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Sample records for liver disease model

  1. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  2. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  3. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases: Diseases caused by viruses, such as hepatitis ...

  4. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  5. Research advances in animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Haiyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has increased gradually along with the rising prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipidemia, and NAFLD has become one of the most common chronic liver diseases in the world and the second major liver disease after chronic viral hepatitis in China. However, its pathogenesis has not yet been clarified. Animal models are playing an important role in researches on NAFLD due to the facts that the development and progression of NAFLD require a long period of time, and ethical limitations exist in conducting drug trials in patients or collecting liver tissues from patients. The animal models with histopathology similar to that of NAFLD patients are reviewed, and their modeling principle, as well as the advantages and disadvantages, are compared. Animal models provide a powerful tool for further studies of NAFLD pathogenesis and drug screening for prevention and treatment of NAFLD.

  6. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ridding your body of toxic substances. Liver disease can be inherited (genetic) or caused by a variety of factors that damage the ... that you can't stay still. Causes Liver disease has many ... or semen, contaminated food or water, or close contact with a person who is ...

  7. New Insights from Rodent Models of Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Rodent models of fatty liver disease are essential research tools that provide a window into disease pathogenesis and a testing ground for prevention and treatment. Models come in many varieties involving dietary and genetic manipulations, and sometimes both. High-energy diets that induce obesity do not uniformly cause fatty liver disease; this has prompted close scrutiny of specific macronutrients and nutrient combinations to determine which have the greatest potential for hepatotoxicity. At the same time, diets that do not cause obesity or the metabolic syndrome but do cause severe steatohepatitis have been exploited to study factors important to progressive liver injury, including cell death, oxidative stress, and immune activation. Rodents with a genetic predisposition to overeating offer yet another model in which to explore the evolution of fatty liver disease. In some animals that overeat, steatohepatitis can develop even without resorting to a high-energy diet. Importantly, these models and others have been used to document that aerobic exercise can prevent or reduce fatty liver disease. This review focuses primarily on lessons learned about steatohepatitis from manipulations of diet and eating behavior. Numerous additional insights about hepatic lipid metabolism, which have been gained from genetically engineered mice, are also mentioned. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 535–550. PMID:21126212

  8. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  9. Models of alcoholic liver disease in rodents: a critical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la M. Hall, P.; Lieber, C.S.; De Carli, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    ) Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for alcohol-induced liver injury in rats, by C. S. Lieber and L. M. DeCarli; (3) Tsukamoto-French model of alcoholic liver injury, by S. W. French; (4) Animal models to study endotoxin-ethanol interactions, by K. O. Lindros and H. Järveläinen; and (5) Jejunoileal bypass...

  10. Long-Term Adult Feline Liver Organoid Cultures for Disease Modeling of Hepatic Steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedwig S. Kruitwagen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hepatic steatosis is a highly prevalent liver disease, yet research is hampered by the lack of tractable cellular and animal models. Steatosis also occurs in cats, where it can cause severe hepatic failure. Previous studies demonstrate the potential of liver organoids for modeling genetic diseases. To examine the possibility of using organoids to model steatosis, we established a long-term feline liver organoid culture with adult liver stem cell characteristics and differentiation potential toward hepatocyte-like cells. Next, organoids from mouse, human, dog, and cat liver were provided with fatty acids. Lipid accumulation was observed in all organoids and interestingly, feline liver organoids accumulated more lipid droplets than human organoids. Finally, we demonstrate effects of interference with β-oxidation on lipid accumulation in feline liver organoids. In conclusion, feline liver organoids can be successfully cultured and display a predisposition for lipid accumulation, making them an interesting model in hepatic steatosis research. : In this study Kruitwagen and colleagues establish and characterize a feline liver organoid culture, which has adult stem cell properties and can be differentiated toward hepatocyte-like cells. They propose liver organoids as a tool to model hepatic steatosis and show that feline liver organoids accumulate more lipids than human organoids when provided with excess fatty acids. Keywords: feline liver organoids, adult liver stem cells, hepatic steatosis, disease modeling, feline hepatic lipidosis, species differences

  11. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da silva, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Cláudia P; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and ‘-omics’-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. . In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:26073454

  12. Long-Term Adult Feline Liver Organoid Cultures for Disease Modeling of Hepatic Steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruitwagen, Hedwig S.; Oosterhoff, Loes A.; Vernooij, Ingrid G.W.H.; Schrall, Ingrid M.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Bannink, Farah; Roesch, Camille; van Uden, Lisa; Molenaar, Martijn R.; Helms, J. Bernd; Grinwis, Guy C.M.; Verstegen, Monique M.A.; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Huch, Meritxell; Geijsen, Niels; Vries, Robert G.; Clevers, Hans; Rothuizen, Jan; Schotanus, Baukje A.; Penning, Louis C.; Spee, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is a highly prevalent liver disease, yet research is hampered by the lack of tractable cellular and animal models. Steatosis also occurs in cats, where it can cause severe hepatic failure. Previous studies demonstrate the potential of liver organoids for modeling genetic diseases.

  13. Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is fatty liver disease? Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Fatty liver disease is a condition in which fat builds ...

  14. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  15. Long-Term Adult Feline Liver Organoid Cultures for Disease Modeling of Hepatic Steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruitwagen, H.S. (Hedwig S.); Oosterhoff, L.A. (Loes A.); Vernooij, I.G.W.H. (Ingrid G.W.H.); Schrall, I.M. (Ingrid M.); M.E. van Wolferen (Monique); Bannink, F. (Farah); Roesch, C. (Camille); van Uden, L. (Lisa); Molenaar, M.R. (Martijn R.); J.B. Helms (J. Bernd); G.C.M. Grinwis (Guy C.); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); L.J.W. van der Laan (Luc); M. Huch (Meritxell); N. Geijsen (Niels); R.G.J. Vries (Robert); H.C. Clevers (Hans); J. Rothuizen (J.); B.A. Schotanus (Baukje A.); C. Penning (Corine); B. Spee (B.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractHepatic steatosis is a highly prevalent liver disease, yet research is hampered by the lack of tractable cellular and animal models. Steatosis also occurs in cats, where it can cause severe hepatic failure. Previous studies demonstrate the potential of liver organoids for modeling

  16. Statistical Fractal Models Based on GND-PCA and Its Application on Classification of Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to establish the statistical fractal model for liver diseases classification. Firstly, the fractal theory is used to construct the high-order tensor, and then Generalized -dimensional Principal Component Analysis (GND-PCA is used to establish the statistical fractal model and select the feature from the region of liver; at the same time different features have different weights, and finally, Support Vector Machine Optimized Ant Colony (ACO-SVM algorithm is used to establish the classifier for the recognition of liver disease. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, PCA eigenface method and normal SVM method are chosen as the contrast methods. The experimental results show that the proposed method can reconstruct liver volume better and improve the classification accuracy of liver diseases.

  17. How predictive quantitative modelling of tissue organisation can inform liver disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasdo, Dirk; Hoehme, Stefan; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-10-01

    From the more than 100 liver diseases described, many of those with high incidence rates manifest themselves by histopathological changes, such as hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, fatty liver disease, fibrosis, and, in its later stages, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, primary biliary cirrhosis and other disorders. Studies of disease pathogeneses are largely based on integrating -omics data pooled from cells at different locations with spatial information from stained liver structures in animal models. Even though this has led to significant insights, the complexity of interactions as well as the involvement of processes at many different time and length scales constrains the possibility to condense disease processes in illustrations, schemes and tables. The combination of modern imaging modalities with image processing and analysis, and mathematical models opens up a promising new approach towards a quantitative understanding of pathologies and of disease processes. This strategy is discussed for two examples, ammonia metabolism after drug-induced acute liver damage, and the recovery of liver mass as well as architecture during the subsequent regeneration process. This interdisciplinary approach permits integration of biological mechanisms and models of processes contributing to disease progression at various scales into mathematical models. These can be used to perform in silico simulations to promote unravelling the relation between architecture and function as below illustrated for liver regeneration, and bridging from the in vitro situation and animal models to humans. In the near future novel mechanisms will usually not be directly elucidated by modelling. However, models will falsify hypotheses and guide towards the most informative experimental design. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  19. Long-Term Adult Feline Liver Organoid Cultures for Disease Modeling of Hepatic Steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruitwagen, Hedwig S; Oosterhoff, Loes A; Vernooij, Ingrid G W H; Schrall, Ingrid M; van Wolferen, Monique E; Bannink, Farah; Roesch, Camille; van Uden, Lisa; Molenaar, Martijn R; Helms, J Bernd; Grinwis, Guy C M; Verstegen, Monique M A; van der Laan, Luc J W; Huch, Meritxell; Geijsen, Niels; Vries, Robert G; Clevers, Hans; Rothuizen, Jan; Schotanus, Baukje A; Penning, Louis C; Spee, Bart

    2017-04-11

    Hepatic steatosis is a highly prevalent liver disease, yet research is hampered by the lack of tractable cellular and animal models. Steatosis also occurs in cats, where it can cause severe hepatic failure. Previous studies demonstrate the potential of liver organoids for modeling genetic diseases. To examine the possibility of using organoids to model steatosis, we established a long-term feline liver organoid culture with adult liver stem cell characteristics and differentiation potential toward hepatocyte-like cells. Next, organoids from mouse, human, dog, and cat liver were provided with fatty acids. Lipid accumulation was observed in all organoids and interestingly, feline liver organoids accumulated more lipid droplets than human organoids. Finally, we demonstrate effects of interference with β-oxidation on lipid accumulation in feline liver organoids. In conclusion, feline liver organoids can be successfully cultured and display a predisposition for lipid accumulation, making them an interesting model in hepatic steatosis research. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be increased in women because their digestive system may be less able to process alcohol, thus increasing the amount of alcohol reaching the liver. Genetic makeup Genetic makeup is thought to be involved because alcoholic liver disease often ...

  1. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  2. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury

  3. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  4. Liver transplant for cholestatic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Andres F; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan Ram

    2013-05-01

    Cholestatic liver diseases include a group of diverse disorders with different epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, and prognosis. Despite significant advances in the clinical care of patients with cholestatic liver diseases, liver transplant (LT) remains the only definitive therapy for end-stage liver disease, regardless of the underlying cause. As per the United Network for Organ Sharing database, the rate of cadaveric LT for cholestatic liver disease was 18% in 1991, 10% in 2000, and 7.8% in 2008. This review summarizes the available evidence on various common and rare cholestatic liver diseases, disease-specific issues, and pertinent aspects of LT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hepatocyte Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Mediates the Development of Liver Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A Mesarwi

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. This progression correlates with the severity of OSA-associated hypoxia. In mice with diet induced obesity, hepatic steatosis leads to liver tissue hypoxia, which worsens with exposure to intermittent hypoxia. Emerging data has implicated hepatocyte cell signaling as an important factor in hepatic fibrogenesis. We hypothesized that hepatocyte specific knockout of the oxygen sensing α subunit of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1, a master regulator of the global response to hypoxia, may be protective against the development of liver fibrosis.Wild-type mice and mice with hepatocyte-specific HIF-1α knockout (Hif1a-/-hep were fed a high trans-fat diet for six months, as a model of NAFLD. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by Sirius red stain and hydroxyproline assay. Liver enzymes, fasting insulin, and hepatic triglyceride content were also assessed. Hepatocytes were isolated from Hif1a-/-hep mice and wild-type controls and were exposed to sustained hypoxia (1% O2 or normoxia (16% O2 for 24 hours. The culture media was used to reconstitute type I collagen and the resulting matrices were examined for collagen cross-linking.Wild-type mice on a high trans-fat diet had 80% more hepatic collagen than Hif1a-/-hep mice (2.21 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, versus 1.23 μg collagen/mg liver tissue, p = 0.03, which was confirmed by Sirius red staining. Body weight, liver weight, mean hepatic triglyceride content, and fasting insulin were similar between groups. Culture media from wild-type mouse hepatocytes exposed to hypoxia allowed for avid collagen cross-linking, but very little cross-linking was seen when hepatocytes were exposed to normoxia, or when hepatocytes from Hif1a-/-hep mice were used in hypoxia or normoxia.Hepatocyte HIF-1 mediates an increase in liver fibrosis in a mouse model of NAFLD, perhaps due to liver

  6. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick-Melin, A J; Kalinski, M I; Kelly, K R

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a rapidly emerging chronic liver disease and is reported to affect up to 70-80% of overweight and obese individuals. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver diseases that range from simple hepatic steatosis, to a more severe and treatment resistant stage...... that features steatosis plus inflammation, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may in turn progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and sub-acute liver failure. Thus, NAFLD and its subsequent complications create a significant health burden, and currently there is no effective treatment strategy...

  7. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients

  8. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  9. Lyman NTCP model analysis of radiation-induced liver disease in hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy for primary liver carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiyong; Zhu Yi; Zhao Jiaodong; Fu Xiaolong; Jiang Guoliang; Liang Shixiong; Zhu Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify the factors associated with radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) and to describe the probability of RILD using the Lyman normal tissue complication(NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma(PLC) treated with hypofractionated conformal therapy (CRT). Methods: A total of 109 PLC patients treated with hypofractionated CRT were prospectively followed according to the Child-Pugh classification for liver cirrhosis, 93 patients in class A and 16 in class B. The mean dose of radiation to the isocenter was (53.5±5.5) Gy, fractions of (4.8±0.5) Gy, with interfraction interval of 48 hours and irradiation 3 times per week. Maximal likelihood analysis yielded the best estimates of parameters of the Lyman NTCP model for all patients; Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients, respectively. Results: Of all the patients, 17 developed RILD (17/109), 8 in Child-Pugh A (8/93) and 9 in Child-Pugh B (9/16). By multivariate analysis, only the Child-Pugh Grade of liver cirrhosis was the independent factor (P=0.000) associated with the developing of BILD. The best estimates of the NTCP parameters for all 109 patients were n=1.1, m=0.35 and TD 50 (1)=38.5 Gy. The n, m, TD 50 (1) estimated from patients with Child-Pugh A was 1.1, 0.28, 40.5 Gy, respectively, compared with 0.7, 0.43, 23 Gy respectively, for patients with Child-Pugh B. Conclusions: Primary liver cancer patients who possess Child-Pugh B cirrhosis would present a significantly greater susceptibility to RILD after hypofractionated CRT than patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. The predominant risk factor for developing RILD is the severity of hepatic cirrhosis in the liver of PLC patients. (authors)

  10. Host homeostatic responses to alcohol-induced cellular stress in animal models of alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He Joe; Murray, Gary J; Jung, Mary Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Humans develop various clinical phenotypes of severe alcoholic liver disease, including alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis, generally after decades of heavy drinking. In such individuals, following each episode of drinking, their livers experience heightened intracellular and extracellular stresses that are closely associated with alcohol consumption and alcohol metabolism. This article focuses on the latest advances made in animal models on evolutionarily conserved homeostatic mechanisms for coping with and resolving these stress conditions. The mechanisms discussed include the stress-activated protein kinase JNK, energy regulator AMPK, autophagy and the inflammatory response. Over time, the host may respond variably to stress with protective mechanisms that are critical in determining an individual's vulnerability to developing severe alcoholic liver disease. A systematic review of these mechanisms and their temporal changes in animal models provides the basis for general conclusions, and raises questions for future studies. The relevance of these data to human conditions is also discussed.

  11. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... critical for people with health conditions such as liver disease. If you have chronic liver disease, talk ...

  12. Ultrasound imaging in an experimental model of fatty liver disease and cirrhosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos de Carvalho Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domestic dogs and cats are very well known to develop chronic hepatic diseases, including hepatic lipidosis and cirrhosis. Ultrasonographic examination is extensively used to detect them. However, there are still few reports on the use of the ultrasound B-mode scan in correlation with histological findings to evaluate diffuse hepatic changes in rodents, which represent the most important animal group used in experimental models of liver diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of ultrasound findings in the assessment of fatty liver disease and cirrhosis when compared to histological results in Wistar rats by following up a murine model of chronic hepatic disease. Results Forty Wistar rats (30 treated, 10 controls were included. Liver injury was induced by dual exposure to CCl4 and ethanol for 4, 8 and 15 weeks. Liver echogenicity, its correlation to the right renal cortex echogenicity, measurement of portal vein diameter (PVD and the presence of ascites were evaluated and compared to histological findings of hepatic steatosis and cirrhosis. Liver echogenicity correlated to hepatic steatosis when it was greater or equal to the right renal cortex echogenicity, with a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 100%, positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 76.9% respectively, and accuracy of 92.5%. Findings of heterogeneous liver echogenicity and irregular surface correlated to liver cirrhosis with a sensitivity of 70.6%, specificity of 100%, positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 82.1% respectively, and accuracy of 87.5%. PVD was significantly increased in both steatotic and cirrhotic rats; however, the later had greater diameters. PVD cut-off point separating steatosis from cirrhosis was 2.1 mm (sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.5%. One third of cirrhotic rats presented with ascites. Conclusion The use of ultrasound imaging in the follow-up of murine diffuse liver disease

  13. Ultrasound imaging in an experimental model of fatty liver disease and cirrhosis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Domestic dogs and cats are very well known to develop chronic hepatic diseases, including hepatic lipidosis and cirrhosis. Ultrasonographic examination is extensively used to detect them. However, there are still few reports on the use of the ultrasound B-mode scan in correlation with histological findings to evaluate diffuse hepatic changes in rodents, which represent the most important animal group used in experimental models of liver diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of ultrasound findings in the assessment of fatty liver disease and cirrhosis when compared to histological results in Wistar rats by following up a murine model of chronic hepatic disease. Results Forty Wistar rats (30 treated, 10 controls) were included. Liver injury was induced by dual exposure to CCl4 and ethanol for 4, 8 and 15 weeks. Liver echogenicity, its correlation to the right renal cortex echogenicity, measurement of portal vein diameter (PVD) and the presence of ascites were evaluated and compared to histological findings of hepatic steatosis and cirrhosis. Liver echogenicity correlated to hepatic steatosis when it was greater or equal to the right renal cortex echogenicity, with a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 100%, positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 76.9% respectively, and accuracy of 92.5%. Findings of heterogeneous liver echogenicity and irregular surface correlated to liver cirrhosis with a sensitivity of 70.6%, specificity of 100%, positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 82.1% respectively, and accuracy of 87.5%. PVD was significantly increased in both steatotic and cirrhotic rats; however, the later had greater diameters. PVD cut-off point separating steatosis from cirrhosis was 2.1 mm (sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90.5%). One third of cirrhotic rats presented with ascites. Conclusion The use of ultrasound imaging in the follow-up of murine diffuse liver disease models is feasible and

  14. Promiscuous activity of the LXR antagonist GSK2033 in a mouse model of fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffett, Kristine; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The liver X receptor (LXR) functions as a receptor for oxysterols and plays a critical role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. We recently described a synthetic LXR inverse agonist that displayed efficacy in treatment of hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This compound, SR9238, was designed to display liver specificity so as to avoid potential detrimental effects on reverse cholesterol transport in peripheral tissues. Here, we examined the effects of a LXR antagonist/inverse agonist, GSK2033, which displays systemic exposure. Although GSK2033 performed as expected in cell-based models as a LXR inverse agonist, it displayed unexpected activity in the mouse NAFLD model. The expression of lipogenic enzyme genes such as fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory binding protein 1c were induced rather than suppressed and no effect on hepatic steatosis was found. Further characterization of the specificity of GSK2033 revealed that it displayed a significant degree of promiscuity, targeting a number of other nuclear receptors that could clearly alter hepatic gene expression. - Highlights: • The LXR antagonist GSK2033 suppresses the expression of lipogenic genes FASN and SREBF1 in HepG2 cells. • GSK2033 exhibits sufficient exposure to perform animal experiments targeting the liver. • GSK2033 has fails to suppress hepatic Fasn and Srebf1 expression in an animal model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. • GSK2033 may regulate the activity of several nuclear receptors.

  15. Prolactin and liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.C. Bauer (Alexander)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractCirrhosis of the liver is associated with profound endocrinological disturbances. Until recently it was thought that these disturbances were caused mainly by ineffective elimination of hormones by the diseased liver. It is now known that the pathogenesis of disturbed hormonal function in

  16. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:59-60. Carithers RL, McClain C. Alcoholic ... Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 86. Haines EJ, Oyama LC. ...

  17. Diet-induced metabolic hamster model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhathena J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Bhathena, Arun Kulamarva, Christopher Martoni, Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska, Meenakshi Malhotra, Arghya Paul, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Obesity, hypercholesterolemia, elevated triglycerides, and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Hamsters, unlike rats or mice, respond well to diet-induced obesity, increase body mass and adiposity on group housing, and increase food intake due to social confrontation-induced stress. They have a cardiovascular and hepatic system similar to that of humans, and can thus be a useful model for human pathophysiology.Methods: Experiments were planned to develop a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model of dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hamsters were fed a normal control diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol/methionine-deficient/choline-devoid diet, and a high-fat/high-cholesterol/choline-deficient diet. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, atherogenic index, and body weight were quantified biweekly. Fat deposition in the liver was observed and assessed following lipid staining with hematoxylin and eosin and with oil red O.Results: In this study, we established a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model for studying dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hyperlipidemia and elevated serum glucose concentrations were induced using this diet. Atherogenic index was elevated, increasing the risk for a cardiovascular event. Histological analysis of liver specimens at the end of four weeks showed increased fat deposition in the liver of animals fed

  18. Cytokines and Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Tilg

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are pleiotropic peptides produced by virtually every nucleated cell in the body. In most tissues, including the liver, constitutive production of cytokines is absent or minimal. There is increasing evidence that several cytokines mediate hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and necrosis of liver cells, cholestasis and fibrosis. Interestingly, the same mediators also mediate the regeneration of liver tissue after injury. Among the various cytokines, the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a has emerged as a key factor in various aspects of liver disease, such as cachexia and/or cholestasis. Thus, antagonism of TNF-a and other injury-related cytokines in liver diseases merits evaluation as a treatment of these diseases. However, because the same cytokines are also necessary for the regeneration of the tissue after the liver has been injured, inhibition of these mediators might impair hepatic recovery. The near future will bring the exiting clinical challenge of testing new anticytokine strategies in various liver diseases.

  19. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  20. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Banumathi K; Feaver, Ryan E; Wamhoff, Brian R; Dash, Ajit

    2018-02-01

    The progressive disease spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which includes non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a rapidly emerging public health crisis with no approved therapy. The diversity of various therapies under development highlights the lack of consensus around the most effective target, underscoring the need for better translatable preclinical models to study the complex progressive disease and effective therapies. Areas covered: This article reviews published literature of various mouse models of NASH used in preclinical studies, as well as complex organotypic in vitro and ex vivo liver models being developed. It discusses translational challenges associated with both kinds of models, and describes some of the studies that validate their application in NAFLD. Expert opinion: Animal models offer advantages of understanding drug distribution and effects in a whole body context, but are limited by important species differences. Human organotypic in vitro and ex vivo models with physiological relevance and translatability need to be used in a tiered manner with simpler screens. Leveraging newer technologies, like metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics, and the future development of validated disease biomarkers will allow us to fully utilize the value of these models to understand disease and evaluate novel drugs in isolation or combination.

  1. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal.......Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  2. Impaired brain glymphatic flow in a rodent model of chronic liver disease and minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lythgoe, Mark; Hosford, Patrick; Arias, Natalia; Gallego-Duran, Rocio; Hadjihambi, Anna; Jalan, Rajiv; Gourine, Alexander; Habtesion, Abeba; Davies, Nathan; Harrison, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal function is exquisitely sensitive to alterations in extracellular environment. In patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE), accumulation of metabolic waste products and noxious substances in the interstitial fluid of the brain may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairment. In a rat model of chronic liver disease, we used an emerging dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI technique to assess the efficacy of the glymphatic system, which facilitates clearance of solutes from t...

  3. Increased diacylglycerols characterize hepatic lipid changes in progression of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; comparison to a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorden, D Lee; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Myers, David S; McIntyre, J Oliver; VanSaun, Michael N; Wright, J Kelly; Matrisian, Lynn M; Brown, H Alex

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and progression to cirrhosis. While differences in liver lipids between disease states have been reported, precise composition of phospholipids and diacylglycerols (DAG) at a lipid species level has not been previously described. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in lipid species through progression of human NAFLD using advanced lipidomic technology and compare this with a murine model of early and advanced NAFLD. Utilizing mass spectrometry lipidomics, over 250 phospholipid and diacylglycerol species (DAGs) were identified in normal and diseased human and murine liver extracts. Significant differences between phospholipid composition of normal and diseased livers were demonstrated, notably among DAG species, consistent with previous reports that DAG transferases are involved in the progression of NAFLD and liver fibrosis. In addition, a novel phospholipid species (ether linked phosphatidylinositol) was identified in human cirrhotic liver extracts. Using parallel lipidomics analysis of murine and human liver tissues it was determined that mice maintained on a high-fat diet provide a reproducible model of NAFLD in regards to specificity of lipid species in the liver. These studies demonstrated that novel lipid species may serve as markers of advanced liver disease and importantly, marked increases in DAG species are a hallmark of NAFLD. Elevated DAGs may contribute to altered triglyceride, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) levels characteristic of the disease and specific DAG species might be important lipid signaling molecules in the progression of NAFLD.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic acid inhibits hepatic cystogenesis in experimental models of polycystic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garrido, Patricia; Marin, José J G; Perugorria, María J; Urribarri, Aura D; Erice, Oihane; Sáez, Elena; Úriz, Miriam; Sarvide, Sarai; Portu, Ainhoa; Concepcion, Axel R; Romero, Marta R; Monte, María J; Santos-Laso, Álvaro; Hijona, Elizabeth; Jimenez-Agüero, Raúl; Marzioni, Marco; Beuers, Ulrich; Masyuk, Tatyana V; LaRusso, Nicholas F; Prieto, Jesús; Bujanda, Luis; Drenth, Joost P H; Banales, Jesús M

    2015-10-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) are genetic disorders characterized by progressive biliary cystogenesis. Current therapies show short-term and/or modest beneficial effects. Cystic cholangiocytes hyperproliferate as a consequence of diminished intracellular calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i). Here, the therapeutic value of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was investigated. Effect of UDCA was examined in vitro and in polycystic (PCK) rats. Hepatic cystogenesis and fibrosis, and the bile acid (BA) content were evaluated from the liver, bile, serum, and kidneys by HPLC-MS/MS. Chronic treatment of PCK rats with UDCA inhibits hepatic cystogenesis and fibrosis, and improves their motor behaviour. As compared to wild-type animals, PCK rats show increased BA concentration ([BA]) in liver, similar hepatic Cyp7a1 mRNA levels, and diminished [BA] in bile. Likewise, [BA] is increased in cystic fluid of PLD patients compared to their matched serum levels. In PCK rats, UDCA decreases the intrahepatic accumulation of cytotoxic BA, normalizes their diminished [BA] in bile, increases the BA secretion in bile and diminishes the increased [BA] in kidneys. In vitro, UDCA inhibits the hyperproliferation of polycystic human cholangiocytes via a PI3K/AKT/MEK/ERK1/2-dependent mechanism without affecting apoptosis. Finally, the presence of glycodeoxycholic acid promotes the proliferation of polycystic human cholangiocytes, which is inhibited by both UDCA and tauro-UDCA. UDCA was able to halt the liver disease of a rat model of PLD through inhibiting cystic cholangiocyte hyperproliferation and decreasing the levels of cytotoxic BA species in the liver, which suggests the use of UDCA as a potential therapeutic tool for PLD patients. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease & NASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease & NASH View or Print All Sections Definition & Facts Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition in which fat ...

  6. Non-invasive separation of alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease with predictive modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Peter Sowa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Currently, a major clinical challenge is to distinguish between chronic liver disease caused by metabolic syndrome (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD from that caused by long term or excessive alcohol consumption (ALD. The etiology of severe liver disease affects treatment options and priorities for liver transplantation and organ allocation. Thus we compared physiologically similar NAFLD and ALD patients to detect biochemical differences for improved separation of these mechanistically overlapping etiologies. METHODS: In a cohort of 31 NAFLD patients with BMI below 30 and a cohort of ALD patient with (ALDC n = 51 or without cirrhosis (ALDNC n = 51 serum transaminases, cell death markers and (adipo-cytokines were assessed. Groups were compared with One-way ANOVA and Tukey's correction. Predictive models were built by machine learning techniques. RESULTS: NAFLD, ALDNC or ALDC patients did not differ in demographic parameters. The ratio of alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase--common serum parameters for liver damage--was significantly higher in the NAFLD group compared to both ALD groups (each p<0.0001. Adiponectin and tumor necrosis factor(TNF-alpha were significantly lower in NAFLD than in ALDNC (p<0.05 or ALDC patients (p<0.0001. Significantly higher serum concentrations of cell death markers, hyaluronic acid, adiponectin, and TNF-alpha (each p<0.0001 were found in ALDC compared to ALDNC. Using machine learning techniques we were able to discern NAFLD and ALDNC (up to an AUC of 0.9118±0.0056 or ALDC and ALDNC (up to an AUC of 0.9846±0.0018, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Machine learning techniques relying on ALT/AST ratio, adipokines and cytokines distinguish NAFLD and ALD. In addition, severity of ALD may be non-invasively diagnosed via serum cytokine concentrations.

  7. In Vitro and in Vivo Models of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Bergheim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available By now, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is considered to be among the most common liver diseases world-wide. NAFLD encompasses a broad spectrum of pathological conditions ranging from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and finally even cirrhosis; however, only a minority of patients progress to end-stages of the disease, and the course of the disease progression to the later stages seems to be slow, developing progressively over several years. Key risk factors including overweight, insulin resistance, a sedentary life-style and an altered dietary pattern, as well as genetic factors and disturbances of the intestinal barrier function have been identified in recent years. Despite intense research efforts that lead to the identification of these risk factors, knowledge about disease initiation and molecular mechanisms involved in progression is still limited. This review summarizes diet-induced and genetic animal models, as well as cell culture models commonly used in recent years to add to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in NAFLD, also referring to their advantages and disadvantages.

  8. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. METHODS: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including 'liver cirrhosis', 'end-stage liver disease', 'liver diseases', 'oral...

  9. Inhibition of p53 attenuates steatosis and liver injury in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdak, Zoltan; Villegas, Kristine A; Harb, Ragheb; Wu, Annie M; Sousa, Aryanna; Wands, Jack R

    2013-04-01

    p53 and its transcriptional target miRNA34a have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fatty liver. We tested the efficacy of a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α p-nitro (PFT) in attenuating steatosis, associated oxidative stress and apoptosis in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat (HFD) or control diet for 8 weeks; PFT or DMSO (vehicle) was administered three times per week. Markers of oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as mediators of hepatic fatty acid metabolism were assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, real-time PCR, and biochemical assays. PFT administration suppressed HFD-induced weight gain, ALT elevation, steatosis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. PFT treatment blunted the HFD-induced upregulation of miRNA34a and increased SIRT1 expression. In the livers of HFD-fed, PFT-treated mice, activation of the SIRT1/PGC1α/PPARα axis increased the expression of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MLYCD), an enzyme responsible for malonyl-CoA (mCoA) degradation. Additionally, the SIRT1/LKB1/AMPK pathway (upstream activator of MLYCD) was promoted by PFT. Thus, induction of these two pathways by PFT diminished the hepatic mCoA content by enhancing MLYCD expression and function. Since mCoA inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), the decrease of hepatic mCoA in the PFT-treated, HFD-fed mice increased CPT1 activity, favored fatty acid oxidation, and decreased steatosis. Additionally, we demonstrated that PFT abrogated steatosis and promoted MLYCD expression in palmitoleic acid-treated human HepaRG cells. The p53 inhibitor PFT diminished hepatic triglyceride accumulation and lipotoxicity in mice fed a HFD, by depleting mCoA and favoring the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. in Human Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Fujimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathways are strictly coordinated by several mechanisms to regulate adequate innate immune responses. Recent lines of evidence indicate that the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family proteins, originally identified as negative-feedback regulators in cytokine signaling, are involved in the regulation of TLR-mediated immune responses. SOCS1, a member of SOCS family, is strongly induced upon TLR stimulation. Cells lacking SOCS1 are hyperresponsive to TLR stimulation. Thus, SOCS1 is an important regulator for both cytokine and TLR-induced responses. As an immune organ, the liver contains various types of immune cells such as T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, and Kupffer cells and is continuously challenged with gut-derived bacterial and dietary antigens. SOCS1 may be implicated in pathophysiology of the liver. The studies using SOCS1-deficient mice revealed that endogenous SOCS1 is critical for the prevention of liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancers. Recent studies on humans suggest that SOCS1 is involved in the development of various liver disorders in humans. Thus, SOCS1 and other SOCS proteins are potential targets for the therapy of human liver diseases.

  11. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fede, Giuseppe; Germani, Giacomo; Gluud, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  12. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  13. Kidney function and mortality post-liver transplant in the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethi A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Aastha Sethi1, Michelle M Estrella1, Richard Ugarte2, Mohamed G Atta1 1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2University of Maryland Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score incorporates serum creatinine and was introduced to facilitate allocation of orthotopic liver transplantation (LT. The objective is to determine the impact of MELD and kidney function on all-cause mortality. Among LTs performed in a tertiary referral hospital between 1995 and 2009, 419 cases were studied. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to estimate the hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for death. Over mean follow-ups of 8.4 and 3.1 years during the pre-MELD and MELD era, 57 and 63 deaths were observed, respectively. Those transplanted during the MELD era had a higher likelihood of hepatorenal syndrome (8% vs 2%, P < 0.01, lower kidney function (median estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 77.8 vs 92.6 mL/min/1.73 m2, P < 0.01, and more pretransplantation renal replacement therapy (RRT (5% vs 1%; P < 0.01. All-cause mortality risk was similar in the MELD vs the pre-MELD era (HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.58–1.65. The risk of death, however, was nearly 3-fold greater (95% CI: 1.14–6.60 among those requiring pre-transplant RRT. Similarly, eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 post-transplant was associated with a 2.5-fold higher mortality (95% CI: 1.48–4.11. The study suggests that MELD implementation had no impact on all-cause mortality post-LT. However, the need for pre-transplant RRT and post-transplant kidney dysfunction was associated with a more than 2-fold greater risk of subsequent death. Keywords: eGFR, mortality, MELD, liver transplant

  14. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  15. Rodent Models of Alcoholic Liver Disease: Role of Binge Ethanol Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Ghosh Dastidar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Both chronic and acute (binge alcohol drinking are important health and economic concerns worldwide and prominent risk factors for the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD. There are no FDA-approved medications to prevent or to treat any stage of ALD. Therefore, discovery of novel therapeutic strategies remains a critical need for patients with ALD. Relevant experimental animal models that simulate human drinking patterns and mimic the spectrum and severity of alcohol-induced liver pathology in humans are critical to our ability to identify new mechanisms and therapeutic targets. There are several animal models currently in use, including the most widely utilized chronic ad libitum ethanol (EtOH feeding (Lieber–DeCarli liquid diet model, chronic intragastric EtOH administration (Tsukamoto–French model, and chronic-plus-binge EtOH challenge (Bin Gao—National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA model. This review provides an overview of recent advances in rodent models of binge EtOH administration which help to recapitulate different features and etiologies of progressive ALD. These models include EtOH binge alone, and EtOH binge coupled with chronic EtOH intake, a high fat diet, or endotoxin challenge. We analyze the strengths, limitations, and translational relevance of these models, as well as summarize the liver injury outcomes and mechanistic insights. We further discuss the application(s of binge EtOH models in examining alcohol-induced multi-organ pathology, sex- and age-related differences, as well as circadian rhythm disruption.

  16. Disease modeling using human induced pluripotent stem cells: lessons from the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseck, Richard L; Colquhoun, Jennifer; Hannan, Nicholas R F

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any of the hundreds of distinct cell types that comprise the human body. This unique characteristic has resulted in considerable interest in the field of regenerative medicine, given the potential for these cells to be used to protect, repair, or replace diseased, injured, and aged cells within the human body. In addition to their potential in therapeutics, hPSCs can be used to study the earliest stages of human development and to provide a platform for both drug screening and disease modeling using human cells. Recently, the description of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) has allowed the field of disease modeling to become far more accessible and physiologically relevant, as pluripotent cells can be generated from patients of any genetic background. Disease models derived from hIPSCs that manifest cellular disease phenotypes have been established to study several monogenic diseases; furthermore, hIPSCs can be used for phenotype-based drug screens to investigate complex diseases for which the underlying genetic mechanism is unknown. As a result, the use of stem cells as research tools has seen an unprecedented growth within the last decade as researchers look for in vitro disease models which closely mimic in vivo responses in humans. Here, we discuss the beginnings of hPSCs, starting with isolation of human embryonic stem cells, moving into the development and optimization of hIPSC technology, and ending with the application of hIPSCs towards disease modeling and drug screening applications, with specific examples highlighting the modeling of inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. OSI-027 modulates acute graft-versus-host disease after liver transplantation in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Chen, Wei; Liang, Chao; Liu, Hao; Ma, Tao; Xia, Xuefeng; Hu, Liqiang; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2017-09-01

    Despite its rarity (1%-2%), acute graft-versus-host disease after liver transplantation (LT-aGVHD) has a high mortality rate (85%). A gradual decrease in regulatory T cells (Tregs) correlates with disease progression in a rat LT-GVHD model, and treatments which increase Tregs exert therapeutic effects on LT-aGVHD. In this study, LT-aGVHD model rats were treated with rapamycin (RAPA), OSI-027, or an equal quantity of vehicle. Rats treated with OSI-027 survived longer (>100 days) than those in the RAPA (70 ± 8 days) or control (24 ± 3 days) groups. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the Treg ratios in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the OSI-027 group were higher than those in the RAPA or control groups. The proportions of donor-derived lymphocytes in the OSI-027 group were lower than those in the RAPA or control groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining of skin tissue demonstrated less severe lymphocyte infiltration in the OSI-027 group than that in the RAPA or control groups. In vitro, OSI-027 induced differentiation of CD4 + CD25 - T cells into CD4 + CD25 + forkhead box P3 + Tregs. Furthermore, injection of OSI-027-induced donor-derived CD4 + CD25 + T cells into the peripheral blood of LT-aGVHD model rats prevented LT-aGVHD. Thus, OSI-027 is implicated as a novel method for the treatment of LT-aGVHD. Liver Transplantation 23 1186-1198 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. A cellular model to study drug-induced liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Application to acetaminophen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaut, Anaïs; Le Guillou, Dounia [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Moreau, Caroline [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Service de Biochimie et Toxicologie, CHU Pontchaillou, Rennes (France); Bucher, Simon [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); McGill, Mitchell R. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Martinais, Sophie [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Gicquel, Thomas; Morel, Isabelle [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Service de Biochimie et Toxicologie, CHU Pontchaillou, Rennes (France); Robin, Marie-Anne [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France); Jaeschke, Hartmut [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fromenty, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.fromenty@inserm.fr [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes (France)

    2016-02-01

    Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) can increase susceptibility to hepatotoxicity induced by some xenobiotics including drugs, but the involved mechanisms are poorly understood. For acetaminophen (APAP), a role of hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) is suspected since the activity of this enzyme is consistently enhanced during NAFLD. The first aim of our study was to set up a cellular model of NAFLD characterized not only by triglyceride accumulation but also by higher CYP2E1 activity. To this end, human HepaRG cells were incubated for one week with stearic acid or oleic acid, in the presence of different concentrations of insulin. Although cellular triglycerides and the expression of lipid-responsive genes were similar with both fatty acids, CYP2E1 activity was significantly increased only by stearic acid. CYP2E1 activity was reduced by insulin and this effect was reproduced in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Next, APAP cytotoxicity was assessed in HepaRG cells with or without lipid accretion and CYP2E1 induction. Experiments with a large range of APAP concentrations showed that the loss of ATP and glutathione was almost always greater in the presence of stearic acid. In cells pretreated with the CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole, recovery of ATP was significantly higher in the presence of stearate with low (2.5 mM) or high (20 mM) concentrations of APAP. Levels of APAP-glucuronide were significantly enhanced by insulin. Hence, HepaRG cells can be used as a valuable model of NAFLD to unveil important metabolic and hormonal factors which can increase susceptibility to drug-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequent in obese individuals. • NAFLD can favor hepatotoxicity induced by some drugs including acetaminophen (APAP). • A model of NAFLD was set up by using HepaRG cells incubated with stearate or oleate. • Stearate-loaded HepaRG cells presented higher cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1

  19. Liver scanning in diffuse liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiginger, P.; Atefie, K.; Scherak, O.; Wolf, A.; Hoefer, R.; Seyfried, H.

    1975-01-01

    The results of liver scans performed with sup(99m)Tc-sulphur colloid in 169 patients suffering from diffuse liver diseases and in 48 normal controls were evaluated. The patients with reactive hepatitis, acute hepatitis, chronic persistent hepatitis, fatty liver and fibrosis of the liver show only minimal deviations from the scintigraphic pattern. On the contrary, highly increased colloid uptake in the spleen is found in cases of chronic aggressive hepatitis, whilst the intrahepatic distribution of the colloid is approximately normal. In cases of liver cirrhosis, increased colloid uptake is found in the left lobe of the liver as well as in the spleen and in the bone marrow. Either normal findings or cirrhosis-like changes of the colloid distribution are observed in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. (orig.) [de

  20. Glycogen storage disease type Ia in canines: a model for human metabolic and genetic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y; Byrne, Barry J; Correia, Catherine E; Mah, Cathryn S; Weinstein, David A; Conlon, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including "lactic acidosis", larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  1. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  2. Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficient pigs are a novel large animal model of metabolic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond D. Hickey

    2014-07-01

    FAH-deficiency produced a lethal defect in utero that was corrected by administration of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC throughout pregnancy. Animals on NTBC were phenotypically normal at birth; however, the animals were euthanized approximately four weeks after withdrawal of NTBC due to clinical decline and physical examination findings of severe liver injury and encephalopathy consistent with acute liver failure. Biochemical and histological analyses, characterized by diffuse and severe hepatocellular damage, confirmed the diagnosis of severe liver injury. FAH−/− pigs provide the first genetically engineered large animal model of a metabolic liver disorder. Future applications of FAH−/− pigs include discovery research as a large animal model of HT1 and spontaneous acute liver failure, and preclinical testing of the efficacy of liver cell therapies, including transplantation of hepatocytes, liver stem cells, and pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes.

  3. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize development of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by performing liver biopsy in wild-type and genetically obese mice. METHODS: Male wild-type C57BL/6J (C57) mice (DIO-NASH) and male Lepob/Lepob (ob/ob) mice (ob/ob-NASH) were maintained on a diet high in trans-fat (40%), fructose (22%) and cholesterol (2%) for 26 and 12 wk, respectively. A normal chow diet served as control in C57 mice (lean chow) and ob/ob mice (ob/ob chow). After the diet-induction period, mice were liver biopsied and a blinded histological assessment of steatosis and fibrosis was conducted. Mice were then stratified into groups counterbalanced for steatosis score and fibrosis stage and continued on diet and to receive daily PO dosing of vehicle for 8 wk. Global gene expression in liver tissue was assessed by RNA sequencing and bioinformatics. Metabolic parameters, plasma liver enzymes and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides) as well as hepatic lipids and collagen content were measured by biochemical analysis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) (steatosis/inflammation/ballooning degeneration) and fibrosis were scored. Steatosis and fibrosis were also quantified using percent fractional area. RESULTS: Diet-induction for 26 and 12 wk in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice, respectively, elicited progressive metabolic perturbations characterized by increased adiposity, total cholesterol and elevated plasma liver enzymes. The diet also induced clear histological features of NASH including hepatosteatosis and fibrosis. Overall, the metabolic NASH phenotype was more pronounced in ob/ob-NASH vs DIO-NASH mice. During the eight week repeated vehicle dosing period, the metabolic phenotype was sustained in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice in conjunction with hepatomegaly and increased hepatic lipids and collagen accumulation. Histopathological scoring demonstrated significantly increased NAS of DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 4.7 ± 0.4, P NASH mice (2.4 ± 0.3 vs 6.3

  4. Metabolic adaptations in models of fatty liver disease : Of mice and math

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    The increasing incidence of overweight is accompanied by a plethora of medical symptoms together called the metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by persistent storage of lipids in the liver, is regarded as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome. An imbalance

  5. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B.; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.; Correia, Catherine E.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Weinstein, David A.; Conlon, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size,...

  6. [Liver diseases in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruguera, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Liver diseases in the elderly have aroused less interest than diseases of other organs, since the liver plays a limited role in aging. There are no specific liver diseases of old age, but age-related anatomical and functional modifications of the liver cause changes in the frequency and clinical behavior of some liver diseases compared with those in younger patients. This review discusses the most important features of liver function in the healthy elderly population, as well as the features of the most prevalent liver diseases in this age group, especially the diagnostic approach to the most common liver problems in the elderly: asymptomatic elevation of serum transaminases and jaundice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of experimental fibrotic liver diseases animal model by Carbon Tetracholoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitiara, Atoosa; Tokhanbigli, Samaneh; Mazhari, Sogol; Baghaei, Kaveh; Hatami, Behzad; Hashemi, Seyed Mahmoud; Asadi Rad, Ali; Moradi, Afshin; Nasiri, Meyam; Zarrabi Ahrabi, Nakisa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    This study is presenting an effective method of inducing liver fibrosis by CCL4 as a toxin in two different breeds of rat models. Liver fibrosis is a result of inflammation and liver injury caused by wound healing responses which ultimately lead to liver failure. Consequently, after liver fibrosis, the progression will be continued to liver cirrhosis and at the end stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many studies have demonstrated that one of the most important causes of liver fibrosis is Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Fibrotic Liver is affected by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins like collagen and α-SMA. In two different experiments, male Vistar, and Sprague Dawley Rat models ranging from 200±60, corresponding to an age of approximately 10 weeks were utilized in order to induce CCL4 treated liver fibrosis. After 6 weeks of CCL4 injection, different tests have been carried out to verify the liver fibrosis including serum markers such as Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), molecular tests containing, laminin and α-SMA and also pathological observation by Hematoxylin and eosin staining in both fibrosis and control group. The results of Pathology and Real-time PCR showed that fibrosis was induced much more effectively in Sprague Dawley rat model compared with Wistar rats.

  8. Ursodeoxycholic acid inhibits hepatic cystogenesis in experimental models of polycystic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Garrido, Patricia; Marin, José J. G.; Perugorria, María J.; Urribarri, Aura D.; Erice, Oihane; Sáez, Elena; Úriz, Miriam; Sarvide, Sarai; Portu, Ainhoa; Concepcion, Axel R.; Romero, Marta R.; Monte, María J.; Santos-Laso, Álvaro; Hijona, Elizabeth; Jimenez-Agüero, Raúl; Marzioni, Marco; Beuers, Ulrich; Masyuk, Tatyana V.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Prieto, Jesús; Bujanda, Luis; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Banales, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims: Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) are genetic disorders characterized by progressive biliary cystogenesis. Current therapies show short-term and/or modest beneficial effects. Cystic cholangiocytes hyperproliferate as a consequence of diminished intracellular calcium levels

  9. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX...... from 1992 to 2005. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective study of the journals of 440 patients, who underwent 506 LTXs between 1992 and 2005, showed that 14 patients underwent LTX for PLD. All patients had normal liver function. Three were receiving haemodialysis and thus underwent combined liver...

  10. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-27

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD.

  11. Polycystic Liver Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linda, Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile

  12. Polycystic Liver Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda, Nguyen, E-mail: nguyenli@einstein.edu [5501 Old York Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile.

  13. Pimpinella anisum L. fruit: Chemical composition and effect on rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asadollahpoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD includes a group of chronic liver disorders caused by irregular accumulation of fat in liver tissue. The current study aimed to evaluate chemical composition and the effect of fruit extract and essential oil of Pimpinella anisum in experimental model of NAFLD. Materials and Methods: Sixty rats were randomly divided into ten groups, six in each group. NAFLD was induced in rats using choline-deficient diet for 90 days, followed by 30 days of treatment with 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day of hydroethanolic extract (AE as well as 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 mg/kg/day of essential oil (AO. Blood samples were collected in the final day, and lipid profile, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT as well as biomarkers of oxidative damage including myeloperoxidase, lipid peroxidation, total thiol molecules, and ferric-reducing ability of plasma were measured. Liver tissue sections of the sacrificed rats were also assessed histologically. Results: AE and AO significantly reversed increase in the plasma levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and triacylglycerol and decrease in high-density lipoprotein level in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05. Serum levels of AST and ALT were also significantly modified by treatment with AE and AO (P < 0.05. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were modulated by administration of AE and AO (P < 0.05. Histological assessments also confirmed the effectiveness of treatments by reduced macrovesicular steatohepatitis. Conclusion: It could be concluded that P. anisum fruit extract and essential oil have beneficial effects in the treatment of NAFLD. Further studies are necessary to confirm safety and efficacy of this medicinal plant in clinical setting.

  14. Center variation in the use of nonstandardized model for end-stage liver disease exception points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David S; Makar, George; Bittermann, Therese; French, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score is an imperfect prognosticator of waitlist dropout, so transplant centers may apply for exception points to increase a waitlist candidate's priority on the waitlist. Exception applications are categorized as recognized exceptional diagnoses (REDs; eg, hepatocellular carcinoma) and non-REDs (eg, cholangitis). Although prior work has demonstrated regional variation in the use of exceptions, no work has examined the between-center variability. We analyzed all new waitlist candidates from February 27, 2002 to June 3, 2011 to explore variations in the use of non-REDs, for which no strict exception criteria exist. There were 58,641 new waitlist candidates, and 4356 (7.4%) applied for a non-RED exception. The number of applications increased steadily over time, as did the approval rates for such applications: from variation to ensure the appropriate and equitable use of non-RED exceptions. © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Assessment of non-invasive models for liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B virus related liver disease patients in resource limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rakesh; Sen, Sourav; Banerji, Debabrata; Praharaj, Ashok K; Chopra, Gurvinder Singh; Gill, Satyajit Singh

    2013-01-01

    A total of 350 million individuals are affected by chronic hepatitis B virus infection world-wide. Historically, liver biopsy has been instrumental in adequately assessing patients with chronic liver disease. A number of non-invasive models have been studied world-wide. The aim of this study is to assess the utility of non-invasive mathematical models of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Indian patients in a resource limited setting using routinely performed non-invasive laboratory investigations. A cross-sectional study carried out at a tertiary care center. A total of 52 consecutive chronic liver disease patients who underwent percutaneous liver biopsy and 25 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Routine laboratory investigations included serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Gama glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total bilirubin, total cholesterol, prothrombin time and platelet count. Three non-invasive models for namely aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI), Fibrosis 4 (FIB-4) and Forn's index were calculated. Outcomes were compared for the assessment of best predictor of fibrosis by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of each index. Medcalc online software and by Microsoft Excel Worksheet. Chi-square test was used for significance. P value value of all 3 indices were significantly higher in patients group as compare with the controls (P model for excluding significant liver fibrosis while FIB-4 with a PPV of 61% showed fair correlation with significant fibrosis. Thus, these two non-invasive models for predicting of liver fibrosis, namely APRI and FIB-4, can be utilized in combination as screening tools in monitoring of CHB patients, especially in resource limiting settings.

  16. Offer acceptance practices and geographic variability in allocation model for end-stage liver disease at transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Andrew; Pyke, Joshua; Schladt, David P; Gentry, Sommer E; Weaver, Tim; Salkowski, Nicholas; Kasiske, Bertram L; Israni, Ajay K; Snyder, Jon J

    2018-04-01

    Offer acceptance practices may cause geographic variability in allocation Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (aMELD) score at transplant and could magnify the effect of donor supply and demand on aMELD variability. To evaluate these issues, offer acceptance practices of liver transplant programs and donation service areas (DSAs) were estimated using offers of livers from donors recovered between January 1, 2016, and December 31, 2016. Offer acceptance practices were compared with liver yield, local placement of transplanted livers, donor supply and demand, and aMELD at transplant. Offer acceptance was associated with liver yield (odds ratio, 1.32; P offer acceptance (r = 0.09; P = 0.50). Additionally, the association between DSA-level donor-to-candidate ratios and aMELD at transplant did not change after adjustment for offer acceptance. The average squared difference in median aMELD at transplant across DSAs was 24.6; removing the effect of donor-to-candidate ratios reduced the average squared differences more than removing the effect of program-level offer acceptance (33% and 15% reduction, respectively). Offer acceptance practices and donor-to-candidate ratios independently contributed to geographic variability in aMELD at transplant. Thus, neither offer acceptance nor donor-to-candidate ratios can explain all of the geographic variability in aMELD at transplant. Liver Transplantation 24 478-487 2018 AASLD. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin......Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... hemodynamics in cirrhosis. The most characteristic findings in cirrhotic patients are vasodilatation with low systemic vascular resistance, increased cardiac output, high arterial compliance, secondary activation of counterregulatory systems (sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system...

  18. Epidemiology Of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.Г. Мартынова

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main factors of chronic liver disease is alcohol. The level of alcoholic liver disease incidence and cirrhosis mortality has increased considerably in the recent years in many countries. The risk of development and disease progression are determined by the effect of endogenous and exogenous factors: "drinking mode", female gender, heredity and genetic predisposition, obesity, concomitant viral hepatitis

  19. Graft versus host disease in the bone marrow, liver and thymus humanized mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Greenblatt

    Full Text Available Mice bearing a "humanized" immune system are valuable tools to experimentally manipulate human cells in vivo and facilitate disease models not normally possible in laboratory animals. Here we describe a form of GVHD that develops in NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human fetal bone marrow, liver and thymus (NS BLT mice. The skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and parotid glands are affected with progressive inflammation and sclerosis. Although all mice showed involvement of at least one organ site, the incidence of overt clinical disease was approximately 35% by 22 weeks after reconstitution. The use of hosts lacking the IL2 common gamma chain (NOD/SCID/γc(-/- delayed the onset of disease, but ultimately did not affect incidence. Genetic analysis revealed that particular donor HLA class I alleles influenced the risk for the development of GVHD. At a cellular level, GVHD is associated with the infiltration of human CD4+ T cells into the skin and a shift towards Th1 cytokine production. GVHD also induced a mixed M1/M2 polarization phenotype in a dermal murine CD11b+, MHC class II+ macrophage population. The presence of xenogenic GVHD in BLT mice both presents a major obstacle in the use of humanized mice and an opportunity to conduct preclinical studies on GVHD in a humanized model.

  20. Fibropolycystic liver disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veigel, Myka Call; Prescott-Focht, Julia; Zinati, Reza; Rodriguez, Michael G.; Shao, Lei; Moore, Charlotte A.W.; Lowe, Lisa H.

    2009-01-01

    Fibropolycystic liver diseases are a group of associated congenital disorders that present most often in childhood. These disorders include congenital hepatic fibrosis, biliary hamartomas, autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, choledochal cysts and Caroli disease. We present a discussion and illustrations of the embryology, genetics, anatomy, pathology, imaging approach and key imaging features that distinguish fibropolycystic liver disease in children. The pathogenesis of these disorders is believed to be abnormal development of the embryonic ductal plates, which ultimately form the liver and biliary systems. An understanding of the abnormal embryogenesis helps to explain the characteristic imaging features of these disorders. (orig.)

  1. Protective effect of genetic deletion of pannexin1 in experimental mouse models of acute and chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Govoni, Veronica Mollica; Lopes, Valéria Veras; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Shestopalov, Valery I; Nogueira, Marina Sayuri; de Castro, Inar Alves; Farhood, Anwar; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo; Akakpo, Jephte; Lebofsky, Margitta; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2018-03-01

    Pannexins are transmembrane proteins that form communication channels connecting the cytosol of an individual cell with its extracellular environment. A number of studies have documented the presence of pannexin1 in liver as well as its involvement in inflammatory responses. In this study, it was investigated whether pannexin1 plays a role in acute liver failure and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, being prototypical acute and chronic liver pathologies, respectively, both featured by liver damage, oxidative stress and inflammation. To this end, wild-type and pannexin1 -/- mice were overdosed with acetaminophen for 1, 6, 24 or 48h or were fed a choline-deficient high-fat diet for 8weeks. Evaluation of the effects of genetic pannexin1 deletion was based on a number of clinically relevant read-outs, including markers of liver damage, histopathological analysis, lipid accumulation, protein adduct formation, oxidative stress and inflammation. In parallel, in order to elucidate molecular pathways affected by pannexin1 deletion as well as to mechanistically anchor the clinical observations, whole transcriptome analysis of liver tissue was performed. The results of this study show that pannexin1 -/- diseased mice present less liver damage and oxidative stress, while inflammation was only decreased in pannexin1 -/- mice in which non-alcoholic steatohepatitis was induced. A multitude of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and xenobiotic metabolism were differentially modulated in both liver disease models in wild-type and in pannexin1 -/- mice. Overall, the results of this study suggest that pannexin1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Diet - liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteins normally help the body repair tissue. They also prevent fatty buildup and damage to the liver cells. In people with badly damaged livers, proteins are not properly processed. Waste products may build up and affect the brain. Dietary ...

  3. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiko Ishida

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy, autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the

  4. Liver Disease in the Alcoholic

    OpenAIRE

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    The problem of liver damage in alcoholic patients is widespread. This review discusses hepatic damage on the basis of a histologic classification of increasing severity. In the early stages, or with compensated cirrhosis, clinical and laboratory findings may not accurately reflect hepatic involvement. Furthermore, there exists a group of alcoholic patients in whom liver disease may be caused by factors other than alcohol. Nevertheless, in most patients with liver disease, certain biochemical ...

  5. Population pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic modelling of eltrombopag in healthy volunteers and subjects with chronic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan C; Wire, Mary; Zhang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Aims To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of eltrombopag in chronic liver disease (CLD). Methods The PK/PD model was developed using data from 79 CLD patients using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Results The PK of eltrombopag were described by a two-compartment model with dual sequential first-order absorption. Gender, race and severity of CLD were predictors of the apparent clearance of eltrombopag. The PD of eltrombopag in CLD were adequately described by a four-compartment lifespan model, in which eltrombopag stimulated platelet precursor production rate. East Asian CLD patients were less sensitive to the stimulatory effect of eltrombopag. Following a daily dose regimen of 50 mg eltrombopag, the time to achieve peak platelet counts was longer for the CLD population compared with patients who had immune thrombocytopenic purpura, but was comparable to patients with hepatitis C. Likewise, it took a longer time for platelet counts to rebound back to baseline once eltrombopag treatment was discontinued. Conclusions The time course of the platelet response in CLD was different from that in immune thrombocytopenic purpura but comparable to that in hepatitis C. PMID:24117976

  6. A nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cirrhosis model in gerbil : the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Wei; Guan, Zheng; Brisset, Jean C.; Shi, Qiaojuan; Lou, Qi; Ma, Yue; Suriguga, Su; Ying, Huazhong; Sa, Xiaoying; Chen, Zhenwen; Quax, Wim J.; Chu, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) usually takes decades to develop into cirrhosis, which limits the longitudinal study of NAFLD. This work aims at developing a NAFLD-caused cirrhosis model in gerbil and examining the dynamic relationship between hepatic lipid metabolism and cirrhosis. We fed

  7. Lipotoxicity and steatohepatitis in an overfed mouse model for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaemers, Ingrid C.; Stallen, Jan M.; Kunne, Cindy; Wallner, Christian; van Werven, Jochem; Nederveen, Aart; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2011-01-01

    The major risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. The cause for progression from the steatosis stage to the inflammatory condition (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)) remains elusive at present. Aim of this study was to test

  8. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  9. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is often associated with a cluster of increased health risks collectively known as "Metabolic Syndrome" (MS). MS is often accompanied by development of fatty liver. Sometimes fatty liver results in damage leading to reduced liver function, and need for a transplant. This condition is known...

  10. Assessment of non-invasive models for liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B virus related liver disease patients in resource limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A total of 350 million individuals are affected by chronic hepatitis B virus infection world-wide. Historically, liver biopsy has been instrumental in adequately assessing patients with chronic liver disease. A number of non-invasive models have been studied world-wide. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the utility of non-invasive mathematical models of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B (CHB. Indian patients in a resource limited setting using routinely performed non-invasive laboratory investigations. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study carried out at a tertiary care center. Subjects and Methods: A total of 52 consecutive chronic liver disease patients who underwent percutaneous liver biopsy and 25 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Routine laboratory investigations included serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, Gama glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, total bilirubin, total cholesterol, prothrombin time and platelet count. Three non-invasive models for namely aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI, Fibrosis 4 (FIB-4 and Forn′s index were calculated. Outcomes were compared for the assessment of best predictor of fibrosis by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of each index. Statistical Analysis Used: Medcalc online software and by Microsoft Excel Worksheet. Chi-square test was used for significance. P value < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: While the serum levels of AST, ALT and GGT were significantly higher in patients group as compare with the healthy controls (P < 0.01, the platelet counts were significantly lower in patient group as compared to the control group (P < 0.01. Mean value of all 3 indices were significantly higher in patients group as compare with the controls (P < 0.01. Conclusions: Out of the three indices, APRI index with a NPV of 95% appeared to be a better model

  11. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of infant short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild, Per Torp; Ney, Denise M; Sigalet, David L

    2014-01-01

    enterocolitis, atresia, gastroschisis, volvulus and aganglionosis. Patient outcomes have improved, but there is a need to develop new therapies for SBS and to understand intestinal adaptation after different diseases, resection types, nutritional interventions and growth factor therapies. Animal studies may......, newborn pigs and weanling rats represent a translational advantage for infant SBS due to their immature intestine. A balance among practical, economical, experimental and ethical constraints determines the choice of SBS model for each clinical or basic research question....

  12. Liver Disease and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The gallbladder is a sac attached below the liver to the common bile duct. Gallstones form when bile (the liquid stored in ... a stone may have passed down the common bile duct to the area where it joins the ... of the liver. Chronic (long term) hepatitis can be from inflammation ...

  13. Manifestation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Different Dietary Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera HI Fengler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, which are usually associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, are considerable health and economic issues due to the rapid increase of their prevalence in Western society. Histologically, the diseases are characterised by steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and if further progressed, fibrosis. Dietary-induced mouse models are widely used in investigations of the development and progression of NAFLD and NASH; these models attempt to mimic the histological and metabolic features of the human diseases. However, the majority of dietary mouse models fail to reflect the whole pathophysiological spectrum of NAFLD and NASH. Some models exhibit histological features similar to those seen in humans while lacking the metabolic context, while others resemble the metabolic conditions leading to NAFLD in humans but fail to mimic the whole histological spectrum, including progression from steatosis to liver fibrosis, and thus fail to mimic NASH. This review summarises the advantages and disadvantages of the different dietary-induced mouse models of NAFLD and NASH, with a focus on the genetic background of several commonly used wild-type mouse strains as well as gender and age, which influence the development and progression of these liver diseases.

  14. A mouse radiation-induced liver disease model for stereotactic body radiation therapy validated in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhi-Feng; Zhang, Jian-Ying; Shen, Xiao-Yun; Gao, Ya-Bo; Hu, Yong; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Zhou, Le-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lower radiation tolerance of the whole liver hinders dose escalations of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. This study was conducted to define the exact doses that result in radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) as well as to determine dose constraints for the critical organs at risk (OARs) in mice; these parameters are still undefined in HCC SBRT. Methods: This study consisted of two phases. In the primary phase, mice treated with helical tomotherapy-based SBRT were stratified according to escalating radiation doses to the livers. The pathological differences, signs [such as mouse performance status (MPS)], and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/albumin levels were observed. Radiation-induced disease severities of the OARs were scored using systematic evaluation standards. In the validation phase in humans, 13 patients with HCC who had undergone radiotherapy before hepatectomy were enrolled to validate RILD pathological changes in a mouse study. Results: The evaluation criteria of the mouse liver radiotherapy-related signs were as follows: MPS ≥ 2.0 ± 0.52, AST/ALT ≥ 589.2 ± 118.5/137.4 ± 15.3 U/L, serum albumin ≤ 16.8 ± 2.29 g/L. The preliminary dose constraints of the OARs were also obtained, such as those for the liver (average dose ≤ 26.36 ± 1.71 Gy) and gastrointestinal tract (maximum dose ≤ 22.63 Gy). Mouse RILD models were able to be developed when the livers were irradiated with average doses of ≥31.76 ± 1.94 Gy (single fraction). RILD pathological changes in mice have also been validated in HCC patients. Conclusions: Mouse RILD models could be developed with SBRT based on the dose constraints for the OARs and evaluation criteria of mouse liver radiotherapy-related signs, and the authors’ results favor the study of further approaches to treat HCC with SBRT.

  15. Decreasing mitochondrial fission alleviates hepatic steatosis in a murine model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Chad A; Lee, Hakjoo; Brookes, Paul S; Yoon, Yisang

    2014-09-15

    Mitochondria produce the majority of cellular ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, and their capacity to do so is influenced by many factors. Mitochondrial morphology is recently suggested as an important contributor in controlling mitochondrial bioenergetics. Mitochondria divide and fuse continuously, which is affected by environmental factors, including metabolic alterations. Underscoring its bioenergetic influence, altered mitochondrial morphology is reported in tissues of patients and in animal models of metabolic dysfunction. In this study, we found that mitochondrial fission plays a vital role in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The development of hepatic steatosis, oxidative/nitrative stress, and hepatic tissue damage, induced by a high-fat diet, were alleviated in genetically manipulated mice suppressing mitochondrial fission. The alleviation of steatosis was recapitulated in primary hepatocytes with the inhibition of mitochondrial fission. Mechanistically, our study indicates that fission inhibition enhances proton leak under conditions of free fatty acid incubation, implicating bioenergetic change through manipulating mitochondrial fission. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanistic role for mitochondrial fission in the etiology of NAFLD. The efficacy of decreasing mitochondrial fission in the suppression of NAFLD suggests that mitochondrial fission represents a novel target for therapeutic treatment of NAFLD. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now The Progression of Liver ...

  17. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If cirrhosis is not treated, the liver will fail and will not be able to work well ... Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give ...

  18. Constitutive androstane receptor activation promotes bilirubin clearance in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Zheng, Liyu; Wu, Jinming; Tang, Binbin; Zhang, Mengqin; Zhu, Debin; Lin, Xianfan

    2017-06-01

    Increased plasma levels of bilirubin have been reported in rat models and patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a known xenobiotic receptor, which induces the detoxification and transport of bilirubin. In the present study, the bilirubin transport regulatory mechanisms, and the role of CAR activation in hepatic and extrahepatic bilirubin clearance were investigated in a murine model of ALD. The mice were fed a Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet for 4 weeks, followed by the administration of CAR agonists, 1,4-bis-[2‑(3,5-dichlorpyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) and phenobarbital (PB), and their vehicles to examine the effect of the pharmacological activation of CAR on serum levels of bilirubin and on the bilirubin clearance pathway in ALD by serological survey, western blotting and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that chronic ethanol ingestion impaired the nuclear translocation of CAR, which was accompanied by elevated serum levels of bilirubin, suppression of the expression of hepatic and renal organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1A1 and hepatic multidrug resistance‑associated protein 2 (MRP2), and induction of the expression of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1. The activation of CAR by TCPOBOP and PB resulted in downregulation of the serum levels of bilirubin followed by selective upregulation of the expression levels of OATP1A1, OATP1A4, UGT1A1 and MRP2 in ALD. These results revealed the bilirubin transport regulatory mechanisms and highlighted the importance of CAR in modulating the bilirubin clearance pathway in the ALD mouse model.

  19. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepat...

  20. Hydrogen peroxide impairs autophagic flux in a cell model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Pengtao [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Zhen [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 17 Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100021 (China); Zhao, Hong, E-mail: zhaohong9@sina.com [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 17 Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100021 (China); Wei, Taotao, E-mail: weitt@moon.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Free fatty acids exposure induces elevated autophagy. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits autophagic flux through impairing the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. •Inhibition of autophagy potentiates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease, but the pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We found that the levels of autophagy were elevated in hepatoma cells upon exposure to free fatty acids, as confirmed by the increase in the number of autophagosomes. However, exposure of hepatoma cells to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and TNF-α, two typical “second hit” factors, increased the initiation of autophagy but inhibited the autophagic flux. The inhibition of autophagy sensitized cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy acts as a protective mechanism in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and that impairment of autophagy might induce more severe lesions of the liver. These findings will be a benefit to the understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and might suggest a strategy for the prevention and cure of NAFLD.

  1. Animal models for the study of hepatitis C virus infection and related liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver-related death in more than 300,000 people annually. Treatments for patients with chronic HCV are suboptimal, despite the introduction of directly acting antiviral agents. There is no vaccine that prevents HCV infection. Relevant animal models are important...... for HCV research and development of drugs and vaccines. Chimpanzees are the best model for studies of HCV infection and related innate and adaptive host immune responses. They can be used in immunogenicity and efficacy studies of HCV vaccines. The only small animal models of robust HCV infection are T......- and B- cell deficient mice with human chimeric livers. Although these mice cannot be used in studies of adaptive immunity, they have provided new insights into HCV neutralization, interactions between virus and receptors, innate host responses, and therapeutic approaches. Recent progress in developing...

  2. Evaluation of model for end-stage liver disease score cut off values in patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurram, M.; Qayyum, W.; Umar, M.; Abedin, Z.U.; Bushra, H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) is scoring system used for prioritization of patients waiting liver transplantation. Patients with decompensated chronic liver disease (DCLD) with higher MELD score and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) have poor outcome. We planned to note association between short term mortality and various cut-off values of at admission MELD score in HCV related DCLD patients presenting with HE. Methods: In this descriptive case series, 208 Hepatitis C (HCV) related chronic liver disease (CLD) patients with HE were included. At admission serum bilirubin, creatinine and INR were sought to calculate MELD score. Patients who improved were discharged and kept under regular follow up. Outcome was categorized into alive or expired in 3 months after admission. Based on MELD score cut off values of >15, >20, >25 and >30, association with outcome was determined using Chi-square test. Results: One hundred and six (51%) patients were female. Mean patient age was 55.3±10.6 years. Outcome wise, 128 (61.5%) were alive and 80 (38.5%) expired. Mean MELD score of expired was 22.17±9.14. 55 (51%) patients with MELD score >15, 44 (65.7%) patients with >20, 30 (73.2%) patients with >25, and 21 (72.5%) patients with >30 expired. MELD score >20 had strongest association with outcome, p value less than o.01. Conclusion: At admission MELD score >20 are most significantly associated with poor outcome in DCLD patients with HE. (author)

  3. HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS IN LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Minov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary hemostasis as it is the site of synthesis of all coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Liver diseases are associated with complex changes in coagulation and the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors is preserved but reset to a lower level. There is growing evidence that portal and hepatic vein thrombosis is cause of disease progression in cirrhotic patients and worsens hemostatic abnormalities. These hemostatic abnormalities do not always lead to spontaneous bleeding, which may be triggered only by additional factors, such as infections. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. In patients with end stage liver disease liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal hemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects. During liver transplantation hemorrhage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis. 

  4. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether this condition is a

  5. Metabonomics Research Progress on Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengqian; Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qingwei; Wu, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics as the new omics technique develops after genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics and has rapid development at present. Liver diseases are worldwide public health problems. In China, chronic hepatitis B and its secondary diseases are the common liver diseases. They can be diagnosed by the combination of history, virology, liver function, and medical imaging. However, some patients seldom have relevant physical examination, so the diagnosis may be delayed. Many other liver diseases, such as drug-induced liver injury (DILI), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and autoimmune liver diseases, still do not have definite diagnostic markers; the diagnosis consists of history, medical imaging, and the relevant score. As a result, the clinical work becomes very complex. So it has broad prospects to explore the specific and sensitive biomarkers of liver diseases with metabolomics. In this paper, there are several summaries which are related to the current research progress and application of metabolomics on biomarkers of liver diseases.

  6. A Systems Biology Approach to Understanding Alcoholic Liver Disease Molecular Mechanism: The Development of Static and Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghati, Leila; Razaghi-Moghadam, Zahra; Mohammadnejad, Javad

    2017-11-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a complex disease characterized by damages to the liver and is the consequence of excessive alcohol consumption over years. Since this disease is associated with several pathway failures, pathway reconstruction and network analysis are likely to explicit the molecular basis of the disease. To this aim, in this paper, a network medicine approach was employed to integrate interactome (protein-protein interaction and signaling pathways) and transcriptome data to reconstruct both a static network of ALD and a dynamic model for it. Several data sources were exploited to assemble a set of ALD-associated genes which further was used for network reconstruction. Moreover, a comprehensive literature mining reveals that there are four signaling pathways with crosstalk (TLR4, NF- [Formula: see text]B, MAPK and Apoptosis) which play a major role in ALD. These four pathways were exploited to reconstruct a dynamic model of ALD. The results assure that these two models are consistent with a number of experimental observations. The static network of ALD and its dynamic model are the first models provided for ALD which offer potentially valuable information for researchers in this field.

  7. Model for End-stage Liver Disease and Organ Allocation in Liver Transplantation: Where Are We and Where Should We Go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teh-Ia Huo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP score has been used for decades to measure the severity of chronic liver disease. Recent studies have shown that the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD more accurately predicts the short-and mid-term survival for patients with cirrhosis compared to the CTP system. MELD, which has 3 parameters (serum bilirubin, creatinine, and prothrombin time that need logarithmic transformation, has the advantage of a wide-range continuous scale and is more objective and less variable. The liver allocation system has changed from a status-based algorithm using the CTP score, to one using a continuous MELD severity score as a reference system to prioritize adult patients on the waiting list since 2002 in the USA. However, there are potential limitations of MELD. An intrinsic defect is that some important parameters, such as hepatic encephalopathy and ascites, which are common adverse complications in cirrhosis, are not included in MELD. It has been suggested to incorporate a low serum sodium level into the prognostic model to enhance the predictive ability. Moreover, the change of MELD over time may provide updated information for patients on the transplant waiting list. In summary, although there was encouraging evidence supporting the prognostic advantage of MELD, the optimal role of MELD in the setting of outcome assessment for cirrhotic patients needs more study. Appropriate modifications and fine tuning of MELD are necessary for determining the ranking status of patients on the waiting list, to avoid a futile transplantation and improve overall patient survival.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  9. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. PMID:27418683

  10. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan; Ji, Baoan

    2016-09-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan; Ji, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mai...

  12. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients.

  13. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension......This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  14. Autoimmune liver disease and therapy in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Homan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the liver. In childhood, autoimmune liver disorders include autoimmune hepatitis type I and II, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, Coombs-positive giant cell hepatitis, and de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation. Autoimmune liver disease has a more aggressive course in children, especially autoimmune hepatitis type II. Standard therapy is a combination of corticosteroids and azathioprine. Around 80 % of children with autoimmune liver disease show a rapid response to combination therapy. The non-responders are treated with more potent drugs, otherwise autoimmune disease progresses to cirrhosis of the liver and the child needs liver transplantation as rescue therapy.

  15. Nutritional support for liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretz, Ronald L; Avenell, Alison; Lipman, Timothy O

    2012-05-16

    treatment; any nutrition provided to the controls; other interventions provided to the patients; number, sex, age of the study participants; hospital or outpatient status; underlying liver disease; risks of bias (sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome reporting, intention-to-treat analysis, selective outcome reporting, others (vested interests, baseline imbalance, early stopping)); mortality; hepatic morbidity (development or resolution of ascites or hepatic encephalopathy, occurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding); quality of life scores; adverse events; infections; lengths of stay in the hospital or intensive care unit; costs; serum bilirubin; postoperative complications (surgical trials only); and nutritional outcomes (nitrogen balance, anthropometric measurements, body weight). The primary outcomes of this review were mortality, hepatic morbidity, quality of life, and adverse events. Data were extracted in duplicate; differences were resolved by consensus.Data for each outcome were combined in a meta-analysis (RevMan 5.1). Estimates were reported using risk ratios or mean differences, along with the 95% confidence intervals (CI). Both fixed-effect and random-effects models were employed; fixed-effect models were reported unless one model, but not the other, found a significant difference (in which case both were reported). Heterogeneity was assessed by the Chi(2) test and I(2) statistic. Subgroup analyses were planned to assess specific liver diseases (alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma), acute or chronic liver diseases, and trials employing standard or branched-chain amino acid formulations (for the hepatic encephalopathy outcomes). Sensitivity analyses were planned to compare trials at low and high risk of bias and trials reported as full papers. The following exploratory analyses were undertaken: 1) medical and surgical trials were combined for each nutritional intervention; 2) intention-to-treat analyses in

  16. [Liver involvement in coeliac disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riestra, S; Fernández, E; Rodrigo, L

    1999-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy in which, genetic, immunologic and environmental factors are implied. Several extradigestive diseases have been described in association with coeliac disease, which share most of the times an immunologic mechanism. The liver is damaged in coeliac disease, and it has been considered by some authors as an extraintestinal manifestation of the disease. In the present revision we discuss the different hepatic diseases related with the coeliac disease, as well as the best approach to diagnosis and therapy of choice. At diagnosis, it is very frequent to find an asymptomatic hipertransaminasemia, which frequently disappears after gluten suppression; the morphological substratum found in this alteration is a non-specific reactive hepatitis in the majority of cases. Coeliac disease is a demonstrated cause of cryptogenic hipertransaminasemia. In a small percentage of patient with coeliac disease an association has been found with other immunological liver diseases, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis. Few studies exist that include a large number of patient, and the results on occasions are discordant. Nevertheless, the strongest association is with autoimmune hepatitis and with primary biliary cirrhosis. Several communications of isolated cases of rare hepatic diseases, which probably, only reflect a fortuitous association, have been cited in the literature.

  17. Inhibition of 5-Lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton in high-fat diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuifen Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Arachidonic Acid/5-lipoxygenase (AA/5-LOX pathway connects lipid metabolism and proinflammatory cytokine, which are both related to the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of AA/5-LOX pathway in progression of NAFLD, and the effect of zileuton, an inhibitor of 5-LOX, in this model. Materials and Methods: Animal model for progression of NAFLD was established via feeding high saturated fat diet (HFD. Liver function, HE staining, NAFLD activity score (NAS were used to evaluate NAFLD progression. We detected the lipid metabolism substrates: free fatty acids (FFA and AA, products: cysteinyl-leukotrienes (CysLTs, and changes in gene and protein level of key enzyme in AA/5-LOX pathway including PLA2 and 5-LOX. Furthermore, we determined whether NAFLD progression pathway was delayed or reversed when zileuton (1-[1-(1-benzothiophen-2-ylethyl]-1-hydroxyurea was administrated. Results: Rat model for progression of NAFLD was well established as analyzed by liver transaminase activities, hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining and NAS. The concentrations of substrates and products in AA/5-LOX pathway were increased with the progression of NAFLD. mRNA and protein expression of PLA2 and 5-LOX were all enhanced. Moreover, administration of zileuton inhibited AA/5-LOX pathway and reversed the increased transamine activities and NAS. Conclusion: AA/5-LOX pathway promotes the progression of NAFLD, which can be reversed by zileuton.

  18. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension...

  19. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  20. Comparable Short- and Long-term Outcomes in Living Donor and Deceased Donor Liver Transplantations for Patients With Model for End-stage Liver Disease Scores ≥35 in a Hepatitis-B Endemic Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, Kenneth S H; Fung, James Y Y; Chan, Albert C Y; Dai, Wing Chiu; Sharr, William W; Cheung, Tan To; Chan, See Ching; Lo, Chung Mau

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) should be offered to patients with Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores ≥35. No data was available to support LDLT of such patients. Data of 672 consecutive adult liver transplant recipients from 2005 to 2014 at our center were reviewed. Patients with MELD scores ≥35 were divided into the deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) group and the LDLT group and were compared. Univariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors affecting survival. The LDLT group (n = 54) had younger (33 yrs vs 50 yrs, P standard-liver-volume rates (51.28% vs 99.76%, P Hong Kong, where most waitlisted patients have acute-on-chronic liver failure from hepatitis B, LDLT is a wise alternative to DDLT.

  1. Preoperative selective desensitization of live donor liver transplant recipients considering the degree of T lymphocyte cross-match titer, model for end-stage liver disease score, and graft liver volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Geun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Suk-won; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Hyeyoung; Park, Min-Su; Choi, YoungRok; Lee, Kyungbun; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Park, Myoung Hee; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that a positive lymphocyte cross-matching (XM) is associated with low graft survival rates and a high prevalence of acute rejection after adult living donor liver transplantations (ALDLTs) using a small-for-size graft. However, there is still no consensus on preoperative desensitization. We adopted the desensitization protocol from ABO-incompatible LDLT. We performed desensitization for the selected patients according to the degree of T lymphocyte cross-match titer, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, and graft liver volume. We retrospectively evaluated 230 consecutive ALDLT recipients for 5 yr. Eleven recipients (4.8%) showed a positive XM. Among them, five patients with the high titer (> 1:16) by antihuman globulin-augmented method (T-AHG) and one with a low titer but a high MELD score of 36 were selected for desensitization: rituximab injection and plasmapheresis before the transplantation. There were no major side effects of desensitization. Four of the patients showed successful depletion of the T-AHG titer. There was no mortality and hyperacute rejection in lymphocyte XM-positive patients, showing no significant difference in survival outcome between two groups (P=1.000). In conclusion, this desensitization protocol for the selected recipients considering the degree of T lymphocyte cross-match titer, MELD score, and graft liver volume is feasible and safe.

  2. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Higher Mortality in registrants with sudden model for end-stage liver disease increase: Disadvantaged by the current allocation policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Allan B; Luo, Xun; Alejo, Jennifer L; Poon, Anna K; Cameron, Andrew M; Segev, Dorry L

    2015-05-01

    Liver allocation is based on current Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores, with priority in the case of a tie being given to those waiting the longest with a given MELD score. We hypothesized that this priority might not reflect risk: registrants whose MELD score has recently increased receive lower priority but might have higher wait-list mortality. We studied wait-list and posttransplant mortality in 69,643 adult registrants from 2002 to 2013. By likelihood maximization, we empirically defined a MELD spike as a MELD increase ≥ 30% over the previous 7 days. At any given time, only 0.6% of wait-list patients experienced a spike; however, these patients accounted for 25% of all wait-list deaths. Registrants who reached a given MELD score after a spike had higher wait-list mortality in the ensuing 7 days than those with the same resulting MELD score who did not spike, but they had no difference in posttransplant mortality. The spike-associated wait-list mortality increase was highest for registrants with medium MELD scores: specifically, 2.3-fold higher (spike versus no spike) for a MELD score of 10, 4.0-fold higher for a MELD score of 20, and 2.5-fold higher for a MELD score of 30. A model incorporating the MELD score and spikes predicted wait-list mortality risk much better than a model incorporating only the MELD score. Registrants with a sudden MELD increase have a higher risk of short-term wait-list mortality than is indicated by their current MELD score but have no increased risk of posttransplant mortality; allocation policy should be adjusted accordingly. © 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. A Novel Wistar Rat Model of Obesity-Related Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Induced by Sucrose-Rich Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luíza R. P. Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is not fully understood, and experimental models are an alternative to study this issue. We investigated the effects of a simple carbohydrate-rich diet on the development of obesity-related NAFLD and the impact of physical training on the metabolic abnormalities associated with this disorder. Sixty Wistar rats were randomly separated into experimental and control groups, which were fed with sucrose-enriched (18% simple carbohydrates and standard diet, respectively. At the end of each experimental period (5, 10, 20, and 30 weeks, 6 animals from each group were sacrificed for blood tests and liver histology and immunohistochemistry. From weeks 25 to 30, 6 animals from each group underwent physical training. The experimental group animals developed obesity and NAFLD, characterized histopathologically by steatosis and hepatocellular ballooning, clinically by increased thoracic circumference and body mass index associated with hyperleptinemia, and metabolically by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, increased levels of very low-density lipoprotein- (VLDL- cholesterol, depletion of the antioxidants liver enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase, and increased hepatic levels of malondialdehyde, an oxidative stress marker. Rats that underwent physical training showed increased high-density lipoprotein- (HDL- cholesterol levels. In conclusion, a sucrose-rich diet induced obesity, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and NAFLD in rats.

  5. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  6. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepatic encephalopathy. Aggressive nutritional support is indicated in inpatients with ALD, and patients often need to be fed through an enteral feeding tube to achieve protein and calorie goals. Enteral nutritional support clearly improves nutrition status and may improve clinical outcome. Moreover, late-night snacks in outpatient cirrhotics improve nutritional status and lean body mass. Thus, with no FDA-approved therapy for ALD, careful nutritional intervention should be considered as frontline therapy. PMID:21284673

  7. Alogliptin alleviates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by promoting CPT1a expression via Thr172 phosphorylation of AMPKα in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Hiroshi; Sato, Shuichi; Yazaki, Tomotaka; Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Ishimura, Norihisa; Ishihara, Shunnji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2018-05-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO) has been reported to be effective for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alogliptin (ALO) may have efficacy against NAFLD progression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study examined the effectiveness of ALO in a rodent model of NAFLD and diabetes mellitus. KK‑Ay mice were used to produce an NAFLD model via administration of a choline‑deficient (CD) diet. To examine the effects of alogliptin, KK‑Ay mice were provided with a CD diet with 0.03% ALO and/or 0.02% PIO orally for 8 weeks. Biochemical parameters, pathological alterations and hepatic mRNA levels associated with fatty acid metabolism were assessed. Severe hepatic steatosis was observed in KK‑Ay mice fed with a CD diet, which was alleviated by the administration of ALO and/or PIO. ALO administration increased the hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) mRNA expression level and enhanced the Thr172 phosphorylation of AMP‑activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) in the liver. PIO administration tended to decrease the hepatic fatty acid synthase mRNA expression level and increase the serum adiponectin level. Homeostasis model of assessment‑insulin resistance values tended to improve with ALO and PIO administration. ALO and PIO alleviated hepatic steatosis in KK‑Ay mice fed with a CD diet. ALO increased hepatic mRNA expression levels associated with fatty acid oxidation. In addition, the results of the present study suggested that ALO promotes CPT1a expression via Thr172 phosphorylation of AMPKα.

  8. Effective treatment of steatosis and steatohepatitis by fibroblast growth factor 1 in mouse models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weilin; Struik, Dicky; Nies, Vera J M; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Harkema, Liesbeth; de Bruin, Alain; Verkade, Henkjan J; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; van Zutphen, Tim; Jonker, Johan W

    2016-02-23

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder and is strongly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Currently, there is no approved pharmacological treatment for this disease, but improvement of insulin resistance using peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists, such as thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has been shown to reduce steatosis and steatohepatitis effectively and to improve liver function in patients with obesity-related NAFLD. However, this approach is limited by adverse effects of TZDs. Recently, we have identified fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a target of nuclear receptor PPARγ in visceral adipose tissue and as a critical factor in adipose remodeling. Because FGF1 is situated downstream of PPARγ, it is likely that therapeutic targeting of the FGF1 pathway will eliminate some of the serious adverse effects associated with TZDs. Here we show that pharmacological administration of recombinant FGF1 (rFGF1) effectively improves hepatic inflammation and damage in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and in choline-deficient mice, two etiologically different models of NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis was effectively reduced only in ob/ob mice, suggesting that rFGF1 stimulates hepatic lipid catabolism. Potentially adverse effects such as fibrosis or proliferation were not observed in these models. Because the anti-inflammatory effects were observed in both the presence and absence of the antisteatotic effects, our findings further suggest that the anti-inflammatory property of rFGF1 is independent of its effect on lipid catabolism. Our current findings indicate that, in addition to its potent glucose-lowering and insulin-sensitizing effects, rFGF1 could be therapeutically effective in the treatment of NAFLD.

  9. Acute renal dysfunction in liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Betrosian, Alex P; Agarwal, Banwari; Douzinas, Emmanuel E

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in liver diseases, either as part of multiorgan involvement in acute illness or secondary to advanced liver disease. The presence of renal impairment in both groups is a poor prognostic indicator. Renal failure is often multifactorial and can present as pre-renal or intrinsic renal dysfunction. Obstructive or post renal dysfunction only rarely complicates liver disease. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a unique form of renal failure associated with advanced liver dise...

  10. Diagnostic methods of fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Traeber, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is defined as an abnormal accumulation of lipids into the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Different kinds of fatty liver diseases are becoming the most important etiologies of end-stage liver disease in the western world. Because fatty liver is a theoretically reversible process, timely and accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for potential therapeutic options. This work describes major diagnostic methods and discusses particular advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.

  11. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing in pediatric age group parallel to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight all around the world. So changing in life style and   interventions on obesogenic environment is cornerstone of NAFLD therapy in obese children. Some experts recommend that children and adolescents be encouraged to follow a low-fat, low-glycemic-index diet that includes eating a minimum of 5 servings of vegetables and fruits daily, engaging in physical activity for at least 1 hour daily, and minimizing television/computer time to 2 hours daily.  In spite of effectiveness of weight loss and exercise in improvement NAFLD, this goal is very difficult to be achieved and pharmacological approaches have become necessary. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress also might slow the progression of NAFLD to NASH or cirrhosis.  On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials but there is no approved pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD or NASH. Not all obese children affected by NAFLD. Diet modification and regular exercise beside to serial medical follow up highly suggested for this group of children. Normal weight and thin children with NAFLD or NASH should be investigated appropriately in a logical manner based on causes of primary liver steatosis in children and treatment of underlying disease can cause improvement fatty liver in these patients.   Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Children; Steatosis; Treatment

  12. Computational Modeling in Liver Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Christ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for extended liver resection is increasing due to the growing incidence of liver tumors in aging societies. Individualized surgical planning is the key for identifying the optimal resection strategy and to minimize the risk of postoperative liver failure and tumor recurrence. Current computational tools provide virtual planning of liver resection by taking into account the spatial relationship between the tumor and the hepatic vascular trees, as well as the size of the future liver remnant. However, size and function of the liver are not necessarily equivalent. Hence, determining the future liver volume might misestimate the future liver function, especially in cases of hepatic comorbidities such as hepatic steatosis. A systems medicine approach could be applied, including biological, medical, and surgical aspects, by integrating all available anatomical and functional information of the individual patient. Such an approach holds promise for better prediction of postoperative liver function and hence improved risk assessment. This review provides an overview of mathematical models related to the liver and its function and explores their potential relevance for computational liver surgery. We first summarize key facts of hepatic anatomy, physiology, and pathology relevant for hepatic surgery, followed by a description of the computational tools currently used in liver surgical planning. Then we present selected state-of-the-art computational liver models potentially useful to support liver surgery. Finally, we discuss the main challenges that will need to be addressed when developing advanced computational planning tools in the context of liver surgery.

  13. Models of non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Potential Translational Value: the Effects of 3,5-L-diiodothyronine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, Elena; Canesi, Laura; Portincasa, Piero; Voci, Adriana; Vergani, Laura; Demori, Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder in industrialized countries and is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular, hepatic and metabolic diseases. Molecular mechanisms on the root of the disrupted lipid homeostasis in NAFLD and potential therapeutic strategies can benefit of in vivo and in vitro experimental models of fatty liver. Here, we describe the high fat diet (HFD)-fed rat in vivo model, and two in vitro models, the primary cultured rat fatty hepatocytes or the FaO rat hepatoma fatty cells, mimicking human NAFLD. Liver steatosis was invariably associated with increased number/size of lipid droplets (LDs) and modulation of expression of genes coding for key genes of lipid metabolism such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (Ppars) and perilipins (Plins). In these models, we tested the anti-steatotic effects of 3,5-L-diiodothyronine (T2), a metabolite of thyroid hormones. T2 markedly reduced triglyceride content and LD size acting on mRNA expression of both Ppars and Plins. T2 also stimulated mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of fatty acids. We conclude that in vivo and especially in vitro models of NAFLD are valuable tools to screen a large number of compounds counteracting the deleterious effect of liver steatosis. Because of the high and negative impact of liver steatosis on human health, ongoing experimental studies from our group are unravelling the ultimate translational value of such cellular models of NAFLD.

  14. Gaucher disease of the liver: CT appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Poznanski, A.K.; Young, S.; Urban, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    We present a child with Gaucher disease with hepatic involvement that caused portal hypertension. Computerized tomography (CT) showed distortion of liver parenchyma and central necrosis of the liver. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of fibrotic liver disease with multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Tai, Dean C. S.; Lin, Jian; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagens, which may result in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension. In this study, we apply a multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform developed to investigate the fibrotic liver diseases in rat models established by performing bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery. The three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are implemented on the same sectioned tissues of diseased model sequentially: i.e., second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantifies the contents of the collagens, the two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging reveals the morphology of hepatic cells, while coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging maps the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue. Our imaging results show that during the development of liver fibrosis (collagens) in BDL model, fatty liver disease also occurs. The aggregated concentrations of collagen and fat constituents in liver fibrosis model show a certain correlationship between each other.

  16. Effect of physical training on liver expression of activin A and follistatin in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.N. [Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Bueno, P.G. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Avó, L.R.S. [Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Nonaka, K.O.; Selistre-Araújo, H.S. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Leal, A.M.O. [Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-25

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-β superfamily and inhibits hepatocyte growth. Follistatin antagonizes the biological actions of activin. Exercise is an important therapeutic strategy to reduce the metabolic effects of obesity. We evaluated the pattern of activin A and follistatin liver expression in obese rats subjected to swimming exercise. Control rats (C) and high-fat (HF) diet-fed rats were randomly assigned to a swimming training group (C-Swim and HF-Swim) or a sedentary group (C-Sed and HF-Sed). Activin βA subunit mRNA expression was significantly higher in HF-Swim than in HF-Sed rats. Follistatin mRNA expression was significantly lower in C-Swim and HF-Swim than in either C-Sed or HF-Sed animals. There was no evidence of steatosis or inflammation in C rats. In contrast, in HF animals the severity of steatosis ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The extent of liver parenchyma damage was less in HF-Swim animals, with the severity of steatosis ranging from grade 0 to grade 1. These data showed that exercise may reduce the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on the liver, suggesting that the local expression of activin-follistatin may be involved.

  17. Effect of physical training on liver expression of activin A and follistatin in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.N.; Bueno, P.G.; Avó, L.R.S.; Nonaka, K.O.; Selistre-Araújo, H.S.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-β superfamily and inhibits hepatocyte growth. Follistatin antagonizes the biological actions of activin. Exercise is an important therapeutic strategy to reduce the metabolic effects of obesity. We evaluated the pattern of activin A and follistatin liver expression in obese rats subjected to swimming exercise. Control rats (C) and high-fat (HF) diet-fed rats were randomly assigned to a swimming training group (C-Swim and HF-Swim) or a sedentary group (C-Sed and HF-Sed). Activin βA subunit mRNA expression was significantly higher in HF-Swim than in HF-Sed rats. Follistatin mRNA expression was significantly lower in C-Swim and HF-Swim than in either C-Sed or HF-Sed animals. There was no evidence of steatosis or inflammation in C rats. In contrast, in HF animals the severity of steatosis ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The extent of liver parenchyma damage was less in HF-Swim animals, with the severity of steatosis ranging from grade 0 to grade 1. These data showed that exercise may reduce the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on the liver, suggesting that the local expression of activin-follistatin may be involved

  18. Effect of physical training on liver expression of activin A and follistatin in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.N. Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Activin A is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β superfamily and inhibits hepatocyte growth. Follistatin antagonizes the biological actions of activin. Exercise is an important therapeutic strategy to reduce the metabolic effects of obesity. We evaluated the pattern of activin A and follistatin liver expression in obese rats subjected to swimming exercise. Control rats (C and high-fat (HF diet-fed rats were randomly assigned to a swimming training group (C-Swim and HF-Swim or a sedentary group (C-Sed and HF-Sed. Activin βA subunit mRNA expression was significantly higher in HF-Swim than in HF-Sed rats. Follistatin mRNA expression was significantly lower in C-Swim and HF-Swim than in either C-Sed or HF-Sed animals. There was no evidence of steatosis or inflammation in C rats. In contrast, in HF animals the severity of steatosis ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The extent of liver parenchyma damage was less in HF-Swim animals, with the severity of steatosis ranging from grade 0 to grade 1. These data showed that exercise may reduce the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on the liver, suggesting that the local expression of activin-follistatin may be involved.

  19. Perioperative management of liver surgery-review on pathophysiology of liver disease and liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Lukas; Eschertzhuber, Stephan; Tiefenthaler, Werner

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of patients present for liver surgery. Given the complex pathophysiological changes in chronic liver disease (CLD), it is pivotal to understand the fundamentals of chronic and acute liver failure. This review will give an overview on related organ dysfunction as well as recommendations for perioperative management and treatment of liver failure-related symptoms.

  20. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease : an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, Rene; Porte, Robert J.; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Becker, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Preben; Metselaar, Herold J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR)

  1. Tim-3/galectin-9 regulate the homeostasis of hepatic NKT cells in a murine model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhao-Hui; Liang, Shuwen; Potter, James; Jiang, Xuan; Mao, Hai-Quan; Li, Zhiping

    2013-02-15

    T cell Ig and mucin domain (Tim)-3 is well known to interact with its natural ligand, Galectin-9 (Gal-9), to regulate T cell function. However, little is known about the function of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) mediated by hepatic NKT cells that also express Tim-3. In the current study, we define the role and the mechanism of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in hepatic NKT cell regulation in a mouse model of diet-induced NAFLD. Adult male wild-type or CD1d knockout C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet to induce steatosis. Some of the mice also received one or a combination of Gal-9, anti-IL-15R/IL-15 mAb, rIL-15, α-galactosylceramide, and multilamellar liposomes containing Cl(2)MDP. The expression of Tim-3 and various markers reflecting cell proliferation, activation, cytokine production, and apoptosis was analyzed. Liver histology, steatosis grade, and hepatic triglyceride content were also evaluated. In the liver, Tim-3(+) NKT cells are in an activated state, and Gal-9 directly induces Tim-3(+) NKT cell apoptosis and contributes to the depletion of NKT cells in diet-induced steatosis. However, Gal-9 also interacts with Tim-3-expressing Kupffer cells to induce secretion of IL-15, thus promoting NKT cell proliferation. Exogenous administration of Gal-9 significantly ameliorates diet-induced steatosis by modulating hepatic NKT cell function. In summary, the Tim-3/Gal-9-signaling pathway plays a critical role in the homeostasis of hepatic NKT cells through activation-induced apoptosis and secondary proliferation and, thus, contributes to the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

  2. Tim-3/Galectin-9 Regulate the Homeostasis of Hepatic NKT Cells in a Murine Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuwen; Potter, James; Jiang, Xuan; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2013-01-01

    T cell Ig and mucin domain (Tim)-3 is well known to interact with its natural ligand, Galectin-9 (Gal-9), to regulate T cell function. However, little is known about the function of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) mediated by hepatic NKT cells that also express Tim-3. In the current study, we define the role and the mechanism of Tim-3/Gal-9 signaling in hepatic NKT cell regulation in a mouse model of diet-induced NAFLD. Adult male wild-type or CD1d knockout C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet to induce steatosis. Some of the mice also received one or a combination of Gal-9, anti–IL-15R/IL-15 mAb, rIL-15, α-galactosylceramide, and multilamellar liposomes containing Cl2MDP. The expression of Tim-3 and various markers reflecting cell proliferation, activation, cytokine production, and apoptosis was analyzed. Liver histology, steatosis grade, and hepatic triglyceride content were also evaluated. In the liver, Tim-3+ NKT cells are in an activated state, and Gal-9 directly induces Tim-3+ NKT cell apoptosis and contributes to the depletion of NKT cells in diet-induced steatosis. However, Gal-9 also interacts with Tim-3–expressing Kupffer cells to induce secretion of IL-15, thus promoting NKT cell proliferation. Exogenous administration of Gal-9 significantly ameliorates diet-induced steatosis by modulating hepatic NKT cell function. In summary, the Tim-3/Gal-9–signaling pathway plays a critical role in the homeostasis of hepatic NKT cells through activation-induced apoptosis and secondary proliferation and, thus, contributes to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:23296703

  3. Water Extract of Dolichos lablab Attenuates Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in a Cellular Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Yun Hee; Lee, Hye Won; Song, Kwang Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common chronic liver disease that is rising in prevalence worldwide. Therapeutic strategies for patients with NAFLD are limited by a lack of effective drugs. In this report, we show that Dolichos lablab water extract (DLL-Ex) protects against free fatty acid (FFA)-induced lipid accumulation and attenuates expression of genes involved in lipid droplet accumulation in cellular NAFLD models. The hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanism of DLL-Ex were assessed using an in vitro cellular model in which NAFLD was simulated by inducing excessive FFA influx into hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were treated with DLL-Ex and FFAs for 24 h, after which intracellular lipid content was observed by using Nile Red and Oil Red O staining. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression levels of genes related to FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion. Western blotting was used to measure protein levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha. In HepG2 cells, DLL-Ex inhibited expression of CD36, which regulates fatty acid uptake, as well as BODIPY-labeled fatty acid uptake. Additionally, DLL-Ex significantly attenuated FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Furthermore, DLL-Ex enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK, indicating that AMPK is a critical regulator of DLL-Ex-mediated inhibition of hepatic lipid accumulation, possibly through its antioxidative effect. These results demonstrate that DLL-Ex exerts potent anti-NAFLD activity, suggesting that it could be a potential adjuvant treatment for patients with NAFLD.

  4. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  5. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  6. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  7. Long Non-Coding RNA Profiling in a Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rodent Model: New Insight into Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most prevalent chronic liver diseases worldwide with an unclear mechanism. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have recently emerged as important regulatory molecules. To better understand NAFLD pathogenesis, lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA microarrays were conducted in an NAFLD rodent model. Potential target genes of significantly changed lncRNA were predicted using cis/trans-regulatory algorithms. Gene Ontology (GO analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment analysis were then performed to explore their function. In the current analysis, 89 upregulated and 177 downregulated mRNAs were identified, together with 291 deregulated lncRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis of these RNAs has categorized these RNAs into pathways including arachidonic acid metabolism, circadian rhythm, linoleic acid metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR signaling pathway, sphingolipid metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism and tyrosine metabolism were compromised. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of representative nine mRNAs and eight lncRNAs (named fatty liver-related lncRNA, FLRL was conducted and this verified previous microarray results. Several lncRNAs, such as FLRL1, FLRL6 and FLRL2 demonstrated to be involved in circadian rhythm targeting period circadian clock 3 (Per3, Per2 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Arntl, respectively. While FLRL8, FLRL3 and FLRL7 showed a potential role in PPAR signaling pathway through interaction with fatty acid binding protein 5 (Fabp5, lipoprotein lipase (Lpl and fatty acid desaturase 2 (Fads2. Functional experiments showed that interfering of lncRNA FLRL2 expression affected the expression of predicted target, circadian rhythm gene Arntl. Moreover, both FLRL2 and Arntl were downregulated in the NAFLD cellular model. The current study identified lncRNA and corresponding mRNA in NAFLD

  8. Liver microRNA-21 is overexpressed in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and contributes to the disease in experimental models by inhibiting PPARα expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyer, Xavier; Paradis, Valérie; Hénique, Carole; Vion, Anne-Clémence; Colnot, Nathalie; Guerin, Coralie L; Devue, Cécile; On, Sissi; Scetbun, Jérémy; Romain, Mélissa; Paul, Jean-Louis; Rothenberg, Marc E; Marcellin, Patrick; Durand, François; Bedossa, Pierre; Prip-Buus, Carina; Baugé, Eric; Staels, Bart; Boulanger, Chantal M; Tedgui, Alain; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies suggested that microRNA-21 may be upregulated in the liver in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), but its role in the development of this disease remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the role of microRNA-21 in NASH. Design We inhibited or suppressed microRNA-21 in different mouse models of NASH: (a) low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet and treated with antagomir-21 or antagomir control; (b) microRNA-21-deficient and wild-type mice fed a methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet; (c) peroxisome proliferation-activator receptor α (PPARα)-deficient mice fed an MCD diet and treated with antagomir-21 or antagomir control. We assessed features of NASH and determined liver microRNA-21 levels and cell localisation. MicroRNA-21 levels were also quantified in the liver of patients with NASH, bland steatosis or normal liver and localisation was determined. Results Inhibiting or suppressing liver microRNA-21 expression reduced liver cell injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis without affecting liver lipid accumulation in Ldlr−/− fed a high-fat diet and in wild-type mice fed an MCD diet. Liver microRNA-21 was overexpressed, primarily in biliary and inflammatory cells, in mouse models as well as in patients with NASH, but not in patients with bland steatosis. PPARα, a known microRNA-21 target, implicated in NASH, was decreased in the liver of mice with NASH and restored following microRNA-21 inhibition or suppression. The effect of antagomir-21 was lost in PPARα-deficient mice. Conclusions MicroRNA-21 inhibition or suppression decreases liver injury, inflammation and fibrosis, by restoring PPARα expression. Antagomir-21 might be a future therapeutic strategy for NASH. PMID:26338827

  9. Human intrahepatic ILC2 are IL-13positive amphiregulinpositive and their frequency correlates with model of end stage liver disease score.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah C Jeffery

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILC have been implicated in the initiation of inflammation and fibrosis in mice. However, ILC have not been characterized in inflamed human liver tissue.Human intrahepatic lymphocytes were isolated by mechanical digestion and phenotyped by flow cytometry. Conditioned medium from cultures of primary human biliary epithelial cells, stellate cells, fibroblasts and inflamed human liver tissue was used to model the effects of the inflammatory liver environment of ILC phenotype and function.All three ILC subsets were present in the human liver, with the ILC1 (CRTH2negCD117neg subset constituting around 70% of intrahepatic ILCs. Both NCRpos (NKp44+ and NCRneg ILC3 (CRTH2negCD117pos subsets were also detected. ILC2 (CRTH2pos frequency correlated with disease severity measured by model of end stage liver disease (MELD scoring leading us to study this subset in more detail. ILC2 displayed a tissue resident CD69+ CD161++ phenotype and expressed chemokine receptor CCR6 allowing them to respond to CCL20 secreted by cholangiocytes and stellate cells. ILC2 expressed integrins VLA-5 and VLA-6 and the IL-2 and IL-7 cytokine receptors CD25 and CD127 although IL-2 and IL-7 were barely detectable in inflamed liver tissue. Although biliary epithelial cells secrete IL-33, intrahepatic ILC2 had low expression of the ST2 receptor. Intrahepatic ILC2 secreted the immunoregulatory and repair cytokines IL-13 and amphiregulin.Intrahepatic ILC2 express receptors allowing them to be recruited to bile ducts in inflamed portal tracts. Their frequencies increased with worsening liver function. Their secretion of IL-13 and amphiregulin suggests they may be recruited to promote resolution and repair and thereby they may contribute to ongoing fibrogenesis in liver disease.

  10. Evaluation of an anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutic in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick C liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Vincent

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. The majority of NPC patients die in their teen years due to progressive neurodegeneration; however, half of NPC patients also suffer from cholestasis, prolonged jaundice, and hepatosplenomegaly. We previously showed that a key mediator of NPC liver disease is tumor necrosis factor (TNF α, which is involved in both proinflammatory and apoptotic signaling cascades. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that blocking TNF action with an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody (CNTO5048 will slow the progression of NPC liver disease.Treatment of wild-type C57BL/6 mice with NPC1-specific antisense oligonucleotides led to knockdown of NPC1 protein expression in the liver. This caused classical symptoms of NPC liver disease, including hepatic cholesterol accumulation, hepatomegaly, elevated serum liver enzymes, and lipid laden macrophage accumulation. In addition, there was a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells and a proliferation of stellate cells. Concurrent treatment of NPC1 knockdown mice with anti-TNF had no effect on the primary lipid storage or accumulation of lipid-laden macrophages. However, anti-TNF treatment slightly blunted the increase in hepatic apoptosis and stellate cell activation that was seen with NPC1 knockdown.Current therapeutic options for NPC disease are limited. Our results provide proof of principle that pharmacologically blocking the TNF-α inflammatory cascade can slightly reduce certain markers of NPC disease. Small molecule inhibitors of TNF that penetrate tissues and cross the blood-brain barrier may prove even more beneficial.

  11. Parenteral nutrition dysregulates bile salt homeostasis in a rat model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Schaap, Frank G; Hodin, Caroline M J M; Visschers, Ruben G J; Svavarsson, Björn I; Lenicek, Martin; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2017-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN), a lifesaving therapy in patients with intestinal failure, has been associated with hepatobiliary complications including steatosis, cholestasis and fibrosis, collectively known as parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). To date, the pathogenesis of PNALD is poorly understood and therapeutic options are limited. Impaired bile salt homeostasis has been proposed to contribute PNALD. The objective of this study was to establish a PNALD model in rats and to evaluate the effects of continuous parenteral nutrition (PN) on bile salt homeostasis. Rats received either PN via the jugular vein or received normal diet for 3, 7 or 14 days. Serum biochemistry, hepatic triglycerides, circulating bile salts and C4, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, and lipogenic and bile salt homeostatic gene expression in liver and ileum were assessed. PN increased hepatic triglycerides already after 3 days of administration, and resulted in conjugated bilirubin elevation after 7 or more days. This indicates PN-induced steatosis and impaired canalicular secretion of bilirubin, the latter which is in line with reduced hepatic expression of Mrp2 mRNA. There was no histological evidence for liver inflammation after PN administration, and circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, were comparable in all groups. Hepatic expression of Fxr mRNA was decreased after 7 days of PN, without apparent effect on expression of Fxr targets Bsep and Shp. Nonetheless, Cyp7a1 expression was reduced after 7 days of PN, indicative for lowered bile salt synthesis. Circulating levels of C4 (marker of bile salt synthesis) were also decreased after 3, 7 and 14 days of PN. Levels of circulating bile salts were not affected by PN. This study showed that PN in rats caused early mild steatosis and cholestasis, while hepatic and systemic inflammation were not present. The onset of these abnormalities was associated with alterations in bile salt synthesis and transport. This

  12. Therapeutic efficacy of human hepatocyte transplantation in a SCID/uPA mouse model with inducible liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna N Douglas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe Combined Immune Deficient (SCID/Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA mice undergo liver failure and are useful hosts for the propagation of transplanted human hepatocytes (HH which must compete with recipient-derived hepatocytes for replacement of the diseased liver parenchyma. While partial replacement by HH has proven useful for studies with Hepatitis C virus, complete replacement of SCID/uPA mouse liver by HH has never been achieved and limits the broader application of these mice for other areas of biomedical research. The herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV system is a powerful tool for cell-specific ablation in transgenic animals. The aim of this study was to selectively eliminate murine-derived parenchymal liver cells from humanized SCID/uPA mouse liver in order to achieve mice with completely humanized liver parenchyma. Thus, we reproduced the HSVtk (vTK/GCV system of hepatic failure in SCID/uPA mice.In vitro experiments demonstrated efficient killing of vTK expressing hepatoma cells after GCV treatment. For in vivo experiments, expression of vTK was targeted to the livers of FVB/N and SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic sensitivity to GCV was first established in FVB/N mice since these mice do not undergo liver failure inherent to SCID/uPA mice. Hepatic vTK expression was found to be an integral component of GCV-induced pathologic and biochemical alterations and caused death due to liver dysfunction in vTK transgenic FVB/N and non-transplanted SCID/uPA mice. In SCID/uPA mice with humanized liver, vTK/GCV caused death despite extensive replacement of the mouse liver parenchyma with HH (ranging from 32-87%. Surprisingly, vTK/GCV-dependent apoptosis and mitochondrial aberrations were also localized to bystander vTK-negative HH.Extensive replacement of mouse liver parenchyma by HH does not provide a secure therapeutic advantage against vTK/GCV-induced cytotoxicity targeted to residual mouse hepatocytes

  13. Therapeutic role of niacin in the prevention and regression of hepatic steatosis in rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Shobha H; Kukes, Gary D; Lambrecht, Nils; Kashyap, Moti L; Kamanna, Vaijinath S

    2014-02-15

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a leading cause of liver damage, comprises a spectrum of liver abnormalities including the early fat deposition in the liver (hepatic steatosis) and advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Niacin decreases plasma triglycerides, but its effect on hepatic steatosis is elusive. To examine the effect of niacin on steatosis, rats were fed either a rodent normal chow, chow containing high fat (HF), or HF containing 0.5% or 1.0% niacin in the diet for 4 wk. For regression studies, rats were first fed the HF diet for 6 wk to induce hepatic steatosis and were then treated with niacin (0.5% in the diet) while on the HF diet for 6 wk. The findings indicated that inclusion of niacin at 0.5% and 1.0% doses in the HF diet significantly decreased liver fat content, liver weight, hepatic oxidative products, and prevented hepatic steatosis. Niacin treatment to rats with preexisting hepatic steatosis induced by the HF diet significantly regressed steatosis. Niacin had no effect on the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthesis or oxidation genes (including sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, fatty acid synthase, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1) but significantly inhibited mRNA levels, protein expression, and activity of diacylglycerol acyltrasferase 2, a key enzyme in triglyceride synthesis. These novel findings suggest that niacin effectively prevents and causes the regression of experimental hepatic steatosis. Approved niacin formulation(s) for other indications or niacin analogs may offer a very cost-effective opportunity for the clinical development of niacin for treating NAFLD and fatty liver disease.

  14. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Bambino; Chi Zhang; Christine Austin; Chitra Amarasiriwardena; Manish Arora; Jaime Chu; Kirsten C. Sadler

    2018-01-01

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined...

  15. Traditional Chinese medicine treatment of liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Rongbing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM treatment of liver diseases is derived from the regulation of liver function including storing blood and governing the free flow of qi, in which functional systems such as modern digestion, endocrine, and the gut-liver axis are involved, and is established on modern hepatic physiology, pathology, and etiology. To objectively reveal the characteristics and advantages of modern TCM treatment of liver diseases, we analyzed the clinical and research situation of TCM therapy for liver diseases in the last decade and collected major achievements that have been applied in clinical treatment of diseases, published in core journals, and confirmed by major scientific research programs. The results showed TCM combined with antiviral therapy can improve the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis B. TCM can help HBV carriers prevent disease progression. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine therapy for acute-on-chronic liver failure can block the deterioration induced by endotoxin. TCM has been widely applied in protecting the liver through nonspecific anti-inflammation, alleviating hepatic fibrosis, and preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver. TCM plays an important role in treating some currently untreatable liver diseases. Therefore, it is our common responsibility to inherit and develop effective principle-method-recipe-medicines and create a better medical care system.

  16. The relationship between a model of end stage liver disease score (MELD score) and the occurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in liver cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, A A Ayu Yuli; Suryadharma, I G A; Purwadi, N; Wibawa, I D N

    2007-01-01

    To determine relationship between MELD score and the occurrence of SBP, prevalence of SBP, pattern of bacterial culture and antibiotic susceptibility of causative bacteria of liver cirrhotic patients at Sanglah Hospital. Study design was a cross-sectional analytic study. The population in this study consists of liver cirrhotic patients admitted at Sanglah Hospital Denpasar from June 2005 to February 2006. This result confirmed that the MELD score is a reliable index of disease severity and that higher MELD scores had a significantly more frequent SBP prevalence in patients with a MELD score of 18 or more compared with that in patients with a MELD score of 17 or less (p=0.01; 95% CI = 1.379-15.537). Prevalence of SBP was 30.6%. Thirteen patients (68.4%) had monomicrobial positive culture of Aerob bacteria, consisting of Gram negative bacterias in 10 (77%), with Escherichia coli and Acinettobacter baumanii being the most frequent, and 3 (23%) had Gram positive bacteria. High sensitivity to Cefoperazone, Cefotaxim, Ceftazidime, Cefpirome, Ciprofloxacin, Fosfomicin, Meropenem, Streptomycin, Gentamycin, Trimethoprim/Sulphamethoxazole, were shown. Based on this study we concluded that severe liver cirrhosis with MELD score > or = 18 was associated with an increase risk of SBP, with a prevalence of 30.6%. Common causes of SBP mostly were Escherichia coli and Acinettobacter baumanii, which were sensitive to antibiotic treatment of Cefoperazone, Cefotaxime and Ciprofloxacin.

  17. Liver Transplantation for Alcoholic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Patrizia; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo

    2018-02-09

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the main important causes of cancer-related death and its mortality is increasingly worldwide. In Europe, alcohol abuse accounts for approximately half of all liver cancer cases and it will become the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma in the next future with the sharp decline of chronic viral hepatitis. The pathophysiology of alcohol-induced carcinogenesis involves acetaldehyde catabolism, oxidative stress and chronic liver inflammation. Genetic background plays also a significant role and specific patterns of gene mutations in alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma have been characterized. Survival is higher in patients who undergo specific surveillance programmes than in patients who do not. However, patients with alcohol cirrhosis present a significantly greater risk of liver decompensation than those with cirrhosis due to other aetiologies. Furthermore, the adherence to screening program can be suboptimal. Liver transplant for patients with Milan-in hepatocellular carcinoma represents the best possible treatment in case of tumour recurrence/progression despite loco-regional or surgical treatments. Long-term result after liver transplantation for alcohol related liver disease is good. However, cardiovascular disease and de novo malignancies can significantly hamper patients' survival and should be carefully considered by transplant team. In this review, we have focused on the evolution of alcohol-related hepatocellular carcinoma epidemiology and risk factors as well as on liver transplantation in alcoholic patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Prediction of radiation-induced liver disease by Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for primary liver carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu ZhiYong; Liang Shixiong; Zhu Ji; Zhu Xiaodong; Zhao Jiandong; Lu Haijie; Yang Yunli; Chen Long; Wang Anyu; Fu Xiaolong; Jiang Guoliang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the probability of RILD by application of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal-tissue complication (NTCP) model for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) treated with hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 109 PLC patients treated by 3D-CRT were followed for RILD. Of these patients, 93 were in liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 16 were in Child-Pugh Grade B. The Michigan NTCP model was used to predict the probability of RILD, and then the modified Lyman NTCP model was generated for Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B patients by maximum-likelihood analysis. Results: Of all patients, 17 developed RILD in which 8 were of Child-Pugh Grade A, and 9 were of Child-Pugh Grade B. The prediction of RILD by the Michigan model was underestimated for PLC patients. The modified n, m, TD 5 (1) were 1.1, 0.28, and 40.5 Gy and 0.7, 0.43, and 23 Gy for patients with Child-Pugh A and B, respectively, which yielded better estimations of RILD probability. The hepatic tolerable doses (TD 5 ) would be MDTNL of 21 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, for Child-Pugh A and B patients. Conclusions: The Michigan model was probably not fit to predict RILD in PLC patients. A modified Lyman NTCP model for RILD was recommended

  19. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Liver Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoo Ok; Kim, Ki Whang; Park, Chang Yun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1978-09-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen was initially known as tumor specific antigen and had a potential diagnostic value in the detection of digestive tract malignancies. However, subsequent studies showed CEA and CEA-like antigen present in benign disease, particularly in liver. We had collected sera from 58 patients who had liver scan and later were diagnosed clinically and histologically as liver disease. We estimated CEA values and correlations were made with liver function tests in liver cirrhosis cases. The results: 1) The raised plasma carcinoembryonic antigen level were found in 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients cirrhosis, 5 (27.8%) of 18 patients in hepatoma, 5 (71%) of 7 patients in chronic active hepatitis, all 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in obstructive biliary disease and none in each one patient of traumatic liver hematoma, subphrenic abscess and clonorchiasis. 2) There is no linear correlation between carcinoembryonic antigen level and liver function tests including serum bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, SGOT and prothrombin time in liver patients.

  20. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Liver Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyoo Ok; Kim, Ki Whang; Park, Chang Yun

    1978-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen was initially known as tumor specific antigen and had a potential diagnostic value in the detection of digestive tract malignancies. However, subsequent studies showed CEA and CEA-like antigen present in benign disease, particularly in liver. We had collected sera from 58 patients who had liver scan and later were diagnosed clinically and histologically as liver disease. We estimated CEA values and correlations were made with liver function tests in liver cirrhosis cases. The results: 1) The raised plasma carcinoembryonic antigen level were found in 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients cirrhosis, 5 (27.8%) of 18 patients in hepatoma, 5 (71%) of 7 patients in chronic active hepatitis, all 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in liver abscesses, 2 (66.7%) of 3 patients in obstructive biliary disease and none in each one patient of traumatic liver hematoma, subphrenic abscess and clonorchiasis. 2) There is no linear correlation between carcinoembryonic antigen level and liver function tests including serum bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, SGOT and prothrombin time in liver patients.

  1. Capybara Oil Improves Hepatic Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Steatosis, and Inflammation in a Murine Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Polyana C; Vieira, Aline B; Pereira, Priscila G; Rabelo, Kíssila; Ciambarella, Bianca T; Nascimento, Ana L R; Cortez, Erika; Moura, Aníbal S; Guimarães, Fernanda V; Martins, Marco A; Barquero, Gonzalo; Ferreira, Rodrigo N; de Carvalho, Jorge J

    2018-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is recognized as the most common cause of liver dysfunction worldwide and is commonly associated with obesity. Evidences suggest that NAFLD might be a mitochondrial disease, which contributes to the hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress, cytokine release, and cell death. Capybara oil (CO) is a rich source of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which is known to improve inflammation and oxidative stress. In order to determine the effects of CO on NAFLD, C57Bl/6 mice were divided into 3 groups and fed a high-fat diet (HFD) (NAFLD group and NAFLD + CO group) or a control diet (CG group) during 16 weeks. The CO (1.5 g/kg/daily) was administered by gavage during the last 4 weeks of the diet protocol. We evaluated plasma liver enzymes, hepatic steatosis, and cytokine expression in liver as well as hepatocyte ultrastructural morphology and mitochondrial function. CO treatment suppressed hepatic steatosis, attenuated inflammatory response, and decreased plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in mice with NAFLD. CO was also capable of restoring mitochondrial ultrastructure and function as well as balance superoxide dismutase and catalase levels. Our findings indicate that CO treatment has positive effects on NAFLD improving mitochondrial dysfunction, steatosis, acute inflammation, and oxidative stress.

  2. Assessment of adrenal function in liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kharb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent times, there are reports of adrenal dysfunction in whole spectrum of liver disease. Adrenal insufficiency (AI has been shown to correlate with progression of liver disease. Hence this study was conducted to assess adrenal function in subjects with acute liver disease (ALD, chronic liver disease (CLD and post liver transplantation (LT. Material and Methods: This study included 25 healthy controls, 25 patients of ALD, 20 subjects of CLD with Child-Pugh stage A (CLD-1 and 30 with Child-Pugh stage B or C (CLD-2, and 10 subjects with LT. All subjects were assessed clinically, biochemically and for adrenal functions. Results: AI was present in 9 (34.6% patients with ALD, 20 (40% patients with CLD and 4 (40% in subjects with LT. AI was more common in CLD-2 (18 patients - 60% than CLD-1 (2 patients - 10%. All patients with chronic liver disease had significantly lower basal cortisol (8.8±4.8, P=0.01, stimulated cortisol (18.2±6.3, P <0.00001 and incremental cortisol (9.4±4.6, P <0.00001 as compared to controls. There was increase in percentage of subjects with adrenal dysfunction with progression of liver disease as assessed by Child-Pugh staging. AI was predicted by lower levels of serum protein, serum albumin, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol and higher levels of serum bilirubin and INR. Adrenal functions showed recovery following liver transplantation. Conclusions: AI forms important part of spectrum of acute and chronic liver disease. Deterioration of synthetic functions of liver disease predicts presence of AI, and these patients should be evaluated for adrenal dysfunction periodically.

  3. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...... underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the patients than...

  4. Coffee: The magical bean for liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Heath, Ryan D; Brahmbhatt, Mihir; Tahan, Asli C; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    Coffee has long been recognized as having hepatoprotective properties, however, the extent of any beneficial effect is still being elucidated. Coffee appears to reduce risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, reduce advancement of fibrotic disease in a variety of chronic liver diseases, and perhaps reduce ability of hepatitis C virus to replicate. This review aims to catalog the evidence for coffee as universally beneficial across a spectrum of chronic liver diseases, as well as spotlight opportunit...

  5. Viral persistence, liver disease and host response in Hepatitis C-like virus rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trivedi, Sheetal; Murthy, Satyapramod; Sharma, Himanshu

    2018-01-01

    The lack of a relevant, tractable, and immunocompetent animal model for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has severely impeded investigations of viral persistence, immunity and pathogenesis. In the absence of immunocompetent models with robust HCV infection, homolog hepaciviruses in their natural host could...... potentially provide useful surrogate models. We isolated a rodent hepacivirus (RHV) from wild rats (Rattus norvegicus), RHV-rn1, acquired the complete viral genome sequence and developed an infectious reverse genetics system. RHV-rn1 resembles HCV in genomic features including the pattern of polyprotein...... cleavage sites and secondary structures in the viral 5' and 3' UTRs. We used site-directed and random mutagenesis to determine that only the first of the two miR-122 seed sites in viral 5'UTR is required for viral replication and persistence in rats. Next, we used the clone derived virus progeny to infect...

  6. Silymarin attenuated hepatic steatosis through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xunjun; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, which derived from the milk thistle plant (silybum marianum), has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for diseases of the liver and biliary tract. Considering the therapeutic potential to liver disease, we tested efficacy of silymarin on hepatic steatosis with a high fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and investigated possible effects on lipid metabolic pathways. In our study, silymarin could attenuate the hepatic steatosis, which was proved by both Oil Red O staining and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level determination. Furthermore, compared with INT-747, a potent and selective FXR agonist, silymarin could preserve plasmatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to a higher level and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to a lower level, which benefited more to the circulation system. Through real-time PCR analysis, we clarified a vital protective role of silymarin in mRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. It was also shown that silymarin had no effects on body weight, food intake, and liver transaminase. Taken together, silymarin could attenuate hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of NAFLD through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress, and benefit to the circulation system. All these findings shed new light on NAFLD treatment.

  7. The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The role of IL6 in liver cancer linked to metabolic liver disease. Liver cancer is highly fatal, it has very few treatment options, and it is one of the few cancers whose incidence is rising worldwide. One poorly understood risk factor for liver cancer is obesity/metabolic disease (such as diabetes and fatty liver disease).

  8. Genetics Home Reference: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individual is considered to have a fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) if the liver contains more than 5 to ... Resources Genetic Testing (2 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic 1 Genetic Testing Registry: Fatty liver ...

  9. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skehan, S.; Norris, S.; Hegarty, J.; Owens, A.; MacErlaine, D.

    1997-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Nutrition for children with cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Lukovac, Sabina; Werner, Anniek; Dijkstra, Tietie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Cooke, RJ; Vandenplas, Y; Wahn, U

    2007-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) in children negatively affects nutritional status, growth and development, which all lead to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This is illustrated by the fact that the clinical outcome of children with CLD awaiting a liver transplantation is in part

  12. Differential response of the liver to bile acid treatment in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick disease type C [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Raluca Nicoli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the NPC1 or NPC2 genes. Liver disease is also a common feature of NPC that can present as cholestatic jaundice in the neonatal period. Liver enzymes can remain elevated above the normal range in some patients as they age. We recently reported suppression of the P450 detoxification system in a mouse model of NPC disease and also in post-mortem liver from NPC patients. We demonstrated the ability of the hydrophobic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA (3α, 7β-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid to correct the P450 system suppression. UDCA is used to treat several cholestatic disorders and was tested in NPC due to the P450 system being regulated by bile acids. Here, we compare the effect of UDCA and cholic acid (CA, another bile acid, in the NPC mouse model. We observed unexpected hepatotoxicity in response to CA treatment of NPC mice. No such hepatotoxicity was associated with UDCA treatment. These results suggest that CA treatment is contraindicated in NPC patients, whilst supporting the use of UDCA as an adjunctive therapy in NPC patients.

  13. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR......) database to extract demographics and outcomes of 58 PCLD patients. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for survival rates. Severe abdominal pain (75%) was the most prominent symptom, while portal hypertension (35%) was the most common complication in PCLD. The explantation of the polycystic liver...

  14. Discharge Disposition After Stroke in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neal S; Merkler, Alexander E; Schneider, Yecheskel; Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-02-01

    Liver disease is associated with both hemorrhagic and thrombotic processes, including an elevated risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to assess the relationship between liver disease and outcomes after stroke, as measured by discharge disposition. Using administrative claims data, we identified a cohort of patients hospitalized with stroke in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013. The predictor variable was liver disease. All diagnoses were defined using validated diagnosis codes. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and worsening discharge disposition: home, nursing/rehabilitation facility, or death. Secondarily, multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and in-hospital mortality. Models were adjusted for demographics, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities. We identified 121 428 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and 703 918 with ischemic stroke. Liver disease was documented in 13 584 patients (1.7%). Liver disease was associated with worse discharge disposition after both intracerebral hemorrhage (global odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.38) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.29). Similarly, liver disease was associated with in-hospital death after both intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.44) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.71). Liver disease was associated with worse hospital discharge disposition and in-hospital mortality after stroke, suggesting worse functional outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Effects of Stigmasterol and β-Sitosterol on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Mouse Model: A Lipidomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Simin; Gan, Ling; Yang, Chung S; Liu, Anna B; Lu, Wenyun; Shao, Ping; Dai, Zhuqing; Sun, Peilong; Luo, Zisheng

    2018-04-04

    To study the effects of stigmasterol and β-sitosterol on high-fat Western diet (HFWD)-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), lipidomic analyses were conducted in liver samples collected after 33 weeks of the treatment. Principal component analysis showed these phytosterols were effective in protecting against HFWD-induced NAFLD. Orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA) and S-plots showed that triacylglycerols (TGs), phosphatidylcholines, cholesteryl esters, diacylglycerols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) were the major lipid species contributing to these discriminations. The alleviation of NAFLD is mainly associated with decreases in hepatic cholesterol, TGs with polyunsaturated fatty acids, and alterations of free hepatic FFA. In conclusion, phytosterols, at a dose comparable to that suggested for humans by the FDA for the reduction of plasma cholesterol levels, are shown to protect against NAFLD in this long-term (33-week) study.

  16. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  17. Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John D Scott; Naomi Garland

    2008-01-01

    A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death.Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD,but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD.Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive.In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.

  18. Loss of brain function - liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatic coma; Encephalopathy - hepatic; Hepatic encephalopathy; Portasystemic encephalopathy ... 2017:417-421. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal ... of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  19. Polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggreini, A. Y.; Dairi, L. B.

    2018-03-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PCLD) is a condition in which multiple cysts form in the hepatic parenchyma. The polycystic liver disease is also an autosomal dominant disorder (ADPLD) caused by a mutation in a gene that encodes a protein hepatocystin. PCLD has a prevalence count of 1:200,000 people in the people of America. PCLD occurs ± 24% of patients in the third decade of age to 80% by the sixth decade. Women tend to get larger cysts and more and correlated with the number of pregnancies. The following case report of a woman, 51-years-old who was treated at Haji Adam Malik hospital Medan with a diagnosis of polycystic liver disease with right pleural effusion. Some literature has reported complications of the polycystic liver disease but rarely reported with pleural effusion presentation. The patient had already undergone a puncture of pleural fluid and after three weeks of treatment condition of the patient improved and permitted to be outgoing patient.

  20. Maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, ameliorates the development of hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martínez, Laura; Pérez-Matute, Patricia; Aguilera-Lizarraga, Javier; Rubio-Mediavilla, Susana; Narro, Judit; Recio, Emma; Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Oteo, José-Antonio; Blanco, José-Ramón

    2014-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the general population. The NAFLD spectrum ranges from simple steatosis to cirrhosis. The chemokine CCL5/RANTES plays an important role in the progression of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, on liver pathology in a NAFLD mouse model. A total of 32 male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: (i) control group (chow diet plus tap water); (ii) maraviroc group (chow diet plus maraviroc in drinking water); (iii) high-fat diet (HFD) group (HFD plus tap water); and (iv) maraviroc/HFD group (HFD plus maraviroc). All mice were sacrificed 16 weeks after the beginning of the experiment. Biochemical analyses and liver examinations were performed. Mice in the HFD group showed a tendency towards increased body mass gain and liver damage compared with the maraviroc/HFD group. Moreover, liver weight in the HFD group was significantly higher than in the maraviroc/HFD group. Hepatic triglyceride concentration in the maraviroc/HFD group was significantly lower than in the HFD group. Interestingly, the maraviroc/HFD group exhibited a lower degree of steatosis. Furthermore, hepatic CCL5/RANTES expression was significantly lower in the maraviroc/HFD group than in the HFD group. Overall, no differences were observed between the control group and the maraviroc group. Maraviroc ameliorates hepatic steatosis in an experimental model of NAFLD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Increase of infiltrating monocytes in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chenchen; Pan, Zhiyun; Xia, Juan; Xiong, Yali; Wang, Guiyang; Sun, Zhenhua; Chen, Jun; Yan, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhaoping; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Infiltrating monocytes have been demonstrated to contribute to tissue damage in experimental models of liver injury and fibrosis. However, less is known about monocyte infiltration in the livers of patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). In the present study, we demonstrated that CD68+ hepatic macrophages and MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies as compared with normal liver tissue. In addition, CLD patients with higher inflammatory grading scores had more CD68+ macrophages and MAC387+ monocytes infiltration in their livers compared to those with lower scores. Significantly more MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes were found in the liver tissue of CLD patients with higher fibrotic staging scores compared to those with lower scores. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression was significantly increased in the livers of CLD patients with different etiologies. MCP-1 staining scores were significantly positively associated with the numbers of MAC387+ infiltrating monocytes in CLD patients. Taken together, our results demonstrate that infiltrating monocytes may play a pathological role in exacerbating chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD. MCP-1 may be involved in the monocyte infiltration and progression of liver inflammation and fibrosis in CLD.

  2. Family history and obesity in youth, their effect on acylcarnitine/aminoacids metabolomics and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Structural equation modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Romero-Ibarguengoitia, Maria Elena; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Caballero, Augusto Enrique; Ibarra-González, Isabel; Herrera-Rosas, Arturo; Serratos-Canales, María Fabiola; León-Hernández, Mireya; González-Chávez, Antonio; Mummidi, Srinivas; Duggirala, Ravindranath; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Background: Structural equation modeling (SEM) can help understanding complex functional relationships among obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), family history of obesity, targeted metabolomics and pro-inflammatory markers. We tested two hypotheses: 1) If obesity precedes an excess of free fatty acids that increase oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, there would be an increase of serum acylcarnitines, amino acids and cytokines in obese subjects. Acylcarnitines woul...

  3. When can nutritional therapy impact liver disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Benns, Matthew V; McClave, Stephen A; Miller, Keith R; Jones, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the current literature regarding nutritional therapy in liver disease, with an emphasis on patients progressing to liver failure as well as surgical patients. Mechanisms of malnutrition and sarcopenia in liver failure patients as well as nutritional assessment, nutritional requirements of this patient population, and goals and methods of therapy are discussed. Additionally, recommendations for feeding, micronutrient, branched chain amino acid supplementation, and the use of pre- and probiotics are included. The impact of these methods can have on patients with advanced disease and those undergoing surgical procedures will be emphasized.

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Is the Liver Another Target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aibek eMirrakhimov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH. OSA has been associated with all components of the metabolic syndrome as well as with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. NAFLD is a common condition ranging in severity from uncomplicated hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis (NASH, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. The gold standard for the diagnosis and staging of NAFLD is liver biopsy. Obesity and insulin resistance lead to liver steatosis, but the causes of the progression to NASH are not known. Emerging evidence suggests that OSA may play a role in the progression of hepatic steatosis and the development of NASH. Several cross-sectional studies showed that the severity of IH in patients with OSA predicted the severity of NAFLD on liver biopsy. However, neither prospective nor interventional studies with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment have been performed. Studies in a mouse model showed that IH causes triglyceride accumulation in the liver and liver injury as well as hepatic inflammation. The mouse model provided insight in the pathogenesis of liver injury showing that (1 IH accelerates the progression of hepatic steatosis by inducing adipose tissue lipolysis and increasing free fatty acids (FFA flux into the liver; (2 IH up-regulates lipid biosynthetic pathways in the liver; (3 IH induces oxidative stress in the liver; (4 IH up-regulates hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha and possibly HIF-2 alpha, which may increase hepatic steatosis and induce liver inflammation and fibrosis. However, the role of FFA and different transcription factors in the pathogenesis of IH-induced NAFLD is yet to be established. Thus, multiple lines of evidence suggest that IH of OSA may contribute to the progression of NAFLD but definitive clinical studies and experiments in the mouse model have yet to be done.

  5. Molecular adsorbents recirculating system treatment in acute-on-chronic hepatitis patients on the transplant waiting list improves model for end-stage liver disease scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, G; Rossi, M; Pugliese, F; Poli, I; Ruberto, E; Martelli, S; Nudo, F; Morabito, V; Mennini, G; Berloco, P B

    2007-01-01

    The aim of our study was to show an improvement in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score after treatment with Molecular adsorbents recirculating system (MARS) in acute-on-chronic hepatitis (AoCHF) patients. MELD was adopted to determine the prognosis of patients with liver chronic desease. We evaluated the possibility to improve the MELD score of patients awaiting liver transplantation using a liver support device, namely, MARS. From September 1999 to April 2006, we treated 80 patients whose diagnoses were hepatitis C, 41.25%; hepatitis B, 27.5%; alcholic, 17.5%; intoxication, 8.75%; primary biliary cirrhosis, 5%. The overall mean age was 45 years (23 to 62), the cohort included 56 men and 24 women. Inclusion criteria were bilirubin >15 mg/dL; MELD >20; encephalopathy >II; and International Normalized Ratio, >2.1. Other parameters evaluated included ammonia, creatinine, lactate, glutamic oxalic transminase, and guanosine 5'-triphosphate. All patients were treated with a mean of 6-hour cycles of MARS (range, 5 to 8 hours) for a minimum of three treatments and a maximum of 20 treatments over 3 months. Clinical conditions were evaluated by improved hemodynamic parameters, kidney function, liver function, coagulation, neurologic status using the SOFA score, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II Criteria. The MELD score for all categories of living patients showed significant improvements at the end of treatment and at 3-months follow-up, but the small number of patients was a limitation to determine prediction of mortality. Our study shows that MARS treatment improved multiple organ functions-liver, renal, neurologic, and hemodynamic. The improved MELD score gave patients on the transplant waiting list longer survival, allowing them a greater opportunity for liver transplantation.

  6. MR of the liver in Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Steiner, S.; Hammerstingl, R.; Schwarz, S.; Kraft, E.; Weinzierl, M.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    To show that Wilson's disease is one likely cause of multiple low-intensity nodules of the liver we obtained MR images in 16 patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed Wilson's disease. Corresponding to morphological changes MRI enabled the subdivision of the patients into two groups. Using a T 2 -weighted spin-echo sequence (TR/TE=2000/45-90) liver parenchyma showed multiple tiny low-intensity-nodules surrounded by high-intensity septa in 10 out of 16 patients. 5 patients had also low-intensity nodules in T 1 -weighted images (TR/TE=600/20). In patients of this group histopathology revealed liver cirrhosis (n=7) and fibrosis (n=2). Common feature of this patient group was marked inflammatory cell infiltration into fibrous septa, increase of copper concentration in liver parenchyma and distinct pathological changes of laboratory data. In the remaining 6 patients no pathological change of liver morphology was demonstrated by MRI corresponding to slight histopathological changes of parenchyma and normal laboratory data. As low-intensity nodules surrounded by high intensity septa can be demonstrated in patients with marked inflammatory infiltration of liver parenchyma MRI may help to define Wilson patients with poorer prognosis. In patients with low-intensity nodules of the liver and unknown cause of liver cirrhosis laboratory data and histopathology should be checked when searching for disorders of copper metabolism. (orig.) [de

  7. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanliang Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin.

  8. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  9. Autoimmune liver disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    2003-03-01

    Autoimmune liver disorders are characterised by an inflammatory liver histology, circulating non-organ specific autoantibodies and increased levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the absence of a known aetiology. They respond to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted as soon as diagnosis is made. Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC). Two types of AIH are recognised according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1-positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalisation of biochemical parameters and decreased inflammatory activity on follow-up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress and there may be an evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. Whether the juvenile autoimmune form of sclerosing cholangitis and AIH are 2 distinct entities, or different aspects of the same condition, remains to be elucidated.

  10. LPSF/GQ-02 inhibits the development of hepatic steatosis and inflammation in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares e Silva, Amanda Karolina; de Oliveira Cipriano Torres, Dilênia; dos Santos Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Lima Ribeiro, Edlene; Costa Oliveira, Amanda; dos Santos, Laise Aline Martins; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extends from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Although the pathogenesis of NAFLD remains undefined, it is recognized that insulin resistance is present in almost all patients who develop this disease. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act as an insulin sensitizer and have been used in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant conditions, including NAFLD. Hence, therapy of NAFLD with insulin-sensitizing drugs should ideally improve the key hepatic histological changes, while also reducing cardiometabolic and cancer risks. Controversially, TZDs are associated with the development of cardiovascular events and liver problems. Therefore, there is a need for the development of new therapeutic strategies to improve liver function in patients with chronic liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the therapeutic effects of LPSF/GQ-02 on the liver of LDLR-/- mice after a high-fat diet. Eighty male mice were divided into 4 groups and two different experiments: 1-received a standard diet; 2-fed with a high-fat diet (HFD); 3-HFD+pioglitazone; 4-HFD+LPSF/GQ-02. The experiments were conducted for 10 or 12 weeks and in the last two or four weeks respectively, the drugs were administered daily by gavage. The results obtained with an NAFLD murine model indicated that LPSF/GQ-02 was effective in improving the hepatic architecture, decreasing fat accumulation, reducing the amount of collagen, decreasing inflammation by reducing IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and F4 / 80, and increasing the protein expression of IκBα, cytoplasmic NFκB-65, eNOS and IRS-1 in mice LDLR -/-. These results suggest a direct action by LPSF/GQ-02 on the factors that affect inflammation, insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver of these animals. Further studies are being conducted in our laboratory to investigate the possible mechanism of action of LPSF/GQ-02 on

  11. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  12. Radiation induced liver disease: A clinical update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.; Madan, R.; Chander, S.; Kilambi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) or radiation hepatitis is a sub-acute form of liver injury due to radiation. It is one of the most dreaded complications of radiation which prevents radiation dose escalation and re irradiation for hepatobiliary or upper gastrointestinal malignancies. This complication should be kept in mind whenever a patient is planned for irradiation of these malignancies. Although, incidence of RILD is decreasing due to better knowledge of liver tolerance, improved investigation modalities and modern radiation delivery techniques, treatment options are still limited. In this review article, we have focussed on pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention and management of RILD

  13. Pharmacological Approaches for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionică Floriana Elvira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFDL is a multifactorial condition with a wide spectrum of histological severities, from asymptomatic hepatic steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH with or without fibrosis. NAFLD is highly common and potentially serious in children and adolescents and affects approximately one third of the general population. It is closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. NASH is a histological diagnosis and has a great significance because it can progress to cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and is associated with both increased cardiovascular and liver related mortality. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for current potential therapies of NAFLD.

  14. Liver fat content, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bo Kobberø; Stender, Stefan; Kristensen, Thomas Skårup

    2018-01-01

    Aims: In observational studies, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with high risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We tested the hypothesis that a high liver fat content or a diagnosis of NAFLD is a causal risk factor for IHD. Methods and results: In a cohort study...

  15. Access to Liver Transplantation in Different ABO-Blood Groups and "Exceptions Points" in a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Allocation System: A Brazilian Single-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, R B; Waisberg, D R; Dias, A P M; Inoue, V B S; Arantes, R M; Haddad, L B P; Rocha-Santos, V; Pinheiro, R S N; Nacif, L S; D'Albuquerque, L A C

    2018-04-01

    In the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) system, patients with "MELD exceptions" points may have unfair privilege in the competition for liver grafts. Furthermore, organ distribution following identical ABO blood types may also result in unjust organ allocation. The aim of this study was to investigate access to liver transplantation in a tertiary Brazilian center, regarding "MELD exceptions" situations and among ABO-blood groups. A total of 465 adult patients on the liver waitlist from August 2015 to August 2016 were followed up until August 2017. Patients were divided into groups according to ABO-blood type and presence of "exceptions points." No differences in outcomes were observed among ABO-blood groups. However, patients from B and AB blood types spent less time on the list than patients from A and O groups (median, 46, 176, 415, and 401 days, respectively; P = .03). "Exceptions points" were granted for 141 patients (30.1%), hepatocellular carcinoma being the most common reason (52.4%). Patients with "exceptions points" showed higher transplantation rate, lower mortality on the list, and lower delta-MELD than non-exceptions patients (56.7% vs 19.1% [P blood types, despite shorter time on the waitlist for AB and B groups. The current MELD exception system provides advantages for candidates with "exception points," resulting in superior outcomes compared with those without exceptions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley Bush

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: With the increase in the prevalence of obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has become among the leading causes of chronic liver disease in the pediatric age group. Once believed to be a “two-hit process”, it is now clear that the actual pathophysiology of NAFLD is complex and involves multiple pathways. Moreover, NAFLD is not always benign, and patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are at increased risk of developing advanced stages of liver disease. It has also been shown that NAFLD is not only a liver disease, but is also associated with multiple extrahepatic manifestations, including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and low bone mineral density. Although the data is scarce in the pediatric population, some studies have suggested that long-term mortality and the requirement of liver transplantation will continue to increase in patients with NAFLD. More studies are needed to better understand the natural history of NAFLD, especially in the pediatric age group.

  17. Antifibrotic and molecular aspects of rifaximin in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjørn Stæhr; Trebicka, Jonel; Thiele, Maja

    2018-01-01

    Background: Alcoholic liver disease is the leading cause of cirrhosis worldwide. Due to an increase in alcohol overuse, alcoholic liver disease has become an increased burden on health care systems. Abstinence from alcohol remains the cornerstone of alcoholic liver disease treatment; however......, this approach is hampered by frequent relapse and lack of specific therapy for treating advanced cases of liver disease. In the present study, we hypothesized that gut microbiota drive the development of liver fibrosis and that modulation of gut microbiota with the gut-selective, nonabsorbable antibiotic...... promoter of alcoholic liver disease, current results may open new therapeutic avenues and revolutionize the current understanding of chronic liver diseases....

  18. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Focus on Lipoprotein and Lipid Deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klementina Fon Tacer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity with associated comorbidities is currently a worldwide epidemic and among the most challenging health conditions in the 21st century. A major metabolic consequence of obesity is insulin resistance which underlies the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of obesity and metabolic syndrome. It comprises a disease spectrum ranging from simple steatosis (fatty liver, through nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH to fibrosis, and ultimately liver cirrhosis. Abnormality in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism accompanied by chronic inflammation is the central pathway for the development of metabolic syndrome-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease (CVD, and NAFLD. This paper focuses on pathogenic aspect of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in NAFLD and the relevant mouse models of this complex multifactorial disease.

  19. Morphofunctional Changes After Sleeve Gastrectomy and Very Low Calorie Diet in an Animal Model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera-Urquijo, Eider; Rodríguez-Navarro, Sarai; Beisani, Marc; Salcedo-Allende, Maria Teresa; Chakkur, Aisha; Arús-Avilés, Marc; Cremades, Manel; Augustin, Salvador; Martell, María; Balibrea, José M

    2018-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent chronic liver disease and is found in 70% of obese people. The evidence available to date suggests that bariatric surgery could be an effective treatment by reducing weight and also by improving metabolic complications in the long term. This work aimed to compare, in a diet-induced NAFLD animal model, the effect of both sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and very-low calorie diet (VLCD). Thirty-five Wistar rats were divided into control rats (n = 7) and obese rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). After 10 weeks, the obese rats were subdivided into four groups: HFD (n = 7), VLCD (n = 7), and rats submitted to either a sham operation (n = 7) or SG (n = 7). Both liver tissue and blood samples were processed to evaluate steatosis and NASH changes in histology (Oil Red, Sirius Red and H&E); presence of endothelial damage (CD31, Moesin/p-Moesin, Akt/p-Akt, eNOS/p-eNOS), oxidative stress (iNOS) and fibrosis (αSMA, Col1, PDGF, VEGF) proteins in liver tissue; and inflammatory (IL6, IL10, MCP-1, IL17α, TNFα), liver biochemical function, and hormonal (leptin, ghrelin, visfatin and insulin) alterations in plasma. Both VLCD and SG improved histology, but only SG induced a significant weight loss, improved endothelial damage, and a decreased cardiovascular risk by reducing insulin resistance (IR), leptin, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. There were no relevant variations in the inflammatory and fibrosis markers. Our study suggests a slight superiority of SG over VLCD by improving not only the histology but also the IR and cardiovascular risk markers related to NAFLD.

  20. Garlic-Derived S-Allylmercaptocysteine Ameliorates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Rat Model through Inhibition of Apoptosis and Enhancing Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Man-Lung; Liong, Emily C.; Chang, Raymond Chuen Chung; Ching, Yick-Pang; Tipoe, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that administration of garlic-derived antioxidant S-allylmercaptocysteine (SAMC) ameliorated hepatic injury in a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) rat model. Our present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of SAMC on NAFLD-induced hepatic apoptosis and autophagy. Adult female rats were fed with a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to develop NAFLD with or without intraperitoneal injection of 200 mg/kg SAMC for three times per week. During NAFLD development, increased apoptotic cells and caspase-3 activation were observed in the liver. Increased apoptosis was modulated through both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. NAFLD treatment also enhanced the expression of key autophagic markers in the liver with reduced activity of LKB1/AMPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. Increased expression of proapoptotic regulator p53 and decreased activity of antiautophagic regulator mTOR were also observed. Administration of SAMC reduced the number of apoptotic cells through downregulation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic mechanisms. SAMC also counteracted the effects of NAFLD on LKB1/AMPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. Treatment with SAMC further enhanced hepatic autophagy by regulating autophagic markers and mTOR activity. In conclusion, administration of SAMC during NAFLD development in rats protects the liver from chronic injury by reducing apoptosis and enhancing autophagy. PMID:23861709

  1. Liver Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: an Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Giuseppe Fabio; Di Dio, Giovanna; Franzonello, Chiara; Gennaro, Alessia; Rotolo, Novella; Lionetti, Elena; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Context Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most widespread autosomal recessive genetic disorder that limits life expectation amongst the Caucasian population. As the median survival has increased related to early multidisciplinary intervention, other manifestations of CF have emergedespecially for the broad spectrum of hepatobiliary involvement. The present study reviews the existing literature on liver disease in cystic fibrosis and describes the key issues for an adequate clinical evaluation and management of patients, with a focus on the pathogenetic, clinical and diagnostic-therapeutic aspects of liver disease in CF. Evidence Acquisition A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for relevant studies published from 1990 about liver disease in cystic fibrosis. The databases searched were: EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library. Results CF is due to mutations in the gene on chromosome 7 that encodes an amino acidic polypeptide named CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator). The hepatic manifestations include particular changes referring to the basic CFTR defect, iatrogenic lesions or consequences of the multisystem disease. Even though hepatobiliary disease is the most common non-pulmonary cause ofmortalityin CF (the third after pulmonary disease and transplant complications), only about the 33%ofCF patients presents clinically significant hepatobiliary disease. Conclusions Liver disease will have a growing impact on survival and quality of life of cystic fibrosis patients because a longer life expectancy and for this it is important its early recognition and a correct clinical management aimed atdelaying the onset of complications. This review could represent an opportunity to encourage researchers to better investigate genotype-phenotype correlation associated with the development of cystic fibrosis liver disease, especially for non-CFTR genetic polymorphisms, and detect predisposed individuals. Therapeutic trials are needed to find strategies of

  2. New therapeutic strategies for canine liver disease; Growth factors and liver progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, B.

    2008-01-01

    The liver has the unique capacity to regulate its mass after loss of functional liver cells due to liver disease, injury, and/or toxicity. Unfortunately, in the course of chronic liver disease this meticulously regulated regeneration process is imbalanced resulting in a decreased regenerative

  3. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido M.; Schaefer, Stephanie G.; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Spengler, Ulrich [Department of Internal Medicine I, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a valuable biomarker for liver function. The strongest correlation with liver enhancement was found for the MELD Score. (orig.)

  4. Clinical epidemiology and disease burden of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumpail, Brandon J; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Yoo, Eric R; Cholankeril, George; Kim, Donghee; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as the presence of hepatic fat accumulation after the exclusion of other causes of hepatic steatosis, including other causes of liver disease, excessive alcohol consumption, and other conditions that may lead to hepatic steatosis. NAFLD encompasses a broad clinical spectrum ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NAFLD is the most common liver disease in the world and NASH may soon become the most common indication for liver transplantation. Ongoing persistence of obesity with increasing rate of diabetes will increase the prevalence of NAFLD, and as this population ages, many will develop cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. There has been a general increase in the prevalence of NAFLD, with Asia leading the rise, yet the United States is following closely behind with a rising prevalence from 15% in 2005 to 25% within 5 years. NAFLD is commonly associated with metabolic comorbidities, including obesity, type II diabetes, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of NAFLD is constantly evolving. Based on NAFLD subtypes, it has the potential to progress into advanced fibrosis, end-stage liver disease and HCC. The increasing prevalence of NAFLD with advanced fibrosis, is concerning because patients appear to experience higher liver-related and non-liver-related mortality than the general population. The increased morbidity and mortality, healthcare costs and declining health related quality of life associated with NAFLD makes it a formidable disease, and one that requires more in-depth analysis. PMID:29307986

  5. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  6. Liver Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing liver cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  7. The Role of Liver Biopsy in the Management of Patients with Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wong

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of liver biopsy in the diagnosis and management of liver disease is a controversial issue even among hepatologists. Although most causes of elevated liver enzymes can be determined, or at least suspected, on the basis of a careful history and laboratory tests, histological assessment remains the gold standard for most liver diseases. Histological evaluation can either confirm or refute clinical diagnoses and can provide information about the severity and stage of disease. Occasionally, the liver biopsy also provides an additional diagnosis. The spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease accounts for a substantial proportion of cases of chronically elevated liver enzymes and can be reliably diagnosed only by liver biopsy. Prognostic information can be obtained in patients with this disorder, as well as in those with alcoholic liver disease and viral hepatitis, and liver biopsy can be used as a guide to their management.

  8. Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Targeting Liver Disease: TTR Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Niemietz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The liver has become an increasingly interesting target for oligonucleotide therapy. Mutations of the gene encoding transthyretin (TTR, expressed in vast amounts by the liver, result in a complex degenerative disease, termed familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP. Misfolded variants of TTR are linked to the establishment of extracellular protein deposition in various tissues, including the heart and the peripheral nervous system. Recent progress in the chemistry and formulation of antisense (ASO and small interfering RNA (siRNA designed for a knockdown of TTR mRNA in the liver has allowed to address the issue of gene-specific molecular therapy in a clinical setting of FAP. The two therapeutic oligonucleotides bind to RNA in a sequence specific manner but exploit different mechanisms. Here we describe major developments that have led to the advent of therapeutic oligonucleotides for treatment of TTR-related disease.

  9. Radiofrequency-thermoablation in malignant liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, L.; Anzboeck, W.; Paertan, G.; Hruby, W.

    2002-01-01

    The clinical application of radiofrequency tumor ablation in primary liver tumors and metastatic liver disease is rapidly growing because this technique has proven to be simple, safe, and effective in first clinical studies. Most of the patients with malignant liver disease are not candidates for surgical resection due localisation or comorbidity, so radiofrequency therapy offers a good alternative for inoperable patients. With this method, high frequency alternating current is delivered to tissue via a needle electrode, the produced heat leads to coagulation necrosis. The largest focus of necrosis that can be induced with the currently available systems is approximately 4-5 cm with a single application. The radiofrequency needle is usually placed with US or CT guidance. For follow up examinations CT and MRI can be used, they proved to be equally accurate in the assessment of treatment response. (orig.) [de

  10. The Effects of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair on Pathological Microvessel and Angiogenesis-Associated Signaling Pathway in Mice Model of CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyan Xi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease is one of the most common diseases that threaten human health. Effective treatment is still lacking in western medicine. Semen Persicae (Taoren and Flos Carthami (Honghua are known to relieve acute hepatic injury and inflammation, improve microcirculation, and reduce tissue fiber. The aim of our study is to investigate the potential mechanisms of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair (THHP in murine model of chronic liver disease caused by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4. Mice were randomly divided into seven groups: (1 blank, (2 model, (3 control (colchicine, 0.1 mg/kg, (4 THHP (5.53, 2.67, and 1.33 g/kg, and (5 Tao Hong Siwu Decoction (THSWD (8.50 g/kg. Histological change and microvessels density were examined by microscopy. Hepatic function, serum fibrosis related factors, and hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were measured with ELISA. VEGF, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR, Flt-1, and Akt mRNA expression in hepatic tissue were determined with PCR. Tissues of Akt, pAkt, KDR, and Flt-1 were measured with western blotting. Data from this study showed that THHP improved hepatic function and restrained the hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Its role in inhibiting pathological angiogenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis may be through affecting the angiogenesis-associated VEGF and its upstream and downstream signaling pathways.

  11. Outcome in cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowland, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) does not affect mortality or morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The importance of gender and age in outcome in CF makes selection of an appropriate comparison group central to the interpretation of any differences in mortality and morbidity in patients with CFLD.

  12. Celiac disease in autoimmune cholestatic liver disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volta, Umberto; Rodrigo, Luis; Granito, Alessandro; Petrolini, Nunzio; Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Linares, Antonio; Veronesi, Lorenza; Fuentes, Dolores; Zauli, Daniela; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-10-01

    In this study, serological screening for celiac disease (CD) was performed in patients with autoimmune cholestasis to define the prevalence of such an association and to evaluate the impact of gluten withdrawal on liver disease associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy. Immunoglobulin A endomysial, human and guinea pig tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and immunoglobulin A and G gliadin antibodies were sought in 255 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune cholangitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Immunoglobulin A endomysial and human tissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in nine patients (seven primary biliary cirrhosis, one autoimmune cholangitis, and one primary sclerosing cholangitis), whose duodenal biopsy results showed villous atrophy consistent with CD. Two of these patients had a malabsorption syndrome, and one had iron-deficiency anemia. Clinical and biochemical signs of cholestasis did not improve after gluten withdrawal in the three patients with severe liver disease. A longer follow-up of the six celiac patients with mild liver damage is needed to clarify whether gluten restriction can contribute to slow down the progression of liver disease. The high prevalence of CD (3.5%) in autoimmune cholestasis suggests that serological screening for CD should be routinely performed in such patients by immunoglobulin A endomysial or human tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

  13. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1998-01-01

    and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal neurohumoral...

  14. Radiologic evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Soo; Park, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent cause of chronic liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-related liver cirrhosis. Although liver biopsy is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD, especially for the diagnosis of NASH, imaging methods have been increasingly accepted as noninvasive alternatives to liver biopsy. Ultrasonography is a well-established and cost-effective imaging technique for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, especially for screening a large population at risk of NAFLD. Ultrasonography has a reasonable accuracy in detecting moderate-to-severe hepatic steatosis although it is less accurate for detecting mild hepatic steatosis, operator-dependent, and rather qualitative. Computed tomography is not appropriate for general population assessment of hepatic steatosis given its inaccuracy in detecting mild hepatic steatosis and potential radiation hazard. However, computed tomography may be effective in specific clinical situations, such as evaluation of donor candidates for hepatic transplantation. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging are now regarded as the most accurate practical methods of measuring liver fat in clinical practice, especially for longitudinal follow-up of patients with NAFLD. Ultrasound elastography and magnetic resonance elastography are increasingly used to evaluate the degree of liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD and to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. This article will review current imaging methods used to evaluate hepatic steatosis, including the diagnostic accuracy, limitations, and practical applicability of each method. It will also briefly describe the potential role of elastography techniques in the evaluation of patients with NAFLD. PMID:24966609

  15. Successful introduction of Model for End-stage Liver Disease scoring in deceased donor liver transplantation in Korea: analysis of first 1 year experience at a high-volume transplantation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Soo-Min; Hwang, Shin; Song, Gi-Won; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Kim, Ki-Hun; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Namgung, Jungman; Kang, Woo-Hyoung; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Jwa, Eunkyoung; Kwon, Jae-Hyeon; Cho, Hui-Dong; Jung, Yong-Kyu; Kang, Sang-Hyeon; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2017-11-01

    Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score was adopted in June 2016 in Korea. We analyzed changes in volumes and outcomes of deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) for 1 year before and after introduction of MELD scoring at Asan Medical Center. There were 64 cases of DDLT in 1 year before MELD introduction and 106 in 1 year after MELD introduction, an increase of 65%. The volume of DDLTs abruptly increased during first 3 months, but then returned to its usual level before MELD introduction, which indicated 3-month depletion of accumulated recipient pool with high MELD scores. The number of pediatric DDLT cases increased from 3 before MELD introduction to 11 after it, making up 21.4% and 47.8% of all cases of pediatric liver transplantation, respectively. The number of cases of retransplanted DDLTs increased from 4 to 27, representing 6.3% and 25.5% of all DDLT cases, respectively. The number of status 1 DDLT cases increased from 5 to 12, being 7.8% and 11.3% of all cases. Patient survival outcomes were similar before and after MELD introduction. The number of DDLTs temporarily increased after adoption of MELD scoring due to accumulated recipient pool with high MELD scores. The numbers of retransplanted and pediatric DDLT cases significantly increased. Patient survival in adult and pediatric DDLT was comparable before and after adoption of MELD scoring. These results imply that Korean MELD score-based allocation system was successfully established within its first year.

  16. Malnutrition in end stage liver disease : Who is malnourished?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    Liver diseases are highly prevalent. While death rates of most other diseases, such as heart disease and cancer, have decreased, standardized mortality rates of liver diseases have increased up to 400% in the last decades. Cirrhosis is the endstage of patients who have chronic progressive liver

  17. A Noninvasive Score Model for Prediction of NASH in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To develop a noninvasive score model to predict NASH in patients with combined CHB and NAFLD. Objective and Methods. 65 CHB patients with NAFLD were divided into NASH group (34 patients and non-NASH group (31 patients according to the NAS score. Biochemical indexes, liver stiffness, and Controlled Attenuation Parameter (CAP were determined. Data in the two groups were compared and subjected to multivariate analysis, to establish a score model for the prediction of NASH. Results. In the NASH group, ALT, TG, fasting blood glucose (FBG, M30 CK-18, CAP, and HBeAg positive ratio were significantly higher than in the non-NASH group (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that CK-18 M30, CAP, FBG, and HBVDNA level were independent predictors of NASH. Therefore, a new model combining CK18 M30, CAP, FBG, and HBVDNA level was established using logistic regression. The AUROC curve predicting NASH was 0.961 (95% CI: 0.920–1.00, cutoff value is 0.218, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 80.6%. Conclusion. A noninvasive score model might be considered for the prediction of NASH in patients with CHB combined with NAFLD.

  18. Dynamic isotope studies in liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weits, J

    1978-01-01

    Much information in the field of liver research has been gained by dynamic isotope studies. Clinically, these studies can help to settle selection criteria for different types of surgical shunt, which relieve the complications of portal hypertension. By performing splenoportoscintigraphy, splenic and portal vein thrombosis can be easily and safely excluded. So-called hypoxaemia of cirrhosis can most easily be diagnosed. Suprahepatic caval vein obstruction in a patient with cryptogenic liver disease is easily excluded by a radionuclide cavogram after injection of pertechnetate into a foot vein.

  19. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Bambino

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD. We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf, including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin, suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  20. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambino, Kathryn; Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish; Chu, Jaime; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2018-02-26

    The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt , which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Inorganic arsenic causes fatty liver and interacts with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Austin, Christine; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Arora, Manish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rapid increase in fatty liver disease (FLD) incidence is attributed largely to genetic and lifestyle factors; however, environmental toxicants are a frequently overlooked factor that can modify the effects of more common causes of FLD. Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with liver disease in humans and animal models, but neither the mechanism of action nor the combinatorial interaction with other disease-causing factors has been fully investigated. Here, we examined the contribution of iAs to FLD using zebrafish and tested the interaction with ethanol to cause alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We report that zebrafish exposed to iAs throughout development developed specific phenotypes beginning at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), including the development of FLD in over 50% of larvae by 5 dpf. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of livers from larvae exposed to either iAs or ethanol revealed the oxidative stress response and the unfolded protein response (UPR) caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as common pathways in both these models of FLD, suggesting that they target similar cellular processes. This was confirmed by our finding that arsenic is synthetically lethal with both ethanol and a well-characterized ER-stress-inducing agent (tunicamycin), suggesting that these exposures work together through UPR activation to cause iAs toxicity. Most significantly, combined exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of iAs and ethanol potentiated the expression of UPR-associated genes, cooperated to induce FLD, reduced the expression of as3mt, which encodes an arsenic-metabolizing enzyme, and significantly increased the concentration of iAs in the liver. This demonstrates that iAs exposure is sufficient to cause FLD and that low doses of iAs can potentiate the effects of ethanol to cause liver disease. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. PMID:29361514

  2. Hypercoagulability in end-stage liver disease: prevalence and its correlation with severity of liver disease and portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Ashish; Karachristos, Andreas; Bromberg, Michael; Daly, Ellen; Maloo, Manoj; Jain, Ashok Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Contrary to well-recognized bleeding diathesis in chronic liver disease, thrombotic events can occur in these patients due to reduction or loss of synthesis of anticoagulant proteins. Forty-seven consecutive patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) were investigated for activity of protein C, protein S, antithrombin, and factor V Leiden mutation. Forty-two (89.4%) patients had low levels of at least 1 while 33 (70.2%) patients were deficient for all anticoagulant proteins studied. Forty-six (97.9%) patients were negative for factor V Leiden mutation. The deficiencies were more marked in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and patients with model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >15. Six (12.8%) patients had portal vein thrombosis (PVT), and all had diminished protein S activity. In conclusions, deficiency of anticoagulant proteins occur in early phase of chronic liver disease. The severity of deficiency is proportional to the severity of liver disease. Despite the high prevalence of hypercoagulability, the incidence of PVT is low. Further studies with larger cohort of patients are needed to support these conclusions and to study other associated factors.

  3. Herbal medicines for liver diseases in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, S P; Jayaram, S; Gopalakrishnan, V; Hari, R; Jeyakumar, P; Sripathi, M S

    2002-12-01

    The use of natural remedies for the treatment of liver diseases has a long history, starting with the Ayurvedhic treatment, and extending to the Chinese, European and other systems of traditional medicines. The 21st century has seen a paradigm shift towards therapeutic evaluation of herbal products in liver diseases by carefully synergizing the strengths of the traditional systems of medicine with that of the modern concept of evidence-based medicinal evaluation, standardization of herbal products and randomized placebo controlled clinical trials to support clinical efficacy. The present review provides the status report on the scientific approaches made to herbal preparations used in Indian systems of medicine for the treatment of liver diseases. In spite of the availability of more than 300 preparations for the treatment of jaundice and chronic liver diseases in Indian systems of medicine using more than 87 Indian medicinal plants, only four terrestrial plants have been scientifically elucidated while adhering to the internationally acceptable scientific protocols. In-depth studies have proved Sylibum marianum to be anti-oxidative, antilipidperoxidative, antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating and liver regenerative. Glycyrrhiza glabra has been shown to be hepatoprotective and capable of inducing an indigenous interferon. Picrorhiza kurroa is proved to be anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and immunomodulatory. Extensive studies on Phyllanthus amarus have confirmed this plant preparation as being anti-viral against hepatitis B and C viruses, hepatoprotective and immunomodulating, as well as possessing anti-inflammatory properties. For the first time in the Indian systems of medicine, a chemo-biological fingerprinting methodology for standardization of P. amarus preparation has been patented. Copyright 2002 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  4. Nutritional support of children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect that chronic liver disease has on a child's nutritional status and ... even children with less severe liver disease require nutritional .... Reduced muscle bulk .... pain and fractures, palpation of the spine and assessment of pubertal stage.

  5. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  6. Mitochondrial alterations in children with chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    chondrial function and structure in livers from humans with chronic liver disease ... ease, 2 with lipid storage disease, one with type I autoimmune hepatitis, one ..... a classification scheme for mitochondrial hepatopathies into primary and ...

  7. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed.

  8. Increased accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in female GSTA4/PPAR alpha double knockout mice enhance steatosis and inflammation in a model of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatocellular injury resulting from increased lipid peroxidation products and oxidative stress is considered a potential mechanism driving the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitsis (NASH). To test the significance of lipid peroxidation and protein...

  9. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  10. The association of coffee intake with liver cancer incidence and chronic liver disease mortality in male smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, G Y; Weinstein, S J; Albanes, D; Taylor, P R; McGlynn, K A; Virtamo, J; Sinha, R; Freedman, N D

    2013-09-03

    Coffee intake is associated with reduced risk of liver cancer and chronic liver disease as reported in previous studies, including prospective ones conducted in Asian populations where hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) and hepatitis C viruses (HCVs) are the dominant risk factors. Yet, prospective studies in Western populations with lower HBV and HCV prevalence are sparse. Also, although preparation methods affect coffee constituents, it is unknown whether different methods affect disease associations. We evaluated the association of coffee intake with incident liver cancer and chronic liver disease mortality in 27,037 Finnish male smokers, aged 50-69, in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, who recorded their coffee consumption and were followed up to 24 years for incident liver cancer or chronic liver disease mortality. Multivariate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. Coffee intake was inversely associated with incident liver cancer (RR per cup per day=0.82, 95% CI: 0.73-0.93; P-trend across categories=0.0007) and mortality from chronic liver disease (RR=0.55, 95% CI: 0.48-0.63; P-trendcoffee. These findings suggest that drinking coffee may have benefits for the liver, irrespective of whether coffee was boiled or filtered.

  11. Psoriasis and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, J M; Bonanad, C; Dauden, E; Botella, R; Olveira-Martín, A

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver condition in the West. The prevalence and severity of NAFLD is higher and the prognosis worse in patients with psoriasis. The pathogenic link between psoriasis and NAFLD is chronic inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance, a common finding in diseases associated with psoriasis. NAFLD should therefore be ruled out during the initial evaluation of patients with psoriasis, in particular if they show signs of metabolic syndrome and require systemic treatment. Concomitant psoriasis and NAFLD and the likelihood of synergy between them place limitations on general recommendations and treatment for these patients given the potential for liver toxicity. As hepatotoxic risk is associated with some of the conventional drugs used in this setting (e.g., acitretin, methotrexate, and ciclosporin), patients prescribed these treatments should be monitored as appropriate. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents hold the promise of potential benefits based on their effects on the inflammatory process and improving peripheral insulin resistance. However, cases of liver toxicity have also been reported in relation to these biologics. No evidence has emerged to suggest that anti-p40 or anti-interleukin 17 agents provide benefits or have adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Evolving paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardo, Amedeo; Nascimbeni, Fabio; Maurantonio, Mauro; Marrazzo, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Luca; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio

    2017-01-01

    In the last years new evidence has accumulated on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) challenging the paradigms that had been holding the scene over the previous 30 years. NAFLD has such an epidemic prevalence as to make it impossible to screen general population looking for NAFLD cases. Conversely, focusing on those cohorts of individuals exposed to the highest risk of NAFLD could be a more rational approach. NAFLD, which can be diagnosed with either non-invasive strategies or through liver biopsy, is a pathogenically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. The existence of metabolic as opposed to genetic-associated disease, notably including ”lean NAFLD” has recently been recognized. Moreover, NAFLD is a systemic condition, featuring metabolic, cardiovascular and (hepatic/extra-hepatic) cancer risk. Among the clinico-laboratory features of NAFLD we discuss hyperuricemia, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, gallstones, psoriasis and selected endocrine derangements. NAFLD is a precursor of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome and progressive liver disease develops in T2D patients in whom the course of disease is worsened by NAFLD. Finally, lifestyle changes and drug treatment options to be implemented in the individual patient are also critically discussed. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the new concepts on clinical and pathogenic heterogeneity of NAFLD, a systemic disorder with a multifactorial pathogenesis and protean clinical manifestations. It is highly prevalent in certain cohorts of individuals who are thus potentially amenable to selective screening strategies, intensive follow-up schedules for early identification of liver-related and extrahepatic complications and in whom earlier and more aggressive treatment schedules should be carried out whenever possible. PMID:29085206

  13. Dietary Oleate Has Beneficial Effects on Every Step of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Progression in a Methionine- and Choline-Deficient Diet-Fed Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Lee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasingly recognized as a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. The underlying mechanisms of disease progression remain poorly understood, and primary therapy of NAFLD is not yet established. We investigated the effects of dietary oleate on the development and progression of NAFLD in a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD diet-fed animal model.MethodsA total of 30 C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into three groups (n=10 in each group and fed various experimental diets for four weeks: chow, MCD diet, or OMCD (MCD diet with oleate, 0.5 mg/g/day. Liver samples were examined for steatohepatitis and fibrosis parameters and associated genes.ResultsAdditional dietary oleate dramatically reduced MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. Hepatic carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein was overexpressed in MCD diet-fed mice, and dietary oleate prevented this overexpression (P<0.001. Dietary oleate partially prevented MCD diet-induced serum level increases in aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (P<0.001, respectively. The mRNA expressions of hepatic monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, tumor necrosis factor-α and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were increased in MCD diet-fed mice, and this overexpression of inflammatory molecules was prevented by dietary oleate (P<0.001. Hepatic pericellular fibrosis was observed in MCD diet-fed mice, and dietary oleate prevented this fibrosis. Altogether, dietary oleate prevented MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis.ConclusionDietary oleate has beneficial effects in every step of NAFLD development and progression and could be a nutritional option for NAFLD prevention and treatment.

  14. Diagnostic methods of fatty liver disease; Diagnostik der Fettleber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Traeber, Frank [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). FE MRT

    2017-09-15

    Fatty liver disease is defined as an abnormal accumulation of lipids into the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. Different kinds of fatty liver diseases are becoming the most important etiologies of end-stage liver disease in the western world. Because fatty liver is a theoretically reversible process, timely and accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for potential therapeutic options. This work describes major diagnostic methods and discusses particular advantages and disadvantages of various techniques.

  15. Metabolomic profiling of a modified alcohol liquid diet model for liver injury in the mouse uncovers new markers of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, Blair U.; O'Connell, Thomas M.; Han, Jun; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Ross, Pamela K.; Winnike, Jason; Kono, Hiroshi; Rusyn, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Metabolomic evaluation of urine and liver was conducted to assess the biochemical changes that occur as a result of alcohol-induced liver injury. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed an isocaloric control- or alcohol-containing liquid diet with 35% of calories from corn oil, 18% protein and 47% carbohydrate/alcohol for up to 36 days ad libitum. Alcohol treatment was initiated at 7 g/kg/day and gradually reached a final dose of 21 g/kg/day. Urine samples were collected at 22, 30 and 36 days and, in additional treatment groups, liver and serum samples were harvested at 28 days. Steatohepatitis was induced in the alcohol-fed group since a 5-fold increase in serum alanine aminotransferase activity, a 6-fold increase in liver injury score (necrosis, inflammation and steatosis) and an increase in lipid peroxidation in liver were observed. Liver and urine samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrospray infusion/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry. In livers of alcohol-treated mice the following changes were noted. Hypoxia and glycolysis were activated as evidenced by elevated levels of alanine and lactate. Tyrosine, which is required for L-DOPA and dopamine as well as thyroid hormones, was elevated possibly reflecting alterations of basal metabolism by alcohol. A 4-fold increase in the prostacyclin inhibitor 7,10,13,16-docosatetraenoic acid, a molecule important for regulation of platelet formation and blood clotting, may explain why chronic drinking causes serious bleeding problems. Metabolomic analysis of the urine revealed that alcohol treatment leads to decreased excretion of taurine, a metabolite of glutathione, and an increase in lactate, n-acetylglutamine and n-acetylglycine. Changes in the latter two metabolites suggest an inhibition of the kidney enzyme aminoacylase I and may be useful as markers for alcohol consumption

  16. Liver involvement in Gaucher disease - Review and clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adar, Tomer; Ilan, Yaron; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari

    2018-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), one of the most prevalent lysosomal storage diseases, is associated with glucocerebroside accumulation in cells of the monocyte-macrophage system in various organs, including the liver. Evaluating and managing liver disease in patients with Gaucher disease may be challenging. While hepatic involvement is common in Gaucher disease, its severity, and clinical significance span a wide spectrum, ranging from sub-clinical involvement to liver cirrhosis with its associated complications including portal hypertension. Apart from liver involvement in Gaucher disease, patients with may also suffer from other comorbidities involving the liver. That Gaucher disease itself can mimic hepatic lesions, affect laboratory tests used to characterize liver disease, and may be associated with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, complicates the diagnostic approach even more. Better understanding of liver involvement in Gaucher disease can spare patients unnecessary invasive testing, and assist physicians in decision making when evaluating patients with Gaucher disease suspected for significant liver disease. This review describes the various clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging abnormalities that may be encountered when following patients with Gaucher disease for liver involvement. The mechanism for liver disease are discussed, as well as the possible hepato-protective effect of glucocerebroside, and the a diagnostic and treatment approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment (II). The treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Disease nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage same. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in our Western societies, from the point of view liver in its progressive evolution from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This updated January 2016 revision consists of two parts. In this second part, the treatment of NAFLD and its influence on cardiovascular disease and drugs used in the control of cardiovascular risk factors showing a beneficial effect on the liver disease will be reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Pruritus in chronic cholestatic liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Vinnitskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pruritus can be a prominent symptom  in patients with chronic liver disorders, especially those  with cholestasis,  and  substantially  affects  quality  of life. Management of pruritus  in cholestatic  liver diseases  remains  a  complicated   medical  problem. The review article deals with pathophysiological mechanisms of pruritus in cholestatic liver diseases, in particular, with the role of bile acids, endogenous opioids, serotonin, and histamine. There is new data on the key pathophysiological elements, such as neuronal activation lysophosphatidic acid and autotaxin, an enzyme that produces lysophosphatidic acid and whose serum activity is associated with the intensity of pruritus. Pathophysiology-based management approaches include administration of anionic exchange resin cholestyramine, ursodeoxycholic acid, rifampicin agonists, an opioid antagonist naltrexone and a  serotonin-reuptake inhibitor sertraline. These agents are recommended for the use as a stepped treatment algorithm. Patients who do not respond to these therapies can become candidates for albumin dialysis, plasmapheresis, ultraviolet B phototherapy, or need some other individualized approaches. New knowledge on the pathophysiology of pruritus may potentially result in the development of new agents for cholestatic pruritus.

  19. Caput medusae in alcoholic liver disease | Hari Kumar | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caput medusae and palmar erythema are cardinal signs in cirrhosis of liver with portal hypertension. Palmar erythema is described more often as a marker for alcoholic etiology of chronic liver disease. The peripheral stigmata of chronic liver disease are not routinely seen now a days due to early diagnosis and better ...

  20. Circulating lipocalin 2 is neither related to liver steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease nor to residual liver function in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Elisabeth M; Pohl, Rebekka; Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Schacherer, Doris; Eisinger, Kristina; Wiest, Reiner; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa

    2016-09-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is induced in the injured liver and associated with inflammation. Aim of the present study was to evaluate whether serum LCN2 is a non-invasive marker to assess hepatic steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or residual liver function in patients with liver cirrhosis. Therefore, LCN2 was measured by ELISA in serum of 32 randomly selected patients without fatty liver (controls), 24 patients with ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD and 42 patients with liver cirrhosis mainly due to alcohol. Systemic LCN2 was comparable in patients with liver steatosis, those with liver cirrhosis and controls. LCN2 negatively correlated with bilirubin in both cohorts. In cirrhosis, LCN2 was not associated with more advanced liver injury defined by the CHILD-PUGH score and model for end-stage liver disease score. Resistin but not C-reactive protein or chemerin positively correlated with LCN2. LCN2 levels were not increased in patients with ascites or patients with esophageal varices. Consequently, reduction of portal pressure by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt did not affect LCN2 levels. Hepatic venous blood (HVS), portal venous blood and systemic venous blood levels of LCN2 were similar. HVS LCN2 was unchanged in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis compared to those with well-compensated disease arguing against increased hepatic release. Current data exclude that serum LCN2 is of any value as steatosis marker in patients with NAFLD and indicator of liver function in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Accuracy of liver scintigraphy in focal liver disease - a comparison with postmortem studies in 159 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Helpap, B.; Bell, E.; Vogt, R.; Breuel, H.P.; Bonn Univ.

    1979-01-01

    Our investigations were carried out in 139 patients with various types of malignancy. Included in the investigations were 20 patients with primary liver tumor. The interval between scintigraphic examination and the histological verification ranged from 3 days to 1 year. In 62 of the patients histopathology revealed liver metastases, while 77 patients showed no liver involvement. We arrived at the correct diagnosis 'liver metastasis' in 50 out of 2 patientes. Fifty six out of 77 patients without histopathological evidence of liver metastases revealed negative scintigrams. In 18 of 20(90%) patients with focal liver disease correct diagnosis was established. Considering the fact that liver scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure, it can be recommended as screening method. In connection with sonography and computer tomography liver scintigraphy can undoubtedly improve the diagnostic accuracy in detecting liver metastases and primary liver tumors. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Aetiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, C S

    1993-09-01

    Until the 1960s, liver disease of the alcoholic patient was attributed exclusively to dietary deficiencies. Since then, however, our understanding of the impact of alcoholism on nutritional status has undergone a progressive evolution. Alcohol, because of its high energy content, was at first perceived to act exclusively as 'empty calories' displacing other nutrients in the diet, and causing primary malnutrition through decreased intake of essential nutrients. With improvement in the overall nutrition of the population, the role of primary malnutrition waned and secondary malnutrition was emphasized as a result of a better understanding of maldigestion and malabsorption caused by chronic alcohol consumption and various diseases associated with chronic alcoholism. At the same time, the concept of the direct toxicity of alcohol came to the forefront as an explanation for the widespread cellular injury. Some of the hepatotoxicity was found to result from the metabolic disturbances associated with the oxidation of ethanol via the liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) pathway and the redox changes produced by the generated NADH, which in turn affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and purines. Exaggeration of the redox change by the relative hypoxia which prevails physiologically in the perivenular zone contributes to the exacerbation of the ethanol-induced lesions in zone 3. In addition to ADH, ethanol can be oxidized by liver microsomes: studies over the last twenty years have culminated in the molecular elucidation of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450IIE1 (CYP2E1) which contributes not only to ethanol metabolism and tolerance, but also to the selective hepatic perivenular toxicity of various xenobiotics. Their activation by CYP2E1 now provides an understanding for the increased susceptibility of the heavy drinker to the toxicity of industrial solvents, anaesthetic agents, commonly prescribed drugs, 'over the counter' analgesics, chemical

  3. Defining normal liver stiffness range in a normal healthy Chinese population without liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Fung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic liver disease, different optimal liver stiffness cut-off values correspond to different stages of fibrosis, which are specific for the underlying liver disease and population. AIMS: To establish the normal ranges of liver stiffness in the healthy Chinese population without underlying liver disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross sectional study of 2,528 healthy volunteers recruited from the general population and the Red Cross Transfusion Center in Hong Kong. All participants underwent a comprehensive questionnaire survey, measurement of weight, height, and blood pressure. Fasting liver function tests, glucose and cholesterol was performed. Abdominal ultrasound and transient elastography were performed on all participants. RESULTS: Of the 2,528 subjects, 1,998 were excluded with either abnormal liver parenchyma on ultrasound, chronic medical condition, abnormal blood tests including liver enzymes, fasting glucose, fasting cholesterol, high body mass index, high blood pressure, or invalid liver stiffness scan. The reference range for the 530 subjects without known liver disease was 2.3 to 5.9 kPa (mean 4.1, SD 0.89. The median liver stiffness was higher in males compared with females (4.3 vs 4.0 kPa respectively, p55 years (p=0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The healthy reference range for liver stiffness in the Chinese population is 2.3 to 5.9 kPa. Female gender and older age group was associated with a lower median liver stiffness.

  4. Current management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    LISBOA, QUELSON COELHO; COSTA, SILVIA MARINHO FEROLLA; COUTO, CLÁUDIA ALVES

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic accumulation of lipid in patients who do not consume alcohol in amounts generally considered harmful to the liver. NAFLD is becoming a major liver disease in Eastern countries and it is related to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Treatment has focused on improving insulin sensitivity, protecting the liver from oxidative stress, decreasing obesity and improving diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hepatic infla...

  5. Bioengineered Liver Models for Drug Testing and Cell Differentiation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Underhill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro models of the human liver are important for the following: (1 mitigating the risk of drug-induced liver injury to human beings, (2 modeling human liver diseases, (3 elucidating the role of single and combinatorial microenvironmental cues on liver cell function, and (4 enabling cell-based therapies in the clinic. Methods to isolate and culture primary human hepatocytes (PHHs, the gold standard for building human liver models, were developed several decades ago; however, PHHs show a precipitous decline in phenotypic functions in 2-dimensional extracellular matrix–coated conventional culture formats, which does not allow chronic treatment with drugs and other stimuli. The development of several engineering tools, such as cellular microarrays, protein micropatterning, microfluidics, biomaterial scaffolds, and bioprinting, now allow precise control over the cellular microenvironment for enhancing the function of both PHHs and induced pluripotent stem cell–derived human hepatocyte-like cells; long-term (4+ weeks stabilization of hepatocellular function typically requires co-cultivation with liver-derived or non–liver-derived nonparenchymal cell types. In addition, the recent development of liver organoid culture systems can provide a strategy for the enhanced expansion of therapeutically relevant cell types. Here, we discuss advances in engineering approaches for constructing in vitro human liver models that have utility in drug screening and for determining microenvironmental determinants of liver cell differentiation/function. Design features and validation data of representative models are presented to highlight major trends followed by the discussion of pending issues that need to be addressed. Overall, bioengineered liver models have significantly advanced our understanding of liver function and injury, which will prove useful for drug development and ultimately cell-based therapies.

  6. Probiotics and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Treatment and Potential Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyuan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, alcohol remains one of the most common causes of liver disease in the United States. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders, including steatosis, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. Although many agents and approaches have been tested in patients with ALD and in animals with experimental ALD in the past, there is still no FDA (Food and Drug Administration approved therapy for any stage of ALD. With the increasing recognition of the importance of gut microbiota in the onset and development of a variety of diseases, the potential use of probiotics in ALD is receiving increasing investigative and clinical attention. In this review, we summarize recent studies on probiotic intervention in the prevention and treatment of ALD in experimental animal models and patients. Potential mechanisms underlying the probiotic function are also discussed.

  7. Update on Berberine in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberine (BBR, an active ingredient from nature plants, has demonstrated multiple biological activities and pharmacological effects in a series of metabolic diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. The recent literature points out that BBR may be a potential drug for NAFLD in both experimental models and clinical trials. This review highlights important discoveries of BBR in this increasing disease and addresses the relevant targets of BBR on NAFLD which links to insulin pathway, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling, gut environment, hepatic lipid transportation, among others. Developing nuanced understanding of the mechanisms will help to optimize more targeted and effective clinical application of BBR for NAFLD.

  8. Assessment of Liver Viscoelasticity for the Diagnosis of Early Stage Fatty Liver Disease Using Transient Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenieras, Jean-Pierre; Dejobert, Maelle; Bastard, Cécile; Miette, Véronique; Perarnau, Jean-Marc; Patat, Frédéric

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by accumulation of fat within the Liver. The main objective of this work is (1) to evaluate the feasibility of measuring in vivo in the liver the shear wave phase velocity dispersion cs(ω) between 20 Hz and 90 Hz using vibration-controlled transient elastography (VCTE); (2) to estimate through the rheological Kelvin-Voigt model the shear elastic μ and shear viscosity η modulus; (3) to correlate the evolution of these viscoelastic parameters on two patients at Tours Hospital with the hepatic fat percentage measured with T1-weighted gradient-echo in-and out-phase MRI sequence. For the first volunteer who has 2% of fat in the liver, we obtained μ = 1233 ± 133 Pa and η = 0.5 ± 0.4 Pa.s. For the patient with 22% of fat, we measure μ = 964 ± 91 Pa and η = 1.77 ± 0.3 Pa.s. In conclusion, this novel method showed to be sensitive in characterizing the visco-elastic properties of fatty liver.

  9. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1998-01-01

    oxide and vasodilating peptides seem to play an important role. The development of central hypovolaemia and activation of potent vasoconstricting systems such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the sympathetic nervous system lead to a hyperdynamic circulation with increased heart rate...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal neurohumoral...

  10. Circulating extracellular vesicles with specific proteome and liver microRNAs are potential biomarkers for liver injury in experimental fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Povero

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy.Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens.We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05, fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05 and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05. Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs and exosomes (EXO present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192--two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver.These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD.

  11. Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD score as a predictor and monitor of mortality in patients with Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chin Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio vulnificus necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections (VNSSTIs usually predispose patients with or without preexisting liver disease to septic shock, and then evolve to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS, thus resulting in high mortality in humans. However, clinicians do not have a valid prediction model to provide a reliable estimate of case-fatality rate when caring for these acutely and/or critically ill patients.We retrospectively analyzed 39 consecutive patients with VNSSTIs (mean age: 65.7 ± 11.3 years at our institution between 2007 and 2010. All patients were treated with the same protocol. Demographic and clinical characteristics, disease severity on admission, treatment details, and outcomes were collected for each patient and extracted for analyses. We studied the predictive value of the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD, modified MELD including sodium (MELD-Na, and laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC scores for case-fatality. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses were performed. The mean MELD, MELD-Na and LRINEC scores on admission were 15.1 ± 1.1, 17.7 ± 1.1, and 3.4 ± 0.4 points, respectively. After admission, these patients had temporary or progressive deterioration of nearly all their scores and lab values. The area under the ROC curve for the MELD and ΔMELD scoring models were 0.929 (p = 0.002 and 0.897 (p = 0.005, respectively. An optimal MELD/ΔMELD cutoff value ≥ 20/2 had a good sensitivity and specificity (all > 80%, with a 64/13-fold increased odds for case-fatality. Additionally, the development of severe forms of anemia (p = 0.014 and hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.019 were associated with an increased case-fatality rate.The MELD/ΔMELD scoring model is an effective risk stratification indicator at the time of admission and also an excellent condition monitor during hospitalization for medical care of acutely and/or critically ill patients

  12. Simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease : A multicenter experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, R. H. J.; Bozic, M. A.; Fridell, J. A.; Crull, M. H.; Molleston, J.; Avitzur, Y.; Mozer-Glassberg, Y.; Gonzalez-Peralta, R. P.; Hodik, M.; Fecteau, A.; de Angelis, M.; Durie, P.; Ng, V. L.

    Background: Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While liver transplantation is well established for CF-related liver disease (CFLD), the role of simultaneous liver pancreas transplantation is less understood. Methods: We polled 81

  13. Family history and obesity in youth, their effect on acylcarnitine/aminoacids metabolomics and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ibarguengoitia, Maria Elena; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Caballero, Augusto Enrique; Ibarra-González, Isabel; Herrera-Rosas, Arturo; Serratos-Canales, María Fabiola; León-Hernández, Mireya; González-Chávez, Antonio; Mummidi, Srinivas; Duggirala, Ravindranath; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) can help understanding complex functional relationships among obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), family history of obesity, targeted metabolomics and pro-inflammatory markers. We tested two hypotheses: 1) If obesity precedes an excess of free fatty acids that increase oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, there would be an increase of serum acylcarnitines, amino acids and cytokines in obese subjects. Acylcarnitines would be related to non-alcoholic fatty disease that will induce insulin resistance. 2) If a positive family history of obesity and type 2 diabetes are the major determinants of the metabolomic profile, there would be higher concentration of amino acids and acylcarnitines in patients with this background that will induce obesity and NAFLD which in turn will induce insulin resistance. 137 normoglycemic subjects, mean age (SD) of 30.61 (8.6) years divided in three groups: BMI30 with absence of NAFLD (G2), n = 24; and BMI>30 with NAFLD (G3), n = 31. Family history of obesity (any) was present in 53%. Both models were adjusted in SEM. Family history of obesity predicted obesity but could not predict acylcarnitines and amino acid concentrations (effect size obesity phenotype. Family history of obesity is the major predictor of obesity, and the metabolic abnormalities on amino acids, acylcarnitines, inflammation, insulin resistance, and NAFLD.

  14. Family history and obesity in youth, their effect on acylcarnitine/aminoacids metabolomics and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Structural equation modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Romero-Ibarguengoitia

    Full Text Available Structural equation modeling (SEM can help understanding complex functional relationships among obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, family history of obesity, targeted metabolomics and pro-inflammatory markers. We tested two hypotheses: 1 If obesity precedes an excess of free fatty acids that increase oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, there would be an increase of serum acylcarnitines, amino acids and cytokines in obese subjects. Acylcarnitines would be related to non-alcoholic fatty disease that will induce insulin resistance. 2 If a positive family history of obesity and type 2 diabetes are the major determinants of the metabolomic profile, there would be higher concentration of amino acids and acylcarnitines in patients with this background that will induce obesity and NAFLD which in turn will induce insulin resistance.137 normoglycemic subjects, mean age (SD of 30.61 (8.6 years divided in three groups: BMI30 with absence of NAFLD (G2, n = 24; and BMI>30 with NAFLD (G3, n = 31. Family history of obesity (any was present in 53%. Both models were adjusted in SEM. Family history of obesity predicted obesity but could not predict acylcarnitines and amino acid concentrations (effect size <0.2, but did predict obesity phenotype.Family history of obesity is the major predictor of obesity, and the metabolic abnormalities on amino acids, acylcarnitines, inflammation, insulin resistance, and NAFLD.

  15. β2‑adrenergic receptor functionality and genotype in two different models of chronic inflammatory disease: Liver cirrhosis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Reyes; Esteban, Pablo; Zapater, Pedro; Inda, María-Del-Mar; Conte, Anna Lucia; Gómez-Escolar, Laura; Martínez, Helena; Horga, José F; Palazon, José M; Peiró, Ana M

    2018-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the functional status of β2 adrenoceptors (β2AR) in two models of chronic inflammatory disease: liver cirrhosis (LC) and osteoarthritis (OA). The β2AR gene contains three single nucleotide polymorphisms at amino acid positions 16, 27 and 164. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential influence of lymphocyte β2AR receptor functionality and genotype in LC and OA patients. Blood samples from cirrhotic patients (n=52, hepatic venous pressure gradient 13±4 mmHg, CHILD 7±2 and MELD 11±4 scores), OA patients (n=30, 84% Kellgren‑Lawrence severity 4 grade, 14% knee replacement joint) and healthy volunteers as control group (n=26) were analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from whole blood and basal and isoproterenol induced adenylate cyclase activity (isoproterenol stimulus from 10‑9 to 10‑4 mM), and β2AR allelic variants (rs1042713, rs1042714, rs1800888) were determined. β2AR functionality was decreased in the two different models of chronic inflammatory disease studied, OA (50% vs. control) and LC (85% vs. control). In these patients, the strength of the β2AR response to adrenergic stimulation was very limited. Adrenergic modulation of PBMC function through the β2AR stimulus is decreased in chronic inflammatory processes including LC and OA, suggesting that the adrenergic system may be important in the development of these processes.

  16. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Juan; Pineda, Juan A; Real, Luis M

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most frequent chronic hepatic conditions worldwide. The spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease goes from hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are metabolic, mainly obesity and the accompanying consequences. Treatment and prevention of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease should target those metabolic abnormalities. The frequency of and the factors associated with hepatic steatosis in HIV infection seem to be similar to those reported in the general population, though direct comparisons are lacking. Hepatic steatosis in HIV infection may also be secondary to antiretroviral drugs or HCV-related factors in HCV-coinfected subjects. However, more recent data suggest that hepatic steatosis in HIV infection represents true non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As such, management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in HIV infection should follow the same principles as in the general population.

  17. Chronological evaluation of liver enhancement in patients with chronic liver disease at Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3-T MR imaging. Does liver function correlate with enhancement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Awai, Kazuo; Nakaura, Takeshi; Morita, Kosuke

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chronological relationship between scan delay and liver enhancement for the hepatobiliary phase on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and evaluate the effects of liver function on liver enhancement. Hepatobiliary-phase images were retrospectively evaluated in 125 patients with chronic liver disease. Hepatobiliary phase images were obtained at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after injection. We calculated relative liver enhancement (RLE) at t min after injection by dividing the signal intensity (SI) of the liver at t min by precontrast SI. We compared RLE values at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min and evaluated the detectability of focal hepatic lesions. We analyzed the effect of liver function on RLE with the generalized linear model. There was not significant difference in RLE and lesion detectability at 15 and 20 min. RLE in the Child-Pugh C group was significantly lower than in the Child-Pugh A and B groups. The serum albumin level and prothrombin time were significantly correlated with the liver enhancement. A delay time of 15 min for the hepatobiliary phase was thought to be adequate in patients with mild liver dysfunction. The serum albumin level and prothrombin time would be predictive of liver enhancement in the hepatobiliary phase. (author)

  18. Applications of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells; focused on disease modeling, drug screening and therapeutic potentials for liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Yong Soon; Chaudhari, Pooja; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2010-12-14

    The recent advances in the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research have significantly changed our perspectives on regenerative medicine by providing researchers with a unique tool to derive disease-specific stem cells for study. In this review, we describe the human iPSC generation from developmentally diverse origins (i.e. endoderm-, mesoderm-, and ectoderm- tissue derived human iPSCs) and multistage hepatic differentiation protocols, and discuss both basic and clinical applications of these cells including disease modeling, drug toxicity screening/drug discovery, gene therapy and cell replacement therapy.

  19. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Kholodenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable.

  20. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  1. Health and economic benefits of reducing sugar intake in the USA, including effects via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a microsimulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreman, Rick A; Goodell, Alex J; Rodriguez, Luis A; Porco, Travis C; Lustig, Robert H; Kahn, James G

    2017-08-03

    Excessive consumption of added sugars in the human diet has been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), coronary heart disease (CHD) and other elements of the metabolic syndrome. Recent studies have shown that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a critical pathway to metabolic syndrome. This model assesses the health and economic benefits of interventions aimed at reducing intake of added sugars. Using data from US National Health Surveys and current literature, we simulated an open cohort, for the period 2015-2035. We constructed a microsimulation model with Markov chains for NAFLD (including steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)), body mass index, T2D and CHD. We assessed reductions in population disease prevalence, disease-attributable disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and costs, with interventions that reduce added sugars consumption by either 20% or 50%. The model estimated that a 20% reduction in added sugars intake will reduce prevalence of hepatic steatosis, NASH, cirrhosis, HCC, obesity, T2D and CHD. Incidence of T2D and CHD would be expected to decrease by 19.9 (95% CI 12.8 to 27.0) and 9.4 (95% CI 3.1 to 15.8) cases per 100 000 people after 20 years, respectively. A 20% reduction in consumption is also projected to annually avert 0.767 million (M) DALYs (95% CI 0.757M to 0.777M) and a total of US$10.3 billion (B) (95% CI 10.2B to 10.4B) in discounted direct medical costs by 2035. These effects increased proportionally when added sugars intake were reduced by 50%. The decrease in incidence and prevalence of disease is similar to results in other models, but averted costs and DALYs were higher, mainly due to inclusion of NAFLD and CHD. The model suggests that efforts to reduce consumption of added sugars may result in significant public health and economic benefits. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All

  2. Health and economic benefits of reducing sugar intake in the USA, including effects via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a microsimulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreman, Rick A; Goodell, Alex J; Rodriguez, Luis A; Porco, Travis C; Lustig, Robert H; Kahn, James G

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Excessive consumption of added sugars in the human diet has been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), coronary heart disease (CHD) and other elements of the metabolic syndrome. Recent studies have shown that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a critical pathway to metabolic syndrome. This model assesses the health and economic benefits of interventions aimed at reducing intake of added sugars. Methods Using data from US National Health Surveys and current literature, we simulated an open cohort, for the period 2015–2035. We constructed a microsimulation model with Markov chains for NAFLD (including steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)), body mass index, T2D and CHD. We assessed reductions in population disease prevalence, disease-attributable disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and costs, with interventions that reduce added sugars consumption by either 20% or 50%. Findings The model estimated that a 20% reduction in added sugars intake will reduce prevalence of hepatic steatosis, NASH, cirrhosis, HCC, obesity, T2D and CHD. Incidence of T2D and CHD would be expected to decrease by 19.9 (95% CI 12.8 to 27.0) and 9.4 (95% CI 3.1 to 15.8) cases per 100 000 people after 20 years, respectively. A 20% reduction in consumption is also projected to annually avert 0.767 million (M) DALYs (95% CI 0.757M to 0.777M) and a total of US$10.3 billion (B) (95% CI 10.2B to 10.4B) in discounted direct medical costs by 2035. These effects increased proportionally when added sugars intake were reduced by 50%. Conclusions The decrease in incidence and prevalence of disease is similar to results in other models, but averted costs and DALYs were higher, mainly due to inclusion of NAFLD and CHD. The model suggests that efforts to reduce consumption of added sugars may result in significant public health and economic benefits. PMID:28775179

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF System in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Adamek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis are affected by growth factors produced in liver. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and 2 (IGF1 and IGF2 act in response to growth hormone (GH. Other IGF family components include at least six binding proteins (IGFBP1 to 6, manifested by both IGFs develop due to interaction through the type 1 receptor (IGF1R. The data based on animal models and/or in vitro studies suggest the role of IGF system components in cellular aspects of hepatocarcinogenesis (cell cycle progression, uncontrolled proliferation, cell survival, migration, inhibition of apoptosis, protein synthesis and cell growth, and show that systemic IGF1 administration can reduce fibrosis and ameliorate general liver function. In epidemiologic and clinicopathological studies on chronic liver disease (CLD, lowered serum levels, decreased tissue expression of IGF1, elevated production of IGF1R and variable IGF2 expression has been noted, from the start of preneoplastic alterations up to the developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC stage. These changes result in well-known clinical symptoms of IGF1 deficiency. This review summarized the current data of the complex role of IGF system components in the most common CLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Better recognition and understanding of this system can contribute to discovery of new and improved versions of current preventive and therapeutic actions in CLD.

  4. Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound for Non-tumor Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Maruyama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is a simple, safe and reliable technique for the clinical management of patients with various liver diseases. Although the major target of the technique may be focal hepatic lesions, it is also effective for the diagnosis of non-tumor liver diseases, such as grading hepatic fibrosis, characterization of chronic liver diseases and diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis. This review article aimed to overview the recent application of CEUS in the assessment of non-tumor liver diseases. Keywords: Cirrhosis, contrast agent, fibrosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, microbubble, portal vein thrombosis, ultrasound.

  5. Adipokines and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Multiple Interactions

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    Timon E. Adolph

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence links obesity with low-grade inflammation which may originate from adipose tissue that secretes a plethora of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines termed adipokines. Adiponectin and leptin have evolved as crucial signals in many obesity-related pathologies including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Whereas adiponectin deficiency might be critically involved in the pro-inflammatory state associated with obesity and related disorders, overproduction of leptin, a rather pro-inflammatory mediator, is considered of equal relevance. An imbalanced adipokine profile in obesity consecutively contributes to metabolic inflammation in NAFLD, which is associated with a substantial risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC also in the non-cirrhotic stage of disease. Both adiponectin and leptin have been related to liver tumorigenesis especially in preclinical models. This review covers recent advances in our understanding of some adipokines in NAFLD and associated HCC.

  6. Hotspots in clinical management of severe liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Jiayu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe liver diseases such as liver failure and acute decompensated cirrhosis have critical conditions and high mortality rates, and the prognosis of such patients is closely associated with early warning, timely dynamic assessment, and comprehensive and effective therapy. The patients require a series of effective clinical management measures for elimination of causative factors, organ support, and prevention and treatment of complications. Medical treatment-artificial liver-liver transplantation is an important modality for severe liver diseases. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, stem cell therapy, and bioartificial liver have a promising future, while there are still controversies over non-selective β-blocker. This article reviews the hotspots in the clinical management of severe liver diseases.

  7. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Liangping

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been changing, the incidence of HCC related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is gradually increasing in developed countries in Europe and America and some countries in Asia. This article introduces the close association between NAFLD and HCC, risk factors, clinicopathological features, and prevention and screening, and points out that although the incidence of NAFLD is not as high as that of hepatitis B- or hepatitis C-related HCC, there are a large absolute number of NAFLD patients, especially the high-risk patients with diabetes and obesity, or liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, due to a huge base number of NAFLD patients. NAFLD-related HCC is commonly seen in the elderly with various comorbidities and a poor prognosis. This article also points out that the prevention should focus on the effective treatment of NAFLD. The strict screening of high-risk population is the strategy for the diagnosis of early-stage HCC. At present, the sensitivity of alpha-fetoprotein is relatively low, and imaging examinations including computed tomography are the main screening methods; however, there are no measures for early warning of NAFLD-related HCC.

  8. Echocardiography in chronic liver disease: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Vitor Gomes; Markman Filho, Brivaldo

    2013-04-01

    Doppler echocardiography (Echo) is a non-invasive method of excellent accuracy to screen portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and to assess intrapulmonary shunts (IPS) in chronic liver disease (CLD). In the past decade, Echo proved to play a fundamental role in the diagnosis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM). To perform a systematic review of relevant articles on the subject 'Echo in CLD'. In November 2011, a systematic review was performed in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases, and the characteristics of the studies selected were reported. The search based on descriptors and free terms obtained 204 articles (179 in Pubmed, 21 in LILACS, and 1 in SciELO). Of those 204 articles, 22 were selected for systematic review. A meta-analysis could not be performed because of the heterogeneity of the articles. Echo should be part of CLD stratification for screening PPH, IPS and CCM, because, most of the time, such complications are diagnosed only when patients are already waiting for a liver transplant.

  9. Vitamin D in chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Caroline S; Volmer, Dietrich A; Grünhage, Frank; Lammert, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) and several related extrahepatic manifestations such as hepatic osteodystrophy are associated with deficiency of vitamin D, which has therefore been suggested as therapeutic target. Vitamin D undergoes hepatic 25-hydroxylation, rendering the liver critical to the metabolic activation of this vitamin. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in CLD patients, and vitamin D levels are inversely related to the severity of CLD. Declining levels of carrier proteins such as albumin and vitamin D-binding protein might also be critical in CLD. Intervention studies report improvements of CLD following supplementation, and benefits to health outcomes in particular with respect to hepatitis C virus infection have recently been documented. We discuss vitamin D sources, functions and metabolism with a focus on the inherent complications of analytical measurements, such as the interference of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D C-3 epimers. Global discrepancies in the definition of optimal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are covered, and the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in CLD is reviewed. We also address the functional mechanisms underlying this deficiency, and refer to associations between genetic variation in vitamin D metabolism and CLD. Lastly, we consider the health implications of a vitamin D deficiency in CLD and consider therapeutic options. Herein, we focus on the epidemiological and functional relationships between vitamin D deficiency and CLD, followed by a discussion of the potential implications for therapeutic interventions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. The Nutraceutic Silybin Counteracts Excess Lipid Accumulation and Ongoing Oxidative Stress in an In Vitro Model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Progression

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    Giulia Vecchione

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, are major consequences of hepatic lipid overload, which can contribute to progression of NAFLD to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Also, mitochondria are involved in the NAFLD pathogenesis for their role in hepatic lipid metabolism. Definitive treatments for NAFLD/NASH are lacking so far. Silybin, the extract of the milk thistle seeds, has previously shown beneficial effects in NAFLD. Sequential exposure of hepatocytes to high concentrations of fatty acids (FAs and TNFα resulted in fat overload and oxidative stress, which mimic in vitro the progression of NAFLD from simple steatosis (SS to steatohepatitis (SH. The exposure to 50 µM silybin for 24 h reduced fat accumulation in the model of NAFLD progression. The in vitro progression of NAFLD from SS to SH resulted in reduced hepatocyte viability, increased apoptosis and oxidative stress, reduction in lipid droplet size, and up-regulation of IκB kinase β-interacting protein and adipose triglyceride lipase expressions. The direct action of silybin on SS or SH cells and the underlying mechanisms were assessed. Beneficial action of silybin was sustained by changes in expression/activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and enzymes for FA oxidation. Moreover, silybin counteracted the FA-induced mitochondrial damage by acting on complementary pathways: (i increased the mitochondrial size and improved the mitochondrial cristae organization; (ii stimulated mitochondrial FA oxidation; (iii reduced basal and maximal respiration and ATP production in SH cells; (iv stimulated ATP production in SS cells; and (v rescued the FA-induced apoptotic signals and oxidative stress in SH cells. We provide new insights about the direct protective effects of the nutraceutic silybin on hepatocytes

  11. Analytical study of cell liver proliferation and serum AFP in various liver diseases other than hepatomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takino, T; Okuda, K; Kitamura, O; Takahashi, T; Ashihara, T [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1974-12-01

    Cell proliferative activity in the liver tissue obtained in 50 cases by liver biopsy, was analyzed using in vitro labeling of /sup 3/H-thymidine autoradiography. The proliferating cells were found to be located mainly in the periportal areas of the lobules. The mean labeling indices of the liver cells were 0.06 % in chronic hepatitis in its active form, 0.05 % in pre-cirrhosis of the liver, 0.03 % in liver cirrhosis, 0.02 % in chronic hepatitis in an inactive form and 0.018 % in acute hepatitis at the restoractive stage. The labeling indices of the liver parenchymal cells of each specimen studied were very low being at most 0.2 %. On the other hand, when the serum AFP was analyzed by radioimmunoassay technique in 185 patients with various liver diseases, level of the mean serum AFP in each group of the liver diseases was found to correspond to that of the proliferative activity of the liver cells in its respective group. From these data it was suggested that the proliferative activity of the liver cells in various liver diseases, with the exception of hepatomas, was closely related to release of AFP into the serum.

  12. Association of serum retinoic acid with hepatic steatosis and liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Hongen; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Wenjing; Sun, Ruifang; Xia, Min

    2015-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A (retinol), has been implicated in the regulation of lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis in animal models. However, the relation between RA and liver histology in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unknown. This study aimed at examining the association of RA with NAFLD and NASH in Chinese subjects. Serum RA concentration was determined by ELISA in 41 control subjects, 45 patients with NAFLD, and 38 patients with NASH. The associations of RA with adiposity, serum glucose, lipid profiles, and markers of liver damage were studied. Moreover, both mRNA and protein levels of retinoic X receptor α (RXRα) in the liver were analyzed in subjects with different degrees of hepatic steatosis. Serum RA concentrations in patients with NAFLD (1.42 ± 0.47 ng/mL) and NASH (1.14 ± 0.26 ng/mL) were significantly lower than those in control subjects (2.70 ± 0.52 ng/mL) (P hepatic steatosis. Both serum RA concentrations and RXRα mRNA levels were inversely correlated with intrahepatic triglyceride content (r = -0.700, P hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin resistance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01940263. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    , calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This provides an effective (although relative) counterbalance to raised arterial blood pressure. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during......This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic...... vascular resistance, high arterial compliance, increased cardiac output, secondary activation of counterregulatory systems (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system, release of vasopressin), and resistance to vasopressors. The vasodilatory state is mediated through adrenomedullin...

  14. Potential and Challenges of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Liver Diseases Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tens of millions of patients are affected by liver disease worldwide. Many of these patients can benefit from cell therapy involving living metabolically active cells, either by treatment of their liver disease, or by prevention of their disease phenotype. Cell therapies, including hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial liver (BAL devices, have been proposed as therapeutic alternatives to the shortage of transplantable livers. Both BAL and hepatocyte transplantation are cellular therapies that avoid use of a whole liver. Hepatocytes are also widely used in drug screening and liver disease modelling. However, the demand for human hepatocytes, heavily outweighs their availability by conventional means. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs technology brings together the potential benefits of embryonic stem cells (ESCs (i.e., self-renewal, pluripotency and addresses the major ethical and scientific concerns of ESCs: embryo destruction and immune-incompatibility. It has been shown that hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs can be generated from iPSCs. Furthermore, human iPSCs (hiPSCs can provide an unlimited source of human hepatocytes and hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine, drug screening and liver diseases modelling. Despite steady progress, there are still several major obstacles that need to be overcome before iPSCs will reach the bedside. This review will focus on the current state of efforts to derive hiPSCs for potential use in modelling and treatment of liver disease.

  15. The pediatric NAFLD fibrosis index: a predictor of liver fibrosis in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrobattista Andrea

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver fibrosis is a stage of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD which is responsible for liver-related morbidity and mortality in adults. Accordingly, the search for non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis has been the subject of intensive efforts in adults with NAFLD. Here, we developed a simple algorithm for the prediction of liver fibrosis in children with NAFLD followed at a tertiary care center. Methods The study included 136 male and 67 female children with NAFLD aged 3.3 to 18.0 years; 141 (69% of them had fibrosis at liver biopsy. On the basis of biological plausibility, readily availability and evidence from adult studies, we evaluated the following potential predictors of liver fibrosis at bootstrapped stepwise logistic regression: gender, age, body mass index, waist circumference, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, gamma-glutamyl-transferase, albumin, prothrombin time, glucose, insulin, triglycerides and cholesterol. A final model was developed using bootstrapped logistic regression with bias-correction. We used this model to develop the 'pediatric NAFLD fibrosis index' (PNFI, which varies between 0 and 10. Results The final model was based on age, waist circumference and triglycerides and had a area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85 (95% bootstrapped confidence interval (CI with bias correction 0.80 to 0.90 for the prediction of liver fibrosis. A PNFI ≥ 9 (positive likelihood ratio = 28.6, 95% CI 4.0 to 201.0; positive predictive value = 98.5, 95% CI 91.8 to 100.0 could be used to rule in liver fibrosis without performing liver biopsy. Conclusion PNFI may help clinicians to predict liver fibrosis in children with NAFLD, but external validation is needed before it can be employed for this purpose.

  16. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  17. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression.

  18. An epidemiological study of the association of coffee with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, H B; Masterton, G S; Hayes, P C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic liver disease affects 855 people per million in the UK. Previous studies have reported that coffee appears protective against the development of abnormal liver enzymes, hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study, the first in a Scottish population, was to compare coffee consumption in patients with liver disease and that of control populations to determine correlations between coffee intake and the incidence of non-cancerous liver disease and with Child's-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores. Two hundred and eighty-six patients attending the liver outpatient department at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh completed a questionnaire regarding coffee consumption and lifestyle factors. Control questionnaires were also completed by 100 orthopaedic outpatients and 120 medical students. Patients with cirrhosis (n = 95) drank significantly less coffee than those without cirrhosis (p = coffee consumption. Coffee drinking is associated with a reduced prevalence of cirrhosis in patients with chronic liver disease. However, there was no significant difference in the amount of coffee drunk by liver patients and the control groups. It is possible that by changing the amount of coffee drunk, the development of cirrhosis in liver disease could be postponed.

  19. Liver diseases and aging : friends or foes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Di Biase, Stefano; Koonen, Debby; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the only internal human organ capable of natural regeneration of lost tissue, as little as 25% of a liver can regenerate into a whole liver. The process of aging predisposes to hepatic functional and structural impairment and metabolic risk. Therefore, understanding how aging could

  20. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijk, Ewart W.; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah−/− Il2rg−/− rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat. PMID:26915950

  1. S-adenosyl-L-methionine for alcoholic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of liver disease and disrupts methionine and oxidative balances. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) acts as a methyl donor for methylation reactions and participates in the synthesis of glutathione, the main cellular antioxidant. Randomised clinical trials have addressed...... the question whether SAMe may benefit patients with alcoholic liver diseases....

  2. S-adenosyl-L-methionine for alcoholic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of liver disease in the Western world today. S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) acts as a methyl donor for all known biological methylation reactions and participates in the synthesis of glutathione, the main cellular anti-oxidant. Randomised clinical trials have addressed...... the question whether SAMe has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver diseases....

  3. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: From patient to population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Koehler (Edith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries, in parallel with epidemics in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD comprises a wide range of histological findings, extending from simple steatosis to

  4. Depression and Chronic Liver Diseases: Are There Shared Underlying Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of depression is higher in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD than that in the general population. The mechanism described in previous studies mainly focused on inflammation and stress, which not only exists in CLD, but also emerges in common chronic diseases, leaving the specific mechanism unknown. This review was to summarize the prevalence and risk factors of depression in CLD including chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to point out the possible underlying mechanism of this potential link. Clarifying the origins of this common comorbidity (depression and CLD may provide more information to understand both diseases.

  5. Endocrine-Manifestations of Cirrhosis and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khalili

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The liver is involved in the synthesis and metabolism of many kinds of hormones, various abnormalities hormone levels are found in advanced liver disease. For example the liver is, extremely sensitive to changes in insulin or glucagon levels. The liver is the primary organ of iron storage is frequently involved, diabetes is common in patients with iron overload and may be seen in cirrhosis. Chronic infection with HCV is associated with insulin resistance. Thyroid disease often accompanies chronic hepatitis C infection .Anti thyroid autoantibodies are also found in chronic HCV infection. Nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLDas a most common cause of chronic liver disease in western world ,as well accompanied by Type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism also have been in NAFLD.The patients with NAFLD and Hypopituitarism may be susceptible to central obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance leading to disease progression. Hepatic cirrhosis as the end stage of chronic liver disease is also associated with hypogonadism and signs of feminization. The peripheral metabolism of steroids is altered in many of hypogonadism, low testosterone level decreased libido, infertility, reduced secondary sex hair and gynecomastia, reduced spermatogenesis and peritubular fibrosis are found in men with cirrhosis .The normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis is affected in liver disease. In cirrhotic patients the estrogen/androgen ratio is usually increased, the level of testosterone and dihydroepiandosteron are reduced while the estradiol level are normal or slightly elevated, these alterations are dependent on the severity of the liver disease.Succsesfull orthotropic liver transplantation  leads to improvement of the sex hormone disturbances. The pathogenesis of gynecomastia is due to the loss of equilibrium between estrogen and androgen caused by a feminizing state but it is due to increased estrogen precursor in

  6. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L'Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-03-02

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development.

  7. Phytosterols Promote Liver Injury and Kupffer Cell Activation in Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Devereaux, Michael W.; Vue, Padade M.; Zhang, Wujuan; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Karpen, Saul J.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease (PNALD) is a serious complication of PN in infants who do not tolerate enteral feedings, especially those with acquired or congenital intestinal diseases. Yet, the mechanisms underlying PNALD are poorly understood. It has been suggested that a component of soy oil (SO) lipid emulsions in PN solutions, such as plant sterols (phytosterols), may be responsible for PNALD, and that use of fish oil (FO)–based lipid emulsions may be protective. We used a mouse model of PNALD combining PN infusion with intestinal injury to demonstrate that SO-based PN solution causes liver damage and hepatic macrophage activation and that PN solutions that are FO-based or devoid of all lipids prevent these processes. We have furthermore demonstrated that a factor in the SO lipid emulsions, stigmasterol, promotes cholestasis, liver injury, and liver macrophage activation in this model and that this effect may be mediated through suppression of canalicular bile transporter expression (Abcb11/BSEP, Abcc2/MRP2) via antagonism of the nuclear receptors Fxr and Lxr, and failure of up-regulation of the hepatic sterol exporters (Abcg5/g8/ABCG5/8). This study provides experimental evidence that plant sterols in lipid emulsions are a major factor responsible for PNALD and that the absence or reduction of plant sterols is one of the mechanisms for hepatic protection in infants receiving FO-based PN or lipid minimization PN treatment. Modification of lipid constituents in PN solutions is thus a promising strategy to reduce incidence and severity of PNALD. PMID:24107776

  8. Usefulness of ECT in liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Jun-ichi

    1981-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of single photon emission tomography using rotating chair (ECT), comparing with liver scintigrams was examined with ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analysis. The ROC curve of ECT drew higher curved line than that of liver scintigram, i.e. true positive ratio of ECT was slightly inferior to that of liver scintigram, but false positive ratio of ECT was superior to that of liver scintigram. ECT adds useful clinical information to liver scintigram which shows questionable or suspected uptake defects. (author)

  9. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including 'liver cirrhosis', 'end-stage liver disease', 'liver diseases', 'oral health', 'periodontal disease', 'mouth disease', 'gingivitis', and 'periodontitis'. Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%-79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed.

  10. Predictive accuracy of model for end stage liver disease (meld) as a prognostic marker for cirrhosis in comparison with child - pugh score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, U.B.; Alam, M.M.; Saeed, F.

    2015-01-01

    To compare Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and Child-Turcott-Pugh (CTG) scoring as predictors of survival in cirrhotic patients. Study Design: Observational prospective study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from 1st Dec 2008 to 30th April 2009. Material and Methods: The study was carried out at Military Hospital, Rawalpindi a tertiary care hospital of Pakistan. Study included 55 patients suffering from cirrhosis of both genders being above 12 years of age, admitted in medical wards during the period from 1st December, 2008 to 30th April 2009. Each patient was assigned a MELD and CTP score. On discharge, these patients were followed up at 03 months, 06 months and 1 year duration through telephone. Results: Thirty seven (67.3%) patients were male while 18 (32.7%) were female patients, with age ranging from 27 years to 75 years (mean 53). Fourteen (25.4%) patients were dead at 3-months, 22 patients (40%) were dead at 6-months and 29 (52.7%) patients were dead at 1 year follow up. MELD score proved to be a better indicator of survival than CTP score over a period of 01 year follow-up. Conclusion: MELD score is a better prognostic marker for cirrhotic patients as compared to CTP score. (author)

  11. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation of primary human hepatocytes from normal and diseased liver tissue: a one hundred liver experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky H Bhogal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful and consistent isolation of primary human hepatocytes remains a challenge for both cell-based therapeutics/transplantation and laboratory research. Several centres around the world have extensive experience in the isolation of human hepatocytes from non-diseased livers obtained from donor liver surplus to surgical requirement or at hepatic resection for tumours. These livers are an important but limited source of cells for therapy or research. The capacity to isolate cells from diseased liver tissue removed at transplantation would substantially increase availability of cells for research. However no studies comparing the outcome of human hepatocytes isolation from diseased and non-diseased livers presently exist. Here we report our experience isolating human hepatocytes from organ donors, non-diseased resected liver and cirrhotic tissue. We report the cell yields and functional qualities of cells isolated from the different types of liver and demonstrate that a single rigorous protocol allows the routine harvest of good quality primary hepatocytes from the most commonly accessible human liver tissue samples.

  14. Clinical efficacy of computed tomography in liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Sachiko; Hino, Kazunari; Ohashi, Katsuhiko; Hirano, Yutaka

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomographic studies were performed with special reference to attenuation values (CT number) in 207 cases including 30 of normal controls and 177 of liver diseases. in addition to fatty liver (CT no. 12.2), attenuation values of liver cirrhosis (25.4) was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than normal controls (29.7). In localized hepatic lesions, attenuation values were low in order of primary liver cancer (15.9), metastatic liver cancer (13.5), gallbladder cancer (13.4), liver abscess (10.2) and liver cyst (1.4). Although statistical differences were present among attenuation values, CT had often limited diagnostic value in the differentiation of hepatic mass lesions except liver cyst. In primary liver cancer hepatic lesions were mostly single (89.7%) and specific patterns of CT images (Type III or IV by Moriyama's classification) were present, while in metastatic liver cancer hepatic lesions were multiple (75.9%) and type I or II was predominant. The majority of lesions (66.7%) were equally visualized before and after contrast enhancement (C.E.) in metastatic liver cancer, while they were better defined following C.E. in 81.2% in primary liver cancer. (author)

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms for the hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2013-09-01

    Liver plays a central role in the biogenesis of major metabolites including glucose, fatty acids, and cholesterol. Increased incidence of obesity in the modern society promotes insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues in humans, and could cause severe metabolic disorders by inducing accumulation of lipid in the liver, resulting in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD, which is characterized by increased fat depots in the liver, could precede more severe diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. Accumulation of lipid in the liver can be traced by increased uptake of free fatty acids into the liver, impaired fatty acid beta oxidation, or the increased incidence of de novo lipogenesis. In this review, I would like to focus on the roles of individual pathways that contribute to the hepatic steatosis as a precursor for the NAFLD.

  16. Bone histomorphometric changes after liver transplantation for chronic cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guichelaar, MMJ; Malinchoc, M; Sibonga, JD; Clarke, BL; Hay, JE

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with advanced liver disease, especially chronic cholestasis, often have osteopenia, which worsens early after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) before starting to recover. The changes in bone metabolism leading to this rapid loss of bone after OLT, and to its recovery,

  17. Bisphenol A sulfonation is impaired in metabolic and liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcin, Emine B.; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Slitt, Angela L.; King, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical and suspected endocrine disruptor to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. The liver metabolizes and facilitates BPA excretion through glucuronidation and sulfonation. The sulfotransferase enzymes contributing to BPA sulfonation (detected in human and rodents) is poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the impact of metabolic and liver disease on BPA sulfonation in human and mouse livers. Methods: The capacity for BPA sulfonation was determined in human liver samples that were categorized into different stages of metabolic and liver disease (including obesity, diabetes, steatosis, and cirrhosis) and in livers from ob/ob mice. Results: In human liver tissues, BPA sulfonation was substantially lower in livers from subjects with steatosis (23%), diabetes cirrhosis (16%), and cirrhosis (18%), relative to healthy individuals with non-fatty livers (100%). In livers of obese mice (ob/ob), BPA sulfonation was lower (23%) than in livers from lean wild-type controls (100%). In addition to BPA sulfonation activity, Sult1a1 protein expression decreased by 97% in obese mouse livers. Conclusion: Taken together these findings establish a profoundly reduced capacity of BPA elimination via sulfonation in obese or diabetic individuals and in those with fatty or cirrhotic livers versus individuals with healthy livers. - Highlights: • Present study demonstrates that hepatic SULT 1A1/1A3 are primarily sulfonate BPA in mouse and human. • Hepatic BPA sulfonation is profoundly reduced steatosis, diabetes and cirrhosis. • With BPA-S detectable in urine under low or common exposures, these findings are novel and important.

  18. Bisphenol A sulfonation is impaired in metabolic and liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalcin, Emine B.; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Slitt, Angela L., E-mail: angela_slitt@uri.edu; King, Roberta, E-mail: rking@uri.edu

    2016-02-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical and suspected endocrine disruptor to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. The liver metabolizes and facilitates BPA excretion through glucuronidation and sulfonation. The sulfotransferase enzymes contributing to BPA sulfonation (detected in human and rodents) is poorly understood. Objectives: To determine the impact of metabolic and liver disease on BPA sulfonation in human and mouse livers. Methods: The capacity for BPA sulfonation was determined in human liver samples that were categorized into different stages of metabolic and liver disease (including obesity, diabetes, steatosis, and cirrhosis) and in livers from ob/ob mice. Results: In human liver tissues, BPA sulfonation was substantially lower in livers from subjects with steatosis (23%), diabetes cirrhosis (16%), and cirrhosis (18%), relative to healthy individuals with non-fatty livers (100%). In livers of obese mice (ob/ob), BPA sulfonation was lower (23%) than in livers from lean wild-type controls (100%). In addition to BPA sulfonation activity, Sult1a1 protein expression decreased by 97% in obese mouse livers. Conclusion: Taken together these findings establish a profoundly reduced capacity of BPA elimination via sulfonation in obese or diabetic individuals and in those with fatty or cirrhotic livers versus individuals with healthy livers. - Highlights: • Present study demonstrates that hepatic SULT 1A1/1A3 are primarily sulfonate BPA in mouse and human. • Hepatic BPA sulfonation is profoundly reduced steatosis, diabetes and cirrhosis. • With BPA-S detectable in urine under low or common exposures, these findings are novel and important.

  19. Schistosoma liver disease; a clinico- pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Suzan Ibrahim

    1996-05-01

    Schistomiasis mansoni infection is a leading cause of severe morbidity in the Sudan. Most of the morbidity and mortality are due to the development of hepatic periportal fibrosis and consequent portal hypertension and bleeding varices. This is a hospital-based, retro-prospective study in the period from 1980-1995. Liver disease (i.e. periportal fibrosis) and its clinical presentation were studied in relation to the degree of fibrosis and other pathological, haematological, and biochemical parameters. The study identified the common hospital presenting symptoms, assessed factors that influence pathogenesis of periportal fibrosis and its severity, as well as, defined criteria which predict those patients who are at risk of bleeding. 898 patients were included. The common presenting symptoms were left hypochondrial pain, haematemesis and enlarged spleen (Towal). Males were found to have an increase prevalence of periportal fibrosis. Splenomegaly was found in almost all patients of the study of different age groups, but spleen size didn't show any significant difference between bleeders and non-bleeders (p=0.28). A sharp rise in the prevalence of bleeding was noted after the age of 16 years. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding was found to be more common

  20. Clinical availability of cholescintigraphy in evaluating diffuse liver parenchymal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisao; Shimono, Reiko; Hamamoto, Ken; Ohshima, Kanji; Akamatsu, Koichi

    1988-01-01

    Technetium-99m N-pyridoxyl-5-methyltryptophan (PMT) cholescintigraphy has been performed in 46 consecutive patients with diffuse liver parenchymal diseases, including acute hepatitis (9), chronic hepatitis (17), and liver cirrhosis (20), and 18 controls. Blood clearance rate, liver uptake rate, liver excretion rate, and half time (T1/2) were determined from cardiac and hepatic time-activity curves. Regarding the four parameters, there were statistically significant differences between the control group and the groups of acute hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. Both blood clearance rate and liver uptake rate were well correlated with ICG-k values (r = 0.874 and r = 0.791, respectively). Liver excretion rate was most highly correlated with total serum bilirubin levels (r = 0.763), followed by ICG-k values. T1/2 was well correlated as well with total serum bilirubin levels. During the process where liver excretory ability was lowered in association with elevated serum bilirubin levels, threshold values for liver excretion rate appeared to be established. Cholescintigraphy may be of value in evaluating the pathophysiology of diffuse liver parenchymal diseases in that it is capable of quantitatively determining excretory function of hepatic cells. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis and to identify opportunities and directions for future research in this area. Methods: A systematic review of English articles in the PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus databases was conducted using search terms including ‘liver cirrhosis’, ‘end-stage liver disease’, ‘liver diseases’, ‘oral health’, ‘periodontal disease’, ‘mouth disease’, ‘gingivitis’, and ‘periodontitis’. Results: Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%–79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among patients who underwent dental treatment versus non-treated patients. Another study suggested an association between periodontal disease and the progression of liver cirrhosis, but data are sparse and conflicting as to whether periodontal disease is correlated to cirrhosis aetiology and severity. Conclusion: Despite the clinical reality of periodontal disease in liver cirrhosis patients, there are few published studies. Before clinical implications can be addressed, more data on the prevalence of and correlation between periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis aetiology, duration, and progression are needed. PMID:26770799

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: MR imaging of liver proton density fat fraction to assess hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Tan, Justin; Sun, Mark; Hamilton, Gavin; Bydder, Mark; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C; Middleton, Michael; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Loomba, Rohit; Lavine, Joel E; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B; Sirlin, Claude B

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-estimated proton density fat fraction (PDFF) for assessing hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by using centrally scored histopathologic validation as the reference standard. This prospectively designed, cross-sectional, internal review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study was conducted in 77 patients who had NAFLD and liver biopsy. MR imaging-PDFF was estimated from magnitude-based low flip angle multiecho gradient-recalled echo images after T2* correction and multifrequency fat modeling. Histopathologic scoring was obtained by consensus of the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network Pathology Committee. Spearman correlation, additivity and variance stabilization for regression for exploring the effect of a number of potential confounders, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed. Liver MR imaging-PDFF was systematically higher, with higher histologic steatosis grade (P steatosis grade (ρ = 0.69, P steatosis grade 0 (n = 5) from those with grade 1 or higher (n = 72), 0.825 (95% confidence interval: 0.734, 0.915) to distinguish those with grade 1 or lower (n = 31) from those with grade 2 or higher (n = 46), and 0.893 (95% confidence interval: 0.809, 0.977) to distinguish those with grade 2 or lower (n = 58) from those with grade 3 (n = 19). MR imaging-PDFF showed promise for assessment of hepatic steatosis grade in patients with NAFLD. For validation, further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. © RSNA, 2013.

  3. [Coffee can be beneficial for patients with liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjærgaard, Maria; Thiele, Maja; Krag, Aleksander

    2014-10-20

    Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world. Consequently, it is important to consider the impact of coffee on health and disease. A daily intake of at least three cups of coffee is likely to have beneficial health effects, especially in patients at risk of liver diseases. Coffee has been associated with decreased liver inflammation, prevention of cirrhosis, reduced steatosis and lower incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. It is not yet possible to make clear recommendations, but coffee can likely be included as part of a healthy diet for patients with liver diseases.

  4. Laparoscopic management of cystic disease of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W; Rosemurgy, A S; Karl, R C; Carey, L C

    1994-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgical procedures are increasing in scope and in variety. The benefits of decreased wound morbidity and pain have been well documented for multiple procedures that have traditionally required laparotomy. Although there are few controlled studies to document them, these benefits may be evident from simple clinical observation. Cystic disease of the liver is a condition that is treated largely for symptomatic reasons. The so-called noninvasive or radiographic guided methods of treatment for cystic disease of the liver are fraught with high recurrence rates. We present four cases of cystic disease of the liver treated laparoscopically, followed with pertinent discussion.

  5. Meta-analysis: antioxidant supplements for liver diseases - the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, L L; Nikolova, D

    2010-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  6. Evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease using magnetic resonance in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetolo, Patrícia O; Fernandes, Maria I M; Ciampo, Ieda R L Del; Elias-Junior, Jorge; Sawamura, Regina

    2018-02-10

    To determine the frequency of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease using nuclear magnetic resonance as a noninvasive method. This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 50 children and adolescents followed up at an outpatient obesity clinic. The subjects were submitted to physical examination, laboratory tests (transaminases, liver function tests, lipid profile, glycemia, and basal insulin) and abdominal nuclear magnetic resonance (calculation of hepatic, visceral, and subcutaneous fat). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was diagnosed in 14 (28%) participants, as a severe condition in eight (percent fat >18%), and as non-severe in four (percent fat from 9% to 18%). Fatty liver was associated with male gender, triglycerides, AST, ALT, AST/ALT ratio, and acanthosis nigricans. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome did not show an association with fatty liver. The frequency of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the present population of children and adolescents was lower than that reported in the international literature. It is suggested that nuclear magnetic resonance is an imaging exam that can be applied to children and adolescents, thus representing an effective noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in this age range. However, further national multicenter studies with longitudinal design are needed for a better analysis of the correlation between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its risk factors, as well as its consequences. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation of Deviance in Arterial Oxygenation with Severity of Chronic Liver Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaukat, A. A.; Zuhaid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B and C related chronic liver diseases have led to development of a serious threat to the people of South Asia. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of magnitude of arterial deoxygention to the severity of liver disease. Methods: It was a hospital based cross sectional descriptive study, carried out in the Medical Department of Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar. All in all 115 patients were assessed for the severity of the liver diseases and were correlated with arterial deoxygenation using linear regression models. Results: Male to female ratio was 1.5:1. Males infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C and both were 9, 60 and 1, while females suffered from hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and both were 2, 42 and 1 respectively. The linear relationship between A-a DO2 with severity of liver disease showed positive correlation while PO2 showed negative correlation with severity of liver disease. Conclusion: There was a positive correlation between A-a DO2 and severity of liver diseases while PO2 and severity of liver diseases showed negative correlation. (author)

  8. RESEARCH ARTICLES The spectrum of liver diseases in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Harriet

    Conclusion:Drug history, liver enzyme studies, ultrasound, and hepatitis B and C investigations identified the probable etiology in 60. (78%) of 77 patients with HIV infection presenting with symptoms and/or signs of liver disease. African Health Sciences 2008; 8(1): 8-12. Corresponding author: Ponsiano Ocama. Infectious ...

  9. Diagnosis of alcohol misuse and alcoholic liver disease among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alcohol related hepatocellular liver injury was assessed using aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase levels. A combination of CAGE score ≥2 and De Ritis ratio ≥2 defined alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), and viral hepatitis B and C serologies were evaluated in all ...

  10. Risk factors of radiation-induced liver disease after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary liver carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Shixiong; Zhu Xiaodong; Lu Haijie; Pan Chaoyang; Huang Qifang; Li Fuxiang; Wang Anyu; Liang Guoliang; Fu Xiaolong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To identify the risk factors of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) after three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) for primary liver carcinoma (PLC) and the dosimetric threshold of RILD. Methods: Between April 1999 and August 2003, 128 PLC patients who were treated with 3DCRT received a mean dose of 53.6 ± 6.6 Gy with a 4-8 Gy/f, 3f/w, qod regimen. The relation between RILD and the possible clinical factors, such as gender, age, UICC/ AJCC T stage, GTV, HBV status, PTV, TACE, Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis, BED calculated by LQ model and fraction size were analyzed. Among 84 patients who had full dose- volume histogram (DVH) data, the relation between RILD and dosimetric parameters were analyzed. Results: Nineteen patients (14.8%) developed RILD. It was found that T stage, GTV, PTV, Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis and the acute hepatic toxicity proposed by common toxicity criteria version 2.0 (CTC2.0) were correlated with RILD (P=0.024, 0.002, 0.001, 0.000, 0.000, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that only the Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis was independent factor (P=0.000). The mean liver dose was significantly higher in patients with RILD (P=0.027). In patients with Child-Pugh grade A, V5 (percentage of normal liver volume with radiation dose > 5 Gy), V 10 and V 20 ≤81%, 69% and 42%, mean liver dose ≤28 Gy, RILD was not observed, whereas in patients with Child-Pugh grade B, the possibility of developing RILD was 53.3%(8/15). Conclusions: Comprehensive consideration of T stage, GTV, PTV and Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis, especially the Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis, when planning 3DCRT for PLC, may lower the incidence of RILD. (authors)

  11. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, to struggle with the strangle: Oxygen availability in fatty livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anavi, Sarit; Madar, Zecharia; Tirosh, Oren

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) is one of the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries. Oxygen is a central component of the cellular microenvironment, which participate in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation, functions and energy metabolism. Accordingly, sufficient oxygen supply is an important factor for tissue durability, mainly in highly metabolic tissues, such as the liver. Accumulating evidence from the past few decades provides strong support for the existence of interruptions in oxygen availability in fatty livers. This outcome may be the consequence of both, impaired systemic microcirculation and cellular membrane modifications which occur under steatotic conditions. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the main factors which can affect oxygen supply in fatty liver. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Association between noninvasive fibrosis markers and chronic kidney disease among adults with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Sesti

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether the severity of liver fibrosis estimated by NAFLD fibrosis score is associated with higher prevalence of CKD in individuals with NAFLD. To this end NAFLD fibrosis score and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR were assessed in 570 White individuals with ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. As compared with subjects at low probability of liver fibrosis, individuals at high and intermediate probability showed an unfavorable cardio-metabolic risk profile having significantly higher values of waist circumference, insulin resistance, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, uric acid and lower insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. Individuals at high and intermediate probability of liver fibrosis have lower eGFR after adjustment for gender, smoking, glucose tolerance status, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index, diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, statin therapy, anti-diabetes and anti-hypertensive treatments (P = 0.001. Individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 5.1-fold increased risk of having CKD (OR 5.13, 95%CI 1.13-23.28; P = 0.03 as compared with individuals at low probability after adjustment for age, gender, and BMI. After adjustment for glucose tolerance status, statin therapy, and anti-hypertensive treatment in addition to gender, individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 3.9-fold increased risk of CKD (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.11-14.05; P = 0.03 as compared with individuals at low probability. In conclusion, advanced liver fibrosis, determined by noninvasive fibrosis markers, is associated with CKD independently from other known factors.

  13. Low Hepatic Tissue Copper in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Michael; Caltharp, Shelley; Song, Ming; Collin, Lindsay; Konomi, Juna V; McClain, Craig J; Vos, Miriam B

    2017-07-01

    Animal models and studies in adults have demonstrated that copper restriction increases severity of liver injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This has not been studied in children. We aimed to determine if lower tissue copper is associated with increased NAFLD severity in children. This was a retrospective study of pediatric patients who had a liver biopsy including a hepatic copper quantitation. The primary outcome compared hepatic copper concentration in NAFLD versus non-NAFLD. Secondary outcomes compared hepatic copper levels against steatosis, fibrosis, lobular inflammation, balloon degeneration, and NAFLD activity score (NAS). The study analysis included 150 pediatric subjects (102 with NAFLD and 48 non-NAFLD). After adjusting for age, body mass index z score, gamma glutamyl transferase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bilirubin, NAFLD subjects had lower levels of hepatic copper than non-NAFLD (P = 0.005). In addition, tissue copper concentration decreased as steatosis severity increased (P steatosis alone. Further studies are needed to explore the relationship between copper levels and NAFLD progression.

  14. Disease assessment and prognosis of liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liver failure has a high fatality rate and greatly threatens human health. Liver transplantation can effectively reduce the fatality rate. However, the problems such as donor shortage and allograft rejection limit the wide application of liver transplantation. An accurate early assessment helps to evaluate patients′ condition and optimize therapeutic strategies. At present, commonly used systems for prognostic evaluation include the King′s College Hospital, MELD, integrated MELD, Child-Pugh score, CLIF-SOFA, CLIF-C ACLFS, and D-MELD, and each system has its own advantages and disadvantages. Among these systems, the MELD scoring system is the most commonly used one, and the D-MELD scoring system is the most innovative one, which can be used for patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. This article elaborates on the characteristics and predictive value of each scoring system in clinical practice.

  15. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  16. COMPLICATIONS OF ALCOHOLIC LIVER DISEASE AND DIAGNOSTIC MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Ilić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is one of the leading diseases affecting people’s health and immunity worldwide. Nearly 30 thousand people in the USA die from chronic liver damage. The liver is the central organ in the metabolism of alcohol. Alcohol is primarily a hepatotoxic agent. Hepatotoxicity of alcohol is clinically manifested by the development of alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis and alcoholic cirrhosis. It is characterized by appropriate symptomatology, depending on the degree of liver damage. Excessive use of alcohol for a long period of time, along with malnutrition, genetic and ethnic predisposition, leads to alcoholic cirrhosis and the development of its complications. Portal hypertension damages other organs and organ systems, causing hepatopulmonary syndrome, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatic encephalopathy, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, etc. For these reasons, alcoholism reduction is given priority, as well as reduction of morbidity and mortality of people with alcoholic chronic liver damage. Therefore, early diagnosis of alcohol abuse is necessary, as well as timely diagnosis of different degrees of alcoholic liver damage. The diagnosis of chronic alcoholic liver damage is set on the basis of confirmed data of alcohol consumption; liver function test (serum markers aminotransferase, gammaglutamyl transferase, prothrombin time, serum bilirubin and albumin level; serum markers of liver fibrosis. Fibrosis markers are directly involved in sedimentation and dissolution of extracellular matrix, i.e. in the process of fibrogenesis and fibrinolysis of liver tissues. They include markers and enzymes of metabolism, as well as cytokines and chemokines.

  17. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with alcoholic liver disease without cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varju, T; Lesch, M; Adorján, A

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy associated with alcoholic liver disease without cirrhosis are reported. Conditions which can be associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and theoretical factors which can play a role in its pathomechanism are briefly discussed.

  18. Vitamin D supplementation for chronic liver diseases in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Bjelakovic, Marko

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency is often reported in people with chronic liver diseases. Therefore, improving vitamin D status could have a beneficial effect on people with chronic liver diseases. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation in people...... with chronic liver diseases. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science. We also searched databases...... that compared vitamin D at any dose, duration, and route of administration versus placebo or no intervention in adults with chronic liver diseases. Vitamin D could have been administered as supplemental vitamin D (vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) or vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol)), or an active form of vitamin D (1α...

  19. Fatty liver disease--a practical guide for GPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, David; Ryan, Marno

    2013-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), encompassing both simple steatosis and non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH), is the most common cause of liver disease in Australia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease needs to be considered in the context of the metabolic syndrome, as cardiovascular disease will account for much of the mortality associated with NAFLD. To provide an approach to the identification of NAFLD in general practice, the distinction between simple steatosis and NASH, and the management of these two conditions. Non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis is more common in the presence of diabetes, obesity, older age and increased inflammation, and is more likely to progress to cirrhosis. Cirrhosis may be complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma or liver failure. Hepatocellular carcinoma has also been described in NASH without cirrhosis. Assessment and treatment of features of the metabolic syndrome may reduce associated cardiovascular mortality. Numerous agents have been evaluated, but weight loss remains the only effective treatment for NAFLD.

  20. Associations between Zinc Deficiency and Metabolic Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Himoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element which has favorable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and apoptotic effects. The liver mainly plays a crucial role in maintaining systemic Zn homeostasis. Therefore, the occurrence of chronic liver diseases, such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or fatty liver, results in the impairment of Zn metabolism, and subsequently Zn deficiency. Zn deficiency causes plenty of metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Inversely, metabolic abnormalities like hypoalbuminemia in patients with liver cirrhosis often result in Zn deficiency. Recent studies have revealed the putative mechanisms by which Zn deficiency evokes a variety of metabolic abnormalities in chronic liver disease. Zn supplementation has shown beneficial effects on such metabolic abnormalities in experimental models and actual patients with chronic liver disease. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities deriving from Zn deficiency and the favorable effects of Zn administration in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, we also highlight the interactions between Zn and other trace elements, vitamins, amino acids, or hormones in such patients.

  1. Research advances in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been developing rapidly in recent years and has become one of the most common liver diseases. However, its pathogenesis remains unclear, and there are no widely accepted therapeutic regimens. NAFLD has a complex pathogenesis with multiple factors involved, including insulin resistance, oxidative stress, bile acid metabolic disorders, and autophagy. This article reviews the pathogenesis of NAFLD in order to provide a reference for further research and clinical treatment in the future.

  2. The Interleukin-20 Cytokine Family in Liver Disease

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    Esther Caparrós

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The three main causes of inflammation and chronic injury in the liver are viral hepatitis, alcohol consumption, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, all of which can lead to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which in turn may prompt the need for liver transplant. The interleukin (IL-20 is a subfamily part of the IL-10 family of cytokines that helps the liver respond to damage and disease, they participate in the control of tissue homeostasis, and in the immunological responses developed in this organ. The best-studied member of the family in inflammatory balance of the liver is the IL-22 cytokine, which on the one hand may have a protective role in fibrosis progression but on the other may induce liver tissue susceptibility in hepatocellular carcinoma development. Other members of the family might also carry out this dual function, as some of them share IL receptor subunits and signal through common intracellular pathways. Investigators are starting to consider the potential for targeting IL-20 subfamily members in liver disease. The recently explored role of miRNA in the transcriptional regulation of IL-22 and IL-24 opens the door to promising new approaches for controlling the local immune response and limiting organ injury. The IL-20RA cytokine receptor has also been classified as being under miRNA control in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Moreover, researchers have proposed combining anti-inflammatory drugs with IL-22 as a hepatoprotective IL for alcoholic liver disease (ALD treatment, and clinical trials of ILs for managing severe alcoholic-derived liver degeneration are ongoing. In this review, we focus on exploring the role of the IL-20 subfamily of cytokines in viral hepatitis, ALD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as delineating the main strategies explored so far in terms of therapeutic possibilities of the IL-20 subfamily of cytokines in liver disease.

  3. Inherited metabolic liver diseases in infants and children: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Barić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of metabolism, which affect the liver are a large, continuously increasing group of diseases. Their clinical onset can occur at any age, from intrauterine period presenting as liver failure already at birth to late adulthood. Inherited metabolic disorders must be considered in differential diagnosis of every unexplained liver disease. Specific diagnostic work-up for either their confirmation or exclusion should start immediately since any postponing can result in delayed diagnosis and death or irreversible disability. This can be particularly painful while many inherited metabolic liver diseases are relatively easily treatable if diagnosed on time, for instance galactosemia or hereditary fructose intolerance by simple dietary means. Any unexplained liver disease, even one looking initially benign, should be considered as a potential liver failure and therefore should deserve proper attention. Diagnosis in neonates is additionally complicated because of the factors which can mask liver disease, such as physiological neonatal jaundice, normally relatively enlarged liver and increased transaminases at that age. In everyday practice, in order to reveal the etiology, it is useful to classify and distinguish some clinical patterns which, together with a few routine, widely available laboratory tests (aminotransferases, prothrombine time, albumin, gammaGT, total and conjugated bilirubin, ammonia, alkaline phosphatase and glucose make the search for the cause much easier. These patterns are isolated hyperbilirubinemia, syndrome of cholestasis in early infancy, hepatocellular jaundice, Reye syndrome, portal cirrhosis and isolated hepatomegaly. Despite the fact that some diseases can present with more than one pattern (for instance, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency as infantile cholestasis, but also as hepatocellular jaundice, and that in some disesases one pattern can evolve into another (for instance, Wilson disease from hepatocellular

  4. Chronic liver disease related mortality pattern in northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhar, N.; Niazi, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the mortality pattern pertaining to chronic liver disease (CLD) in Northern Pakistan. Results: There were a total of 8529 admissions in twelve months period from August 2001 to July 2002. There were 283 (3.31%) total deaths. Out of these, 160 deaths were pertaining to medical causes. Out of these medical cases, 33 (20.6%) patients had died of chronic liver disease. Other major causes of death were cerebro-vascular accident (18.7%), malignancy (18.1%) and acute myocardial infarction (10.6%). Out of 33 patients of CLD, 12 (36%) presented with acute gastrointestinal (Gl) bleeding, 9(27%) presented with Ascites and 6(18%) presented with altered mental status due to hepatic encephalopathy. Rest of them had jaundice and fever as their initial presentation. Out of these 33 patients with CLD, 23 (70%) had hepatitis C virus (HCV) as cause of their liver disease, 4 (12%) had hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, 3(9%) had both hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections and 3 (9%) had no known cause of their chronic liver disease. Conclusion: Chronic liver disease is a major cause of mortality in this part of Pakistan at a tertiary care hospital. HCV infection is the main cause of chronic liver disease followed by either HBV or a combination of these viruses. Major manifestations of CLD have been gastrointestinal bleeding, hepatic failure and portal hypertension.(author)

  5. A etiological factors of chronic liver disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, A.; Malik, F.R.; Akhtar, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronicity of liver disease is determined either by duration of liver disease or by evidence of either severe liver disease or physical stigmata of chronic liver disease. Chronic liver disease may be caused commonly by persistent viral infections, metabolic diseases, drugs, autoimmune hepatitis, or unknown factors. The objective of this study was to find out the aetiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in children. Methodology: It was a descriptive, prospective study which used a structured proforma designed to collect data of cases of CLD from both indoor and outdoor Paediatrics units of Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, and Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. All children under 12 years having either clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease and/or elevated liver enzymes for more than 3 months were included in this study. Results: Sixty cases of CLD were enrolled from indoor and outdoor units from January 2010 to July 201. Thirty nine (65%) cases were male and 21 (35%) were female. Eleven children were less than 1 year, 18 were 1-5 years old and 31 were 5-12 years of age. Viral hepatitis was the most common cause found in 22 (36.7%) cases. Out of these 22 patients with viral aetiology 19 (31.66%) patients had Hepatitis C and 3 (5%) had Hepatitis B. Glycogen storage disease was seen in 8.3% cases, and biliary atresia and Wilson disease in 6.7% each. Other less commonly found cases were autoimmune hepatitis, TORCH infections, hepatoma and drug induced hepatitis (1.7% each). Cause couldn't be established in 35% cases which remained idiopathic. Conclusion: Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children, with the highest incidence of chronic Hepatitis C followed by metabolic disorders (glycogen storage disease and Wilson disease) and biliary atresia. Chronic viral hepatitis was most prevalent between 11 months to 12 years of age. Wilson disease was common in 3-7 years age group, and

  6. Molecular pathways in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlanga A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alba Berlanga,1,* Esther Guiu-Jurado,1,* José Antonio Porras,1,2 Teresa Auguet1,21Group GEMMAIR (AGAUR and Applied Medicine Research Group, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV, IISPV, Hospital Universitari Joan XXIII, Tarragona, Spain; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitari Joan XXIII Tarragona, Tarragona, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a clinicopathological change characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes and has frequently been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. It is an increasingly recognized condition that has become the most common liver disorder in developed countries, affecting over one-third of the population and is associated with increased cardiovascular- and liver-related mortality. NAFLD is a spectrum of disorders, beginning as simple steatosis. In about 15% of all NAFLD cases, simple steatosis can evolve into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, a medley of inflammation, hepatocellular injury, and fibrosis, often resulting in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying NAFLD progression is not completely understood. Its pathogenesis has often been interpreted by the "double-hit" hypothesis. The primary insult or the "first hit" includes lipid accumulation in the liver, followed by a "second hit" in which proinflammatory mediators induce inflammation, hepatocellular injury, and fibrosis. Nowadays, a more complex model suggests that fatty acids (FAs and their metabolites may be the true lipotoxic agents that contribute to NAFLD progression; a multiple parallel hits hypothesis has also been suggested. In NAFLD patients, insulin resistance leads to hepatic steatosis via multiple mechanisms. Despite the excess hepatic accumulation of FAs in NAFLD, it has been described that not only de novo FA

  7. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Promote Fatty Liver Disease Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Højland Ipsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the subsequent reprogramming of the white adipose tissue are linked to human disease-complexes including metabolic syndrome and concurrent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The dietary imposed dyslipidemia promotes redox imbalance by the generation of excess levels of reactive oxygen species and induces adipocyte dysfunction and reprogramming, leading to a low grade systemic inflammation and ectopic lipid deposition, e.g., in the liver, hereby promoting a vicious circle in which dietary factors initiate a metabolic change that further exacerbates the negative consequences of an adverse life-style. Large epidemiological studies and findings from controlled in vivo animal studies have provided evidence supporting an association between poor vitamin C (VitC status and propagation of life-style associated diseases. In addition, overweight per se has been shown to result in reduced plasma VitC, and the distribution of body fat in obesity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with VitC plasma levels. Recently, a number of epidemiological studies have indicated a VitC intake below the recommended daily allowance (RDA in NAFLD-patients, suggesting an association between dietary habits, disease and VitC deficiency. In the general population, VitC deficiency (defined as a plasma concentration below 23 μM affects around 10% of adults, however, this prevalence is increased by an adverse life-style, deficiency potentially playing a broader role in disease progression in specific subgroups. This review discusses the currently available data from human surveys and experimental models in search of a putative role of VitC deficiency in the development of NAFLD and NASH.

  8. Chronic Liver Diseases in Children: Clinical Profile and Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhole, Sachin Devidas; Kher, Archana S; Ghildiyal, Radha G; Tambse, Manjusha P

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of the study is to study the clinical profile of disorders of the liver and hepatobiliary system in paediatric patients and to correlate the histopathology findings of liver biopsy in chronic liver disease. Another aim being to assess the prognosis and to know the outcome and the effects of treatment in chronic liver diseases in paediatric age group. It was a prospective study, included the clinical profile of Chronic Liver Diseases (CLD) in children and the histopathological correlation. A total of 55 children were thoroughly investigated by doing relevant investigations and liver biopsy. A male predominance (60%) was noted with maximum incidence in the age group of 6-12 years. The incidence of CLD was 1.1% of total admissions. The most common presenting complaint was jaundice and abdominal distension. Hepatic encephalopathy was noted in 29% patients. Hepatomegaly was seen in 63% patients and spleenomegaly was seen in 60% patients. The incidence of cirrhosis on liver biopsy was 42% (23cases) in CLD patients. The most common diagnosis on histopathology was Wilson's disease (22%), followed by hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis. The predominant spectrum of CLD was metabolic liver disease and also the predominant cause of death. As the incidence of CLD is quite low, a very high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. Some uncommon causes of CLD in children were seen in our study like neutral lipid storage disease, α1-Antitrypsin deficiency disease, lupus hepatitis, Alagille syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. A patient of CLD with jaundice and hepatomegaly should be treated aggressively as those are the poor prognostic indicators of the disease. Hepatic encephalopathy and cirrhosis are also associated with poor outcome in patients with CLD. Liver biopsy histopathology by an expert and its correlation with laboratory investigations plays an important role in the diagnosis of CLD. The major cause of deaths in patients with CLD is due to end stage

  9. Epstein-Barr viral load before a liver transplant in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazad, Nader; Honar, Naser; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2014-12-01

    Many children with chronic liver disease require a liver transplant. These patients are prone to various infections, including Epstein-Barr virus infection. This study sought to measure the Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before a liver transplant. This cross-sectional study was done at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2011. All patients were aged younger than 18 years with chronic liver disease and were candidates for a liver transplant at the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital Organ Transplant Center. They had been investigated regarding their demographic characteristics, underlying disease, laboratory findings, and Epstein-Barr viral load by real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Ninety-eight patients were studied and the mean age was 6.5 ± 5.9 years. Cryptogenic cirrhosis was the most-prevalent reason for liver transplant, and the death rate before a transplant was 15%. Among the study subjects, 6 had measurable Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before the transplant, and 4 of them had considerably higher Epstein-Barr viral loads (more than 1000 copies/mL). With respect to the close prevalence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (6%) and the high Epstein-Barr viral load in the patients before a transplant (4%), high pretransplant Epstein-Barr viral load can be considered a risk factor for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  10. Radiorespirometric study of carbohydrate metabolism in childhood liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DaCosta, H.; Shreeve, W.W.; Merchant, S.

    1976-01-01

    The need for a suitable parameter to evaluate patients with chronic liver disease has been felt for some time, especially in order to judge the response to surgical shunts and the influence of certain drugs and diets on the liver. Since the liver is a major organ for carbohydrate metabolism, it was decided to analyze the in vivo oxidation of such substrates as glucose and galactose labeled with 14 C. Moderately advanced ''Indian childhood cirrhosis'' and idiopathic fatty hepatic infiltration were selected to represent diffuse chronic liver disease. Oral administration of 14 C-U-glucose or 14 C-1-galactose was followed by analyses of 14 CO 2 in breath by liquid scintillation counting. Conversion of 14 C-glucose to 14 CO 2 was accelerated by both diseases. On the other hand, oxidation of 14 C-galactose was slowed in fatty infiltration and was markedly subnormal in Indian childhood cirrhosis

  11. Relationships among alcoholic liver disease, antioxidants, and antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2016-01-07

    Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages is a serious cause of liver disease worldwide. The metabolism of ethanol generates reactive oxygen species, which play a significant role in the deterioration of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Antioxidant phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, regulate the expression of ALD-associated proteins and peptides, namely, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. These plant antioxidants have electrophilic activity and may induce antioxidant enzymes via the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway and antioxidant responsive elements. Furthermore, these antioxidants are reported to alleviate cell injury caused by oxidants or inflammatory cytokines. These phenomena are likely induced via the regulation of mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by plant antioxidants, similar to preconditioning in ischemia-reperfusion models. Although the relationship between plant antioxidants and ALD has not been adequately investigated, plant antioxidants may be preventive for ALD because of their electrophilic and regulatory activities in the MAPK pathway.

  12. Applications of Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells; Focused on Disease Modeling, Drug Screening and Therapeutic Potentials for Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Yong Soon; Chaudhari, Pooja; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research have significantly changed our perspectives on regenerative medicine by providing researchers with a unique tool to derive disease-specific stem cells for study. In this review, we describe the human iPSC generation from developmentally diverse origins (i.e. endoderm-, mesoderm-, and ectoderm- tissue derived human iPSCs) and multistage hepatic differentiation protocols, and discuss both basic and clinical applications of...

  13. Oral Anticoagulation in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greenberger, Norton J; Giugliano, Robert P

    2018-05-15

    Patients with liver disease are at increased risks of both thrombotic and bleeding complications. Many have atrial fibrillation (AF) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) necessitating oral anticoagulant agents (OACs). Recent evidence has contradicted the assumption that patients with liver disease are "auto-anticoagulated" and thus protected from thrombotic events. Warfarin and non-vitamin K-antagonist OACs have been shown to reduce thrombotic events safely in patients with either AF or VTE. However, patients with liver disease have largely been excluded from trials of OACs. Because all currently approved OACs undergo metabolism in the liver, hepatic dysfunction may cause increased bleeding. Thus, the optimal anticoagulation strategy for patients with AF or VTE who have liver disease remains unclear. This review discusses pharmacokinetic and clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of OACs in patients with liver disease and provides a practical, clinically oriented approach to the management of OAC therapy in this population. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Prophylaxis of alcoholic disease of the liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliakin, S A

    2009-08-01

    Military doctors should have a uniform position to the use of alcohol. Now alcohol is the basic pathogenic factor in development of a lethal cirrhosis of a liver. The most known sayings justifying the use of alcohol, are insolvent. Useful doses of alcohol does not exist. The quantity of used alcohol has the great value. Only at achievement of age 21 year it is possible to use safe doses of alcohol. A safe dose of pure alcohol (ethanol) less than 30,0 in day. In a basis of prophylaxis of a cirrhosis of a liver there is a medical educational activity.

  15. Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardino, M.E.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Barton Price, R.; Berkman, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluation of the liver for focal lesions is extremely important because the liver is one of the most common sites for metastatic disease. Most patients with metastatic deposits to the liver have a survival rate of about 6 months. Thus, metastatic disease to the liver has an extremely grave prognosis. In the past patients with hepatic lesions had no therapeutic recourse. However, with recent aggressive surgical advances (such as partial hepatectomies) and hepatic artery embolization, survival of patients with hepatic metastases has increased. Thus it is important for noninvasive imaging not only to detect lesions early in their course, but also to give their true hepatic involvement and the extent of the neoplastic process elsewhere in the body. Recent advances in imaging have been rapidly changing over the past 5 years. These changes have been more rapid in computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound than in radionuclide imaging. Thus, the question addressed in this chapter is: What is the relationship of hepatic ultrasound to the other current diagnostic modalities in detecting metastatic liver disease and other focal liver lesions? Also, what is its possible future relationship to nuclear magnetic resonance?

  16. Clinical usefulness of biochemical markers of liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Sakugawa; Fukunori Kinjo; Atsushi Saito; Tomofumi Nakayoshi; Kasen Kobashigawa; Tsuyoshi Yamashiro; Tatsuji Maeshiro; Satoru Miyagi; Joji Shiroma; Akiyo Toyama; Tomokuni Nakayoshi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and progresses to the end stage of liver disease. Biochemical markers of liver fibrosis are strongly associated with the degree of histological liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease.However, data are few on the usefulness of markers in NAFLD patients. The aim of this study was to identify better noninvasive predictors of hepatic fibrosis, with special focus on markers of liver fibrosis, type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain and hyaluronic acid.METHODS: One hundred and twelve patients with histologically proven NAFLD were studied.RESULTS: The histological stage of NAFLD correlated with several clinical and biochemical variables, the extent of hepatic fibrosis and the markers of liver fibrosis were relatively strong associated. The best cutoff values to detect NASH were assessed by using receiver operating characteristic analysis: type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain ≥5.0 ng/mL, hyaluronic acid ≥43 ng/mL. Both markers had a high positive predictive value: type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain, 86% and hyaluronic acid,92%. Diagnostic accuracies of these markers were evaluated to detect severe fibrosis. Both markers showed high negative predictive values: type Ⅵ collagen 7S domain (≥5.0 ng/mL),84% and hyaluronic acid (≥50 ng/mL), 78%, and were significantly and independently associated with the presence of NASH or severe fibrosis by logistic regression analysis.CONCLUSION: Both markers of liver fibrosis are useful in discriminating NASH from fatty liver alone or patients with severe fibrosis from patients with non-severe fibrosis.

  17. Modeling liver electrical conductivity during hypertonic injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, Quim; Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Moll, Xavier; Berjano, Enrique; Andaluz, Anna; Burdío, Fernando; Bijnens, Bart; Ivorra, Antoni

    2018-01-01

    Metastases in the liver frequently grow as scattered tumor nodules that neither can be removed by surgical resection nor focally ablated. Previously, we have proposed a novel technique based on irreversible electroporation that may be able to simultaneously treat all nodules in the liver while sparing healthy tissue. The proposed technique requires increasing the electrical conductivity of healthy liver by injecting a hypersaline solution through the portal vein. Aiming to assess the capability of increasing the global conductivity of the liver by means of hypersaline fluids, here, it is presented a mathematical model that estimates the NaCl distribution within the liver and the resulting conductivity change. The model fuses well-established compartmental pharmacokinetic models of the organ with saline injection models used for resuscitation treatments, and it considers changes in sinusoidal blood viscosity because of the hypertonicity of the solution. Here, it is also described a pilot experimental study in pigs in which different volumes of NaCl 20% (from 100 to 200 mL) were injected through the portal vein at different flow rates (from 53 to 171 mL/minute). The in vivo conductivity results fit those obtained by the model, both quantitatively and qualitatively, being able to predict the maximum conductivity with a 14.6% average relative error. The maximum conductivity value was 0.44 second/m, which corresponds to increasing 4 times the mean basal conductivity (0.11 second/m). The results suggest that the presented model is well suited for predicting on liver conductivity changes during hypertonic saline injection. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Immunology in the liver--from homeostasis to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Felix; Tacke, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The liver is a central immunological organ with a high exposure to circulating antigens and endotoxins from the gut microbiota, particularly enriched for innate immune cells (macrophages, innate lymphoid cells, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells). In homeostasis, many mechanisms ensure suppression of immune responses, resulting in tolerance. Tolerance is also relevant for chronic persistence of hepatotropic viruses or allograft acceptance after liver transplantation. The liver can rapidly activate immunity in response to infections or tissue damage. Depending on the underlying liver disease, such as viral hepatitis, cholestasis or NASH, different triggers mediate immune-cell activation. Conserved mechanisms such as molecular danger patterns (alarmins), Toll-like receptor signalling or inflammasome activation initiate inflammatory responses in the liver. The inflammatory activation of hepatic stellate and Kupffer cells results in the chemokine-mediated infiltration of neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer (NK) and natural killer T (NKT) cells. The ultimate outcome of the intrahepatic immune response (for example, fibrosis or resolution) depends on the functional diversity of macrophages and dendritic cells, but also on the balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory T-cell populations. As reviewed here, tremendous progress has helped to understand the fine-tuning of immune responses in the liver from homeostasis to disease, indicating promising targets for future therapies in acute and chronic liver diseases.

  19. Ultrasonography and computed tomography in diffuse liver disease with cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, K.; Pikkarainen, P.; Pasanen, P.; Alhava, E.; Soimakallio, S.; Kuopio Univ. Central Hospital; Kuopio Univ. Central Hospital

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on respectively 67 and 42 (altogether 72) patients, for the assessment of intrahepatic cholestasis. The diagnostic ability to differentiate between malignant (17 patients) and benign (55 patients) liver disease was analyzed. Coarse echogenicity of the liver led to inconclusive results in differentiating between cirrhosis (2 out of 29 patients) and malignant infiltration (4 out of 15 patients) by US. Other benign liver diseases in 23 patients, including acute hepatitis, chronic active hepatitis, fatty liver, and liver congestion, were correctly interpreted as benign. CT correctly disclosed malignant liver disease in all cases. A false positive diagnosis of malignancy was encountered in 4 (out of 17) patients with decompensated hepatic cirrhosis because of non-homogeneous expansive areas on CT in 3 cases. The true cause was in 2 patients non-uniform fatty infiltration, and in one patient with acute hepatitis A, small hypodense lesions. Among cholestatic patients, decompensated cirrhosis and malignant liver infiltration could not always be differentiated on US or CT. (orig.)

  20. NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Chistova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome that represents a totality of interrelated carbohydrate metabolism and lipid disorders, as well as a mechanism regulating arterial tension and endothelium function is one of the critical issues in pediatrics. In recent years, children with metabolic syndrome are increasingly diagnosed with liver injuries symptoms that are associated with a fatty transformation of the liver [1–3]. In this case, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, a liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome is diagnosed. The diagnosis is confirmed in the absence of alcohol abuse in the past medical history, virus and autoimmune liver disease markers, elimination of toxic and drug influence, as wells as disorders of copper and iron exchange in the patient’s system. One of the key risk factors for developing NAFLD in children is overeating and reduced physical activities. It was believed in the past that NAFLD is relatively benign, however, there is evidence in current literature that this is a pathological condition that may develop and result in extreme fibrotic alterations in the liver parenchymatous tissue all the way to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma [4]. Early-stage identification and timely launch of therapy for NAFLD in children represents one of the most important objectives in modern healthcare. Key words: metabolic syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, children, steatohepatosis. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(6:68-72

  1. Perioperative liver and spleen elastography in patients without chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Sam; Borsiin, Hanna; Öberg, Carl-Fredrik; Brange, Hannes; Mijovic, Zoran; Sturesson, Christian

    2018-02-27

    To investigate changes in hepatic and splenic stiffness in patients without chronic liver disease during liver resection for hepatic tumors. Patients scheduled for liver resection for hepatic tumors were considered for enrollment. Tissue stiffness measurements on liver and spleen were conducted before and two days after liver resection using point shear-wave elastography. Histological analysis of the resected liver specimen was conducted in all patients and patients with marked liver fibrosis were excluded from further study analysis. Patients were divided into groups depending on size of resection and whether they had received preoperative chemotherapy or not. The relation between tissue stiffness and postoperative biochemistry was investigated. Results are presented as median (interquartile range). 35 patients were included. The liver stiffness increased in patients undergoing a major resection from 1.41 (1.24-1.63) m/s to 2.20 (1.72-2.44) m/s ( P = 0.001). No change in liver stiffness in patients undergoing a minor resection was found [1.31 (1.15-1.52) m/s vs 1.37 (1.12-1.77) m/s, P = 0.438]. A major resection resulted in a 16% (7%-33%) increase in spleen stiffness, more ( P = 0.047) than after a minor resection [2 (-1-13) %]. Patients who underwent preoperative chemotherapy ( n = 20) did not differ from others in preoperative right liver lobe [1.31 (1.16-1.50) vs 1.38 (1.12-1.56) m/s, P = 0.569] or spleen [2.79 (2.33-3.11) vs 2.71 (2.37-2.86) m/s, P = 0.515] stiffness. Remnant liver stiffness on the second postoperative day did not show strong correlations with maximum postoperative increase in bilirubin ( R 2 = 0.154, Pearson's r = 0.392, P = 0.032) and international normalized ratio ( R 2 = 0.285, Pearson's r = 0.534, P = 0.003). Liver and spleen stiffness increase after a major liver resection for hepatic tumors in patients without chronic liver disease.

  2. Long-term prognosis of fatty liver: risk of chronic liver disease and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Larsen, S.; Franzmann, M.; Andersen, I.B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Fatty liver is a common histological finding in human liver biopsy specimens. It affects 10-24% of the general population and is believed to be a marker of risk of later chronic liver disease. The present study examined the risk of development of cirrhotic liver disease...... and the risk of death in a cohort diagnosed with pure fatty liver without inflammation. METHODS: A total of 215 patients who had a liver biopsy performed during the period 1976-1987 were included in the study. The population consisted of 109 non-alcoholic and 106 alcoholic fatty liver patients. Median follow...... up time was 16.7 (0.2-21.9) years in the non-alcoholic and 9.2 (0.6-23.1) years in the alcoholic group. Systematic data collection was carried out by review of all medical records. All members of the study cohort were linked through their unique personal identification number to the National Registry...

  3. Progress and challenges in the prevention and control of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Hongliang

    2018-05-30

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is rapidly becoming the most common liver disease worldwide. Individuals with NAFLD have a high frequency of developing progressive liver disease and metabolism-related comorbidities, which result from of a lack of awareness and poor surveillance of the disease and a paucity of approved and effective therapies. Managing the complications of NAFLD has already begun to place a tremendous burden on health-care systems. Although efforts to identify effective therapies are underway, the lack of validated preclinical NAFLD models that represent the biology and outcomes of human disease remains a major barrier. This review summarizes the characteristics and prevalence of the disease and the status of our understanding of its mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Liver stiffness by transient elastography predicts liver-related complications and mortality in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack X Q Pang

    Full Text Available Liver stiffness measurement (LSM by transient elastography (TE, FibroScan is a validated method for noninvasively staging liver fibrosis. Most hepatic complications occur in patients with advanced fibrosis. Our objective was to determine the ability of LSM by TE to predict hepatic complications and mortality in a large cohort of patients with chronic liver disease.In consecutive adults who underwent LSM by TE between July 2008 and June 2011, we used Cox regression to determine the independent association between liver stiffness and death or hepatic complications (decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation. The performance of LSM to predict complications was determined using the c-statistic.Among 2,052 patients (median age 51 years, 65% with hepatitis B or C, 87 patients (4.2% died or developed a hepatic complication during a median follow-up period of 15.6 months (interquartile range, 11.0-23.5 months. Patients with complications had higher median liver stiffness than those without complications (13.5 vs. 6.0 kPa; P<0.00005. The 2-year incidence rates of death or hepatic complications were 2.6%, 9%, 19%, and 34% in patients with liver stiffness <10, 10-19.9, 20-39.9, and ≥40 kPa, respectively (P<0.00005. After adjustment for potential confounders, liver stiffness by TE was an independent predictor of complications (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05 per kPa; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.06. The c-statistic of liver-stiffness for predicting complications was 0.80 (95% CI 0.75-0.85. A liver stiffness below 20 kPa effectively excluded complications (specificity 93%, negative predictive value 97%; however, the positive predictive value of higher results was sub-optimal (20%.Liver stiffness by TE accurately predicts the risk of death or hepatic complications in patients with chronic liver disease. TE may facilitate the estimation of prognosis and guide management of these patients.

  5. [Comparison of various noninvasive serum markers of liver fibrosis in chronic viral liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Min; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Roh, Young Wook; Eun, Chang Soo; Jeon, Yong Cheol; Han, Dong Soo; Oh, Young Ha

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical performances of noninvasive serum markers for the prediction of liver fibrosis in chronic viral liver diseases. We analyzed a total of 225 patients with chronic viral liver diseases (180 with hepatitis B virus, 43 with hepatitis C virus, and 2 with hepatitis B+C virus) who underwent a liver biopsy procedure at the Hanyang University Guri Hospital between March 2002 and February 2007. Serum was also obtained at the time of liver biopsy. Liver fibrosis was staged according to the scoring system proposed by the Korean Study Group for the Pathology of Digestive Diseases. Various noninvasive serum markers were evaluated, including the aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR), age-platelet (AP) index, AST/platelet ratio index (APRI), cirrhosis discriminant score (CDS), platelet count, hyaluronic acid (HA), and type IV collagen. There were 17, 40, 61, 74, and 33 patients at stages F0, F1, F2, F3, and F4, respectively. The overall diagnostic accuracies of each marker, as determined by the area under receiver operating characteristics curves, were APRI=0.822, CDS=0.776, platelet count=0.773, AP index=0.756, HA=0.749, type IV collagen=0.718, and AAR=0.642 for predicting significant fibrosis (> or =F2); and CDS=0.835, platelet count=0.795, AP index=0.794, HA=0.766, AAR=0.711, type IV collagen=0.697, and APRI=0.691 for predicting extensive fibrosis (> or =F3). All noninvasive serum markers evaluated in this study were useful for predicting significant or extensive liver fibrosis in chronic viral liver diseases. In particular, APRI was most useful for the prediction of significant fibrosis, and CDS was most useful for the prediction of extensive fibrosis.

  6. Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    , alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, dietary habits, education, body mass index, and ALT). The risk of having a high level of ALT, AST, or GGT tended to be higher for lower vitamin D levels, although not statistically significant. In this general population study, vitamin D status...... was inversely associated with incident liver disease. Further studies are needed to determine whether patients in risk of developing impaired liver function should be screened for vitamin D deficiency for preventive purposes....

  7. Transferrin metabolism in alcoholic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, B.J.; Chapman, R.W.; Nunes, R.M.; Sorrentino, D.; Sherlock, S.

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of transferrin was studied using purified 125 I-labeled transferrin in 11 alcoholic patients; six with fatty liver and five with cirrhosis. Six healthy subjects whose alcohol intake was les than 40 gm daily were studied as a control group. There were no significant differences in the mean fractional catabolic rate and plasma volume in the alcoholic groups when compared with control subjects. A significantly decreased mean serum transferrin concentration was found in the alcoholic cirrhotic patients (1.8 +/- 0.3 gm per liter vs. 2.9 +/- 0.2; p less than 0.01), resulting from diminished total body synthesis (0.9 +/- 0.2 mg per kg per hr vs. 1.8 +/- 0.2; p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the patients with alcoholic fatty liver, the mean total body transferrin synthesis (2.4 +/- 0.3 mg per kg per hr) was significantly increased when compared with controls (p less than 0.05). For all the alcoholic patients, the serum transferrin correlated with transferrin synthesis (r = +0.70; p less than 0.01) but the serum iron did not. These results suggest that, in alcoholic cirrhosis, transferrin synthesis is decreased, probably reflecting diminished synthetic capacity by the liver. In contrast, in patients with alcoholic fatty liver, transferrin turnover is accelerated

  8. (HBV)-related chronic liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-08

    Mar 8, 2012 ... 1Artificial Liver Center, Beijing You'an Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing ... Prevention and Cure Standard proposed at the 10th China National .... and cerebro-spinal fluid. ... negative effect on endothelial cells and blood capillaries .... Project on Science and Technology (2007B055), Beijing.

  9. Evaluation of Aroclor 1260 exposure in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlang, Banrida; Song, Ming; Beier, Juliane I.; Cameron Falkner, K.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Clair, Heather B.; Prough, Russell A.; Osborne, Tanasa S.; Malarkey, David E.; Christopher States, J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatic effects of a PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, whose composition mimics human bioaccumulation patterns, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control diet or 42% high fat diet (HFD) and exposed to Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg in corn oil) for 12 weeks. A glucose tolerance test was performed; plasma/tissues were obtained at necropsy for measurements of adipocytokine levels, histology, and gene expression. Aroclor 1260 exposure was associated with decreased body fat in HFD-fed mice but had no effect on blood glucose/lipid levels. Paradoxically, Aroclor 1260 + HFD co-exposed mice demonstrated increased hepatic inflammatory foci at both doses while the degree of steatosis did not change. Serum cytokines, ALT levels and hepatic expression of IL-6 and TNFα were increased only at 20 mg/kg, suggesting an inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the 200 mg/kg exposure. Aroclor 1260 induced hepatic expression of cytochrome P450s including Cyp3a11 (Pregnane-Xenobiotic Receptor target) and Cyp2b10 (constitutive androstane receptor target) but Cyp2b10 inducibility was diminished with HFD-feeding. Cyp1a2 (aryl hydrocarbon Receptor target) was induced only at 200 mg/kg. In summary, Aroclor 1260 worsened hepatic and systemic inflammation in DIO. The results indicated a bimodal response of PCB-diet interactions in the context of inflammation which could potentially be explained by xenobiotic receptor activation. Thus, PCB exposure may be a relevant “second hit” in the transformation of steatosis to steatohepatitis. - Highlights: • Aroclor 1260 exposure decreased adiposity in mice fed with high fat diet • Aroclor 1260 exposure induced steatohepatitis in diet-induced obese mice • Aroclor 1260 (20 and 200 mg/kg) induced

  10. Evaluation of Aroclor 1260 exposure in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlang, Banrida [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Song, Ming [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Beier, Juliane I. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Cameron Falkner, K. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Al-Eryani, Laila [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Clair, Heather B.; Prough, Russell A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Osborne, Tanasa S.; Malarkey, David E. [Cellular and Molecular Pathology Branch, National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Christopher States, J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Cave, Matthew C., E-mail: matt.cave@louisville.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); The Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY 40206 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatic effects of a PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, whose composition mimics human bioaccumulation patterns, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control diet or 42% high fat diet (HFD) and exposed to Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg in corn oil) for 12 weeks. A glucose tolerance test was performed; plasma/tissues were obtained at necropsy for measurements of adipocytokine levels, histology, and gene expression. Aroclor 1260 exposure was associated with decreased body fat in HFD-fed mice but had no effect on blood glucose/lipid levels. Paradoxically, Aroclor 1260 + HFD co-exposed mice demonstrated increased hepatic inflammatory foci at both doses while the degree of steatosis did not change. Serum cytokines, ALT levels and hepatic expression of IL-6 and TNFα were increased only at 20 mg/kg, suggesting an inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the 200 mg/kg exposure. Aroclor 1260 induced hepatic expression of cytochrome P450s including Cyp3a11 (Pregnane-Xenobiotic Receptor target) and Cyp2b10 (constitutive androstane receptor target) but Cyp2b10 inducibility was diminished with HFD-feeding. Cyp1a2 (aryl hydrocarbon Receptor target) was induced only at 200 mg/kg. In summary, Aroclor 1260 worsened hepatic and systemic inflammation in DIO. The results indicated a bimodal response of PCB-diet interactions in the context of inflammation which could potentially be explained by xenobiotic receptor activation. Thus, PCB exposure may be a relevant “second hit” in the transformation of steatosis to steatohepatitis. - Highlights: • Aroclor 1260 exposure decreased adiposity in mice fed with high fat diet • Aroclor 1260 exposure induced steatohepatitis in diet-induced obese mice • Aroclor 1260 (20 and 200 mg/kg) induced

  11. Ω-3 fatty acids prevent hepatic steatosis, independent of PPAR-α activity, in a murine model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Esther; Lazare, Farrah B; Treem, William R; Xu, Jiliu; Iqbal, Jahangir; Pan, Xiaoyue; Josekutty, Joby; Walsh, Meghan; Anderson, Virginia; Hussain, M Mahmood; Schwarz, Steven M

    2014-07-01

    ω-3 Fatty acids (FAs), natural ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α), attenuate parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). However, the mechanisms underlying the protective role of ω-3 FAs are still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ω-3 FAs on hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in a murine model of PNALD and to investigate the role of PPAR-α and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in this experimental setting. 129S1/SvImJ wild-type or 129S4/SvJaePparatm/Gonz/J PPAR-α knockout mice were fed chow and water (controls); oral, fat-free PN solution only (PN-O); PN-O plus intraperitoneal (IP) ω-6 FA-predominant supplements (PN-ω-6); or PN-O plus IP ω-3 FA (PN-ω-3). Control and PN-O groups received sham IP injections of 0.9% NaCl. Hepatic histology, TG and cholesterol, MTP activity, and PPAR-α messenger RNA were assessed after 19 days. In all experimental groups, PN feeding increased hepatic TG and MTP activity compared with controls. Both PN-O and PN-ω-6 groups accumulated significantly greater amounts of TG when compared with PN-ω-3 mice. Studies in PPAR-α null animals showed that PN feeding increases hepatic TG as in wild-type mice. PPAR-α null mice in the PN-O and PN-ω-6 groups demonstrated variable degrees of hepatic steatosis, whereas no evidence of hepatic fat accumulation was found after 19 days of oral PN plus IP ω-3 FAs. PN induces TG accumulation (steatosis) in wild-type and PPAR-α null mice. In PN-fed wild-type and PPAR-α null mice given IP ω-3 FAs, reduced hepatic TG accumulation and absent steatosis are found. Prevention of steatosis by ω-3 FAs results from PPAR-α-independent pathways. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with HCC and none of them presented diabetes mellitus. Our study revealed that there is a

  13. Evaluation of nutritional indicators and body composition in patients with advanced liver disease enrolled for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Daniela Salate Biagioni; Carvalhaes, Maria Antonieta de Barros Leite; Bakonyi Neto, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with advanced liver disease (LD) related to multifactorial causes. Fluid retention can underestimate the nutritional status based on anthropometric measures. We evaluated nutritional indicators and body composition (BC) in patients with liver cirrhosis and correlated them with LD severity. Forty three patients with LD enrolled for liver transplantation were evaluated by Anthropometric measures, subjective evaluation (Global Assessment of Nutritional Status - SGA) and biochemical indicators. Single-frequency electrical bioimpedance (SFE-BIA) was used to evaluate body composition (BC). It measured resistance (R), reactance (Xc) and the phase angle (PA). LD severity was estimated by Child-Pugh and Meld criteria (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease). Child-Pugh index between patients was 7.11 ± 1.70 and Meld was 12.23 ± 4.22. Arm Circumference, Arm Muscle Circumference and Arm Muscle Area, SGA, hemoglobin, hematocrit and albumin showed better correlation with disease severity. Xc and PA showed correlation both with Meld and Child-Pugh score when BC were evaluated. PA was depleted in 55.8% of the patients. Diagnosis of malnutrition varied according to the method. Global assessment of nutritional status showed better correlation with disease severity than with objective methods. Single-frequency electrical bioimpedance for body composition analysis in cirrhotic patients must be cautiously used; however, primary vectors seems to be valid and promising in clinical practice.

  14. Utility of dynamic computed tomography in diffuse liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Koichi; Inagawa, Akira; Yokoyama, Tatsushi; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki; Ito, Katsuhide; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1985-01-01

    We tested the diagnostic abilities of dynamic CT in diffuse liver diseases. The material includes 23 cases of chronic active hepatitis (CAH), 32 cases of liver cirrhosis (LC) and 15 cases with normal liver. For each case, time-density curve was obtained from the right lobe of the liver. To allow numerical evaluation of the curve, gamma variate fit techniques were employed. Changes in the curves were analyzed by comparing three parameters-rise time (RT), decay time (DT) and corrected first moment (MC)-derived from two coefficients of the fitting equation. Values of three parameters increased with the severity of the diseases reflecting prolonged curves with delayed peak and gradual downslope in damaged livers. MC values showed most significant correlation with the degree of the diseases. High MC value (>95) were associated with 30 cases of LC and 3 cases of CHA, and moderate MC value (70< MC<=95) with 19 cases of CAH and 2 controls, and low MC value (<=70) with 15 controls and a case of CAH. We conclude that dynamic CT time-density study with gamma variate fitting is useful in the differential diagnosis of the diffuse liver diseases. (author)

  15. Pre-operative evaluation of patients with chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapias M Monica; Idrovo Cubides, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Patients with advanced liver disease have an increased risk of complications, compared to healthy patients when they undergo a surgical procedure. This risk is related to the type of surgery, to the type of anesthetic used, and to the severity of the underlying liver disease. Several risk factors for liver disease should be identified prior to a procedure. Those with advanced disease should undergo specific pre-surgical diagnostic tests. The Child Pugh score, and the MELD score, are very useful to establish the surgical risk in individuals with liver disease. The Child-Pugh score is a very useful tool that correlates closely to morbidity and mortality in patients with liver disease. Mortality rates in these patients undergoing major surgery is 10, 30 and 82% for Child-Pugh scores A, B and C respectively. In order to optimize the patient's condition before surgery, a complete evaluation and management of conditions such as jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites, electrolyte abnormalities, renal insufficiency and encephalopathy must be performed. This approach helps to reduce the complication rate in these individuals

  16. The Effects of Betaine on the Nuclear Fractal Dimension, Chromatin Texture, and Proliferative Activity in Hepatocytes in Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesković, Milena; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Zaletel, Ivan; Rakočević, Jelena; Mladenović, Dušan; Jorgačević, Bojan; Vučević, Danijela; Radosavljević, Tatjana

    2018-04-01

    The effects of betaine on hepatocytes chromatin architecture changes were examined by using fractal and gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) analysis in methionine/choline-deficient (MCD) diet-induced, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into groups: (1) Control: standard diet; (2) BET: standard diet and betaine supplementation through drinking water (solution 1.5%); (3) MCD group: MCD diet for 6 weeks; (4) MCD+BET: fed with MCD diet + betaine for 6 weeks. Liver tissue was collected for histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and determination of fractal dimension and GLCM parameters. MCD diet induced diffuse micro- and macrovesicular steatosis accompanied with increased Ki67-positive hepatocyte nuclei. Steatosis and Ki67 immunopositivity were less prominent in the MCD+BET group compared with the MCD group. Angular second moment (ASM) and inverse difference moment (IDM) (textural homogeneity markers) were significantly increased in the MCD+BET group versus the MCD group (pMCD and the control group was evident. Heterogeneity parameters, contrast, and correlation were significantly increased in the MCD group versus the control (pMCD group (pMCD diet-induced NAFLD by reducing fat accumulation and inhibiting hepatocyte proliferation. Betaine supplementation increased nuclear homogeneity and chromatin complexity with reduction of entropy, contrast, and correlation.

  17. Evaluation of usefulness of Tc-99m-GSA liver scintigraphy in chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Hiroyuki; Kashiwagi, Toru; Kasahara, Akinori

    1991-01-01

    Liver scintigraphy was performed using a newly developed radiopharmaceutical, Tc-99m-DTPA-galactosyl-human-serum-albumin (Tc-99m-GSA), which binds specifically to the receptors on the hepatic cell surface, in 15 patients with chronic liver disease. The scintigraphy was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively, and the results were compared with those obtained from the Tc-99m-PMT or Tc-99m-sn-phytate scintigraphy, and the liver function tests. The Tc-99m-GSA scintigraphy showed clear liver images in chronic hepatitis. However, in liver cirrhosis, the liver images were not clear and the cardiac images still existed 40 minutes after administration of Tc-99m-GSA, suggesting that the image quality of the Tc-99m-GSA scintigrams may be inferior to that of Tc-99m-sn-phytate or Tc-99m-PMT in some cases of severe liver dysfunction. The time-activity curves of the heart and liver were analyzed by non-linear regression analysis. The clearance rate from plasma (Kd) were obtained from the time-activity curve of the heart, and the hepatic uptake rate (Ku), hepatic excretion rate (Ke) and peak time of hepatic uptake-excretion curve (PT) were obtained from the time-activity curve of the liver. Kd, Ku, and PT values were more significantly decreased or prolonged in the patients with chronic hepatitis. Kd, Ku, and PT values had positive correlations with the result of the serum liver function tests, ICG-R15 and ICG-K. Ku and PT values had also correlations with the histological degree of hepatic fibrosis. On the other hand, the indices obtained using Tc-99m-PMT or Tc-99m-sn-phytate did not have correlations with the histological degrees of hepatic fibrosis. It is concluded that the liver scintigraphy using Tc-99m-GSA may be useful and give different information from those with conventional liver scintigraphies in evaluating chronic liver diseases. (author)

  18. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira C.P.M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondria play a role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. Fatty liver was induced in Wistar rats with a choline-deficient diet (CD; N = 7 or a high-fat diet enriched with PUFAs-omega-3 (H; N = 7 for 4 weeks. The control group (N = 7 was fed a standard diet. Liver mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically and oxidative stress was estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations. Moderate macrovacuolar liver steatosis was observed in the CD group and mild liver steatosis was observed in the periportal area in the H group. There was an increase in the oxygen consumption rate by liver mitochondria in respiratory state 4 (S4 and a decrease in respiratory control rate (RCR in the CD group (S4: 32.70 ± 3.35; RCR: 2.55 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1 when compared to the H and control groups (S4: 23.09 ± 1.53, 17.04 ± 2.03, RCR: 3.15 ± 0.15, 3.68 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1, respectively, P < 0.05. Hepatic lipoperoxide concentrations were significantly increased and the concentration of reduced glutathione was significantly reduced in the CD group. A choline-deficient diet causes moderate steatosis with disruption of liver mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. These data suggest that lipid peroxidation products can impair the flow of electrons along the respiratory chain, causing overreduction of respiratory chain components and enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. These findings are important in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  19. Hepatic cholesterol ester hydrolase in human liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J B; Poon, R W

    1978-09-01

    Human liver contains an acid cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH) of presumed lysosomal origin, but its significance is unknown. We developed a modified CEH radioassay suitable for needle biopsy specimens and measured hepatic activity of this enzyme in 69 patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy. Histologically normal livers hydrolyzed 5.80 +/- 0.78 SEM mumoles of cholesterol ester per hr per g of liver protein (n, 10). Values were similar in alcoholic liver disease (n, 17), obstructive jaundice (n, 9), and miscellaneous hepatic disorders (n, 21). In contrast, mean hepatic CEH activity was more than 3-fold elevated in 12 patients with acute hepatitis, 21.05 +/- 2.45 SEM mumoles per hr per g of protein (P less than 0.01). In 2 patients studied serially, CEH returned to normal as hepatitis resolved. CEH activity in all patients paralleled SGOT levels (r, 0.84; P less than 0.01). There was no correlation with serum levels of free or esterified cholesterol nor with serum activity of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for cholesterol esterification in plasma. These studies confirm the presence of CEH activity in human liver and show markedly increased activity in acute hepatitis. The pathogenesis and clinical significance of altered hepatic CEH activity in liver disease require further study.

  20. The association of vitamin D deficiency with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Küçükazman, Metin; Ata, Naim; Dal, Kürşat; Yeniova, Abdullah Özgür; Kefeli, Ayşe; Basyigit, Sebahat; Aktas, Bora; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Ağladioğlu, Kadir; Üre, Öznur Sari; Topal, Firdes; Nazligül, Yaşar; Beyan, Esin; Ertugrul, Derun Taner

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D deficiency has been related to diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and peripheral vascular disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of vitamin D status in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. METHODS: We included 211 consecutive subjects to examine the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Of these subjects, 57 did not have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and 154 had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. RESULTS: The non-alcoholic fatty liver ...

  1. Reversal of intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Christian; Kodjabashia, Kamelia; Nixon, Emma

    2016-01-01

    in an adult patient with IF secondary to severe Crohn's disease and multiple small bowel resections. The patient developed liver dysfunction and pathology consistent with IFALD. Multiple causal factors were implicated, including nutrition-related factors, catheter sepsis and the use of hepatotoxic medications....... Multidisciplinary treatment in a tertiary IF referral centre included aggressive sepsis management, discontinuation of hepatotoxic medications and a reduction of parenteral nutrition dependency through optimisation of enteral nutrition via distal enteral tube feeding. Upon this, liver function tests normalised....

  2. Liver Disease Secondary to Intestinal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Abu-Wasel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IFALD is a common and potentially life-threatening condition for patients with SBS requiring long-term PN. There exists the potential for decreasing its incidence by optimizing the composition and the rate of infusion of parenteral solutions, by advocating a multidisciplinary approach, and by early referral for intestinal-liver transplantation to ensure long-term survival of patients with SBS.

  3. Coffee Intake Is Associated with a Lower Liver Stiffness in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Hepatitis C, and Hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Alexander; Lim, Sarah; Goh, Evan; Wong, Ophelia; Marsh, Philip; Knight, Virginia; Sievert, William; de Courten, Barbora

    2017-01-10

    There is emerging evidence for the positive effects or benefits of coffee in patients with liver disease. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study on patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection to determine the effects of coffee intake on a non-invasive marker of liver fibrosis: liver stiffness assessed by transient elastography (TE). We assessed coffee and tea intake and measured TE in 1018 patients with NAFLD, HCV, and HBV (155 with NAFLD, 378 with HCV and 485 with HBV). Univariate and multivariate regression models were performed taking into account potential confounders. Liver stiffness was higher in males compared to females ( p disease state (NAFLD, HCV, and HBV status), those who drank 2 or more cups of coffee per day had a lower liver stiffness ( p = 0.044). Tea consumption had no effect ( p = 0.9). Coffee consumption decreases liver stiffness, which may indicate less fibrosis and inflammation, independent of disease state. This study adds further evidence to the notion of coffee maybe beneficial in patients with liver disease.

  4. Fructose Consumption, Lipogenesis, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, Kasper W.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2017-01-01

    Increased fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, but a causal role of fructose in these metabolic diseases remains debated. Mechanistically, hepatic fructose metabolism yields precursors that can be

  5. Extrahepatic manifestations of cholestatic liver diseases: pathogenesis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusl, Thomas; Beuers, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Pruritus, fatigue, and metabolic bone disease are frequent complications of cholestatic liver diseases, which can be quite distressing for the patient and can considerably reduce the quality of life. The molecular pathogenesis of these extrahepatic manifestations of cholestasis is poorly understood,

  6. Symptom Status Predicts Patient Outcomes in Persons with HIV and Comorbid Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. Henderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are living longer; therefore, they are more likely to suffer significant morbidity due to potentially treatable liver diseases. Clinical evidence suggests that the growing number of individuals living with HIV and liver disease may have a poorer health-related quality of life (HRQOL than persons living with HIV who do not have comorbid liver disease. Thus, this study examined the multiple components of HRQOL by testing Wilson and Cleary’s model in a sample of 532 individuals (305 persons with HIV and 227 persons living with HIV and liver disease using structural equation modeling. The model components include biological/physiological factors (HIV viral load, CD4 counts, symptom status (Beck Depression Inventory II and the Medical Outcomes Study HIV Health Survey (MOS-HIV mental function, functional status (missed appointments and MOS-HIV physical function, general health perceptions (perceived burden visual analogue scale and MOS-HIV health transition, and overall quality of life (QOL (Satisfaction with Life Scale and MOS-HIV overall QOL. The Wilson and Cleary model was found to be useful in linking clinical indicators to patient-related outcomes. The findings provide the foundation for development and future testing of targeted biobehavioral nursing interventions to improve HRQOL in persons living with HIV and liver disease.

  7. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Management: Dietary and Lifestyle Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vi; George, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of abnormalities that can range from bland liver fat (steatosis), to hepatic inflammation and liver injury (steatohepatitis). It is estimated that NAFLD will become the principal cause of liver disease in Western nations and the leading indication for liver transplantation. Advancements in disease recognition and management are therefore paramount. Although the development of new, reliable drug therapies is vital, lifestyle interventions remain the most effective treatment modality. In addition to weight loss as a primary measure of treatment success, there is growing recognition that other endpoints, including the prevention or delay of diabetes onset, reduced cardiovascular events, prevention of cancer, and improved overall mortality, are equally important outcomes that can be independently modified by lifestyle change. Moreover, NAFLD is inextricably part of a complex, systemic disease process that is linked with deeply entrenched maladaptive lifestyle behaviors. Thus, a holistic, multidisciplinary, and individualized approach to disease management will be the key to achieving any realistic population-level change. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. [Advances in the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the most common liver disease. Its more aggressive form is the non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Multiple genetic and environmental factors lead to the accumulation of triglicerides and the inflammatory cascade. High fat diet, obesity, adipocyte dysfunction with cytokine production, insulin resistance and increased lipolysis with free fatty acid flux into the liver - all are the drivers of liver cell injury. Activation of inflammasome by damage- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns results in "steril inflammation" and immune response, while the hepatic stellate cells and progenitor cells lead to fibrogenesis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and gut dysbiosis are also of pivotal importance in the inflammation. Among the susceptible genetic factors, mutations of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and the transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 genes play a role in the development and progression of the disease, similarly as do epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs and extracellular vesicles. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease may identify novel therapeutic agents that improve the outcome of the disease. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(23): 882-894.

  9. The spleen-to-liver ratios in hepatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorne, M.; Jurvelin, J.; Vaehaetalo, S.; Himanka, E.

    1984-01-01

    We compared light pen (LPEN) and Region of Interest (ROI) computer methods in determining spleen-to-liver (S/L) ratios both in anterior and posterior images in various liver diseases. The S/L ratio was independent of age or type of colloid used (equal particle size provided). Results with corresponding LPEN and ROI programs did not differ significantly from each other. The sensitivity and specificity were tested and the anterior view yielded somewhat better results than the posterior view but the best results were obtained when both projections were used. The sensitivity for all liver diseases was 60% and the corresponding specificity 93%. In hepatocellular diseases the sensitivity was 80-100%, but the S/L ratio had only 37% sensitivity for hepatic metastases. Hepatomegaly in the anterior view was found in 67% of fatty liver cases, in 25% of cirrhosis cases, in 20% of hepatitis and in 25% of metastatic livers. Splenomegaly was noted in 39-54% of patients with hepatocellular diseases but only in 4-10% of metastatic diseases. (orig.) [de

  10. Chronic Liver Disease : Value of Sonographic Study of the Liver Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Ki Whang

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of sonographic irregularities of liver surface in the differentiation of chronic liver disease. Fifty-eight patients with either chronic hepatitis or early stage of liver cirrhosis were examined with 5 MHz linear array transducer by observing the liver surface.We compared the sonographic findings with peritoneoscopic and pathologic findings. Thirty-five patients with smooth surface showed variable pathological results, including chronic active and persistent hepatitis, inactive hepatitis and alcoholic hepatitis without any evidence of cirrhosis. Nineteen patients with micronodules mostly revealed chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis. All 4 patients with macronodules were proved pathologically ascirrhosis. High resolution ultrasonography(HRUS) showed smooth liver surface in 35 patients(60.3%),micronodular surface in l9(32.8%), and macronodular surface in 4 (6.9%). Twenty-one cases(60.0%) among 35 patients with smooth surface were peritoneoscopically normal and 12 cases(34.3%) showed dimpling surface. However among l9 patients with micronodular surface, only 5 cases(26.3%) showed micronodular surface on peritoneoscopy. while 8 cases(42.l%) showed nracronodular surface and 6 cases(3l.6%) dimpling surface. All 4 patients with macronodulesrevealed peritoneoscopically nracronodular surface. Observation of liver surface by HRUS was useful in predicting the progression of chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis. However, it was not helpful in the differentiation between normal liver and chronic hepatrtrs

  11. The Use of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Study and Treatment of Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Marc C; Davila, Julio C; Vosough, Massoud; Gramignoli, Roberto; Skvorak, Kristen J; Dorko, Kenneth; Marongiu, Fabio; Blake, William; Strom, Stephen C

    2016-02-01

    Liver disease is a major global health concern. Liver cirrhosis is one of the leading causes of death in the world and currently the only therapeutic option for end-stage liver disease (e.g., acute liver failure, cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, cholestatic diseases, metabolic diseases, and malignant neoplasms) is orthotropic liver transplantation. Transplantation of hepatocytes has been proposed and used as an alternative to whole organ transplant to stabilize and prolong the lives of patients in some clinical cases. Although these experimental therapies have demonstrated promising and beneficial results, their routine use remains a challenge due to the shortage of donor livers available for cell isolation, variable quality of those tissues, the potential need for lifelong immunosuppression in the transplant recipient, and high costs. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies and more reliable clinical treatments are urgently needed. Recent and continuous technological advances in the development of stem cells suggest they may be beneficial in this respect. In this review, we summarize the history of stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology in the context of hepatic differentiation and discuss the potential applications the technology may offer for human liver disease modeling and treatment. This includes developing safer drugs and cell-based therapies to improve the outcomes of patients with currently incurable health illnesses. We also review promising advances in other disease areas to highlight how the stem cell technology could be applied to liver diseases in the future. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Risk of seizures and status epilepticus in older patients with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M; Rubinos, Clio; Kummer, Benjamin R; Parikh, Neal S; Chen, Monica; Chatterjee, Abhinaba; Reynolds, Alexandra; Merkler, Alexander E; Claassen, Jan; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-06-06

    Seizures can be provoked by systemic diseases associated with metabolic derangements, but the association between liver disease and seizures remains unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study using inpatient and outpatient claims between 2008 and 2015 from a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries. The primary exposure variable was cirrhosis, and the secondary exposure was mild, noncirrhotic liver disease. The primary outcome was seizure, and the secondary outcome was status epilepticus. Diagnoses were ascertained using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification codes. Survival statistics were used to calculate incidence rates, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between exposures and outcomes while adjusting for seizure risk factors. Among 1 782 402 beneficiaries, we identified 10 393 (0.6%) beneficiaries with cirrhosis and 19 557 (1.1%) with mild, noncirrhotic liver disease. Individuals with liver disease were older and had more seizure risk factors than those without liver disease. Over 4.6 ± 2.2 years of follow-up, 49 843 (2.8%) individuals were diagnosed with seizures and 25 patients (0.001%) were diagnosed with status epilepticus. Cirrhosis was not associated with seizures (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.3), but there was an association with status epilepticus (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3-2.8). Mild liver disease was not associated with a higher risk of seizures (HR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.6-0.9) or status epilepticus (HR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.7-1.5). In a large, population-based cohort, we found an association between cirrhosis and status epilepticus, but no overall association between liver disease and seizures. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Comparison of CT scanning and radionuclide imaging in liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, M.L.; Esposito, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Early experience with body CT suggested its usefulness in many diagnostic problems; jaundice, renal and pancreatic masses, and in the evaluation of relatively inaccessible parts of the body, such as the retroperitineum, mediastinum, and pelvis. Investigation of hepatic disease by CT was not unexpectedly compared to radionuclide liver scanning, the major preexisting modality for imaging the liver. In the evaluation of the jaundiced patient, CT rapidly assumed a major role, providing more specific information about the liver than the RN liver scan, as well as demonstrating adjacent organs. CT differentiate obstructive from non-obstructive jaundice. With respect to mass lesions of the liver, the RN liver scan is more sensitive than CT but less specific. The abnormalities on an isotope image of the liver consist of normal variants in configuration, extrinsic compression by adjacent structures, cysts, hemangiomata, abscesses, and neoplasms. These suspected lesions may then be better delineated by the CT image, and a more precise diagnosis made. The physiologic information provided by the RN liver scan is an added facet which is helpful in the patient with diffuse hepatic disease. The CT image will be normal in many of these patients, however, hemochromatosis and fatty infiltration lend themselves especially to density evaluation by CT. The evaluation of lymphoma is more thorough with CT. Structures other than the liver, such as lymph nodes, are visualized. Gallium, however, provides additional isotopic information in patients with lymphoma, and in addition, is known to be useful in the investigation of a febrile patient with an abscess. Newer isotopic agents expand hepatic imaging in other directions, visualizing the biliary tree and evaluating the jaundiced patient

  14. High coffee intake is associated with lower grade nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: the role of peripheral antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Grobe, Ylse; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto; Sánchez-Valle, Vicente; Gavilanes-Espinar, Juan Gabriel; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Some phytochemicals present in coffee have a potential antioxidant role which seems to protect the human body against cardiovascular diseases, liver disease and malignancies. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common disease with limited therapeutic options. This study investigated the antioxidant effect of coffee by measuring antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation markers in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We performed a case-control study at the University Hospital, Mexico City. Anthropometric, metabolic, dietary and biochemical variables of all patients were determined and compared. The presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was established by ultrasonography. All patients completed a dietary questionnaire in order to determine their of coffee consumption. Catalase, superoxide dismutase and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were measured in all of the patients. Seventy-three subjects with and 57 without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease were included. Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease had significantly higher body mass index, blood glucose, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance and insulin values in comparison to patients without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the one hand, there was a significant difference in coffee intake between the groups (p coffee has a protective effect against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease however there was no significant difference in the antioxidant variables analyzed.

  15. Drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballinger, Anne; Farthing, M. J. G. (Michael J. G.)

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Peptic ulcer disease Erik AJ Rauws, Guido NJ Tytgat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Emesis Gareth J Sanger, Paul LR Andrews...

  16. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oto, Aytekin; Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics

  17. Focal inflammatory diseases of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oto, Aytekin; Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa

    1999-10-01

    Inflammatory lesions constitute an important subgroup of focal liver lesions. They may mimic primary or metastatic neoplastic lesions and their differentiation from neoplasia is clinically very important since management of the patient significantly changes. Radiologists should have an important role in both the diagnosis and therapy of these lesions by performing percutaneous aspirations and drainages. In this review we discussed the radiological findings of pyogenic abscesses, amebic abscesses, candidiasis, tuberculosis, hydatic cysts, fascioliasis, ascariasis, schistosomiasis, and sarcoidosis with a special emphasis on US, CT and MR characteristics.

  18. Glycyrrhizic Acid in the Treatment of Liver Diseases: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-yuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizic acid (GA is a triterpene glycoside found in the roots of licorice plants (Glycyrrhiza glabra. GA is the most important active ingredient in the licorice root, and possesses a wide range of pharmacological and biological activities. GA coupled with glycyrrhetinic acid and 18-beta-glycyrrhetic acid was developed in China or Japan as an anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and antiallergic drug for liver disease. This review summarizes the current biological activities of GA and its medical applications in liver diseases. The pharmacological actions of GA include inhibition of hepatic apoptosis and necrosis; anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory actions; antiviral effects; and antitumor effects. This paper will be a useful reference for physicians and biologists researching GA and will open the door to novel agents in drug discovery and development from Chinese herbs. With additional research, GA may be more widely used in the treatment of liver diseases or other conditions.

  19. A Different Perspective for Management of Diabetes Mellitus: Controlling Viral Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingying; Xing, Huichun

    2017-01-01

    Knowing how to prevent and treat diabetes mellitus (DM) earlier is essential to improving outcomes. Through participating in synthesis and catabolism of glycogen, the liver helps to regulate glucose homeostasis. Viral related liver diseases are associated with glycometabolism disorders, which means effective management of viral liver diseases may be a therapeutic strategy for DM. The present article reviews the correlation between DM and liver diseases to give an update of the management of DM rooted by viral liver diseases.

  20. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Rubio-Manzanares-Dorado

    Full Text Available Introduction: Post-transplant lymphoproliferative syndrome (PTLD is a rare and potentially life-threatening complication after liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicopathologic features related to PTLD in a single institution after liver transplantation. Methods: Observational study where we have retrospectively analyzed 851 cases who underwent liver transplantation. Ten cases have developed PTLD. Their clinical-pathological characteristics and the treatment received have been analyzed. Results: PTLD incidence was 1.2% (10/851. The mean time from liver transplantation to PTLD diagnosis was 36 months (range 1.2 to 144 months. PTLD localization was extranodal in all cases, the most frequent location being intestinal. Seven cases showed a monomorphic lymphoma which in all cases was differentiated B cell lymphomas. Fifty per cent of the series were seropositive for Epstein-Barr virus. Five patients were alive at the time of the review. Among these patients, we observed three cases of complete remission and two cases of disease stabilization. The death rate was higher in the first year after diagnosis of PTLD. Conclusion: PTLD is a rare complication after liver transplantation, but it may pose a threat to the life of a liver transplant recipient. It is essential to identify patients at risk, to establish an early diagnosis and treatment that can change the outcome of the disease.

  1. Evaluation of computed tomography in the diagnosis of liver diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K; Takayama, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Shibata, T [Kamo Hospital, Toyota, Aichi (Japan)

    1980-10-01

    In order to evaluate computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of liver disease, 90 cases of diffuse parenchymal diseases and 37 cases of mass lesions were examined with a GE 8800 CT scanner. Abnormal CT findings in liver cirrhosis were characterized by splenomegaly, uneven liver margin and asites. Atrophy of right lobe and enlargement of left lobe could not be easily recognized on CT scan, compared with nuclear imaging. CT values of the liver were decreased and the ratios of CT values of the liver to those of the spleen were less than 0.9 in all cases with fatty liver. Jaundice in acute viral hepatitis can be easily differentiated from obstructive jaundice on CT scan because of observing no dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct. CT was superior in detecting space-occupying lesions to nuclear imaging and was more specific in that it was able to differentiate cystic from solid lesions. However, it was almost impossible to make a histological diagnosis of solid lesions even on CT scan.

  2. Evaluation of computed tomography in the diagnosis of liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsumoto; Takayama, Tetsuo; Katada, Naoyuki; Nishimura, Daisaku; Shibata, Tokimune

    1980-01-01

    In order to evaluate computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of liver disease, 90 cases of diffuse parenchymal diseases and 37 cases of mass lesions were examined with GE 8800 CT scanner. Abnormal CT findings in liver cirrhosis were characterized by splenomegaly, uneven liver margin and asites. Atrophy of right lobe and enlargement of left lobe could not be easily recognized on CT scan, compared with nuclear imaging. CT values of the liver were decreased and the ratios of CT values of the liver to those of the spleen were less than 0.9 in all cases with fatty liver. Jaundice in acute viral hepatitis can be easily differentiated from obstructive jaundice on CT scan because of observing no dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct. CT was superior in detecting space-occupying lesions to nuclear imaging and was more specific in that it was able to differentiate cystic from solid lesions. However, it was almost impossible to make a histological diagnosis of solid lesions even on CT scan. (author)

  3. Active form of vitamin D ameliorates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by alleviating oxidative stress in a high-fat diet rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chong-Gui; Liu, Ya-Xin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Bao-Ping; Qu, Hui-Qi; Wang, Bao-Li; Zhu, Mei

    2017-07-28

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether treatment using the active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) could protect against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in rats and ameliorate oxidative stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and treated with standard chow, HFD, or HFD plus intraperitoneal injection of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 (5 μg/kg body weight, twice per week), respectively, for 16 weeks. Serum lipid profiles, hepatic function, intrahepatic lipid, and calcium levels were determined. Hepatic histology was examined using hematoxylin/eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Oil Red O staining. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and F2α-isoprostane content. Expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and downstream target genes was analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 treatment improved the serum lipid profile, reduced intrahepatic lipid levels, and attenuated hepatic steatosis and inflammation in HFD rats. Furthermore, MDA and F2α-isoprostane levels in liver tissue were reduced by 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 administration. Although 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 did not regulate the expression of Nrf2 mRNA, it did induce Nrf2 nuclear translocation. The expression of Nrf2 target genes, including Gclc, Nqo1, Sod2, and Cat, was up-regulated by 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 . We conclude that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 protects against HFD-induced NAFLD by attenuating oxidative stress, inducing NRF2 nuclear translocation, and up-regulating the expression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes.

  4. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--new view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Lawniczak, Małgorzata; Marlicz, Wojciech; Miezyńska-Kurtycz, Joanna; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2008-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology--from steatosis alone, through the necroinflammatory disorder of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis and liver cancer. NAFLD/NASH is mostly related with visceral adiposity, obesity, type 2 diabetes melitus (DM t.2) and metabolic syndrome. Pathogenetic concepts of NAFLD include overnutrition and underactivity, insulin resistance (IR) and genetic factor. The prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated to be 17-33% in some countries, NASH may be present in about 1/3 of such cases, while 20-25% of NASH cases could progress to cirrhosis. NAFLD is now recognized as one of the most frequent reason of liver tests elevation without clinical symptoms. Insulin resistance is considering as having a central role in NAFLD pathogenesis. In hepatocytes, IR is related to hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, formation of advanced glycation end-products, increased free fatty acids and their metabolites, oxidative stress and altered profiles of adipocytokines. Early stages of fatty liver are clinically silent and include elevation of ALT and GGTP, hyperechogenic liver in USG and/or hepatomegaly. Among clinical symptoms, abdominal discomfort is relatively common as well as chronic fatigue. NAFLD/NASH is not a benign disease, progressive liver biopsy have shown histological progression of fibrosis in 32%, the estimated rate of cirrhosis development is 20% and a liver--related death is 12% over 10 years. No treatment has scientifically proved to ameliorate NAFLD or to avoid its progression. The various therapeutic alternatives are aimed at interfering with the risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder in order to prevent the progression to end-stage liver disease. The most important therapeutic measure is increasing insulin sensitivity by an attempt to change a lifestyle mostly by dieting and physical activity in order to loose weight. The most used agent is metformin, the others

  5. Role of autoimmunity in nonviral chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarapurkar, D N; Amarapurkar, A D

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and clinical profile of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in patients with chronic liver disease. Four hundred and thirty five consecutive patient with chronic liver disease seen in our department from January 1997 to December 1998 were studied with detailed history and clinical examination. All the patients underwent liver function tests, ultrasonography, isotope liver scanning, viral markers, autoimmune markers ANA, ASMA, LKM1 and AMA (by immunofluorescence technique) and liver histology whenever permissible. Appropriate work up for Wilson's disease was done whenever suspected clinically. Diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was made by the composite scoring system by international autoimmune hepatitis group. Twenty out of the 435 patients met the criteria of definite autoimmune hepatitis and seven patient had probable autoimmune hepatitis. Forty out of 408 patients showed markers of autoimmunity positive but did not qualify diagnosis of AIH on composite scores. Demographic profile of 27 patients with autoimmune hepatitis was as follows; male:female ratio 1:8, mean age 39.8 +/- 13 years (Range 4-65 years); mode of presentation as cirrhosis 11/27 (40.7%), chronic hepatitis 12/27 (44.4%) and acute hepatitis 4/27 (14.8%). Elevated serum bilirubin levels were seen in 12 (44.4%) patients while mean serum aminotransferases levels were 249 +/- 343 and 262 +/- 418 respectively. Other disease associations seen were as follows: diabetes in 4 (14.8%), rheumatoid arthritis in 3 (11%), hypothyroidism in 2 (7.4%) and ulcerative colitis in 1 (3.7%). The pattern of autoimmune markers was ANA +ve 23/27 (85%) (+ve titres of ANA > 1:80 in adults and 1:20 in children), ASMA +ve in 16/27 (59.2%) (+ve titres of ASMA > 1:40) and LKM1 in 3 patients. AMA in tires less than 1:80 was found in 3 patients. Liver histology changes seen were lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates (100%), bridging necrosis (93%), liver cell rossetting (80%) and fibrosis with or without cirrhosis (50

  6. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy in chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frusciante, V.; Barbano, F.; Btuno, M.; Facciorusso, D.; Tonti, P.; Giacobbe, A.; Andriulli, A.; Vettori, P.G.P.

    1993-01-01

    Portal circulation has been evaluated by per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 21 controls and in 30 pts affected by chronic liver diseases. Tc99m-pertechnetate (10 mci) was given through a Nelaton's catheter in the upper rectum; a per-rectal portal shunt index (SI) was calculated. A relevant overlap is evident between controls and CHP pts; no overlap exists between controls and B or C graded cirrhosis. We conclude that the technique may be suggested to monitor the course of chronic liver diseases and different therapeutic regimens. (orig.) [de

  7. Plasma fibronectin concentrations in patients with liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Dejgaard, A; Clemmensen, I

    1983-01-01

    age- and sex-matched healthy controls in patients with chronic persistent or chronic active hepatitis (n = 7), primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 8), alcoholic fatty liver (n = 9), alcoholic hepatitis (n = 10), and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 16). Patients with acute viral hepatitis (type A (n = 2); type B...... (n = 7); type non A, non B (n = 1] had significantly (P less than 0.01) raised plasma fibronectin concentrations (median 506 mg/l (range 339-804] compared to controls (median 399 mg/l (range 304-462]. Morbidly obese patients with fatty liver (n = 11) had significantly (P less than 0.001) raised......Plasma, obtained just prior to diagnostic liver biopsy in 71 patients with various liver diseases, was examined by electroimmunoassay using immunoglobulin against human fibronectin and purified plasma fibronectin as standard. The plasma fibronectin concentration was not significantly different from...

  8. Treatment and follow-up of children with common chronic liver diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Xintong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases in children greatly affect their growth and development and quality of life in future. There are many causes of chronic liver diseases in children, and such causes, diet, and treatment guidance are closely associated with prognosis. This article discusses the guidance and follow-up of common chronic liver diseases in children, such as infantile cholestatic liver disease, chronic hepatitis B, hepatolenticular degeneration, and nonalcoholic fatter liver disease, in order to deepen the understanding of these diseases among patients, raise the awareness of follow-up in medical staff, and improve the cure rate of liver diseases with different causes and children’s quality of life.

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment. (I). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its association with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically lesions similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in the Western world and, from the point of view of the liver, in its gradual progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with acceleration of arteriosclerosis and events related to it, being the main cause of its morbidity and mortality. This review, updated to January 2016, consists of two parts, with the first part analysing the association of NAFLD with cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Gut Microbiota and Host Reaction in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fukui

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although alcohol feeding produces evident intestinal microbial changes in animals, only some alcoholics show evident intestinal dysbiosis, a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Gut dysbiosis is related to intestinal hyperpermeability and endotoxemia in alcoholic patients. Alcoholics further exhibit reduced numbers of the beneficial Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Large amounts of endotoxins translocated from the gut strongly activate Toll-like receptor 4 in the liver and play an important role in the progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD, especially in severe alcoholic liver injury. Gut microbiota and bacterial endotoxins are further involved in some of the mechanisms of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. There is experimental evidence that a high-fat diet causes characteristic dysbiosis of NAFLD, with a decrease in Bacteroidetes and increases in Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and gut dysbiosis itself can induce hepatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome. Clinical data support the above dysbiosis, but the details are variable. Intestinal dysbiosis and endotoxemia greatly affect the cirrhotics in relation to major complications and prognosis. Metagenomic approaches to dysbiosis may be promising for the analysis of deranged host metabolism in NASH and cirrhosis. Management of dysbiosis may become a cornerstone for the future treatment of liver diseases.

  11. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-06-24

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis.

  12. [Comparison of the prognostic value of mortality Child Pugh Score and forecasting models of chronic liver disease in patients with decompensated cirrhosis of the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima-Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Granados, Vanessa; Salazar-Quiñones, Maria; Cheng-Zárate, Lester; Malpica-Castillo, Alexander; Huerta Mercado, Jorge; Ticse, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of prognosis is an essential part of the evaluation of all patients with liver cirrhosis. Currently continues to develop new models to optimize forecast accuracy mortality score is calculated by the Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) and the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD). Compare the prognostic accuracy of hospital mortality and short-term mortality CTP, MELD and other models in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Prospective descriptive study, comparison type of diagnostic test that included 84 patients. The score CTP, MELD and other models were calculated on the first day of hospitalization. The prognostic accuracy of mortality was assessed by the area under the ROC curve (AUROCs) of score CTP, MELD and other models. Hospital mortality and mortality in the short-term monitoring was 20 (23.8%) and 44 (52.4%), respectively. The AUROCs CTP, MELD, MELD Na, MESO, iMELD, RefitMELD and RefitMELD Na to predict hospital mortality was 0.4488, 0.5645, 0.5426, 0.5578, 0.5719, 0.5598 and 0.5754; and to predict short-term mortality was 0.5386, 0.5747, 0.5770, 0.5781, 0.5631, 0.5881 and 0.5693, respectively. By comparing each AUROCs of the CTP score, MELD and other models proved to be no better than the other (p>0.05). This study has not shown the predictive utility of the CTP score, MELD and other models (MELD Na, MESO, iMELD, Refit Refit MELD and MELD Na) to evaluate hospital mortality or short-term mortality in a sample of patients with decompensated cirrhosis of the Hospital Cayetano Heredia.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal diseases in patients with severe liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZANG Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs are an important factor affecting the prognosis of patients with severe liver diseases, and their early diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians. The four most commonly seen IFDs are candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and pneumocystis pneumonia. We should pay attention to the risk of developing IFDs in patients with severe liver diseases during clinical management. Particularly, early diagnosis and proper treatment of IFDs are important in high-risk patients. These are vital to improving the prognosis of patients with severe liver diseases.

  14. Assessment of tumor vascularization with functional computed tomography perfusion imaging in patients with cirrhotic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Ping; Zhao, De-Li; Jiang, Hui-Jie; Huang, Ya-Hua; Li, Da-Qing; Wan, Yong; Liu, Xin-Ding; Wang, Jin-E

    2011-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumor in China, and early diagnosis is critical for patient outcome. In patients with HCC, it is mostly based on liver cirrhosis, developing from benign regenerative nodules and dysplastic nodules to HCC lesions, and a better understanding of its vascular supply and the hemodynamic changes may lead to early tumor detection. Angiogenesis is essential for the growth of primary and metastatic tumors due to changes in vascular perfusion, blood volume and permeability. These hemodynamic and physiological properties can be measured serially using functional computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging and can be used to assess the growth of HCC. This study aimed to clarify the physiological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis in cirrhotic liver disease by this fast imaging method. CTP was performed in 30 volunteers without liver disease (control subjects) and 49 patients with liver disease (experimental subjects: 27 with HCC and 22 with cirrhosis). All subjects were also evaluated by physical examination, laboratory screening and Doppler ultrasonography of the liver. The diagnosis of HCC was made according to the EASL criteria. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, pre- and post-contrast triple-phase CT and CTP study. A mathematical deconvolution model was applied to provide hepatic blood flow (HBF), hepatic blood volume (HBV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability of capillary vessel surface (PS), hepatic arterial index (HAI), hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP) and hepatic portal perfusion (HPP) data. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine differences in perfusion parameters between the background cirrhotic liver parenchyma and HCC and between the cirrhotic liver parenchyma with HCC and that without HCC. In normal liver, the HAP/HVP ratio was about 1/4. HCC had significantly higher HAP and HAI and lower HPP than background liver parenchyma adjacent to the HCC. The value of HBF at the tumor

  15. Serum adipokines might predict liver histology findings in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Raika; Razavizade, Mohsen; Arj, Abbas; Aarabi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-07

    To assess significance of serum adipokines to determine the histological severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients with persistent elevation in serum aminotransferase levels and well-defined characteristics of fatty liver at ultrasound were enrolled. Individuals with a history of alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic medication, viral hepatitis or known liver disease were excluded. Liver biopsy was performed to confirm non-alcoholic liver disease (NAFLD). The degrees of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis were determined based on the non-alcoholic fatty liver activity score (NAS) by a single expert pathologist. Patients with a NAS of five or higher were considered to have steatohepatitis. Those with a NAS of two or lower were defined as simple fatty liver. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent association of adipokines with histological findings. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to determine cut-off values of serum adipokines to discriminate the grades of liver steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis. Fifty-four participants aged 37.02 ± 9.82 were enrolled in the study. Higher serum levels of visfatin, IL-8, TNF-α levels were associated independently with steatosis grade of more than 33% [β = 1.08 (95%CI: 1.03-1.14), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.008-1.07), 1.04 (95%CI: 1.004-1.08), P < 0.05]. Elevated serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels were associated independently with advanced lobular inflammation [β = 1.4 (95%CI: 1.09-1.8), 1.07 (95%CI: 1.003-1.15), P < 0.05]. Similarly, higher TNF-α, resistin, and hepcidin levels were associated independently with advanced fibrosis stage [β = 1.06 (95%CI: 1.002-1.12), 19.86 (95%CI: 2.79-141.19), 560.72 (95%CI: 5.98-5255.33), P < 0.05]. Serum IL-8 and TNF-α values were associated independently with the NAS score, considering a NAS score of 5 as the reference value [β = 1.05 (95%CI: 1.01-1.1), 1.13 (95%CI: 1.04-1.22), P < 0.05]. Certain adipokines may

  16. Computer tomography in the diagnosis of liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, D.; Zhelyazkov, S.; Nedelkov, G.

    1983-01-01

    The modern achievements in the clinical study and diagnosis of liver diseases has definitely been associated with the application of whole body computer tomography (CT) in the practice. The diagnostic possibilities of the method come from high contrast and spacial disjunctive capabilities. Visualization of local lesions is associated with their size and the differences in their densitometric compactness from that of the normal parenchyma. The advantages of computer tomography in the diagnosis of liver diseases is discussed. They are associated with the possibilities for densitometric analysis of the pathologic changes, which opens a way for a probable qualitative diagnosis. Diffuse processes in the liver are relative indication for performing computer tomography. Examination under conditions of contrast amplification is indicated in cases when the nature of the lesion has to be specified and a ''negative'' result does not concur with the clinical manifestations. (authors)

  17. Comparison of CT and scintigraphy in diseases of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenig, H.G.; Wegener, O.H.; Souchon, R.; Ziegler, U.; Koppenhagen, K.

    1979-01-01

    Sixty-five patients with various diseases of the liver were examined by CT and scintigraphy. We found the following preliminary conclusions: diffusely infiltrative and hepatocellular diseases of the liver, espacially cirrhosis, are recognized on CT by shape and contour rather than by density values. In these cases, scintigraphy provides important information about the function of the parenchyma. In space-occupying processes, a close correlation exists between CT and scintigraphy. In the investigation of liver metastases in advanced stages, CT and radionuclide studies proved to be nearly identical in accuracy. The advantages of CT consist in the possibility of showing more morphologic detail of adjacent organs and in possessing better spatial resolution. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world comprising a spectrum of liver damage from fatty liver infiltration to end-stage liver disease, in patients without significant alcohol consumption. Increased prevalence of NAFLD has been reported in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common endocrinopathies in premenopausal women, which has been redefined as a reproductive and metabolic disorder after the recognition of the important role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Obesity, in particular central adiposity and insulin resistance are considered as the main factors related to NAFLD in PCOS. Moreover, existing data support that androgen excess, which is the main feature of PCOS and is interrelated to insulin resistance, may be an additional contributing factor to the development of NAFLD. Although the natural history of NAFLD remains unclear and hepatic steatosis seems to be a relatively benign condition in most patients, limited data imply that advanced stage of liver disease is possibly more frequent in obese PCOS patients with NAFLD. PCOS patients, particularly obese patients with features of the metabolic syndrome, should be submitted to screening for NAFLD comprising assessment of serum aminotransferase levels and of hepatic steatosis by abdominal ultrasound. Lifestyle modifications including diet, weight loss and exercise are the most appropriate initial therapeutic interventions for PCOS patients with NAFLD. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, metformin may be used, although currently there is no medical therapy of proven benefit for NAFLD. Long-term follow up studies are needed to clarify clinical implications and guide appropriate diagnostic evaluation, follow-up protocol and optimal treatment for PCOS patients with NAFLD. PMID:25024594

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilatou, Evangeline

    2014-07-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world comprising a spectrum of liver damage from fatty liver infiltration to end-stage liver disease, in patients without significant alcohol consumption. Increased prevalence of NAFLD has been reported in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common endocrinopathies in premenopausal women, which has been redefined as a reproductive and metabolic disorder after the recognition of the important role of insulin resistance in the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Obesity, in particular central adiposity and insulin resistance are considered as the main factors related to NAFLD in PCOS. Moreover, existing data support that androgen excess, which is the main feature of PCOS and is interrelated to insulin resistance, may be an additional contributing factor to the development of NAFLD. Although the natural history of NAFLD remains unclear and hepatic steatosis seems to be a relatively benign condition in most patients, limited data imply that advanced stage of liver disease is possibly more frequent in obese PCOS patients with NAFLD. PCOS patients, particularly obese patients with features of the metabolic syndrome, should be submitted to screening for NAFLD comprising assessment of serum aminotransferase levels and of hepatic steatosis by abdominal ultrasound. Lifestyle modifications including diet, weight loss and exercise are the most appropriate initial therapeutic interventions for PCOS patients with NAFLD. When pharmacologic therapy is considered, metformin may be used, although currently there is no medical therapy of proven benefit for NAFLD. Long-term follow up studies are needed to clarify clinical implications and guide appropriate diagnostic evaluation, follow-up protocol and optimal treatment for PCOS patients with NAFLD.

  20. Sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue in MCD diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Kim, Sang-Nam; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jeong-Dong; Oh, Ji Youn; Jung, Young-Suk

    2016-07-26

    Higher susceptibility to metabolic disease in male exemplifies the importance of sexual dimorphism in pathogenesis. We hypothesized that the higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in males involves sex-specific metabolic interactions between liver and adipose tissue. In the present study, we used a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced fatty liver mouse model to investigate sex differences in the metabolic response of the liver and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks on an MCD-diet, fatty liver was induced in a sex-specific manner, affecting male mice more severely than females. The MCD-diet increased lipolytic enzymes in the gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) of male mice, whereas it increased expression of uncoupling protein 1 and other brown adipocyte markers in the gWAT of female mice. Moreover, gWAT from female mice demonstrated higher levels of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial content compared to gWAT from male mice. FGF21 expression was increased in liver tissue by the MCD diet, and the degree of upregulation was significantly higher in the livers of female mice. The endocrine effect of FGF21 was responsible, in part, for the sex-specific browning of gonadal white adipose tissue. Collectively, these data demonstrated that distinctively female-specific browning of white adipose tissue aids in protecting female mice against MCD diet-induced fatty liver disease.

  1. Three-dimensional printing and pediatric liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouri, Naim; Zein, Nizar N

    2016-10-01

    Enthusiastic physicians and medical researchers are investigating the role of three-dimensional printing in medicine. The purpose of the current review is to provide a concise summary of the role of three-dimensional printing technology as it relates to the field of pediatric hepatology and liver transplantation. Our group and others have recently demonstrated the feasibility of printing three-dimensional livers with identical anatomical and geometrical landmarks to the native liver to facilitate presurgical planning of complex liver surgeries. Medical educators are exploring the use of three-dimensional printed organs in anatomy classes and surgical residencies. Moreover, mini-livers are being developed by regenerative medicine scientist as a way to test new drugs and, eventually, whole livers will be grown in the laboratory to replace organs with end-stage disease solving the organ shortage problem. From presurgical planning to medical education to ultimately the bioprinting of whole organs for transplantation, three-dimensional printing will change medicine as we know in the next few years.

  2. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Coagulation activity in liver disease | Reza | Internet Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation ...

  4. Current and future therapies for inherited cholestatic liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woerd, Wendy L.; Houwen, Roderick Hj; van de Graaf, Stan Fj

    2017-01-01

    Familial intrahepatic cholestasis (FIC) comprises a group of rare cholestatic liver diseases associated with canalicular transport defects resulting predominantly from mutations in ATP8B1, ABCB11 and ABCB4. Phenotypes range from benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC), associated with

  5. Nutritional support of children with chronic liver disease | Nel | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diets are usually enriched with medium-chain fatty acids because of their better absorption in cholestatic liver disease. High-dose fat-soluble vitamin supplements are given while care is taken to avoid toxicity. Initial doses are two to three times the RDI and then adjusted according to serum levels or international normalised ...

  6. Role of folate in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sid, Victoria; Siow, Yaw L; O, Karmin

    2017-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of chronic liver conditions that are characterized by steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and liver injury. The global prevalence of NAFLD is rapidly increasing in proportion to the rising incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because NAFLD is a multifaceted disorder with many underlying metabolic abnormalities, currently, there is no pharmacological agent that is therapeutically approved for the treatment of this disease. Folate is a water-soluble B vitamin that plays an essential role in one-carbon transfer reactions involved in nucleic acid biosynthesis, methylation reactions, and sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism. The liver is the primary organ responsible for storage and metabolism of folates. Low serum folate levels have been observed in patients with obesity and diabetes. It has been reported that a low level of endogenous folates in rodents perturbs folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism, and may be associated with development of metabolic diseases such as NAFLD. This review highlights the biological role of folate in the progression of NAFLD and its associated metabolic complications including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Understanding the role of folate in metabolic disease may position this vitamin as a potential therapeutic for NAFLD.

  7. [Nutritional Assessment and Management for Patients with Chronic Liver Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hee

    2018-04-25

    When liver disease is severe, the prognosis can be worse if the patient is malnourished. Adequate nutritional support for patients with liver diseases can improve the patient's condition and prognosis. In the case of liver cirrhosis, malnutrition can occur due to a variety of causes, including poor oral intake, maldigestion, malabsorption, associated renal disease, and metabolic abnormalities. For a nutritional assessment, it is important to check the dietary intake, change in body composition, including anthropometry, and a functional assessment of muscle. Counselling and oral or enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition as in other diseases. If esophageal varices are present, care should be taken when installing a feeding tube, but if there are ascites, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated because of the risk of complications. Calories of 30-35 kcal/kg/day and protein from 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg/day are appropriate. Protein restriction is unnecessary unless the hepatic encephalopathy is severe. A late evening snack and branched chain amino acids can be helpful. In the case of cholestasis, the supply of manganese and copper should be restricted. Sarcopenia in patients with liver cirrhosis is also prevalent and associated with the prognosis.

  8. Stem Cells and Liver Disease | Akhter | Internet Journal of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver transplantation is the primary treatment for various end-stage hepatic diseases but is hindered by the lack of donor organs, complications associated with rejection and immunosuppression. An increasingly unbridgeable gap exists between the supply and demand of transplantable organs. Hence stem cell research ...

  9. Pattern of liver disease admissions in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-19

    Sep 19, 2012 ... Objective: Liver disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Its pattern ... (49.4%), ingestion of herbs and roots (45.5%) and cigarette smoking (30.1%). Conclusion: ... E mail: scnwokediuko@yahoo.com.

  10. 13 Research Article ABSTRACT Liver diseases in HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-10

    Nov 10, 2016 ... Liver diseases in HIV infected persons can occur due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus ... immunochromatographic test in Yaoundé central hospital, from ..... Hepatitis. B and C virus co-infection in The TREAT Asia.

  11. Alcohol Consumption and Viral Hepatitis in Chronic Liver Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Precise assessment of the risks and interactions of alcohol consumption and viral hepatitis in the aetiology of chronic liver disease [CLD] are not locally available. Methodology: 74 patients with CLD and 74 controls were evaluated for Hepatitis B and C infection [anti-HCV, HBsAg]. The type and amount of ...

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) among type 2 diabetic patients is completely ignored in developing regions like Africa paving the way for public health and economic burden in the region. Therefore, the main objective of this research was to evaluate non-alcoholic ...

  13. [Bio-ecological control of chronic liver disease and encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengmark, S; Di Cocco, P; Clemente, K; Corona, L; Angelico, R; Manzia, T; Famulari, A; Pisani, F; Orlando, G

    2011-08-01

    Minimal encephalopathy was originally associated with chronic liver disease but is increasingly associated with most other chronic diseases and particularly with diabetes and also chronic disorders in other organs: kidneys, lungs, thyroid and with obesity. It is increasingly with dramatically increased and more or less permanent increase in systemic inflammation, most likely a result of Western lifestyle. Frequent physical exercise and intake of foods rich in vitamins, antioxidants, fibres, lactic acid bacteria etc in combination with reduction in intake of refined and processed foods is known to reduce systemic inflammation and prevent chronic diseases. Some lactic acid bacteria, especially Lb paracasei, lb plantarum and pediococcus pentosaceus have proven effective to reduce inflammation and eliminate encephalopathy. Significant reduction in blood ammonia levels and endotoxin levels were reported in parallel to improvement of liver disease. Subsequent studies with other lactic acid bacteria seem to demonstrate suppression of inflammation and one study also provides evidence of clinical improvement.

  14. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An expanded review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Mark; Zhang, Xuchen

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses the simple steatosis to more progressive steatosis with associated hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in some cases hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is a growing epidemic, not only in the United States, but worldwide in part due to obesity and insulin resistance leading to liver accumulation of triglycerides and free fatty acids. Numerous risk factors for the development of NAFLD have been espoused with most having some form of metabolic derangement or insulin resistance at the core of its pathophysiology. NAFLD patients are at increased risk of liver-related as well as cardiovascular mortality, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the leading indication for liver transplantation. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for definitive diagnosis, but the development of noninvasive advanced imaging, biochemical and genetic tests will no doubt provide future clinicians with a great deal of information and opportunity for enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis and targeted treatment. As it currently stands several medications/supplements are being used in the treatment of NAFLD; however, none seem to be the “magic bullet” in curtailing this growing problem yet. In this review we summarized the current knowledge of NAFLD epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, pathogenesis, pathologic changes, natural history, and treatment in order to aid in further understanding this disease and better managing NAFLD patients. PMID:28652891

  15. Metabolic Disturbances in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver disease results in complex pathophysiologic disturbances affecting nutrient digestion, absorption, distribution, storage, and use. This article aimed to present a classification of metabolic disturbances in chronic liver disease in children?   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"  ” metabolic disorder””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 8 related articles have been found.   Results: Metabolic disorder in this population could be categorized in four set: 1carbohydrates, 2proteins,3 fats and 4vitamins. 1 Carbohydrates: Children with CLD are at increased risk for fasting hypoglycemia, because the capacity for glycogen storage and gluconeogenesis is reduced as a result of abnormal hepatocyte function and loss of hepatocyte mass. 2 Proteins: The liver’s capacity for plasma protein synthesis is impaired by reduced substrate availability, impaired hepatocyte function, and increased catabolism. This results in hypoalbuminemia, leading to peripheral edema and contributing to ascites. Reduced synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and its binding protein IGF-BP3 by the chronically diseased liver results in growth hormone resistance and may contribute to the poor growth observed in these children. 3 Fats: There is increased fat oxidation in children with end-stage liver disease in the fed and fasting states compared with controls, which is probably related to reduced carbohydrate availability. The increased lipolysis results in a decrease in fat stores, which may not be easily replenished in the setting of the fat malabsorption that accompanies cholestasis. Reduced bile delivery to the gut results in impaired fat emulsification, and hence digestion. The products of fat digestion are also poorly absorbed, because bile is also required for micelle formation

  16. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  17. Pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis: the link between hypercortisolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Giovanni; Finelli, Carmine

    2013-10-28

    Based on the available literature, non alcoholic fatty liver disease or generally speaking, hepatic steatosis, is more frequent among people with diabetes and obesity, and is almost universally present amongst morbidly obese diabetic patients. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is being increasingly recognized as a common liver condition in the developed world, with non alcoholic steatohepatitis projected to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Previous data report that only 20% of patients with Cushing's syndrome have hepatic steatosis. Aiming at clarifying the reasons whereby patients suffering from Cushing's syndrome - a condition characterized by profound metabolic changes - present low prevalence of hepatic steatosis, the Authors reviewed the current concepts on the link between hypercortisolism and obesity/metabolic syndrome. They hypothesize that this low prevalence of fat accumulation in the liver of patients with Cushing's syndrome could result from the inhibition of the so-called low-grade chronic-inflammation, mainly mediated by Interleukin 6, due to an excess of cortisol, a hormone characterized by an anti-inflammatory effect. The Cushing's syndrome, speculatively considered as an in vivo model of the hepatic steatosis, could also help clarify the mechanisms of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  18. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  19. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Vikram; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit; Shull, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na + /H + exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors

  20. NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AT OUR INSTITUTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION A Correlation clinical observational hospital based clinical study with 50 patients were undertaken to study the Clinical Profile of incidentally detected Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. The cases for the study were selected retrospectively who were diagnosed as fatty liver by ultrasound imaging who attended the Department of General Medicine, Government General Hospital Kakinada Rangaraya Medical College. Data has been enumerated for those who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. This study was conducted between January 2013-January 2015. The study has limitations of observer variant dependent diagnostic ultrasound for inclusion in to study. A BMI of>25 kg/m2 taken as definition for obesity for analysis.

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : Risk factors for recurrence and De novo disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonka, RC; Dijkstra, G; Haagsma, EB; Shostrom, VK; Van den Berg, AP; Kleibeuker, JH

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and can recur or develop de novo after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of IBD after liver

  2. Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, R; Ortiz, A; Hernández, R; López, V; Gómez, M M; Mena, P

    1996-09-01

    Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity, together with malondialdehyde levels, were determined as indicators of peroxidation in 83 patients from whom liver biopsies had been taken for diagnostic purposes. On histological study, the patients were classified into groups as minimal changes (including normal liver), steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, light to moderately active chronic hepatitis, and severe chronic active hepatitis. The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes showed no significant changes in any liver disease group. In the hepatic study, an increased activity was observed in steatosis with respect to the minimal changes group, this increased activity induced by the toxic agent in the initial stages of the alcoholic hepatic disease declining as the hepatic damage progressed. There was a negative correlation between the levels of hepatic malondialdehyde and hepatic glutathione peroxidase in subjects with minimal changes. This suggested the existence of an oxidative equilibrium in this group. This equilibrium is broken in the liver disease groups as was manifest in a positive correlation between malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase activity.

  3. Focus on Therapeutic Strategies of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Durazzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world (it affects 30% of the general adult population. The NAFLD encompasses a histological spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, defined by steatosis, hepatocellular damage, and lobular inflammation in individuals without significant alcohol consumption and negative viral, congenital, and autoimmune liver disease markers. Currently, NAFLD is considered an emerging epidemic in light of the dramatic increase in obesity rates. With the progressive nature of NASH and its rising prevalence there is a significant need for a specific and targeted treatments since to date there has not been any validated therapies for NAFLD other than weight loss, which is well known to have a poor long-term success rate. In recent years, visceral adipose tissue has taken an important role in NAFLD pathogenesis, and current therapeutic approaches aim at reducing visceral obesity and free fatty acid overflow to the liver. This paper is focused on the treatments used for NAFLD and the potential new therapy.

  4. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal “self” cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a “two-edged weapon” and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease.

  5. Angiogenesis-Related Biomarkers in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease: Their Association with Liver Disease Complications and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kasztelan-Szczerbinska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is believed to be implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD. We aimed to explore the usefulness and accuracy of plasma angiogenic biomarkers for noninvasive evaluation of the severity of liver failure and ALD outcome. One hundred and forty-seven patients with ALD were prospectively enrolled and assessed based on their (1 gender, (2 age, (3 severity of liver dysfunction according to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh and MELD scores, and (4 the presence of ALD complications. Plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A and angiopoietins 1 and 2 (Ang1 and Ang2 were investigated using ELISAs. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Significantly higher concentrations of Ang2 and VEGF-A in ALD patients as compared to controls were found. There was no difference in Ang1 levels in both groups. A positive correlation of Ang2 levels with INR (Rho 0.66; P<0.0001 and its inverse correlation with plasma albumin levels (Rho –0.62; P<0.0001 were found. High Ang2 concentrations turned out to be an independent predictor of severe liver dysfunction, as well as hepatic encephalopathy and renal impairment. Ang2 possessed the highest diagnostic and prognostic potential among three studied angiogenesis-related molecules.

  6. The Relationship Between Fatty Liver Disease and Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent and destructive chronic disease. Numerous studies support an association between periodontal disease and other...destruction seen in periodontal disease. The association between the two diseases has never been investigated. A reasonable mechanism in which periodontal ...disease may play a role in the destruction seen in NAFLD is the remote site infection of periodontal disease. Chewing and oral hygiene measures lead to

  7. Computerized tomography in diffuse diseases of the liver. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, H.; Vogel, U.; Bautz, W.

    1993-01-01

    Computerized tomography is a first-line method of imaging to confirm diffuse disorders of the liver suggested by preliminary clinical and biochemical findings. If the disease is caused by an obstructed vessel, this is reliably detected. For most types of thesaurismosis as well as hepatic steatosis and cirrhosis of the liver approaches to quantitative determinations of the spread of disease have been described in theory but so far failed to show great merits in practice. The transition from hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis as the final developmental stage common to all those disorders has typical features on computerized tomography. This explains why the use of this method in diffuse hepatic disease offers particular advantages as regards the detection of complications occurring at an advanced stage ot the diagnosis of changes developing into malignancies. (orig.) [de

  8. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD.

  9. [Liver diseases in high-production cows with ruminal acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I B; Mikhaĭlov, G; Pham, T H

    1987-01-01

    Studied was the relation of the subclinical, recurring, and chronic rumen acidosis, on the one hand, to the disturbed function, resp., injuries of the liver, on the other. Experiments were carried out with a total of 862 high-producing cows, 54 out of which had massive injuries of the liver. Full clinical examination was performed, 22 of the animals being subject to laboratory investigations with regard to the rumen content (pH, infusorial count per 1 cm3 with the differentiation of bacteria, activity with regard to glucose, nitrates, sedimentation, and flotation), blood (whole blood picture, coagulation tests, bilirubin, SGOT, SGPT, serum aldolase, alkaline phosphatase, alkaline reserves, blood sugar), and urine (pH, protein, ketone bodies, sugar, and CSR). It is concluded that three inferences could be drawn, pointing to the relation between recurring rumen acidosis and the liver diseases.

  10. Lipocalin-2 in Fructose-Induced Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Lambertz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The intake of excess dietary fructose most often leads to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Fructose is metabolized mainly in the liver and its chronic consumption results in lipogenic gene expression in this organ. However, precisely how fructose is involved in NAFLD progression is still not fully understood, limiting therapy. Lipocalin-2 (LCN2 is a small secreted transport protein that binds to fatty acids, phospholipids, steroids, retinol, and pheromones. LCN2 regulates lipid and energy metabolism in obesity and is upregulated in response to insulin. We previously discovered that LCN2 has a hepatoprotective effect during hepatic insult, and that its upregulation is a marker of liver damage and inflammation. To investigate if LCN2 has impact on the metabolism of fructose and thereby arising liver damage, we fed wild type and Lcn2−/− mice for 4 or 8 weeks on diets that were enriched in fructose either by adding this sugar to the drinking water (30% w/v, or by feeding a chow containing 60% (w/w fructose. Body weight and daily intake of food and water of these mice was then measured. Fat content in liver sections was visualized using Oil Red O stain, and expression levels of genes involved in fat and sugar metabolism were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. We found that fructose-induced steatosis and liver damage was more prominent in female than in male mice, but that the most severe hepatic damage occurred in female mice lacking LCN2. Unexpectedly, consumption of elevated fructose did not induce de novo lipogenesis or fat accumulation. We conclude that LCN2 acts in a lipid-independent manner to protect the liver against fructose-induced damage.

  11. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Beneficial Effects of Flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Masoumeh

    2016-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been known as the hepatic feature of metabolic syndrome. Extra fat depots, especially in visceral areas, develop insulin resistance as a result of mild oxidation and inflammation. Insulin resistance induces lipolysis and releases free fatty acids into the circulation, where they are transported to the liver. In the liver, free fatty acids are converted to triglycerides and accumulate, causing simple steatosis that, if left untreated, can lead to steatohepatitis, and subsequently liver necrosis and cirrhosis.Flavonoids, a group of plant compounds with incredible biological characteristics, have shown advantages in pathological conditions. Beneficial effects of flavonoids against NAFLD and its related disorders have been observed in both animal and human studies. Various mechanisms have been found for their protection. Flavonoids prevent hepatosteatosis by increasing fatty acid oxidation in the liver. They can also reduce caloric intake and decrease body weight and fat deposition in visceral tissues. Flavonoids are unique antioxidants that exert their beneficial effects through inhibition of nuclear factor κB, thereby attenuating release of inflammatory cytokines, which are triggers of insulin resistance. Finally, flavonoids have shown to increase adiponectin, improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, correct dyslipidemia, and reduce blood pressure in patients with NAFLD. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Disease in Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myungsoo Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastasis in solid tumors, including colorectal cancer, is the most frequent and lethal complication. The development of systemic therapy has led to prolonged survival. However, in selected patients with a finite number of discrete lesions in liver, defined as oligometastatic state, additional local therapies such as surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation, cryotherapy, and radiotherapy can lead to permanent local disease control and improve survival. Among these, an advance in radiation therapy made it possible to deliver high dose radiation to the tumor more accurately, without impairing the liver function. In recent years, the introduction of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has offered even more intensive tumor dose escalation in a few fractions with reduced dose to the adjacent normal liver. Many studies have shown that SABR for oligometastases is effective and safe, with local control rates widely ranging from 50% to 100% at one or two years. And actuarial survival at one and two years has been reported ranging from 72% to 94% and from 30% to 62%, respectively, without severe toxicities. In this paper, we described the definition and technical aspects of SABR, clinical outcomes including efficacy and toxicity, and related parameters after SABR in liver oligometastases from colorectal cancer.

  13. Liver Toxicity of Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Use in an Adolescent with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awai, Hannah I; Yu, Elizabeth L; Ellis, Linda S; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related morbidities such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is high among adolescents. Current treatment recommendations for NAFLD focus on lifestyle optimization via nutrition and exercise. After encouraging exercise, many adolescents choose to participate in organized sports, which may lead to use of illicit substances such as anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) to boost athletic performance. Approximately 3,000,000 individuals use non-therapeutic AAS at supra-physiologic doses in the United States.1 In 2012, 5.9% of adolescent boys reported steroid use in the previous year.2 We anticipate adolescents with pre-existing liver disease are at increased risk for AAS induced hepatotoxicity. We present such a case with IRB approval and written individual patient consent. PMID:23568051

  14. Functional pitch of a liver: fatty liver disease diagnosis with photoacoustic spectrum analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhuoxian; Lin, Jiandie; Carson, Paul; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    To provide more information for classification and assessment of biological tissues, photoacoustic spectrum analysis (PASA) moves beyond the quantification of the intensities of the photoacoustic (PA) signals by the use of the frequency-domain power distribution, namely power spectrum, of broadband PA signals. The method of PASA quantifies the linear-fit to the power spectrum of the PA signals from a biological tissue with 3 parameters, including intercept, midband-fit and slope. Intercept and midband-fit reflect the total optical absorption of the tissues whereas slope reflects the heterogeneity of the tissue structure. Taking advantage of the optical absorption contrasts contributed by lipid and blood at 1200 and 532 nm, respectively and the heterogeneous tissue microstructure in fatty liver due to the lipid infiltration, we investigate the capability of PASA in identifying histological changes of fatty livers in mouse model. 6 and 9 pairs of normal and fatty liver tissues from rat models were examined by ex vivo experiment with a conventional rotational PA measurement system. One pair of rat models with normal and fatty livers was examined non-invasively and in situ with our recently developed ultrasound and PA parallel imaging system. The results support our hypotheses that the spectrum analysis of PA signals can provide quantitative measures of the differences between the normal and fatty liver tissues and that part of the PA power spectrum can suffice for characterization of microstructures in biological tissues. Experimental results also indicate that the vibrational absorption peak of lipid at 1200nm could facilitate fatty liver diagnosis.

  15. Ursodeoxycholic acid for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Katharine; Ashby, Deborah; Smyth, Rosalind L

    2017-09-11

    Abnormal biliary secretion leads to the thickening of bile and the formation of plugs within the bile ducts; the consequent obstruction and abnormal bile flow ultimately results in the development of cystic fibrosis-related liver disease. This condition peaks in adolescence with up to 20% of adolescents with cystic fibrosis developing chronic liver disease. Early changes in the liver may ultimately result in end-stage liver disease with people needing transplantation. One therapeutic option currently used is ursodeoxycholic acid. This is an update of a previous review. To analyse evidence that ursodeoxycholic acid improves indices of liver function, reduces the risk of developing chronic liver disease and improves outcomes in general in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane CF and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We also contacted drug companies and searched online trial registries.Date of the most recent search of the Group's trials register: 09 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials of the use of ursodeoxycholic acid for at least three months compared with placebo or no additional treatment in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and quality. The authors used GRADE to assess the quality of the evidence. Twelve trials have been identified, of which four trials involving 137 participants were included; data were only available from three of the trials (118 participants) since one cross-over trial did not report appropriate data. The dose of ursodeoxycholic acid ranged from 10 to 20 mg/kg/day for up to 12 months. The complex design used in two trials meant that data could only be analysed for subsets of participants. There was no significant difference in weight change, mean difference -0.90 kg (95% confidence interval -1.94 to 0.14) based on 30

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the liver disease of our age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients.

  17. Modeled Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) Exposure and Liver Function in a Mid-Ohio Valley Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Lyndsey A; Groth, Alyx C; Winquist, Andrea; Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Bartell, Scott M; Steenland, Kyle

    2016-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA or C8) has hepatotoxic effects in animals. Cross-sectional epidemiologic studies suggest PFOA is associated with liver injury biomarkers. We estimated associations between modeled historical PFOA exposures and liver injury biomarkers and medically validated liver disease. Participants completed surveys during 2008-2011 reporting demographic, medical, and residential history information. Self-reported liver disease, including hepatitis, fatty liver, enlarged liver and cirrhosis, was validated with healthcare providers. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and direct bilirubin, markers of liver toxicity, were obtained from blood samples collected in the C8 Health Project (2005-2006). Historically modeled PFOA exposure, estimated using environmental fate and transport models and participant residential histories, was analyzed in relation to liver biomarkers (n = 30,723, including 1,892 workers) and liver disease (n = 32,254, including 3,713 workers). Modeled cumulative serum PFOA was positively associated with ALT levels (p for trend indicating possible liver toxicity. An increase from the first to the fifth quintile of cumulative PFOA exposure was associated with a 6% increase in ALT levels (95% CI: 4, 8%) and a 16% increased odds of having above-normal ALT (95% CI: odds ratio: 1.02, 1.33%). There was no indication of association with either elevated direct bilirubin or GGT; however, PFOA was associated with decreased direct bilirubin. We observed no evidence of an effect of cumulative exposure (with or without a 10-year lag) on all liver disease (n = 647 cases), nor on enlarged liver, fatty liver, and cirrhosis only (n = 427 cases). Results are consistent with previous cross-sectional studies showing association between PFOA and ALT, a marker of hepatocellular damage. We did not observe evidence that PFOA increases the risk of clinically diagnosed liver disease. Darrow LA, Groth AC, Winquist A, Shin HM, Bartell SM

  18. DMPD: Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10807517 Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases....l) Show Pathophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. PubmedID 10807517 Title P...athophysiological roles of interleukin-18 in inflammatory liver diseases. Authors

  19. Flow, Liver, Flow: A Retrospective Analysis of the Interplay of Liver Disease and Coagulopathy in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolcun, John Paul George; Gernsback, Joanna Elizabeth; Richardson, Angela Mae; Jagid, Jonathan Russell

    2017-06-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a common neurosurgical ailment, particularly in elderly patients. A recent study uncovered an association between liver disease and recurrence in patients with cSDH. Here, we explored that relationship to identify recurrence predictors in at-risk patients. We hypothesized that the association between liver disease and recurrence was attributable to coagulopathy secondary to liver disease. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with cSDH treated with burr-hole drainage by 2 surgeons between 2007 and 2015. Comorbidities and laboratory findings for each patient were examined by Pearson χ 2 analysis or Mann-Whitney U tests. We identified 261 cSDH in 215 patients. Patients were a mean age of 65.6 years, and 72% were male. Sixteen patients with cSDH required repeat surgery (6.1%). There were 123 coagulopathic patients (47.1%), and 14 with liver disease (5.4%), all of whom were coagulopathic (P < 0.001). Coagulopathic patients with liver disease were more likely to experience recurrence than patients with coagulopathy alone (relative risk = 4.09, P = 0.019). Patients with liver disease had significantly elevated prothrombin time (P = 0.013) and reduced platelet counts (P < 0.001). Platelets also were reduced in coagulopathic patients with liver disease, as compared with those with coagulopathy alone (P = 0.002). Thrombocytopenia remained significant in a multivariate analysis (P < 0.001). Liver disease is significantly associated with the recurrence of cSDH. Although coagulopathy alone does not predict recurrence, patients with coagulopathy and liver disease are at greater risk for recurrence than those with coagulopathy alone. Liver disease effects are reflected in certain hematologic laboratory values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gallstone disease is associated with more severe liver damage in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ludovica Fracanzani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and gallstone disease (GD are both highly prevalent in the general population and associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of GD in a cross sectional study of NAFLD patients and to define whether the presence of GD is associated with diabetes and predicts more severe liver disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We merged databases of four Liver Units, comprising 524 consecutive biopsy-proven NAFLD (373 males observed between January 2003 and June 2010. GD was diagnosed in 108 (20%, and 313 cases (60% were classified by liver biopsy as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. The GD subgroup was characterized by a significantly higher prevalence of females, prediabetes/diabetes, abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome, older age, higher BMI, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and lower ALT. The prevalence of GD progressively increased with advancing fibrosis and with the severity of necroinflammatory activity (p for trend  = 0.0001 and  = 0.01, respectively, without differences in the severity of steatosis. At multivariate analysis GD was associated with female gender (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.04-1.8, age (OR 1.027, 95% CI1.003-1.05, fasting glucose (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.10-1.33 and NASH (OR 1.40,95% CI 1.06-1.89, whereas ALT levels were associated with a lower GD risk (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99. When subjects with cirrhosis were excluded from analysis, the association between GD and fasting glucose, female gender, and NASH was maintained. CONCLUSION: Patients with NAFLD have a high prevalence of GD, which characterizes subjects with altered glucose regulation and more advanced liver disease.

  1. Epicardial Adipose Tissue (EAT Thickness Is Associated with Cardiovascular and Liver Damage in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ludovica Fracanzani

    Full Text Available Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT has been proposed as a cardiometabolic and hepatic fibrosis risk factor in patients with non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of EAT in NAFLD by analyzing 1 the association between EAT, the other metabolic parameters and the severity of steatosis 2 the relationship between cardiovascular (cIMT, cplaques, E/A, liver (presence of NASH and significant fibrosis damage and metabolic risk factors including EAT 3 the relationship between EAT and genetic factors strongly influencing liver steatosis.In a cross-sectional study, we considered 512 consecutive patients with NAFLD (confirmed by biopsy in 100. EAT, severity of steatosis, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT and plaques were evaluated by ultrasonography and results analysed by multiple linear and logistic regression models. Variables independently associated with EAT (mm were female gender (p = 0.003, age (p = 0.001, BMI (p = 0.01, diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.009, steatosis grade 2 (p = 0.01 and 3 (p = 0.04, fatty liver index (p = 0.001 and statin use (p = 0.03. Variables independently associated with carotid IMT were age (p = 0.0001, hypertension (p = 0.009, diabetes (p = 0.04, smoking habits (p = 0.04 and fatty liver index (p = 0.02, with carotid plaques age (p = 0.0001, BMI (p = 0.03, EAT (p = 0.02, and hypertension (p = 0.02, and with E/A age (p = 0.0001, diabetes (p = 0.005, hypertension (p = 0.04 and fatty liver index (p = 0.004. In the 100 patients with available liver histology non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH was independently associated with EAT (p = 0.04 and diabetes (p = 0.054 while significant fibrosis with EAT (p = 0.02, diabetes (p = 0.01 and waist circumference (p = 0.05. No association between EAT and PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 polymorphisms was found.In patients with NAFLD, EAT is associated with the severity of liver and vascular damage besides with the known metabolic risk factors.

  2. Expression and function of the atypical cadherin FAT1 in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valletta, Daniela; Czech, Barbara; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Müller, Martina; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The expression of the atypical cadherin FAT1 is increased in chronic liver disease. ► FAT1 expression goes up during the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ► Activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. ► FAT1 enhanced NFkB activity and resistance to apoptosis in activated HSCs. ► FAT1 is a new therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of hepatic fibrosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic fibrosis can be considered as wound healing process in response to hepatocellular injury. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a key event of hepatic fibrosis since activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced extracellular matrix deposition, and reversion of liver fibrosis is accompanied by clearance of activated HSCs by apoptosis. The atypical cadherin FAT1 has been shown to regulate diverse biological functions as cell proliferation and planar cell polarity, and also to affect wound healing. Here, we found increased FAT1 expression in different murine models of chronic liver injury and in cirrhotic livers of patients with different liver disease. Also in hepatic tissue of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis FAT1 expression was significantly enhanced and correlated with collagen alpha I(1) expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed no significant differences in staining intensity between hepatocytes in normal and cirrhotic liver tissue but myofibroblast like cells in fibrotic septa of cirrhotic livers showed a prominent immunosignal. Furthermore, FAT1 mRNA and protein expression markedly increased during in vitro activation of primary human and murine HSCs. Together, these data indicated activated HSCs as cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. To gain insight into the functional role of FAT1 in activated HSCs we suppressed FAT1 in these cells by siRNA. We newly found that FAT1 suppression in activated HSCs caused a downregulation of NFκB activity. This

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid in advanced polycystic liver disease: A phase 2 multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnolo, Hedwig M A; Kievit, Wietske; Takkenberg, R Bart; Riaño, Ioana; Bujanda, Luis; Neijenhuis, Myrte K; Brunenberg, Ellen J L; Beuers, Ulrich; Banales, Jesus M; Drenth, Joost P H

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) inhibits proliferation of polycystic human cholangiocytes in vitro and hepatic cystogenesis in a rat model of polycystic liver disease (PLD) in vivo. Our aim was to test whether UDCA may beneficially affect liver volume in patients with advanced PLD. We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized controlled trial in symptomatic PLD patients from three tertiary referral centers. Patients with PLD and total liver volume (TLV) ⩾2500ml were randomly assigned to UDCA treatment (15-20mg/kg/day) for 24weeks, or to no treatment. Primary endpoint was proportional change in TLV. Secondary endpoints were change in symptoms and health-related quality of life. We performed a post-hoc analysis of the effect of UDCA on liver cyst volume (LCV). We included 34 patients and were able to assess primary endpoint in 32 patients, 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (ADPLD). Proportional TLV increased by 4.6±7.7% (mean TLV increased from 6697ml to 6954ml) after 24weeks of UDCA treatment compared to 3.1±3.8% (mean TLV increased from 5512ml to 5724ml) in the control group (p=0.493). LCV was not different after 24weeks between controls and UDCA treated patients (p=0.848). However, UDCA inhibited LCV growth in ADPKD patients compared to ADPKD controls (p=0.049). UDCA administration for 24weeks did not reduce TLV in advanced PLD, but UDCA reduced LCV growth in ADPKD patients. Future studies might explore whether ADPKD and ADPLD patients respond differently to UDCA treatment. Current therapies for polycystic liver disease are invasive and have high recurrence risks. Our trial showed that the drug, ursodeoxycholic acid, was not able to reduce liver volume in patients with polycystic liver disease. However, a subgroup analysis in patients that have kidney cysts as well showed that liver cyst volume growth was reduced in patients who received ursodeoxycholic acid in comparison

  4. Expression and function of the atypical cadherin FAT1 in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valletta, Daniela; Czech, Barbara [Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Thasler, Wolfgang E. [Grosshadern Tissue Bank and Center for Liver Cell Research, Department of Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (Germany); Mueller, Martina [Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin [Institute of Pathology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Hellerbrand, Claus, E-mail: claus.hellerbrand@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of the atypical cadherin FAT1 is increased in chronic liver disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 expression goes up during the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 enhanced NFkB activity and resistance to apoptosis in activated HSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 is a new therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of hepatic fibrosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic fibrosis can be considered as wound healing process in response to hepatocellular injury. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a key event of hepatic fibrosis since activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced extracellular matrix deposition, and reversion of liver fibrosis is accompanied by clearance of activated HSCs by apoptosis. The atypical cadherin FAT1 has been shown to regulate diverse biological functions as cell proliferation and planar cell polarity, and also to affect wound healing. Here, we found increased FAT1 expression in different murine models of chronic liver injury and in cirrhotic livers of patients with different liver disease. Also in hepatic tissue of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis FAT1 expression was significantly enhanced and correlated with collagen alpha I(1) expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed no significant differences in staining intensity between hepatocytes in normal and cirrhotic liver tissue but myofibroblast like cells in fibrotic septa of cirrhotic livers showed a prominent immunosignal. Furthermore, FAT1 mRNA and protein expression markedly increased during in vitro activation of primary human and murine HSCs. Together, these data indicated activated HSCs as cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. To gain insight into the functional role of FAT1 in activated HSCs we suppressed FAT1 in these

  5. A combined model based on spleen stiffness measurement and Baveno VI criteria to rule out high risk varices in advanced chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colecchia, Antonio; Ravaioli, Federico; Marasco, Giovanni; Colli, Agostino; Dajti, Elton; Biase, Annarita Di; Reggiani, Maria Letizia Bacchi; Berzigotti, Annalisa; Pinzani, Massimo; Festi, Davide

    2018-05-02

    Recently, Baveno VI guidelines suggested that esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) can be avoided in patients with cACLD who have a liver stiffness measurement (LSM) 150,000/mm 3 . We aimed to: assess the performance of spleen stiffness measurement (SSM) in ruling out patients with high-risk varices (HRV); validate Baveno VI criteria in a large population and assess how the sequential use of Baveno VI criteria and SSM could safely avoid the need for endoscopy. We retrospectively analysed 498 cACLD patients who had undergone LSM/SSM by transient elastography (TE) (Fibroscan®), platelet count and EGDs from 2012 to 2016 referred to our tertiary centre. The new combined model was validated internally by a split-validation method, and externally in a prospective multicentre cohort of 115 patients. SSM, LSM, platelet count and Child-Pugh-B were independent predictors of HRV. Applying the newly identified SSM cut-off (≤46 kPa) or Baveno VI criteria, 35.8% and 21.7% of patients in the internal validation cohort could have avoided EGD, with HRV being missed in only 2% in both cases. The combination of SSM with Baveno VI criteria would have led to additionally avoiding 22.5% of EGDs, reaching a final value of 43.8% spared EGDs, with <5% missed HRV. Results were confirmed in the prospective external validation cohort, as the combined Baveno VI/SSM≤46 Model would have safely spared (0 HRV missed) 37.4% of EGDs, compared to 16.5% avoiding Baveno VI Criteria only. A non-invasive prediction model combining SSM with Baveno VI criteria may be useful to rule out HRV and could make it possible to avoid a significantly larger number of unnecessary EGDs compared to Baveno VI criteria only. Spleen stiffness measurement (SSM) assessed by TE, the most widely used electrographic technique, is a non-invasive technique that can help the physician to better stratify the degree of portal hypertension and the risk of oesophageal varices in patients with cACLD. Performing SSM together with LSM

  6. Recellularization of rat liver: An in vitro model for assessing human drug metabolism and liver biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Robertson

    Full Text Available Liver-like organoids that recapitulate the complex functions of the whole liver by combining cells, scaffolds, and mechanical or chemical cues are becoming important models for studying liver biology and drug metabolism. The advantages of growing cells in three-dimensional constructs include enhanced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions and preserved cellular phenotype including, prevention of de-differentiation. In the current study, biomimetic liver constructs were made via perfusion decellularization of rat liver, with the goal of maintaining the native composition and structure of the extracellular matrix. We optimized our decellularization process to produce liver scaffolds in which immunogenic residual DNA was removed but glycosaminoglycans were maintained. When the constructs were recellularized with rat or human liver cells, the cells remained viable, capable of proliferation, and functional for 28 days. Specifically, the cells continued to express cytochrome P450 genes and maintained their ability to metabolize a model drug, midazolam. Microarray analysis showed an upregulation of genes involved in liver regeneration and fibrosis. In conclusion, these liver constructs have the potential to be used as test beds for studying liver biology and drug metabolism.

  7. Prevalence of psoriasis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive alcohol use has been implicated as a risk factor in the development of psoriasis, particularly in men. Despite this, little is known of the incidence or prevalence of psoriasis in patients who misuse alcohol. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of psoriasis in patients with alcoholic liver disease. METHODS: In total, 100 patients with proven alcoholic liver disease were surveyed for a history of psoriasis and a full skin examination was performed if relevant. RESULTS: Of the 100 patients, 15 reported a history of psoriasis and another 8 had evidence of current activity, suggesting a prevalence (past or present) of 15% in this group of patients. CONCLUSION: It would appear that the prevalence of psoriasis in patients who misuse alcohol is much higher than the 1-3% variously quoted in the general population.

  8. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Glycosyltransferases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yu-Tao; Su, Hai-Ying; An, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are a diverse class of enzymes involved in catalyzing the transfer of one or multiple sugar residues to a wide range of acceptor molecules. GTs mediate a wide range of functions from structure and storage to signaling, and play a key role in many fundamental biological processes. Therefore, it is anticipated that GTs have a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In this article, we present an overview of the basic information on NAFLD, particularly GTs and glycosylation modification of certain molecules and their association with NAFLD pathogenesis. In addition, the effects and mechanisms of some GTs in the development of NAFLD are summarized. PMID:26937136

  10. Assessing nutritional status in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Dhawan, Anil

    2005-12-01

    The metabolic changes compounded by anorexia associated with chronic liver disease adversely affect growth in children. In many cases, this requires the administration of artificial nutritional support. It is important in this group of patients that those who are becoming nutritionally depleted are identified quickly and in those receiving artificial nutritional support, the effectiveness is monitored. The current review is an examination of methods available to assess nutritional status. These include anthropometry, methods available in the laboratory and a selection of less commonly used methods undergoing evaluation at research level. A brief discussion accompanies each technique, outlining the limitations of its use in children with chronic liver disease. The review concludes with an outline of how nutritional status should be assessed in this group of children, and suggests further research.

  11. Rising Rates of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Leading to Liver Transplantation in Baby Boomer Generation with Chronic Hepatitis C, Alcohol Liver Disease, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholankeril, George; Yoo, Eric R; Perumpail, Ryan B; Liu, Andy; Sandhu, Jeevin S; Nair, Satheesh; Hu, Menghan; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-09-26

    We aim to study the impact of the baby boomer (BB) generation, a birth-specific cohort (born 1945-1965) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related liver transplantation (LT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We performed a retrospective analysis using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) database from 2003 to 2014 to compare HCC-related liver transplant surgery trends between two cohorts-the BB and non-BB-with a secondary diagnosis of HCV, ALD, or NASH. From 2003-2014, there were a total of 8313 liver transplant recipients for the indication of HCC secondary to HCV, ALD, or NASH. Of the total, 6658 (80.1%) HCC-related liver transplant recipients were BB. The number of liver transplant surgeries for the indication of HCC increased significantly in NASH (+1327%), HCV (+382%), and ALD (+286%) during the study period. The proportion of BB who underwent LT for HCC was the highest in HCV (84.7%), followed by NASH (70.3%) and ALD (64.7%). The recommendations for birth-cohort specific HCV screening stemmed from a greater understanding of the high prevalence of chronic HCV and HCV-related HCC within BB. The rising number of HCC-related LT among BB with ALD and NASH suggests the need for increased awareness and improved preventative screening/surveillance measures within NASH and ALD cohorts as well.

  12. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Focus on Nutritional Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD.

  13. Drug-induced Liver Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna, Klyarytskaya; Helen, Maksymova; Elena, Stilidi

    2016-01-01

    The study presented here was accomplished to assess the course of drug-induced liver diseases in patient’s rheumatoid arthritis receiving long-term methotrexate therapy. Diabetes mellitus was revealed as the most significant risk factor. The combination of diabetes mellitus with other risk factors (female sex) resulted in increased hepatic fibrosis, degree of hepatic encephalopathy and reduction of hepatic functions. The effectiveness and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid and cytolytic type-with...

  14. Spontaneous expulsive suprachoroidal hemorrhage caused by decompensated liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnagopal Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Expulsive suprachoroidal hemorrhage can be surgical or spontaneous. Spontaneous expulsive suprachoroidal hemorrhage (SESCH is a rare entity. Most of the reported cases of SESCH were caused by a combination of corneal pathology and glaucoma. We are reporting a rare presentation of SESCH with no pre-existing glaucoma or corneal pathology and caused by massive intra- and peri-ocular hemorrhage due to decompensated liver disease.

  15. The Role of Ischemia Modified Albumin as a Biomarker in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashanth Ashok; Subramanian, Kavitha

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) is characterised by gradual destruction of liver tissue over time. Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA) is an upcoming biomarker shown to be elevated in conditions associated with ischemia and oxidative stress. Albumin levels are greatly reduced in patients with CLD and studying its alterations will provide essential information regarding the molecular changes occurring to it. The study aims to estimate IMA and IMA/Albumin ratio in patients with CLD and to correlate it with parameters assessing liver function and the Model for End Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. The study consisted of 43 CLD patients as test subjects and 28 apparently healthy individuals as controls. Multiple parameters assessing liver function like albumin, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Prothrombin Time (PT) INR and creatinine were estimated and the MELD score calculated. Serum IMA expressed as Absorbance Units (ABSU) was estimated using the Albumin Cobalt Binding test (ABT). Student's t-test and correlation coefficient was used for statistical analysis. Serum IMA was significantly higher in CLD patients (0.5320 ± 0.1677) as compared to the control group (0.3203 ± 0.1257) with a p-value of CLD compared to control group (0.0714 ± 0.0283) with a p-value of CLD could indicate a qualitative change and not merely a quantitative reduction of albumin. IMA can serve as a biomarker to assess the disease severity and prognosis of CLD patients.

  16. Emerging roles of the RB/E2F pathway in fatty liver disease and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, R.B.

    2018-01-01

    Liver cancer in humans is ranked number five concerning cancer related deaths accounted worldwide. Many risk factors related to liver cancer have been identified including hepatitis virus infection, exposure to mycotoxins, and fatty liver disease. These risk factors predispose livers to develop

  17. Therapeutic effects of the traditional medicinal plant Ipomoea stolonifera for the treatment of liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Xueting

    2016-01-01

    Liver diseases are categorized into acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver failure (CLF). Massive cell death is a hallmark of ALF and leads to a dramatic loss of liver function. Therefore, specific interventions targeted to prevent or attenuate this massive cell death may be very effective in

  18. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C.; Clair, Heather B.; Hardesty, Josiah E.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J.; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A.; McClain, Craig J.; Prough, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  19. Alcohol Consumption in Diabetic Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preya J. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the association between lifetime alcohol consumption and significant liver disease in type 2 diabetic patients with NAFLD. Methods. A cross-sectional study assessing 151 patients with NAFLD at risk of clinically significant liver disease. NAFLD fibrosis severity was classified by transient elastography; liver stiffness measurements ≥8.2 kPa defined significant fibrosis. Lifetime drinking history classified patients into nondrinkers, light drinkers (always ≤20 g/day, and moderate drinkers (any period with intake >20 g/day. Result. Compared with lifetime nondrinkers, light and moderate drinkers were more likely to be male (p=0.008 and to be Caucasian (p=0.007 and to have a history of cigarette smoking (p=0.000, obstructive sleep apnea (p=0.003, and self-reported depression (p=0.003. Moderate drinkers required ≥3 hypoglycemic agents to maintain diabetic control (p=0.041 and fibrate medication to lower blood triglyceride levels (p=0.044. Compared to lifetime nondrinkers, light drinkers had 1.79 (95% CI: 0.67–4.82; p=0.247 and moderate drinkers had 0.91 (95% CI: 0.27–3.10; p=0.881 times the odds of having liver stiffness measurements ≥8.2 kPa (adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index. Conclusions. In diabetic patients with NAFLD, light or moderate lifetime alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with liver fibrosis. The impact of lifetime alcohol intake on fibrosis progression and diabetic comorbidities, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and hypertriglyceridemia, requires further investigation.

  20. Phytosterols, Lipid Administration, and Liver Disease During Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are structurally and functionally analogous to cholesterol in vertebrate animals. Phytosterols are found in many foods and are part of the normal human diet. However, absorption of phytosterols from the diet is minimal. Most lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition are based on vegetable oils. As a result, phytosterol administration occurs during intravenous administration of lipid. Levels of phytosterols in the blood and tissues may reach high levels during parenteral lipid administration and may be toxic to cells. Phytosterols are not fully metabolized by the human body and must be excreted through the hepatobiliary system. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that administration of high doses of intravenous lipids that are high in phytosterols contributes to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. In this review, mechanisms by which lipids and phytosterols may cause cholestasis are discussed. Human studies of the association of phytosterols with liver disease are reviewed. In addition, clinical studies of lipid/phytosterol reduction for reversing and/or preventing parenteral nutrition associated liver disease are discussed. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Genetic background in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Maida, Marcello; Petta, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In the Western world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as one of the most significant liver diseases of the twenty-first century. Its development is certainly driven by environmental factors, but it is also regulated by genetic background. The role of heritability has been widely demonstrated by several epidemiological, familial, and twin studies and case series, and likely reflects the wide inter-individual and inter-ethnic genetic variability in systemic metabolism and wound healing response processes. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide association studies have clearly identified Patatin-like phosholipase domain-containing 3 gene variant I148M as a major player in the development and progression of NAFLD. More recently, the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 E167K variant emerged as a relevant contributor in both NAFLD pathogenesis and cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, numerous case-control studies have been performed to elucidate the potential role of candidate genes in the pathogenesis and progression of fatty liver, although findings are sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we performed a comprehensive literature search and review on the role of genetics in NAFLD. We emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the available literature and outline the putative role of each genetic variant in influencing susceptibility and/or progression of the disease. PMID:26494964

  2. Frequency of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouman, S.; Hussain, A.; Hussain, M.; Ahmed, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is defined as infected ascites in the absence of any recognizable secondary cause of infection. Objectives: To find out the percentage of SBP in patients of chronic liver disease with ascites, its clinical and laboratory characteristics. Place and Duration of Study: Medical ward II, Jinnah Hospital Lahore and duration of study was six months. Study Design: Descriptive/ Observational study. Subjects and Method: One hundred patients of chronic liver disease with ascities were included in this study. Diagnostic paracentesis was performed immediately upon admission and the bacterial cultures and biochemical analysis was done on sample. Results: Ascitic fluid examination was the main basis for establishing the diagnosis of SBP. It was found that SBP was present in 22 patients, out of which 11 were culture positive and 11 were culture negative, 35 patients were HBsAg positive and 65 patients were anti HCV positive. SBP was found in 22 patients out of whom 10 were males and 12 females. Ascites was present in all the patients (100%). Shifting dullness was present in 76 (76%) cases, fluid thrill in 24 cases (24%) and tenderness in 47 patients (47%). Conclusion: Frequency of SBP is quite high in patients with chronic liver disease with ascites. SBP should be suspected in all such cases presenting with typical or atypical features. (author)

  3. Alcoholic liver disease and changes in bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán López-Larramona

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and osteopenia are alterations in bone mineral density (BMD that frequently occur in the context of chronic liver disease (CLD. These alterations have been studied predominantly in chronic cholestatic disease and cirrhosis of the liver. Alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for the onset of osteoporosis, whose estimated prevalence in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD ranges between 5 % and 40 %. The loss of BMD in ALD is the result of an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes the toxic effects of alcohol on bone and endocrine and nutritional disorders secondary to alcoholism and a deficiency of osteocalcin, vitamin D and insulin growth factor-1. The diagnosis of BMD alterations in ALD is based on its measurement using bone densitometry. Treatment includes smoking and alcohol cessation and general measures such as changes in nutrition and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are recommended in all patients with ALD and osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the specific treatment of this condition. Alternatives include raloxifene, hormone replacement therapy and calcitonin. This review will address the most important aspects involved in the clinical management of abnormal BMD in the context of ALD, including its prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis. We will also review the treatment of osteoporosis in CLD in general, focusing on specific aspects related to bone loss in ALD.

  4. Fructose Consumption, Lipogenesis, and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Horst, Kasper W; Serlie, Mireille J

    2017-09-06

    Increased fructose consumption has been suggested to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, but a causal role of fructose in these metabolic diseases remains debated. Mechanistically, hepatic fructose metabolism yields precursors that can be used for gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Fructose-derived precursors also act as nutritional regulators of the transcription factors, including ChREBP and SREBP1c, that regulate the expression of hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL genes. In support of these mechanisms, fructose intake increases hepatic gluconeogenesis and DNL and raises plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in humans. However, epidemiological and fructose-intervention studies have had inconclusive results with respect to liver fat, and there is currently no good human evidence that fructose, when consumed in isocaloric amounts, causes more liver fat accumulation than other energy-dense nutrients. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the seemingly contradicting literature on fructose and NAFLD. We outline fructose physiology, the mechanisms that link fructose to NAFLD, and the available evidence from human studies. From this framework, we conclude that the cellular mechanisms underlying hepatic fructose metabolism will likely reveal novel targets for the treatment of NAFLD, dyslipidemia, and hepatic insulin resistance. Finally, fructose-containing sugars are a major source of excess calories, suggesting that a reduction of their intake has potential for the prevention of NAFLD and other obesity-related diseases.

  5. Screening for nutritional risk in hospitalized children with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tiantian; Mu, Ying; Gong, Xue; Ma, Wenyan; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality from pediatric liver disease. We investigated the prevalence of both malnutrition and high nutritional risk in hospitalized children with liver disease as well as the rate of in-hospital nutritional support. A total of 2,874 hospitalized children and adolescents with liver disease aged 1 to 17 years (inclusive) were enrolled. Malnutrition was screened by anthropometric measures (height-for-age, weight-for-height, weight-for-age, and BMI- for-age z-scores). The Screening Tool for Risk on Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids) was used to evaluate nutritional risk status. Nutrition markers in blood, rate of nutritional support, length of hospital stay, and hospital fees were compared among nutritional risk groups. The overall prevalence of malnutrition was 38.6%. About 20.0% of children had high nutritional risk, and prevalence of malnutrition was markedly greater in the high nutritional risk group compared with the moderate risk group (67.9% vs 31.3%). Serum albumin and prealbumin differed significantly between high and moderate risk groups (pnutritional risk and 3.5% with moderate nutritional risk received nutrition support during hospitalization. Children with high nutritional risk had longer hospital stays and greater hospital costs (pnutritional risk is also prevalent at admission. Albumin and prealbumin are sensitive markers for distinguishing nutritional risk groups. High nutritional risk prolongs length of stay and increases hospital costs. The nutritional support rate is still low and requires standardization.

  6. Modeling the mechanical properties of liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Siping; Shen, Yuanyuan; Song, Liang

    2016-06-14

    The progression of liver fibrosis changes the biomechanical properties of liver tissue. This study characterized and compared different liver fibrosis stages in rats in terms of viscoelasticity. Three viscoelastic models, the Voigt, Maxwell, and Zener models, were applied to experimental data from rheometer tests and then the elasticity and viscosity were estimated for each fibrosis stage. The study found that both elasticity and viscosity are correlated with the various stages of liver fibrosis. The study revealed that the Zener model is the optimal model for describing the mechanical properties of each fibrosis stage, but there is no significant difference between the Zener and Voigt models in their performance on liver fibrosis staging. Therefore the Voigt model can still be effectively used for liver fibrosis grading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IgG4-related Disease and the Liver.

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    Chen, Jonathan H; Deshpande, Vikram

    2017-06-01

    Pathologists are likely to encounter IgG4-related disease in several organ systems. This article focuses on helping pathologists diagnose IgG4-related disease in the hepatobiliary system. Missing the diagnosis can result in unnecessary organ damage and/or unnecessary surgical and cancer therapy. In the liver, tumefactive lesion(s) involving the bile ducts with storiform fibrosis and an IgG4-enriched lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate are highly concerning for IgG4-related disease. The recent identification of oligoclonal populations of T cells and B cells in IgG4-related disease may lead to molecular tests, new therapeutics, and a greater mechanistic understanding of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: State-of-the-art

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    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular

  9. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE IMPULSE IS EQUIVALENT TO LIVER BIOPSY TO EVALUATE LIVER FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C AND NONALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ayres de Alencar Arrais GUERRA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLiver biopsy is recommended as the gold standard method for assessing the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. However, it is invasive, with potential risks and complications. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that provides information of changes in the liver tissue, evaluating tissue elasticity and acoustic radiation force impulse is one of the available techniques.ObjectiveThe main objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of acoustic radiation force impulse comparing to liver biopsy to evaluate fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.MethodsTwenty four patients were included, everyone underwent liver biopsy and acoustic radiation force impulse, and the results were compared with values described in the literature by several authors.ResultsIn the population of patients with chronic hepatitis C, our data were better correlated with data published by Carmen Fierbinteanu-Braticevici et al., with an accuracy of 82.4%, sensitivity of 71.4% and specificity of 90%. For nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, our data were better correlated with data published by Masato Yoneda et al., with an accuracy of 85.7%, sensitivity 80% and specificity of 100%.ConclusionAcoustic radiation force impulse is a method with good accuracy to distinguish initial fibrosis from advanced fibrosis in hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and can replace biopsy in most cases.

  10. Pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Recent solutions, unresolved issues, and future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Maria Grazia; Mandato, Claudia; Poeta, Marco; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children is becoming a major health concern. A “multiple-hit” pathogenetic model has been suggested to explain the progressive liver damage that occurs among children with NAFLD. In addition to the accumulation of fat in the liver, insulin resistance (IR) and oxidative stress due to genetic/epigenetic background, unfavorable lifestyles, gut microbiota and gut-liver axis dysfunction, and perturbations of trace element homeostasis have been shown to be critical for disease progression and the development of more severe inflammatory and fibrotic stages [non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]. Simple clinical and laboratory parameters, such as age, history, anthropometrical data (BMI and waist circumference percentiles), blood pressure, surrogate clinical markers of IR (acanthosis nigricans), abdominal ultrasounds, and serum transaminases, lipids and glucose/insulin profiles, allow a clinician to identify children with obesity and obesity-related conditions, including NAFLD and cardiovascular and metabolic risks. A liver biopsy (the “imperfect” gold standard) is required for a definitive NAFLD/NASH diagnosis, particularly to exclude other treatable conditions or when advanced liver disease is expected on clinical and laboratory grounds and preferably prior to any controlled trial of pharmacological/surgical treatments. However, a biopsy clearly cannot represent a screening procedure. Advancements in diagnostic serum and imaging tools, especially for the non-invasive differentiation between NAFLD and NASH, have shown promising results, e.g., magnetic resonance elastography. Weight loss and physical activity should be the first option of intervention. Effective pharmacological treatments are still under development; however, drugs targeting IR, oxidative stress, proinflammatory pathways, dyslipidemia, gut microbiota and gut liver axis dysfunction are an option for patients who are unable to comply with the recommended

  11. Gender and racial differences in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jen-Jung; Fallon, Michael B

    2014-05-27

    Due to the worldwide epidemic of obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver injury ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may progress to advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Individuals with NAFLD, especially those with metabolic syndrome, have higher overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and liver-related mortality compared with the general population. According to the population-based studies, NAFLD and NASH are more prevalent in males and in Hispanics. Both the gender and racial ethnic differences in NAFLD and NASH are likely attributed to interaction between environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors. Using genome-wide association studies, several genetic variants have been identified to be associated with NAFLD/NASH. However, these variants account for only a small amount of variation in hepatic steatosis among ethnic groups and may serve as modifiers of the natural history of NAFLD. Alternatively, these variants may not be the causative variants but simply markers representing a larger body of genetic variations. In this article, we provide a concise review of the gender and racial differences in the prevalence of NAFLD and NASH in adults. We also discuss the possible mechanisms for these disparities.

  12. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in patients with advanced liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahousen, Theresa; Hegenbarth, Karin; Ille, Rottraut; Lipp, Rainer W.; Krause, Robert; Little, Randie R.; Schnedl, Wolfgang J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c) determination methods and to determine fructosamine in patients with chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and in patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin. METHODS: HbA1c values were determined in 15 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and in 20 patients with chronic hepatitis using the ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography and the immunoassay methods. Fructosamine was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium. RESULTS: Forty percent of patients with liver cirrhosis had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method, while fructosamine results were either within the reference range or elevated. Twenty percent of patients with chronic hepatitis (hepatic fibrosis) had HbA1c results below the non -diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method. In patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin, 50% of HbA1c results were below the non-diabetic reference using at least one of the HbA1c methods. CONCLUSION: Only evaluated in context with all liver function parameters as well as a red blood count including reticulocytes, HbA 1c results should be used in patients with advanced liver disease. HbA 1c and fructosamine measurements should be used with caution when evaluating long-term glucose control in patients with hepatic cirrhosis or in patients with chronic hepatitis and ribavirin treatment. PMID:15259084

  13. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Noninvasive Methods of Diagnosing Hepatic Steatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShaalan, Rasha; Aljiffry, Murad; Al-Busafi, Said; Metrakos, Peter; Hassanain, Mazen

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is the buildup of lipids within hepatocytes. It is the simplest stage in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It occurs in approximately 30% of the general population and as much as 90% of the obese population in the United States. It may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which is a state of hepatocellular inflammation and damage in response to the accumulated fat. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard tool to diagnose and stage NAFLD. However, it comes with the risk of complicat