-driven fusion explosions in the laboratory and to exploit this capability for both military applications and for civilian energy production. In the past year we have made significant progress both theoretically and experimentally in our understanding of the laser interaction with both directly coupled and radiation-driven implosion targets and their implosion dynamics. We have made significant developments in fabricating the target structures. Data from the target experiments are producing important near-term physics results. We have also continued to develop attractive reactor concepts which illustrate ICF's potential as an energy producer

  16. Absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heft, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Environmental Science Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has in use a system of absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Basically, absolute INAA is dependent upon the absolute measurement of the disintegration rates of the nuclides produced by neutron capture. From such disintegration rate data, the amount of the target element present in the irradiated sample is calculated by dividing the observed disintegration rate for each nuclide by the expected value for the disintegration rate per microgram of the target element that produced the nuclide. In absolute INAA, the expected value for disintegration rate per microgram is calculated from nuclear parameters and from measured values of both thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes which were present during irradiation. Absolute INAA does not depend on the concurrent irradiation of elemental standards but does depend on the values for thermal and epithermal neutron capture cross-sections for the target nuclides. A description of the analytical method is presented

  17. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Intelligent Actinide Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Koenig, Z.M.

    1993-07-01

    The authors have developed an Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS) for Materials Management to use in the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The IAAS will measure isotopic ratios for plutonium and other actinides non-destructively by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. This system will measure samples in a variety of matrices and containers. It will provide automated control of many aspects of the instrument that previously required manual intervention and/or control. The IAAS is a second-generation instrument, based on the authors' experience in fielding gamma isotopic systems, that is intended to advance non-destructive actinide analysis for nuclear safeguards in performance, automation, ease of use, adaptability, systems integration and extensibility to robotics. It uses a client-server distributed monitoring and control architecture. The IAAS uses MGA 3 as the isotopic analysis code. The design of the IAAS reduces the need for operator intervention, operator training, and operator exposure

  18. Seismic and geologic investigations of the Sandia Livermore Laboratory site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes results of a seismic and geologic investigation in the vicinity of Sandia Laboratories property and Sandia's Tritium Building at Livermore, California. The investigation was done to define any seismically capable faults in the immediate area and to obtain necessary information to support estimates of future possible or probable ground motions. The work included a variety of geophysical measurements, trenching, seismologic studies, geologic examination, and evaluation of possible ground surface rupture at the site. Ground motions due to the maximum potential earthquake are estimated, and probability of exceedance for various levels of peak ground acceleration is calculated. Descriptions of the various calculations and investigative techniques used and the data obtained are presented. Information obtained from other sources relevant to subsurface geology and faulting is also given. Correlation and evaluation of the various lines of evidence and conclusions regarding the seismic hazard to the Tritium Building are included

  19. Malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, D.F.; Reynolds, P.J.; Snyder, M.A.; Biggs, M.W.; Stubbs, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    19 cases of malignant melanoma (MM) were observed during 1972-77 among approximately 5100 employees of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where high energy physics research is conducted. This number was significantly higher (p -6 ) than that expected in a comparable age/race/sex/geographical segment of the population of the San Francisco Bay area. That excess seemed to occur only among laboratory employees and not among the surrounding community, which suggests that an occupational factor is responsible. Preliminary case-comparison findings suggest that MM risk is not associated with length of employment at the laboratory nor with type of monitored radiation exposure. Although the data did not support an association between MM incidence and all scientific job classifications combined, an excess relative risk was observed among chemists. The reasons for the MM excess have not been identified. (author)

  20. Optical Design Capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Optical design capabilities continue to play the same strong role at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that they have played in the past. From defense applications to the solid-state laser programs to the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), members of the optical design group played critical roles in producing effective system designs and are actively continuing this tradition. This talk will explain the role optical design plays at LLNL, outline current capabilities and summarize a few activities in which the optical design team has been recently participating. Among the many optical engineers working at LLNL, a distinct group exists which specializes in optical design issues. The optical design group collectively has a wide range of fields of expertise as well as a diversity of background histories including LLNL, university, industry and aerospace experience. This unique resource has resulted many effective and productive designs for customers at LLNL and outside the lab.

  1. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.; Wang, F.

    1980-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater involves the following process steps: (1) produce activated carbon via a coal gasification plant; (2) contact activated carbon sorbent with seawater using a settling process (no pumping of seawater); (3) vacuum activated carbon from sea floor; (4) gasify or burn activated carbon (further concentrating the uranium in the ash); (5) extract the uranium from the rich ash ore by conventional techniques. The process advantages are: (1) eliminates seawater pumping, the need for an illuent, and the need for a fresh water wash; (2) should result in much lower capital investment and regional process energy. Major process issues are: (1) uranium loading on activated carbon; (2) activated carbon modifications required to improve the sorbtion performance; (3) activated carbon particle size needed to meet system requirements; (4) minimization of sorbent losses when contacted with seawater

  2. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Intelligent Actinide Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.B.; Koenig, Z.M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed an Intelligent Actinide Analysis System (IAAS) for Materials Management to use in the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The IAAS will measure isotopic ratios for plutonium and other actinides non-destructively by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. This system will measure samples in a variety of matrices and containers. It will provide automated control of many aspects of the instrument that previously required manual intervention and/or control. The IAAS is a second-generation instrument, based on experience in fielding gamma isotopic systems, that is intended to advance non-destructive actinide analysis for nuclear safeguards in performance, automation, ease of use, adaptability, systems integration and extensibility to robotics. It uses a client-server distributed monitoring and control architecture. The IAAS uses MGA as the isotopic analysis code. The design of the IAAS reduces the need for operator intervention, operator training, and operator exposure

  3. Requirements Document for Development of a Livermore Tomography Tools Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetho, I. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-09

    In this document, we outline an exercise performed at LLNL to evaluate the user interface deficits of a LLNL-developed CT reconstruction software package, Livermore Tomography Tools (LTT). We observe that a difficult-to-use command line interface and the lack of support functions compound to generate a bottleneck in the CT reconstruction process when input parameters to key functions are not well known. Through the exercise of systems engineering best practices, we generate key performance parameters for a LTT interface refresh, and specify a combination of back-end (“test-mode” functions) and front-end (graphical user interface visualization and command scripting tools) solutions to LTT’s poor user interface that aim to mitigate issues and lower costs associated with CT reconstruction using LTT. Key functional and non-functional requirements and risk mitigation strategies for the solution are outlined and discussed.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Tang, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    This Program Plan document describes the background of the Waste Minimization field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and refers to the significant studies that have impacted on legislative efforts, both at the federal and state levels. A short history of formal LLNL waste minimization efforts is provided. Also included are general findings from analysis of work to date, with emphasis on source reduction findings. A short summary is provided on current regulations and probable future legislation which may impact on waste minimization methodology. The LLN Waste Minimization Program Plan is designed to be dynamic and flexible so as to meet current regulations, and yet is able to respond to an everchanging regulatory environment. 19 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. The remote security station (RSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletta, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that, as an outgrowth of research into physical security systems, Sandia is investigating robotic technologies for improving physical security performance and flexibility. Robotic systems have the potential to allow more effective utilization of security personnel, especially in scenarios where they might be exposed to harm. They also can supplement fixed site installations where sensors have failed or where transient assets are present. The Remote Security Station (RSS) program for the defense Nuclear Agency is developing a proof-of-principle robotic system which will be used to evaluate the role, and associated cost, of robotic technologies in exterior physical security systems. The RSS consists of three primary elements: a fixed but quickly moveable tripod with intrusion detection sensors and assessment camera; a mobile robotic platform with a functionally identical security module; and a control console which allows an operator to perform security functions and teleoperate the mobile platform

  7. High-pressure safety at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, an energy research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    The high-pressure safety program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, California, has been successful in preventing lost-time high-pressure accidents over the past 12 years. Program organization, personnel training and qualification, pressure vessel design criteria and documentation, and pressure testing and inspection are discussed

  8. Current and future health physics research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed several radiation protection instruments and continues to pursue new approaches in this area. Some of the instruments developed include innovative air-monitoring systems; neutron detection and dosimetry systems; specialized calibration materials and structures, such as the LLNL Realistic Torso Phantom; a fast-response detector system to detect stray beams from x-ray fluorescence devices that can be manufactured for less than $600; and a reliable, light weight personnel air-monitoring system that can be incorporated into a security badge/dosimeter package. A multi-disciplinary team of experts at LLNL is developing and testing cleanable/reusable high-efficiency particulate air-filtration systems and highly sensitive instrumentation for differentiating transuranic waste from nontransuranic waste; developing an advanced detector and circuit design for a hand-held neutron spectrometer; developing techniques for detecting neutron sources using CR-39 and for calibrating in-vivo measurement equipment using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Monte Carlo simulation; and developing a seamless bottle mannequin adsorption (BOMAB) phantom with recessed fill caps, which have no potential for leakage of liquid sources used for calibrating whole-body counters

  9. Historic Context and Building Assessments for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Built Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, R. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sullivan, M. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2007-09-14

    This document was prepared to support u.s. Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) compliance with Sections 106 and 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a DOE/NNSA laboratory and is engaged in determining the historic status of its properties at both its main site in Livermore, California, and Site 300, its test site located eleven miles from the main site. LLNL contracted with the authors via Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to prepare a historic context statement for properties at both sites and to provide assessments of those properties of potential historic interest. The report contains an extensive historic context statement and the assessments of individual properties and groups of properties determined, via criteria established in the context statement, to be of potential interest. The historic context statement addresses the four contexts within which LLNL falls: Local History, World War II History (WWII), Cold War History, and Post-Cold War History. Appropriate historic preservation themes relevant to LLNL's history are delineated within each context. In addition, thresholds are identified for historic significance within each of the contexts based on the explication and understanding of the Secretary of the Interior's Guidelines for determining eligibility for the National Register of Historic Places. The report identifies specific research areas and events in LLNL's history that are of interest and the portions of the built environment in which they occurred. Based on that discussion, properties of potential interest are identified and assessments of them are provided. Twenty individual buildings and three areas of potential historic interest were assessed. The final recommendation is that, of these, LLNL has five individual historic buildings, two sets of historic objects, and two historic districts eligible for the National Register. All are

  10. Research applications of the Livermore RTNS-II neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has completed construction of the Rotating Target Neutron Source-II (RTNS-II) Facility. These sources, built and operated for the Office of Fusion Energy of the Department of Energy, will be operated by LLL as a national facility for the study of materials damage processes induced by 14-MeV neutrons. Design strength of the sources is 4 x 10 13 n/s with a maximum flux of 1 X 10 13 n/cm 2 s. The 400 keV, 150 mA D + accelerators and 5000 rpm titanium--tritide target assemblies were built using experience gained with LLL's RTNS-I neutron source. The RTNS-I source, producing 6 x 10 12 n/s, is currently the most intense 14-MeV source available. RTNS-I has been used for fusion reactor materials studies for the past six years. The experimental program for the new sources will be oriented toward fundamental measurements of high energy neutron-induced effects. The data produced will be used to develop models of damage processes to help guide materials selection for future fusion reactors

  11. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, N.W.

    1976-01-01

    Data on the geology of the USERDA Nevada Test Site have been collected for the purpose of evaluating the possibility of release of radioactivity at proposed underground nuclear test sites. These data, including both the rock physical properties and the geologic structure and stratigraphy of a large number of drill-hole sites, are stored in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Earth Sciences Division Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank. Retrieval programs can quickly provide a geological and geophysical comparison of a particular site with other sites where radioactivity was successfully contained. The data can be automatically sorted, compared, and averaged, and information listed according to site location, drill-hole construction, rock units, depth to key horizons and to the water table, and distance to faults. These programs also make possible ordered listings of geophysical properties (interval bulk density, overburden density, interval velocity, velocity to the surface, grain density, water content, carbonate content, porosity, and saturation of the rocks). The characteristics and capabilities of the data bank are discussed

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  13. Cross Domain Deterrence: Livermore Technical Report, 2014-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Peter D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bahney, Ben [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Matarazzo, Celeste [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Markey, Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pearl, Jonathan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-03

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is an original collaborator on the project titled “Deterring Complex Threats: The Effects of Asymmetry, Interdependence, and Multi-polarity on International Strategy,” (CDD Project) led by the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation at UCSD under PIs Jon Lindsay and Erik Gartzke , and funded through the DoD Minerva Research Initiative. In addition to participating in workshops and facilitating interaction among UC social scientists, LLNL is leading the computational modeling effort and assisting with empirical case studies to probe the viability of analytic, modeling and data analysis concepts. This report summarizes LLNL work on the CDD Project to date, primarily in Project Years 1-2, corresponding to Federal fiscal year 2015. LLNL brings two unique domains of expertise to bear on this Project: (1) access to scientific expertise on the technical dimensions of emerging threat technology, and (2) high performance computing (HPC) expertise, required for analyzing the complexity of bargaining interactions in the envisioned threat models. In addition, we have a small group of researchers trained as social scientists who are intimately familiar with the International Relations research. We find that pairing simulation scientists, who are typically trained in computer science, with domain experts, social scientists in this case, is the most effective route to developing powerful new simulation tools capable of representing domain concepts accurately and answering challenging questions in the field.

  14. LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) research on cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, K I; Holzrichter, J F [eds.

    1989-09-14

    With the appearance of reports on Cold Fusion,'' scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a series of increasingly sophisticated experiments and calculations to explain these phenomena. These experiments can be categorized as follows: (a) simple experiments to replicate the Utah results, (b) more sophisticated experiments to place lower bounds on the generation of heat and production of nuclear products, (c) a collaboration with Texas A M University to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for fusion by-products in a cell producing 10% excess heat (we found no by-products), and (d) attempts to replicate the Frascati experiment that first found neutron bursts when high-pressure deuterium gas in a cylinder with Ti chips was temperature-cycled. We failed in categories (a) and (b) to replicate either the Pons/Fleischmann or the Jones phenomena. We have seen phenomena similar to the Frascati results, (d) but these low-level burst signals may not be coming from neutrons generated in the Ti chips. Summaries of our experiments are described in Section II, as is a theoretical effort based on cosmic ray muons to describe low-level neutron production. Details of the experimental groups' work are contained in the six appendices. At LLNL, independent teams were spontaneously formed in response to the early announcements on cold fusion. This report's format follows this organization.

  15. The Livermore Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, M.J.; Kulke, B.; Deis, G.A.; Frye, R.W.; Kallman, J.S.; Ollis, C.W.; Tyler, G.C.; Van Maren, R.D.; Weiss, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Free-Electron Laser Program Magnet Test Laboratory supports the ongoing development of the Induction Linac Free Electron Laser (IFEL) and uses magnetic field measurement systems that are useful in the testing of long periodic magnetic structures, electron-beam transport magnets, and spectrometer magnets. The major systems described include two computer-controlled, three-axis Hall probe-and-search coil transports with computer-controlled data acquisition; a unique, automated-search coil system used to detect very small inaccuracies in wiggler fields; a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based Hall probe-calibration facility; and a high-current DC ion source using heavy ions of variable momentum to model the transport of high-energy electrons. Additionally, a high-precision electron-beam-position monitor for use within long wigglers that has a positional resolution of less than 100 μm is under development in the laboratory and will be discussed briefly. Data transfer to LLNL's central computing facility and on-line graphics enable us to analyze large data sets quickly. 3 refs

  16. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, S.; Wilson, K.

    1998-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchased by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in a concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved

  17. An operator-console system of the photon factory injector LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Kazuo; Abe, Isamu; Furukawa, Kazuro; Kamikubota, Norihiko

    1990-01-01

    It is sometimes difficult to unify accelerator control systems constructed in different ways. This problem arose in unifying the control systems of the injector linac and the storage ring making up the Photon Factory of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. One easy approach is to unify only the operator consoles; the unified console is connected to both separate control systems using gateways. The operator-console system of the Photon Factory injector linac has been designed and constructed using this approach. It consists of several workstations interconnected via a local-area network, a gateway to the old linac control network and a CATV system for the real-time display of the accelerator status. In this way the linac will be controlled from the control center of the Photon Factory storage ring. (orig.)

  18. Principle of human system interface (HSI) design for new reactor console of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Mohd Idris Taib; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: This paper will describe the principle of human system interface design for new reactor console in control room at TRIGA reactor facility. In order to support these human system interface challenges in digital reactor console. Software-based instrumentation and control (I and C) system for new reactor console could lead to new human machine integration. The proposed of Human System Interface (HSI) which included the large display panels which shows reactor status, compact and computer-based workstations for monitoring, control and protection function. The proposed Human System Interface (HIS) has been evaluated using various human factor engineering. It can be concluded that the Human System Interface (HIS) is designed as to address the safety related computer controlled system. (author)

  19. ANALISA TEKNIS DAN EKONOMIS PENGEMBANGAN INDUSTRI PENDUKUNG KONSOL KAPAL (SHIP CONSOLE DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisa Prasetyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Industri konsol kapal di Indonesia masih perlu dikembangkan untuk mendukung peningkatan jumlah komponen lokal dalam industri perkapalan. Melihat besarnya peluang dan pasar industri konsol kapal di Indonesia, maka dilakukan penelitian tugas akhir analisa teknis dan ekonomis pengembangan industri pendukung konsol kapal (ship console di Indonesia. Konsol kapal yang dimaksud adalah bridge control console, engine control console, cargo control console, water ballast control console, bridge wing control console. Tujuan dari tugas akhir ini adalah melakukan analisa teknis meliputi pemilihan lokasi, proses produksi, pemeriksaan hasil produksi, penentuan kapasitas produksi, peralatan dan mesin yang digunakan dalam proses pembuatannya, serta pembuatan layout dari pabrik dengan luas bangunan 2728 m² dan luas tanah 3886 m² berada pada Desa Karangploso, Kec. Benjeng, Kab. Gresik, Jawa Timur. Analisa ekonomis meliputi analisa kondisi pasar di Indonesia untuk permintaan konsol kapal dalam lima tahun yang akan datang. Biaya investasi pembangunan industri ini kira-kira sebesar Rp 14.186.000.000,00 yang berupa biaya pembelian tanah, pembangunan, pembelian peralatan dan mesin. Selanjutnya dilakukan perhitungan biaya operasional dan pemasukan perusahaan agar dapat melakukan analisa kelayakan investasi dengan menggunakan metode Break Event Point, Net Present Value, dan Internal Rate of Return yang hasilnya digunakan untuk menentukan kelayakan pengembangan dari industri konsol kapal di Indonesia. Berdasarkan analisa yang telah dilakukan Break Event Point terjadi pada 6 tahun 8 bulan dengan keuntungan kira-kira sebesar Rp 1.507.000.000,00. Nilai Net Present Value kira-kira sebesar Rp 4,408,000,000.00. Nilai Internal Rate of Return sebesar 11.38% lebih besar dari bunga bank yang telah ditetapkan yaitu 10.25%. Hal tersebut dikarenakan besarnya potensi pasar di Indonesia dan sedikitnya jumlah kompetitor pada industri konsol kapal.    

  20. Modified Brokk Demolition Machine with Remote Operator Console. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Low-Cost D and D System modifies a commercially available BROKK demolition system for remote viewing and long tether remote operation that provides a portable facility camera pod and interfaces with the Compact Remote Operator Console (TMS Tech ID 2180) to extend the applicability of the BROKK system to projects that require removal of the operator from the work area due to exposure to radiological, chemical, or industrial hazards. The modified BROKK has been integrated with the Compact Remote Operator Console to provide a true remotely operated low-cost D and D system applicable to a wide range of small D and D demolition tasks across the DOE complex

  1. Use of an electron penetration cathode ray tube in a colour display console

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickles, Pierre

    1972-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to study the possibility to obtain a colour image which can be used in cathode ray tube display console. The author describes a cathode ray tube, presents different methods to obtain a colour image (mask tube, electron penetration tube, and intensity change tube), discusses the choice of a cathode ray tube type, and describes its use in a display console. In the next part, the author addresses some theoretical aspects of corrections to be made for spot deflection, spot focussing, and spot brightness. A first version of a mock-up is presented, and experimental results are presented and discussed. A second version is then presented

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site

  3. The Current and Historical Distribution of Special Status Amphibians at the Livermore Site and Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattem, M V; Paterson, L; Woollett, J

    2008-08-20

    65 surveys were completed in 2002 to assess the current distribution of special status amphibians at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Livermore Site and Site 300. Combined with historical information from previous years, the information presented herein illustrates the dynamic and probable risk that amphibian populations face at both sites. The Livermore Site is developed and in stark contrast to the mostly undeveloped Site 300. Yet both sites have significant issues threatening the long-term sustainability of their respective amphibian populations. Livermore Site amphibians are presented with a suite of challenges inherent of urban interfaces, most predictably the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), while Site 300's erosion issues and periodic feral pig (Sus scrofa) infestations reduce and threaten populations. The long-term sustainability of LLNL's special status amphibians will require active management and resource commitment to maintain and restore amphibian habitat at both sites.

  4. Proposals for ORNL [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] support to Tiber LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, L.A.; Rosenthal, M.W.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, T.E.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes the interests and capabilities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in their proposals to support the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) project. Five individual proposals are cataloged separately. (FI)

  5. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1980 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toy, A.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; Griggs, K.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The results of environmental monitoring for 1980 at the Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Radioactivity in air, soil, sewage, water, vegetation and food, and milk was measured. Noise pollution, beryllium, heavy metals, and pesticides were monitored

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Codes Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savy, J B

    2003-01-01

    Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) is a methodology that estimates the likelihood that various levels of earthquake-caused ground motion will be exceeded at a given location in a given future time-period. LLNL has been developing the methodology and codes in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) needs for reviews of site licensing of nuclear power plants, since 1978. A number of existing computer codes have been validated and still can lead to ranges of hazard estimates in some cases. Until now, the seismic hazard community had not agreed on any specific method for evaluation of these codes. The Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) and the Pacific Engineering Earthquake Research (PEER) center organized an exercise in testing of existing codes with the aim of developing a series of standard tests that future developers could use to evaluate and calibrate their own codes. Seven code developers participated in the exercise, on a voluntary basis. Lawrence Livermore National laboratory participated with some support from the NRC. The final product of the study will include a series of criteria for judging of the validity of the results provided by a computer code. This EERI/PEER project was first planned to be completed by June of 2003. As the group neared completion of the tests, the managing team decided that new tests were necessary. As a result, the present report documents only the work performed to this point. It demonstrates that the computer codes developed by LLNL perform all calculations correctly and as intended. Differences exist between the results of the codes tested, that are attributed to a series of assumptions, on the parameters and models, that the developers had to make. The managing team is planning a new series of tests to help in reaching a consensus on these assumptions

  7. Laser materials processing applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, R.S.; Dragon, E.P.; Hackel, R.P.; Kautz, D.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and high radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) such as copper-vapor lasers, solid-state slab lasers, dye lasers, harmonic wavelength conversion of these lasers, and fiber optic delivery systems show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant potential for tenfold increases in welding, cutting, and drilling performance, as well as capability for applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper and dye laser systems are currently being developed at LLNL for uranium enrichment production facilities. The goals of this program are to develop low-cost, reliable and maintainable industrial laser systems. Chains of copper lasers currently operate at more than 1.5 kW output and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. The beam quality of copper vapor lasers is approximately three times the diffraction limit. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Diode laser pumped, Nd:YAG slab lasers are also being developed at LLNL. Current designs achieve powers of greater than 1.0 kW and projected beam quality is in the two to five times diffraction limited range. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratio holes in drilling tests (> 60: 1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. Other, traditionally more difficult, materials such as copper, aluminum and ceramics will soon be studied in detail

  8. 75 FR 80843 - In the Matter of Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-752] In the Matter of Certain Gaming and... the sale within the United States after importation of certain gaming and entertainment consoles...,094 (``the `094 patent''). The complaint further alleges that an industry in the United States exists...

  9. 77 FR 40082 - Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-745] Certain Gaming and Entertainment... gaming and entertainment consoles, related software, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... finally concluded that an industry exists within the United States that practices the '896, '094, '571...

  10. Prolonging the Magic: The Political Economy of the 7th Generation Console Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieborg, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on critical political economic theory to discuss the implications of the dominant mode of production and circulation of "Triple-A" or blockbuster console games. It is argued that the seventh generation Triple-A game is a highly standardized cultural commodity giving way to two

  11. Development of a remote control console for the HHIRF 25-MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasanul Basher, A.M.

    1991-09-01

    The CAMAC-based control system for the 25-MV Tandem Accelerator at HHIRF uses two Perkin-Elmer, 32-bit minicomputers: a message-switching computer and a supervisory computer. Two operator consoles are located on one of the six serial highways. Operator control is provided by means of a console CRT, trackball, assignable shaft encoders and meters. The message-switching computer transmits and receives control information on the serial highways. At present, the CRT pages with updated parameters can be displayed and parameters can be controlled only from the two existing consoles, one in the Tandem control room and the other in the ORIC control room. It has become necessary to expand the control capability to several other locations in the building. With the expansion of control and monitoring capability of accelerator parameters to other locations, the operators will be able to control and observe the result of the control action at the same time. Since the new control console will be PC-based, the existing page format will be changed. The PC will be communicating with the Perkin-Elmer through RS-232 and a communication software package. Hardware configuration has been established, a communication software program that reads the pages from the shared memory has been developed. In this paper, we present the implementation strategy, works completed, existing and new page format, future action plans, explanation of pages and use of related global variables, a sample session, and flowcharts

  12. Probing of brain states in real-time: Introducing the ConSole environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHartmann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen huge advancements in the methods available and used in neuroscience employing EEG or MEG. However, the standard approach is to average a large number of trials for experimentally defined conditions in order to reduce intertrial-variability, i.e. treating it as a source of "noise". Yet it is now more and more accepted that trial-to-trial fluctuations bear functional significance, reflecting fluctuations of "brain states" that predispose perception and action. Such effects are often revealed in a pre-stimulus period, when comparing response variability to an invariant stimulus. However such offline analyses are disadvantageous as they are correlational by drawing conclusions in a posthoc-manner and stimulus presentation is random with respect to the feature of interest. A more direct test is to trigger stimulus presentation when the relevant feature is present. The current paper introduces ConSole (CONstance System for OnLine Eeg, a software package capable of analyzing ongoing EEG / MEG in real-time and presenting auditory and visual stimuli via internal routines. Stimulation via external devices (e.g. TMS or third-party software (e.g. Psyscope X is possible by sending TTL-triggers. With ConSole it is thus possible to target the stimulation at specific brain-states. In contrast to many available applications, ConSole is open-source. Its modular design enhances the power of the software as it can be easily adapted to new challenges and writing new experiments is an easy task. ConSole is already pre-equipped with modules performing standard signal processing steps. The software is also independent from the EEG / MEG system, as long as a driver can be written (currently 2 EEG systems are supported. Besides a general introduction, we present benchmark data regarding performance and validity of the calculations used, as well as three example applications of ConSole in different settings. ConSole can be downloaded at: http://console-kn.sf.net.

  13. Supplement analysis for Greenville Gate access to Kirschbaum Field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Program proposes to provide additional access to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area. This additional access would alleviate traffic congestion at the East Gate entrance to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from Greenville Road during periods of heavy construction for the NIF. The new access would be located along the northeastern boundary of LLNL, about 305 m (1,000 ft) north of the East Gate entrance. The access road would extend from Greenville Road to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area and would traverse an existing storm water drainage channel. Two culverts, side by side, and a compacted road base would be installed across the channel. The security fence that runs parallel to Greenville Road would be modified to accommodate this new entrance and a vehicle gate would be installed at the entrance of Kirschbaum Field. The exiting shoulder along Greenville Road would be converted into a new turn lane for trucks entering the new gate. This analysis evaluates the impacts of constructing the Kirschbaum Field bridge and access gate at a different location than was analyzed in the NIF Project specific Analysis in the Final Programmatic environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SS and M PEIS) published in September 1996 (DOE/EIS-0236) and the Record of Decision published on December 19, 1996. Issues of concern addressed in this supplement analysis include potential impacts to wetlands downstream of the access bridge, potential impacts to the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) listed as threatened on the federal listing pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1974, and potential impacts on the 100-yr floodplain along the Arroyo Las Positas

  14. You can't take it with you? Effects of handheld portable media consoles on physiological and psychological responses to video game and movie content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, James D; Magee, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    Portable media consoles are becoming extremely popular devices for viewing a number of different types of media content, both for entertainment and for educational purposes. Given the increasingly heavy use of portable consoles as an alternative to traditional television-style monitors, it is important to investigate how physiological and psychological effects of portable consoles may differ from those of television-based consoles, because such differences in physiological and psychological responses may precipitate differences in the delivered content's effectiveness. Because portable consoles are popular as a delivery system for multiple types of media content, such as movies and video games, it is also important to investigate whether differences between the effects of portable and television-based consoles are consistent across multiple types of media. This article reports a 2 x 2 (console: portable or television-based x medium: video game or movie) mixed factorial design experiment with physiological arousal and self-reported flow experience as dependent variables, designed to explore whether console type affects media experiences and whether these effects are consistent across different media. Results indicate that portable media consoles evoke lower levels of physiological arousal and flow experience and that this effect is consistent for both video games and movies. These findings suggest that even though portable media consoles are often convenient compared to television-based consoles, the convenience may come at a cost in terms of the user experience.

  15. Device 2F112 (F-14A WST (Weapon System Trainers)) Instructor Console Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    irdividuals adequately trained in the use of a particular trainer. ’S G. L. RICARD Scientific Officer 9., - 5 * NAVTRAEQUIPCEN 81-M-1121-1 TABLE OF...through verbal comunication with the instructors at the console. Several problems exist in the use of the flyout mismatch page. a. The automatic display...Washington, DC 20350 Washington, DC 20301 Chief of Naval Operations Commanding Officer OP-596C Air Force Office of Scientific Washington, DC 20350

  16. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories' operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR, which in part relies on the detailed information in the appendices, and comprehensively discusses the proposed action, the alternatives, and the existing conditions and impacts of the proposed action and the alternatives

  17. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories' operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains copies of the written comments and transcripts of individual statements at the public hearing and the responses to them

  18. Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories' operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices which provide technical support for the analyses in Volume 1 and also provide additional information and references

  19. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Regents of the University of California (UC) propose the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition, DOE proposes the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Continued operation plus proposed projects at the two Laboratories is needed so that the research and development missions established by Congress and the President can continue to be supported. As provided and encouraged by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), DOE and UC have prepared this document as a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to analyze the impacts of the proposed action. In addition, this document discusses a no action alternative for continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative focused on specific adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative. This document also examines the alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. The environmental documentation process provides information to the public, government agencies, and decision makers about the environmental impacts of implementing the proposed and alternative actions. In addition, this environmental documentation identifies alternatives and possible ways to reduce or prevent environmental impacts. A list of the issues raised through the EIS/EIR scoping process is presented

  20. The design of the m-health service application using a Nintendo DS game console.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangjoon; Kim, Jungkuk; Lee, Myoungho

    2011-03-01

    In this article, we developed an m-health monitoring system using a Nintendo DS game console to demonstrate its utility. The proposed system consists of a biosignal acquisition device, wireless sensor network, base-station for signal reception from the sensor network and signal conversion according to Internet protocol, personal computer display program, and the Nintendo DS game console. The system collects three-channel electrocardiogram (ECG) signals for cardiac abnormality detection and three-axis accelerometer signals for fall detection of a person. The collected signals are then transmitted to the base-station through the wireless sensor network, where they are transformed according to the transmission control protocol/Internet protocol (TCP/IP) and sent to the destination IP through Internet network. To test the developed system, the collected signals were displayed on a computer located in different building through wired Internet network and also simultaneously displayed on the Nintendo DS game console connected to Internet network wirelessly. The system was able to collect and transmit signals for more than 24 h without any interruptions or malfunctions, showing the possibility of integrating healthcare monitoring functions into a small handheld-type electronic device developed for different purposes without significant complications. It is expected that the system can be used in an ambulance, nursing home, or general hospital where efficient patient monitoring from long distance is necessary.

  1. [Efficacy of interventions with video games consoles in stroke patients: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Huerta, J H; Perez-de-Heredia-Torres, M; Guijo-Blanco, V; Santamaria-Vazquez, M

    2018-01-16

    In recent years video games and games consoles have been developed that are potentially useful in rehabilitation, which has led to studies conducted to evaluate the degree of efficacy of these treatments for people following a stroke. To analyse the literature available related to the effectiveness of applying video games consoles in the functional recovery of the upper extremities in subjects who have survived a stroke. A review of the literature was conducted in the CINHAL, Medline, PEDro, PsycArticles, PsycInfo, Science Direct, Scopus and Web of Science databases, using the query terms 'video game', 'stroke', 'hemiplegia', 'upper extremity' and 'hemiparesis'. After applying the eligibility criteria (clinical trials published between 2007 and 2017, whose participants were adults who had suffered a stroke with involvement of the upper extremity and who used video games), the scientific quality of the selected studies was rated by means of the PEDro scale. Eleven valid clinical trials were obtained for the systematic review. The studies that were selected, all of which were quantitative, presented different data and the inferential results indicated different levels of significance between control and experimental groups (82%) or between the different types of treatment (18%). The use of video games consoles is a useful complement for the conventional rehabilitation of the upper extremities of persons who have survived a stroke, since it increases rehabilitation time and enhances the recovery of motor functioning. Nevertheless, homogeneous intervention protocols need to be implemented in order to standardise the intervention.

  2. Plutonium discharges to the sanitary sewer: Health impacts at the Livermore Water Reclamation Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balke, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the largest discharger of sewage treated by the Livermore Water Reclamation (LWRP), contributing approximately 7% by volume of the LWRP influent LILNL operations, as potential sources both of industrial pollutants and radioactivity, are therefore of particular concern to the LWRP. For this reason, LLNL has maintained vigorous wastewater discharge control and monitoring programs. In particular, the monitoring program has demonstrated that, except in a few rare instances, the concentration of contaminants in LLNL effluent have always remained below the appropriate regulatory standards. The exceptions have generally been due to inadvertent discharges of metals-bearing solutions produced by metal plating or cleaning operations

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  4. Analytical capabilities and services of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmacher, R.; Crawford, R.

    1978-01-01

    This comprehensive guide to the analytical capabilities of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division describes each analytical method in terms of its principle, field of application, and qualitative and quantitative uses. Also described are the state and quantity of sample required for analysis, processing time, available instrumentation, and responsible personnel

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory DIII-D cooperation: 1987 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Calderon, M.O.; Ellis, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) DIII-D cooperation during FY87. The LLNL participation in DIII-D concentrated on three principal areas: ECH and current-drive physics, divertor and edge physics, and tokamak operations. These topics are dicussed in this report. 27 refs., 11 figs

  6. User's guide to the Sandia Mathematical Program Library at Livermore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, R.E.; Jefferson, T.H.

    1976-03-01

    The Sandia Mathematical Program Library is a collection of general-purpose mathematical subroutines which are maintained within Sandia on a quick service basis. This document is intended to be a reference guide for using the library at Sandia Laboratories, Livermore. (auth)

  7. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's beryllium control program for high-explosive test firing bunkers and tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    This detailed report on Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's control program to minimize beryllium levels in Laboratory workplaces includes an outline of beryllium surface, soil, and air levels and an 11-y summary of sampling results from two high-use, high-explosive test firing bunkers. These sampling data and other studies demonstrate that the beryllium control program is funcioning effectively

  8. Final Report Bald and Golden Eagle Territory Surveys for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratanduono, M. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct surveys for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) at Site 300 and in the surrounding area out to 10-miles. The survey effort was intended to document the boundaries of eagle territories by careful observation of eagle behavior from selected viewing locations throughout the study area.

  9. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taffet, M.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Oberdorfer, J.A. (San Jose State Univ., CA (USA)); McIlvride, W.A. (Weiss Associates, Oakland, CA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory selects Intel Itanium 2 processors for world's most powerful Linux cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Intel Corporation, system manufacturer California Digital and the University of California at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) today announced they are building one of the world's most powerful supercomputers. The supercomputer project, codenamed "Thunder," uses nearly 4,000 Intel® Itanium® 2 processors... is expected to be complete in January 2004" (1 page).

  11. Vadose zone investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Superfund Site: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovenitti, J.L.; Nitao, J.J.; Bishop, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)is investigating the fate and transport of vadose zone contaminants at their Livermore site in Livermore, California. The principal objectives of this work are to identify potential source areas at the Livermore site which require remediation, to prioritize those areas, and finally, to optimize the remediation process. Primary contaminants of interest for this investigation are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and tritium. A fully integrated, three-part program, consisting of quantitative modeling, field studies, and laboratory measurements, is in progress. To evaluate and predict vadose zone contaminant migration, quantitative modeling is used. Our modeling capabilities are being enhanced through the development of a multicomponent,three-dimensional,nonaqueous phase liquid-liquid-vapor,nonisothermal flow and transport computer code. This code will be also used to evaluate vadose zone remediation requirements. Field studies to acquire LLNL site-specific soil (sediment) characteristics for computer code calibration and validation include subsurf ace lithologic and contaminant profiling, in situ soil moisture content, ground surface emission flux of VOCs and tritium, transpiration of tritium, and ground surface evapotranspiration of water. Multilevel vadose zone monitoring devices are used to monitor the gaseous and aqueous transport of contaminants

  12. Managing RTP Console Upgrading Project: Best Practice for Nuclear Malaysia as TSO in Supporting NPP Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Syahirah Abdul Rahman; Izhar Abu Hussin

    2011-01-01

    Human Resource Development (HRD) is required for Nuclear Power Programme (NPP). To be a Technical Support Organisation (TSO) for NPP, Nuclear Malaysia should be ready to take the responsibility in supporting Nuclear Regulatory Agency (NRA) and NPP Operators. In nurturing Nuclear Malaysia as TSO, the prime important and focus of HRD for the NPP is the reactor engineering technology. Nuclear Malaysia gives various phases of supports needed to build NPP such as during siting, design, planning, licensing, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance in its own way and capability. The current Nuclear Malaysia unique approach is the TRIGA PUSPATI reactor (RTP) upgrading project. Research reactor plays an important role in Research and Developpement organization as a nuclear facility to assist the development of NPP. Therefore, upgrading the research reactor is needed to build the skills and gain knowledge of workers to work safely. After 29 years of operation, the RTP system is facing aging problems due to many components in the reactor are outdated. Therefore, immediate action should be carried out to mitigate the aging factor of the reactor to prevent the worsening of the aging problem, and to prevent untoward incident from happening. Action should also cover short and long term planning to prevent current situation from recurring. Currently, RTP is upgrading its console from analog to digital system. One of the achievements in this console upgrading project is the development and implementation of project management. This paper comprises the overview on the RTP console upgrading project, the project management and how this project can lead Nuclear Malaysia to be a good TSO for the development of NPP. (author)

  13. FORTRAN text correction with the CDC-1604-A console typewriter during reading a punched card program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotorobaj, F.; Ruzhichka, Ya.; Stolyarskij, Yu.V.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes FORTRAN text correction with the CDC 1604-A console typewriter during reading a punched card program. This method gives one more possibility of FORTRAN program correction during program's input to the CDC 1604-A computer. This essentially reduced the time necessary for punched card correction with other methods. Possibility of inputting desired number of punched cards one after another allows one writing small FORTRAN programs to computer core storage with simultaneous punching of the cards. The correction program has been written to the CDC 1604 COOP monitor

  14. Design and implementation of the control system for the new console of TRIGA-3-Salazar Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    TRIGA-3-Salazar Reactor was set in operation in 1968 and the aging of its components has cause the increasing in the maintenance. In the presence of this, it becomes necessary to replace the reactor console using new technologies, considering the incorporation of a personal computer. The aim of this work is the design and construction of the equipment interfaces as well as the digital computer program for the automation and control of the TRIGA-3-Salazar Reactor by means of a personal computer. (Author)

  15. Livermore Lab's giant laser system will bring star power to Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E.

    2010-01-01

    In the 50 years since the laser was first demonstrated in Malibu, California, on May 16, 1960, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a world leader in laser technology and the home for many of the world's most advanced laser systems. That tradition continues today at LLNL's National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system. NIF's completion in March 2009 not only marked the dawn of a new era of scientific research - it could also prove to be the next big step in the quest for a sustainable, carbon-free energy source for the world. NIF consists of 192 laser beams that will focus up to 1.8 million joules of energy on a bb-sized target filled with isotopes of hydrogen - forcing the hydrogen nuclei to collide and fuse in a controlled thermonuclear reaction similar to what happens in the sun and the stars. More energy will be produced by this 'ignition' reaction than the amount of laser energy required to start it. This is the long-sought goal of 'energy gain' that has eluded fusion researchers for more than half a century. Success will be a scientific breakthrough - the first demonstration of fusion ignition in a laboratory setting, duplicating on Earth the processes that power the stars. This impending success could not be achieved without the valuable partnerships forged with other national and international laboratories, private industry and universities. One of the most crucial has been between LLNL and the community in which it resides. Over 155 businesses in the local Tri-Valley area have contributed to the NIF, from industrial technology and engineering firms to tool manufacturing, electrical, storage and supply companies. More than $2.3B has been spent locally between contracts with nearby merchants and employee salaries. The Tri-Valley community has enabled the Laboratory to complete a complex and far-reaching project that will have national and global impact in the future. The first experiments were conducted on NIF

  16. The willingness to pay of parties to traffic accidents for loss of productivity and consolation compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Rong-Chang; Chen, Tzu-Ying

    2015-12-01

    In this study, willingness to pay (WTP) for loss of productivity and consolation compensation by parties to traffic accidents is investigated using the Tobit model. In addition, WTP is compared to compensation determined by Taiwanese courts. The modelling results showed that variables such as education, average individual monthly income, traffic accident history, past experience of severe traffic accident injuries, the number of working days lost due to a traffic accident, past experience of accepting compensation for traffic accident-caused productivity loss and past experience of accepting consolation compensation caused by traffic accidents have a positive impact on WTP. In addition, average WTP for these two accident costs were obtained. We found that parties to traffic accidents were willing to pay more than 90% of the compensation determined by the court in the scenario of minor and moderate injuries. Parties were willing to pay approximately 80% of the compensation determined by the court for severe injuries, disability and fatality. Therefore, related agencies can use our study findings as the basis for determining the compensation that parties should pay for productivity losses caused by traffic accidents of different types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CCL: console command language, RSX11M V4. 0, V7. OC tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downward, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The normal user interface to an RSX11M operating system is via MCR (Monitor Console Routine). If terminal input is not specifically requested by a task, all data or commands typed in at a user's terminal, are sent by the terminal driver to MCR for decoding. The MCR task (and its child ...SYS) decode user commands (ACT, ABORT,RUN, DEV, ETC.). Tasks installed with special names of the form ...XYZ are treated as an external MCR command. Hence if a user types, XYZ COMMANDLINE, the commandline in its entirety (or at least up to 79 characters) is sent as input to the task ...XYZ. This is the conventional way of supplying most system commands and controlling the operation of the RSX11M utility program. The limitations of this method are: (1) each task must be installed to get MCR command lines; (2) each installed task uses valuable POOL space; (3) only privileged users can INSTALL and REMOVE tasks; and (4) non-privileged users are restricted to RUNning non-installed tasks. To solve this problem, a user tailorable Console Command Language (CCL) has been implemented which allows each user to have a private task control language to pass command lines to tasks that are not installed in th system as external MCR commands.

  18. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1986 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Brekke, D.D.

    1987-04-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental monitoring program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 1986. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, milk, foodstuff, and sewage effluents were made at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. This report was prepared to meet the requirements of DOE Order 5484.1. Evaluations are made of LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicate that no releases in excess of the applicable standards were made during 1986, and that LLNL operations had no adverse environmental impact

  19. Energy conservation and management plan for plant facilities at the Livermore site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, W.; Szybalski, S.; Kerr, W. H.; Meyer, H. J.

    1976-03-15

    An energy conservation and management plan for the Livermore site of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is presented. The plan defines the energy-conservation goals for the next 10 years and proposes the ways and means of attaining them. The main features contained in this plan are as follows: development of the criteria and underlying assumptions required for long range planning, including energy growth rates and the case for using the concept of the technical-fix energy growth rate, LLL energy outlook and fuel cost projections, and life-cycle-cost criteria; targets of the long-range plan include between 1975 and 1985, an annual energy usage growth equal to 5.8 percent of the 1975 energy consumption, 1985 and thereafter, zero energy growth, a change from the current dependence on natural gas to the use of other fuels for heating, and a doubling of the 30-day strategic oil storage capacity; and cost schedule for the next 10 years.

  20. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, R.C.; Brekke, D.D.

    1988-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) for 1987. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements were made of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical pollutants in ambient air, soil, sewage effluents, surface water, groundwater, vegetation, foodstuff, and milk at both the Livermore site and nearby Site 300. Evaluations were made of LLNL's compliance with the applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological releases to the environment. The data indicates that the only releases in excess of applicable standards were four releases to the sanitary sewer. LLNL operations had no adverse impact on the environment during 1987. 65 refs., 24 figs

  1. High-resolution compact Johann crystal spectrometer with the Livermore electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.L.; Chen, H.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; May, M.J.; Dunn, J.; Smith, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    A compact high-resolution (λ/Δλ≅10 000) spherically bent crystal spectrometer in the Johann geometry was recently installed and tested on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap. The curvature of the mica (002) crystal grating allows for higher collection efficiency compared to the flat and cylindrically bent crystal spectrometers commonly used on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The spectrometer's Johann configuration enables orientation of its dispersion plane to be parallel to the electron beam propagation. Used in concert with a crystal spectrometer, whose dispersion plane is perpendicular to the electron beam propagation, the polarization of x-ray emission lines can be measured

  2. CDC 7600 LTSS programming stratagens: preparing your first production code for the Livermore Timesharing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.W.

    1977-01-01

    This report deals with some techniques in applied programming using the Livermore Timesharing System (LTSS) on the CDC 7600 computers at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Computer Center (LLLCC or Octopus network). This report is based on a document originally written specifically about the system as it is implemented at NMFECC but has been revised to accommodate differences between LLLCC and NMFECC implementations. Topics include: maintaining programs, debugging, recovering from system crashes, and using the central processing unit, memory, and input/output devices efficiently and economically. Routines that aid in these procedures are mentioned. The companion report, UCID-17556, An LTSS Compendium, discusses the hardware and operating system and should be read before reading this report

  3. LTSS compendium: an introduction to the CDC 7600 and the Livermore Timesharing System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.W.

    1977-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the CDC 7600 computer and to the Livermore Timesharing System (LTSS) used by the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Computer Center (LLLCC or Octopus network) on their 7600's. This report is based on a document originally written specifically about the system as it is implemented at NMFECC but has been broadened to point out differences in implementation at LLLCC. It also contains information about LLLCC not relevant to NMFECC. This report is written for computational physicists who want to prepare large production codes to run under LTSS on the 7600's. The generalized discussion of the operating system focuses on creating and executing controllees. This document and its companion, UCID-17557, CDC 7600 LTSS Programming Stratagems, provide a basis for understanding more specialized documents about individual parts of the system

  4. Construction quality assurance closure report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, Pits 1 and 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document presents the Final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) report for the closure cover system of two mixed, low-level radioactive and hazardous waste landfills (pits) at Site 300. Site 300, operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is located in the Altamont Hills, approximately 15 miles southeast of Livermore, California. The purpose of this report is to document the CQA program established to assure that construction is completed in accordance with the design intent and the approved Closure and Post Closure Plans dated May 1989 and revised January 1990 (EPA ID Number: CA 2890090002). Inclusive within the Closure and Post Closure Plan were the CQA Plan and the Technical Specifications for the final cover system. This report contains a complete narrative with photographic documentation of the construction activities and progress, problems encountered and solutions utilized, and third party testing and monitoring results, thus establishing the verification of compliance with the Quality Assurance Plan for the project

  5. Exploiting the X-Window environment to expand the number, reach, and usefulness of Fermilab accelerator control consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, K.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Fermilab accelerator operator workstation of choice is now the Digital VAX station running VMS and X-Window software. This new platform provides an easy to learn programming environment while support routines are expanding in number and power. The X-Window environment is exploited to provide remote consoles to users across long haul networks and to support multiple consoles on a single workstation. The integration of imaging systems, local datalogging, commercial and Physics community's software, and development facilities on the operator workstation adds functionality to the system. The locally engineered knob/pointer/keyboard interface solves the multiple keyboard and mouse problems of a multi-screen console. This paper will address these issues of Fermilab's accelerator operator workstations. (author)

  6. The value of assessments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Waste Certification Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, E.M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper will discuss the value of assessments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Waste Certification Programs by: introducing the organization and purpose of the LLNL Waste Certification Programs for transuranic, low-level, and hazardous waste; examining the differences in internal assessment/audit requirements for these programs; discussing the values and costs of assessments in a waste certification program; presenting practical recommendations to maximize the value of your assessment programs; and presenting improvements in LLNL's waste certification processes that resulted from assessments

  7. Trace element analysis at the Livermore pool-type reactor using neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragaini, R.C.; Ralston, R.; Garvis, D.

    1975-01-01

    The capabilities of trace element analysis at the Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) are discussed. A description is given of the technology and the methods employed, including sample preparation, irradiation, and analysis. Applications of the INAA technique in past and current projects are described. A computer program, GAMANAL, has been used for nuclide identification and quantification. (U.S.)

  8. 2003 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. Uranium-series dating of pedogenic carbonates from the Livermore Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1981-01-01

    A uranium-series dating technique has been applied to pedogenic carbonates from the Livermore Valley in California. The results from geomorphologically distinct Quaternary alluvial units are internally consistent and for one alluvial unit are corroborated by a concordant 14 C age for an associated wood fragment. In appropriate situations, age dates for pedogenic carbonates derived using this technique may provide a time stratigraphy for alluvial units and hence provide some limits (minimum age) for last fault movement

  10. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  11. On the Development of a Web-Based M-Learning System for Dual Screen Handheld Game Consoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend S. Al-Khalifa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our experience on the design and development of an M-Learning web-based system for the Nintendo DSi game console. The paper starts by addressing the difficulties that emerged from the lack of resources on design guidelines for dual screen devices also the absence of adequate techniques and methods to support the design decisions. Then it explains how we overcame these challenges by adopting a design decision suitable for the screen requirements of the Nintendo DSi console. Finally, we present the components of our M-Learning system and the results of a preliminary usability evaluation.

  12. Exercise intensity levels in children with cerebral palsy while playing with an active video game console.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Maxime; Ballaz, Laurent; Hart, Raphael; Lemay, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are prone to secondary complications related to physical inactivity and poor cardiorespiratory capacity. This problem could be greatly attenuated through the use of video games that incorporate physical activity for 2 reasons: Video games already represent an important component of leisure time in younger people, and such games can lead to a high level of exercise intensity in people who are healthy. The study objective was to evaluate exercise intensity in children with spastic diplegic CP and children who were typically developing while playing with an active video game console. This was a cross-sectional study. Ten children (7-12 years old) with spastic diplegic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II) and 10 children who were age matched and typically developing were evaluated in a movement analysis laboratory. Four games were played with the active video game console (jogging, bicycling, snowboarding, and skiing) for 40 minutes. Heart rate was recorded during the entire playing period with a heart rate belt monitor. Exercise intensity was defined as the percentage of heart rate reserve (HRR). In addition, lower extremity motion analysis was carried out during the final minute of the playing period for the jogging and bicycling games. No difference between groups was observed for any variables. A main effect of games was observed for the amount of time spent at an intensity greater than 40% of HRR. Specifically, more than 50% of the playing time for the jogging game and more than 30% of the playing time for the bicycling game were spent at an intensity greater than 40% of HRR. In addition, the jogging game produced a larger range of motion than the bicycling game. A limitation of this study was the relatively small and heterogeneous sample. For all 4 games, similar exercise intensity levels were observed for children who were typically developing and children with CP, suggesting that children with CP could

  13. Design and testing of a 750MHz CW-EPR digital console for small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Emoto, Miho C; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirotada G

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a digital console for three-dimensional (3D) continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging of a small animal to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and lower the cost of the EPR imaging system. A RF generation board, an RF acquisition board and a digital signal processing (DSP) & control board were built for the digital EPR detection. Direct sampling of the reflected RF signal from a resonator (approximately 750MHz), which contains the EPR signal, was carried out using a band-pass subsampling method. A direct automatic control system to reduce the reflection from the resonator was proposed and implemented in the digital EPR detection scheme. All DSP tasks were carried out in field programmable gate array ICs. In vivo 3D imaging of nitroxyl radicals in a mouse's head was successfully performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Workstations as consoles for the CERN-PS complex, setting-up the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsanti, P.; Arruat, M.; Bouche, J.M.; Cons, L.; Deloose, Y.; Di Maio, F.

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the rejuvenation project of the CERN control systems, commercial workstations have to replace existing home-designed operator consoles. RISC-based workstations with UNIX, X-window TM and OSF/Motif TM have been introduced for the control of the PS complex. The first versions of general functionalities like synoptic display, program selection and control panels have been implemented and the first large scale application has been realized. This paper describes the different components of the workstation environment for the implementation of the applications. The focus is on the set of tools which have been used, developed or integrated, and on how we plan to make them evolve. (author)

  15. Design and testing of a 750 MHz CW-EPR digital console for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Emoto, Miho C.; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirotada G.

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a digital console for three-dimensional (3D) continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging of a small animal to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and lower the cost of the EPR imaging system. A RF generation board, an RF acquisition board and a digital signal processing (DSP) & control board were built for the digital EPR detection. Direct sampling of the reflected RF signal from a resonator (approximately 750 MHz), which contains the EPR signal, was carried out using a band-pass subsampling method. A direct automatic control system to reduce the reflection from the resonator was proposed and implemented in the digital EPR detection scheme. All DSP tasks were carried out in field programmable gate array ICs. In vivo 3D imaging of nitroxyl radicals in a mouse's head was successfully performed.

  16. Usability of the remote console for virtual reality telerehabilitation: formative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey A; Deutsch, Judith E; Burdea, Grigore

    2006-04-01

    The Remote Console (ReCon) is a telerehabilitation application that allows therapists to remotely communicate with patients while monitoring and controlling their virtual rehabilitation exercises. It provides therapists visual feedback of patients' movements, their exercise simulations replicated in real time and with tools to conduct training without a face-to-face session. The Recon underwent a formative evaluation (a type of usability engineering methodology) used to refine its design. Five physical therapists from different practice settings acted as representative users. During the evaluation, these users made errors related to manipulation and finding and understanding controls. Technical issues with the server and audio communication were identified. These findings were used to fine-tune the ReCon system.

  17. Gaming across different consoles: exploring the influence of control scheme on game-player enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limperos, Anthony M; Schmierbach, Michael G; Kegerise, Andrew D; Dardis, Frank E

    2011-06-01

    Many studies have investigated how different technological features impact the experience of playing video games, yet few have focused on how control schemes may affect the play experience. This research employed a between-subjects design to explore the relationship between the type of console played (Nintendo Wii, Playstation 2) and feelings of flow and enjoyment during the game-play experience. Results indicated that participants reported greater feelings of control and enjoyment with a traditional control scheme (Playstation 2) than with the more technologically advanced control scheme (Nintendo Wii). Further mediation analysis showed that enjoyment was driven by the sense of control that participants experienced and not simply by whether they won the game. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  18. Gabriela Mistral's «Sonnets to Ruth»: The Consolation of Passion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard M. Fraser

    1978-08-01

    Full Text Available As for many poets, the sonnet form presented the opportunity to Gabriela Mistral to perfect her poetic technique. This study examines in detail the Nobel Laureate's trio of sonnets commemorating the biblical matriarch Ruth. Mistral's treatment of the themes of alienation, self- sacrifice, and the search for human dignity features the contrasts of suffering and consolation which are present in the biblical narrative. But, alongside the thematic purposes which the pleasure/pain duality serves, Mistral exploits this opposition for technical and structural reasons. She uses the feelings of love and pain as an organizational device in her treatment of time, characters and diction. The discipline with which she handled traditional metres, in this case the sonnet, reveals that Mistral was a capable and mature poet at an early age.

  19. Testing the feasibility and safety of the Nintendo Wii gaming console in orthopedic rehabilitation: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Stapf, Jonas; Meissner, Kay Michael; Niethammer, Thomas; Lahner, Matthias; Wagenhäuser, Markus; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-12-01

    The Nintendo Wii game console is already used as an additional training device for e.g. neurological wards. Still there are limited data available regarding orthopedic rehabilitation. The authors' objective was to examine whether the Nintendo Wii is an appropriate and safe tool in rehabilitation after orthopedic knee surgery. A prospective, randomized, controlled study comparing standard physiotherapy vs. standard physiotherapy plus game console training (Wii group) in patients having anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair or knee arthroplasty was conducted. The subjects of the Wii group ( n = 17; mean age: 54 ±19 years) performed simple knee exercises daily under the supervision of a physiotherapist in addition to the normal rehabilitation program. The patients of the control group ( n = 13; 52 ±18 years) were treated with physiotherapy only. The participants of both groups completed a questionnaire including the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, the Modified Cincinnati Rating System and the Tegner Lysholm Knee Score prior to the operation, before discharge from hospital and four weeks after treatment. There was no significant difference in the score results between the Wii and the control group ( p > 0.05). We demonstrated that physiotherapy using the Nintendo Wii gaming console after ACL reconstruction and knee arthroplasty does not negatively influence outcome. Because training with the Wii device was highly accepted by patients, we see an opportunity whereby additional training with a gaming console for a longer period of time could lead to even better results, regarding the training motivation and the outcome after orthopedic surgery.

  20. “You’re not alone” : Music as a source of consolation among adolescents and young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Bogt, T.F.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071628274; Vieno, Alessio; Doornwaard, S.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/353722618; Pastore, Massimiliano; van den Eijnden, R.J.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17399394X

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining whether adolescents and young adults use music as an agent of consolation when dealing with daily sorrow and stress. We furthermore tested whether three aspects of music listening, i.e., the music itself, its lyrics, and experiences of closeness to artists and fans,

  1. Security issues at the Department of Energy and records management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUSBAUM, ANNA W.

    2000-01-01

    In order to discuss the connection between security issues within the Department of Energy and records management, the author covers a bit of security history and talks about what she calls ''the Amazing Project''. Initiated in late May 1999, it was to be a tri-laboratory (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of Livermore, California, Los Alamos National Laboratory of Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California) project. The team that formed was tasked to develop the best set of security solutions that still enabled weapon mission work to get done and the security solutions were to be the same set for everyone. The amazing project was called ''The Integrated Security Management Project'', or ''ISecM' for short. She'll describe why she thinks this project was so amazing and what it accomplished. There's a bit of sad news about the project, but then she'll move onto discuss what was learned at Sandia as a result of the project and what they're currently doing in records management

  2. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1983 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, K.S.; Myers, D.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1984-02-01

    The 1983 annual average airborne gross beta activity in Livermore Valley air samples, 1.4 x 10 -14 μCi/ml, was less than 1982. Airborne 238 U concentrations at Site 300 were higher than those at Livermore because of the depleted uranium (a byproduct of 235 U enrichment) used in high-explosive tests at the Site. However, these concentrations were well below the standards set by DOE. The average gross alpha activity shows no significant change from 1982. The annual average beryllium concentrations were less than 1% of the local air pollution standard at both sites and can be accounted for by the natural concentrations in airborne dust. The total tritium released to the atmosphere in 1983 was 3245 Ci. Water samples exhibited gross beta and tritium activities within the ranges previously observed in these areas. Two water samples from Site 300 showed an above-average level of gross alpha activity. This activity is due to naturally occurring uranium. The discharge of tritiated water (HTO) into the sanitary sewer system in 1982 was 1.7 Ci, unchanged from the previous year. Tritium concentrations observed in local wells in 1983 were generally the same as previous years measurements. Tritium levels found in the Livermore Valley and Site 300 vegetation were comparable to 1982. The 1983 average annual gamma-radiation doses at the Laboratory perimeter and off-site locations were 51 mrem and 50 mrem, essentially unchanged from previous year. A 14-MeV neutron generator (Bldg. 212) near the south perimeter continued to be a source of elevated radiation. 19 references, 19 figures, 36 tables

  3. Automation of multiple neutral beam injector controls at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, G.G.

    1977-01-01

    The computer control system used on the twelve Neutral Beams of the 2XIIB experiment at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has evolved over the last three years. It is now in its final form and in regular use. It provides automatic data collection, reduction, and graphics presentation, as well as automatic conditioning, automatic normal operation, and processing of calorimeter data. This paper presents an overview of the capabilities and implementation of the current system, a detailed discussion of the automatic conditioning algorithm, and discusses the future directions for neutral beam automation

  4. Environmental Assessment for the vacuum process laboratory (VPL) relocation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates the potential environmental impacts of relocating a vacuum process laboratory (VPL) from Building 321 to Building 2231 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The VPL provides the latest technology in the field of vacuum deposition of coatings onto various substrates for several weapons-related and energy-related programs at LLNL. Operations within the VPL at LLNL will not be expanded nor reduced by the relocation. No significant environmental impacts are expected as a result of the relocation of the VPL

  5. Evaluation and recommendations on U.C. Lawrence Livermore Labortory Quality Assurance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, F.D.; Horner, M.H.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted of the University of California's Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Quality Assurance Program, which focused on training needs and recommendations tailored to the various on-going programs. Specific attention was directed to an assessment of the quality status for the MFTF facility and the capabilities of assigned quality project engineers. Conclusions and recommendations are presented which not only address the purpose of this study, but extend into other areas to provide insight and needs for a total cost effective application of a quality assurance program

  6. Development of a design basis tornado and structural design criteria for Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.R.; Minor, J.E.; Mehta, K.C.

    1975-11-01

    Criteria are prescribed and guidance is provided for professional personnel who are involved with the evaluation of existing buildings and facilities at Site 300 near Livermore, California to resist the possible effects of extreme winds and tornadoes. The development of parameters for the effects of tornadoes and extreme winds and guidelines for evaluation and design of structures are presented. The investigations conducted are summarized and the techniques used for arriving at the combined tornado and extreme wind risk model are discussed. The guidelines for structural design methods for calculating pressure distributions on walls and roofs of structures and methods for accommodating impact loads from missiles are also presented

  7. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1982 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, K.S.; Gonzalez, M.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental monitoring efforts spanned air, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, and radiation doses. Monitoring data collection, analysis, and evaluation are presented for air, soils, sewage, water, vegetation and foodstuffs, milk, and general environmental radioactivity. Non-radioactive monitoring addresses beryllium, chemical effluents in sewage, noise pollution, and storm runoff and liquid discharge site pollutants. Quality assurance efforts are addressed. Five appendices present tabulated data; environmental activity concentration; dose calculation method; discharge limits to sanitary sewer systems of Livermore; and sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring

  8. Inertial fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: program status and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Hogan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Laser Fusion Program are to understand and develop the science and technology required to utilize inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for both military and commercial applications. The results of recent experiments are described. We point out the progress in our laser studies, where we continue to develop and test the concepts, components, and materials for present and future laser systems. While there are many potential commercial applications of ICF, we limit our discussions to electric power production

  9. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  10. Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    2009-06-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

  11. Supplement analysis for paleontological excavation at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    On December 15, 1997, contractor workers supporting the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction uncovered bones suspected to be of paleontological importance. The NIF workers were excavating a utility trench near the southwest corner of the NIF footprint area, located at the northeast corner of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Livermore Site, and were excavating at a depth of approximately 30 feet. Upon the discovery of bone fragments, the excavation in the immediate vicinity was halted and the LLNL archaeologist was notified. The archaeologist determined that there was no indication of cultural resources. Mark Goodwin, Senior Curator for the University of California Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley, was then contacted. Mr. Goodwin visited the site on December 16th and confirmed that the bones consisted of a section of the skull, a portion of the mandible, several teeth, upper palate, and possibly the vertebrae of a mammoth, genus Mammuthus columbi. This supplement analysis evaluates the potential for adverse impacts of excavating skeletal remains, an activity that was only generally assessed by the NIF Project-Specific Analysis in the Final Programmatic Environmental impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SS and M PEIS) published in September 1996 (DOE/EIS-0236) and its Record of Decision published on December 19, 1996. This supplement analysis has been prepared pursuant to the DOE regulations implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (10 CFR 1021.314)

  12. Warhead politics: Livermore and the competitive system of nuclear weapon design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, Sybil [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    From the 1950s onward, US evolved a two-laboratory system to design, develop, and test nuclear weapons. LANL (New Mexico) dates from World War II. The founding in 1952 of LLNL in California effectively established the two-laboratory system. Despite essentially identical missions, LANL and LLNL adopted different strategies and approaches to the development of nuclear weapons. This thesis looks to their joint history for an explanation of this and consequent questions (how did the two-laboratory system originate and evolve? how did it function? what impact did it have on nuclear weapons development?) The incentives and constraints that shaped laboratory strategies and outputs was determined by military demand for nuclear weapons, an informal mandate against laboratory duplication, congressional support for competition, and Livermore`s role as the ``second lab.`` This thesis discusses the laboratories` role in the arms race, organizational strategies for coping with changing political environments, dynamics of technological innovation, and the leverage of policymakers over large organizations.

  13. Construction quality assurance for Pit 6 landfill closure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-30

    Golder Construction Services, Inc. (GCS), under contract to the Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), provided the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and testing during the construction of the Site 300, Pit 6 landfill closure cover. The cap construction was performed as a CERCLA non-time-critical removal action from June 2 to August 29, 1997. the project site is located 18 miles east of Livermore on Tesla Road and approximately 10 miles southwest of Tracy on Corral Hollow Road in San Joaquin County, California. This report certifies that the LLNL, Site 300, Pit 6, Landfill Closure was constructed in accordance with the construction specifications and design drawings. This report documents construction activities and CQA monitoring and testing for construction of the Pit 6 Landfill Closure. Golder Associates, Inc. of Oakland, California was the design engineering firm responsible for preparation of the drawings and specifications. CQA services were provided by GCS, of Roseville, California, under supervision of a California registered civil Engineer.

  14. Modification and testing of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore tritium decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gildea, P.D.; Birnbaum, H.G.; Wall, W.R.

    1978-08-01

    Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, has put into operation a new facility, the Tritium Research Laboratory. The laboratory incorporates containment and cleanup facilities such that any tritium accidentally released is captured rather than vented to the atmosphere. This containment is achieved with hermetically sealed glove boxes that are connected on demand by manifolds to two central decontamination systems called the Gas Purification System (GPS) and the Vacuum Effluent Recovery System (VERS). The primary function of the GPS is to remove tritium and tritiated water vapor from the glove box atmosphere. The primary function of the VERS is to decontaminate the gas exhausted from the glove box pressure control systems and vacuum pumps in the building before venting the gas to the stack. Both of these systems are designed to remove tritium to the few parts per billion range. Acceptance tests at the manufacturer's plant and preoperational testing at Livermore demonstrated that the systems met their design specifications. After preoperational testing the Gas Purification System was modified to enhance the safety of maintanance operations. Both the Gas Purification System and the Vacuum Effluent Recovery System were performance tested with tritium. Results show that concentraion reduction factors (ratio of inlet to exhaust concentrations) much in excess of 1000 per pass have been achieved for both systems at inlet concentrations of 1 ppM or less

  15. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  16. Modification and testing of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore tritium decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gildea, P.D.; Birnbaum, H.G.; Wall, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, has put into operation a new facility, the Tritium Research Laboratory. The laboratory incorporates containment and cleanup facilities such that any tritium accidentally released is captured rather than vented to the atmosphere. This containment is achieved with hermetically sealed glove boxes that are connected on demand by manifolds to two central decontamination systems called the Gas Purification System (GPS) and the Vacuum Effluent Recovery System (VERS). The primary function of the GPS is to remove tritium and tritiated water vapor from the glove box atmosphere. The primary function of the VERS is to decontaminate the gas exhausted from the glove box pressure control systems and vacuum pumps in the building before venting the gas to the stack. Both of these systems are designed to remove tritium to the few parts per billion range. Acceptance tests at the manufacturer's plant and preoperational testing at Livermore demonstrated that the systems met their design specifications. After preoperational testing the Gas Purification System was modified to enhance the safety of maintanance operations. Both the Gas Purification System and the Vacuum Effluent Recovery System were performance tested with tritium. Results show that concentration reduction factors (ratio of inlet to exhaust concentrations) much in excess of 1000 per pass have been achieved for both systems at inlet concentrations of 1 ppM or less

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  18. Alternative security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview

  19. Type B accident investigation board report of the July 2, 1997 curium intake by shredder operator at Building 513 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    On July 2, 1997 at approximately 6:00 A.M., two operators (Workers 1 and 2), wearing approved personal protective equipment (PPE), began a shredding operation of HEPA filters for volume reduction in Building 513 (B-513) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The waste requisitions indicated they were shredding filters containing ≤ 1 μCi of americium-241 (Am-241). A third operator (Worker 3) provided support to the shredder operators in the shredding area (hot area) from a room that was adjacent to the shredding area (cold area). At Approximately 8:00 A.M., a fourth operator (Worker 4) relieved Worker 2 in the shredding operation. Sometime between 8:30 A.M. and 9:00 A.M., Worker 3 left the cold area to make a phone call and set off a hand and foot counter in Building 514. Upon discovering the contamination, the shredding operation was stopped and surveys were conducted in the shredder area. Surveys conducted on the workers found significant levels of contamination on their PPE and the exterior of their respirator cartridges. An exit survey of Worker 1 was conducted at approximately 10:05 A.M., and found contamination on his PPE, as well as on the exterior and interior of his respirator. Contamination was also found on his face, chest, back of neck, hair, knees, and mustache. A nose blow indicated significant contamination, which was later determined to be curium-244

  20. Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of EPA's homeland security roles and responsibilities, and links to specific homeland security issues: water security, research, emergency response, recovery, and waste management.

  1. Multi-platform subsystem for controlling acquisition, visualization and data organization of an NMR Digital Spectrometer: ToRM Console; Subsistema multiplataforma para controle de aquisicao, visualizacao e organizacao de dados do Espectrometro Digital de RM: ToRM Console

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Danilo M.D.D. da; Pizetta, Daniel C.; Freire, Guilherme M.; Coelho, Felipe B.; Lourenco, Gustavo V.; Correa, Rodrigo R.M.; Martins, Mateus J.; Vidoto, Edson L.G.; Tannus, Alberto, E-mail: danilomendes@usp.br, E-mail: danilomendesdias@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (CIERMag/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Int. de Fisica. Centro de Imagens e Espectroscopia ' in vivo' por Ressonancia Magnetica

    2013-08-15

    In this work, we present the recent results from the development of the CIERMag NMR Digital Spectrometer - a subsystem for controlling acquisition, visualization and data organization. Some aspects of the architecture and features will be shown, including a demonstration with CPMG method for transversal relaxation time (T{sub 2}) measurement using the system. With these achievements, ToRM Console is now being prepared to be an MRI scanner in a near future (author)

  2. Security Dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wivel, Anders

    2011-01-01

    What is a security dilemma? What are the consequences of security dilemmas in international politics?......What is a security dilemma? What are the consequences of security dilemmas in international politics?...

  3. The control consoles for the CERN 400 GeV proton synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, F; Shering, G

    1977-01-01

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) provides research facilities for investigation into the physics of high energy particles for physicists from 11 European member states and visitors from several continents. To this end it constructs and operates large accelerators, and of these is a 400 GeV proton synchrotron, which is built in a circular tunnel cut into the bedrock, the majority of the equipment being housed in a number of buildings scattered over the surface of the site. Data are gathered in local units, multiplexed into a CAMAC interface, collected into local computers, and sent down high-speed data links to the control centre. Data-collection rates vary from leisurely status changes to megahertz transfer rates on the data links. All links are connected to a message-transfer system in the control centre, as are connections from various central computers giving library, graphics and alarm facilities. The three computers driving the three control consoles are similarly attached to the mes...

  4. Joystick-controlled video console game practice for developing power wheelchairs users' indoor driving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei Pin; Wang, Chia Cheng; Hung, Jo Hua; Chien, Kai Chun; Liu, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Ng, How-Hing; Lin, Yang-Hua

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of joystick-controlled video console games in enhancing subjects' ability to control power wheelchairs. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy young adults without prior experience of driving power wheelchairs were recruited. Four commercially available video games were used as training programs to practice joystick control in catching falling objects, crossing a river, tracing the route while floating on a river, and navigating through a garden maze. An indoor power wheelchair driving test, including straight lines, and right and left turns, was completed before and after the video game practice, during which electromyographic signals of the upper limbs were recorded. The paired t-test was used to compare the differences in driving performance and muscle activities before and after the intervention. [Results] Following the video game intervention, participants took significantly less time to complete the course, with less lateral deviation when turning the indoor power wheelchair. However, muscle activation in the upper limbs was not significantly affected. [Conclusion] This study demonstrates the feasibility of using joystick-controlled commercial video games to train individuals in the control of indoor power wheelchairs.

  5. Possibilities for retracing of copyright violations on current video game consoles by optical disk analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmler, Frank; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    This paper deals with the possibilities of retracing copyright violations on current video game consoles (e.g. Microsoft Xbox, Sony PlayStation, ...) by studying the corresponding optical storage media DVD and Blu-ray. The possibilities of forensic investigation of DVD and Blu-ray Discs are presented. It is shown which information can be read by using freeware and commercial software for forensic examination. A detailed analysis is given on the visualization of hidden content and the possibility to find out information about the burning hardware used for writing on the optical discs. In connection with a forensic analysis of the Windows registry of a suspects PC a detailed overview of the crime scene for forged DVD and Blu-ray Discs can be obtained. Optical discs are examined under forensic aspects and the obtained results are implemented into automatic analysis scripts for the commercial forensics program EnCase Forensic. It is shown that for the optical storage media a possibility of identification of the drive used for writing can be obtained. In particular Blu-ray Discs contain the serial number of the burner. These and other findings were incorporated into the creation of various EnCase scripts for the professional forensic investigation with EnCase Forensic. Furthermore, a detailed flowchart for a forensic investigation of copyright infringement was developed.

  6. Mixing console design for telematic applications in live performance and remote recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, David J.

    The development of a telematic mixing console addresses audio engineers' need for a fully integrated system architecture that improves efficiency and control for applications such as distributed performance and remote recording. Current systems used in state of the art telematic performance rely on software-based interconnections with complex routing schemes that offer minimal flexibility or control over key parameters needed to achieve a professional workflow. The lack of hardware-based control in the current model limits the full potential of both the engineer and the system. The new architecture provides a full-featured platform that, alongside customary features, integrates (1) surround panning capability for motorized, binaural manikin heads, as well as all sources in the included auralization module, (2) self-labelling channel strips, responsive to change at all remote sites, (3) onboard roundtrip latency monitoring, (4) synchronized remote audio recording and monitoring, and (5) flexible routing. These features combined with robust parameter automation and precise analog control will raise the standard for telematic systems as well as advance the development of networked audio systems for both research and professional audio markets.

  7. Barium fluoride surface preparation, analysis and UV reflective coatings at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has begun a program of study on barium fluoride scintillating crystals for the Barium Fluoride Electromagnetic Calorimeter Collaboration. This program has resulted in a number of significant improvements in the mechanical processing, polishing and coating of barium fluoride crystals. Techniques have been developed using diamond-loaded pitch lapping that can produce 15 angstrom RMS surface finishes over large areas. These lapped surfaces have been shown to be crystalline using Rutherford Back-scattering (RBS). Also, special polishing fixtures have been designed based on mounting technology developed for the 1.1 m diameter optics used in LLNL's Nova Laser. These fixtures allow as many as five 25--50 cm long barium fluoride crystals to be polished and lapped at a time with the necessary tolerances for the 16,000 crystal Barium Fluoride Calorimeter. In addition, results will be presented on coating barium fluoride with UV reflective layers of magnesium fluoride and aluminum

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory low-level waste systems performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Systems Performance Assessment (PA) presents a systematic analysis of the potential risks posed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) waste management system. Potential risks to the public and environment are compared to established performance objectives as required by DOE Order 5820.2A. The report determines the associated maximum individual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to a member of the public from LLW and mixed waste. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.01 mrem could result from routine radioactive liquid effluents. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.003 mrem could result from routine radioactive gaseous effluents. No other pathways for radiation exposure of the public indicated detectable levels of exposure. The dose rate, monitoring, and waste acceptance performance objectives were found to be adequately addressed by the LLNL Program. 88 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs

  9. Solid modeling research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1982-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalibjian, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has sponsored solid modeling research for the past four years to assess this new technology and to determine its potential benefits to the Nuclear Weapons Complex. We summarize here the results of five projects implemented during our effort. First, we have installed two solid modeler codes, TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1) and PADL-2 (Part and Assembly Description Language), on the Laboratory's CRAY-1 computers. Further, we have extended the geometric coverage and have enhanced the graphics capabilities of the TIPS-1 modeler. To enhance solid modeler performance on our OCTOPUS computer system, we have also developed a method to permit future use of the Laboratory's network video system to provide high-resolution, shaded images at users' locations. Finally, we have begun to implement code that will link solid-modeler data bases to finite-element meshing codes

  10. Description and use of LSODE, the Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Hindmarsh, Alan C.

    1993-01-01

    LSODE, the Livermore Solver for Ordinary Differential Equations, is a package of FORTRAN subroutines designed for the numerical solution of the initial value problem for a system of ordinary differential equations. It is particularly well suited for 'stiff' differential systems, for which the backward differentiation formula method of orders 1 to 5 is provided. The code includes the Adams-Moulton method of orders 1 to 12, so it can be used for nonstiff problems as well. In addition, the user can easily switch methods to increase computational efficiency for problems that change character. For both methods a variety of corrector iteration techniques is included in the code. Also, to minimize computational work, both the step size and method order are varied dynamically. This report presents complete descriptions of the code and integration methods, including their implementation. It also provides a detailed guide to the use of the code, as well as an illustrative example problem.

  11. Title I conceptual design for Pit 6 landfill closure at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonnell, B.A.; Obenauf, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this design project is to evaluate and prepare design and construction documents for a closure cover cap for the Pit 6 Landfill located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300. This submittal constitutes the Title I Design (Conceptual Design) for the closure cover of the Pit 6 Landfill. A Title I Design is generally 30 percent of the design effort. Title H Design takes the design to 100 percent complete. Comments and edits to this Title I Design will be addressed in the Title II design submittal. Contents of this report are as follows: project background; design issues and engineering approach; design drawings; calculation packages; construction specifications outline; and construction quality assurance plan outline

  12. Large-scale automation of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory x-ray analytical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, P.L.; Shimamoto, F.Y.; Quick, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has undertaken an ambitious plan to automate its x-ray analytical equipment. This project ultimately will automate 15 x-ray diffraction and 3 x-ray spectrometric systems. All automation is being done by retrofitting existing equipment and combining it with minicomputers to produce smart instruments. Two types of smart instruments have been developed: one that controls an experiment and acquires data and another that analyzes data and communicates with LLL's large computer center. Three of the former type have been built and are operating; seven more will soon be put into service. Only two of the later type are needed, and both are currently in service. We describe the details of our overall plan, the smart instruments, the retrofitting, our current status, and our software

  13. 2002 Small Mammal Inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, E; Woollett, J

    2004-11-16

    To assist the University of California in obtaining biological assessment information for the ''2004 Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)'', Jones & Stokes conducted an inventory of small mammals in six major vegetation communities at Site 300. These communities were annual grassland, native grassland, oak savanna, riparian corridor, coastal scrub, and seep/spring wetlands. The principal objective of this study was to assess the diversity and abundance of small mammal species in these communities, as well as the current status of any special-status small mammal species found in these communities. Surveys in the native grassland community were conducted before and after a controlled fire management burn of the grasslands to qualitatively evaluate any potential effects of fire on small mammals in the area.

  14. Hazardous waste site assessment: Inactive landfill, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of an inactive landfill (Pit 6) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300. The primary objectives were to: collect and review background information pertaining to past waste disposal practices and previous environmental characterization studies; conduct a geophysical survey of the landfill area to locate the buried wastes; conduct a hydrogeologic investigation to provide additional data on the rate and direction of groundwater flow, the extent of any groundwater contamination, and to investigate the connection, if any, of the shallow groundwater beneath the landfill with the local drinking water supply; conduct a risk assessment to identify the degree of threat posed by the landfill to the public health and environment; compile a preliminary list of feasible long-term remedial action alternatives for the landfill; and develop a list of recommendations for any interim measures necessary at the landfill should the long-term remedial action plan be needed.

  15. Hazardous waste site assessment: Inactive landfill, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of an inactive landfill (Pit 6) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300. The primary objectives were to: collect and review background information pertaining to past waste disposal practices and previous environmental characterization studies; conduct a geophysical survey of the landfill area to locate the buried wastes; conduct a hydrogeologic investigation to provide additional data on the rate and direction of groundwater flow, the extent of any groundwater contamination, and to investigate the connection, if any, of the shallow groundwater beneath the landfill with the local drinking water supply; conduct a risk assessment to identify the degree of threat posed by the landfill to the public health and environment; compile a preliminary list of feasible long-term remedial action alternatives for the landfill; and develop a list of recommendations for any interim measures necessary at the landfill should the long-term remedial action plan be needed

  16. Recent progress in inertial confinement fusion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.; Manes, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Shiva and Argus laser systems at Livermore have been developed to study the physics of inertial confinement fusion. Both laser system designs are predicated on the use of large aperture Nd-glass disk amplifiers and high power spatial filters. During the past year we have irradiated DT filled microshell targets with and without polymer coatings. Recently new instruments have been developed to investigate implosion dynamics and to determine the maximum fuel density achieved by these imploded fusion pellets. A series of target irradiations with thin wall microshells at 15 to 20 TW, exploding pusher designs, resulted in a maximum neutron yield of 3 x 10 10 . Polymer coated microshells designed for high compression were subjected to 4 kJ for 0.2 ns and reached fuel densities of 2.0 to 3.0 gm/cm 3 . Results of these and other recent experiments will be reviewed

  17. Contingency plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's hazardous-waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the necessary equipment and trained personnel to respond to a large number of hazardous material spills and fires or other emergencies resulting from these spills including injured personnel. This response capability is further expanded by the agreements that LLNL has with a number of outside response agencies. The Hazards Control Department at LLNL functions as the central point for coordinating the response of the equipment and personnel. Emergencies involving hazardous waste are also coordinated through the Hazards Control Department, but the equipment and personnel in the Toxic Waste Control Group would be activated for large volume waste pumpouts. Descriptions of response equipment, hazardous waste locations communication systems, and procedures for personnel involved in the emergency are provided

  18. Environmental site characterization and remediation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, A.L.; Ferry, R.A.

    1992-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a research and development laboratory owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by the University of California. The Laboratory operates its Site 300 test facility in support of DOE's national defense programs. In support of activities, at the 300 Site numerous industrial fluids are used and various process or rinse waters and solid wastes are produced. Some of these materials are hazardous by current standards. HE rinse waters were previously discharged to inlined lagoons; they now are discharged to a permitted Class II surface impoundment Solid wastes have been deposited in nine landfills. Waste HE compounds are destroyed by open burning at a burn pit facility. As a result of these practices, environmental contaminants have been released to the soil and ground water

  19. Computer-aided mapping of stream channels beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Super Fund Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sick, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site rests upon 300-400 feet of highly heterogeneous braided stream sediments which have been contaminated by a plume of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). The stream channels are filled with highly permeable coarse grained materials that provide quick avenues for contaminant transport. The plume of VOCs has migrated off site in the TFA area, making it the area of greatest concern. I mapped the paleo-stream channels in the TFA area using SLICE an LLNL Auto-CADD routine. SLICE constructed 2D cross sections and sub-horizontal views of chemical, geophysical, and lithologic data sets. I interpreted these 2D views as a braided stream environment, delineating the edges of stream channels. The interpretations were extracted from Auto-CADD and placed into Earth Vision`s 3D modeling and viewing routines. Several 3D correlations have been generated, but no model has yet been chosen as a best fit.

  20. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. High Energy, Short Pulse Fiber Injection Lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-09-10

    A short pulse fiber injection laser for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system produces 100 {micro}J pulses with 5 nm of bandwidth centered at 1053 nm. The pulses are stretched to 2.5 ns and have been recompressed to sub-ps pulse widths. A key feature of the system is that the pre-pulse power contrast ratio exceeds 80 dB. The system can also precisely adjust the final recompressed pulse width and timing and has been designed for reliable, hands free operation. The key challenges in constructing this system were control of the signal to noise ratio, dispersion management and managing the impact of self phase modulation on the chirped pulse.

  2. Environmental impact report addendum for the continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    An environmental impact statement/environmental impact report (ES/EIR) for the continued operation and management of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was prepared jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC). The scope of the document included near-term (within 5-10 years) proposed projects. The UC Board of Regents, as state lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), certified and adopted the EIR by issuing a Notice of Determination on November 20, 1992. The DOE, as the lead federal agency under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), adopted a Record of Decision for the ES on January 27, 1993 (58 Federal Register [FR] 6268). The DOE proposed action was to continue operation of the facility, including near-term proposed projects. The specific project evaluated by UC was extension of the contract between UC and DOE for UC's continued operation and management of LLNL (both sites) from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1997. The 1992 ES/EIR analyzed impacts through the year 2002. The 1992 ES/EIR comprehensively evaluated the potential environmental impacts of operation and management of LLNL within the near-term future. Activities evaluated included programmatic enhancements and modifications of facilities and programs at the LLNL Livermore site and at LLNL's Experimental Test Site (Site 300) in support of research and development missions 2048 established for LLNL by Congress and the President. The evaluation also considered the impacts of infrastructure and building maintenance, minor modifications to buildings, general landscaping, road maintenance, and similar routine support activities

  3. Security Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Examines how to evaluate school security, begin making schools safe, secure schools without turning them into fortresses, and secure schools easily and affordably; the evolution of security systems into information technology systems; using schools' high-speed network lines; how one specific security system was developed; pros and cons of the…

  4. California GAMA Program: Sources and Transport of Nitrate in Groundwater in the Livermore Valley Basin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, H; Eaton, G F; Ekwurzel, B E; Esser, B K; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Leif, R; McNab, W; Moody-Bartel, C; Moore, K; Moran, J E

    2005-01-01

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate concentrations approaching and greater than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) are impairing the viability of many groundwater basins as drinking water sources Source attribution and nitrate fate and transport are therefore the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the City of Livermore, where high nitrate levels affect both public supply and private domestic wells. Nitrate isotope data are effective in determining contaminant sources, especially when combined with other isotopic tracers such as stable isotopes of water and tritium-helium ages to give insight into the routes and timing of nitrate inputs to the flow system. This combination of techniques is demonstrated in Livermore, where it is determined that low nitrate reclaimed wastewater predominates in the northwest, while two flowpaths with distinct nitrate sources originate in the southeast. Along the eastern flowpath, (delta) 15 N values greater than 10(per t housand) indicate that animal waste is the primary source. Diminishing concentrations over time suggest that contamination results from historical land use practices. The other flowpath begins in an area where rapid recharge, primarily of low nitrate imported water (identified by stable isotopes of water and a tritium-helium residence time of less than 1 year), mobilizes a significant local nitrate source, bringing groundwater concentrations above the MCL of 45 mg NO 3 L -1 . In this area, artificial recharge of imported water via local arroyos induces flux of the contaminant to the regional aquifer. The low (delta) 15 N value (3.1(per t housand)) in this location implicates synthetic fertilizer

  5. Control console for the X-ray room; Consola de control para la sala de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia H, J.M.; Aguilar B, M.A.; Torres B, M.A

    1998-07-01

    It is presented the design and construction of Control console for the X-ray room of Metrology Center for ionizing radiations at National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). This system controls the positioning of 6 different filters for an X-ray beam. Also it controls a shutter which blockades the beam during periods established by user, these periods can be fixed from hours until tenth of second. The shutter opening periods, as well as the X-ray beam filter are establish and monitoring from a Personal computer outside of room. (Author)

  6. Superconducting wire for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Itaru; Ikeda, Masaru; Tanaka, Yasuzo; Meguro, Shinichiro

    1985-01-01

    In Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in USA, the development of a mirror type nuclear fusion reactor is carried out, and for plasma confinement, superconducting magnets are used. For the axicell coil generating a 12 T magnetic field in one of these magnets, Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires are to be used, and after the completion, it will be the largest magnet in the world as high magnetic field superconducting magnets. Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. has completed the delivery of Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires used for this purpose. Since the Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires are very brittle, attention was paid to the manufacture to satisfy the required characteristics, and it was able to obtain the good reputation that the product was highly homogeneous as the superconducting wires of this type. In this paper, the design, manufacture and various characteristics of these superconducting wires are reported. The Nb 3 Sn superconducting wires were manufactured on industrial scale of 8 tons. The features of these Nb 3 Sn wires are the compound structure with semi-hard copper for low temperature stability and strengthening. (Kako, I.)

  7. Overview of the current spectroscopy effort on the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Brown, G.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the current spectroscopic effort on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facilities. The effort focuses on four aspects: spectral line position, line intensity, temporal evolution, and line shape. Examples of line position measurements include studies of the K-shell transitions in heliumlike Kr 34+ and the 2s-2p intrashell transitions in lithiumlike Th 87+ and U 89+ , which provide benchmark values for testing the theory of relativistic and quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions. Examples of line intensity measurements are provided by measurements of the electron-impact excitation and dielectronic recombination cross sections of heliumlike transition-metal ions Ti 20+ through CO 25+ . A discussion of radiative lifetime measurements of metastable levels in heliumlike ions is given to illustrate the time-resolved spectroscopy techniques in the microsecond range. The authors also present a measurement of the spectral lineshape that illustrates the very low ion temperatures that can be achieved in an EBIT

  8. The XRS microcalorimeter spectrometer at the Livermore Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, F S; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Gygax, J; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C A; Magee, E; Thorn, D B

    2007-08-22

    NASA's X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) microcalorimeter instrument has been operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since July of 2000. The spectrometer is currently undergoing its third major upgrade to become an easy to use, extremely high performance instrument for a broad range of EBIT experiments. The spectrometer itself is broadband, capable of simultaneously operating from 0.1 to 12 keV and has been operated at up to 100 keV by manipulating its operating conditions. The spectral resolution closely follows the spaceflight version of the XRS, beginning at 10 eV FWHM at 6 keV in 2000, upgraded to 5.5 eV in 2003, and will hopefully be {approx}3.8 eV in the Fall of 2007. Here we review the operating principles of this unique instrument, the extraordinary science that has been performed at EBIT over the last 6 years, and prospects for future upgrades. Specifically we discuss upgrades to cover the high-energy band (to at least 100 keV) with a high quantum efficiency detector, and prospects for using a new superconducting detector to reach 0.8 eV resolution at 1 keV, and 2 eV at 6 keV with high counting rates.

  9. Routine environmental audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (SNL/CA). During this audit the activities the Audit Team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from preview audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of California regulators, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from February 22 through March 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The audit's functional scope was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management and a programmatic evaluation of NEPA and inactive waste sites

  10. Plasma experiments with 1.06-μm lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.; Holzrichter, J.F.; Manes, K.R.; Storm, E.K.; Boyle, M.J.; Brooks, K.M.; Haas, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Rupert, V.C.

    1976-01-01

    Recent laser fusion experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have provided basic data concerning: laser beam propagation and absorption in high temperature plasmas, electron energy transport processes that transfer the absorbed laser energy to the high-density ablation region, the general fluid dynamic expansion and compression of the heated plasma, and the processes responsible for the production of 14-MeV neutrons during implosion experiments. Irradiation experiments were performed with Nd:YAG glass laser systems: the two-beam Janus (less than or equal to40 J/100 ps, approx.0.4 TW) and Argus (less than or equal to140 J, 35 ps, approx.4 TW), and the single beam Cyclops (less than or equal to70 J/100 ps, approx.0.7 TW). Two classes of targets have been used: glass microshells (approx.40 to 120 μm in diameter with approx.0.75-μm-thick walls) filled with an equimolar deuterium-tritium mixture, and disks (approx.160 to 600 μm in diameter and approx. 10 μm thick) of several compositions. The targets were supported in vacuum (pressure less than or equal to10 -5 Torr) by thin glass stalks. This paper reports on results related to the propagation, absorption, and scattering of laser light by both spherical and planar targets

  11. Routine environmental audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (SNL/CA). During this audit the activities the Audit Team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from preview audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of California regulators, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from February 22 through March 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The audit`s functional scope was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management and a programmatic evaluation of NEPA and inactive waste sites.

  12. Estimating The Reliability of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Flash X-ray (FXR) Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, M M; Kihara, R; Zentler, J M; Kreitzer, B R; DeHope, W J

    2007-01-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), our flash X-ray accelerator (FXR) is used on multi-million dollar hydrodynamic experiments. Because of the importance of the radiographs, FXR must be ultra-reliable. Flash linear accelerators that can generate a 3 kA beam at 18 MeV are very complex. They have thousands, if not millions, of critical components that could prevent the machine from performing correctly. For the last five years, we have quantified and are tracking component failures. From this data, we have determined that the reliability of the high-voltage gas-switches that initiate the pulses, which drive the accelerator cells, dominates the statistics. The failure mode is a single-switch pre-fire that reduces the energy of the beam and degrades the X-ray spot-size. The unfortunate result is a lower resolution radiograph. FXR is a production machine that allows only a modest number of pulses for testing. Therefore, reliability switch testing that requires thousands of shots is performed on our test stand. Study of representative switches has produced pre-fire statistical information and probability distribution curves. This information is applied to FXR to develop test procedures and determine individual switch reliability using a minimal number of accelerator pulses

  13. Cost-benefit analysis for waste segregation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a cost-benefit analysis for the segregation of mixed, hazardous, and nonhazardous wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The cost-benefit analysis was conducted to determine if current waste segregation practices and additional candidates for waste segregation at LLNL might have the potential for significant waste source reduction and annual savings in treatment and disposal costs. In the following cost-benefit analysis, capital costs and recurring costs of waste segregation practices are compared to the economic benefits of savings in treatment and disposal costs. Indirect or overhead costs associated with these wastes are not available and have not been included. Not considered are additional benefits of waste segregation such as decreased potential for liability to LLNL for adverse environmental effects, improved worker safety, and enhanced LLNL image within the community because of environmental improvement. The economic evaluations in this report are presented on a Lab-wide basis. All hazardous wastes generated by a program are turned over to the Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) group, which is responsible for the storage, treatment, or disposal of these wastes and funded funded directly for this work

  14. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, A; Dreicer, M; Essner, J; Gaffney, A; Reed, J; Williams, R

    2009-11-16

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  15. Building an internet-based workflow system - the case of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, C. W., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` Zephyr System provides a showcase for the ways in which emerging technologies can help streamline procurement processes and improve the coordination between participants in engineering projects by allowing collaboration in ways that have not been possible before. The project also shows the success of a highly pragmatic approach that was initiated by the end user community, and that intentionally covered standard situations, rather than aiming at also automating the exceptions. By helping push purchasing responsibilities down to the end user, thereby greatly reducing the involvement of the purchasing department in operational activities, it was possible to streamline the process significantly resulting in time savings of up to 90%, major cost reductions, and improved quality. Left with less day-to- day purchasing operations, the purchasing department has more time for strategic tasks such as selecting and pre-qualifying new suppliers, negotiating blanket orders, or implementing new procurement systems. The case shows once more that the use of information technologies can result in major benefits when aligned with organizational adjustments.

  16. Final Safety Analysis Document for Building 693 Chemical Waste Storage Building at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, R.J.; Lane, S.

    1992-02-01

    This Safety Analysis Document (SAD) for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Building 693, Chemical Waste Storage Building (desipated as Building 693 Container Storage Unit in the Laboratory's RCRA Part B permit application), provides the necessary information and analyses to conclude that Building 693 can be operated at low risk without unduly endangering the safety of the building operating personnel or adversely affecting the public or the environment. This Building 693 SAD consists of eight sections and supporting appendices. Section 1 presents a summary of the facility designs and operations and Section 2 summarizes the safety analysis method and results. Section 3 describes the site, the facility desip, operations and management structure. Sections 4 and 5 present the safety analysis and operational safety requirements (OSRs). Section 6 reviews Hazardous Waste Management's (HWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program. Section 7 lists the references and background material used in the preparation of this report Section 8 lists acronyms, abbreviations and symbols. Appendices contain supporting analyses, definitions, and descriptions that are referenced in the body of this report

  17. Environmental assessment for the electric utility system distribution, replacements and upgrades at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the environmental effects resulting from the distribution of new electrical service, replacement of inadequate or aging equipment, and upgrade of the existing electrical utility system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The projects assessed herein do not impact cultural or historic resources, sensitive habitats or wetlands and are not a source of air emissions. The potential environmental effects that do result from the action are fugitive dust and noise from construction and the disposal of potentially contaminated soil removed from certain limited areas of the LLNL site as a result of trenching for underground transmission lines. The actions described in this assessment represent an improved safety and reliability to the existing utility system. Inherent in the increased reliability and upgrades is a net increase in electrical capacity, with future expansion reserve. As with any electrical device, the electrical utility system has associated electric and magnetic fields that present a potential source of personnel exposure. The potential is not increased, however, beyond that which already exists for the present electrical utility system

  18. On-line monitoring of toxic materials in sewage at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong, M.; Cate, J.L. Jr.; Rueppel, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for industry to prevent releases of potentially toxic material to the environment. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has developed a system to monitor its sewage effluent on a continuous basis. A representative fraction of the total waste stream leaving the Plant is passed through a detection assembly consisting of an x-ray fluorescence unit which detects high levels of metals, sodium iodide crystal detectors that scan the sewage for the presence of elevated levels of radiation, and an industrial probe for pH monitoring. With the aid of a microprocessor, the data collected is reduced and analyzed to determine whether levels are approaching established environmental limits. Currently, if preset pH or radiation levels are exceeded, a sample of the suspect sewage is automatically collected for further analysis, and an alarm is sent to a station where personnel can be alerted to respond on a 24-hour basis. In the same manner, spectral data from the x-ray fluorescence unit will be routed through the 24-hour alarm system as soon as evaluation of the unit is complete. The design of the system and operational experience is discussed

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

    1981-08-21

    The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

  20. Workplace investigation of increased diagnosis of malignant melanoma among employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, D.H. II; Patterson, H.W.; Hatch, F.; Discher, D.; Schneider, J.S.; Bennett, D.

    1994-08-01

    Based on rates for the surrounding communities, the diagnosis rate of malignant melanoma for employees of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 1972 to 1977 was three to four times higher than expected. In 1984 Austin and Reynolds concluded, as a result of a case-control study, that five occupational factors were {open_quotes}causally associated{close_quotes} with melanoma risk at LLNL. These factors were: (1) exposure to radioactive materials, (2) work at Site 300, (3) exposure to volatile photographic chemicals, (4) presence at the Pacific Test Site, and (5) chemist duties. Subsequent reviews of the Austin and Reynolds report concluded that the methods used were appropriate and correctly carried out. These reports did determine, however, that Austin and Reynolds` conclusion concerning a causal relationship between occupational factors and melanoma among employees was overstated. There is essentially no supporting evidence linking the occupational factors with melanoma from animal studies or human epidemiology. Our report summarizes the results of further investigation of potential occupational factors.

  1. Assessment and cleanup of the Taxi Strip waste storage area at LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerer, A.

    1983-01-01

    In September 1982 the Hazards Control Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a final radiological survey of a former low-level radioactive waste storage area called the Taxi Strip so that the area could be released for construction of an office building. Collection of soil samples at the location of a proposed sewer line led to the discovery of an old disposal pit containing soil contaminated with low-level radioactive waste and organic solvents. The Taxi Strip area was excavated leading to the discovery of three additional small pits. The clean-up of Pit No. 1 is considered to be complete for radioactive contamination. The results from the chlorinated solvent analysis of the borehole samples and the limited number of samples analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry indicate that solvent clean-up at this pit is complete. This is being verified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of a few additional soil samples from the bottom sides and ends of the pit. As a precaution, samples are also being analyzed for metals to determine if further excavation is necessary. Clean-up of Pits No. 2 and No. 3 is considered to be complete for radioactive and solvent contamination. Results of analysis for metals will determine if excavation is complete. Excavation of Pit No. 4 which resulted from surface leakage of radioactive contamination from an evaporation tray is complete

  2. HIGH ENERGY, HIGH BRIGHTNESS X-RAYS PRODUCED BY COMPTON BACKSCATTERING AT THE LIVERMORE PLEIADES FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremaine, A M; Anderson, S G; Betts, S; Crane, J; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Jacob, J S; Frigola, P; Lim, J; Rosenzweig, J; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser Electron Interaction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures) produces tunable 30-140 keV x-rays with 0.3-5 ps pulse lengths and up to 10 7 photons/pulse by colliding a high brightness electron beam with a high power laser. The electron beam is created by an rf photo-injector system, accelerated by a 120 MeV linac, and focused to 20 (micro)m with novel permanent magnet quadrupoles. To produce Compton back scattered x-rays, the electron bunch is overlapped with a Ti:Sapphire laser that delivers 500 mJ, 100 fs, pulses to the interaction point. K-edge radiography at 115 keV on Uranium has verified the angle correlated energy spectrum inherent in Compton scattering and high-energy tunability of the Livermore source. Current upgrades to the facility will allow laser pumping of targets synchronized to the x-ray source enabling dynamic diffraction and time-resolved studies of high Z materials. Near future plans include extending the radiation energies to >400 keV, allowing for nuclear fluorescence studies of materials

  3. Update of Earthquake Strong-Motion Instrumentation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Robert C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Following the January 1980 earthquake that was felt at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a network of strong-motion accelerographs was installed at LLNL. Prior to the 1980 earthquake, there were no accelerographs installed. The ground motion from the 1980 earthquake was estimated from USGS instruments around the Laboratory to be between 0.2 – 0.3 g horizontal peak ground acceleration. These instruments were located at the Veterans Hospital, 5 miles southwest of LLNL, and in San Ramon, about 12 miles west of LLNL. In 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) requested to know the status of our seismic instruments. We conducted a survey of our instrumentation systems and responded to DOE in a letter. During this survey, it was found that the recorders in Buildings 111 and 332 were not operational. The instruments on Nova had been removed, and only three of the 10 NIF instruments installed in 2005 were operational (two were damaged and five had been removed from operation at the request of the program). After the survey, it was clear that the site seismic instrumentation had degraded substantially and would benefit from an overhaul and more attention to ongoing maintenance. LLNL management decided to update the LLNL seismic instrumentation system. The updated system is documented in this report.

  4. Summary Report of Summer 2009 NGSI Human Capital Development Efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, A.; Dreicer, M.; Essner, J.; Gaffney, A.; Reed, J.; Williams, R.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engaged in several activities to support NA-24's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI). This report outlines LLNL's efforts to support Human Capital Development (HCD), one of five key components of NGSI managed by Dunbar Lockwood in the Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243). There were five main LLNL summer safeguards HCD efforts sponsored by NGSI: (1) A joint Monterey Institute of International Studies/Center for Nonproliferation Studies-LLNL International Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis Course; (2) A Summer Safeguards Policy Internship Program at LLNL; (3) A Training in Environmental Sample Analysis for IAEA Safeguards Internship; (4) Safeguards Technology Internships; and (5) A joint LLNL-INL Summer Safeguards Lecture Series. In this report, we provide an overview of these five initiatives, an analysis of lessons learned, an update on the NGSI FY09 post-doc, and an update on students who participated in previous NGSI-sponsored LLNL safeguards HCD efforts.

  5. Mixed waste study, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This document addresses the generation and storage of mixed waste at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from 1984 to 1990. Additionally, an estimate of remaining storage capacity based on the current inventory of low-level mixed waste and an approximation of current generation rates is provided. Section 2 of this study presents a narrative description of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE) requirements as they apply to mixed waste in storage at LLNL's Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. Based on information collected from the HWM non-TRU radioactive waste database, Section 3 presents a data consolidation -- by year of storage, location, LLNL generator, EPA code, and DHS code -- of the quantities of low-level mixed waste in storage. Related figures provide the distribution of mixed waste according to each of these variables. A historical review follows in Section 4. The trends in type and quantity of mixed waste managed by HWM during the past five years are delineated and graphically illustrated. Section 5 provides an estimate of remaining low-level mixed waste storage capacity at HWM. The estimate of remaining mixed waste storage capacity is based on operational storage capacity of HWM facilities and the volume of all waste currently in storage. An estimate of the time remaining to reach maximum storage capacity is based on waste generation rates inferred from the HWM database and recent HWM documents. 14 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs

  6. Financial security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goede, M.; Burgess, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    1. Introduction J. Peter Burgess Part 1: New Security Concepts 2. Civilizational Security Brett Bowden 3. Risk Oliver Kessler 4. Small Arms Keith Krause 5. Critical Human Security Taylor Owen 6. Critical Geopolitics Simon Dalby Part 2: New Security Subjects 7. Biopolitics Michael Dillon 8. Gendered

  7. Cyber security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering topics related to cyber security metrics and measure  and related technologies that meet security needs. Specific applications to web services, the banking and the finance sector, and industrial process control systems are discussed.

  8. Results of Surveys for Special Status Reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woollett, J J

    2008-09-18

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a live-trapping and visual surveys for special status reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The survey was conducted under the authority of the Federal recovery permit of Swaim Biological Consulting (PRT-815537) and a Memorandum of Understanding issued from the California Department of Fish and Game. Site 300 is located between Livermore and Tracy just north of Tesla road (Alameda County) and Corral Hollow Road (San Joaquin County) and straddles the Alameda and San Joaquin County line (Figures 1 and 2). It encompasses portions of the USGS 7.5 minute Midway and Tracy quadrangles (Figure 2). Focused surveys were conducted for four special status reptiles including the Alameda whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus), the San Joaquin Whipsnake (Masticophis Hagellum ruddock), the silvery legless lizard (Anniella pulchra pulchra), and the California horned lizard (Phrynosoma coronanum frontale).

  9. ENDL-84. The Evaluated Nuclear Data Library of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the ENDF-5 format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.; McLaughlin, P.K.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1990-09-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the evaluated nuclear data library (ENDL) by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA, converted to ENDF-5 format. The library contains evaluated data for all significant neutron reactions in the energy range from 10 -4 eV to 20 MeV for 94 elements or isotopes. The entire library or selective retrievals from it can be obtained on magnetic tape, free of charge, from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  10. A case-control study of malignant melanoma among Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employees: A critical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupper, L.L.; Setzer, R.W.; Schwartzbaum, J.; Janis, J.

    1987-07-01

    This document reports on a reevaluation of data obtained in a previous report on occupational factors associated with the development of malignant melanomas at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current report reduces the number of these factors from five to three based on a rigorous statistical analysis of the original data. Recommendations include restructuring the original questionnaire and trying to contact more individuals that worked with volatile photographic chemicals. 17 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs. (TEM)

  11. A case-control study of malignant melanoma among Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employees: A critical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupper, L.L.; Setzer, R.W.; Schwartzbaum, J.; Janis, J.

    1987-01-01

    This document reports on a reevaluation of data obtained in a previous report on occupational factors associated with the development of malignant melanomas at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current report reduces the number of these factors from five to three based on a rigorous statistical analysis of the original data. Recommendations include restructuring the original questionnaire and trying to contact more individuals that worked with volatile photographic chemicals. 17 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site, Site 300, Biological Review, January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Lisa E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Woollett, Jim S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) is required to conduct an ecological review at least every five years to ensure that biological and contaminant conditions in areas undergoing remediation have not changed such that existing conditions pose an ecological hazard (Dibley et al. 2009a). This biological review is being prepared by the Natural Resources Team within LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area (EFA) to support the 2013 five-year ecological review.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore Environmental Protection Implementation Plan for the period November 9, 1991--November 9, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, as part of the DOE complex, is committed to full compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations. This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL, Livermore. The EPIP will serve as an aid to management and staff to implement these new programs in a timely manner. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Application of the reliability theory on the analysis of the effects of sbwr' main control console maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widagdo, S.

    1997-01-01

    Maintenance activities on the main control console, which is a primary element of the man-machine interface system, are a source of concern. this concern has been arisen since the main control function is the central part to observe and control the reactor operation. the paper will discuss a study of the effects of main control console maintenance activity upon the operability of SBWR. the first step is learning the SBWR main control room design in order to know its monitoring and controlling capability and then makes an assumption of maintenance requirement followed by an evaluation of the effects of the maintenance activity. it is assumed that 2 years or equivalent to 17.520 hours are the reference time for one cycle operation of SBWR. the aim is to identify any adverse effects and eliminate or minimize them through design improvements. the evaluation method used here is the reability theory R(t) = e sup-λt. Based on the result of the evaluation can be concluded that there are no negative effects of maintenance activity upon the operability of the SBWR

  16. Cultural adaptation to Brazilian Portuguese of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr scale of pain assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Aparecida Bussotti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to perform the translation into Brazilian Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr scale, with children under 18 years old, affected by cerebral palsy, presenting or not cognitive impairment and unable to report their pain.Method: methodological development study of translation into Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. After approval by the ethics committee, the process aimed at translation and back-translation, evaluation of translation and back-translation using the Delphi technique and assessment of cultural equivalence. The process included the five categories of the scale and the four application instructions, considering levels of agreement equal to or greater than 80%.Results: it was necessary three rounds of the Delphi technique to achieve consensus among experts. The agreement achieved for the five categories was: Face 95.5%, Legs 90%, Activity 94.4%, Cry 94.4% and Consolability 99.4%. The four instructions achieved the following consensus levels: 1st 99.1%, 2nd 99.2%, 3rd 99.1% and 4th 98.3%.Conclusion: the method enabled the translation and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. This is a study able to expand the knowledge of Brazilian professionals on pain assessment in children with CP

  17. Security negotiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović, Miroslav M.; Ivaniš, Željko

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary security challenges, risks and threats represent a resultant of the achieved level of interaction between various entities within the paradigm of global security relations. Asymmetry and nonlinearity are main features of contemporary challenges in the field of global security. Negotiation in the area of security, namely the security negotiation, thus goes beyond just the domain of negotiation in conflicts and takes into consideration particularly asymmetric forms of possible sour...

  18. Low-Level Plutonium Bioassay Measurements at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T; Brown, T; Hickman, D; Marchetti, A; Williams, R; Kehl, S

    2007-06-18

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) are important alpha emitting radionuclides contained in radioactive debris from nuclear weapons testing. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu are long-lived radionuclides with half-lives of 24,400 years and 6580 years, respectively. Concerns over human exposure to plutonium stem from knowledge about the persistence of plutonium isotopes in the environment and the high relative effectiveness of alpha-radiation to cause potential harm to cells once incorporated into the human body. In vitro bioassay tests have been developed to assess uptakes of plutonium based on measured urinary excretion patterns and modeled metabolic behaviors of the absorbed radionuclides. Systemic plutonium absorbed by the deep lung or from the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion is either excreted or distributed to other organs, primarily to the liver and skeleton, where it is retained for biological half-times of around 20 and 50 years, respectively. Dose assessment and atoll rehabilitation programs in the Marshall Islands have historically given special consideration to residual concentrations of plutonium in the environment even though the predicted dose from inhalation and/or ingestion of plutonium accounts for less than 5% of the annual effective dose from exposure to fallout contamination. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a state-of-the-art bioassay test to assess urinary excretion rates of plutonium from Marshallese populations. This new heavy-isotope measurement system is based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The AMS system at LLNL far exceeds the standard measurement requirements established under the latest United States Department of Energy (DOE) regulation, 10CFR 835, for occupational monitoring of plutonium, and offers several advantages over classical as well as competing new technologies for low-level detection and measurement of plutonium isotopes. The United States

  19. User Interface Program for secure electronic tags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Y.; Koehl, E.R.; Carlson, R.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents the efforts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in developing a secure tag communication user interface program comprising a tag monitor and a communication tool. This program can perform the same functions as the software that was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but it is enhanced with a user-friendly screen. It represents the first step in updating the TRANSCOM Tracking System (TRANSCOM) by incorporating a tag communication screen menu into the main menu of the TRANSCOM user program. A working version of TRANSCOM, enhanced with ANL secure-tag graphics, will strongly support the Department of Energy Warhead Dismantlement/Special Nuclear Materials Control initiatives. It will allow commercial satellite tracking of the movements and operational activities of treaty-limited items and transportation vehicles throughout Europe and the former USSR, as well as the continental US

  20. Security Expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    systematic study of security expertise and opens up a productive dialogue between science and technology studies and security studies to investigate the character and consequences of this expertise. In security theory, the study of expertise is crucial to understanding whose knowledge informs security making......This volume brings together scholars from different fields to explore the power, consequences and everyday practices of security expertise. Expertise mediates between different forms of knowledge: scientific and technological, legal, economic and political knowledge. This book offers the first...... and to reflect on the impact and responsibility of security analysis. In science and technology studies, the study of security politics adds a challenging new case to the agenda of research on expertise and policy. The contributors investigate cases such as academic security studies, security think tanks...

  1. Chemical health risk assessment for hazardous and mixed waste management units at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operates three Hazardous Waste Management Facilities with 24 associated waste management units for the treatment and storage of hazardous and mixed wastes. These wastes are generated by research programs and support operations. The storage and treatment units are presently operated under interim status in accordance with the requirements of the US Envirorunental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), a division of the California Envirorunental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA). As required by the California Hazardous Waste Control Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), LLNL ha s applied for a Part B permit to continue operating the storage and waste treatment facilities. As part of this permitting process, LLNL is required to conduct a health risk assessment (HRA) to examine the potential health impacts to the surrounding community from continued storage and treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes. analysis document presents the results of this risk assessment. An analysis of maximum credible chemical accidents is also included in Section 7.0. This HRA was prepared in accordance with procedures set forth by the California Air Pollution Control Officers Association (CAPCOA) ''Air Toxics Assessment Manual,'' CAPCOA guidelines for preparing risk assessments under the Air Toxic ''Hot Spots'' Act (AB 2588) and requirements of the US EPA. By following these procedures, this risk assessment presents a conservative analysis of a hypothetical Maximally Exposed Individual (MEI) using many worst-case assumptions that will not apply to an actual individual. As such, the risk estimates presented should be regarded as a worst-case estimate of any actual risk that may be present

  2. Geomechanical Simulations of CO2 Storage Integrity using the Livermore Distinct Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J P; Johnson, S M; Friedmann, S J

    2008-07-11

    Large-scale carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects involving annual injections of millions of tons of CO{sub 2} are a key infrastructural element needed to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The large rate and volume of injection will induce pressure and stress gradients within the formation that could activate existing fractures and faults, or drive new fractures through the caprock. We will present results of an ongoing investigation to identify conditions that will activate existing fractures/faults or make new fractures within the caprock using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC is a multiphysics code, developed at LLNL, capable of simulating dynamic fracture of rock masses under a range of conditions. As part of a recent project, LDEC has been extended to consider fault activation and dynamic fracture of rock masses due to pressurization of the pore-space. We will present several demonstrations of LDEC functionality and applications of LDEC to CO{sub 2} injection scenarios including injection into an extensively fractured rockmass. These examples highlight the advantages of explicitly including the geomechanical response of each interface within the rockmass. We present results from our investigations of Teapot Dome using LDEC to study the potential for fault activation during injection. Using this approach, we built finite element models of the rock masses surrounding bounding faults and explicitly simulated the compression and shear on the fault interface. A CO{sub 2} injection source was introduced and the area of fault activation was predicted as a function of injection rate. This work presents an approach where the interactions of all locations on the fault are considered in response to specific injection scenarios. For example, with LDEC, as regions of the fault fail, the shear load is taken up elsewhere on the fault. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies of Teapot Dome and indicate

  3. Geomechanical Simulations of Caprock Integrity Using the Livermore Distinict Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S; Friedmann, S J

    2008-04-17

    Large-scale carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects involving annual injections of millions of tons of CO2 are a key infrastructural element needed to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The large rate and volume of injection will induce pressure and stress gradients within the formation that could activate existing fractures and faults, or drive new fractures through the caprock. We will present results of an ongoing investigation to identify conditions that will activate existing fractures/faults or make new fractures within the caprock using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC is a multiphysics code, developed at LLNL, capable of simulating dynamic fracture of rock masses under a range of conditions. As part of a recent project, LDEC has been extended to consider fault activation and dynamic fracture of rock masses due to pressurization of the pore-space. We will present several demonstrations of LDEC functionality and an application of LDEC to a CO2 injection scenario. We present results from our investigations of Teapot Dome using LDEC to study the potential for fault activation during injection. Using this approach, we built finite element models of the rock masses surrounding bounding faults and explicitly simulated the compression and shear on the fault interface. A CO2 injection source was introduced and the area of fault activation was predicted as a function of injection rate. This work presents an approach where the interactions of all locations on the fault are considered in response to specific injection scenarios. For example, with LDEC, as regions of the fault fail, the shear load is taken up elsewhere on the fault. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies of Teapot Dome and indicate significantly elevated pore pressures are required to activate the bounding faults, given the assumed in situ stress state on the faults.

  4. Potential for saturated ground-water system contamination at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, R.; Ruggieri, M.R.; Rogers, L.L.; Emerson, D.O.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    A program of hydrogeologic investigation has been carried out to determine the likelihood of contaminant movement to the saturated zone from near the ground surface at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A companion survey of potential contaminant sources was also conducted at the LLNL. Water samples from selected LLNL wells were analyzed to test the water quality in the uppermost part of the saturated zone, which is from 14 to 48 m (45 to 158 ft) beneath the surface. Only nitrate and tritium were found in concentrations above natural background. In one well, the nitrate was slightly more concentrated than the drinking water limit. The nitrate source has not been found. The tritium in all ground-water samples from wells was found far less concentrated than the drinking water limit. The extent of infiltration of surface water was traced with environmental tritium. The thickness and stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone beneath the LLNL, and nearby area, was determined with specially constructed wells and boreholes. Well hydrograph analysis indicated where infiltration of surface water reached the saturated ground-water system. The investigation indicates that water infiltrating from the surface, through alluvial deposits, reaches the saturated zone along the course of Arroyo Seco, Arroyo Las Positas, and from the depression near the center of the site where seasonal water accumulates. Several potential contaminant sources were identified, and it is likely that contaminants could move from near the ground surface to the saturated zone beneath LLNL. Additional ground-water sampling and analysis will be performed and ongoing investigations will provide estimates of the speed with which potential contaminants can flow laterally in the saturated zone beneath LLNL. 34 references, 61 figures, 16 tables

  5. Regional seismic observations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment at the Livermore NTS Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, W.R.; Mayeda, K.; Patton, H.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), a 1-kiloton chemical explosion in N-tunnel at Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), was recorded by the four station, regional seismic Livermore NTS Network, (LNN). In this study we compare the NPE`s seismic yield, frequency content, and discrimination performance with other NTS events recorded at LNN. Preliminary findings include: The NPE LNN average magnitudes are 4.16 for m{sub b}(P{sub n}) and 4.59 for m{sub b}(L{sub g}). Using published magnitude-yield relations gives nuclear equivalent yields of 2.3 and 2.2 kilotons respectively, implying enhanced coupling of chemical relative to nuclear explosions. A comparison of the NPE seismograms with those with similar magnitude N-tunnel nuclear explosions shows remarkable similarity over the frequency band 0.5 to 5.0 Hz. Outside this band the explosions show more variability, with the NPE having the least relative energy below 0.5 Hz and the most energy above 5 Hz when scaled by magnitude. Considering the variability within the N-tunnel nuclear explosions, these low- and high-frequency NPE-nuclear differences may not reflect chemical-nuclear source differences. The NPE was compared to a large number of NTS nuclear explosions and earthquakes as part of an ongoing short-period discrimination study of P{sub N}/L{sub g},P{sub g}/L{sub g}, and spectral ratios in the P{sub n}, P{sub g},L{sub g}, and coda phases. For these discriminants, the NPE looks very similar to N-tunnel nuclear explosions and other NTS nuclear explosions, implying seismic identification of contained, non-ripple-fired, chemical explosions as non-nuclear may not be possible. However, such blasts might serve as surrogate nuclear explosions when calibrating seismic discriminants in regions where nuclear testing has not occurred.

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2016 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gard, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sketchley, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Watkins, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The LDRD annual report for FY2016 consists of two parts: The Overview. This section contains a broad description of the LDRD Program, highlights of recent accomplishments and awards, Program statistics, and the LDRD portfolio-management processes. Project Reports. Project reports are submitted by all principal investigators at the end of the fiscal year. The length and depth of the report depends on the project’s lifecycle. For projects that will be continuing the following year, the principal investigator submits a continuing project report, which is a brief update containing descriptions of the goals, scope, motivation, relevance (to DOE/NNSA and Livermore mission areas), and technical progress achieved in FY16, as well as a list of selected publications and presentations that resulted from the research. For projects that concluded in FY16, a more detailed final report is provided that is technical in nature and includes the background, objectives, scientific approach, accomplishments, and impacts on the Laboratory missions, as well as a list of publications and presentations that resulted from the research. Project reports are listed under their research topics and organized by year and type, such as exploratory research (ER), feasibility study (FS), laboratory-wide competition (LW), and strategic initiative (SI). Each project is assigned a unique tracking code, an identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year in which the project began, the second represents the project type, and the third identifies the serial number of the project for that fiscal year. For example, 16-ERD-100 means the project is an exploratory research project that began in FY16. The three-digit number (100) represents the serial number for the project.

  7. Federal enclaves: The community culture of Department of Energy cities Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick Kerry

    During the Second World War, the United States Government funded the research of nuclear fusion to create the first atomic weapons. To accomplish this task, the Manhattan Engineering District recruited scientists and engineers to remote sites in New Mexico, Tennessee, and Washington. During the five decades of the Cold War, the congressionally created Atomic Energy Commission, and later the Department of Energy (DOE), funded and operated numerous facilities throughout the United States. The mission of the facilities was to design and stockpile atomic weapons and to further the understanding of nuclear energy. This dissertation examines the influences of the United States federal government on three communities associated with these facilities, Los Alamos, New Mexico, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Livermore, California. As isolated secret cities, these environments each created complex community structures. This work identifies how, unlike other community settings, the influences of the federal government, both directly and indirectly, created distinctive patterns of behavior within the residents of each city. Examining these behaviors within the framework of the dissertation's chapters provides the necessary context to understand fully the community culture of these Department of Energy cities. This work addresses contemporary community settings in new ways. It approaches the topic broadly by examining five specific areas of community interaction: social, political, business and economic, educational, and ethical. Through the use of oral history methodology and techniques, the researcher captured significant information from respondents. This approach provides valuable insights to the behavior and interaction of the individual populations while revealing important insights all aspects of each town's community culture.

  8. A demonstration of a low cost approach to security at shipping facilities and ports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Robert C.; Al Akkoumi, Mouhammad K.; Herath, Ruchira W.; Sluss, James J., Jr.; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Landers, Thomas L.

    2010-04-01

    Government funding for the security at shipping facilities and ports is limited so there is a need for low cost scalable security systems. With over 20 million sea, truck, and rail containers entering the United States every year, these facilities pose a large risk to security. Securing these facilities and monitoring the variety of traffic that enter and leave is a major task. To accomplish this, the authors have developed and fielded a low cost fully distributed building block approach to port security at the inland Port of Catoosa in Oklahoma. Based on prior work accomplished in the design and fielding of an intelligent transportation system in the United States, functional building blocks, (e.g. Network, Camera, Sensor, Display, and Operator Console blocks) can be assembled, mixed and matched, and scaled to provide a comprehensive security system. The following functions are demonstrated and scaled through analysis and demonstration: Barge tracking, credential checking, container inventory, vehicle tracking, and situational awareness. The concept behind this research is "any operator on any console can control any device at any time."

  9. Watermarking security

    CERN Document Server

    Bas, Patrick; Cayre, François; Doërr, Gwenaël; Mathon, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This book explains how to measure the security of a watermarking scheme, how to design secure schemes but also how to attack popular watermarking schemes. This book gathers the most recent achievements in the field of watermarking security by considering both parts of this cat and mouse game. This book is useful to industrial practitioners who would like to increase the security of their watermarking applications and for academics to quickly master this fascinating domain.

  10. Security Locks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    According to a 2008 "Year in Review" report by Educational Security Incidents, an online repository that collects data on higher education security issues, the total number of security incidents reported at universities and colleges worldwide rose to 173 in 2008, a 24.5 percent increase over 2007. The number of institutions…

  11. Application of a new MR Microscope using an Independent Console System (MRMICS) for biological tissues in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Naotaka; Kose, Katsumi

    1999-01-01

    We studied microscopic MR images of the normal appendix in vitro using a new MR microscope system: MR Microscope using an Independent Console System (MRMICS). The MRMICS was placed in the clinical MR room, and the probe box was fixed on the bed of the 1.5 T clinical MR machine. T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted images were obtained using spin echo sequences with an in-plane pixel size of 100 x 100 μm. Zonal structures of the appendix were clearly demonstrated with different contrast by different sequences. Therefore, the MRMICS is a useful add-on system for investigating microscopic MR images of biological tissues in vitro. (author)

  12. Application of a new MR Microscope using an Independent Console System (MRMICS) for biological tissues in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Naotaka; Kose, Katsumi

    1999-02-01

    We studied microscopic MR images of the normal appendix in vitro using a new MR microscope system: MR Microscope using an Independent Console System (MRMICS). The MRMICS was placed in the clinical MR room, and the probe box was fixed on the bed of the 1.5 T clinical MR machine. T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted images were obtained using spin echo sequences with an in-plane pixel size of 100 x 100 {mu}m. Zonal structures of the appendix were clearly demonstrated with different contrast by different sequences. Therefore, the MRMICS is a useful add-on system for investigating microscopic MR images of biological tissues in vitro. (author)

  13. A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important

  14. A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important

  15. An Overview of the Target Fabrication Operations at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibbard, R L; Bono, M J

    2005-01-01

    The Target Engineering team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) builds precision laser targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the Omega Laser in Rochester, NY, and other experimental facilities. The physics requirements demand precision in these targets, which creates a constant need for innovative manufacturing processes. As experimental diagnostics improve, there is greater demand for precision in fabrication, assembly, metrology, and documentation of as-built targets. The team specializes in meso-scale fabrication with core competencies in diamond turning, assembly, and metrology. Figure 1 shows a typical diamond turning center. The team builds over 200 laser targets per year in batches of five to fifteen targets. Thus, all are small-lot custom builds, and most are novel designs requiring engineering and process development. Component materials are metals, polymers and low density aerogel foams. Custom fixturing is used to locate parts on the Diamond Turning Machines (DTM) and assembly stations. This ensures parts can be repeatably located during manufacturing operations. Most target builds involve a series of fabricating one surface with features and then relocating the components on another fixture to finish the opposite side of the component. These components are then assembled to complete multiple-component targets. These targets are typically built one at a time. Cost and efficiency are issues with production of targets, and the team is developing batch processing techniques to meet precision target specifications and cost goals. Three example target builds will highlight some of the fabrication and material issues faced at LLNL. A low temperature Rayleigh Taylor target shows how multiple precision targets can be fabricated out of a single large disk. The ignition double shell targets highlight the required manufacturing complexity. A low density aerogel target highlights some material handling and assembly issues. The metrology

  16. The copper-pumped dye laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackel, R.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program has developed a high-average-power, pulsed, tunable, visible laser system. Testing of this hardware is in progress at industrial scale. The LLNL copper-dye laser system is prototypical of a basic module of a uranium-AVLIS plant. The laser demonstration facility (LDF) system consists of copper vapor lasers arranged in oscillator-amplifier chains providing optical pump power to dye-laser master-oscillator-power-amplifier chains. This system is capable of thousands of watts (average) tunable between 550 and 650 mm. The copper laser system at LLNL consists of 12 chains operating continuously. The copper lasers operate at nominally 4.4 kHz, with 50 ns pulse widths and produce 20 W at near the diffraction limit from oscillators and >250 W from each amplifier. Chains consist of an oscillator and three amplifiers and produce >750 W average, with availabilities >95% (i.e., >8,300 h/y). The total copper laser system power averages ∼9,000 W and has operated at over 10,000 W for extended intervals. The 12 copper laser beams are multiplexed and delivered to the dye laser system where they pump multiple dye laser chains. Each dye chain consists of a master oscillator and three or four power amplifiers. The master oscillator operates at nominally 100 mW with a 50 MHz single mode bandwidth. Amplifiers are designed to efficiently amplify the dye beam with low ASE content and high optical quality. Sustained dye chain powers are up to 1,400 W with dye conversion efficiency >50%, ASE content <5%, and wavefront quality correctable to <λ/10 RMS, using deformable mirrors. Since the timing of the copper laser chains can be offset, the dye laser system is capable of repetition rates which are multiples of 4.4 kHz, up to 26 kHz, limited by the dye pumping system. Development of plant-scale copper and dye laser hardware is progressing in off-line facilities

  17. Determination of new European biometric equations for the calibration of in vivo lung counting systems using Livermore phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierrat, N.; Prulhiere, G.; Carlan de, L.; Franck, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In vivo lung measurement is a widely used method for nuclear workers monitoring. This technique consists of assessing retained activity in lungs after an inhalation, by means of an external direct measurement of x- or gamma rays emitted during disintegration of incorporated nuclides. This estimation is always done by comparing the measurement of the subject to the measurement obtained using a physical calibration phantom. However, due to emissions by actinides of x and γ-rays with energies below 200 keV and low emission ratio, calibration of in vivo measurement systems is very delicate, leading to important systematic errors despite the improvements realized in the design of sophisticated phantoms. Moreover, in France, calibration factors for a given subject are generally corrected thanks to biometric equations determining chest wall thickness according to weight/height ratio of the measured person. Nevertheless these equations were determined for a 2, 3 or 6 detectors system in chair geometry and for American subjects, that doesn't represent the geometry encountered in French laboratories. The work presented here is dedicated to the determination of new biometric equations more adapted to the French measurement systems using 4 germanium detectors in bed geometry with a Livermore calibration phantom. These equations were determined on the basis of computed tomography (CT) images of 33 adult males and for energies of 17 and 60 keV (respectively full absorption peaks of 239 Pu and 241 Am). These biometric equations which can be directly converted into Livermore chest thicknesses, were calculated for all kinds of Livermore phantoms: 16 mm and 19 mm torso plate (100 % muscle equivalent) and for all composition of overlay plates (100 % muscle; 50 % muscle-50 % adipose; 13 % muscle-87 % adipose). The obtained results could directly be used in the different European radiobioassay laboratories to improve the calibration of in vivo lung counting systems. (author)

  18. Augmented reality to the rescue of the minimally invasive surgeon. The usefulness of the interposition of stereoscopic images in the Da Vinci™ robotic console.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonté, Francesco; Buchs, Nicolas C; Pugin, François; Spaltenstein, Joël; Schiltz, Boris; Jung, Minoa; Hagen, Monika; Ratib, Osman; Morel, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    Computerized management of medical information and 3D imaging has become the norm in everyday medical practice. Surgeons exploit these emerging technologies and bring information previously confined to the radiology rooms into the operating theatre. The paper reports the authors' experience with integrated stereoscopic 3D-rendered images in the da Vinci surgeon console. Volume-rendered images were obtained from a standard computed tomography dataset using the OsiriX DICOM workstation. A custom OsiriX plugin was created that permitted the 3D-rendered images to be displayed in the da Vinci surgeon console and to appear stereoscopic. These rendered images were displayed in the robotic console using the TilePro multi-input display. The upper part of the screen shows the real endoscopic surgical field and the bottom shows the stereoscopic 3D-rendered images. These are controlled by a 3D joystick installed on the console, and are updated in real time. Five patients underwent a robotic augmented reality-enhanced procedure. The surgeon was able to switch between the classical endoscopic view and a combined virtual view during the procedure. Subjectively, the addition of the rendered images was considered to be an undeniable help during the dissection phase. With the rapid evolution of robotics, computer-aided surgery is receiving increasing interest. This paper details the authors' experience with 3D-rendered images projected inside the surgical console. The use of this intra-operative mixed reality technology is considered very useful by the surgeon. It has been shown that the usefulness of this technique is a step toward computer-aided surgery that will progress very quickly over the next few years. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Neutronic calculation and cross section sensitivity analysis of the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, L.P.; Price, W.G. Jr.

    1977-08-01

    The neutronic calculation for the Livermore mirror fusion/fission hybrid reactor blanket was performed using the PPPL cross section library. Significant differences were found in the tritium breeding and plutonium production in comparison to the results of the LLL calculation. The cross section sensitivity study for tritium breeding indicates that the response is sensitive to the cross section of 238 U in the neighborhood of 14 MeV and 1 MeV. The response is also sensitive to the cross sections of iron in the vicinity of 14 MeV near the first wall. Neutron transport in the resonance region is not important in this reactor model

  20. Advances in software development for intelligent interfaces for alarm and emergency management consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, M.R.; Olson, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in technology allow features like voice synthesis, voice and speech recognition, image understanding, and intelligent data base management to be incorporated in computer driven alarm and emergency management information systems. New software development environments make it possible to do rapid prototyping of custom applications. Three examples using these technologies are discussed. 1) Maximum use is made of high-speed graphics and voice synthesis to implement a state-of-the-art alarm processing and display system with features that make the operator-machine interface efficient and accurate. 2) An application generator which has the capability of ''building'' a specific alarm processing and display application in a matter of a few hours, using the site definition developed in the security planning phase to produce the custom application. 3) A software tool, is described which permits rapid prototyping of human-machine interfaces for a variety of applications including emergency management, alarm display and process information display

  1. Annual Continuation And Progress Report For Nuclear Theory At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quaglioni, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schunck, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vranas, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Nuclear Theory research under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is conducted within several funding sources and projects. These include base funding, and early career award, and a collaborative SciDAC-­3 award that is jointly funded by DOE/NP and the Advanced Simulations and Computations (ASC) effort within the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Therefore, this annual report is organized within the three primary sections covering these projects.

  2. Securing Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Sudheesh

    2013-01-01

    This book is a step-by-step tutorial filled with practical examples which will focus mainly on the key security tools and implementation techniques of Hadoop security.This book is great for Hadoop practitioners (solution architects, Hadoop administrators, developers, and Hadoop project managers) who are looking to get a good grounding in what Kerberos is all about and who wish to learn how to implement end-to-end Hadoop security within an enterprise setup. It's assumed that you will have some basic understanding of Hadoop as well as be familiar with some basic security concepts.

  3. Grid Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The aim of Grid computing is to enable the easy and open sharing of resources between large and highly distributed communities of scientists and institutes across many independent administrative domains. Convincing site security officers and computer centre managers to allow this to happen in view of today's ever-increasing Internet security problems is a major challenge. Convincing users and application developers to take security seriously is equally difficult. This paper will describe the main Grid security issues, both in terms of technology and policy, that have been tackled over recent years in LCG and related Grid projects. Achievements to date will be described and opportunities for future improvements will be addressed.

  4. A Monte Carlo Simulation of the in vivo measurement of lung activity in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory torso phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acha, Robert; Brey, Richard; Capello, Kevin

    2013-02-01

    A torso phantom was developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that serves as a standard for intercomparison and intercalibration of detector systems used to measure low-energy photons from radionuclides, such as americium deposited in the lungs. DICOM images of the second-generation Human Monitoring Laboratory-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (HML-LLNL) torso phantom were segmented and converted into three-dimensional (3D) voxel phantoms to simulate the response of high purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems, as found in the HML new lung counter using a Monte Carlo technique. The photon energies of interest in this study were 17.5, 26.4, 45.4, 59.5, 122, 244, and 344 keV. The detection efficiencies at these photon energies were predicted for different chest wall thicknesses (1.49 to 6.35 cm) and compared to measured values obtained with lungs containing (241)Am (34.8 kBq) and (152)Eu (10.4 kBq). It was observed that no statistically significant differences exist at the 95% confidence level between the mean values of simulated and measured detection efficiencies. Comparisons between the simulated and measured detection efficiencies reveal a variation of 20% at 17.5 keV and 1% at 59.5 keV. It was found that small changes in the formulation of the tissue substitute material caused no significant change in the outcome of Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Estimate of aircraft crash hit frequencies on to facilities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities are required by DOE Order 5480.23, Section 8.b.(3)(k) to consider external events as initiating events to accidents within the scope of their Safety Analysis Reports (SAR). One of the external initiating events which should be considered within the scope of a SAR is an aircraft accident, i.e., an aircraft crashing into the nuclear facility with the related impact and fire leading to penetration of the facility and to the release of radioactive and/or hazardous materials. This report presents the results of an Aircraft Crash Frequency analysis performed for the Materials Management Area (MMA), and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 200. The analysis estimates only the aircraft crash hit frequency on to the analyzed facilities. No initial aircraft crash hit frequency screening structural response calculations of the facilities to the aircraft impact, or consequence analysis of radioactive/hazardous materials released following the aircraft impact are performed. The method used to estimate the aircraft crash hit frequencies on to facilities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) generally follows the procedure given by the DOE Standard 3014-96 on Aircraft Crash Analysis. However, certain adjustments were made to the DOE Standard procedure because of the site specific fight environment or because of facility specific characteristics

  6. Advances in software development for intelligent interfaces for alarm and emergency management consoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, M.R.; Olson, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in technology allow features like voice synthesis, voice and speech recognition, image understanding, and intelligent data base management to be incorporated in computer driven alarm and emergency management information systems. New software development environments make it possible to do rapid prototyping of custom applications. Three examples using these technologies are discussed. (1) Maximum use is made of high-speed graphics and voice synthesis to implement a state-of-the-art alarm processing and display system with features that make the operator-machine interface efficient and accurate. Although very functional, this system is not portable or flexible; the software would have to be substantially rewritten for other applications. (2) An application generator which has the capability of ''building'' a specific alarm processing and display application in a matter of a few hours, using the site definition developed in the security planning phase to produce the custom application. This package is based on a standardized choice of hardware, within which it is capable of building a system to order, automatically constructing graphics, data tables, alarm prioritization rules, and interfaces to peripherals. (3) A software tool, the User Interface Management System (UIMS), is described which permits rapid prototyping of human-machine interfaces for a variety of applications including emergency management, alarm display and process information display. The object-oriented software of the UIMS achieves rapid prototyping of a new interface by standardizing to a class library of software objects instead of hardware objects

  7. Social Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1983

    1983-01-01

    This group of articles discusses a variety of studies related to social security and retirement benefits. These studies are related to both developing and developed nations and are also concerned with studying work conditions and government role in administering a democratic social security system. (SSH)

  8. Security management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    Technical progress is moving more and more quickly and the systems thus produced are so complex and have become so unclear to the individual that he can no longer estimate the consequences: Faith in progress has given way to deep mistrust. Companies have adjusted to this change in consciousness. An interesting tendency can be identified: technical security is already available - now the organization of security has become an important objective for companies. The key message of the book is: If outworn technical systems are no longer adequate, the organization must be thoroughly overhauled. Five chapters deal with the following themes: organization as an aspect of society; risk control; aspects of security; is there security in ADP; the broader concept of security. (orig./HP) [de

  9. INFORMATION SYSTEM SECURITY (CYBER SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Siddique Ansari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - Business Organizations and Government unequivocally relies on upon data to deal with their business operations. The most unfavorable impact on association is disappointment of friendship, goodness, trustworthiness, legitimacy and probability of data and administrations. There is an approach to ensure data and to deal with the IT framework's Security inside association. Each time the new innovation is made, it presents some new difficulties for the insurance of information and data. To secure the information and data in association is imperative on the grounds that association nowadays inside and remotely joined with systems of IT frameworks. IT structures are inclined to dissatisfaction and security infringement because of slips and vulnerabilities. These slips and vulnerabilities can be brought on by different variables, for example, quickly creating headway, human slip, poor key particulars, poor movement schedules or censuring the threat. Likewise, framework changes, new deserts and new strikes are a huge piece of the time displayed, which helpers augmented vulnerabilities, disappointments and security infringement all through the IT structure life cycle. The business went to the confirmation that it is essentially difficult to ensure a slip free, risk free and secure IT structure in perspective of the disfigurement of the disavowing security parts, human pass or oversight, and part or supplies frustration. Totally secure IT frameworks don't exist; just those in which the holders may have changing degrees of certainty that security needs of a framework are fulfilled do. The key viewpoints identified with security of data outlining are examined in this paper. From the start, the paper recommends pertinent legitimate structure and their duties including open association obligation, and afterward it returns to present and future time, system limits, structure security in business division. At long last, two key inadequacy markers

  10. Information security management handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Tipton, Harold F

    2006-01-01

    Access Control Systems and Methodology. Telecommunications and Network Security. Security Management Practices. Application Program Security. Cryptography. Computer, System, and Security Architecture. Operations Security. Business Continuity Planning and Disaster Recovery Planning. Law, Investigation and Ethics. Physical Security.

  11. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    performance criteria may not be the level of performance desired Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or Sandia/CA. Performance at levels greater than those established by this document will provide a higher level of fire safety, fire protection, or loss control and is encouraged. In Section 7, Determination of Baseline Needs, a standard template was used to describe the process used that involves separating basic emergency response needs into nine separate services. Each service being evaluated contains a determination of minimum requirements, an analysis of the requirements, a statement of minimum performance, and finally a summary of the minimum performance. The requirement documents, listed in Section 5, are those laws, regulations, DOE Directives, contractual obligations, or LLNL policies that establish service levels. The determination of minimum requirements section explains the rationale or method used to determine the minimum requirements.

  12. Strategic information security

    CERN Document Server

    Wylder, John

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to Strategic Information SecurityWhat Does It Mean to Be Strategic? Information Security Defined The Security Professional's View of Information Security The Business View of Information SecurityChanges Affecting Business and Risk Management Strategic Security Strategic Security or Security Strategy?Monitoring and MeasurementMoving Forward ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUESThe Life Cycles of Security ManagersIntroductionThe Information Security Manager's Responsibilities The Evolution of Data Security to Information SecurityThe Repository Concept Changing Job Requirements Business Life Cycles

  13. The replacement of touch-terminal consoles of the CERN antiproton accumulator complex (AAC) by office PC's as well as X-windows based workstations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chohan, V.; Deloose, I.; Shering, G.

    1992-01-01

    With aging hardware and expensive maintenance and replacement possibilities, it was decided to upgrade the AAC touch terminal consoles with modern hardware. With significant amount of operational application software developed with touch terminals over 10 years, the philosophy adopted was to attempt a total emulation of these console functions of touch actions, graphics display as well as simple keyboard terminal entry onto the front-end computer controlling the AAC. The PC based emulation by mouse and multiple windows under MS-DOS and later, under the Windows 3 environment was realized relatively quickly; the next stage was therefore to do the same on the Unix platform using software based on X-windows. The communications channel was established using the TCP/IP socket library. This paper reviews this work up to the operational implementation for routine control room usage for both these solutions. (author)

  14. Security Bingo

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2011-01-01

    Want to check your security awareness and win one of three marvellous books on computer security? Just print out this page, mark which of the 25 good practices below you already follow, and send the sheet back to us by 31 October 2011 at either Computer.Security@cern.ch or P.O. Box G19710.   Winners[1] must show that they fulfil at least five good practices in a continuous vertical, horizontal or diagonal row. For details on CERN Computer Security, please consult http://cern.ch/security. I personally…   …am concerned about computer security. …run my computer with an anti-virus software and up-to-date signature files. …lock my computer screen whenever I leave my office. …have chosen a reasonably complex password. …have restricted access to all my files and data. …am aware of the security risks and threats to CERN’s computing facilities. &hell...

  15. Intensive strength and balance training with the Kinect console (Xbox 360) in a patient with CMT1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Emanuela; Foscan, Maria; Marchi, Alessia; Corlatti, Alice; Aprile, Giorgia; Riva, Daria

    2017-08-01

    Effective drugs for type 1A Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT1A) disease are not available. Various forms of moderate exercise are beneficial, but few data are available on the effectiveness of exercise in CMT1A children. To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of exercises to improve ankle strength and limb function in a child with CMT1A. Outpatient clinic. Nine-year-old boy with CMT1A. The rehabilitation program consisted of ankle exercises and Kinect videogame-directed physical activities (using an Xbox 360 console/movement sensor) that aimed to improve balance and limb strength. The program was given 3 times a week for 5 weeks. The child was assessed at baseline, after 5 weeks, and 3 and 6 months after. By the end of follow-up, child balance and endurance had improved, but ankle strength did not. The encouraging results for balance and endurance justify further studies on videogame-directed activities in CMT1A children/adolescents.

  16. Computer security

    CERN Document Server

    Gollmann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    A completely up-to-date resource on computer security Assuming no previous experience in the field of computer security, this must-have book walks you through the many essential aspects of this vast topic, from the newest advances in software and technology to the most recent information on Web applications security. This new edition includes sections on Windows NT, CORBA, and Java and discusses cross-site scripting and JavaScript hacking as well as SQL injection. Serving as a helpful introduction, this self-study guide is a wonderful starting point for examining the variety of competing sec

  17. Secure PVM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.H.; Venugopal, N.

    1996-09-01

    This research investigates techniques for providing privacy, authentication, and data integrity to PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine). PVM is extended to provide secure message passing with no changes to the user`s PVM application, or, optionally, security can be provided on a message-by message basis. Diffe-Hellman is used for key distribution of a single session key for n-party communication. Keyed MD5 is used for message authentication, and the user may select from various secret-key encryption algorithms for message privacy. The modifications to PVM are described, and the performance of secure PVM is evaluated.

  18. Junos Security

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Rob; Giecco, Patricio; Eberhard, Timothy; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    Junos® Security is the complete and authorized introduction to the new Juniper Networks SRX hardware series. This book not only provides a practical, hands-on field guide to deploying, configuring, and operating SRX, it also serves as a reference to help you prepare for any of the Junos Security Certification examinations offered by Juniper Networks. Network administrators and security professionals will learn how to use SRX Junos services gateways to address an array of enterprise data network requirements -- including IP routing, intrusion detection, attack mitigation, unified threat manag

  19. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills (editor), Cathy [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-09-07

    This Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report (NNSSER) was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NNSSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2016 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and its two Nevada-based support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis (RSL-Nellis). It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). NNSA/NFO directs the management and operation of the NNSS and six sites across the nation. In addition to the NNSA itself, the six sites include two in Nevada (NLVF and RSL-Nellis) and four in other states (RSL-Andrews in Maryland, Livermore Operations in California, Los Alamos Operations in New Mexico, and Special Technologies Laboratory in California). Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories are the principal organizations that sponsor and implement the nuclear weapons programs at the NNSS. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), is the current Management and Operating contractor accountable for the successful execution of work and ensuring that work is performed in compliance with environmental regulations. The six sites all provide support to enhance the NNSS as a location for its multiple

  20. Collective Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    in worldwide market conditions left perceptible ripples in Danish economy, budget discussions grew in importance over this period. The pacifist stance entailed disinclination to accept that the collective security concept and international treaties and accords signed by Denmark should necessitate credible...... and other international treaties provided arguments for adjusting the foreign and security policy ambitions, and since the general flux in worldwide market conditions left perceptible ripples in Danish economy, budget discussions grew in importance over this period. The pacifist stance entailed......Collective Security: National Egotism (Abstract) In Danish pre-World War I defence debate the notion of collective security is missing. During the early years of the 19th century, the political work is influenced by a pervasive feeling of rising tension and danger on the continent of Europe...

  1. Security Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Metz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    ... adjustment. With American military forces engaged around the world in both combat and stabilization operations, the need for rigorous and critical analysis of security transformation has never been greater...

  2. European Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Bjørn

    Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"......Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"...

  3. Data Security

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Training specialists in the field of data security and security administrators for the information systems represents a significant priority demanded by both governmental environments and the central and local administrations, as well as by the private sector - companies, banks. They are responsible for implementing information services and systems, but they are also their beneficiaries, with applicability in fields such as: e government, e-administration, e-banking, e-commerce, e-payment, wh...

  4. Nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that despite their crucial importance to national security, safeguards at the Department of Energy's (DOE) weapons facilities may be falling short. DOE security inspections have identified many weaknesses, including poor performance by members of DOE's security force, poor accountability for quantities of nuclear materials, and the inability of personnel to locate documents containing classified information. About 13 percent of the 2,100 identified weakness resulted in DOE inspectors giving out unsatisfactory security ratings; another 38 percent led to marginal ratings. In addition, DOE's centralized safeguards and security information tracking system lacks current data on whether DOE field offices have corrected the identified weaknesses. Without reliable information, DOE has no way of knowing whether timely action was taken to correct problems, nor can it determine whether weaknesses are systematic. DOE has tried to minimize the impact of these security weaknesses at its facilities by establishing multiple layers of protection measures and instituting interim and compensatory measures for identified weaknesses. DOE is planning enhancements to the centralized tracking system that should improve its reliability and increase its effectiveness

  5. FOOD SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Ardelean

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The assurance of food security at the individual level doesn’t implicitly provide for the one at family level as the concepts of hunger, malnutrition and food insecurity are the steps of the same process of access restricted to a sufficient supply of food. In order to achieve food security at the individual level the following is necessary: ensuring food availability (production, reserve stocks; redistribution of food availability within the country or out through international exchanges; effective access of the population to purchase food consumer goods, by ensuring its effective demand as required. Food security of families (FFS is required for assuring individual food security (IFS, but it is not sufficient because the food available may be unevenly distributed between family members. National food security (NFS corresponds to the possibilities that different countries have to ensure both FFS and IFS without sacrificing other important objectives. Under the name of GAS is defined the global food security which represents permanent access for the entire population of the globe to the necessary food for a healthy and active life.

  6. Security an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Purpura, Philip P

    2011-01-01

    Section I The History and Profession of SecurityDefinition, Role, and History of Security Security Defined The Contexts of Security The Roles of Security The History of Security Security in an Environment of Threats, Terrorism, and All-Hazards Threats and Hazards Terrorism National Strategies The Profession and Business of Security The Business of Security Professionalism and Security Associations Ethics Regulation of the Security Industry Security Training Higher Education Careers Section II Protecting People and AssetsSecurity Methodology Methodology Defined Security Business Proposals Secur

  7. Assessment of Robotic Console Skills (ARCS): construct validity of a novel global rating scale for technical skills in robotically assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, May; Purohit, Shreya; Mazanetz, Joshua; Allen, Whitney; Kreaden, Usha S; Curet, Myriam

    2018-01-01

    Skill assessment during robotically assisted surgery remains challenging. While the popularity of the Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotics Skills (GEARS) has grown, its lack of discrimination between independent console skills limits its usefulness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate construct validity and interrater reliability of a novel assessment designed to overcome this limitation. We created the Assessment of Robotic Console Skills (ARCS), a global rating scale with six console skill domains. Fifteen volunteers who were console surgeons for 0 ("novice"), 1-100 ("intermediate"), or >100 ("experienced") robotically assisted procedures performed three standardized tasks. Three blinded raters scored the task videos using ARCS, with a 5-point Likert scale for each skill domain. Scores were analyzed for evidence of construct validity and interrater reliability. Group demographics were indistinguishable except for the number of robotically assisted procedures performed (p = 0.001). The mean scores of experienced subjects exceeded those of novices in dexterity (3.8 > 1.4, p  1.8, p  2.2, p  1.9, p = 0.001), and force sensitivity (4.3 > 2.6, p  1.4, p = 0.002), field of view (2.8 > 1.8, p = 0.021), instrument visualization (3.2 > 2.2, p = 0.045), manipulator workspace (3.1 > 1.9, p = 0.004), and force sensitivity (3.7 > 2.6, p = 0.033). The mean scores of experienced subjects exceeded those of intermediates in dexterity (3.8 > 2.8, p = 0.003), field of view (4.1 > 2.8, p  3.2, p = 0.044). Rater agreement in each domain demonstrated statistically significant concordance (p skills plateau faster than others. Therefore, ARCS may be more useful than GEARS to evaluate distinct console skills. Future studies will examine why some domains did not adequately differentiate between subjects and applications for intraoperative use.

  8. Logs of wells and boreholes drilled during hydrogeologic studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, January 1, 1991--September 1, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, N.B.; McConihe, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 is located in the Altamont Hills between Livermore and Tracy, about 18 road miles southeast of Livermore, California. The site is used as a test facility to support national defense research carried out by LLNL. This Addendum 2 to the Logs of Wells and Boreholes Drilled During Hydrogeologic Studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 presents hydrogeologic logs for monitor wells and boreholes drilled primarily between January 1, 1991 and September 1, 1992. Some logs drilled earlier and not incorporated in earlier volumes of this document are also included here. A small number of logs drilled before September 1, 1992, are not available at the time of closing the report for publication of this volume (Addendum 2), but will be included in subsequent documents. By September 1, 1992, a total of 495 monitor wells and 285 exploratory boreholes had been drilled at Site 300 since the beginning of hydrogeologic studies in 1982. The primary purpose of these logs is to document lithologic and hydrogeologic conditions together with well completion information. For this reason, not all chemical analytical data are presented. These logs report concentrations of only the most commonly encountered volatile organic compounds, trace metals, and radionuclides detected in ground water and soil samples collected during drilling

  9. DIRAC Security

    CERN Document Server

    Casajús Ramo, A

    2006-01-01

    DIRAC is the LHCb Workload and Data Management System. Based on a service-oriented architecture, it enables generic distributed computing with lightweight Agents and Clients for job execution and data transfers. DIRAC implements a client-server architecture exposing server methods through XML Remote Procedure Call (XML-RPC) protocol. DIRAC is mostly coded in python. DIRAC security infrastructure has been designed to be a completely generic XML-RPC transport over a SSL tunnel. This new security layer is able to handle standard X509 certificates as well as grid-proxies to authenticate both sides of the connection. Serve and client authentication relies over OpenSSL and py-Open SSL, but to be able to handle grid proxies some modifications have been added to those libraries. DIRAC security infrastructure handles authorization and authorization as well as provides extended capabilities like secure connection tunneling and file transfer. Using this new security infrastructure all LHCb users can safely make use o...

  10. Privatising Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mindova-Docheva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes an analysis of the different approaches towards employing the international legal framework in the regulation and oversight of private military and security companies’ operation in armed conflicts and in peace time security systems. It proposes a partnership-based approach for public and private actors aiming at creating and sharing common values under the principles of solidarity, protection of human rights and rule of law. A focus of further research should be the process of shaping those common values.

  11. Information Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; Suryana Herman, Nanna; Leukfeldt, E.R.; Stol, W.Ph.

    2012-01-01

    Information security is all about the protection of digital assets, such as digital content, personal health records, state secrets etc. These assets can be handled by a party who is authorised to access and control the asset or a party who is not authorised to do so. Authorisation determines who is

  12. Food security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, M. de

    2011-01-01

    Food security is back on the agenda as a top priority for policy makers. In January 2011, record high food prices resulted in protests in Tunisia, which subsequently led to the spread of the revolutions in other North African and Middle Eastern countries. Although experts have asserted that no

  13. An integrated approach to validation of safeguards and security program performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, W.D.; Hunt, J.S.; Hockert, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for safeguards and security programs are becoming increasingly performance oriented. Master Safeguards and Security Agreemtns specify performance levels for systems protecting DOE security interests. In order to measure and validate security system performance, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed cost effective validation tools and a comprehensive validation approach that synthesizes information gained from different activities such as force on force exercises, limited scope performance tests, equipment testing, vulnerability analyses, and computer modeling; into an overall assessment of the performance of the protection system. The analytic approach employs logic diagrams adapted from the fault and event trees used in probabilistic risk assessment. The synthesis of the results from the various validation activities is accomplished using a method developed by LLNL, based upon Bayes' theorem

  14. Computer Security: the security marathon

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2014-01-01

    If you believe that “security” is a sprint, that a quick hack is invulnerable, that quick bug fixing is sufficient, that plugging security measures on top of existing structures is good, that once you are secure your life will be easy... then let me convince you otherwise.   An excellent example of this is when the summer students join us at CERN. As the summer period is short, software projects must be accomplished quickly, like a sprint. Rush, rush! But often, this sprint ends with aching muscles. Regularly, these summer students approach us to have their project or web server made visible to the Internet. Regularly, quick security reviews of those web servers diagnose severe underperformance with regards to security: the web applications are flawed or use insecure protocols; the employed software tools, databases or web frameworks are sub-optimal and not adequately chosen for that project; the operating system is non-standard and has never been brought up-to-date; and ...

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy, quarter ending March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.; Mansur, D.L.; Davis, G.

    1993-04-01

    This quarterly report discusses activities in the Safeguards Technology Program (STP) which is a program in LLNL`s Nuclear Chemistry Division that develop advanced, nondestructive-analysis (NDA) technology for measurement of special nuclear materials. The work focuses on R&D relating to x{minus} and gamma-ray spectrometry techniques and to the development of computer codes for interpreting the spectral data obtained by these techniques.

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Safeguards and Security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.; Davis, G.; Johnson, D. [and others

    1996-01-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program (STP) is a program in LLNL`s Isotope Sciences Division of the Chemistry and Materials Science Department that develops advanced, nondestructive analysis (NDA) technology for measurement of special nuclear materials. Our work focuses on R&D relating to x- and gamma-ray spectrometry techniques and to the development of computer codes for interpreting the spectral data obtained by these techniques.

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory- Completing the Human Genome Project and Triggering Nearly $1 Trillion in U.S. Economic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The success of the Human Genome project is already nearing $1 Trillion dollars of U.S. economic activity. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was a co-leader in one of the biggest biological research effort in history, sequencing the Human Genome Project. This ambitious research effort set out to sequence the approximately 3 billion nucleotides in the human genome, an effort many thought was nearly impossible. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was discovered in 1869, and by 1943 came the discovery that DNA was a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of living organisms and many viruses. To make full use of the information, scientists needed to first sequence the billions of nucleotides to begin linking them to genetic traits and illnesses, and eventually more effective treatments. New medical discoveries and improved agriculture productivity were some of the expected benefits. While the potential benefits were vast, the timeline (over a decade) and cost ($3.8 Billion) exceeded what the private sector would normally attempt, especially when this would only be the first phase toward the path to new discoveries and market opportunities. The Department of Energy believed its best research laboratories could meet this Grand Challenge and soon convinced the National Institute of Health to formally propose the Human Genome project to the federal government. The U.S. government accepted the risk and challenge to potentially create new healthcare and food discoveries that could benefit the world and the U.S. Industry.

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experience Using 30-Gallon Drum Neutron Multiplicity Counter for Measuring Plutonium-Bearing Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearborn, D M; Keeton, S C

    2004-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been performing accountability measurements of plutonium (Pu) -bearing items with the 30-gallon drum neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) since August 1998. A previous paper focused on the LLNL experience with Pu-bearing oxide and metal items. This paper expands on the LLNL experience with Pu-bearing salts containing low masses of Pu. All Pu-bearing salts used in this study were measured using calorimetry and gamma isotopic analyses (Cal/Iso) as well as the 30-gallon drum NMC. The Cal/Iso values were treated as being the true measure of Pu content because of the inherent high accuracy of the Cal/Iso technique, even at low masses of Pu, when measured over a sufficient period of time. Unfortunately, the long time period required to achieve high accuracy from Cal/Iso can impact other required accountability measurements. The 30-gallon drum NMC is a much quicker system for making accountability measurements of a Pu-bearing salt and might be a desirable tradeoff. The accuracy of 30-gallon drum NMC measurements of Pu-bearing salts, relative to that of Cal/Iso, is presented in relation to the mass range and alpha associated with each item. Conclusions drawn from the use of the 30-gallon drum NMC for accountability measurements of salts are also included

  19. Resumption of surrogate testing in the Engineering Demonstration System at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Engineering Demonstration System (EDS) is an existing equipment system within the Plutonium Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) designed to test the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) process for application to the Special Isotope Separation (SIS) program. The proposed action is to resume testing with members of the family of rare-earth metals in the EDS. The purpose of these tests is to train operators, verify operations procedures and obtain information on the engineering design, operational reliability, and separative performance capability of the integrated system hardware. The information to be provided by the EDS tests with the rare-earth metals is needed for engineering and operability evaluation of the prototype AVLIS separator hardware in an integrated system configuration. These evaluations are necessary to demonstrate the technology to the maximum extent possible, short of actual validation with plutonium. The EDS tests to be performed would use single and multiple separator units. Testing would be intermittent in nature, typically consisting of one to two tests per month, with durations ranging from approximately 10 to 200 h. 19 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  20. The LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] ICF [Inertial Confinement Fusion] Program: Progress toward ignition in the Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, E.; Batha, S.H.; Bernat, T.P.; Bibeau, C.; Cable, M.D.; Caird, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Campbell, J.H.; Coleman, L.W.; Cook, R.C.; Correll, D.L.; Darrow, C.B.; Davis, J.I.; Drake, R.P.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Ellis, R.J.; Glendinning, S.G.; Haan, S.W.; Haendler, B.L.; Hatcher, C.W.; Hatchett, S.P.; Hermes, G.L.; Hunt, J.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Kruer, W.L.; Kyrazis, D.T.; Lane, S.M.; Laumann, C.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Letts, S.A.; Lindl, J.D.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Mauger, G.J.; Montgomery, D.S.; Munro, D.H.; Murray, J.R.; Phillion, D.W.; Powell, H.T.; Remington, B.R.; Ress, D.B.; Speck, D.R.; Suter, L.J.; Tietbohl, G.L.; Thiessen, A.R.; Trebes, J.E.; Trenholme, J.B.; Turner, R.E.; Upadhye, R.S.; Wallace, R.J.; Wiedwald, J.D.; Woodworth, J.G.; Young, P.M.; Ze, F.

    1990-01-01

    The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made substantial progress in target physics, target diagnostics, and laser science and technology. In each area, progress required the development of experimental techniques and computational modeling. The objectives of the target physics experiments in the Nova laser facility are to address and understand critical physics issues that determine the conditions required to achieve ignition and gain in an ICF capsule. The LLNL experimental program primarily addresses indirect-drive implosions, in which the capsule is driven by x rays produced by the interaction of the laser light with a high-Z plasma. Experiments address both the physics of generating the radiation environment in a laser-driven hohlraum and the physics associated with imploding ICF capsules to ignition and high-gain conditions in the absence of alpha deposition. Recent experiments and modeling have established much of the physics necessary to validate the basic concept of ignition and ICF target gain in the laboratory. The rapid progress made in the past several years, and in particular, recent results showing higher radiation drive temperatures and implosion velocities than previously obtained and assumed for high-gain target designs, has led LLNL to propose an upgrade of the Nova laser to 1.5 to 2 MJ (at 0.35 μm) to demonstrate ignition and energy gains of 10 to 20 -- the Nova Upgrade

  1. Preliminary report of the past and present uses, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, M.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains the findings of a records search performed to survey the past and present use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site. This report provides a point of departure for further planning of environmental protection activities at the site. This report was conducted using the LLNL archives and library, documents from the US Navy, old LLNL Plant Engineering blueprint files, published articles and reports, Environmental Protection Program records, employee interviews, and available aerial photographs. Sections I and II of this report provide an introduction to the LLNL site and its environmental characteristics. Several tenants have occupied the site prior to the establishment of LLNL, currently operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Section III of this report contains information on environmentally related operations of early site users, the US Navy and California Research and Development. Section IV of this report contains information on the handling of hazardous materials and wastes by LLNL programs. The information is presented in 12 sub-sections, one for each currently operating LLNL program. General site areas, i.e., garbage trenches, the traffic circle landfill, the taxi strip, and old ammunition bunkers are discussed in Section V. 12 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  2. Preliminary report of the past and present uses, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains the findings of a records search performed to survey the past and present use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site. This report provides a point of departure for further planning of environmental protection activities at the site. This report was conducted using the LLNL archives and library, documents from the US Navy, old LLNL Plant Engineering blueprint files, published articles and reports, Environmental Protection Program records, employee interviews, and available aerial photographs. Sections I and II of this report provide an introduction to the LLNL site and its environmental characteristics. Several tenants have occupied the site prior to the establishment of LLNL, currently operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Section III of this report contains information on environmentally related operations of early site users, the US Navy and California Research and Development. Section IV of this report contains information on the handling of hazardous materials and wastes by LLNL programs. The information is presented in 12 sub-sections, one for each currently operating LLNL program. General site areas, i.e., garbage trenches, the traffic circle landfill, the taxi strip, and old ammunition bunkers are discussed in Section V. 12 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Oxide Material Representation in the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Program, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, D C; Dodson, K

    2004-06-30

    The Materials Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program was established within the 94-1 R&D Program to confirm the suitability of plutonium-bearing materials for stabilization, packaging, and long-term storage under DOE-STD-3013-2000. Oxide materials from different sites were chemically and physically characterized. The adequacy of the stabilization process parameters of temperature and duration at temperature (950 C and 2 hours) for eliminating chemical reactivity and reducing the moisture content to less than 0.5 weight percent were validated. Studies also include surveillance monitoring to determine the behavior of the oxides and packaging materials under storage conditions. Materials selected for this program were assumed to be representative of the overall inventory for DOE sites. The Quality Assurance section of the DOE-STD-3013-2000 required that each site be responsible for assuring that oxides packaged according to this standard are represented by items in the MIS characterization program. The purpose of this document is to define the path for determining if an individual item is ''represented'' in the MIS Program and to show that oxides being packaged at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are considered represented in the MIS program. The methodology outlined in the MIS Representation Document (LA-14016-MS) for demonstrating representation requires concurrence of the MIS working Group (MIS-WG). The signature page on this document provides for the MIS-WG concurrence.

  4. Security Administration Reports Application

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Contains SSA Security Reports that allow Information Security Officers (ISOs) to access, review and take appropriate action based on the information contained in the...

  5. Security Investigation Database (SID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Security Investigation & Personnel Security Clearance - COTS personnel security application in a USAID virtualized environement that can support USAID's business...

  6. Nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that despite an Executive Order limiting the authority to make original classification decisions to government officials, DOE has delegated this authority to a number of contractor employees. Although the number of original classification decisions made by these contractors is small, this neither negates nor diminishes the significance of the improper delegation of authority. If misclassification were to occur, particularly at the Top Secret level, U.S. national security interests could potentially be seriously affected and threatened. DOE's argument that the delegation of such authority is a long-standing policy and done on a selective basis does not legitimize the practice and does not relieve DOE of its responsibility to meet the requirements of the Executive Order. DOE needs to independently assess all original classification determinations made by contractors; otherwise, it cannot be sure that U.S. national security interests have been or are being adequately protected

  7. Security seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeli, Garth W.

    1985-01-01

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  8. Security system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Mark J.; Kuca, Michal; Aragon, Mona L.

    2016-02-02

    A security system includes a structure having a structural surface. The structure is sized to contain an asset therein and configured to provide a forceful breaching delay. The structure has an opening formed therein to permit predetermined access to the asset contained within the structure. The structure includes intrusion detection features within or associated with the structure that are activated in response to at least a partial breach of the structure.

  9. Sandia`s network for Supercomputing `94: Linking the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National Laboratories using switched multimegabit data service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahle, M.O.; Gossage, S.A.; Brenkosh, J.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Networking Integration Dept.

    1995-01-01

    Supercomputing `94, a high-performance computing and communications conference, was held November 14th through 18th, 1994 in Washington DC. For the past four years, Sandia National Laboratories has used this conference to showcase and focus its communications and networking endeavors. At the 1994 conference, Sandia built a Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) network running at 44.736 megabits per second linking its private SMDS network between its facilities in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Livermore, California to the convention center in Washington, D.C. For the show, the network was also extended from Sandia, New Mexico to Los Alamos National Laboratory and from Sandia, California to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This paper documents and describes this network and how it was used at the conference.

  10. Security studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venot, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Security studies constitute one of the major tools for evaluating the provisions implemented at facilities to protect and control Nuclear Material against unauthorized removal. Operators use security studies to demonstrate that they are complying with objectives set by the Competent Authority to counter internal or external acts aimed at unauthorized removal of NM. The paper presents the context of security studies carried out in France. The philosophy of these studies is based on a postulated unauthorized removal of NM and the study of the behavior of the systems implemented to control and protect NM in a facility. The potential unauthorized removal of NM usually may take place in two stages. The first stage involves the sequence leading to handling of the NM. It occurs inside the physical barriers of a facility and may include action involving the documents corresponding to Material Control and Accounting systems. At this stage it is possible to limit the risk of unauthorized removal of NM by means of detection capabilities of the MC and A systems. The second stage is more specific to theft and involves removing the NM out of the physical barriers of a facility in which they are being held, notably by affecting the Physical Protection System. Operators have to study, from a quantity and time lapse point of view, the ability of the installed systems to detect unauthorized removal, as well as the possibility of tampering with the systems to mask unlawful operations. Operators have also to analyze the sequences during which NM are accessed, removed from their containment and further removed from the facility in which they are stored. At each stage in the process, the probability of detection and the time taken to carry out the above actions have to be estimated. Of course, these two types of studies complement each other. Security studies have begun, in France, for more than fifteen years. Up to now more than fifty security studies are available in the

  11. National Cyber Security Policy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    National Cyber Security Policy. Salient Features: Caters to ... Creating a secure cyber ecosystem. Creating an assurance framework. Encouraging Open Standards. Strengthening the Regulatory framework. Creating mechanisms for security threat early warning, vulnerability management and response to security threats.

  12. Seismic site characterization of an urban dedimentary basin, Livermore Valley, California: Site tesponse, basin-edge-induced surface waves, and 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Leeds, Alena L.; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Allen, James P.; Schmitt, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty‐two accelerometers were deployed in the Livermore Valley, California, for approximately one year to study sedimentary basin effects. Many local and near‐regional earthquakes were recorded, including the 24 August 2014 Mw 6.0 Napa, California, earthquake. The resulting ground‐motion data set is used to quantify the seismic response of the Livermore basin, a major structural depression in the California Coast Range Province bounded by active faults. Site response is calculated by two methods: the reference‐site spectral ratio method and a source‐site spectral inversion method. Longer‐period (≥1  s) amplification factors follow the same general pattern as Bouguer gravity anomaly contours. Site response spectra are inverted for shallow shear‐wave velocity profiles, which are consistent with independent information. Frequency–wavenumber analysis is used to analyze plane‐wave propagation across the Livermore Valley and to identify basin‐edge‐induced surface waves with back azimuths different from the source back azimuth. Finite‐element simulations in a 3D velocity model of the region illustrate the generation of basin‐edge‐induced surface waves and point out strips of elevated ground velocities along the margins of the basin.

  13. Statistical security for Social Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; King, Gary

    2012-08-01

    The financial viability of Social Security, the single largest U.S. government program, depends on accurate forecasts of the solvency of its intergenerational trust fund. We begin by detailing information necessary for replicating the Social Security Administration's (SSA's) forecasting procedures, which until now has been unavailable in the public domain. We then offer a way to improve the quality of these procedures via age- and sex-specific mortality forecasts. The most recent SSA mortality forecasts were based on the best available technology at the time, which was a combination of linear extrapolation and qualitative judgments. Unfortunately, linear extrapolation excludes known risk factors and is inconsistent with long-standing demographic patterns, such as the smoothness of age profiles. Modern statistical methods typically outperform even the best qualitative judgments in these contexts. We show how to use such methods, enabling researchers to forecast using far more information, such as the known risk factors of smoking and obesity and known demographic patterns. Including this extra information makes a substantial difference. For example, by improving only mortality forecasting methods, we predict three fewer years of net surplus, $730 billion less in Social Security Trust Funds, and program costs that are 0.66% greater for projected taxable payroll by 2031 compared with SSA projections. More important than specific numerical estimates are the advantages of transparency, replicability, reduction of uncertainty, and what may be the resulting lower vulnerability to the politicization of program forecasts. In addition, by offering with this article software and detailed replication information, we hope to marshal the efforts of the research community to include ever more informative inputs and to continue to reduce uncertainties in Social Security forecasts.

  14. Validity of the Korean Version of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability Scale for Assessment of Pain in Dementia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yeonsil; Kim, Yoon Sook; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol Heui

    2017-11-01

    Pain is often associated with a more rapid progression of cognitive and functional decline, and behavioral disturbance in dementia. Therefore, it is essential to accurately assesses pain for proper intervention in patients with dementia. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) scale is an excellent behaviour scale which includes most of the domains that are recommended by the American Geriatrics Society to evaluate when assessing pain in patients with dementia. The purpose of this study was to develop the Korean version of the FLACC (K-FLACC) and to verify its reliability and validity in assessing pain of elderly patients with dementia. We developed the K-FLACC to consist of the five domains (face, legs, activity, cry, and consolability) with scores of 0, 1, and 2 for each domain and a total score ranging from 0 to 10 as in the original FLACC. Eighty-eight patients with dementia who visited Konkuk University Medical Center were evaluated. The K-FLACC revealed good validity as compared to the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS; r = 0.617, P dementia in Korea. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  15. Network security

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, André

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the security mechanisms deployed in Ethernet, Wireless-Fidelity (Wi-Fi), Internet Protocol (IP) and MultiProtocol Label Switching (MPLS) networks. These mechanisms are grouped throughout the book according to the following four functions: data protection, access control, network isolation, and data monitoring. Data protection is supplied by data confidentiality and integrity control services. Access control is provided by a third-party authentication service. Network isolation is supplied by the Virtual Private Network (VPN) service. Data monitoring consists of applying

  16. Information Security

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Information security is all about the protection of digital assets, such as digital content, personal health records, state secrets etc. These assets can be handled by a party who is authorised to access and control the asset or a party who is not authorised to do so. Authorisation determines who is trusted to actually handle an asset. Two concepts complement authorisation. Authentication deter-mines who makes a request to handle an asset. To decide who is authorised, a system needs to au-the...

  17. Benchmarking transition energies and emission strengths for X-ray astrophysics with measurements at the Livermore EBITs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Natalie [Friedrich Alexander Univ., Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    K-shell transitions in astrophysically abundant metals and L-shell transitions in Fe group elements show characteristic signatures in the soft X-ray spectrum in the energy range 0.1–10 keV. These signatures have great diagnostic value for plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, and can thus help understand the physics controlling the energetic processes in astrophysical sources. This diagnostic power increases with advances in spectral resolution and effective area of the employed X-ray observatories. However, to make optimal use of the diagnostic potential – whether through global spectral modeling or through diagnostics from local modeling of individual lines – the underlying atomic physics has to be complete and well known. With the next generation of soft X-ray observatories featuring micro-calorimeters such as the SXS on Astro- H/Hitomi and the X-IFU on Athena, broadband high-resolution spectroscopy with large effective area will become more commonly available in the next decade. With these spectrometers, the accuracy of the plasma parameters derived from spectral modeling will be limited by the uncertainty of the reference atomic data rather than by instrumental factors, as is sometimes already the case for the high-resolution grating observations with Chandra-HETG and XMM-Newton-RGS. To take full advantage of the measured spectra, assessment of the accuracy of and improvements to the available atomic reference data are therefore important. Dedicated measurements in the laboratory are essential to benchmark the theoretical calculations providing the bulk of the reference data used in astrophysics. Experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps (EBIT-I and SuperEBIT) have a long history of providing this service. In this work, I present new measurements of transition energies and absolute electron impact excitation cross sections geared towards currently open atomic physics data needs.

  18. Calibration of the OHREX high-resolution imaging crystal spectrometer at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg 96049 (Germany); Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report the calibration of the Orion High-Resolution X-ray (OHREX) imaging crystal spectrometer at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap at Livermore. Two such instruments, dubbed OHREX-1 and OHREX-2, are fielded for plasma diagnostics at the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. The OHREX spectrometer can simultaneously house two spherically bent crystals with a radius of curvature of r = 67.2 cm. The focusing properties of the spectrometer allow both for larger distance to the source due to the increase in collected light and for observation of extended sources. OHREX is designed to cover a 2.5°–3° spectral range at Bragg angles around 51.3°. The typically high resolving powers at these large Bragg angles are ideally suited for line shape diagnostics. For instance, the nominal resolving power of the instrument (>10 000) is much higher than the effective resolving power associated with the Doppler broadening due to the temperature of the trapped ions in EBIT-I. The effective resolving power is only around 3000 at typical EBIT-I conditions, which nevertheless is sufficient to set up and test the instrument’s spectral characteristics. We have calibrated the spectral range for a number of crystals using well known reference lines in the first and second order and derived the ion temperatures from these lines. We have also made use of the 50 μm size of the EBIT-I source width to characterize the spatial focusing of the spectrometer.

  19. Security infrastructures: towards the INDECT system security

    OpenAIRE

    Stoianov, Nikolai; Urueña, Manuel; Niemiec, Marcin; Machník, Petr; Maestro, Gema

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the security infrastructures being deployed inside the INDECT project. These security infrastructures can be organized in five main areas: Public Key Infrastructure, Communication security, Cryptography security, Application security and Access control, based on certificates and smartcards. This paper presents the new ideas and deployed testbeds for these five areas. In particular, it explains the hierarchical architecture of the INDECT PKI...

  20. Internet Banking Security Strategy: Securing Customer Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Frimpong Twum; Kwaku Ahenkora

    2012-01-01

    Internet banking strategies should enhance customers¡¯ online experiences which are affected by trust and security issues. This study provides perspectives of users and nonusers on internet banking security with a view to understanding trust and security factors in relation to adoption and continuous usage. Perception of internet banking security influenced usage intentions. Nonusers viewed internet banking to be insecure but users perceived it to be secure with perceived ease of use influenc...

  1. Planning security for supply security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies von Buellesheim.

    1994-01-01

    The situation of the hardcoal mining industry is still difficult, however better than last year. Due to better economic trends in the steel industry, though on a lower level, sales in 1994 have stabilised. Stocks are being significantly reduced. As to the production, we have nearly reached a level which has been politically agreed upon in the long run. Due to the determined action of the coalmining companies, a joint action of management and labour, the strong pressure has been mitigated. On the energy policy sector essential targets have been achieved: First of all the ECSC decision on state aid which will be in force up to the year 2002 and which will contribute to accomplish the results of the 1991 Coal Round. Furthermore, the 1994 Act on ensuring combustion of hardcoal in electricity production up to the year 2005. The hardcoal mining industry is grateful to all political decision makers for the achievements. The industry demands, however, that all questions still left open, including the procurement of financial means after 1996, should be settled soon on the basis of the new act and in accordance with the 1991 Coal Round and the energy concept of the Federal Government. German hardcoal is an indispensable factor within a balanced energy mix which guarantees the security of our energy supply, the security of the price structure and the respect of the environment. (orig.) [de

  2. Information security fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Peltier, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Developing an information security program that adheres to the principle of security as a business enabler must be the first step in an enterprise's effort to build an effective security program. Following in the footsteps of its bestselling predecessor, Information Security Fundamentals, Second Edition provides information security professionals with a clear understanding of the fundamentals of security required to address the range of issues they will experience in the field.The book examines the elements of computer security, employee roles and r

  3. ORACLE DATABASE SECURITY

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina-Maria Titrade

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents some security issues, namely security database system level, data level security, user-level security, user management, resource management and password management. Security is a constant concern in the design and database development. Usually, there are no concerns about the existence of security, but rather how large it should be. A typically DBMS has several levels of security, in addition to those offered by the operating system or network. Typically, a DBMS has user a...

  4. Computer Security: the security marathon, part 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2014-01-01

    Do you recall our latest article on the “Security Marathon” (see here) and why it’s wrong to believe that computer security is a sprint, that a quick hack is invulnerable, that quick bug-fixing is sufficient, that plugging security measures on top of existing structures is a good idea, that once you are secure, your life is cosy?   In fact, security is a marathon for us too. Again and again, we have felt comfortable with the security situation at CERN, with dedicated protections deployed on individual hosts, with the security measures deployed by individual service managers, with the attentiveness and vigilance of our users, and with the responsiveness of the Management. Again and again, however, we subsequently detect or receive reports that this is wrong, that protections are incomplete, that security measures are incomplete, that security awareness has dropped. Thus, unfortunately, we often have to go back to square one and address similar issues over and over...

  5. Human engineering considerations in designing a computerized controlled access security system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.W.; Banks, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a human engineering effort in the design of a major security system upgrade at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This upgrade was to be accomplished by replacing obsolete and difficult-to-man (i.e., multiple operator task actions required) security equipment and systems with a new, automated, computer-based access control system. The initial task was to assist the electronic and mechanical engineering staff in designing a computerized security access system too functionally and ergonomically accommodate 100% of the Laboratory user population. The new computerized access system was intended to control entry into sensitive exclusion areas by requiring personnel to use an entry booth-based system and/or a remote access control panel system. The primary user interface with the system was through a control panel containing a magnetic card reader, function buttons, LCD display, and push-button keypad

  6. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory DOE-STD-3013 Surveillance Program for the Storage of Plutonium Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, D

    2005-01-01

    This document presents a site-specific DOE-STD-3013 (3013) surveillance program for 3013 material stored at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the B332 Plutonium Facility. The 3013 standard requires the development of a surveillance program to assure the long-term safety of plutonium storage in 3013 compliant containers. A complex-wide Integrated Surveillance Program in Support of Long-Term Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials (ISP)(LA-UR-00-3246, Revision 1, March 2001) has been developed to give guidance on an acceptable surveillance approach and to set up a mechanism to integrate surveillance activities and facilitate the sharing of lessons learned. This LLNL 3013 surveillance program has been developed following guidelines established for Storage Sites in the ISP and is sufficient for the storage in the LLNL Plutonium Facility. The LLNL 3013 surveillance program must be coupled with the DOE complex wide Materials Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program and the ISP led by Savannah River Site (SRS). These programs support the technical basis for continuing safe storage of plutonium packages and provide the technical basis for the limited scope of the site-specific LLNL 3013 surveillance program. The LLNL 3013 surveillance program calls for surveillance of 3013 packages to begin approximately three years after packaging of the first oxide. One percent of the stored packages per year will be randomly selected and nondestructively examined (NDE) by LLNL per the guidelines of the ISP. Additional packages may be selected for NDE if recommended by the ISP Steering Committee and agreed upon by the MIS Working Group. One selected package will be shipped to SRS for destructive analysis each year starting when SRS can receive them. This is expected to be in FY2007. We expect to store a maximum of 400 3013 packages. This would result in an expected maximum of 4 surveillances per year. The activities outlined in the program evolved from the current

  7. Information Systems Security Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Popescu; Veronica Adriana Popescu; Cristina Raluca Popescu

    2007-01-01

    The article covers:Defining an information system; benefits obtained by introducing new information technologies; IT management;Defining prerequisites, analysis, design, implementation of IS; Information security management system; aspects regarding IS security policy; Conceptual model of a security system; Auditing information security systems and network infrastructure security.

  8. Security for grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.; Jackson, Keith R.

    2005-08-14

    Securing a Grid environment presents a distinctive set of challenges. This paper groups the activities that need to be secured into four categories: naming and authentication; secure communication; trust, policy, and authorization; and enforcement of access control. It examines the current state of the art in securing these processes and introduces new technologies that promise to meet the security requirements of Grids more completely.

  9. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  10. Technical Evaluation of Soil Remediation Alternatives at the Building 812 Operable Unit, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in

  11. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling

  12. Quality of Security Service: Adaptive Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levin, Timothy E; Irvine, Cynthia E; Spyropoulou, Evdoxia

    2004-01-01

    The premise of Quality of Security Service is that system and network management functions can be more effective if variable levels of security services and requirements can be presented to users or network tasks...

  13. 'EN6-PHOTO' and 'JEF-2/PHOTO'. Photo-Atomic Interaction Data Library by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Photo-Atomic Interaction Data Library of the Livermore Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL) contains pair production cross-sections, photoelectric cross-sections, atomic form factors, coherent scattering cross-sections and some other data for all the elements from Z = 1 to 100. There are two versions of this library, the one being part of the U.S. ENDF/B-6 system, the other being part of the European JEF-2 system. Both are available on magnetic tape costfree from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  14. Determination of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interim report on the status of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnink, R.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents an overview of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for determining plutonium isotopic abundances from gamma-ray spectra that have been measured with germanium detectors. The methodology of fitting the spectral features includes discussions of algorithms for gamma-ray and x-ray peak shape fitting and generation of response spectra profiles characteristic of specific isotopes. Applications of the techniques developed at government, commercial, and Japanese reprocessing plants are described. Current development of the methodology for the nondestructive analysis of samples containing nondescript solid materials is also presented

  15. Cost-benefit analysis for waste compaction alternatives at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Addendum A to the Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Plan of May 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a cost-benefit analysis of the potential procurement and operation of various solid waste compactors or of the use of commercial compaction services, for compaction of solid transuranic (TRU), low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. The cost-benefit analysis was conducted to determine if increased compaction capacity at HWM might afford the potential for significant waste volume reduction and annual savings in material, shipping, labor, and disposal costs

  16. Summary of Environmental Data Analysis and Work Performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Support of the Navajo Nation Abandoned Mine Lands Project at Tse Tah, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taffet, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Madrid, Victor M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This report summarizes work performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under Navajo Nation Services Contract CO9729 in support of the Navajo Abandoned Mine Lands Reclamation Program (NAMLRP). Due to restrictions on access to uranium mine waste sites at Tse Tah, Arizona that developed during the term of the contract, not all of the work scope could be performed. LLNL was able to interpret environmental monitoring data provided by NAMLRP. Summaries of these data evaluation activities are provided in this report. Additionally, during the contract period, LLNL provided technical guidance, instructional meetings, and review of relevant work performed by NAMLRP and its contractors that was not contained in the contract work scope.

  17. Social Security Bulletin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Social Security Bulletin (ISSN 1937-4666) is published quarterly by the Social Security Administration. The Bulletin is prepared in the Office of Retirement and...

  18. Transportation Security Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content Official website of the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration A - Z Index Blog What Can I ... Search form Search the Site Main menu Travel Security Screening Special Procedures TSA Pre✓® Passenger Support Travel ...

  19. Security, Fraud Detection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Secure. Secure. Server – Intruder prevention/detection; Network – Encryption, PKI; Client - Secure. Fraud detection based on audit trails. Automatic alerts like credit-card alerts based on suspicious patterns.

  20. Computer security engineering management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    For best results, computer security should be engineered into a system during its development rather than being appended later on. This paper addresses the implementation of computer security in eight stages through the life cycle of the system; starting with the definition of security policies and ending with continuing support for the security aspects of the system throughout its operational life cycle. Security policy is addressed relative to successive decomposition of security objectives (through policy, standard, and control stages) into system security requirements. This is followed by a discussion of computer security organization and responsibilities. Next the paper directs itself to analysis and management of security-related risks, followed by discussion of design and development of the system itself. Discussion of security test and evaluation preparations, and approval to operate (certification and accreditation), is followed by discussion of computer security training for users is followed by coverage of life cycle support for the security of the system

  1. USCG Security Plan Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Security Plan Review module is intended for vessel and facility operators to check on the status of their security plans submitted to the US Coast Guard. A MISLE...

  2. Kyrgyzstan's security problems today

    OpenAIRE

    Abduvalieva, Ryskul

    2009-01-01

    Regional stability and security consist of two levels-the external security of each country at the regional level and the internal security of each of them individually. A state's external and internal security are closely interrelated concepts. It stands to reason that ensuring internal security and stability is the primary and most important task. But the external aspect also requires attention. This article takes a look at the most important problems of ensuring Kyrgyzstan's security.

  3. Information Security Maturity Model

    OpenAIRE

    Information Security Maturity Model

    2011-01-01

    To ensure security, it is important to build-in security in both the planning and the design phases andadapt a security architecture which makes sure that regular and security related tasks, are deployedcorrectly. Security requirements must be linked to the business goals. We identified four domains thataffect security at an organization namely, organization governance, organizational culture, thearchitecture of the systems, and service management. In order to identify and explore the strengt...

  4. Security By Design

    OpenAIRE

    Tanner, M. James

    2009-01-01

    Securing a computer from unwanted intrusion requires astute planning and effort to effectively minimize the security invasions computers are plagued with today. While all of the efforts to secure a computer are needed, it seems that the underlying issue of what is being secured has been overlooked. The operating system is at the core of the security issue. Many applications and devices have been put into place to add layers of protection to an already weak operating system. Security did not u...

  5. Foundational aspects of security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzikokolakis, Konstantinos; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Palamidessi, Catuscia

    2014-01-01

    This Special Issue of the Journal of Computer Security focuses on foundational aspects of security, which in recent years have helped change much of the way we think about and approach system security.......This Special Issue of the Journal of Computer Security focuses on foundational aspects of security, which in recent years have helped change much of the way we think about and approach system security....

  6. Security guide for subcontractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This security guide of the Department of Energy covers contractor and subcontractor access to DOE and Mound facilities. The topics of the security guide include responsibilities, physical barriers, personnel identification system, personnel and vehicular access controls, classified document control, protecting classified matter in use, storing classified matter repository combinations, violations, security education clearance terminations, security infractions, classified information nondisclosure agreement, personnel security clearances, visitor control, travel to communist-controlled or sensitive countries, shipment security, and surreptitious listening devices.

  7. Redefining security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, J T

    1989-01-01

    The concept of US national security was redefined in the 1970s to include international economics, and lately environmental degradation has also become a factor, as pollution transcends boundaries. By 2100 another 5-6 billion people may be added to the world's population requiring dramatic production and technology transformation with the resultant expanded energy use, emissions, and waste impacting the ecosystem. Climate change through global warming is in the offing. The exponential growth of the population in the developing world poses a crucial challenge for food production, housing, and employment. At a 1% growth rate population doubles in 72 years, while at 3% it doubles in 24 years. Africa's growth rate is almost 3%, it is close to 2% in Latin America, and it is somewhat less in Asia. Renewable resources such as overfished fishing grounds can become nonrenewable, and vanished species can never be resurrected. Deforestation leads to soil erosion, damage to water resources through floods and silting of irrigation networks, and accelerated loss of species. 20% of species could disappear by 2000 thereby losing genetic resources for chemicals, drugs, and food sources. Overcultivation has caused major erosion and decline of agricultural productivity in Haiti, Guatemala, Turkey, and India. Lopsided land ownership in Latin America requires land reform for sustainable agricultural production in the face of the majority of people cultivating plots for bare subsistence. Human practices that have caused environmental damage include concessions granted to logging companies in the Philippines, mismanagement of natural resources in sub-Saharan Africa, the ozone hole, and the greenhouse effect with potential climate changes. Solutions include family planning, efficient energy use, sustainable agroforestry techniques, and environmental accounting of goods and services.

  8. Personnel Security Investigations -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains the types of background investigations, decisions, level of security clearance, date of security clearance training, and credentials issued to...

  9. Security 2020 Reduce Security Risks This Decade

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Doug; Schneier, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Identify real security risks and skip the hype After years of focusing on IT security, we find that hackers are as active and effective as ever. This book gives application developers, networking and security professionals, those that create standards, and CIOs a straightforward look at the reality of today's IT security and a sobering forecast of what to expect in the next decade. It debunks the media hype and unnecessary concerns while focusing on the knowledge you need to combat and prioritize the actual risks of today and beyond.IT security needs are constantly evolving; this guide examine

  10. The corporate security professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Lund

    2013-01-01

    In our age of globalization and complex threat environments, every business is called upon to manage security. This tendency is reflected in the fact that a wide range of businesses increasingly think about security in broad terms and strive to translate national security concerns into corporate...... speech. This article argues that the profession of the security manager has become central for understanding how the relationship between national and corporate security is currently negotiated. The national security background of most private sector security managers makes the corporate security...... professional inside the company a powerful hybrid agent. By zooming in on the profession and the practice of national security inside companies, the article raises questions about where to draw the line between corporate security and national security along with the political consequences of the constitution...

  11. Security guide for subcontractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.C.

    1993-06-01

    This guide is provided to aid in the achievement of security objectives in the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor/subcontractor program. The objectives of security are to protect information that, if released, would endanger the common defense and security of the nation and to safeguard plants and installations of the DOE and its contractors to prevent the interruption of research and production programs. The security objective and means of achieving the objective are described. Specific security measures discussed in this guide include physical barriers, personnel identification systems, personnel and vehicular access control, classified document control, protection of classified matter in use, storing classified matter, and repository combinations. Means of dealing with security violations and security infractions are described. Maintenance of a security education program is discussed. Also discussed are methods of handling clearance terminations, visitor control, travel to sensitive countries, and shipment security. The Technical Surveillance Countermeasures Program (TSCM), the Computer Security Program, and the Operations Security Plan (OPSEC) are examined.

  12. Security research roadmap; Security-tutkimuksen roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumanen, M.; Rouhiainen, V. (eds.)

    2006-02-15

    Requirements for increasing security have arisen in Europe after highly visible and tragic events in Madrid and in London. While responsibility for security rests largely with the national activities, the EU has also started planning a research area .Space and security. as a part of the 7th Framework Programme. As the justification for this research area it has been presented that technology alone can not assure security, but security can not be assured without the support of technology. Furthermore, the justification highlights that security and military research are becoming ever closer. The old separation between civil and military research is decreasing, because it has been noticed that both areas are nowadays utilising the same knowledge. In Finland, there is already now noteworthy entrepreneurship related to security. Although some of the companies are currently only operating in Finland, others are already international leaders in their area. The importance of the security area is increasing and remarkable potential for new growth business areas can already be identified. This however also requires an increase in research efforts. VTT has a broad range of security research ongoing in many technology areas. The main areas have been concentrating on public safety and security, but VTT is participating also in several research projects related to the defence technology. For identifying and defining in more detail the expertise and research goals, the Security research roadmap was developed. The roadmap identified three particularly significant areas related to security. The assurance of critical infrastructure emphasises the protection of energy networks, information networks, water supply, traffic and transport, and obviously also the citizens. For assuring the activities of entrepreneurship, significant areas include the security of production and services, the security of sites and assets, and information security for embedded systems. The most important

  13. Unix Security Cookbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, S. C.

    This document has been written to help Site Managers secure their Unix hosts from being compromised by hackers. I have given brief introductions to the security tools along with downloading, configuring and running information. I have also included a section on my recommendations for installing these security tools starting from an absolute minimum security requirement.

  14. Untangle network security

    CERN Document Server

    El-Bawab, Abd El-Monem A

    2014-01-01

    If you are a security engineer or a system administrator and want to secure your server infrastructure with the feature-rich Untangle, this book is for you. For individuals who want to start their career in the network security field, this book would serve as a perfect companion to learn the basics of network security and how to implement it using Untangle NGFW.

  15. Arguing Against Security Communitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgin, Pinar

    2016-01-01

    Anthony Burke’s ‘security cosmopolitanism’ is a fresh and thought-provoking contribution to critical theorizing about security. In this discussion piece, I would like to join Burke’s call for ‘security cosmopolitanism’ by way of arguing against ‘security communitarianism’. I understand the latter...

  16. Security research roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouhiainen, V. (ed.)

    2007-02-15

    VTT has a broad range of security research ongoing in many areas of technology. The main areas have been concentrating on public safety and security, but VTT is also participating in several research projects related to defence technology. To identify and define expertise and research goals in more detail, the Security research roadmap was developed. The roadmap identified three particularly significant areas related to security. The assurance of a critical infrastructure emphasises the protection of energy networks, information networks, water supply, traffic and transport, and obviously also the citizens. For assuring the activities of entrepreneurship, significant areas include the security of production and services, the security of sites and assets, and information security for embedded systems. The most important security products and technologies needed are, for example, management of total security, detection, identification, localisation and communication, protection of information networks and systems, as well as physical protection. In the EU's Security programme, which aims at ensuring the security of society and its vital functions, it is stated that. Technology alone can not assure security, but security can not be assured without the support of technology. VTT is conducting security research in all its areas of expertise and clusters. The area has a significant research potential. The development of products and systems designed for the improvement of security has just started. There is still room for innovation. This report presents knowledge and development needs in more detail, as well as future development potential seen in the area of security. (orig.)

  17. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  18. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  19. Safeguards and security issues for the disposition of fissile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.D.; Moya, R.W.; Duggan, R.A.; Mangan, D.L.; Tolk, K.M.; Rutherford, D.; Fearey, B.; Moore, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Fissile Material Disposition (FMD) is analyzing long-term storage and disposition options for surplus weapons-usable fissile materials, preparing a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS), preparing for a record of decision (ROD) regarding this material and conducting other activities. The primary security objectives of this program are to reduce major security risks and strengthen arms reduction and nonproliferation (NP). To help achieve these objectives, a safeguards and security (S ampersand S) team consisting of participants from Sandia, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories was established. The S ampersand S activity for this program is a cross-cutting task which addresses all of the FMD program options. It includes both domestic and international safeguards and includes areas such as physical protection, nuclear materials accountability and material containment and surveillance. This paper will discuss the activities of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) S ampersand S team as well as some specific S ampersand S issues associated with various FMDP options/facilities. Some of the items to be discussed include the threat, S ampersand S requirements, S ampersand S criteria for assessing risk, S ampersand S issues concerning fissile material processing/facilities, and international and domestic safeguards

  20. IAEA nuclear security program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  1. IAEA nuclear security program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, D.

    2006-01-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  2. Professional Cocoa Application Security

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Graham J

    2010-01-01

    The first comprehensive security resource for Mac and iPhone developers. The Mac platform is legendary for security, but consequently, Apple developers have little appropriate security information available to help them assure that their applications are equally secure. This Wrox guide provides the first comprehensive go-to resource for Apple developers on the available frameworks and features that support secure application development.: While Macs are noted for security, developers still need to design applications for the Mac and the iPhone with security in mind; this guide offers the first

  3. Lecture 2: Software Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development, testing and deployment. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and ...

  4. Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security - SBIR Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twogood, Richard E [Dirac Solutions Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    2015-01-27

    This is the Final Report for the DOE Phase II SBIR project “Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security.” The topics covered herein include technical progress made, progress against the planned milestones and deliverables, project outcomes (results, collaborations, intellectual property, etc.), and a discussion on future expectations of deployment and impacts of the results of this work. In brief, all planned work for the project was successfully completed, on or ahead of schedule and on budget. The major accomplishment was the successful development of a very advanced passive ultra-secure RFID tag system with combined security features unmatched by any commercially available ones. These tags have high-level dynamic encrypted authentication, a novel tamper-proofing mechanism, system software including graphical user interfaces and networking, and integration with a fiber-optic seal mechanism. This is all accomplished passively (with no battery) by incorporating sophisticated hardware in the tag which harvests the energy from the RFID readers that are interrogating the tag. Based on initial feedback (and deployments) at DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), it is anticipated these tags and their offspring will meet DOE and international community needs for highly secure RFID systems. Beyond the accomplishment of those original objectives for the ultra-secure RF tags, major new spin-off thrusts from the original work were identified and successfully pursued with the cognizance of the DOE sponsor office. In particular, new classes of less sophisticated RFID tags were developed whose lineage derives from the core R&D thrusts of this SBIR. These RF “tag variants” have some, but not necessarily all, of the advanced characteristics described above and can therefore be less expensive and meet far wider markets. With customer pull from the DOE and its national laboratories, new RFID tags and systems (including custom readers and software) for

  5. Dynamic accommodative response to different visual stimuli (2D vs 3D) while watching television and while playing Nintendo 3DS console.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sílvia; Jorge, Jorge; González-Méijome, José M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accommodative response to the same visual content presented in two dimensions (2D) and stereoscopically in three dimensions (3D) while participants were either watching a television (TV) or Nintendo 3DS console. Twenty-two university students, with a mean age of 20.3 ± 2.0 years (mean ± S.D.), were recruited to participate in the TV experiment and fifteen, with a mean age of 20.1 ± 1.5 years took part in the Nintendo 3DS console study. The accommodative response was measured using a Grand Seiko WAM 5500 autorefractor. In the TV experiment, three conditions were used initially: the film was viewed in 2D mode (TV2D without glasses), the same sequence was watched in 2D whilst shutter-glasses were worn (TV2D with glasses) and the sequence was viewed in 3D mode (TV3D). Measurements were taken for 5 min in each condition, and these sections were sub-divided into ten 30-s segments to examine changes within the film. In addition, the accommodative response to three points of different disparity of one 3D frame was assessed for 30 s. In the Nintendo experiment, two conditions were employed - 2D viewing and stereoscopic 3D viewing. In the TV experiment no statistically significant differences were found between the accommodative response with TV2D without glasses (-0.38 ± 0.32D, mean ± S.D.) and TV3D (-0.37 ± 0.34D). Also, no differences were found between the various segments of the film, or between the accommodative response to different points of one frame (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.015) was found, however, between the TV2D with (-0.32 ± 0.32D) and without glasses (-0.38 ± 0.32D). In the Nintendo experiment the accommodative responses obtained in modes 2D (-2.57 ± 0.30D) and 3D (-2.49 ± 0.28D) were significantly different (paired t-test p = 0.03). The need to use shutter-glasses may affect the accommodative response during the viewing of displays, and the accommodative response when playing

  6. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Appendix B, Part 6: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Main Site is located about 40 miles east of San Francisco at the southeast end of the Livermore Valley in southern Alameda County, California. The initial mission of LLNL, operated by the University of California, was to do the research, development, and testing necessary to support the design of nuclear weapons. Over the years, this mission has been broadened to encompass such areas as strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, the economy, and education.This report presents results from an environment, safety, and health assessment report concerned with the storage of plutonium

  7. Defining Information Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Björn; Möller, Niklas

    2017-11-15

    This article proposes a new definition of information security, the 'Appropriate Access' definition. Apart from providing the basic criteria for a definition-correct demarcation and meaning concerning the state of security-it also aims at being a definition suitable for any information security perspective. As such, it bridges the conceptual divide between so-called 'soft issues' of information security (those including, e.g., humans, organizations, culture, ethics, policies, and law) and more technical issues. Because of this it is also suitable for various analytical purposes, such as analysing possible security breaches, or for studying conflicting attitudes on security in an organization. The need for a new definition is demonstrated by pointing to a number of problems for the standard definition type of information security-the so-called CIA definition. Besides being too broad as well as too narrow, it cannot properly handle the soft issues of information security, nor recognize the contextual and normative nature of security.

  8. Managing Cisco network security

    CERN Document Server

    Knipp, Eric

    2002-01-01

    An in-depth knowledge of how to configure Cisco IP network security is a MUST for anyone working in today''s internetworked world"There''s no question that attacks on enterprise networks are increasing in frequency and sophistication..."-Mike Fuhrman, Cisco Systems Manager, Security ConsultingManaging Cisco Network Security, Second Edition offers updated and revised information covering many of Cisco''s security products that provide protection from threats, detection of network security incidents, measurement of vulnerability and policy compliance and management of security policy across an extended organization. These are the tools that network administrators have to mount defenses against threats. Chapters also cover the improved functionality and ease of the Cisco Secure Policy Manger software used by thousands of small-to-midsized businesses and a special section on the Cisco Aironet Wireless Security Solutions.Security from a real-world perspectiveKey coverage of the new technologies offered by the Cisc...

  9. A human engineering and ergonomic evaluation of the security access panel interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartney, C.; Banks, W.W.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically determine which of several security hardware interface designs produced the highest levels of end-user performance and acceptance. The FESSP Security Alarms and Monitoring Systems program area commissioned the authors study as decision support for upgrading the Argus security system's primary user interface so that Argus equipment will support the new DOE and DoD security access badges. Twenty-two test subjects were repeatedly tested using six remote access panel (RAP) designs. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses one of these interface designs in its security access booths. Along with the RAP B insert-style reader, the authors tested five prototype RAP variants, each with a different style of swipe badge reader, through which a badge is moved or swiped. The authors asked the untrained test subjects to use each RAP while they described how they thought they should respond so that the system would operate correctly in reading the magnetic strip on a security badge. With each RAP variant, subjects were required to make four successful card reads (swipes) in which the card reader correctly read and logged the transaction. After each trial, a subject completed a 10-item interface acceptance evaluation before approaching the next RAP. After interacting with the RAP interfaces (for a total of the six RAP trials), each subject completed a 7-item overview evaluation that compared and ranked the five experimental RAPs, using the original (RAP B) insert style as a standard

  10. Securing the Vista Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Peter

    2007-01-01

    "Securing the Vista Environment" takes you on a quick tour of the most significant security features in Vista, Microsoft's first revision of Windows in almost six years. You'll get background on threats and vulnerabilities that will make you think differently about security. Security is more than just the technology and configurations--it's about how we use the system that makes it secure or not. Then we'll cover Vista's security features, from user privileges to Windows Defender, User Account Control, and BitLocker, as well as strategies for protecting your information from unwanted disclo

  11. Digital security technology simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Bernard J

    2007-01-01

    Digital security technology is making great strides in replacing analog and other traditional security systems including CCTV card access, personal identification and alarm monitoring applications. Like any new technology, the author says, it is important to understand its benefits and limitations before purchasing and installing, to ensure its proper operation and effectiveness. This article is a primer for security directors on how digital technology works. It provides an understanding of the key components which make up the foundation for digital security systems, focusing on three key aspects of the digital security world: the security network, IP cameras and IP recorders.

  12. ICT security management

    OpenAIRE

    SCHREURS, Jeanne; MOREAU, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Security becomes more and more important and companies are aware that it has become a management problem. It’s critical to know what are the critical resources and processes of the company and their weaknesses. A security audit can be a handy solution. We have developed BEVA, a method to critically analyse the company and to uncover the weak spots in the security system. BEVA results also in a general security score and security scores for each security factor. These will be used in the risk ...

  13. Android apps security

    CERN Document Server

    Gunasekera, Sheran

    2012-01-01

    Android Apps Security provides guiding principles for how to best design and develop Android apps with security in mind. It explores concepts that can be used to secure apps and how developers can use and incorporate these security features into their apps. This book will provide developers with the information they need to design useful, high-performing, and secure apps that expose end-users to as little risk as possible.  Overview of Android OS versions, features, architecture and security.  Detailed examination of areas where attacks on applications can take place and what controls should b

  14. Smart security proven practices

    CERN Document Server

    Quilter, J David

    2014-01-01

    Smart Security: Understanding and Contributing to the Business is a video presentation. Length: 68 minutes. In Smart Security: Understanding and Contributing to the Business, presenter J. David Quilter demonstrates the benefits of how a fully integrated security program increases business profits and delivers smart security practices at the same time. The presentation does away with the misconception that security is only an expense. In fact, a well-integrated security program can protect business interests, thereby enhancing productivity and net income. Quilter covers cost analysis and secu

  15. Nation State as Security Provider in Human Security Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Padmi, Made Fitri

    2015-01-01

    Human Security notion is emphasizing on human as the central of security studies, challenging the position of state as the core of security. Some studies are tried to separate the state security and human security, however there are strong connection between these two notions. State has important role in establishing and maintaining the security of its own citizens. Through social contract and social security protection, state are oblige to set the security of its own people as their security...

  16. Parasocial interaction with my avatar: effects of interdependent self-construal and the mediating role of self-presence in an avatar-based console game, Wii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-A Annie; Park, Namkee

    2009-12-01

    The "self" concept has grown increasingly important in interactive media environments. This study investigated self-related processes in an avatar-based game console, Wii. A key feature of the Wii is its motion-sensing capability that empowers players to manipulate and interact with items on-screen via movement. The present study examined the effects of video game players' self-construal on parasocial interaction with their avatars and feelings of self-presence. In this study, parasocial interaction was operationally defined as the extent of game players' interpersonal involvement with their avatar and the extent to which game players perceive themselves as interacting with the avatar. Self-presence was defined as the degree to which video game players feel as if their avatar on the screen were their real self. Based on an experiment, the study discovered that game players with high interdependent self-construal showed closer parasocial interaction and higher level of self-presence than those with low interdependent self-construal. Results also showed that self-presence mediated the effects of interdependent self-construal on the parasocial relationship with game players' avatars. Thus, the study discovered an important individual difference factor, interdependent self-construal, affecting the degree to which people form a parasocial relationship with their virtual self that is visually manifested in the form of an avatar. In addition, the present study added empirical evidence about the mediating role played by self-presence in avatar-based video games.

  17. Initial laboratory experience with a novel ultrasound probe for standard and single-port robotic kidney surgery: increasing console surgeon autonomy and minimizing instrument clashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoubi, Rachid; Autorino, Riccardo; Laydner, Humberto; Guillotreau, Julien; White, Michael A; Hillyer, Shahab; Spana, Gregory; Khanna, Rakesh; Isaac, Wahib; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Stein, Robert J; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel ultrasound probe specifically developed for robotic surgery by determining its efficiency in identifying renal tumors. The study was carried out using the Da Vinci™ surgical system in one female pig. Renal tumor targets were created by percutaneous injection of a tumor mimic mixture. Single-port and standard robotic partial nephrectomy were performed. Intraoperative ultrasound was performed using both standard laparoscopic probe and the new ProART™ Robotic probe. Probe maneuverability and ease of handling for tumor localization were recorded. The standard laparoscopic probe was guided by the assistant. Significant clashing with robotic arms was noted during the single-port procedure. The novel robotic probe was easily introduced through the assistant trocar, and held by the console surgeon using the robotic Prograsp™ with no registered clashing in the external operative field. The average time for grasping the new robotic probe was less than 10 s. Once inserted and grasped, no limitation was found in terms of instrument clashing during the single-port procedure. This novel ultrasound probe developed for robotic surgery was noted to be user-friendly when performing porcine standard and especially single-port robotic partial nephrectomy. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Modelling security and trust with Secure Tropos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgini, P.; Mouratidis, H.; Zannone, N.; Mouratidis, H.; Giorgini, P.

    2006-01-01

    Although the concepts of security and trust play an important issue in the development of information systems, they have been mainly neglected by software engineering methodologies. In this chapter we present an approach that considers security and trust throughout the software development process.

  19. Securing abundance : The politics of energy security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Energy Security is a concept that is known in the literature for its ‘slippery’ nature and subsequent wide range of definitions. Instead of another attempt at grasping the essence of this concept, Securing Abundance reformulates the problem and moves away from a definitional problem to a theoretical

  20. Embedded Java security security for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Debbabi, Mourad; Talhi, Chamseddine

    2007-01-01

    Java brings more functionality and versatility to the world of mobile devices, but it also introduces new security threats. This book contains a presentation of embedded Java security and presents the main components of embedded Java. It gives an idea of the platform architecture and is useful for researchers and practitioners.

  1. Quality assurance plan for the data acquisition and management system for monitoring the fuel oil spill at the Sandia National Laboratories installation in Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Leser, C.C.; Ramsey, G.M.; Widing, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    In February 1975, the accidental puncture of an underground transfer line buried about 4 ft below the ground surface at the SNL installation in Livermore, California, resulted in the release of approximately 225.5 m 3 of No. 2 diesel fuel. This report describes the formal quality assurance plan that will be used for the data acquisition and management system developed to monitor a bioremediation pilot study by Argonne National Laboratory in association with Sandia National Laboratories. The data acquisition and management system will record the site data during the bioremediation effort and assist users in site analysis. The designs of the three major subsystems of this system are described in this report. Quality assurance criteria are defined for the management, performance, and assessment of the system. Finally, the roles and responsibilities for configuration management of this system are defined for the entire life cycle of the project

  2. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Code-to-Code Comparison of Inter Lab Test Problem 1 for Asteroid Impact Hazard Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Robert P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Howley, Kirsten [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferguson, Jim Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gisler, Galen Ross [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Plesko, Catherine Suzanne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Managan, Rob [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Owen, Mike [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wasem, Joseph [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bruck-Syal, Megan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The NNSA Laboratories have entered into an interagency collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to explore strategies for prevention of Earth impacts by asteroids. Assessment of such strategies relies upon use of sophisticated multi-physics simulation codes. This document describes the task of verifying and cross-validating, between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), modeling capabilities and methods to be employed as part of the NNSA-NASA collaboration. The approach has been to develop a set of test problems and then to compare and contrast results obtained by use of a suite of codes, including MCNP, RAGE, Mercury, Ares, and Spheral. This document provides a short description of the codes, an overview of the idealized test problems, and discussion of the results for deflection by kinetic impactors and stand-off nuclear explosions.

  3. Security of pipeline facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.C. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Calgary, AB (Canada); Van Egmond, C.; Duquette, L. [National Energy Board, Calgary, AB (Canada); Revie, W. [Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This working group provided an update on provincial, federal and industry directions regarding the security of pipeline facilities. The decision to include security issues in the NEB Act was discussed as well as the Pipeline Security Management Assessment Project, which was created to establish a better understanding of existing security management programs as well as to assist the NEB in the development and implementation of security management regulations and initiatives. Amendments to the NEB were also discussed. Areas of pipeline security management assessment include physical safety management; cyber and information security management; and personnel security. Security management regulations were discussed, as well as implementation policies. Details of the Enbridge Liquids Pipelines Security Plan were examined. It was noted that the plan incorporates flexibility for operations and is integrated with Emergency Response and Crisis Management. Asset characterization and vulnerability assessments were discussed, as well as security and terrorist threats. It was noted that corporate security threat assessment and auditing are based on threat information from the United States intelligence community. It was concluded that the oil and gas industry is a leader in security in North America. The Trans Alaska Pipeline Incident was discussed as a reminder of how costly accidents can be. Issues of concern for the future included geographic and climate issues. It was concluded that limited resources are an ongoing concern, and that the regulatory environment is becoming increasingly prescriptive. Other concerns included the threat of not taking international terrorism seriously, and open media reporting of vulnerability of critical assets, including maps. tabs., figs.

  4. Security Protocols in a Nutshell

    OpenAIRE

    Toorani, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Security protocols are building blocks in secure communications. They deploy some security mechanisms to provide certain security services. Security protocols are considered abstract when analyzed, but they can have extra vulnerabilities when implemented. This manuscript provides a holistic study on security protocols. It reviews foundations of security protocols, taxonomy of attacks on security protocols and their implementations, and different methods and models for security analysis of pro...

  5. Institutionalizing Security Force Assistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binetti, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    .... It looks at the manner in which security assistance guidance is developed and executed. An examination of national level policy and the guidance from senior military and civilian leaders highlights the important role of Security Force Assistance...

  6. Security of Dependable Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.

    2011-01-01

    Security and dependability are crucial for designing trustworthy systems. The approach “security as an add-on” is not satisfactory, yet the integration of security in the development process is still an open problem. Especially, a common framework for specifying dependability and security is very...... much needed. There are many pressing challenges however; here, we address some of them. Firstly, security for dependable systems is a broad concept and traditional view of security, e.g., in terms of confidentiality, integrity and availability, does not suffice. Secondly, a clear definition of security...... in the dependability context is not agreed upon. Thirdly, security attacks cannot be modeled as a stochastic process, because the adversary’s strategy is often carefully planned. In this chapter, we explore these challenges and provide some directions toward their solutions....

  7. Security in Computer Applications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development. The last part of the lecture covers some miscellaneous issues like the use of cryptography, rules for networking applications, and social engineering threats. This lecture was first given on Thursd...

  8. Wireshark network security

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Piyush

    2015-01-01

    If you are network administrator or a security analyst with an interest in using Wireshark for security analysis, then this is the book for you. Basic familiarity with common network and application services terms and technologies is assumed.

  9. Medical Information Security

    OpenAIRE

    William C. Figg, Ph.D.; Hwee Joo Kam, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Modern medicine is facing a complex environment, not from medical technology but rather government regulations and information vulnerability. HIPPA is the government’s attempt to protect patient’s information yet this only addresses traditional record handling. The main threat is from the evolving security issues. Many medical offices and facilities have multiple areas of information security concerns. Physical security is often weak, office personnel are not always aware of security needs an...

  10. Windows Security patch required

    CERN Multimedia

    3004-01-01

    This concerns Windows PCs (XP, 2000, NT) which are NOT centrally managed at CERN for security patches, e.g. home PCs, experiment PCs, portables,... A security hole which can give full privileges on Windows systems needs to be URGENTLY patched. Details of the security hole and hotfix are at: http://cern.ch/it-div/news/hotfix-MS03-026.asp http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/MS03-026.asp

  11. Cloud security mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing has brought great benefits in cost and flexibility for provisioning services. The greatest challenge of cloud computing remains however the question of security. The current standard tools in access control mechanisms and cryptography can only partly solve the security challenges of cloud infrastructures. In the recent years of research in security and cryptography, novel mechanisms, protocols and algorithms have emerged that offer new ways to create secure services atop cloud...

  12. Security system signal supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chritton, M.R.; Matter, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    This purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees for understanding and applying line supervision techniques to security communication links. A review of security communication links is followed by detailed discussions of link physical protection and DC/AC static supervision and dynamic supervision techniques. Material is also presented on security for atmospheric transmission and video line supervision. A glossary of security communication line supervision terms is appended. 16 figs

  13. Android application security essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, Pragati

    2013-01-01

    Android Application Security Essentials is packed with examples, screenshots, illustrations, and real world use cases to secure your apps the right way.If you are looking for guidance and detailed instructions on how to secure app data, then this book is for you. Developers, architects, managers, and technologists who wish to enhance their knowledge of Android security will find this book interesting. Some prior knowledge of development on the Android stack is desirable but not required.

  14. Finance/security/life.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, P.

    2017-01-01

    What is the contemporary relation between finance and security? This essay encourages further research into the securitization of finance by developing the notion of ‘finance/security/life’. A focus on the intersections of finance/security/life will be shown to prompt a broadened range of critical, cross-disciplinary concerns with the various ways in which financial markets are positioned as vital to securing wealth, welfare and wellbeing.

  15. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  16. Hybrid Security Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu CONSTANTINESCU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Policy is defined as the rules and regulations set by the organization. They are laid down by management in compliance with industry regulations, law and internal decisions. Policies are mandatory. Security policies rules how the information is protected against security vulnerabilities and they are the basis for security awareness, training and vital for security audits. Policies are focused on desired results. The means of achieving the goals are defined on controls, standards and procedures.

  17. Mobile platform security

    CERN Document Server

    Asokan, N; Dmitrienko, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mobile security has garnered considerable interest in both the research community and industry due to the popularity of smartphones. The current smartphone platforms are open systems that allow application development, also for malicious parties. To protect the mobile device, its user, and other mobile ecosystem stakeholders such as network operators, application execution is controlled by a platform security architecture. This book explores how such mobile platform security architectures work. We present a generic model for mobile platform security architectures: the model illustrat

  18. EMI Security Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    White, J.; Schuller, B.; Qiang, W.; Groep, D.; Koeroo, O.; Salle, M.; Sustr, Z.; Kouril, D.; Millar, P.; Benedyczak, K.; Ceccanti, A.; Leinen, S.; Tschopp, V.; Fuhrmann, P.; Heyman, E.; Konstantinov, A.

    2013-01-01

    This document describes the various architectures of the three middlewares that comprise the EMI software stack. It also outlines the common efforts in the security area that allow interoperability between these middlewares. The assessment of the EMI Security presented in this document was performed internally by members of the Security Area of the EMI project.

  19. Secure pairing with biometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhan, I.R.; Boom, B.J.; Doumen, J.M.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    Secure pairing enables two devices that share no prior context with each other to agree upon a security association, which they can use to protect their subsequent communication. Secure pairing offers guarantees of the association partner identity and it should be resistant to eavesdropping and to a

  20. Selecting Security Technology Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tod

    2009-01-01

    The world of security technology holds great promise, but it is fraught with opportunities for expensive missteps and misapplications. The quality of the security technology consultants and system integrators one uses will have a direct bearing on how well his school masters this complex subject. Security technology consultants help determine…

  1. Microsoft Azure security

    CERN Document Server

    Freato, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for Azure administrators who want to understand the application of security principles in distributed environments and how to use Azure to its full capability to reduce the risks of security breaches. Only basic knowledge of the security processes and services of Microsoft Azure is required.

  2. Operations Security (OPSEC) Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Request for Proposal TAC Threat Analysis Center TECHINT Technical Intelligence TMAP Telecommunications Monitoring and Assessment Program TTP...communications security, use of secure telephones, and a robust Telecommunications Monitoring and Assessment Program ( TMAP ) prevents undetermined...and AFI 33-219, Telecommunications Monitoring and Assessment Program ( TMAP ), or Information Assurance (IA) or Communications Security (COMSEC

  3. SOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    RESPONSIBILITY CENTCOM COALITION MEDIA SOCIAL MEDIA NEWS ARTICLES PRESS RELEASES IMAGERY VIDEOS TRANSCRIPTS VISITORS AND PERSONNEL FAMILY CENTER FAMILY READINESS CENTCOM WEBMAIL SOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY ACCOUNTABILITY HomeVISITORS AND PERSONNELSOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY FAQ on Security for Social Media Due to the widespread use of

  4. Mobile communication security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, F.M.J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Security of the mobile network Fabian van den Broek We looked at the security of the wireless connection between mobile phone and cell towers and suggested possible improvements. The security was analysed on a design level, by looking at the protocols and encryption techniques, but also on an

  5. Learning Puppet security

    CERN Document Server

    Slagle, Jason

    2015-01-01

    If you are a security professional whose workload is increasing, or a Puppet professional looking to increase your knowledge of security, or even an experienced systems administrator, then this book is for you. This book will take you to the next level of security automation using Puppet. The book requires no prior knowledge of Puppet to get started.

  6. Refelctions on the security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Hofreiter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented the author‘s reflections about concept meaning of the security, about his systemic perception and actual scientific access to the security research. The author presented securitology paradigm for valuation security optional reference object.

  7. Core software security security at the source

    CERN Document Server

    Ransome, James

    2013-01-01

    First and foremost, Ransome and Misra have made an engaging book that will empower readers in both large and small software development and engineering organizations to build security into their products. This book clarifies to executives the decisions to be made on software security and then provides guidance to managers and developers on process and procedure. Readers are armed with firm solutions for the fight against cyber threats.-Dr. Dena Haritos Tsamitis. Carnegie Mellon UniversityIn the wake of cloud computing and mobile apps, the issue of software security has never been more importan

  8. Secure Transportation Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-01-01

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  9. Pro Spring security

    CERN Document Server

    Scarioni, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Security is a key element in the development of any non-trivial application. The Spring Security Framework provides a comprehensive set of functionalities to implement industry-standard authentication and authorization mechanisms for Java applications. Pro Spring Security will be a reference and advanced tutorial that will do the following: Guides you through the implementation of the security features for a Java web application by presenting consistent examples built from the ground-up. Demonstrates the different authentication and authorization methods to secure enterprise-level applications

  10. Android security cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Makan, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Android Security Cookbook' breaks down and enumerates the processes used to exploit and remediate Android app security vulnerabilities in the form of detailed recipes and walkthroughs.""Android Security Cookbook"" is aimed at anyone who is curious about Android app security and wants to be able to take the necessary practical measures to protect themselves; this means that Android application developers, security researchers and analysts, penetration testers, and generally any CIO, CTO, or IT managers facing the impeding onslaught of mobile devices in the business environment will benefit from

  11. Information security management handbook

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The Information Security Management Handbook continues its tradition of consistently communicating the fundamental concepts of security needed to be a true CISSP. In response to new developments, Volume 4 supplements the previous volumes with new information covering topics such as wireless, HIPAA, the latest hacker attacks and defenses, intrusion detection, and provides expanded coverage on security management issues and applications security. Even those that don't plan on sitting for the CISSP exam will find that this handbook is a great information security reference.The changes in the tech

  12. European [Security] Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2013-01-01

    The past 20 years, since the 1992 Treaty on European Union, have seen the gradual creation of both an “Area of Freedom, Security and Justice” and a “Common Foreign and Security Policy”. More recent is the development of a “European Neighbourhood Policy” over the past 10 years. All three...... of these policies involved the navigation and negotiation of security, borders and governance in and by the European Union (EU). This article analyses these practices of bordering and governance through a five-fold security framework. The article argues that a richer understanding of EU security discourses can...

  13. Quality of Security Service: Adaptive Security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levin, Timothy E; Irvine, Cynthia E; Spyropoulou, Evdoxia

    2004-01-01

    .... In this approach, the "level of service" must be within an acceptable range, and can indicate degrees of security with respect to various aspects of assurance, mechanistic strength, administrative diligence, etc...

  14. Securing collaborative environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Mary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-16

    The diverse set of organizations and software components involved in a typical collaboratory make providing a seamless security solution difficult. In addition, the users need support for a broad range of frequency and locations for access to the collaboratory. A collaboratory security solution needs to be robust enough to ensure that valid participants are not denied access because of its failure. There are many tools that can be applied to the task of securing collaborative environments and these include public key infrastructure, secure sockets layer, Kerberos, virtual and real private networks, grid security infrastructure, and username/password. A combination of these mechanisms can provide effective secure collaboration capabilities. In this paper, we discuss the requirements of typical collaboratories and some proposals for applying various security mechanisms to collaborative environments.

  15. Contemporary security management

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, John

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary Security Management, 3rd Edition teaches security professionals how to operate an efficient security department and how to integrate smoothly with other groups inside and outside their own organizations. Fay demonstrates the specifics of security management: * how to organize, plan, develop and manage a security operation. * how to identify vulnerabilities. * how to determine the protective resources required to offset threats. * how to implement all necessary physical and IT security measures. Security professionals share the responsibility for mitigating damage, serving as a resource to an Emergency Tactical Center, assisting the return of business continuity, and liaising with local response agencies such as police and fire departments, emergency medical responders, and emergency warning centers. At the organizational level, the book addresses budgeting, employee performance, counseling, hiring and termination, employee theft and other misconduct, and offers sound advice on building constructi...

  16. Introduction to Hardware Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yier Jin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hardware security has become a hot topic recently with more and more researchers from related research domains joining this area. However, the understanding of hardware security is often mixed with cybersecurity and cryptography, especially cryptographic hardware. For the same reason, the research scope of hardware security has never been clearly defined. To help researchers who have recently joined in this area better understand the challenges and tasks within the hardware security domain and to help both academia and industry investigate countermeasures and solutions to solve hardware security problems, we will introduce the key concepts of hardware security as well as its relations to related research topics in this survey paper. Emerging hardware security topics will also be clearly depicted through which the future trend will be elaborated, making this survey paper a good reference for the continuing research efforts in this area.

  17. DNS security management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2017-01-01

    An advanced Domain Name System (DNS) security resource that explores the operation of DNS, its vulnerabilities, basic security approaches, and mitigation strategies DNS Security Management offers an overall role-based security approach and discusses the various threats to the Domain Name Systems (DNS). This vital resource is filled with proven strategies for detecting and mitigating these all too frequent threats. The authors—noted experts on the topic—offer an introduction to the role of DNS and explore the operation of DNS. They cover a myriad of DNS vulnerabilities and include preventative strategies that can be implemented. Comprehensive in scope, the text shows how to secure DNS resolution with the Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC), DNS firewall, server controls, and much more. In addition, the text includes discussions on security applications facilitated by DNS, such as anti-spam, SFP, and DANE.

  18. Information security cost management

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavan, Ioana V

    2006-01-01

    While information security is an ever-present challenge for all types of organizations today, most focus on providing security without addressing the necessities of staff, time, or budget in a practical manner.Information Security Cost Management offers a pragmatic approach to implementing information security, taking budgetary and real-world constraints into consideration. By providing frameworks, step-by-step processes, and project management breakdowns, this book demonstrates how to design the best security strategy with the resources you have available. Organized into five sections, the book-Focuses on setting the right road map so that you can be most effective in your information security implementationsDiscusses cost-effective staffing, the single biggest expense to the security organizationPresents practical ways to build and manage the documentation that details strategy, provides resources for operating annual audits, and illustrates how to advertise accomplishments to senior management effectivelyI...

  19. Computer Security Systems Enable Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggen, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A good security system enables access and protects information from damage or tampering, but the most important aspects of a security system aren't technical. A security procedures manual addresses the human element of computer security. (MLW)

  20. Home - Defense Technology Security Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    by @dtsamil Defense Technology Security Administration Mission, Culture, and History Executive Official seal of Defense Technology Security Administration Official seal of Defense Technology Security Administration OFFICE of the SECRETARY of DEFENSE Defense Technology Security Administration

  1. Investigating the Usability and Acute Effects of a Bedside Video Console to Prefrontal Cortical Activity Alterations: A Preclinical Study in Healthy Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knols, Ruud H; Swanenburg, Jaap; De Bon, Dino; Gennaro, Federico; Wolf, Martin; Krüger, Bernard; Bettex, Dominique; de Bruin, Eling D

    2017-01-01

    Elderly people at risk of developing cognitive decline; e.g., following surgery, may benefit from structured, challenging, and repetitive cognitive video training. This study assessed usability and acute effects of a newly developed bedside console (COPHYCON). Fifteen healthy elderly individuals performed a one-time 80-min intervention, including cognitive video games aimed at improving awareness and selective attention. Perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use (Technology Acceptance Model) were assessed together with measures of the achieved game level, reaction times, (in-) correct responses during ALERT and SELECT game play. Further, prefrontal cortical involvement of the regional cerebral hemoglobin saturation (rS02%) assessed with functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) ( n = 5) and EEG power ( n = 10) was analyzed. All participants completed the study without any adverse events. Perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use (TAM scores range 1-7) of the system varied between 3.9 and 6.3. The game levels reached for awareness varied between 9 and 11 (initial score 8-10), for reaction speed between 439 and 469 ms, and for correct responses between 74.1 and 78.8%. The highest level for the selective attention games was 2 (initial score 1), where reaction speed varied between 439 and 469 ms, correct responses between 96.2 and 98.5%, respectively. The decrease of rS02% in the right prefrontal cortex during gameplay was significantly ( p games ( p games. EEG recordings of theta power significantly decreased in the averaged ~0.25-0.75 time interval for the left prefrontal cortex sensor across the cognitive game levels between the ALERT 1 and SELECT 1, as well as between SELECT 1 and 2 games. Participants rated the usability of the COPHYCON training positively. Further results indicate that video gaming may be an effective measure to affect prefrontal cortical functioning in elderly. The results warrant a clinical explorative study investigating the

  2. Graphic console for analysis of severe accidents visualization of OEs, NAEs and calculation of the source term for the NPP-LV (CoGrAAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval V, S.; Mendoza E, P. R.; Gonzalez C, J. M.; Cecenas F, M.; Tijerina S, F.

    2016-09-01

    In response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the NRC conducted an analysis and issued recommendations to improve the safety of the nuclear reactors. These include strengthening and integrating emergency response capabilities and emphasizing periodic staff training, the performance of simulation exercises. As a tool to observe these recommendations, the Graphic Console was developed for Analysis of Severe Accidents, Visualization of OEs, NAEs and calculation of the source term for nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-LV ; CoGrAAS). The CoGrAAS is a computer system that displays in an integrated, graphic and dynamic way the information of a catalog of previously simulated accident scenarios. Has core mimics, vessel, primary containment and safety systems, trend graph of thermodynamic and radiological variables and the emergency procedures (OEs), chronological list of events, windows with detailed information for the dry-well, among others. The use of CoGrAAS allows that staff to understand and become familiar with the thermo-hydraulic progression of actual scenarios that exceed the design basis including those with core damage as severe accidents. The system enables personnel to develop an integral vision of the scenarios during the exercises and drills by observing and analyzing the evolution of the main reactor, core and primary containment variables, the response of emergency systems and the influence of that progression on OEs and the emergency action levels (NAEs). The CoGrAAS allows o observe the radiological variables and obtain the source term, to make the projection of doses, at any time within the scenario evolution. Thus, not only can the phenomenology of severe accidents be analyzed and understood, it is also possible to exercise, verify and evaluate the performance of critical tasks in the application of procedures, guidelines and emergency management plans. (Author)

  3. Women with fibromyalgia's experience with three motion-controlled video game consoles and indicators of symptom severity and performance of activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Kristensen, Lola Qvist; Brooks, Eva Petersson; Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Little is known of Motion-Controlled Video Games (MCVGs) as an intervention for people with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to explore the experience women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) had, using commercially available MCVGs; and to investigate indicators of symptom severity and performance of activities of daily living (ADL). Of 15 female participants diagnosed with FMS, 7 completed a program of five sessions with Nintendo Wii (Wii), five sessions with PlayStation 3 Move (PS3 Move) and five sessions with Microsoft Xbox Kinect (Xbox Kinect). Interviews were conducted at baseline and post-intervention and were supported by data from observation and self-reported assessment. Participants experienced play with MCVGs as a way to get distraction from pain symptoms while doing fun and manageable exercise. They enjoyed the slow pace and familiarity of Wii, while some considered PS3 Move to be too fast paced. Xbox Kinect was reported as the best console for exercise. There were no indication of general improvement in symptom severity or performance of ADL. This study demonstrated MCVG as an effective healthcare intervention for the women with FMS who completed the program, with regards to temporary pain relief and enjoyable low impact exercise. Implications for Rehabilitation Exercise is recommended in the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). People with FMS often find it counterintuitive to exercise because of pain exacerbation, which may influence adherence to an exercise program. Motion-controlled video games may offer temporary pain relief and fun low impact exercise for women with FMS.

  4. An Analysis Of Wireless Security

    OpenAIRE

    Salendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    The WLAN security includes Wired Equivalent Primary WEP and WI-FI protected Access WPA. Today WEP is regarded as very poor security standard. WEP was regarded as very old security standard and has many security issues which users need to be addressed. In this Paper we will discuss Wireless Security and ways to improve on wireless security.

  5. What is Security? A perspective on achieving security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-05

    This presentation provides a perspective on achieving security in an organization. It touches upon security as a mindset, ability to adhere to rules, cultivating awareness of the reason for a security mindset, the quality of a security program, willingness to admit fault or acknowledge failure, peer review in security, science as a model that can be applied to the security profession, the security vision, security partnering, staleness in the security program, security responsibilities, and achievement of success over time despite the impossibility of perfection.

  6. Overview of security culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matulanya, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear Security culture concept has been aggressively promoted over the past several years as a tool to improve the physical protection of the nuclear and radioactive materials due to growing threats of catastrophic terrorism and other new security challenges. It is obvious that, the scope of nuclear security and the associated cultures need to be extended beyond the traditional task of protecting weapons-usable materials. The role of IAEA is to strengthen the nuclear security framework globally and in leading the coordination of international activities in this field. Therefore all governments should work closely with the IAEA to take stronger measures to ensure the physical protection, the safety and security of the nuclear and radioactive materials. In the effort to reflect this new realities and concerns, the IAEA in 2008 came up with the document, the Nuclear Security Culture, Nuclear Security Series No. 7, Implementing Guide to the member states which urged every member state to take appropriate measures to promote security culture with respect to nuclear and radioactive materials. The document depicted this cultural approach as the way to protect individual, society and the environment. Among other things, the document defined nuclear security culture as characteristics and attitudes in organizations and of individuals which establishes that, nuclear security issues receives attention warranted by their significance. (au)

  7. SecurID

    CERN Multimedia

    Now called RSA SecurID, SecurID is a mechanism developed by Security Dynamics that allows two-factor authentication for a user on a network resource. It works on the principle of the unique password mode, based on a shared secret. Every sixty seconds, the component generates a new six-digit token on the screen. The latter comes from the current time (internal clock) and the seed (SecurID private key that is available on the component, and is also from the SecurID server). During an authentication request, the SecurID server will check the entered token by performing exactly the same calculation as that performed by your component. The server knows the two information required for this calculation: the current time and the seed of your component. Access is allowed if the token calculated by the server matches the token you specified.

  8. Hybrid-secure MPC 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucas, Christoph; Raub, Dominik; Maurer, Ueli

    2010-01-01

    of the adversary, without being aware of the actual adversarial setting. Thus, hybrid-secure MPC protocols allow for graceful degradation of security. We present a hybrid-secure MPC protocol that provides an optimal trade-off between IT robustness and computational privacy: For any robustness parameter ρ ... obtain one MPC protocol that is simultaneously IT secure with robustness for up to t ≤ ρ actively corrupted parties, IT secure with fairness (no robustness) for up to t ... in the universal composability (UC) framework (based on a network of secure channels, a broadcast channel, and a common reference string). It achieves the bound on the trade-off between robustness and privacy shown by Ishai et al. [CRYPTO'06] and Katz [STOC'07], the bound on fairness shown by Cleve [STOC'86...

  9. The strategic security officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of the strategic security officer, and the potential that it brings to the healthcare security operational environment. The author believes that training and development, along with strict hiring practices, can enable a security department to reach a new level of professionalism, proficiency and efficiency. The strategic officer for healthcare security is adapted from the "strategic corporal" concept of US Marine Corps General Charles C. Krulak which focuses on understanding the total force implications of the decisions made by the lowest level leaders within the Corps (Krulak, 1999). This article focuses on the strategic organizational implications of every security officer's decisions in the constantly changing and increasingly volatile operational environment of healthcare security.

  10. Materialism and food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M W; Wilson, M

    2005-12-01

    The present studies examined if materialists have an elevated concern about food availability, presumably stemming from a general survival security motivation. Study 1 found that materialists set a greater life goal of food security, and reported more food insecurity during their childhood. Materialists reported less present-day food insecurity. Study 2 revealed that materialists stored/hoarded more food at home, and that obese persons endorsed materialism more than low/normal weight persons. Study 3 found that experimentally decreasing participants' feelings of survival security (via a mortality salience manipulation) led to greater endorsement of materialism, food security as goal, and using food for emotional comfort. The results imply that materialists overcame the food insecurity of their childhood by making food security a top life goal, but that materialists' current concerns about food security may not wholly stem from genuine threats to their food supply.

  11. PRIVATE SECURITY IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Vukasović

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of sport for international integration, affirmation, a sense of belonging and other values of general interest, in order to maintain and open new prospects of development, it is necessary to form the private security system along with state security system, with a view to creating conditions for development sports athletes to achieve better results both in domestic and international competitions. Private security is only one element of an integrated security system which, with its efficient organization with the use of adequate means and measures should provide answers to new challenges, risks and threats. Private security in line with the new understanding of the concept of security has an important role in providing athletes.

  12. While Working Around Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg

    Users of technology encounter various IT security mechanisms in their everyday lives. If these mechanisms fail to support everyday activities, they either get in the way, or the users find a way to work around them. Even though users manage to carry out everyday activities by using substandard...... IT security mechanisms or via workarounds, it will influence their experience of security. If researchers and designers only focus on IT security artifacts and fail to take the user experience into account, incorrect processes or workarounds will occur. Accordingly, to get users to follow the correct process...... may seem to be a criterion of success, even though it may yield a less appropriate experience of security. This dissertation deals with an improved understanding of IT security sensitive IT artifacts and presents three design methods, and a framework for addressing the complexities and contingencies...

  13. While working around security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg; Bødker, Susanne; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    This paper describes our work at two levels. First of all the paper discusses how users of IT deal with issues of IT security in their everyday life. Secondly, we discuss how the kind of understanding of IT security that comes out of careful analyses of use confronts the ways in which usable...... IT security is established in the literature. Recent literature has called for better conceptual models as a starting point for improving IT security. In contrast to such models we propose to dress up designers by helping them better understand the work that goes into everyday security. The result...... is a methodological toolbox that helps address and design for usable and useful IT security. We deploy examples of analyses and design, carried out by ourselves and by others to fine-tune our design perspective; in particular we use examples from three current research projects....

  14. Security Engine Management of Router based on Security Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Su Hyung Jo; Ki Young Kim; Sang Ho Lee

    2007-01-01

    Security management has changed from the management of security equipments and useful interface to manager. It analyzes the whole security conditions of network and preserves the network services from attacks. Secure router technology has security functions, such as intrusion detection, IPsec(IP Security) and access control, are applied to legacy router for secure networking. It controls an unauthorized router access and detects an illegal network intrusion. This paper re...

  15. ITIL® and information security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jašek, Roman; Králík, Lukáš; Popelka, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the context of ITIL framework and management of information security. It is therefore a summary study, where the first part is focused on the safety objectives in connection with the ITIL framework. First of all, there is a focus on ITIL process ISM (Information Security Management), its principle and system management. The conclusion is about link between standards, which are related to security, and ITIL framework

  16. Towards Information Security Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Petrescu; Delia Mioara Popescu; Nicoleta Sirbu

    2010-01-01

    Information security has come to be recognized as increasingly important because global communication and information systems allow a potentially large number of unauthorized users to access and possibly alter information from around the world. As the dependence on information systems grows, so the security of information networks becomes ever more critical to any entity, no matter if it is a company or a public institution. Information security involves both technology and people. Any securi...

  17. Outsourcing information security

    CERN Document Server

    Axelrod, Warren

    2004-01-01

    This comprehensive and timely resource examines security risks related to IT outsourcing, clearly showing you how to recognize, evaluate, minimize, and manage these risks. Unique in its scope, this single volume offers you complete coverage of the whole range of IT security services and fully treats the IT security concerns of outsourcing. The book helps you deepen your knowledge of the tangible and intangible costs and benefits associated with outsourcing IT and IS functions.

  18. Cloud Infrastructure Security

    OpenAIRE

    Velev , Dimiter; Zlateva , Plamena

    2010-01-01

    Part 4: Security for Clouds; International audience; Cloud computing can help companies accomplish more by eliminating the physical bonds between an IT infrastructure and its users. Users can purchase services from a cloud environment that could allow them to save money and focus on their core business. At the same time certain concerns have emerged as potential barriers to rapid adoption of cloud services such as security, privacy and reliability. Usually the information security professiona...

  19. Automated security management

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Shaer, Ehab; Xie, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed volume, leading international researchers explore configuration modeling and checking, vulnerability and risk assessment, configuration analysis, and diagnostics and discovery. The authors equip readers to understand automated security management systems and techniques that increase overall network assurability and usability. These constantly changing networks defend against cyber attacks by integrating hundreds of security devices such as firewalls, IPSec gateways, IDS/IPS, authentication servers, authorization/RBAC servers, and crypto systems. Automated Security Managemen

  20. Addressing Software Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Historically security within organizations was thought of as an IT function (web sites/servers, email, workstation patching, etc.) Threat landscape has evolved (Script Kiddies, Hackers, Advanced Persistent Threat (APT), Nation States, etc.) Attack surface has expanded -Networks interconnected!! Some security posture factors Network Layer (Routers, Firewalls, etc.) Computer Network Defense (IPS/IDS, Sensors, Continuous Monitoring, etc.) Industrial Control Systems (ICS) Software Security (COTS, FOSS, Custom, etc.)