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Sample records for lioh decomposition process

  1. The effects of moisture on LiD single crystals studied by temperature-programmed decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, L.N.; Cecala, C.M.; Leckey, J.H.; Balooch, M.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature-programmed decomposition (TPD) technique was performed on LiOH powders and LiD single crystals previously exposed to different moisture levels. Our results show that the LiOH decomposition process is rate-limited by an inward moving reaction front mechanism with an activation energy barrier of ∼122-149 kJ/mol. The LiOH structure is stable even if kept at 320 K. However, LiOH structures formed on the surface of LiD single crystals during moisture exposure at low dosages may have multiple activation energy barriers, some of which may be much lower than 122 kJ/mol. The rate-limiting mechanism for the decomposition of LiOH structures with reduced activation energy barriers is consistent with a unimolecular nucleation model. We attribute the lowering of the activation energy barrier for the LiOH decomposition to the existence of sub-stoichiometric Li(OH) x with x 2 O formation is observed. The release of H 2 O molecules from LiOH · H 2 O structure has small activation energy barriers in the range of 48-69 kJ/mol and follows a unimolecular nucleation process. The loosely bonded H 2 O molecules in the LiOH · H 2 O structure can be easily pumped away at room temperature in a reasonable amount of time. Our experiments also suggest that handling LiD single crystals at an elevated temperature of 340 K or more reduces the growth rate of LiOH and LiOH · H 2 O significantly

  2. Fabrication and characterization of lithium orthosilicate pebbles using LiOH as a new raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knitter, R.; Reimann, J.; Risthaus, P.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Piazza, G.

    2004-01-01

    For the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket slightly overstoichiometric lithium orthosilicate pebbles (Li 4 SiO 4 +SiO 2 ) have been chosen as one optional breeder material. This material is developed in collaboration between Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK) and the Schott Glas, Mainz. The lithium orthosilicate (OSi) pebbles are fabricated by the melting and spraying method in a semi-industrial scale facility. In the past, the not enriched pebbles were produced from a mixture of Li 4 SiO 4 and SiO 2 powders, but due to the fact that enriched Li 4 SiO 4 is not available on the market, highly enriched carbonate powder was used that finally resulted in nonsatisfying pebble characteristics. Enriched LiOH powder is commercially available, therefore, a new production route was pursued based on the following, simplified reaction: 4 LiOH + SiO 2 → Li 4 SiO 4 + 2 H 2 O. The melting process of LiOH and SiO 2 is less difficult to control than the melting of Li 2 CO 3 in spite of the decomposition of water. The pebbles produced from LiOH and SiO 2 are similar to those produced from Li 4 SiO 4 and SiO 2 . They exhibit a distinctly dendritic structure and show only a small amount of pores and cracks. In addition to the main constituent Li 4 SiO 4 , the high temperature phase Li 6 Si 2 O 7 was detected due to the quenching process and the excess of SiO 2 . This minor constituent, however, decomposes to Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 SiO 3 during annealing. In compressive crush load tests of single pebbles a crush load of about 9.5 N was measured for pebbles after drying at 300degC. The chemical analysis revealed a further advantage of the use of LiOH in the melting process. As LiOH is available in high-purity quality, the pebbles contain impurities to a lower degree than pebbles produced from Li 4 SiO 4 or Li 2 CO 3 . In order to obtain characteristic pebble bed data, first Uniaxial Compression Tests (UCTs) were performed at temperatures between ambient and at 850deg

  3. Development and optimization of a modified process for producing the battery grade LiOH: Optimization of energy and water consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grágeda, Mario; González, Alonso; Alavia, Wilson; Ushak, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    LiOH·H 2 O is used for preparation of alkaline batteries. The required characteristics of this compound are low levels of impurities and a specific particle size distribution. LiOH·H 2 O is produced from ore and brines. In northern Chile, lithium is produced from brines. This region presents particular desert climate conditions where water and energy are scarce. To help solve this problem, the conventional production process for battery grade LiOH·H 2 O was simulated and a modified process was developed, with an efficient consumption of energy and water, to improve the environmental sustainability of the plant, and greater process yield and product purity. Different configurations of the equipments were studied and for the best configurations the behavior of the modified process at different scenarios were simulated. It was found that the purity is independent of concentration used in feed to thickeners. The process yield increases in average 2.4% for modified process due to recycling operation. In modified process is obtained 28% more product mass, specific energy consumption decreases up to 4.8% and losses of Li/kg of product decreased by 83% compared to conventional process. The water consumption per kg of product in modified process is 1%–6.3%, being lower than in conventional process. The results presented can be considered as guidelines to address the optimization of the industrial process for obtaining the battery grade LiOH. - Highlights: • Water and energy are important resources in any sustainable industrial process. • High purity LiOH·H 2 O is a material for producing of lithium batteries. • Conventional and modified optimized processes for LiOH·H 2 O production were simulated. • Energy and water consumptions decrease for the modified process. • Optimal operational conditions of H 2 O, feed, pressure and energy were established

  4. Decomposition of variance for spatial Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introduce a general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models...

  5. Decomposition of variance for spatial Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introduce a general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models...

  6. Decomposition of variance for spatial Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introducea general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models with additive...

  7. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally

  8. Thermal decomposition process of silver behenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xianhao; Lu Shuxia; Zhang Jingchang; Cao Weiliang

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition processes of silver behenate have been studied by infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-DTA-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The TG-DTA and the higher temperature IR and XRD measurements indicated that complicated structural changes took place while heating silver behenate, but there were two distinct thermal transitions. During the first transition at 138 deg. C, the alkyl chains of silver behenate were transformed from an ordered into a disordered state. During the second transition at about 231 deg. C, a structural change took place for silver behenate, which was the decomposition of silver behenate. The major products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were metallic silver and behenic acid. Upon heating up to 500 deg. C, the final product of the thermal decomposition was metallic silver. The combined TG-MS analysis showed that the gas products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were carbon dioxide, water, hydrogen, acetylene and some small molecule alkenes. TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the process of the formation and growth of metallic silver nanoparticles

  9. Parallel processing for pitch splitting decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Levi; Li, Yong; Wadkins, David; Biederman, Steve; Miloslavsky, Alex; Cork, Chris

    2009-10-01

    Decomposition of an input pattern in preparation for a double patterning process is an inherently global problem in which the influence of a local decomposition decision can be felt across an entire pattern. In spite of this, a large portion of the work can be massively distributed. Here, we discuss the advantages of geometric distribution for polygon operations with limited range of influence. Further, we have found that even the naturally global "coloring" step can, in large part, be handled in a geometrically local manner. In some practical cases, up to 70% of the work can be distributed geometrically. We also describe the methods for partitioning the problem into local pieces and present scaling data up to 100 CPUs. These techniques reduce DPT decomposition runtime by orders of magnitude.

  10. Decomposition of Variance for Spatial Cox Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2013-03-01

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introduce a general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models with additive or log linear random intensity functions. We moreover consider a new and flexible class of pair correlation function models given in terms of normal variance mixture covariance functions. The proposed methodology is applied to point pattern data sets of locations of tropical rain forest trees.

  11. DECOMPOSITION OF MANUFACTURING PROCESSES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M.Z.N. Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing is a global activity that started during the industrial revolution in the late 19th century to cater for the large-scale production of products. Since then, manufacturing has changed tremendously through the innovations of technology, processes, materials, communication and transportation. The major challenge facing manufacturing is to produce more products using less material, less energy and less involvement of labour. To face these challenges, manufacturing companies must have a strategy and competitive priority in order for them to compete in a dynamic market. A review of the literature on the decomposition of manufacturing processes outlines three main processes, namely: high volume, medium volume and low volume. The decomposition shows that each sub process has its own characteristics and depends on the nature of the firm’s business. Two extreme processes are continuous line production (fast extreme and project shop (slow extreme. Other processes are in between these two extremes of the manufacturing spectrum. Process flow patterns become less complex with cellular, line and continuous flow compared with jobbing and project. The review also indicates that when the product is high variety and low volume, project or functional production is applied.

  12. Finite Range Decomposition of Gaussian Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Brydges, C D; Mitter, P K

    2003-01-01

    Let $D$ be the finite difference Laplacian associated to the lattice $bZ^{d}$. For dimension $dge 3$, $age 0$ and $L$ a sufficiently large positive dyadic integer, we prove that the integral kernel of the resolvent $G^{a}:=(a-D)^{-1}$ can be decomposed as an infinite sum of positive semi-definite functions $ V_{n} $ of finite range, $ V_{n} (x-y) = 0$ for $|x-y|ge O(L)^{n}$. Equivalently, the Gaussian process on the lattice with covariance $G^{a}$ admits a decomposition into independent Gaussian processes with finite range covariances. For $a=0$, $ V_{n} $ has a limiting scaling form $L^{-n(d-2)}Gamma_{ c,ast }{bigl (frac{x-y}{ L^{n}}bigr )}$ as $nrightarrow infty$. As a corollary, such decompositions also exist for fractional powers $(-D)^{-alpha/2}$, $0

  13. Decomposition based parallel processing technique for efficient collaborative optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Soo; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2000-01-01

    In practical design studies, most of designers solve multidisciplinary problems with complex design structure. These multidisciplinary problems have hundreds of analysis and thousands of variables. The sequence of process to solve these problems affects the speed of total design cycle. Thus it is very important for designer to reorder original design processes to minimize total cost and time. This is accomplished by decomposing large multidisciplinary problem into several MultiDisciplinary Analysis SubSystem (MDASS) and processing it in parallel. This paper proposes new strategy for parallel decomposition of multidisciplinary problem to raise design efficiency by using genetic algorithm and shows the relationship between decomposition and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization(MDO) methodology

  14. Thermal decomposition of uranylnitrate by the Spray-Dryer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildhagen, G.R.S.; Silva, G.C. da

    1988-01-01

    The proposal of this work consist in the thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate solutions by the Spray-Dryer process aiming the production of highly reactive fluidized UO 3 , adequate for the use in posterior of reduction to UO 2 and hydrofluorination to UF 4 , in a fluidized bed for the obtention of UF 6 in the cicle of nuclear fuels. (author) [pt

  15. Parallel processing based decomposition technique for efficient collaborative optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Soo; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2001-01-01

    In practical design studies, most of designers solve multidisciplinary problems with large sized and complex design system. These multidisciplinary problems have hundreds of analysis and thousands of variables. The sequence of process to solve these problems affects the speed of total design cycle. Thus it is very important for designer to reorder the original design processes to minimize total computational cost. This is accomplished by decomposing large multidisciplinary problem into several MultiDisciplinary Analysis SubSystem (MDASS) and processing it in parallel. This paper proposes new strategy for parallel decomposition of multidisciplinary problem to raise design efficiency by using genetic algorithm and shows the relationship between decomposition and Multidisciplinary Design Optimization(MDO) methodology

  16. Analysis of benzoquinone decomposition in solution plasma process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratescu, M.A.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in Solution Plasma Processing (SPP) was analyzed by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) by monitoring the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity of the vibrational transitions of the molecule, during and after SPP. Just in the beginning of the SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensities of the ring vibrational molecular transitions increased under the influence of the electric field of plasma. The results show that plasma influences the p-BQ molecules in two ways: (i) plasma produces a polarization and an orientation of the molecules in the local electric field of plasma and (ii) the gas phase plasma supplies, in the liquid phase, hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which reduce or oxidize the molecules, respectively, generating different carboxylic acids. The decomposition of p-BQ after SPP was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography

  17. Analysis of benzoquinone decomposition in solution plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratescu, M. A.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in Solution Plasma Processing (SPP) was analyzed by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) by monitoring the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity of the vibrational transitions of the molecule, during and after SPP. Just in the beginning of the SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensities of the ring vibrational molecular transitions increased under the influence of the electric field of plasma. The results show that plasma influences the p-BQ molecules in two ways: (i) plasma produces a polarization and an orientation of the molecules in the local electric field of plasma and (ii) the gas phase plasma supplies, in the liquid phase, hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which reduce or oxidize the molecules, respectively, generating different carboxylic acids. The decomposition of p-BQ after SPP was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography.

  18. Data-driven process decomposition and robust online distributed modelling for large-scale processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhang; Lijuan, Li; Lijuan, Yao; Shipin, Yang; Tao, Zou

    2018-02-01

    With the increasing attention of networked control, system decomposition and distributed models show significant importance in the implementation of model-based control strategy. In this paper, a data-driven system decomposition and online distributed subsystem modelling algorithm was proposed for large-scale chemical processes. The key controlled variables are first partitioned by affinity propagation clustering algorithm into several clusters. Each cluster can be regarded as a subsystem. Then the inputs of each subsystem are selected by offline canonical correlation analysis between all process variables and its controlled variables. Process decomposition is then realised after the screening of input and output variables. When the system decomposition is finished, the online subsystem modelling can be carried out by recursively block-wise renewing the samples. The proposed algorithm was applied in the Tennessee Eastman process and the validity was verified.

  19. Decomposition of business process models into reusable sub-diagrams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiśniewski Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an approach to automatic decomposition of business process models is proposed. According to our method, an existing BPMN diagram is disassembled into reusable parts containing the desired number of elements. Such elements and structure can work as design patterns and be validated by a user in terms of correctness. In the next step, these component models are categorised considering their parameters such as resources used, as well as input and output data. The classified components may be considered a repository of reusable parts, that can be further applied in the design of new models. The proposed technique may play a significant role in facilitating the business process redesign procedure, which is of a great importance regarding engineering and industrial applications.

  20. Experiments of HI decomposition in Iodine-sulfur process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ho Joon

    2006-02-01

    We performed an experimental study on the HI concentration and decomposition in Iodine-Sulfur process for thermochemical hydrogen production, which is the most expensive and energy consuming stage. For breaking azeotropic restrain, a partial condensing type, perforated plate type, and packed bed distillation column are employed. A Liebig-type condenser was used for a partial condensing distillation test. The perforated plate distillation column has 40 mm diameter and 5 stages with 8 holes per a plate. The packed bed distillation column has 40 mm diameter and was filled with 5 mm glass beads. While no distillation methods are able to change azeotropic conditions at atmospheric pressure, HI decomposition took place in a reboiler at 480 .deg. C. The vapor-liquid equilibrium curve was obtained from the experiment with binary mixtures (HI/H 2 O) at atmospheric pressure. Almost pure H 2 O was evaporated at the lower temperature than 125 .deg. C, and above that temperature binary mixtures (HI/H 2 O) were evaporated until the leftover solution became HI acid of 0.157mol, which was an azeotropic concentration of HI. With a consideration of heat loss, enthalpy of vaporization at azeotropic condition was estimated as 1131 kJ/kg

  1. Experiments of HI decomposition in Iodine-sulfur process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ho Joon

    2006-02-15

    We performed an experimental study on the HI concentration and decomposition in Iodine-Sulfur process for thermochemical hydrogen production, which is the most expensive and energy consuming stage. For breaking azeotropic restrain, a partial condensing type, perforated plate type, and packed bed distillation column are employed. A Liebig-type condenser was used for a partial condensing distillation test. The perforated plate distillation column has 40 mm diameter and 5 stages with 8 holes per a plate. The packed bed distillation column has 40 mm diameter and was filled with 5 mm glass beads. While no distillation methods are able to change azeotropic conditions at atmospheric pressure, HI decomposition took place in a reboiler at 480 .deg. C. The vapor-liquid equilibrium curve was obtained from the experiment with binary mixtures (HI/H{sub 2}O) at atmospheric pressure. Almost pure H{sub 2}O was evaporated at the lower temperature than 125 .deg. C, and above that temperature binary mixtures (HI/H{sub 2}O) were evaporated until the leftover solution became HI acid of 0.157mol, which was an azeotropic concentration of HI. With a consideration of heat loss, enthalpy of vaporization at azeotropic condition was estimated as 1131 kJ/kg.

  2. Accelerated decomposition techniques for large discounted Markov decision processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larach, Abdelhadi; Chafik, S.; Daoui, C.

    2017-12-01

    Many hierarchical techniques to solve large Markov decision processes (MDPs) are based on the partition of the state space into strongly connected components (SCCs) that can be classified into some levels. In each level, smaller problems named restricted MDPs are solved, and then these partial solutions are combined to obtain the global solution. In this paper, we first propose a novel algorithm, which is a variant of Tarjan's algorithm that simultaneously finds the SCCs and their belonging levels. Second, a new definition of the restricted MDPs is presented to ameliorate some hierarchical solutions in discounted MDPs using value iteration (VI) algorithm based on a list of state-action successors. Finally, a robotic motion-planning example and the experiment results are presented to illustrate the benefit of the proposed decomposition algorithms.

  3. Decomposition studies of group 6 hexacarbonyl complexes. Pt. 2. Modelling of the decomposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usoltsev, Ilya; Eichler, Robert; Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Bern Univ. (Switzerland)

    2016-11-01

    The decomposition behavior of group 6 metal hexacarbonyl complexes (M(CO){sub 6}) in a tubular flow reactor is simulated. A microscopic Monte-Carlo based model is presented for assessing the first bond dissociation enthalpy of M(CO){sub 6} complexes. The suggested approach superimposes a microscopic model of gas adsorption chromatography with a first-order heterogeneous decomposition model. The experimental data on the decomposition of Mo(CO){sub 6} and W(CO){sub 6} are successfully simulated by introducing available thermodynamic data. Thermodynamic data predicted by relativistic density functional theory is used in our model to deduce the most probable experimental behavior of the corresponding Sg carbonyl complex. Thus, the design of a chemical experiment with Sg(CO){sub 6} is suggested, which is sensitive to benchmark our theoretical understanding of the bond stability in carbonyl compounds of the heaviest elements.

  4. Understanding LiOH chemistry in a ruthenium-catalyzed Li-O{sub 2} battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Zigeng; Kim, Gunwoo; Grey, Clare P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Frith, James T.; Garcia-Araez, Nuria [Department of Chemistry, University of Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2017-12-11

    Non-aqueous Li-O{sub 2} batteries are promising for next-generation energy storage. New battery chemistries based on LiOH, rather than Li{sub 2}O{sub 2}, have been recently reported in systems with added water, one using a soluble additive LiI and the other using solid Ru catalysts. Here, the focus is on the mechanism of Ru-catalyzed LiOH chemistry. Using nuclear magnetic resonance, operando electrochemical pressure measurements, and mass spectrometry, it is shown that on discharging LiOH forms via a 4 e{sup -} oxygen reduction reaction, the H in LiOH coming solely from added H{sub 2}O and the O from both O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. On charging, quantitative LiOH oxidation occurs at 3.1 V, with O being trapped in a form of dimethyl sulfone in the electrolyte. Compared to Li{sub 2}O{sub 2}, LiOH formation over Ru incurs few side reactions, a critical advantage for developing a long-lived battery. An optimized metal-catalyst-electrolyte couple needs to be sought that aids LiOH oxidation and is stable towards attack by hydroxyl radicals. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  6. Investigation by raman spectroscopy of the decomposition process of HKUST-1 upon exposure to air

    OpenAIRE

    Todaro, M.; Alessi, A.; Sciortino, L.; Agnello, S.; Cannas, M.; Gelardi, F.; Buscarino, G.

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental investigation by Raman spectroscopy of the decomposition process of Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) HKUST-1 upon exposure to air moisture (T=300 K, 70% relative humidity). The data collected here are compared with the indications obtained from a model of the process of decomposition of this material proposed in literature. In agreement with that model, the reported Raman measurements indicate that for exposure times longer than 20 days relevant irreversible processes t...

  7. Improved Empirical Mode Decomposition Algorithm of Processing Complex Signal for IoT Application

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xianzhao; Cheng, Gengguo; Liu, Huikang

    2015-01-01

    Hilbert-Huang transform is widely used in signal analysis. However, due to its inadequacy in estimating both the maximum and the minimum values of the signals at both ends of the border, traditional HHT is easy to produce boundary error in empirical mode decomposition (EMD) process. To overcome this deficiency, this paper proposes an enhanced empirical mode decomposition algorithm for processing complex signal. Our work mainly focuses on two aspects. On one hand, we develop a technique to obt...

  8. Autoclave corrosion of zircaloy-4 cladding samples in LiOH solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, A.

    2010-03-01

    In reactor operation, pH of the cooling water is adjusted by addition of alkaline hydroxides, and LiOH has been found to be the most suitable one. The addition of LiOH above a certain concentration level (depending on temperature) increases the corrosion rate of zirconium and its alloys. Hydrogen pick-up by the metal is also increased, and this effect is used to produce hydrided specimens for different investigations using the corrosion reaction. At the Paul Scherrer Institute several projects were accomplished to investigate the influence of hydrogen in Zircaloy cladding on its mechanical properties. In order to produce hydrided specimens for comparison and for adjusting new equipment, Zircaloy tubing samples were hydrogen charged by autoclave corrosion in lithiated water. Results of the corrosion experiments are outlined in this publication. Because of the great variety of possible experimental parameters these results are still of interest for the scientific community. Autoclave corrosion was accomplished in 0.2 M or 0.5 M LiOH solution at a constant temperature of 340 o C and a pressure of 160 bar. The corrosion rate increases from 84 mg/(dm 2 d) in 0.2 M LiOH to 153 mg/(dm 2 d) in 0.5 M LiOH. The hydrogen pick-up fraction in 0.5 M LiOH amounts to 80%. In 0.5 M LiOH, Zircaloy tubing samples can be charged with ∼ 500 ppm hydrogen in about 40 hours. In the corrosion experiments described in this report a homogeneous distribution of hydrides should be expected (except very high hydride concentrations) because no temperature gradient exists through the tubing wall. Hydrogen stringers are homogeneously distributed with circumferential orientation (stress-relieved tubing samples). (author)

  9. Effect of calcium on the electrochemical behavior of lithium anode in LiOH aqueous solution used for lithium–water battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ziyan; Chen Kanghua; Ni Erfu

    2012-01-01

    The effect of minor addition of calcium to lithium anode on the electrochemical behavior of lithium anode in 4 M LiOH at 30 °C temperature is investigated by hydrogen collection, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the hydrogen evolution rate is marginally reduced with increasing calcium content. Addition of calcium to lithium mainly inhibits the anodic process. Minor addition of calcium to lithium slightly reduced the discharge current of lithium anode. Minor addition of calcium to lithium anode marginally enhances the hydrogen inhibition of lithium by the formation of calcium hydride combined with LiOH and LiOH·H 2 O formed on the anode surface.

  10. Decomposition Characteristics of Benzene, Toluene and Xylene in an Atmospheric Pressure DC Corona Discharge II. Characteristics of Deposited By-products and Decomposition Process

    OpenAIRE

    SAKAI, Seiji; TAKAHASHI, Kazuhiro; SATOH, Kohki; ITOH, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Gaseous by-products and deposited material obtained from the decomposition of benzene, toluene and xylene in an atmospheric pressure DC corona discharge were minutely investigated by gas chromatograph mass spectrometry and infrared absorption spectroscopy, and the decomposition processes of benzene, toluene and xylene were estimated. It was found that carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), formic acid (HCOOH) and formic anhydride ((CHO)2) were the major gaseous by-products from benzene, ...

  11. Investigation by Raman Spectroscopy of the Decomposition Process of HKUST-1 upon Exposure to Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Todaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an experimental investigation by Raman spectroscopy of the decomposition process of Metal-Organic Framework (MOF HKUST-1 upon exposure to air moisture (T=300 K, 70% relative humidity. The data collected here are compared with the indications obtained from a model of the process of decomposition of this material proposed in literature. In agreement with that model, the reported Raman measurements indicate that for exposure times longer than 20 days relevant irreversible processes take place, which are related to the occurrence of the hydrolysis of Cu-O bonds. These processes induce small but detectable variations of the peak positions and intensities of the main Raman bands of the material, which can be related to Cu-Cu, Cu-O, and O-C-O stretching modes. The critical analyses of these changes have permitted us to obtain a more detailed description of the process of decomposition taking place in HKUST-1 upon interaction with moisture. Furthermore, the reported Raman data give further strong support to the recently proposed model of decomposition of HKUST-1, contributing significantly to the development of a complete picture of the properties of this considerable deleterious effect.

  12. Kinetic analysis of overlapping multistep thermal decomposition comprising exothermic and endothermic processes: thermolysis of ammonium dinitramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravyev, Nikita V; Koga, Nobuyoshi; Meerov, Dmitry B; Pivkina, Alla N

    2017-01-25

    This study focused on kinetic modeling of a specific type of multistep heterogeneous reaction comprising exothermic and endothermic reaction steps, as exemplified by the practical kinetic analysis of the experimental kinetic curves for the thermal decomposition of molten ammonium dinitramide (ADN). It is known that the thermal decomposition of ADN occurs as a consecutive two step mass-loss process comprising the decomposition of ADN and subsequent evaporation/decomposition of in situ generated ammonium nitrate. These reaction steps provide exothermic and endothermic contributions, respectively, to the overall thermal effect. The overall reaction process was deconvoluted into two reaction steps using simultaneously recorded thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) curves by considering the different physical meanings of the kinetic data derived from TG and DSC by P value analysis. The kinetic data thus separated into exothermic and endothermic reaction steps were kinetically characterized using kinetic computation methods including isoconversional method, combined kinetic analysis, and master plot method. The overall kinetic behavior was reproduced as the sum of the kinetic equations for each reaction step considering the contributions to the rate data derived from TG and DSC. During reproduction of the kinetic behavior, the kinetic parameters and contributions of each reaction step were optimized using kinetic deconvolution analysis. As a result, the thermal decomposition of ADN was successfully modeled as partially overlapping exothermic and endothermic reaction steps. The logic of the kinetic modeling was critically examined, and the practical usefulness of phenomenological modeling for the thermal decomposition of ADN was illustrated to demonstrate the validity of the methodology and its applicability to similar complex reaction processes.

  13. Processes controlling the production of aromatic water-soluble organic matter during litter decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klotzbücher, T.; Kaiser, K.; Filley, T.R.; Kalbitz, K.

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays a fundamental role for many soil processes. For instance, production, transport, and retention of DOM control properties and long-term storage of organic matter in mineral soils. Production of water-soluble compounds during the decomposition of plant litter is a

  14. Preliminary application of Structure from Motion and GIS to document decomposition and taphonomic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Connor D; Mitchell, Samantha; Lewis, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decade, Structure from Motion (SfM) has increasingly been used as a means of digital preservation and for documenting archaeological excavations, architecture, and cultural material. However, few studies have tapped the potential of using SfM to document and analyze taphonomic processes affecting burials for forensic sciences purposes. This project utilizes SfM models to elucidate specific post-depositional events that affected a series of three human cadavers deposited at the South East Texas Applied Forensic Science Facility (STAFS). The aim of this research was to test the ability for untrained researchers to employ spatial software and photogrammetry for data collection purposes. For a series of three months a single lens reflex (SLR) camera was used to capture a series of overlapping images at periodic stages in the decomposition process of each cadaver. These images are processed through photogrammetric software that creates a 3D model that can be measured, manipulated, and viewed. This project used photogrammetric and geospatial software to map changes in decomposition and movement of the body from original deposition points. Project results indicate SfM and GIS as a useful tool for documenting decomposition and taphonomic processes. Results indicate photogrammetry is an efficient, relatively simple, and affordable tool for the documentation of decomposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The processing of aluminum gasarites via thermal decomposition of interstitial hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.

    Gasarite structures are a unique type of metallic foam containing tubular pores. The original methods for their production limited them to laboratory study despite appealing foam properties. Thermal decomposition processing of gasarites holds the potential to increase the application of gasarite foams in engineering design by removing several barriers to their industrial scale production. The following study characterized thermal decomposition gasarite processing both experimentally and theoretically. It was found that significant variation was inherent to this process therefore several modifications were necessary to produce gasarites using this method. Conventional means to increase porosity and enhance pore morphology were studied. Pore morphology was determined to be more easily replicated if pores were stabilized by alumina additions and powders were dispersed evenly. In order to better characterize processing, high temperature and high ramp rate thermal decomposition data were gathered. It was found that the high ramp rate thermal decomposition behavior of several hydrides was more rapid than hydride kinetics at low ramp rates. This data was then used to estimate the contribution of several pore formation mechanisms to the development of pore structure. It was found that gas-metal eutectic growth can only be a viable pore formation mode if non-equilibrium conditions persist. Bubble capture cannot be a dominant pore growth mode due to high bubble terminal velocities. Direct gas evolution appears to be the most likely pore formation mode due to high gas evolution rate from the decomposing particulate and microstructural pore growth trends. The overall process was evaluated for its economic viability. It was found that thermal decomposition has potential for industrialization, but further refinements are necessary in order for the process to be viable.

  16. IMF-Slices for GPR Data Processing Using Variational Mode Decomposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebing Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using traditional time-frequency analysis methods, it is possible to delineate the time-frequency structures of ground-penetrating radar (GPR data. A series of applications based on time-frequency analysis were proposed for the GPR data processing and imaging. With respect to signal processing, GPR data are typically non-stationary, which limits the applications of these methods moving forward. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD provides alternative solutions with a fresh perspective. With EMD, GPR data are decomposed into a set of sub-components, i.e., the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. However, the mode-mixing effect may also bring some negatives. To utilize the IMFs’ benefits, and avoid the negatives of the EMD, we introduce a new decomposition scheme termed variational mode decomposition (VMD for GPR data processing for imaging. Based on the decomposition results of the VMD, we propose a new method which we refer as “the IMF-slice”. In the proposed method, the IMFs are generated by the VMD trace by trace, and then each IMF is sorted and recorded into different profiles (i.e., the IMF-slices according to its center frequency. Using IMF-slices, the GPR data can be divided into several IMF-slices, each of which delineates a main vibration mode, and some subsurface layers and geophysical events can be identified more clearly. The effectiveness of the proposed method is tested using synthetic benchmark signals, laboratory data and the field dataset.

  17. Origin of the OH vibrational blue shift in the LiOH crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansson, Kersti; Gajewski, Grzegorz; Mitev, Pavlin D

    2008-12-25

    The O-H vibrational frequency in crystalline hydroxides is either upshifted or downshifted by its crystalline surroundings. In the LiOH crystal, the experimental gas-to-solid O-H frequency upshift ("blue shift") is approximately +115 cm(-1). Here plane-wave DFT calculations for the isotope-isolated LiOH crystal have been performed and we discuss the origin of the OH frequency upshift, and the nature of the OH group and the interlayer interactions. We find that (1) the vibrational frequency upshift originates from interactions within the LiOH layer; this OH upshift is slightly lessened by the interlayer interactions; (2) the interlayer O-H - - - H-O interaction is largely electrostatic in character (but there is no hydrogen bonding); (3) the gas-to-solid vibrational shift for OH in LiOH(s) and its subsystems qualitatively adheres to a parabola-like "frequency vs electric field strength" correlation curve, which has a maximum for a positive electric field, akin to the correlation curve earlier found in the literature for an isolated OH(-) ion in an electric field.

  18. Parallel finite elements with domain decomposition and its pre-processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, A.; Yagawa, G.; Hamada, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel finite element analysis using a domain decomposition method, and the pre-processing for the parallel calculation. Computer simulations are about to replace experiments in various fields, and the scale of model to be simulated tends to be extremely large. On the other hand, computational environment has drastically changed in these years. Especially, parallel processing on massively parallel computers or computer networks is considered to be promising techniques. In order to achieve high efficiency on such parallel computation environment, large granularity of tasks, a well-balanced workload distribution are key issues. It is also important to reduce the cost of pre-processing in such parallel FEM. From the point of view, the authors developed the domain decomposition FEM with the automatic and dynamic task-allocation mechanism and the automatic mesh generation/domain subdivision system for it. (author)

  19. The neural basis of novelty and appropriateness in processing of creative chunk decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Furong; Fan, Jin; Luo, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Novelty and appropriateness have been recognized as the fundamental features of creative thinking. However, the brain mechanisms underlying these features remain largely unknown. In this study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to dissociate these mechanisms in a revised creative chunk decomposition task in which participants were required to perform different types of chunk decomposition that systematically varied in novelty and appropriateness. We found that novelty processing involved functional areas for procedural memory (caudate), mental rewarding (substantia nigra, SN), and visual-spatial processing, whereas appropriateness processing was mediated by areas for declarative memory (hippocampus), emotional arousal (amygdala), and orthography recognition. These results indicate that non-declarative and declarative memory systems may jointly contribute to the two fundamental features of creative thinking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Highly oriented Bi-system bulk sample prepared by a decomposition-crystallization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Zhengping; Zhou Lian; Ji Chunlin

    1992-01-01

    A decomposition-crystallization method, preparing highly oriented Bi-system bulk sample is reported. The effects of processing parameter, decomposition temperature, cooling rate and post-treatment condition on texture and superconductivity are investigated. The method has successfully prepared highly textured Bi-system bulk samples. High temperature annealing does not destroy the growing texture, but the cooling rate has some effect on texture and superconductivity. Annealing in N 2 /O 2 atmosphere can improve superconductivity of the textured sample. The study on the superconductivity of the Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O bulk material has been reported in numerous papers. The research on J c concentrates on the tape containing the 2223 phase, with very few studies on the J c of bulk sample. The reason for the lack of studies is that the change of superconducting phases at high temperatures has not been known. The authors have reported that the 2212 phase incongruently melted at about 875 degrees C and proceeded to orient the c-axis perpendicular to the surface in the process of crystallization of the 2212 phase. Based on that result, a decomposition-crystallization method was proposed to prepare highly oriented Bi-system bulk sample. In this paper, the process is described in detail and the effects of processing parameters on texture and superconductivity are reported

  1. Safety measures for integrity test apparatus for IS process. Sulfuric acid decomposition section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Hiroki; Kubo, Shinji; Iwatsuki, Jin; Onuki, Kaoru

    2013-07-01

    Hazardous substances such as sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen iodide acid are employed in thermochemical Iodine-Sulfur (IS) process. It is necessary to take safety measure against workers and external environments to study experimentally on IS process. Presently we have been conducting to verify the soundness of main components made of engineering material in actual corrosive condition. An integrity test apparatus for the components of sulfuric acid decomposition was set up. We will use the hazardous substances such as sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide and perform the experiment in pressurized condition in this integrity test. Safety measures for the test apparatus, operation and abnormal situation were considered prior to starting the test. This report summarized the consideration results for the safety measures on the integrity test apparatus for the components of sulfuric acid decomposition. (author)

  2. Effects of terrestrial isopods (Crustacea: Oniscidea on leaf litter decomposition processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaleid F. Abd El-Wakeil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The leaf litter decomposition is carried out by the combined action of microorganisms and decomposer invertebrates such as earthworms, diplopods and isopods. The present work aimed to evaluate the impact of terrestrial isopod on leaf litter decomposition process. In Lab experimental food sources from oak and magnolia leaves litter were prepared. Air dried leaf litter were cut to 9 mm discs and sterilized in an autoclave then soaked in distilled water or water percolated through soil and left to decompose for 2, 4 and 6 weeks. 12 groups from two isopods species Porcellio scaber and Armadillidium vulgare, were prepared with each one containing 9 isopods. They were fed individually on the prepared food for 2 weeks. The prepared food differed in Carbon stable isotope ratio (δ13C, C%, N% and C/N ratios. At the end of the experiment, isopods were dissected and separated into gut, gut content and rest of the body. The δ13C for the prepared food, faecal pellets, remaining food, gut content, gut and rest of isopod were compared. The feeding activities of the two isopods were significantly different among isopods groups. Consumption and egestion ratios of magnolia leaf were higher than oak leaf. P. scaber consumed and egested litter higher than A. vulgare. The present results suggested that the impact of isopods and decomposition processes is species and litter specific.

  3. Industrial and simulation analysis of the nitrogen trichloride decomposition process in electrolytic chlorine production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares Neto, J.I.H.; Brito, K.D.; Vasconcelos, L.G.S.; Alves, J.J.N.; Fossy, M.F.; Brito, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the dynamic simulation of the thermal decomposition of nitrogen trichloride (NCl 3 ) during electrolytic chlorine (Cl 2 ) production, using an industrial plant as a case study. NCl 3 is an extremely unstable and explosive compound and the decomposition process has the following main problems: changeability of the reactor temperature and loss of solvent. The results of this work will be used to establish a more efficient and safe control strategy and to analyze the loss of solvent during the dynamic period. The implemented model will also be used to study the use of a new solvent, considering that currently used solvent will be prohibited from commercial use in 2010. The process was simulated by using the commercial simulator Aspen TM and the simulations were validated with plant data. From the results of the simulation it can be concluded that the rate of decomposition depends strongly on the temperature of the reactor, which has a stronger relationship to the liquid Cl 2 (reflux) and gaseous Cl 2 flow rates which feed the system. The results also showed that the loss of solvent changes strongly during the dynamic period

  4. Hydrothermal decomposition of industrial jarosite in alkaline media: The rate determining step of the process kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Ibarra A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the role of NaOH and Ca(OH2 on the hydrothermal decomposition of industrial jarosite deposited by a Mexican company in a tailings dam. The industrial jarosite is mainly composed by natrojarosite and contains 150 g Ag/t, showing a narrow particle size distribution, as revealed by XRD, fire assay, SEM-EDS and laser-diffraction analysis. The effect of the pH, when using NaOH or Ca(OH2 as alkalinizing agent was studied by carrying out decomposition experiments at different pH values and 60°C in a homogeneous size particle system (pH = 8, 9, 10 and 11 and in a heterogeneous size particle system (pH = 11. Also, the kinetic study of the process and the controlling step of the decomposition reaction when NaOH and Ca(OH2 are used was determined by fitting the data obtained to the shrinking core model for spherical particles of constant size. These results, supported by chemical (EDS, morphological (SEM and mapping of elements (EDS analysis of a partially reacted jarosite particle allowed to conclude that when NaOH is used, the process kinetics is controlled by the chemical reaction and when Ca(OH2 is used, the rate determining step is changed to a diffusion control through a layer of solid products.

  5. Cation incorporation into zirconium oxide in LiOH, NaOH, and KOH solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y.H.; Kim, K.H.; Baek, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the cation incorporation into zirconium oxide, SIMS analysis was performed on the specimens prepared to have an equal oxide thickness in LiOH, NaOH, and KOH solutions. Even though they have an equal oxide thickness in LiOH, NaOH, and KOH solutions, the penetration depth of cation into the oxide decreased with an increase in the ionic radius of cation. The cation is considered to control the corrosion in alkali hydroxide solutions and its effect is dependent on the concentration of alkali and the oxide thickness. The slight enhancement of the corrosion rate at a low concentration is thought to be caused by cation incorporation into oxide, while the significant acceleration at a high concentration is due to the transformation of oxide microstructures that would be also induced by cation incorporation into oxide. (orig.)

  6. Controlled decomposition and oxidation: A treatment method for gaseous process effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinley, Roger J. B., Sr.

    1990-01-01

    The safe disposal of effluent gases produced by the electronics industry deserves special attention. Due to the hazardous nature of many of the materials used, it is essential to control and treat the reactants and reactant by-products as they are exhausted from the process tool and prior to their release into the manufacturing facility's exhaust system and the atmosphere. Controlled decomposition and oxidation (CDO) is one method of treating effluent gases from thin film deposition processes. CDO equipment applications, field experience, and results of the use of CDO equipment and technological advances gained from the field experiences are discussed.

  7. Sublimation and thermal decomposition of ammonia borane: Competitive processes controlled by pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrat’ev, Yu.V.; Butlak, A.V.; Kazakov, I.V.; Timoshkin, A.Y., E-mail: a.y.timoshkin@spbu.edu

    2015-12-20

    Highlights: • We measured sublimation enthalpy of ammonia borane at 357 K by drop-calorimetry. • We determined activation energy for ammonia borane decomposition by tensimetry. • At 357 K decomposition and sublimation are competitive and depend on the pressure. • We propose new values for the Δ{sub f}H° of solid ammonia borane and polyamidoborane. - Abstract: Thermal behavior of ammonia borane BH{sub 3}NH{sub 3} (AB) has been studied by calorimetry, tensimetry and mass spectrometry methods. It is shown, that depending on vapor pressure in the system two competitive processes are taking place at 357 K. At atmospheric pressure thermal decomposition with hydrogen evolution is the dominant process: BH{sub 3}NH{sub 3(s)} = 1/n (BH{sub 2}NH{sub 2}){sub n(s)} + H{sub 2(g)} (1). At low pressures (circa 4 mTorr) the major process is endothermic sublimation of AB: BH{sub 3}NH{sub 3(s)} = BH{sub 3}NH{sub 3(g)} (2). At intermediate pressures both processes occur simultaneously. Enthalpies for the processes (1) and (2) have been determined by drop-calorimetry method: Δ{sub (1)}H{sub 357}° = −24.8 ± 2.3 kJ mol{sup −1} and Δ{sub sub}H{sub 357}°(BH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}) = 76.3 ± 3.0 kJ mol{sup −1}. Solid products after sublimation and decomposition have been characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy; gaseous forms were studied by mass spectrometry. Activation energy of 94 ± 11 kJ mol{sup −1} for the process (1) in range 327–351 K was determined by static tensimetry method. Based on the analysis of available thermodynamic characteristics, new values for the standard formation enthalpy of solid AB −133.4 ± 5.2 kJ mol{sup −1} and polyamidoborane −156.7 ± 5.8 kJ mol{sup −1} are recommended.

  8. Decomposition of 1,4-dioxane by advanced oxidation and biochemical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Gyun; Seo, Hyung-Joon; Lee, Byung-Ryul

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the optimal decomposition conditions when 1,4-dioxane was degraded using either the AOPs (Advanced Oxidation Processes) or the BAC-TERRA microbial complex. The advanced oxidation was operated with H2O2, in the range 4.7 to 51 mM, under 254 nm (25 W lamp) illumination, while varying the reaction parameters, such as the air flow rate and reaction time. The greatest oxidation rate (96%) of 1,4-dioxane was achieved with H2O2 concentration of 17 mM after a 2-hr reaction. As a result of this reaction, organic acid intermediates were formed, such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids. Furthermore, the study revealed that suspended particles, i.e., bio-flocs, kaolin and pozzolan, in the reaction were able to have an impact on the extent of 1,4-dioxane decomposition. The decomposition of 1,4-dioxane in the presence of bio-flocs was significantly declined due to hindered UV penetration through the solution as a result of the consistent dispersion of bio-particles. In contrast, dosing with pozzolan decomposed up to 98.8% of the 1,4-dioxane after 2 hr of reaction. Two actual wastewaters, from polyester manufacturing, containing 1,4-dioxane in the range 370 to 450 mg/L were able to be oxidized by as high as 100% within 15 min with the introduction of 100:200 (mg/L) Fe(II):H202 under UV illumination. Aerobic biological decomposition, employing BAC-TERRA, was able to remove up to 90% of 1,4-dioxane after 15 days of incubation. In the meantime, the by-products (i.e., acetic, propionic and valeric acid) generated were similar to those formed during the AOPs investigation. According to kinetic studies, both photo-decomposition and biodegradation of 1,4-dioxane followed pseudo first-order reaction kinetics, with k = 5 x 10(-4) s(-1) and 2.38 x 10(-6) s(-1), respectively. It was concluded that 1,4-dioxane could be readily degraded by both AOPs and BAC-TERRA, and that the actual polyester wastewater containing 1,4-dioxane could be successfully

  9. A new decomposition method for parallel processing multi-level optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyung Wook; Kim, Min Soo; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2002-01-01

    In practical designs, most of the multidisciplinary problems have a large-size and complicate design system. Since multidisciplinary problems have hundreds of analyses and thousands of variables, the grouping of analyses and the order of the analyses in the group affect the speed of the total design cycle. Therefore, it is very important to reorder and regroup the original design processes in order to minimize the total computational cost by decomposing large multidisciplinary problems into several MultiDisciplinary Analysis SubSystems (MDASS) and by processing them in parallel. In this study, a new decomposition method is proposed for parallel processing of multidisciplinary design optimization, such as Collaborative Optimization (CO) and Individual Discipline Feasible (IDF) method. Numerical results for two example problems are presented to show the feasibility of the proposed method

  10. In situ measurement of the effect of LiOH on the stability of zircaloy-2 surface film in PWR water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Taehtinen, S.

    1997-01-01

    Surface films on the metals play a major role in corrosion assisted cracking. A new method called Contact Electric Resistance (CER) method has been recently developed for in situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films in high temperature and high pressure environments. The technique has been used to determine in situ the electric resistance of films on metals when in contact with water and dissolved anions, during formation and destruction of oxides and hydrides and during electroplating of metals. Electric resistance data can be measured with a frequency of the order of one hertz, which makes it possible to investigate in situ the kinetics of surface film related processes which are dependent on the environment, temperature, pH and electrochemical potential. This paper presents the results of the CER investigation on the effects of LiOH on the stability of Zircaloy-2 surface film in water with 2000 ppm H 3 BO 3 . At 300 deg. C the LiOH concentrations higher than 10 -2 M (roughly 70 ppm of Li + ) were found to markedly reduce the electric resistance of the Zircaloy-2 surface film during a test period of less than two hours. The decrease of the film resistance is very abrupt, possibly indicating a phase transformation. Moreover, the advantages of the CER technique over the other competing techniques which rely on the measurement of current are discussed. (author)

  11. In situ measurement of the effect of LiOH on the stability of zircaloy-2 surface film in PWR water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saario, T; Taehtinen, S [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-02-01

    Surface films on the metals play a major role in corrosion assisted cracking. A new method called Contact Electric Resistance (CER) method has been recently developed for in situ measurement of the electric resistance of surface films in high temperature and high pressure environments. The technique has been used to determine in situ the electric resistance of films on metals when in contact with water and dissolved anions, during formation and destruction of oxides and hydrides and during electroplating of metals. Electric resistance data can be measured with a frequency of the order of one hertz, which makes it possible to investigate in situ the kinetics of surface film related processes which are dependent on the environment, temperature, pH and electrochemical potential. This paper presents the results of the CER investigation on the effects of LiOH on the stability of Zircaloy-2 surface film in water with 2000 ppm H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}. At 300 deg. C the LiOH concentrations higher than 10{sup -2} M (roughly 70 ppm of Li{sup +}) were found to markedly reduce the electric resistance of the Zircaloy-2 surface film during a test period of less than two hours. The decrease of the film resistance is very abrupt, possibly indicating a phase transformation. Moreover, the advantages of the CER technique over the other competing techniques which rely on the measurement of current are discussed. (author).

  12. Maximum production rate optimization for sulphuric acid decomposition process in tubular plug-flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Lingen; Xia, Shaojun; Sun, Fengrui

    2016-01-01

    A sulphuric acid decomposition process in a tubular plug-flow reactor with fixed inlet flow rate and completely controllable exterior wall temperature profile and reactants pressure profile is studied in this paper by using finite-time thermodynamics. The maximum production rate of the aimed product SO 2 and the optimal exterior wall temperature profile and reactants pressure profile are obtained by using nonlinear programming method. Then the optimal reactor with the maximum production rate is compared with the reference reactor with linear exterior wall temperature profile and the optimal reactor with minimum entropy generation rate. The result shows that the production rate of SO 2 of optimal reactor with the maximum production rate has an increase of more than 7%. The optimization of temperature profile has little influence on the production rate while the optimization of reactants pressure profile can significantly increase the production rate. The results obtained may provide some guidelines for the design of real tubular reactors. - Highlights: • Sulphuric acid decomposition process in tubular plug-flow reactor is studied. • Fixed inlet flow rate and controllable temperature and pressure profiles are set. • Maximum production rate of aimed product SO 2 is obtained. • Corresponding optimal temperature and pressure profiles are derived. • Production rate of SO 2 of optimal reactor increases by 7%.

  13. Noise-assisted data processing with empirical mode decomposition in biomedical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Alexandros; Constantinou, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology is described in order to investigate the performance of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) in biomedical signals, and especially in the case of electrocardiogram (ECG). Synthetic ECG signals corrupted with white Gaussian noise are employed and time series of various lengths are processed with EMD in order to extract the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). A statistical significance test is implemented for the identification of IMFs with high-level noise components and their exclusion from denoising procedures. Simulation campaign results reveal that a decrease of processing time is accomplished with the introduction of preprocessing stage, prior to the application of EMD in biomedical time series. Furthermore, the variation in the number of IMFs according to the type of the preprocessing stage is studied as a function of SNR and time-series length. The application of the methodology in MIT-BIH ECG records is also presented in order to verify the findings in real ECG signals.

  14. An integrated condition-monitoring method for a milling process using reduced decomposition features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jie; Wu, Bo; Hu, Youmin; Wang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Complex and non-stationary cutting chatter affects productivity and quality in the milling process. Developing an effective condition-monitoring approach is critical to accurately identify cutting chatter. In this paper, an integrated condition-monitoring method is proposed, where reduced features are used to efficiently recognize and classify machine states in the milling process. In the proposed method, vibration signals are decomposed into multiple modes with variational mode decomposition, and Shannon power spectral entropy is calculated to extract features from the decomposed signals. Principal component analysis is adopted to reduce feature size and computational cost. With the extracted feature information, the probabilistic neural network model is used to recognize and classify the machine states, including stable, transition, and chatter states. Experimental studies are conducted, and results show that the proposed method can effectively detect cutting chatter during different milling operation conditions. This monitoring method is also efficient enough to satisfy fast machine state recognition and classification. (paper)

  15. Signature of a spinodal decomposition in the multifragmentation process of very heavy nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabacaru, G.

    2000-12-01

    A dynamical description of the multifragmentation process shows that mechanical instabilities are responsible for spinodal decomposition of a nuclear system that spend sufficient time in the low-density region. The Xe + Sn system at 32 MeV/A incident energy, measured with INDRA multidetector, was chosen to prove experimentally this hypothesis. High performance techniques in energy calibration of Silicon detectors and CsI(Tl) scintillators were developed in order to exploit the excellent detection qualities of the multidetector. For the first time, the contribution of δ rays to the light output emitted by scintillators was quantitatively derived. Multifragmentation events coming from a system composed by almost all of nucleons of the reaction entrance channel were selected using detection completeness and event shape criteria. The dynamical model BoB realistically simulates the spinodal instabilities. This model reproduces all of dynamic and static observables. More exclusive comparisons were made to constrain again the model. Reduced velocity correlation functions were studied and gave information about the topology of the fragments at freeze-out. Charge correlation of the fragments showed that a small proportion of events (0.1 %) emits equal-sized fragments. This was interpreted as a fossil signature of the spinodal decomposition in a finite system. Indirectly, this is a proof of a first order phase transition associated to the multifragmentation of hot nuclei. (author)

  16. SDE decomposition and A-type stochastic interpretation in nonequilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ruoshi; Tang, Ying; Ao, Ping

    2017-12-01

    An innovative theoretical framework for stochastic dynamics based on the decomposition of a stochastic differential equation (SDE) into a dissipative component, a detailed-balance-breaking component, and a dual-role potential landscape has been developed, which has fruitful applications in physics, engineering, chemistry, and biology. It introduces the A-type stochastic interpretation of the SDE beyond the traditional Ito or Stratonovich interpretation or even the α-type interpretation for multidimensional systems. The potential landscape serves as a Hamiltonian-like function in nonequilibrium processes without detailed balance, which extends this important concept from equilibrium statistical physics to the nonequilibrium region. A question on the uniqueness of the SDE decomposition was recently raised. Our review of both the mathematical and physical aspects shows that uniqueness is guaranteed. The demonstration leads to a better understanding of the robustness of the novel framework. In addition, we discuss related issues including the limitations of an approach to obtaining the potential function from a steady-state distribution.

  17. A Dynamic Simulation Program for a Hydriodic Acid Concentration and Decomposition Process in the VHTR-SI Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Woon; Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Tae Hoon; Lee, Ki Young; Kim, Yong Wan; Chang, Jong Hwa; Youn, Cheung

    2011-01-01

    The Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle which can produce hydrogen by using nuclear heat consists of a Bunsen reaction (Section 1), a sulfur acid concentration and decomposition (Section 2), and a hydriodic acid concentration and decomposition (Section 3). The heat required in the SI process can be supplied through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) by a Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR). The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute-Dynamic Simulation Code (KAERI-DySCo) based on the Visual C++ is an integration application software that simulates the dynamic behavior of the SI process. KAERI-DySCo was prepared to solve dynamic problem of the seven chemical reactors which consist of Sections 2 and 3. Section 3 is the key part of the SI process, because the strong non-ideality and the partial immiscibility of the binary HI.H 2 O and the ternary HI.I 2 .H 2 O (HIX solution) mixture make it difficult to model and simulate the dynamic behavior of the system. Therefore, it is necessary to compose separately a dynamic simulation program for Section 3 in KAERI-DySCo optimization. In this paper, a simulation program to analyze the dynamic behavior of Section 3 is introduced using the prepared KAERI-DySCo, and results of dynamic simulation are represented by running the program

  18. Properties of pure nickel after long term exposures to LiOH and vacuum at 775 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The solid to liquid phase transformation of LiOH at 744.3 K is considered to be an ideal candidate thermal energy storage (TES) mechanism for a Rankine heat engine based solar dynamic system operating at approximately 682 K. While pure nickel is thought to be a suitable containment material for LiOH, long term containment is of concern because molten hydroxides are usually corrosive. Two commercially pure nickel alloys, Ni-200 and Ni-201, were exposed to molten LiOH, its vapor, and vacuum at 775 K for periods ranging from 50 to 5000 h, and simple mechanical property measurements (77 to 900 K tensile and 750 K creep rupture) of exposed alloys were undertaken. The mechanical property test procedures are described and tabular lists of the test data are presented.

  19. Bifunctional Characteristics of Al2O3 supported Ni in the HI Decomposition of Sulfur-Iodine Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chu-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sulfur-Iodine process is in need of catalytic reactor for HI decomposition because the HI decomposition reaction rate is very slow. Nickel as an alternative catalyst for platinum was investigated in this study. Al2O3 supported Ni catalysts were prepared by impregnation method. Ni amounts loaded over Al2O3 were in the range of 0.1~20 wt. %. HI decompositions were carried out in the temperature range of 573 ~ 773 K using the fixed-bed quartz reactor. The difference of catalysts before and after the reaction was analyzed using BET, CO/H2 chemisorption, XRD, XRF and SEM. It was confirmed by XRD and SEM-EDX analysis that Ni was converted to NiI2 during the HI decomposition. Catalyst deactivation due to the formation of NiI2 leads to a reduction of HI conversion. Although Ni of catalyst converted to NiI2, HI decomposition with low loading (up to 3 wt. % catalyst showed a little decrease of HI conversion. However, with more than 5 wt. % catalyst, the initial HI conversion was considerably decreased. In the particular case of 20 wt. %, the initial conversion was increased close to 60 %, which is higher than 20 % as an equilibrium conversion at 723 K. These results showed that Ni had not only a catalytic function for HI decomposition, but also function as a sorbent to absorb I2 produced from HI.

  20. Decomposition of Factors and Criteria for Evaluating the Process of Intellectualization of Enterprise Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmin Oleh Ye.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the author’s vision of solving the scientific problem of determining factors of influence and forming criteria for evaluating the process of intellectualization of enterprise management systems. It is found that diagnostic evaluation of the process of intellectualization of enterprise management systems depends on the influence of factors of the internal environment of the management systems, personal motivation factors, and the external environment. There carried out decomposition of the process of intellectualization of management systems into separate constituents and group criteria for diagnosing and their detailed indicators are selected. The basic group criteria for evaluating the process of intellectualization of management systems include: knowledge potential of carriers of intelligence; human capital; intellectual competence level of the management personnel; motivation of carriers of intelligence; state of the management development; scientific and research potential; development of information and communication technologies; intellectual and economic activity; formation of intellectual capital; institutional development of the management system, formation of knowledge and innovation prospects; complexity of the intellectualization process.

  1. Demonstration of base catalyzed decomposition process, Navy Public Works Center, Guam, Mariana Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Brown, M.D.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.N.; Wilcox, W.A.; Gano, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kim, B.C.; Gavaskar, A.R. [Battelle Columbus Div., OH (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Base Catalyzed Decomposition (BCD) is a chemical dehalogenation process designed for treating soils and other substrate contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), pesticides, dioxins, furans, and other hazardous organic substances. PCBs are heavy organic liquids once widely used in industry as lubricants, heat transfer oils, and transformer dielectric fluids. In 1976, production was banned when PCBs were recognized as carcinogenic substances. It was estimated that significant quantities (one billion tons) of U.S. soils, including areas on U.S. military bases outside the country, were contaminated by PCB leaks and spills, and cleanup activities began. The BCD technology was developed in response to these activities. This report details the evolution of the process, from inception to deployment in Guam, and describes the process and system components provided to the Navy to meet the remediation requirements. The report is divided into several sections to cover the range of development and demonstration activities. Section 2.0 gives an overview of the project history. Section 3.0 describes the process chemistry and remediation steps involved. Section 4.0 provides a detailed description of each component and specific development activities. Section 5.0 details the testing and deployment operations and provides the results of the individual demonstration campaigns. Section 6.0 gives an economic assessment of the process. Section 7.0 presents the conclusions and recommendations form this project. The appendices contain equipment and instrument lists, equipment drawings, and detailed run and analytical data.

  2. Probabilistic Round Trip Contamination Analysis of a Mars Sample Acquisition and Handling Process Using Markovian Decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Nicolas; Lin, Ying; Barengoltz, Jack

    2010-01-01

    A method for evaluating the probability of a Viable Earth Microorganism (VEM) contaminating a sample during the sample acquisition and handling (SAH) process of a potential future Mars Sample Return mission is developed. A scenario where multiple core samples would be acquired using a rotary percussive coring tool, deployed from an arm on a MER class rover is analyzed. The analysis is conducted in a structured way by decomposing sample acquisition and handling process into a series of discrete time steps, and breaking the physical system into a set of relevant components. At each discrete time step, two key functions are defined: The probability of a VEM being released from each component, and the transport matrix, which represents the probability of VEM transport from one component to another. By defining the expected the number of VEMs on each component at the start of the sampling process, these decompositions allow the expected number of VEMs on each component at each sampling step to be represented as a Markov chain. This formalism provides a rigorous mathematical framework in which to analyze the probability of a VEM entering the sample chain, as well as making the analysis tractable by breaking the process down into small analyzable steps.

  3. Character Decomposition and Transposition Processes in Chinese Compound Words Modulates Attentional Blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongwen; Gao, Min; Yan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is the phenomenon in which the identification of the second of two targets (T2) is attenuated if it is presented less than 500 ms after the first target (T1). Although the AB is eliminated in canonical word conditions, it remains unclear whether the character order in compound words affects the magnitude of the AB. Morpheme decomposition and transposition of Chinese two-character compound words can provide an effective means to examine AB priming and to assess combinations of the component representations inherent to visual word identification. In the present study, we examined the processing of consecutive targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm using Chinese two-character compound words in which the two characters were transposed to form meaningful words or meaningless combinations (reversible, transposed, or canonical words). We found that when two Chinese characters that form a compound word, regardless of their order, are presented in an RSVP sequence, the likelihood of an AB for the second character is greatly reduced or eliminated compared to when the two characters constitute separate words rather than a compound word. Moreover, the order of the report for the two characters is more likely to be reversed when the normal order of the two characters in a compound word is reversed, especially when the interval between the presentation of the two characters is extremely short. These findings are more consistent with the cognitive strategy hypothesis than the resource-limited hypothesis during character decomposition and transposition of Chinese two-character compound words. These results suggest that compound characters are perceived as a unit, rather than two separate words. The data further suggest that readers could easily understand the text with character transpositions in compound words during Chinese reading.

  4. Efficient photoreductive decomposition of N-nitrosodimethylamine by UV/iodide process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhuyu; Zhang, Chaojie; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was effectively decomposed by UV/iodide process. • NDMA was completely converted to nontoxic end products by UV/iodide process. • The photoreductive process was mainly attributed to the attack of hydrated electrons on the photoexcited NDMA. • The elimination of toxic intermediates was greatly enhanced as pH increased, but its effect on NDMA removal was negligible. - Abstract: N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) has aroused extensive concern as a disinfection byproduct due to its high toxicity and elevated concentration levels in water sources. This study investigates the photoreductive decomposition of NDMA by UV/iodide process. The results showed that this process is an effective strategy for the treatment of NDMA with 99.2% NDMA removed within 10 min. The depletion of NDMA by UV/iodide process obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics with a rate constant (k_1) of 0.60 ± 0.03 min"−"1. Hydrated electrons (e_a_q"−) generated by the UV irradiation of iodide were proven to play a critical role. Dimethylamine (DMA) and nitrite (NO_2"−) were formed as the main intermediate products, which completely converted to formate (HCOO"−), ammonium (NH_4"+) and nitrogen (N_2). Therefore, not only the high efficiencies in NDMA destruction, but the elimination of toxic intermediates make UV/iodide process advantageous. A photoreduction mechanism was proposed: NDMA initially absorbed photons to a photoexcited state, and underwent a cleavage of N−NO bond under the attack of e_a_q"−. The solution pH had little impact on NDMA removal. However, alkaline conditions were more favorable for the elimination of DMA and NO_2"−, thus effectively reducing the secondary pollution.

  5. Efficient photoreductive decomposition of N-nitrosodimethylamine by UV/iodide process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhuyu; Zhang, Chaojie, E-mail: myrazh@tongji.edu.cn; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Qi

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was effectively decomposed by UV/iodide process. • NDMA was completely converted to nontoxic end products by UV/iodide process. • The photoreductive process was mainly attributed to the attack of hydrated electrons on the photoexcited NDMA. • The elimination of toxic intermediates was greatly enhanced as pH increased, but its effect on NDMA removal was negligible. - Abstract: N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) has aroused extensive concern as a disinfection byproduct due to its high toxicity and elevated concentration levels in water sources. This study investigates the photoreductive decomposition of NDMA by UV/iodide process. The results showed that this process is an effective strategy for the treatment of NDMA with 99.2% NDMA removed within 10 min. The depletion of NDMA by UV/iodide process obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics with a rate constant (k{sub 1}) of 0.60 ± 0.03 min{sup −1}. Hydrated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup −}) generated by the UV irradiation of iodide were proven to play a critical role. Dimethylamine (DMA) and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup −}) were formed as the main intermediate products, which completely converted to formate (HCOO{sup −}), ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}). Therefore, not only the high efficiencies in NDMA destruction, but the elimination of toxic intermediates make UV/iodide process advantageous. A photoreduction mechanism was proposed: NDMA initially absorbed photons to a photoexcited state, and underwent a cleavage of N−NO bond under the attack of e{sub aq}{sup −}. The solution pH had little impact on NDMA removal. However, alkaline conditions were more favorable for the elimination of DMA and NO{sub 2}{sup −}, thus effectively reducing the secondary pollution.

  6. Energetic Materials Effects on Essential Soil Processes: Decomposition of Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata) Litter in Soil Contaminated with Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    availabilities of their respective food sources (bacteria and fungi ), were also unaffected-or-increasing in soil with CL-20 treatments. This is...ENERGETIC MATERIALS EFFECTS ON ESSENTIAL SOIL PROCESSES: DECOMPOSITION OF ORCHARD...GRASS (DACTYLIS GLOMERATA) LITTER IN SOIL CONTAMINATED WITH ENERGETIC MATERIALS ECBC-TR-1199 Roman G. Kuperman Ronald T. Checkai Michael Simini

  7. Consolidation and Decomposition of APR1400 NRC Design Certification Processes for Collaborative and Accelerated Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Chul [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Deog Ji [KNHP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    KEPCO and KHNP are conducting APR1400 Design Certification from NRC. For the proper management of processes and information, a system called RIS (Regulatory Information management System) has been implemented by FNC from 2014, and it is on the final stage. In retaining the certification from NRC, RIS will be a very essential role by providing platform for collaborative and accelerated processing of responses to RAI (Request of Additional Information). Preparation of responses to RAI with this kind of systematic approach may be the first in the world. Westinghouse is doing manually and using MS Excel to collect the processing status. Where as, RIS will enable each member can do his own job and collect the status automatically. In this paper, how collaborative and accelerated processing of responses to RAI can be enabled will be described, and further enhancements will also be discussed. It handles MS Word directory with the help of VSTO. And with the help of Aspose.Total for .NET, the prepared response to RAI meets NRC's requirements. Through some further work and direct integration with requirement management solution, RIS can be expanded to cover a prior impact notice in case of DCD being altered.

  8. Experimental investigation on the heterogeneous kinetic process of the low thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longuet, Baptiste [Laboratoire Energetique Explosions et Structures Universite d' Orleans (Germany); Gillard, Philippe [Laboratoire Energetic Explosions et Structures, Universite d' Orleans, Bourges (France)

    2009-02-15

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate has been extensively studied in the past. Nevertheless, the various results published illustrate, on the one hand, significant differences regarding the influence of different parameters on the decomposition and on the other hand, a lack of useful quantitative laws to predict the thermal behaviour of this crystal under a range of conditions (temperature, duration of exposure, presence of confinement). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Combined effects of leaf litter and soil microsite on decomposition process in arid rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Analía Lorena; Bertiller, Mónica Beatriz

    2013-01-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze the combined effects of leaf litter quality and soil properties on litter decomposition and soil nitrogen (N) mineralization at conserved (C) and disturbed by sheep grazing (D) vegetation states in arid rangelands of the Patagonian Monte. It was hypothesized that spatial differences in soil inorganic-N levels have larger impact on decomposition processes of non-recalcitrant than recalcitrant leaf litter (low and high concentration of secondary compounds, respectively). Leaf litter and upper soil were extracted from modal size plant patches (patch microsite) and the associated inter-patch area (inter-patch microsite) in C and D. Leaf litter was pooled per vegetation state and soil was pooled combining vegetation state and microsite. Concentrations of N and secondary compounds in leaf litter and total and inorganic-N in soil were assessed at each pooled sample. Leaf litter decay and soil N mineralization at microsites of C and D were estimated in 160 microcosms incubated at field capacity (16 month). C soils had higher total N than D soils (0.58 and 0.41 mg/g, respectively). Patch soil of C and inter-patch soil of D exhibited the highest values of inorganic-N (8.8 and 8.4 μg/g, respectively). Leaf litter of C was less recalcitrant and decomposed faster than that of D. Non-recalcitrant leaf litter decay and induced soil N mineralization had larger variation among microsites (coefficients of variation = 25 and 41%, respectively) than recalcitrant leaf litter (coefficients of variation = 12 and 32%, respectively). Changes in the canopy structure induced by grazing disturbance increased leaf litter recalcitrance, and reduced litter decay and soil N mineralization, independently of soil N levels. This highlights the importance of the combined effects of soil and leaf litter properties on N cycling probably with consequences for vegetation reestablishment and dynamics, rangeland resistance and resilience with implications

  10. Decomposition of organic pollutants in industrial Effluent induced by advanced oxidation process with Electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, C.L.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Rela, P.R.; Oikawa, H.; Silveira, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) by electron beam irradiation induce the decomposition of pollutants in industrial effluent. Experiments were conducted using a Radiation Dynamics Electron Beam Accelerator with 1.5 MeV energy and 37 Kew power. Experiments were conducted using samples from a Governmental Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP) that receives about 20% of industrial wastewater, with the objective of use the electrons beam technology to destroy the refractory organic pollutants. Samples from WTP main Industrial Receiver Unit influent (IRU), Coarse Bar Screens effluent (CBS), Medium Bar Screens effluent (MBS), Primary Sedimentation effluent (PS) and Final Effluent (FE), were collected and irradiated in the electron beam accelerator in a batch system. The delivered doses were 5.0kGy, 10.0kGy and 20.0kGy. The electron beam irradiation showed be efficient on destroying the organic compounds delivered in these effluents mainly chloroform, dichloroethane, methyl isobutyl ketone, benzene, toluene, xylene, phenol. The necessary dose to remove 90% of the most organic compounds from industry effluent was 20 kGy. The removal of organic compounds from this complex mixture were described by the destruction G value (Gd) that were obtained for those compounds in different initial concentration and compared with literature

  11. Design and cost of the sulfuric acid decomposition reactor for the sulfur based hydrogen processes - HTR2008-58009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T. Y.; Connolly, S. M.; Lahoda, E. J.; Kriel, W.

    2008-01-01

    The key interface component between the reactor and chemical systems for the sulfuric acid based processes to make hydrogen is the sulfuric acid decomposition reactor. The materials issues for the decomposition reactor are severe since sulfuric acid must be heated, vaporized and decomposed. SiC has been identified and proven by others to be an acceptable material. However, SiC has a significant design issue when it must be interfaced with metals for connection to the remainder of the process. Westinghouse has developed a design utilizing SiC for the high temperature portions of the reactor that are in contact with the sulfuric acid and polymeric coated steel for low temperature portions. This design is expected to have a reasonable cost for an operating lifetime of 20 years. It can be readily maintained in the field, and is transportable by truck (maximum OD is 4.5 meters). This paper summarizes the detailed engineering design of the Westinghouse Decomposition Reactor and the decomposition reactor's capital cost. (authors)

  12. A sustainable process to utilize ferrous sulfate waste from titanium oxide industry by reductive decomposition reaction with pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Penghui; Deng, Shaogang; Zhang, Zhiye; Wang, Xinlong; Chen, Xiaodong; Yang, Xiushan; Yang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A newly developed treating process of ferrous sulfate was proposed. • The reaction process was discussed by thermodynamic analysis. • Thermodynamic analysis was compared with experiments results. • The kinetic model of the decomposition reaction was determined. • The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions was explored. - Abstract: Ferrous sulfate waste has become a bottleneck in the sustainable development of the titanium dioxide industry in China. In this study, we propose a new method for the reductive decomposition of ferrous sulfate waste using pyrite. Thermodynamics analysis, tubular reactor experiments, and kinetics analysis were performed to analyze the reaction process. The results of the thermodynamic simulation showed that the reaction process and products were different when molar ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was changed. The suitable molar ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was 8–12. The reaction temperature of ferrous sulfate with pyrite was 580–770 K and the main products were Fe_3O_4 and SO_2. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results. The desulphurization rate reached 98.55% and main solid products were Fe_3O_4 at 823.15 K when mole ratio of FeSO_4/FeS_2 was 8. Nano-sized magnetite was obtained at this condition. The kinetic model was investigated by isoconversional methods. The average E value was 244.34 kJ mol"−"1. The ferrous sulfate decomposition process can be treated as autocatalytic reaction mechanism, which corresponded to the expanded Prout–Tompson (Bna) model. The reaction mechanism of autocatalytic reactions during the process of ferrous sulfate decomposition were explored, the products of Fe oxide substances are the catalyst components.

  13. Drift and transmission FT-IR spectroscopy of forest soils: an approach to determine decomposition processes of forest litter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberhauer, G.; Gerzabek, M.H.

    1999-06-01

    A method is described to characterize organic soil layers using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The applicability of FT-IR, either dispersive or transmission, to investigate decomposition processes of spruce litter in soil originating from three different forest sites in two climatic regions was studied. Spectral information of transmission and diffuse reflection FT-IR spectra was analyzed and compared. For data evaluation Kubelka Munk (KM) transformation was applied to the DRIFT spectra. Sample preparation for DRIFT is simpler and less time consuming in comparison to transmission FT-IR, which uses KBr pellets. A variety of bands characteristics of molecular structures and functional groups has been identified for these complex samples. Analysis of both transmission FT-IR and DRIFT, showed that the intensity of distinct bands is a measure of the decomposition of forest litter. Interferences due to water adsorption spectra were reduced by DRIFT measurement in comparison to transmission FT-IR spectroscopy. However, data analysis revealed that intensity changes of several bands of DRIFT and transmission FT-IR were significantly correlated with soil horizons. The application of regression models enables identification and differentiation of organic forest soil horizons and allows to determine the decomposition status of soil organic matter in distinct layers. On the basis of the data presented in this study, it may be concluded that FT-IR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of decomposition dynamics in forest soils. (author)

  14. Decomposition mechanism of trichloroethylene based on by-product distribution in the hybrid barrier discharge plasma process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang-Bo [Industry Applications Research Laboratory, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon, Kyeongnam (Korea, Republic of); Oda, Tetsuji [Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    The hybrid barrier discharge plasma process combined with ozone decomposition catalysts was studied experimentally for decomposing dilute trichloroethylene (TCE). Based on the fundamental experiment for catalytic activities on ozone decomposition, MnO{sub 2} was selected for application in the main experiments for its higher catalytic abilities than other metal oxides. A lower initial TCE concentration existed in the working gas; the larger ozone concentration was generated from the barrier discharge plasma treatment. Near complete decomposition of dichloro-acetylchloride (DCAC) into Cl{sub 2} and CO{sub x} was observed for an initial TCE concentration of less than 250 ppm. C=C {pi} bond cleavage in TCE gave a carbon single bond of DCAC through oxidation reaction during the barrier discharge plasma treatment. Those DCAC were easily broken in the subsequent catalytic reaction. While changing oxygen concentration in working gas, oxygen radicals in the plasma space strongly reacted with precursors of DCAC compared with those of trichloro-acetaldehyde. A chlorine radical chain reaction is considered as a plausible decomposition mechanism in the barrier discharge plasma treatment. The potential energy of oxygen radicals at the surface of the catalyst is considered as an important factor in causing reactive chemical reactions.

  15. Adaptive variational mode decomposition method for signal processing based on mode characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jijian; Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Haijun; Dong, Xiaofeng

    2018-07-01

    Variational mode decomposition is a completely non-recursive decomposition model, where all the modes are extracted concurrently. However, the model requires a preset mode number, which limits the adaptability of the method since a large deviation in the number of mode set will cause the discard or mixing of the mode. Hence, a method called Adaptive Variational Mode Decomposition (AVMD) was proposed to automatically determine the mode number based on the characteristic of intrinsic mode function. The method was used to analyze the simulation signals and the measured signals in the hydropower plant. Comparisons have also been conducted to evaluate the performance by using VMD, EMD and EWT. It is indicated that the proposed method has strong adaptability and is robust to noise. It can determine the mode number appropriately without modulation even when the signal frequencies are relatively close.

  16. Beta decomposition processes in Hf-rich Hf--Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.B.; Taggart, R.; Polonis, D.H.

    1978-01-01

    The decomposition of the bcc β-phase by both athermal and isothermal processes has been investigated in Hf-rich Hf--Nb alloys. An all β-phase structure is retained in chill-cast alloys containing 30 to 50 at.% Nb (Cb), although electron diffraction streaking effects and the behavior of the temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity indicate the presence of a bcc lattice instability similar to that reported in solute lean Ti and Zr alloys. Aging a Hf 0 . 65 Nb 0 . 35 alloy at 400 and 600 0 C resulted in the direct precipitation of a fine dispersion of α-phase needles; this morphology differs from the discs of transition α (α/sub t/) which Carpenter et al observed in Nb-rich Nb 0 . 68 Hf 0 . 32 . During continued aging, the needles grow selectively to form colonies or groups of needles in which both the individual needles and the groups of needles have major axes aligned along (110)/sub β/ type directions. The initial α-phase particles exhibit the Burgers orientation relationship with the parent matrix; continued aging changes the electron diffraction patterns in a way that is similar to that observed in aged Ti--Mo and Ti--Mo--Al alloys where they were attributed to the α-phase having a different crystallographic relationship to the β-phase (Type 2 α-phase). The observed changes in the electron diffraction patterns of aged Hf 0 . 65 Nb 0 . 35 cannot be described as resulting from strained Burgers α-phase

  17. The Training of Morphological Decomposition in Word Processing and Its Effects on Literacy Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Bar-Kochva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study set out to examine the effects of a morpheme-based training on reading and spelling in fifth and sixth graders (N = 47, who present poor literacy skills and speak German as a second language. A computerized training, consisting of a visual lexical decision task (comprising 2,880 items, presented in 12 sessions, was designed to encourage fast morphological analysis in word processing. The children were divided between two groups: the one underwent a morpheme-based training, in which word-stems of inflections and derivations were presented for a limited duration, while their pre- and suffixes remained on screen until response. Another group received a control training consisting of the same task, except that the duration of presentation of a non-morphological unit was restricted. In a Word Disruption Task, participants read words under three conditions: morphological separation (with symbols separating between the words’ morphemes, non-morphological separation (with symbols separating between non-morphological units of words, and no-separation (with symbols presented at the beginning and end of each word. The group receiving the morpheme-based program improved more than the control group in terms of word reading fluency in the morphological condition. The former group also presented similar word reading fluency after training in the morphological condition and in the no-separation condition, thereby suggesting that the morpheme-based training contributed to the integration of morphological decomposition into the process of word recognition. At the same time, both groups similarly improved in other measures of word reading fluency. With regard to spelling, the morpheme-based training group showed a larger improvement than the control group in spelling of trained items, and a unique improvement in spelling of untrained items (untrained word-stems integrated into trained pre- and suffixes. The results further suggest some contribution of

  18. [Decomposition of corpses--a microbial degradation process with special reference to mummification, formation of adipocere and incomplete putrified corpes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenen, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Decomposition of the human body is a microbial process. It is influenced by the environmental situation and it depends to a high degree on the exchange of substances between the corpse and the environment. Mummification occurs at low humidity or frost. Adipocere arises from lack of oxygen, incomplete putrified corpses develop when there is no exchange of air or water between the corpse and the environment.

  19. A thready affair: linking fungal diversity and community dynamics to terrestrial decomposition processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wal, A.; Geydan, T.D.; Kuyper, T.W.; De Boer, W.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to the decomposition of terrestrial organic matter and, consequently, in the global carbon cycle. In particular, their contribution to degradation of recalcitrant lignocellulose complexes has been widely studied. In this review, we focus on the functioning of

  20. Decomposition processes in soil of a healthy and a declining Phragmites australis stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantrůčková, Hana; Picek, Tomáš; Šimek, Miloslav; Bauer, Václav; Kopecký, Jiří; Pechar, Libor; Lukavská, Jaroslava; Čížková, Hana

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 69, - (2001), s. 217-234 ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/96/0589 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : decomposition * eutrophication * Phragmites australis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.361, year: 2001

  1. A preliminary report on the effects of long-term exposure of LiOH on pure nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    A 'bread pan' capsule has been designed which allows large numbers of tensile specimens to be simultaneously exposed to molten LiOH, its vapor, and vacuum. Capsules and specimens fabricated from the pure nickel alloy Ni-200 were annealed for 401 hours and 2500 hours at 775 K. Examination of the exposed materials revealed that little outward damage in terms of visible attack, weight change, or loss of room temperature tensile properties occurred. In particular, the mechanical behavior of hydroxide-contaminated alloy was essentially identical to that receiving a simple thermal exposure in vacuum. Examination of the microstructures revealed that LiOH did produce some nonuniform, shallow intergranular corrosion in NI-200; however, the extent of the damage was insufficient to produce weakening or embrittlement.

  2. Genotypic diversity of an invasive plant species promotes litter decomposition and associated processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Miao, Yuan; Yu, Shuo; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Schmid, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    Following studies that showed negative effects of species loss on ecosystem functioning, newer studies have started to investigate if similar consequences could result from reductions of genetic diversity within species. We tested the influence of genotypic richness and dissimilarity (plots containing one, three, six or 12 genotypes) in stands of the invasive plant Solidago canadensis in China on the decomposition of its leaf litter and associated soil animals over five monthly time intervals. We found that the logarithm of genotypic richness was positively linearly related to mass loss of C, N and P from the litter and to richness and abundance of soil animals on the litter samples. The mixing proportion of litter from two sites, but not genotypic dissimilarity of mixtures, had additional effects on measured variables. The litter diversity effects on soil animals were particularly strong under the most stressful conditions of hot weather in July: at this time richness and abundance of soil animals were higher in 12-genotype litter mixtures than even in the highest corresponding one-genotype litter. The litter diversity effects on decomposition were in part mediated by soil animals: the abundance of Acarina, when used as covariate in the analysis, fully explained the litter diversity effects on mass loss of N and P. Overall, our study shows that high genotypic richness of S. canadensis leaf litter positively affects richness and abundance of soil animals, which in turn accelerate litter decomposition and P release from litter.

  3. Decomposition and Precipitation Process During Thermo-mechanical Fatigue of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weidner, A.; Kolmorgen, R.; Kuběna, Ivo; Kulawinski, D.; Kruml, Tomáš; Biermann, H.

    47A, č. 5 (2016), s. 2112-2124 ISSN 1073-5623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA ČR GA15-08826S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : FE-CR ALLOYS * SPINODAL DECOMPOSITION * COMPUTER-MODELS * ATOMIC-LEVEL * AGING EMBRITTLEMENT * FERRITE * BEHAVIOR * TEMPERATURE Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.874, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11661-016-3392-z

  4. Process and apparatus for pyrolytic decomposition and coking of mixtures of finely divided solid carbonaceous material and hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A

    1933-09-18

    A process is described for pyrolytic decomposition and coking of mixtures of finely divided solid and semi-solid carbonaceous material and hydrocarbon oils, whereby the mixture is first heated to a high temperature; the heated products are introduced into a coking zone, where vapors are separated from nonvaporous residue afterwards to be cracked and condensed, characterized in that the mixture is heated to a high temperature under substantially noncoking conditions and that nonvaporous residue obtained in the coking zone is coked as a relatively thin layer on an externally intensely heated surface, preferably of heat-conducting, fireproof material, such as carborundum, fused-aluminum oxide, or clay.

  5. Decomposition of intact chicken feathers by a thermophile in combination with an acidulocomposting garbage-treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeri, Yasushi; Matsui, Tatsunobu; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    2009-11-01

    In order to develop a practical method for the decomposition of intact chicken feathers, a moderate thermophile strain, Meiothermus ruber H328, having strong keratinolytic activity, was used in a bio-type garbage-treatment machine working with an acidulocomposting process. The addition of strain H328 cells (15 g) combined with acidulocomposting in the garbage machine resulted in 70% degradation of intact chicken feathers (30 g) within 14 d. This degradation efficiency is comparable to a previous result employing the strain as a single bacterium in flask culture, and it indicates that strain H328 can promote intact feather degradation activity in a garbage machine currently on the market.

  6. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goutsias (John); H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    1998-01-01

    textabstract[PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis

  7. Calcined hydrotalcites for the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O in simulated process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armor, J.N.; Braymer, T.A.; Farris, T.S.; Li, Y.; Petrocelli, F.P.; Weist, E.L. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Kannan, S.; Swamy, C.S. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras (India)

    1996-01-18

    Various hydrotalcite based catalysts were prepared for testing for the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O. Co-Al, Ni-Al, Co/Pd-Al, Co/Rh-Al, and Co/Mg-Al substituted hydrotalcites and Co-La-Al hydroxides offer very good activity at modest temperatures. Precalcination of these materials at ca. 450-500C, which destroys the hydrotalcite phase, is necessary for optimum activity and life. For Co substituted hydrotalcites, the optimal ratio of Co/Al is 3.0. The temperature for 50% conversion of N{sub 2}O of these calcined cobalt hydrotalcites is ca. 75C lower than for the previous highly active Co-ZSM-5. These calcined cobalt hydrotalcite materials display sustained life at temperatures in excess of 670C in an O{sub 2} rich, wet stream with high levels of N{sub 2}O (10%). Excess O{sub 2} does not seriously impact N{sub 2}O decomposition, but the combination of both water vapor and O{sub 2} does reduce activity by ca. 50%

  8. Toluene decomposition performance and NOx by-product formation during a DBD-catalyst process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufang; Liao, Xiaobin; Fu, Mingli; Huang, Haibao; Ye, Daiqi

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics of toluene decomposition and formation of nitrogen oxide (NOx) by-products were investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with/without catalyst at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Four kinds of metal oxides, i.e., manganese oxide (MnOx), iron oxide (FeOx), cobalt oxide (CoOx) and copper oxide (CuO), supported on Al2O3/nickel foam, were used as catalysts. It was found that introducing catalysts could improve toluene removal efficiency, promote decomposition of by-product ozone and enhance CO2 selectivity. In addition, NOx was suppressed with the decrease of specific energy density (SED) and the increase of humidity, gas flow rate and toluene concentration, or catalyst introduction. Among the four kinds of catalysts, the CuO catalyst showed the best performance in NOx suppression. The MnOx catalyst exhibited the lowest concentration of O3 and highest CO2 selectivity but the highest concentration of NOx. A possible pathway for NOx production in DBD was discussed. The contributions of oxygen active species and hydroxyl radicals are dominant in NOx suppression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Solar radiation influence on the decomposition process of diclofenac in surface waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, Peter; Tuempling, Wolf von

    2007-01-01

    Diclofenac can be detected in surface water of many rivers with human impacts worldwide. The observed decrease of the diclofenac concentration in waters and the formation of its photochemical transformation products under the impact of natural irradiation during one to 16 days are explained in this article. In semi-natural laboratory tests and in a field experiment it could be shown, that sunlight stimulates the decomposition of diclofenac in surface waters. During one day intensive solar radiation in middle European summer diclofenac decomposes in the surface layer of the water (0 to 5 cm) up to 83%, determined in laboratory exposition experiments. After two weeks in a field experiment, the diclofenac was not detectable anymore in the water surface layer (limit of quantification: 5 ng/L). At a water depth of 50 cm, within two weeks 96% of the initial concentration was degraded, while in 100 cm depth 2/3 of the initial diclofenac concentration remained. With the decomposition, stable and meta-stable photolysis products were formed and observed by UV detection. Beyond that the chemical structure of these products were determined. Three transformation products, that were not described in the literature so far, were identified and quantified with GC-MS

  10. Application of Decomposition Methodology to Solve Integrated Process Design and Controller Design Problems for Reactor-Separator-Recycle System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abd.Hamid, Mohd-Kamaruddin; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the integrated process design and controller design (IPDC) for a reactor-separator-recycle (RSR) system and evaluates a decomposition methodology to solve the IPDC problem. Accordingly, the IPDC problem is solved by decomposing it into four hierarchical stages: (i) pre...... the design of a RSR system involving consecutive reactions, A B -> C and shown to provide effective solutions that satisfy design, control and cost criteria. The advantage of the proposed methodology is that it is systematic, makes use of thermodynamic-process knowledge and provides valuable insights......-analysis, (ii) design analysis, (iii) controller design analysis, and (iv) final selection and verification. The methodology makes use of thermodynamic-process insights and the reverse design approach to arrive at the final process-controller design decisions. The developed methodology is illustrated through...

  11. Continuous-variable quantum Gaussian process regression and quantum singular value decomposition of nonsparse low-rank matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddhartha; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2018-02-01

    With the significant advancement in quantum computation during the past couple of decades, the exploration of machine-learning subroutines using quantum strategies has become increasingly popular. Gaussian process regression is a widely used technique in supervised classical machine learning. Here we introduce an algorithm for Gaussian process regression using continuous-variable quantum systems that can be realized with technology based on photonic quantum computers under certain assumptions regarding distribution of data and availability of efficient quantum access. Our algorithm shows that by using a continuous-variable quantum computer a dramatic speedup in computing Gaussian process regression can be achieved, i.e., the possibility of exponentially reducing the time to compute. Furthermore, our results also include a continuous-variable quantum-assisted singular value decomposition method of nonsparse low rank matrices and forms an important subroutine in our Gaussian process regression algorithm.

  12. Comparison of the thermal decomposition processes of several aminoalcohol-based ZnO inks with one containing ethanolamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Núñez, Alberto [University of Barcelona, Department of Electronics, Martí i Franquès 1, E08028-Barcelona (Spain); Roura, Pere [University of Girona, Department of Physics, Campus Montilivi, Edif. PII, E17071-Girona, Catalonia (Spain); López, Concepción [University of Barcelona, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Martí i Franquès 1, E08028-Barcelona (Spain); Vilà, Anna, E-mail: avila@el.ub.edu [University of Barcelona, Department of Electronics, Martí i Franquès 1, E08028-Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Four alternatives to ethanolamine as stabilizer for the chemical synthesis of ZnO with zinc acetate dihydrate are proposed: aminopropanol, aminomethyl butanol, aminophenol and aminobenzyl alcohol. • Thermal decomposition processes described. Nitrogen cyclic compounds result. • Molecule flexibility helps decomposition, and in particular aliphatic aminoalcohols (quite flexible) decompose the precursor at lower temperatures than aromatic ones (more rigid). • Aminopropanol, aminomethyl butanol and aminobenzyl crystallize ZnO at a lower temperature than ethanolamine. • Nitrogen cyclic specimens have been identified and evolve in all cases (included ethanolamine) at temperatures up to 600 °C. - Abstract: Four inks for the production of ZnO semiconducting films have been prepared with zinc acetate dihydrate as precursor salt and one among the following aminoalcohols: aminopropanol (APr), aminomethyl butanol (AMB), aminophenol (APh) and aminobenzyl alcohol (AB) as stabilizing agent. Their thermal decomposition process has been analyzed in situ by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved gas analysis (EGA), whereas the solid product has been analysed ex-situ by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). Although, except for the APh ink, crystalline ZnO is already obtained at 300 °C, the films contain an organic residue that evolves at higher temperature in the form of a large variety of nitrogen-containing cyclic compounds. The results indicate that APr can be a better stabilizing agent than ethanolamine (EA). It gives larger ZnO crystal sizes with similar carbon content. However, a common drawback of all the amino stabilizers (EA included) is that nitrogen atoms have not been completely removed from the ZnO film at the highest temperature of our experiments (600 °C).

  13. Purification of Sodium Phosphates as by Product of Rirang Ore Decomposition Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugeng-Walujo; Hafni-LN; Susilaningtyas; Mukhlis; Budi-Sarono; Widowati

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to get purification condition of sodium phosphates from the filtration result of mixing mother liquor and filtrate of washing residue from Rirang monazite decomposition by alkaline. The method of purification which has been used is dissolved the precipitation of sodium phosphates into agitated water 5 minutes and solution settling for 12 hours until appear of sodium phosphate crystals. The variable of experiment included dissolution time and ratio of the amount precipitate sodium phosphate volume of water to solvent. Experimental data shown that the good temperature of dissolution is 70 o C with the ratio of precipitate sodium phosphate is 80 gram/ 40 ml to water. The recovery of sodium phosphate crystallisation is 87.4314 % with 54.0105 % pure of Na 3 PO 4 , U content is 0.0004%, NaOH content and other impurities is 45.9889%. (author)

  14. Comparative analysis of gradient-field-based orientation estimation methods and regularized singular-value decomposition for fringe pattern processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi; Fu, Shujun

    2017-09-20

    Fringe orientation is an important feature of fringe patterns and has a wide range of applications such as guiding fringe pattern filtering, phase unwrapping, and abstraction. Estimating fringe orientation is a basic task for subsequent processing of fringe patterns. However, various noise, singular and obscure points, and orientation data degeneration lead to inaccurate calculations of fringe orientation. Thus, to deepen the understanding of orientation estimation and to better guide orientation estimation in fringe pattern processing, some advanced gradient-field-based orientation estimation methods are compared and analyzed. At the same time, following the ideas of smoothing regularization and computing of bigger gradient fields, a regularized singular-value decomposition (RSVD) technique is proposed for fringe orientation estimation. To compare the performance of these gradient-field-based methods, quantitative results and visual effect maps of orientation estimation are given on simulated and real fringe patterns that demonstrate that the RSVD produces the best estimation results at a cost of relatively less time.

  15. First-principles study on the initial decomposition process of CH3NH3PbI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanbin; Shan, Yueyue; Xu, Hu

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid perovskites are promising materials for high-performance photovoltaics. Unfortunately, hybrid perovskites readily decompose in particular under humid conditions, and the mechanisms of this phenomenon have not yet been fully understood. In this work, we systematically studied the possible mechanisms and the structural properties during the initial decomposition process of MAPbI3 (MA = CH3NH3+) using first-principles calculations. The theoretical results show that it is energetically favorable for PbI2 to nucleate and crystalize from the MAPbI3 matrix ahead of other decomposition products. Additionally, the structural instability is an intrinsic property of MAPbI3, regardless of whether the system is exposed to humidity. We find that H2O could facilitate the desorption of gaseous components, acting as a catalyst to transfer the H+ ion. These results provide insight into the cause of the instability of MAPbI3 and may improve our understanding of the properties of hybrid perovskites.

  16. Phase stability and decomposition processes in Ti-Al based intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Kiyomichi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan); Ono, Toshiaki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan); Ohtsubo, Hiroyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan); Ohmori, Yasuya [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    The high-temperature phase equilibria and the phase decomposition of {alpha} and {beta} phases were studied by crystallographic analysis of the solidification microstructures of Ti-48at.%Al and Ti-48at.%Al-2at.%X (X=Mn, Cr, Mo) alloys. The effects on the phase stability of Zr and O atoms penetrating from the specimen surface were also examined for Ti-48at.%Al and Ti-50at.%Al alloys. The third elements Cr and Mo shift the {beta} phase region to higher Al concentrations, and the {beta} phase is ordered to the {beta}{sub 2} phase. The Zr and O atoms stabilize {beta} and {alpha} phases respectively. In the Zr-stabilized {beta} phase, {alpha}{sub 2} laths form with accompanying surface relief, and stacking faults which relax the elastic strain owing to lattice deformation are introduced after formation of {alpha}{sub 2} order domains. Thus shear is thought to operate after the phase transition from {beta} to {alpha}{sub 2} by short-range diffusion. A similar analysis was conducted for the Ti-Al binary system, and the transformation was interpreted from the CCT diagram constructed qualitatively. ((orig.))

  17. The Search for a Volatile Human Specific Marker in the Decomposition Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rosier

    Full Text Available In this study, a validated method using a thermal desorber combined with a gas chromatograph coupled to mass spectrometry was used to identify the volatile organic compounds released during decomposition of 6 human and 26 animal remains in a laboratory environment during a period of 6 months. 452 compounds were identified. Among them a human specific marker was sought using principle component analysis. We found a combination of 8 compounds (ethyl propionate, propyl propionate, propyl butyrate, ethyl pentanoate, pyridine, diethyl disulfide, methyl(methylthioethyl disulfide and 3-methylthio-1-propanol that led to the distinction of human and pig remains from other animal remains. Furthermore, it was possible to separate the pig remains from human remains based on 5 esters (3-methylbutyl pentanoate, 3-methylbutyl 3-methylbutyrate, 3-methylbutyl 2-methylbutyrate, butyl pentanoate and propyl hexanoate. Further research in the field with full bodies has to corroborate these results and search for one or more human specific markers. These markers would allow a more efficiently training of cadaver dogs or portable detection devices could be developed.

  18. Decomposition of Fertilizer Use Intensity and Its Environmental Risk in China’s Grain Production Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Cai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully explore the fertilizer use intensity and its potential threats to the ecological environment, this paper has studied the decomposition of fertilizer use intensity and its environmental risk in China’s grain production. Based on the statistical data collected from 10 provinces during 2004–2015 in China’s grain producing areas, this paper has analyzed the effect of fertilizer use intensity from a regional perspective. The environmental risk assessment model considers some factors such as the fertilizer application safety thresholds use efficiency, multiple cropping index, and environmental impact weight. The fertilizer application safety thresholds are calculated on the target output of local food crops. The results show that: (1 during 2004–2015, the fertilizer use intensity shows an increasing trend in China’s grain producing areas, and the intensity is significantly higher than the upper limit of the international safety fertilization; (2 the cumulative contribution rate of the increase of fertilizer use intensity caused by regional fertilizer use efficiency and grain planting structure adjustment are 57.03% and 1.81% respectively; (3 in 2015, China’s grain producing areas’ environmental risk index of phosphorus and potash was low, with the values in these two provinces being quite different and indicating the characteristics of aggregation and distribution. Therefore, the Chinese government should unswervingly encourage the application of some technology that could save fertilizer and increase efficiency, establish environmental risk monitoring and control systems, and improve relevant policies and regulations.

  19. The Search for a Volatile Human Specific Marker in the Decomposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, E.; Loix, S.; Develter, W.; Van de Voorde, W.; Tytgat, J.; Cuypers, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a validated method using a thermal desorber combined with a gas chromatograph coupled to mass spectrometry was used to identify the volatile organic compounds released during decomposition of 6 human and 26 animal remains in a laboratory environment during a period of 6 months. 452 compounds were identified. Among them a human specific marker was sought using principle component analysis. We found a combination of 8 compounds (ethyl propionate, propyl propionate, propyl butyrate, ethyl pentanoate, pyridine, diethyl disulfide, methyl(methylthio)ethyl disulfide and 3-methylthio-1-propanol) that led to the distinction of human and pig remains from other animal remains. Furthermore, it was possible to separate the pig remains from human remains based on 5 esters (3-methylbutyl pentanoate, 3-methylbutyl 3-methylbutyrate, 3-methylbutyl 2-methylbutyrate, butyl pentanoate and propyl hexanoate). Further research in the field with full bodies has to corroborate these results and search for one or more human specific markers. These markers would allow a more efficiently training of cadaver dogs or portable detection devices could be developed. PMID:26375029

  20. Completed Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition: a Robust Signal Processing Tool to Identify Sequence Strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, H.; Musu, J. T.; Diria, S. A.; Permono, W.; Sadjati, O.; Sopandi, I.; Ruzi, F.

    2018-03-01

    Well logging data provide many geological information and its trends resemble nonlinear or non-stationary signals. As long well log data recorded, there will be external factors can interfere or influence its signal resolution. A sensitive signal analysis is required to improve the accuracy of logging interpretation which it becomes an important thing to determine sequence stratigraphy. Complete Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (CEEMD) is one of nonlinear and non-stationary signal analysis method which decomposes complex signal into a series of intrinsic mode function (IMF). Gamma Ray and Spontaneous Potential well log parameters decomposed into IMF-1 up to IMF-10 and each of its combination and correlation makes physical meaning identification. It identifies the stratigraphy and cycle sequence and provides an effective signal treatment method for sequence interface. This method was applied to BRK- 30 and BRK-13 well logging data. The result shows that the combination of IMF-5, IMF-6, and IMF-7 pattern represent short-term and middle-term while IMF-9 and IMF-10 represent the long-term sedimentation which describe distal front and delta front facies, and inter-distributary mouth bar facies, respectively. Thus, CEEMD clearly can determine the different sedimentary layer interface and better identification of the cycle of stratigraphic base level.

  1. Peatland Microbial Communities and Decomposition Processes in the James Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Michael D.; Smemo, Kurt A.; McLaughlin, James W.; Basiliko, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Northern peatlands are a large repository of atmospheric carbon due to an imbalance between primary production by plants and microbial decomposition. The James Bay Lowlands (JBL) of northern Ontario are a large peatland-complex but remain relatively unstudied. Climate change models predict the region will experience warmer and drier conditions, potentially altering plant community composition, and shifting the region from a long-term carbon sink to a source. We collected a peat core from two geographically separated (ca. 200 km) ombrotrophic peatlands (Victor and Kinoje Bogs) and one minerotrophic peatland (Victor Fen) located near Victor Bog within the JBL. We characterized (i) archaeal, bacterial, and fungal community structure with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of ribosomal DNA, (ii) estimated microbial activity using community level physiological profiling and extracellular enzymes activities, and (iii) the aeration and temperature dependence of carbon mineralization at three depths (0–10, 50–60, and 100–110 cm) from each site. Similar dominant microbial taxa were observed at all three peatlands despite differences in nutrient content and substrate quality. In contrast, we observed differences in basal respiration, enzyme activity, and the magnitude of substrate utilization, which were all generally higher at Victor Fen and similar between the two bogs. However, there was no preferential mineralization of carbon substrates between the bogs and fens. Microbial community composition did not correlate with measures of microbial activity but pH was a strong predictor of activity across all sites and depths. Increased peat temperature and aeration stimulated CO2 production but this did not correlate with a change in enzyme activities. Potential microbial activity in the JBL appears to be influenced by the quality of the peat substrate and the presence of microbial inhibitors, which suggests the existing peat substrate will have a large

  2. An approach to the decomposition of business processes for execution in the cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venezian Povoa, Lucas; Lopes de Souza, Wanderley; Ferreira Pires, Luis; do Prado, Antonio Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Although Business Process Management has emerged as a means to manage and improve business processes, it may require high costs due to the need for software, hardware and technical support. Cloud Computing can help achieve efficient business processes with lower costs, since it provides a fast and

  3. An efficient hybrid sulfur process using PEM electrolysis with a bayonet decomposition reactor - HTR2008-58207

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorensek, M. B.; Summers, W. A.; Lahoda, E. J.; Bolthrunis, C. O.; Greyvenstein, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process is being developed to produce hydrogen by water-splitting using heat from advanced nuclear reactors. It has the potential for high efficiency and competitive hydrogen production cost, and has been demonstrated at a laboratory scale. As a two-step process, the HyS is one of the simplest thermochemical cycles. The sulfuric acid decomposition reaction is common to all sulfur cycles, including the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle. What distinguishes the HyS Process from the other sulfur cycles is the use of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) to depolarize the anode of a water electrolyzer. The two critical HyS Process components are the SO 2 - depolarized electrolyzer (SDE), and the high-temperature decomposition reactor. A proton exchange membrane (PEM)- type SDE and a silicon carbide bayonet-type high-temperature decomposition reactor are being developed for DOE's Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), respectively. The ultimate goal of the NHI-sponsored work is to couple the SDE and the reactor in an integrated laboratory scale experiment to prove the technical readiness of the HyS cycle for the NGNP demonstration. This paper describes the flowsheet that is being prepared to combine these two components into a viable process and presents the latest performance projections and economics for a HyS Process coupled to a PBMR heat source. The basic flowsheet for this process has been described elsewhere [4]. It requires an acid concentration section because the SDE product, which is limited to no more than 50% H 2 SO 4 by cell voltage considerations, is too dilute to be fed directly to the bayonet, which needs at least 65% H 2 SO 4 in the feed for acceptable performance. Optimization involved trade-offs between decomposition reaction and acid concentration heat requirements. The PBMR heat source can split its heat output between the decomposition reaction and either steam

  4. Preliminary radiation-oxidizing treatment influence on radiation-catalytic activity of zirconium during water decomposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibov, A.A.; Aliyev, A.G.; Agayev, T.N.; Aliyev, S.M.; Velibekova, G.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The study of physical-chemical processes proceeding in contact of metal constructional materials nuclear reactors with water at simultaneous influence of temperature and radiation represents the large interest at the decision of problems material authority and safety of work of nuclear -power installations [1-2]. One of the widely widespread materials of active zone nuclear reactors is metal zirconium and its alloys. The influence of preliminary radiation processing on radiation, radiation -thermal and thermal processes of accumulation of molecular hydrogen and oxidation zirconium in contact with water is investigated at T=673 K and ρ=5mg/sm 3 [3-4]. Initial samples zirconium previously has been exposed by an irradiation in medium H 2 O 2 at D=20-410 kGy. The contribution of radiation processes in these contacts in process thermo-radiation decomposition of water and oxidation of materials of zirconium is revealed. It is established that the interaction of Zr metal, preliminary treated by radiation, with water at radiation -heterogeneous processes leads to passivity of a surface. The rate meanings of thermal, radiation -thermal processes and radiation-chemical yields of hydrogen are determined. It is revealed, that at radiation-heterogeneous processes in system Zr +H 2 O (ρ =5mg/sm 3 T=673 K) the increase of the absorbed doze up to 123 kGy results to reduction of a radiation -chemical yield of molecular hydrogen. The further increase of the absorbed doze results to increase of a radiation -chemical yield of hydrogen. The observable effect at the preliminary radiation of zirconium is connected to formation of oxide phase on a surface. The mechanism of radiation -heterogeneous processes proceeding in system Zr+H 2 O is suggested. (author)

  5. Danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Mamatov, E.D.; Ashurov, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan by sulfuric acid. The process of decomposition of danburite concentrate by sulfuric acid was studied. The chemical nature of decomposition process of boron containing ore was determined. The influence of temperature on the rate of extraction of boron and iron oxides was defined. The dependence of decomposition of boron and iron oxides on process duration, dosage of H 2 SO 4 , acid concentration and size of danburite particles was determined. The kinetics of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was studied as well. The apparent activation energy of the process of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was calculated. The flowsheet of danburite processing by sulfuric acid was elaborated.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of thermal processes of nonreversible decomposition of the system N2O4-NO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterenko, V.B.; Nichipor, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to kinetics and mechanism of decomposition of nitrogen oxide in gaseous phase at devated pressures and temperature, decomposition of N 2 O 4 -NO system under flow conditions, as well as to kinetics and mechanism of formation of nitrons oxide. 37 refs.; 13 figs.; 13 tabs

  7. In-Tank Peroxide Oxidation Process for the Decomposition of Tetraphenylborate in Tank 48H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DANIEL, LAMBERT

    2005-01-01

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. The TPB was added during an in-tank precipitation process to removed soluble cesium, but excessive benzene generation curtailed this treatment method. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to routine Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains approximately 240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with approximately 19,000 kg (42,000 lb) of potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). Out of Tank processing of the Tank 48H has some distinct advantages as aggressive processing conditions (e.g., high temperature, low pH) are required for fast destruction of the tetraphenylborate. Also, a new facility can be designed with the optimum materials of construction and other design features to allow the safe processing of the Tank 48H waste. However, it is very expensive to build a new facility. As a result, an in-tank process primarily using existing equipment and facilities is desirable. Development of an in-tank process would be economically attractive. Based on success with Fentons Chemistry (i.e., hydrogen peroxide with an iron or copper catalyst to produce hydroxyl radicals, strong oxidation agents), testing was initiated to develop a higher pH oxidation process that could be completed in-tank

  8. Ozone decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers. Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates

  9. Combined TGA-MS kinetic analysis of multistep processes. Thermal decomposition and ceramification of polysilazane and polysiloxane preceramic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Garrido, C; Sánchez-Jiménez, P E; Pérez-Maqueda, L A; Perejón, A; Criado, José M

    2016-10-26

    The polymer-to-ceramic transformation kinetics of two widely employed ceramic precursors, 1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-1,3,5,7-tetravinylcyclotetrasiloxane (TTCS) and polyureamethylvinylsilazane (CERASET), have been investigated using coupled thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry (TG-MS), Raman, XRD and FTIR. The thermally induced decomposition of the pre-ceramic polymer is the critical step in the synthesis of polymer derived ceramics (PDCs) and accurate kinetic modeling is key to attaining a complete understanding of the underlying process and to attempt any behavior predictions. However, obtaining a precise kinetic description of processes of such complexity, consisting of several largely overlapping physico-chemical processes comprising the cleavage of the starting polymeric network and the release of organic moieties, is extremely difficult. Here, by using the evolved gases detected by MS as a guide it has been possible to determine the number of steps that compose the overall process, which was subsequently resolved using a semiempirical deconvolution method based on the Frasier-Suzuki function. Such a function is more appropriate that the more usual Gaussian or Lorentzian functions since it takes into account the intrinsic asymmetry of kinetic curves. Then, the kinetic parameters of each constituent step were independently determined using both model-free and model-fitting procedures, and it was found that the processes obey mostly diffusion models which can be attributed to the diffusion of the released gases through the solid matrix. The validity of the obtained kinetic parameters was tested not only by the successful reconstruction of the original experimental curves, but also by predicting the kinetic curves of the overall processes yielded by different thermal schedules and by a mixed TTCS-CERASET precursor.

  10. Importance of nitrogen in the decomposition of various organic substances in the Bihugas process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, F; Bruene, H

    1955-01-01

    About 30 percent of the organic matter is decomposed during the fermentation process, 20-25 percent of the organic N being mineralized to NH/sub 3/. Trials with straw, sisal, peat, etc., showed that additional mineral N promotes the fermentation process of substances which decompose rapidly or are poor in easily available N compounds, except potato starch which decomposes without any notable fixation of N. Results did not confirm claims on the beneficial effects of hormone preparations and on killing of pathogenic typhus-enteritis bacteria during fermentation.

  11. New insight in the template decomposition process of large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals: an in situ UV-Vis/fluorescence micro-spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karwacki, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824283; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2011-01-01

    A combination of in situ UV-Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy was used to study the template decomposition process in large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals. Correlation of polarized light dependent UV-Vis absorption spectra with confocal fluorescence emission spectra in the 400–750 nm region

  12. Effect of LiOH, NaOH and KOH on corrosion and oxide microstructure of Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y.H.; Kim, H.G.; Jung, Y.H.; Ruhmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term corrosion test, SIMS analysis, and TEM microstructural study were carried out to investigate the corrosion characteristics and mechanism of Zr alloys in alkali hydroxides. The corrosion tests were performed in solutions of LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH, and CsOH at 350 deg. C for 500 days. SIMS analysis was performed for the specimens prepared to have an equal oxide thickness. TEM studies on the specimens with an equal oxide thickness in various solutions in both pre- and post-transition regimes were also conducted. The corrosion rate in alkali hydroxide solutions was observed to decrease as the ionic radius of alkali cation was increased. The penetration depth of cation into the oxide decreases with increasing the ionic radius of cation. Even though the oxide thickness was equal, the different oxide morphologies were observed in specimens. Namely, in LiOH solution the oxide morphology was transformed early from columnar to equiaxed structure. However, in KOH solution the columnar structure was maintained up to post-transition regime. Based on the corrosion test, SIMS analysis, and microstructural study, the cation is considered to control the corrosion in a alkali hydroxide solution and its effect is dependent on the concentration of alkali and the oxide thickness. The slight acceleration of the corrosion rate at a low concentration is thought to be caused by cation incorporation into oxide while the significant acceleration at a high concentration is due to the transformation of oxide microstructure that would be induced by cation incorporation. KOH was shown not to affect significantly the corrosion and the hydrogen pickup of Zircaloy. Therefore, it has a potential for PWR application only from the point of view of Zircaloy corrosion. (author)

  13. Decomposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  14. Virtual logistics as a support for decomposition process of supply chain (conceptual reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditionally the concept of the "supply chain" is connected with various forms of the technical, organizational and economic integration. The integration deals mainly with multilateral relations among firms, thus constituting subsequent links of products flows in supply chains and creating complex networks of business connections. Due to social and economic factors, and mainly outsourcing and resulting accent on logistics services, traditional supply chains become decomposed. Therefore, there is a need to reconsider some concepts connected with this process. Methods: The description and analysis of present and decomposing supply chains were presented and discussed. The analysis of reasons and possibilities to give up the processes of the absolute integration of supply chains in the direction of decomposed structures and the indication of possibilities to use the concept of a virtual logistics as a concept, which allows essentially such actions, was conducted. Results: The disintegration of traditional value chains is one of these kinds' concepts, which are reflected also in classic supply chains. Probably the commonly used methods of the research and analysis of these supply chains do not conduce to make decisions under conditions of the lack of the continuity of business processes. Old methods and techniques of the management do not fit fully to modern business requirements, which are probably not even fully highlighted and properly understood. Conclusions: The saturation of modern supply chains with services caused significant modifications of the logic and many mechanisms of their functioning, which in turn can lead to changes of a paradigm of the management of these more and more complex business structures. The aspirations of companies to achieve the competitive advantage on modern markets help to change the structure and the nature of supply chains, which operate on these markets, in the direction of their virtualization.

  15. Kinetic Analysis of Isothermal Decomposition Process of Sodium Bicarbonate Using the Weibull Probability Function—Estimation of Density Distribution Functions of the Apparent Activation Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Bojan

    2009-10-01

    The decomposition process of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) has been studied by thermogravimetry in isothermal conditions at four different operating temperatures (380 K, 400 K, 420 K, and 440 K). It was found that the experimental integral and differential conversion curves at the different operating temperatures can be successfully described by the isothermal Weibull distribution function with a unique value of the shape parameter ( β = 1.07). It was also established that the Weibull distribution parameters ( β and η) show independent behavior on the operating temperature. Using the integral and differential (Friedman) isoconversional methods, in the conversion (α) range of 0.20 ≤ α ≤ 0.80, the apparent activation energy ( E a ) value was approximately constant ( E a, int = 95.2 kJmol-1 and E a, diff = 96.6 kJmol-1, respectively). The values of E a calculated by both isoconversional methods are in good agreement with the value of E a evaluated from the Arrhenius equation (94.3 kJmol-1), which was expressed through the scale distribution parameter ( η). The Málek isothermal procedure was used for estimation of the kinetic model for the investigated decomposition process. It was found that the two-parameter Šesták-Berggren (SB) autocatalytic model best describes the NaHCO3 decomposition process with the conversion function f(α) = α0.18(1-α)1.19. It was also concluded that the calculated density distribution functions of the apparent activation energies ( ddfE a ’s) are not dependent on the operating temperature, which exhibit the highly symmetrical behavior (shape factor = 1.00). The obtained isothermal decomposition results were compared with corresponding results of the nonisothermal decomposition process of NaHCO3.

  16. The role of pH in the decomposition of organic micropollutants during the heterogeneous photocatalysis process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudlek Edyta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated that the change in the pH ranged from 5 to 7 affects the adsorption degree of selected organic micropollutants such as: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, pharmaceutical compounds (diclofenac and industrial additives (octylphenol and pentachlorophenol on the photocatalyst surface (100 mg TiO2/dm3. For example, in suspension of pH 5 a 12% reduction in the concentration of octylphenol was noted, while in the suspension of pH 7 the concentration of this compound was reduced by 64%. In the case of anthracene an inverse relationship was observed. The concentration of this micropollutant decreased by 94% for pH 5 and only by 61% for pH 7 suspension. With the commencement of UV irradiation of reaction mixtures a gradual increase in the concentration of micropollutants reduction in aqueous solutions was observed. This indicates the decomposition of compounds as a result of their reaction with highly reactive OH• radicals or other reactive oxygen species generated during the process. For reaction mixtures of pH 7, already in the first 15 minutes, higher degrees of removal of micropollutants ware observed compared to suspension of pH 6. The obtained micropollutants removal degrees exceeded 91% for diclofenac, octylphenol, pentachlorophenol and amounted to 100% for anthracene and benzo(apyrene.

  17. Improved Small Baseline processing by means of CAESAR eigen-interferograms decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Simona; Reale, Diego; Pauciullo, Antonio; Fornaro, Gianfranco

    2018-05-01

    The Component extrAction and sElection SAR (CAESAR) is a method for the selection and filtering of scattering mechanisms recently proposed in the multibaseline interferometric SAR framework. Its strength is related to the possibility to select and extract multiple dominant scattering mechanisms, even interfering in the same pixel, since the stage of the interferograms generation, and to carry out a decorrelation noise phase filtering. Up to now, the validation of CAESAR has been addressed in the framework of SAR Tomography for the model-based detection of Persistent Scatterers (PSs). In this paper we investigate the effectiveness related to the use of CAESAR eigen-interferograms in classical multi-baseline DInSAR processing, based on the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) strategy, typically adopted to extract large scale distributed deformation and atmospheric phase screen. Such components are also exploited for the calibration of the full resolution data for PS or tomographic analysis. By using COSMO-SKyMed (CSK) SAR data, it is demonstrated that dominant scattering component filtering effectively improves the monitoring of distributed spatially decorrelated areas (f.i. bare soil, rocks, etc.) and allows bringing to light man-made structures with dominant backscattering characteristics embedded in highly temporally decorrelated scenario, as isolated asphalt roads and block of buildings in non-urban areas. Moreover it is shown that, thanks to the CAESAR multiple scattering components separation, the layover mitigation in low-topography eigen-interferograms relieves Phase Unwrapping (PhU) errors in urban areas due to abrupt height variations.

  18. Decomposing a Chunk into Its Elements and Reorganizing Them As a New Chunk: The Two Different Sub-processes Underlying Insightful Chunk Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Familiar chunks can be processed highly efficiently, and this automatic process can prohibit the problem solver from developing novel and original ways to creatively solve difficult problems. For this reason, the role of the reverse process, chunk decomposition (CD, the process by which familiar patterns are broken down into their component elements in order to be regrouped in another meaningful manner, has been generally recognized as part of the creative process. However, previous studies on this issue have mainly focused on the decomposition process of CD (the D-process, while the reorganization process of CD has been greatly neglected or has not been distinctively identified in previous work. In this paper, we argue that the R-process could be equally as important as the D-process for CD. Even if a problem solver manages to decompose a familiar chunk into its elements, he or she still may not solve the problem if these elements are not successfully organized in a new and meaningful manner. To investigate whether the cognitive mechanism of the R-process is different from that of the D-process, we designed an experiment for detecting the effects of chunk tightness, which is regarded as the key factor in CD and which can be experimentally manipulated by the radical-level (loose and stroke-level (tight Chinese character CD tasks in the D-process, the R-process, and the more purified organization task (the O-process task that does not involve the decomposition process. Our results showed that the stroke-level (tight task was more difficult than the radical-level (loose task for the D-process. However, for the R-process, the stroke- and radical-level tasks showed no differences in performance. Moreover, for the more purified reorganization task, the O-process task, the radical-level organization and reorganization could be even more difficult than the stroke-level organization and reorganization. This result demonstrated that the cognitive

  19. Singular value decomposition for photon-processing nuclear imaging systems and applications for reconstruction and computing null functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Frey, Eric C.; Clarkson, Eric; Caucci, Luca; Kupinski, Matthew A.

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in technology are enabling a new class of nuclear imaging systems consisting of detectors that use real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate the interaction position, deposited energy, and other attributes of each photon-interaction event and store these attributes in a list format. This class of systems, which we refer to as photon-processing (PP) nuclear imaging systems, can be described by a fundamentally different mathematical imaging operator that allows processing of the continuous-valued photon attributes on a per-photon basis. Unlike conventional photon-counting (PC) systems that bin the data into images, PP systems do not have any binning-related information loss. Mathematically, while PC systems have an infinite-dimensional null space due to dimensionality considerations, PP systems do not necessarily suffer from this issue. Therefore, PP systems have the potential to provide improved performance in comparison to PC systems. To study these advantages, we propose a framework to perform the singular-value decomposition (SVD) of the PP imaging operator. We use this framework to perform the SVD of operators that describe a general two-dimensional (2D) planar linear shift-invariant (LSIV) PP system and a hypothetical continuously rotating 2D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) PP system. We then discuss two applications of the SVD framework. The first application is to decompose the object being imaged by the PP imaging system into measurement and null components. We compare these components to the measurement and null components obtained with PC systems. In the process, we also present a procedure to compute the null functions for a PC system. The second application is designing analytical reconstruction algorithms for PP systems. The proposed analytical approach exploits the fact that PP systems acquire data in a continuous domain to estimate a continuous object function. The approach is parallelizable and

  20. Singular value decomposition for photon-processing nuclear imaging systems and applications for reconstruction and computing null functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K; Barrett, Harrison H; Frey, Eric C; Clarkson, Eric; Caucci, Luca; Kupinski, Matthew A

    2015-09-21

    Recent advances in technology are enabling a new class of nuclear imaging systems consisting of detectors that use real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate the interaction position, deposited energy, and other attributes of each photon-interaction event and store these attributes in a list format. This class of systems, which we refer to as photon-processing (PP) nuclear imaging systems, can be described by a fundamentally different mathematical imaging operator that allows processing of the continuous-valued photon attributes on a per-photon basis. Unlike conventional photon-counting (PC) systems that bin the data into images, PP systems do not have any binning-related information loss. Mathematically, while PC systems have an infinite-dimensional null space due to dimensionality considerations, PP systems do not necessarily suffer from this issue. Therefore, PP systems have the potential to provide improved performance in comparison to PC systems. To study these advantages, we propose a framework to perform the singular-value decomposition (SVD) of the PP imaging operator. We use this framework to perform the SVD of operators that describe a general two-dimensional (2D) planar linear shift-invariant (LSIV) PP system and a hypothetical continuously rotating 2D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) PP system. We then discuss two applications of the SVD framework. The first application is to decompose the object being imaged by the PP imaging system into measurement and null components. We compare these components to the measurement and null components obtained with PC systems. In the process, we also present a procedure to compute the null functions for a PC system. The second application is designing analytical reconstruction algorithms for PP systems. The proposed analytical approach exploits the fact that PP systems acquire data in a continuous domain to estimate a continuous object function. The approach is parallelizable and

  1. LiOH - H2O2 - H2O trinary system study for the selection of optimal conditions of lithium peroxide synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, R A; Ferapontov, Yu A; Kozlova, N P

    2016-01-01

    Using solubility method the decay kinetics of peroxide products contained in liquid phase of LiOH - H 2 O 2 - H 2 O trinary system with 2 to 6% by wt hydrogen peroxide content in liquid phase in 21 to 33 °C temperature range has been studied. Conducted studies have allowed to determine temperature and concentration limits of solid phase existence of Li 2 O 2 ·H 2 O content, distinctness of which has been confirmed using chemical and qualitative X- ray phase analysis. Stabilizing effect of solid phase of Li 2 O 2 ·H 2 O content on hydrogen peroxide decay contained in liquid phase of LiOH - H 2 O 2 - H 2 O trinary system under conditions of experiments conducted has been shown. (paper)

  2. LiOH - H2O2 - H2O trinary system study for the selection of optimal conditions of lithium peroxide synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, R. A.; Ferapontov, Yu A.; Kozlova, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    Using solubility method the decay kinetics of peroxide products contained in liquid phase of LiOH - H2O2 - H2O trinary system with 2 to 6% by wt hydrogen peroxide content in liquid phase in 21 to 33 °C temperature range has been studied. Conducted studies have allowed to determine temperature and concentration limits of solid phase existence of Li2O2·H2O content, distinctness of which has been confirmed using chemical and qualitative X- ray phase analysis. Stabilizing effect of solid phase of Li2O2·H2O content on hydrogen peroxide decay contained in liquid phase of LiOH - H2O2 - H2O trinary system under conditions of experiments conducted has been shown.

  3. Signature of a spinodal decomposition in the multifragmentation process of very heavy nuclear systems; Signature fossile d'une decomposition spinodale dans la multifragmentation de systemes nucleaires tres lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabacaru, G

    2000-12-01

    A dynamical description of the multifragmentation process shows that mechanical instabilities are responsible for spinodal decomposition of a nuclear system that spend sufficient time in the low-density region. The Xe + Sn system at 32 MeV/A incident energy, measured with INDRA multidetector, was chosen to prove experimentally this hypothesis. High performance techniques in energy calibration of Silicon detectors and CsI(Tl) scintillators were developed in order to exploit the excellent detection qualities of the multidetector. For the first time, the contribution of {delta} rays to the light output emitted by scintillators was quantitatively derived. Multifragmentation events coming from a system composed by almost all of nucleons of the reaction entrance channel were selected using detection completeness and event shape criteria. The dynamical model BoB realistically simulates the spinodal instabilities. This model reproduces all of dynamic and static observables. More exclusive comparisons were made to constrain again the model. Reduced velocity correlation functions were studied and gave information about the topology of the fragments at freeze-out. Charge correlation of the fragments showed that a small proportion of events (0.1 %) emits equal-sized fragments. This was interpreted as a fossil signature of the spinodal decomposition in a finite system. Indirectly, this is a proof of a first order phase transition associated to the multifragmentation of hot nuclei. (author)

  4. In-situ and self-distributed: A new understanding on catalyzed thermal decomposition process of ammonium perchlorate over Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Min, E-mail: zoumin3362765@163.com; Wang, Xin, E-mail: wangx@mail.njust.edu.cn; Jiang, Xiaohong, E-mail: jxh0668@sina.com; Lu, Lude, E-mail: lulude17@yahoo.com

    2014-05-01

    Catalyzed thermal decomposition process of ammonium perchlorate (AP) over neodymium oxide (Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was investigated. Catalytic performances of nanometer-sized Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and micrometer-sized Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In contrast to universal concepts, catalysts in different sizes have nearly similar catalytic activities. Based on structural and morphological variation of the catalysts during the reaction, combined with mass spectrum analyses and studies of unmixed style, a new understanding of this catalytic process was proposed. We believed that the newly formed chloride neodymium oxide (NdOCl) was the real catalytic species in the overall thermal decomposition of AP over Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Meanwhile, it was the “self-distributed” procedure which occurred within the reaction that also worked for the improvement of overall catalytic activities. This work is of great value in understanding the roles of micrometer-sized catalysts used in heterogeneous reactions, especially the solid–solid reactions which could generate a large quantity of gaseous species. - Graphical abstract: In-situ and self-distributed reaction process in thermal decomposition of AP catalyzed by Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Micro- and nano-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} for catalytic thermal decomposition of AP. • No essential differences on their catalytic performances. • Structural and morphological variation of catalysts digs out catalytic mechanism. • This catalytic process is “in-situ and self-distributed” one.

  5. Re-examination of Chinese semantic processing and syntactic processing: evidence from conventional ERPs and reconstructed ERPs by residue iteration decomposition (RIDE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    Full Text Available A number of studies have explored the time course of Chinese semantic and syntactic processing. However, whether syntactic processing occurs earlier than semantics during Chinese sentence reading is still under debate. To further explore this issue, an event-related potentials (ERPs experiment was conducted on 21 native Chinese speakers who read individually-presented Chinese simple sentences (NP1+VP+NP2 word-by-word for comprehension and made semantic plausibility judgments. The transitivity of the verbs was manipulated to form three types of stimuli: congruent sentences (CON, sentences with a semantically violated NP2 following a transitive verb (semantic violation, SEM, and sentences with a semantically violated NP2 following an intransitive verb (combined semantic and syntactic violation, SEM+SYN. The ERPs evoked from the target NP2 were analyzed by using the Residue Iteration Decomposition (RIDE method to reconstruct the ERP waveform blurred by trial-to-trial variability, as well as by using the conventional ERP method based on stimulus-locked averaging. The conventional ERP analysis showed that, compared with the critical words in CON, those in SEM and SEM+SYN elicited an N400-P600 biphasic pattern. The N400 effects in both violation conditions were of similar size and distribution, but the P600 in SEM+SYN was bigger than that in SEM. Compared with the conventional ERP analysis, RIDE analysis revealed a larger N400 effect and an earlier P600 effect (in the time window of 500-800 ms instead of 570-810ms. Overall, the combination of conventional ERP analysis and the RIDE method for compensating for trial-to-trial variability confirmed the non-significant difference between SEM and SEM+SYN in the earlier N400 time window. Converging with previous findings on other Chinese structures, the current study provides further precise evidence that syntactic processing in Chinese does not occur earlier than semantic processing.

  6. The impact of enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation on litter quality and decomposition processes in Vaccinium leaves from the Subarctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, C.; Johanson, U. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Callaghan, T. V.; Chadwick, D.; Robinson, C. H.

    1995-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate how UV-B radiation will affect 1) the quality of plant litter grown under different UV-B levels in the Subarctic and 2) decomposition under different UV-B levels. The deciduous dwarf shrubs Vaccinium uliginosum and V. myrtillus grew under ambient and enhanced UV-B (corresponding to 15% ozone depletion) in a natural heath ecosystem in the Subarctic. After two growing seasons senesced leaves were collected and decomposed in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment under both laboratory conditions for 62 d (V. uliginosum: no UV-B and 10 kJ m{sup -2} d{sup -1} UV- B{sub BE}) and under field conditions for twelve months (V. myrtillus: ambient and enhanced UV-B corresponding 15% ozone depletion). Additionally, colonization and growth of decomposing fungi were studied on leaves decomposed without and with UV-B in the laboratory. The enhanced UV-B during growth changed the litter quality (decrease in α-cellulose, increase in tannins). Subsequently the microbial respiration was decreased. This and the decreased cellulose/lignin ratio may have led to the lower relative mass loss due to treatments as detected both after 62 d decomposition in the laboratory and after twelve months decomposition in the field. The UV-B during decomposition decreased the proportion of lignin in the plant residues, which is possibly due to photodegradation by UV-B. Total microbial respiration decreased, indicating the decomposers' sensitivity to UV-B. In general, the litter decomposing under UV-B was less colonized by fungal decomposers. Mucor hiemalis and Truncatella truncata were significantly more abundant in the control, indicating sensitivity to UV-B radiation, while Penicillium brevicompactum was equally abundant in the UV-B and control. There is strong indication of a change in decomposer fungal community structure due to UV-B. Just one of the three fungal species common on the control litter was dominant on leaves decomposed under UV-B. (author)

  7. The impact of enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation on litter quality and decomposition processes in Vaccinium leaves from the Subarctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, C.; Johanson, U.; Callaghan, T.V.; Chadwick, D.; Robinson, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how UV-B radiation will affect 1) the quality of plant litter grown under different UV-B levels in the Subarctic and 2) decomposition under different UV-B levels. The deciduous dwarf shrubs Vaccinium uliginosum and V. myrtillus grew under ambient and enhanced UV-B (corresponding to 15% ozone depletion) in a natural heath ecosystem in the Subarctic. After two growing seasons senesced leaves were collected and decomposed in a 2 × 2 factorial experiment under both laboratory conditions for 62 d (V. uliginosum: no UV-B and 10 kJ m -2 d -1 UV- B BE ) and under field conditions for twelve months (V. myrtillus: ambient and enhanced UV-B corresponding 15% ozone depletion). Additionally, colonization and growth of decomposing fungi were studied on leaves decomposed without and with UV-B in the laboratory. The enhanced UV-B during growth changed the litter quality (decrease in α-cellulose, increase in tannins). Subsequently the microbial respiration was decreased. This and the decreased cellulose/lignin ratio may have led to the lower relative mass loss due to treatments as detected both after 62 d decomposition in the laboratory and after twelve months decomposition in the field. The UV-B during decomposition decreased the proportion of lignin in the plant residues, which is possibly due to photodegradation by UV-B. Total microbial respiration decreased, indicating the decomposers' sensitivity to UV-B. In general, the litter decomposing under UV-B was less colonized by fungal decomposers. Mucor hiemalis and Truncatella truncata were significantly more abundant in the control, indicating sensitivity to UV-B radiation, while Penicillium brevicompactum was equally abundant in the UV-B and control. There is strong indication of a change in decomposer fungal community structure due to UV-B. Just one of the three fungal species common on the control litter was dominant on leaves decomposed under UV-B. (author)

  8. Thermal decomposition of [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6]∙ 2H2O: Topotactic dehydration process, valence and spin exchange mechanism elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Zbořil, Radek; Matiková-Maľarová, Miroslava; Drahoš, Bohuslav; Cernák, Juraj

    2013-01-01

    The Prussian blue analogues represent well-known and extensively studied group of coordination species which has many remarkable applications due to their ion-exchange, electron transfer or magnetic properties. Among them, Co-Fe Prussian blue analogues have been extensively studied due to the photoinduced magnetization. Surprisingly, their suitability as precursors for solid-state synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is almost unexplored. In this paper, the mechanism of thermal decomposition of [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6] ∙∙ 2H2O (1a) is elucidated, including the topotactic dehydration, valence and spins exchange mechanisms suggestion and the formation of a mixture of CoFe2O4-Co3O4 (3:1) as final products of thermal degradation. The course of thermal decomposition of 1a in air atmosphere up to 600°C was monitored by TG/DSC techniques, (57)Fe Mössbauer and IR spectroscopy. As first, the topotactic dehydration of 1a to the hemihydrate [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6] ∙∙ 1/2H2O (1b) occurred with preserving the single-crystal character as was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction analysis. The consequent thermal decomposition proceeded in further four stages including intermediates varying in valence and spin states of both transition metal ions in their structures, i.e. [Fe(II)(en)2(μ-NC)Co(III)(CN)4], Fe(III)(NH2CH2CH3)2(μ-NC)2Co(II)(CN)3] and Fe(III)[Co(II)(CN)5], which were suggested mainly from (57)Fe Mössbauer, IR spectral and elemental analyses data. Thermal decomposition was completed at 400°C when superparamagnetic phases of CoFe2O4 and Co3O4 in the molar ratio of 3:1 were formed. During further temperature increase (450 and 600°C), the ongoing crystallization process gave a new ferromagnetic phase attributed to the CoFe2O4-Co3O4 nanocomposite particles. Their formation was confirmed by XRD and TEM analyses. In-field (5 K / 5 T) Mössbauer spectrum revealed canting of Fe(III) spin in almost fully inverse spinel structure of CoFe2O4. It has been found that the thermal

  9. Effectivity of the Earthworms Pheretima hupiensis, Eudrellus sp. and Lumbricus sp. on the Organic Matter Decomposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ea Kosman Anwar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The earthworms are the one of soil fauna component in soil ecosystem have an important role in organic matter decomposition procces. The earthworm feed plant leaf and plant matter up to apart and dissolved. Earthworm metabolisms produce like faeces that mixed with decomposed organic matter mean vermicompost. The vermicompost fertility varies because of some kind of earthworm differ in “niche” and attitude. The experiment was to study the effectivity of earthworm on organic matter decomposition which has been conducted in Soil Biological and Healthy Laboratory and Green House of Soil Research Institute Bogor, during 2006 Budget Year. The three kind of earthworms i.e Pheretima hupiensis, Lumbricus sp. and Eudrellus sp. combined with three kind of organic matter sources i.e rice straw, trash and palm oil plant waste (compost heap. The result shows that the Lumbricus sp. are the most effective decomposer compared to Pheretima hupiensis and Eudrellus sp. and the organic matter decomposed by Lumbricus sp. as followed: market waste was decomposed of 100%, palm oil empty fruit bunch (compost heap 95.8 % and rice straw 84.9%, respectively. Earthworm effectively decreased Fe, Al, Mn, Cu dan Zn.

  10. Danburite decomposition by hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamatov, E.D.; Ashurov, N.A.; Mirsaidov, U.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan by hydrochloric acid. The interaction of boron containing ores of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan with mineral acids, including hydrochloric acid was studied. The optimal conditions of extraction of valuable components from danburite composition were determined. The chemical composition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit was determined as well. The kinetics of decomposition of calcined danburite by hydrochloric acid was studied. The apparent activation energy of the process of danburite decomposition by hydrochloric acid was calculated.

  11. Influence of CNTs decomposition during reactive friction-stir processing of an Al-Mg alloy on the correlation between microstructural characteristics and microtextural components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhshi, F; Nosko, M; Gerlich, A P

    2018-05-03

    Multipass friction-stir processing was employed to uniformly disperse multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs) within an Al-Mg alloy metal matrix. Decomposition of MW-CNTs occurs in situ as a result of solid-state chemical reactions, forming fullerene (C60) and aluminium carbide (Al 4 C 3 ) phases during reactive high temperature severe plastic processing. The effects of this decomposition on the microstructural features, dynamic restoration mechanisms and crystallographic microtextural developments are studied for the first time by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The formation of an equiaxed grain structure with an average size of ∼1.5 μm occurs within the stirred zone (SZ) under the influence of inclusions which hinder grain boundary migration via Zener-Smith pinning mechanisms during the discontinuous dynamic recrystallisation (DDRX). Formation of two strong Cubic and Brass microtextural components in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and thermomechanical affected zone (TMAZ) was noted as compared to the completely random and Cube components found in the base and SZ regions, respectively. The microstructural modification led to hardening and tensile strength improvement for the processed nanocomposite by ∼55% and 110%, respectively with respect to the annealed Al-Mg base alloy. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Raman spectra from very concentrated aqueous NaOH and from wet and dry, solid, and anhydrous molten, LiOH, NaOH, and KOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrafen, George E; Douglas, Rudolph T W

    2006-03-21

    High-temperature, high-pressure Raman spectra were obtained from aqueous NaOH solutions up to 2NaOHH2O, with X(NaOH)=0.667 at 480 K. The spectra corresponding to the highest compositions, X(NaOH)> or =0.5, are dominated by H3O2-. An IR xi-function dispersion curve for aqueous NaOH, at 473 K and 1 kbar, calculated from the data of Franck and Charuel indicates that the OH- ion forms H3O2- by preferential H bonding with nonhydrogen-bonded OH groups. Raman spectra from wet to anhydrous, solid LiOH, NaOH, and KOH yield sharp, symmetric OH- stretching peaks at 3664, 3633, and 3596 cm(-1), respectively, plus water-related, i.e., H3O2-, peaks near LiOH, 3562 cm(-1), NaOH, 3596 cm(-1), and, KOH, 3500 cm(-1). Absence of H3O2- peaks from the solid assures that the corresponding melt is anhydrous. Raman spectra from the anhydrous melts yield OH- stretching peak frequencies: LiOH, 3614+/-4 cm(-1), 873 K; NaOH, 3610+/-2 cm(-1), 975 K; and, KOH, 3607+/-2 cm(-1), 773 K, but low-frequency asymmetry due to ion-pair interactions is present which is centered near 3550 cm(-1). The ion-pair-related asymmetry corresponds to the sole IR maximum near 3550 cm(-1) from anhydrous molten NaOH, at 623 K. Bose-Einstein correction of published low-frequency Raman data from molten LiOH revealed an acoustic phonon, near 205 cm(-1), related to restricted translation of OH- versus Li+, and an optical phonon, at 625 cm(-1) and tau approximately 0.05 ps, due to protonic precession and/or pendular motion. Strong H bonding between water and the O atom of OH- forms H3O2-, but the proton of OH- does not bond with H significantly. Large Raman bandwidths (aqueous solutions) are explained in terms of inhomogeneous broadening due to proton transfer in a double well. Vibrational assignments are presented for H3O2-.

  13. The impact of enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation on litter quality and decomposition processes in Vaccinium leaves from the Subarctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, C [Lund Univ., Dept. of Plant Ecology, Lund (Sweden); Johanson, U [Lund Univ., Dept. of Plant Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Callaghan, T V; Chadwick, D; Robinson, C H [Merlewood Research Station, Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Cumbira (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how UV-B radiation will affect (1) the quality of plant litter grown under differente UV-B levels in the Subarctic and (2) decomposition under different UV-B levels. The deciduous dwarf shrubs Vaccinium uliginosum and V. myrtillus grew under ambient and enchanced UV-B (corresponding to 15% ozone depletion) in a natural health ecosystem in the Subarctic. After two growing seasons senesced leaves were collected and decomposed in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment under both laboratory conditions for 62 d (V. uliginosum: no UV-B and 10 kJ m{sup -2} d{sup -1} UV-B{sub BE}) and under field conditions for twelve months (V. myrtillus: ambient and enhanced UV-B corresponding 15% ozone depletion). Additionally, colonization and growth of decomposing fungi were studied on leaves decomposed without and with UV-B in the laboratory. The enhanced UV-B during growth changed the litter quality (decrease in {alpha}-cellulose, increase in tannins). Subsequently the microbial respiration was decreased. This and the decreased cellulose/lignin ratio may have led to the lower relative mass loss due to treatments as detected both after 62 d decomposition in the laboratory and after twelve months decompositon in the field. The UV-B during decomposition decreased the proportion of lignin in the plant residues, which is possibly due to photodegradation by UV-B. Total microbial respiration decreased, indicating the decomposers` sensitivity to UV-B. In general, the litter decomposing under UV-B was less colonized by fungal decomposers. Mucor hiemalis and Truncatella truncata were significantly more abundant in the control, indicating sensitivity to UV-B radiation, while Penicillium brevicompactum was equally abundant in the UV-B and control. There is strong indication of a change in decomposer fungal community structure due to UV-B. Just one of the three fungal species common on the control litter was dominant on leaves decomposed under UV-B. (au) (44 refs.)

  14. The influence of bismuth oxide doping on the rechargeability of aqueous cells using MnO2 cathode and LiOH electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakshi, Manickam; Mitchell, David R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Bi-doped manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) has been prepared from γ-MnO 2 by physical admixture of bismuth oxide (Bi 2 O 3 ). The doping improved the cycling ability of the aqueous cell. These results are discussed and compared with the electrochemical behavior of bismuth-free MnO 2 . Batteries using the traditional potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte are non-rechargeable. However, with lithium hydroxide (LiOH) as an electrolyte, the cell becomes rechargeable. Furthermore, the incorporation of bismuth into MnO 2 in the LiOH cell was found to result in significantly longer cycle life, compared with cells using undoped MnO 2 . The Bi-doped cell exhibited a greater capacity after 100 discharge cycles, than the undoped cell after just 40 cycles. X-ray diffraction and the microscopic analysis suggest that the presence of Bi 3+ ions reduces the magnitude of structural changes occurring in MnO 2 during cycling. Comparison with additives assessed in our previous studies (titanium disulfide (TiS 2 ); titanium boride (TiB 2 )) shows that the best rechargeability behavior is obtained for the current Bi-doped MnO 2 . As the size of Bi 3+ ions (0.96 A) is much larger than Mn 3+ (0.73 A) or Mn 2+ (0.67 A) they have effectively prevented the formation of non-rechargeable products

  15. Photo-catalytic studies of transition metal doped titanium dioxide thin films processed by metalorganic decomposition (MOD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talagala, P.; Marko, X.; Padmanabhan, K. R.; Naik, R.; Rodak, D.; Cheng, Y. T.

    2006-03-01

    We have synthesized pure and transition element (Fe, Co and V) doped Titanium oxide thin films of thickness ˜ 350 nm on sapphire, Si, and stainless steel substrates by Metalorganic Decomposition (MOD) method. The films were subsequently annealed at appropriate temperatures ( 500-750C) to obtain either anatase or the rutile phase of TiO2. Analysis of the composition of the films were performed by energy dispersive X-ray(EDAX) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry(RBS). Ion channeling was used to identify possible epitaxial growth of the films on sapphire. Both XRD and Raman spectra of the films exhibit that the films annealed at 550C are of anatase phase, while those annealed at 700C seem to prefer a rutile structure. The water contact angle measurements of the films before and after photoactivation, demonstrate a significant reduction in the contact angle for the anatase phase. However, the variation in contact angle was observed for films exposed to UV (<10^o-30^o) and dark (25^o-50^o). Films doped with Fe show a trend towards lower contact angle than those doped with Co. Results with films doped with V will also be included.

  16. One step process of decomposition and polymerization to fabricate SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres/polyimide composite for foldable OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Kyu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Won; Moon, Soo Hyun [School of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Wook [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Oh, Tae Sik [School of Mechanical and ICT Convergence Engineering, Sunmoon University, Asan 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ji Beom, E-mail: jbyoo@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) and Center for Human Interface Nano Technology (HINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Graphical abstract: The SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres and polyimide hybrid synthesized using one step process, simultaneous occurrence of decomposition and polymerization (SODP) is useful with a ultra-low dielectric constant and high thermal stability for flexible OLED. - Highlights: • We fabricated hybrid films of SHS/PI by using a one step process with SODP. • The film has ultralow dielectric constant (50 vol% at k = 1.67). • There is no collapse of SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres in the PI matrix after bending test for 50,000 cycles. - Abstract: The fabrication of interlayer dielectrics (ILDs) in flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) requires flexible materials with a low dielectric constant as well as materials with excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties for optimal device performance. Hybrid films of SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres (SHS)/polyimide (PI) were prepared using a one-step process, with simultaneous occurrence of decomposition (polystyrene, PS) and polymerization (PI) (SODP). No collapse of SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres in PI was observed from 10 vol% to 60 vol% SHS in hybrid films. The dielectric constant of hybrid films was reduced from 3.45 to 1.67 and was saturated at above 50 vol% of SHS due to the maximum fill factor of SHS in the PI matrix. The thermal stability was excellent up to 500 °C due to the inherent thermal property of PI. After a bending test for 50,000 cycles at a bending radius of 1 mm, the SHS/PI hybrid films retained their dielectric constant and current density. These results indicate the hybrid film to be the most promising candidate for flexible ILDs with a low dielectric constant and high thermal stability for foldable OLEDs.

  17. One step process of decomposition and polymerization to fabricate SiO_2 hollow spheres/polyimide composite for foldable OLEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Dong Won; Moon, Soo Hyun; Shin, Dong-Wook; Oh, Tae Sik; Yoo, Ji Beom

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The SiO_2 hollow spheres and polyimide hybrid synthesized using one step process, simultaneous occurrence of decomposition and polymerization (SODP) is useful with a ultra-low dielectric constant and high thermal stability for flexible OLED. - Highlights: • We fabricated hybrid films of SHS/PI by using a one step process with SODP. • The film has ultralow dielectric constant (50 vol% at k = 1.67). • There is no collapse of SiO_2 hollow spheres in the PI matrix after bending test for 50,000 cycles. - Abstract: The fabrication of interlayer dielectrics (ILDs) in flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) requires flexible materials with a low dielectric constant as well as materials with excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties for optimal device performance. Hybrid films of SiO_2 hollow spheres (SHS)/polyimide (PI) were prepared using a one-step process, with simultaneous occurrence of decomposition (polystyrene, PS) and polymerization (PI) (SODP). No collapse of SiO_2 hollow spheres in PI was observed from 10 vol% to 60 vol% SHS in hybrid films. The dielectric constant of hybrid films was reduced from 3.45 to 1.67 and was saturated at above 50 vol% of SHS due to the maximum fill factor of SHS in the PI matrix. The thermal stability was excellent up to 500 °C due to the inherent thermal property of PI. After a bending test for 50,000 cycles at a bending radius of 1 mm, the SHS/PI hybrid films retained their dielectric constant and current density. These results indicate the hybrid film to be the most promising candidate for flexible ILDs with a low dielectric constant and high thermal stability for foldable OLEDs.

  18. Convenient hydrothermal decomposition process for preparation of nanocrystalline mineral Cu3BiS3 and Pb1-xBi2x/3S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Junqing; Deng Bin; Wang Chunrui; Tang Kaibin; Qian Yitai

    2003-01-01

    Mineral nanocrystalline Cu 3 BiS 3 and Pb 1-x Bi 2x/3 S (or Bi 0.22 Pb 0.89 S 1.22 ) have been prepared at low synthetic temperature of 100-150 deg. C by convenient hydrothermal decomposition process. X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra, and element analysis were used to characterize and measure the samples. The as-prepared Cu 3 BiS 3 sample consisted of whisker-like particles with an average size of 50x10 nm 2 and the Pb 1-x Bi 2x/3 S sample displayed aggregative particles with size in the range of 30-50 nm. Preliminary results showed that the prepared precursors, reaction temperature and time played a role in the formation of the final products. A possible reaction mechanism was also discussed briefly

  19. Preparation of CoFeO Nanocrystallites by Solvothermal Process and Its Catalytic Activity on the Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusen Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanometer cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 was synthesized by polyol-medium solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and selected area electron diffraction (SAED. Further, the catalytic activity and kinetic parameters of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites on the thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate (AP have been investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry analysis (TG-DSC. The results imply that the catalytic performance of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites is significant and the decrease in the activation energy and the increase in the rate constant for AP further confirm the enhancement in catalytic activity of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites. A mechanism based on an proton transfer process has also been proposed for AP in the presence of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites.

  20. Uma Abordagem para a Decomposição de Processos de Nego̿cio para Execução em Nuvens Computacionais (in Portugese; An approach to business processes decomposition for cloud deployment)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Povoa, Lucas Venezian; Lopes de Souza, Wanderley; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Duipmans, Evert F.; do Prado, Antonio Francisco

    Due to safety requirements, certain data or activities of a business process should be kept within the user premises, while others can be allocated to a cloud environment. This paper presents a generic approach to business processes decomposition taking into account the allocation of activities and

  1. Technical and economic aspects of thermo-chemical decomposition of biomass in the processes of transformation of it in power-consuming energy/carriers by the use of the concentrated gel of sun radiation, has been considered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultanova, K.D.; Mustafayeva, R.M.; Rzayev, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The technical and economic assessment of process of thermo-chemical decomposition of biomass in the processes of transformation of it in power-consuming energy/carriers by the use of the concentrated gel of sun radiation, has been considered

  2. Mathematical modelling of the decomposition of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Lev P

    2010-01-01

    Studies on mathematical modelling of the molecular and supramolecular structures of explosives and the elementary steps and overall processes of their decomposition are analyzed. Investigations on the modelling of combustion and detonation taking into account the decomposition of explosives are also considered. It is shown that solution of problems related to the decomposition kinetics of explosives requires the use of a complex strategy based on the methods and concepts of chemical physics, solid state physics and theoretical chemistry instead of empirical approach.

  3. A non-destructive surface burn detection method for ferrous metals based on acoustic emission and ensemble empirical mode decomposition: from laser simulation to grinding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhensheng; Wu, Haixi; Yu, Zhonghua; Huang, Youfang

    2014-01-01

    Grinding is usually done in the final finishing of a component. As a result, the surface quality of finished products, e.g., surface roughness, hardness and residual stress, are affected by the grinding procedure. However, the lack of methods for monitoring of grinding makes it difficult to control the quality of the process. This paper focuses on the monitoring approaches for the surface burn phenomenon in grinding. A non-destructive burn detection method based on acoustic emission (AE) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was proposed for this purpose. To precisely extract the AE features caused by phase transformation during burn formation, artificial burn was produced to mimic grinding burn by means of laser irradiation, since laser-induced burn involves less mechanical and electrical noise. The burn formation process was monitored by an AE sensor. The frequency band ranging from 150 to 400 kHz was believed to be related to surface burn formation in the laser irradiation process. The burn-sensitive frequency band was further used to instruct feature extraction during the grinding process based on EEMD. Linear classification results evidenced a distinct margin between samples with and without surface burn. This work provides a practical means for grinding burn detection. (paper)

  4. Preparation of lithium indium oxide via a rheological phase route and its electrochemical characteristics in LiOH and Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guo-Qing [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science of Yangtze Normal University, 408100 Chongqing (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhang, Sheng-Tao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Wu, Xing-Fa [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science of Yangtze Normal University, 408100 Chongqing (China)

    2010-01-15

    Submicrometer-sized lithium indium oxide (LiInO{sub 2}) powder via a rheological phase method using trilithium citrate tetra hydrate (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Li{sub 3}O{sub 7} . 4H{sub 2}O) and indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been prepared in this work for the first time. The optimal pyrolyzing temperature range to prepare crystalline LiInO{sub 2} is between 650 and 900 C, which was confirmed by thermal gravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis of the precursor and X-ray diffraction analysis. The pure phase LiInO{sub 2} sample obtained has a uniform particle morphology and submicrosize, which was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical studies show that a new pair of cathodic and anodic peaks at 0.23 and 0.38 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode) was obviously observed from the cyclic voltammetry curve of LiInO{sub 2} in 1 M LiOH solution, indicating a battery characteristic of the material in this electrolyte. While in 1 M Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, the sample presents a supercapacitive characteristic within the same potential range. The reasons for different electrochemical behaviors in these two electrolytes can be attributed to the fact that the reaction of lithium ion insertion/extraction into/out of a LiInO{sub 2} electrode takes place in the bulk material in LiOH electrolyte solution, whereas it takes place on the electrode/electrolyte interface for Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte case. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. High-Performance Solution-Processed Amorphous InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors with a Metal–Organic Decomposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingtao Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A facile solution process was introduced for the preparation of IGZO thin films via a metal–organic decomposition (MOD method. The IGZO ink was synthesized by mixing the solutions of gallium acetylacetonate [Ga(C5H7O23], zinc acetylacetonate hydrate [Zn(C5H7O22·xH2O] dissolved in ethanol, and indium acetylacetonate [In(C5H7O23] dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (THF. The deposited films by spin-coating were annealed at moderate process temperature (≤500°C. The relationship between device performance and postannealing temperature was studied. The result demonstrated that mobility of IGZO TFT increased as the annealing temperature increased. Based on the analysis of O 1s statement, the annealing temperature can influence the number of oxygen vacancy to further affect the carrier centration. In addition, the IGZO TFT devices with various Ga molar ratios were compared to demonstrate the influence of the Ga addition. The result demonstrated that the saturated mobilities (μe decreased and VTH shifted to positive voltage as the Ga molar ratio was increased. It is likely that Ga can offer stronger chemical bonds between metal and oxygen that reduced the concentration of free carriers and thus help reducing VTH. As a result, the optimized performance of IGZO TFT with the mobility of 3.4 cm2V−1s−1 showed the MOD process was a promising approach.

  6. Energy saving analysis and management modeling based on index decomposition analysis integrated energy saving potential method: Application to complex chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Zhiqiang; Gao, Huachao; Wang, Yanqing; Han, Yongming; Zhu, Qunxiong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The integrated framework that combines IDA with energy-saving potential method is proposed. • Energy saving analysis and management framework of complex chemical processes is obtained. • This proposed method is efficient in energy optimization and carbon emissions of complex chemical processes. - Abstract: Energy saving and management of complex chemical processes play a crucial role in the sustainable development procedure. In order to analyze the effect of the technology, management level, and production structure having on energy efficiency and energy saving potential, this paper proposed a novel integrated framework that combines index decomposition analysis (IDA) with energy saving potential method. The IDA method can obtain the level of energy activity, energy hierarchy and energy intensity effectively based on data-drive to reflect the impact of energy usage. The energy saving potential method can verify the correctness of the improvement direction proposed by the IDA method. Meanwhile, energy efficiency improvement, energy consumption reduction and energy savings can be visually discovered by the proposed framework. The demonstration analysis of ethylene production has verified the practicality of the proposed method. Moreover, we can obtain the corresponding improvement for the ethylene production based on the demonstration analysis. The energy efficiency index and the energy saving potential of these worst months can be increased by 6.7% and 7.4%, respectively. And the carbon emissions can be reduced by 7.4–8.2%.

  7. Cascade reactor: granule fabrication processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlandson, O.D.; Winkler, E.O.; Maya, I.; Pitts, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    A key feature of Cascade is the granular blanket. Of the many blanket material options open to Cascade, fabrication of Li 2 O granules was felt to offer the greatest challenge. The authors explored available methods for initial Li 2 O granule fabrication. They identified three cost-effective processes for fabricating Li 2 O granules: the VSM drop-melt furnace process, which is based on melting and spheroidizing irregularly shaped Li 2 O feed granules; the LiOH process, which spheroidizes liquefied LiOH and uses GA Technologies' sphere-forming procedures; and the Li 2 CO 3 sol-gel process, used for making spherical fuel particles for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Each process is described below

  8. Early stage litter decomposition across biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ika Djukic; Sebastian Kepfer-Rojas; Inger Kappel Schmidt; Klaus Steenberg Larsen; Claus Beier; Björn Berg; Kris Verheyen; Adriano Caliman; Alain Paquette; Alba Gutiérrez-Girón; Alberto Humber; Alejandro Valdecantos; Alessandro Petraglia; Heather Alexander; Algirdas Augustaitis; Amélie Saillard; Ana Carolina Ruiz Fernández; Ana I. Sousa; Ana I. Lillebø; Anderson da Rocha Gripp; André-Jean Francez; Andrea Fischer; Andreas Bohner; Andrey Malyshev; Andrijana Andrić; Andy Smith; Angela Stanisci; Anikó Seres; Anja Schmidt; Anna Avila; Anne Probst; Annie Ouin; Anzar A. Khuroo; Arne Verstraeten; Arely N. Palabral-Aguilera; Artur Stefanski; Aurora Gaxiola; Bart Muys; Bernard Bosman; Bernd Ahrends; Bill Parker; Birgit Sattler; Bo Yang; Bohdan Juráni; Brigitta Erschbamer; Carmen Eugenia Rodriguez Ortiz; Casper T. Christiansen; E. Carol Adair; Céline Meredieu; Cendrine Mony; Charles A. Nock; Chi-Ling Chen; Chiao-Ping Wang; Christel Baum; Christian Rixen; Christine Delire; Christophe Piscart; Christopher Andrews; Corinna Rebmann; Cristina Branquinho; Dana Polyanskaya; David Fuentes Delgado; Dirk Wundram; Diyaa Radeideh; Eduardo Ordóñez-Regil; Edward Crawford; Elena Preda; Elena Tropina; Elli Groner; Eric Lucot; Erzsébet Hornung; Esperança Gacia; Esther Lévesque; Evanilde Benedito; Evgeny A. Davydov; Evy Ampoorter; Fabio Padilha Bolzan; Felipe Varela; Ferdinand Kristöfel; Fernando T. Maestre; Florence Maunoury-Danger; Florian Hofhansl; Florian Kitz; Flurin Sutter; Francisco Cuesta; Francisco de Almeida Lobo; Franco Leandro de Souza; Frank Berninger; Franz Zehetner; Georg Wohlfahrt; George Vourlitis; Geovana Carreño-Rocabado; Gina Arena; Gisele Daiane Pinha; Grizelle González; Guylaine Canut; Hanna Lee; Hans Verbeeck; Harald Auge; Harald Pauli; Hassan Bismarck Nacro; Héctor A. Bahamonde; Heike Feldhaar; Heinke Jäger; Helena C. Serrano; Hélène Verheyden; Helge Bruelheide; Henning Meesenburg; Hermann Jungkunst; Hervé Jactel; Hideaki Shibata; Hiroko Kurokawa; Hugo López Rosas; Hugo L. Rojas Villalobos; Ian Yesilonis; Inara Melece; Inge Van Halder; Inmaculada García Quirós; Isaac Makelele; Issaka Senou; István Fekete; Ivan Mihal; Ivika Ostonen; Jana Borovská; Javier Roales; Jawad Shoqeir; Jean-Christophe Lata; Jean-Paul Theurillat; Jean-Luc Probst; Jess Zimmerman; Jeyanny Vijayanathan; Jianwu Tang; Jill Thompson; Jiří Doležal; Joan-Albert Sanchez-Cabeza; Joël Merlet; Joh Henschel; Johan Neirynck; Johannes Knops; John Loehr; Jonathan von Oppen; Jónína Sigríður Þorláksdóttir; Jörg Löffler; José-Gilberto Cardoso-Mohedano; José-Luis Benito-Alonso; Jose Marcelo Torezan; Joseph C. Morina; Juan J. Jiménez; Juan Dario Quinde; Juha Alatalo; Julia Seeber; Jutta Stadler; Kaie Kriiska; Kalifa Coulibaly; Karibu Fukuzawa; Katalin Szlavecz; Katarína Gerhátová; Kate Lajtha; Kathrin Käppeler; Katie A. Jennings; Katja Tielbörger; Kazuhiko Hoshizaki; Ken Green; Lambiénou Yé; Laryssa Helena Ribeiro Pazianoto; Laura Dienstbach; Laura Williams; Laura Yahdjian; Laurel M. Brigham; Liesbeth van den Brink; Lindsey Rustad; al. et

    2018-01-01

    Through litter decomposition enormous amounts of carbon is emitted to the atmosphere. Numerous large-scale decomposition experiments have been conducted focusing on this fundamental soil process in order to understand the controls on the terrestrial carbon transfer to the atmosphere. However, previous studies were mostly based on site-specific litter and methodologies...

  9. Clean thermal decomposition of tertiary-alkyl metal thiolates to metal sulfides: environmentally-benign, non-polar inks for solution-processed chalcopyrite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jungwoo; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeki; Yoon, Yung Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Walker, Bright; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-11-01

    We report the preparation of Cu2S, In2S3, CuInS2 and Cu(In,Ga)S2 semiconducting films via the spin coating and annealing of soluble tertiary-alkyl thiolate complexes. The thiolate compounds are readily prepared via the reaction of metal bases and tertiary-alkyl thiols. The thiolate complexes are soluble in common organic solvents and can be solution processed by spin coating to yield thin films. Upon thermal annealing in the range of 200-400 °C, the tertiary-alkyl thiolates decompose cleanly to yield volatile dialkyl sulfides and metal sulfide films which are free of organic residue. Analysis of the reaction byproducts strongly suggests that the decomposition proceeds via an SN1 mechanism. The composition of the films can be controlled by adjusting the amount of each metal thiolate used in the precursor solution yielding bandgaps in the range of 1.2 to 3.3 eV. The films form functioning p-n junctions when deposited in contact with CdS films prepared by the same method. Functioning solar cells are observed when such p-n junctions are prepared on transparent conducting substrates and finished by depositing electrodes with appropriate work functions. This method enables the fabrication of metal chalcogenide films on a large scale via a simple and chemically clear process.

  10. Co-composting of rose oil processing waste with caged layer manure and straw or sawdust: effects of carbon source and C/N ratio on decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onursal, Emrah; Ekinci, Kamil

    2015-04-01

    Rose oil is a specific essential oil that is produced mainly for the cosmetics industry in a few selected locations around the world. Rose oil production is a water distillation process from petals of Rosa damascena Mill. Since the oil content of the rose petals of this variety is between 0.3-0.4% (w/w), almost 4000 to 3000 kg of rose petals are needed to produce 1 kg of rose oil. Rose oil production is a seasonal activity and takes place during the relatively short period where the roses are blooming. As a result, large quantities of solid waste are produced over a limited time interval. This research aims: (i) to determine the possibilities of aerobic co-composting as a waste management option for rose oil processing waste with caged layer manure; (ii) to identify effects of different carbon sources - straw or sawdust on co-composting of rose oil processing waste and caged layer manure, which are both readily available in Isparta, where significant rose oil production also takes place; (iii) to determine the effects of different C/N ratios on co-composting by the means of organic matter decomposition and dry matter loss. Composting experiments were carried out by 12 identical laboratory-scale composting reactors (60 L) simultaneously. The results of the study showed that the best results were obtained with a mixture consisting of 50% rose oil processing waste, 64% caged layer manure and 15% straw wet weight in terms of organic matter loss (66%) and dry matter loss (38%). © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Synthesis, Structure, Characterization, and Decomposition of Nickel Dithiocarbamates: Effect of Precursor Structure and Processing Conditions on Solid-State Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Kulis, Michael J.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Duffy, Norman V.; Hoops, Michael D.; Gorse, Elizabeth; Fanwick, Philip E.; Masnovi, John; Cowen, Jonathan E.; Dominey, Raymond N.

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal X-ray structures of four nickel dithiocarbamate complexes, the homoleptic mixed-organic bis-dithiocarbamates Ni[S2CN(isopropyl)(benzyl)]2, Ni[S2CN(ethyl)(n-butyl)]2, and Ni[S2CN(phenyl)(benzyl)]2, as well as the heteroleptic mixed-ligand complex NiCl[P(phenyl)3][(S2CN(phenyl)(benzyl)], were determined. Synthetic, spectroscopic, structural, thermal, and sulfide materials studies are discussed in light of prior literature. The spectroscopic results are routine. A slightly distorted square-planar nickel coordination environment was observed for all four complexes. The organic residues adopt conformations to minimize steric interactions. Steric effects also may determine puckering, if any, about the nickel and nitrogen atoms, both of which are planar or nearly so. A trans-influence affects the Ni-S bond distances. Nitrogen atoms interact with the CS2 carbons with a bond order of about 1.5, and the other substituents on nitrogen display transoid conformations. There are no strong intermolecular interactions, consistent with prior observations of the volatility of nickel dithiocarbamate complexes. Thermogravimetric analysis of the homoleptic species under inert atmosphere is consistent with production of 1:1 nickel sulfide phases. Thermolysis of nickel dithiocarbamates under flowing nitrogen produced hexagonal or -NiS as the major phase; thermolysis under flowing forming gas produced millerite (-NiS) at 300 C, godlevskite (Ni9S8) at 325 and 350 C, and heazlewoodite (Ni3S2) at 400 and 450 C. Failure to exclude oxygen results in production of nickel oxide. Nickel sulfide phases produced seem to be primarily influenced by processing conditions, in agreement with prior literature. Nickel dithiocarbamate complexes demonstrate significant promise to serve as single-source precursors to nickel sulfides, a quite interesting family of materials with numerous potential applications.

  12. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  13. Thermal decomposition of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Popovic, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of natural pyrite (cubic, FeS 2 ) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis of pyrite ore from different sources showed the presence of associated minerals, such as quartz, szomolnokite, stilbite or stellerite, micas and hematite. Hematite, maghemite and pyrrhotite were detected as thermal decomposition products of natural pyrite. The phase composition of the thermal decomposition products depends on the terature, time of heating and starting size of pyrite chrystals. Hematite is the end product of the thermal decomposition of natural pyrite. (author) 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability

  15. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include

  16. Thermal decomposition of beryllium perchlorate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezkina, L.G.; Borisova, S.I.; Tamm, N.S.; Novoselova, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of Be(ClO 4 ) 2 x4H 2 O was studied by the differential flow technique in the helium stream. The kinetics was followed by an exchange reaction of the perchloric acid appearing by the decomposition with potassium carbonate. The rate of CO 2 liberation in this process was recorded by a heat conductivity detector. The exchange reaction yielding CO 2 is quantitative, it is not the limiting one and it does not distort the kinetics of the process of perchlorate decomposition. The solid products of decomposition were studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopy, roentgenography, thermography and chemical analysis. A mechanism suggested for the decomposition involves intermediate formation of hydroxyperchlorate: Be(ClO 4 ) 2 x4H 2 O → Be(OH)ClO 4 +HClO 4 +3H 2 O; Be(OH)ClO 4 → BeO+HClO 4 . Decomposition is accompained by melting of the sample. The mechanism of decomposition is hydrolytic. At room temperature the hydroxyperchlorate is a thick syrup-like compound crystallizing after long storing

  17. Azimuthal decomposition of optical modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This presentation analyses the azimuthal decomposition of optical modes. Decomposition of azimuthal modes need two steps, namely generation and decomposition. An azimuthally-varying phase (bounded by a ring-slit) placed in the spatial frequency...

  18. Thermal decomposition of lanthanide and actinide tetrafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.K.; Haire, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stabilities of several lanthanide/actinide tetrafluorides have been studied using mass spectrometry to monitor the gaseous decomposition products, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify solid products. The tetrafluorides, TbF 4 , CmF 4 , and AmF 4 , have been found to thermally decompose to their respective solid trifluorides with accompanying release of fluorine, while cerium tetrafluoride has been found to be significantly more thermally stable and to congruently sublime as CeF 4 prior to appreciable decomposition. The results of these studies are discussed in relation to other relevant experimental studies and the thermodynamics of the decomposition processes. 9 refs., 3 figs

  19. Cellular decomposition in vikalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyatskaya, I.S.; Vintajkin, E.Z.; Georgieva, I.Ya.; Golikov, V.A.; Udovenko, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Austenite decomposition in Fe-Co-V and Fe-Co-V-Ni alloys at 475-600 deg C is investigated. The cellular decomposition in ternary alloys results in the formation of bcc (ordered) and fcc structures, and in quaternary alloys - bcc (ordered) and 12R structures. The cellular 12R structure results from the emergence of stacking faults in the fcc lattice with irregular spacing in four layers. The cellular decomposition results in a high-dispersion structure and magnetic properties approaching the level of well-known vikalloys [ru

  20. Decompositions of manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Daverman, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition theory studies decompositions, or partitions, of manifolds into simple pieces, usually cell-like sets. Since its inception in 1929, the subject has become an important tool in geometric topology. The main goal of the book is to help students interested in geometric topology to bridge the gap between entry-level graduate courses and research at the frontier as well as to demonstrate interrelations of decomposition theory with other parts of geometric topology. With numerous exercises and problems, many of them quite challenging, the book continues to be strongly recommended to eve

  1. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maître, O P; Knio, O M; Moraes, A

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  2. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-01

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  3. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Maître, O. P., E-mail: olm@limsi.fr [LIMSI-CNRS, UPR 3251, Orsay (France); Knio, O. M., E-mail: knio@duke.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Moraes, A., E-mail: alvaro.moraesgutierrez@kaust.edu.sa [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  4. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    KAUST Repository

    Le Maî tre, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  5. Photochemical decomposition of catecholamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, N.J. de; Henegouwen, G.M.J.B. van; Gerritsma, K.W.

    1979-01-01

    During photochemical decomposition (lambda=254 nm) adrenaline, isoprenaline and noradrenaline in aqueous solution were converted to the corresponding aminochrome for 65, 56 and 35% respectively. In determining this conversion, photochemical instability of the aminochromes was taken into account. Irradiations were performed in such dilute solutions that the neglect of the inner filter effect is permissible. Furthermore, quantum yields for the decomposition of the aminochromes in aqueous solution are given. (Author)

  6. Excimer laser decomposition of silicone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, L.D.; Cochrane, C.; Dicara, Cl.; Dupas-Bruzek, C.; Kolev, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excimer laser irradiation of silicone foils is shown in this work to induce decomposition, ablation and activation of such materials. Thin (100 μm) laminated silicone foils are irradiated at 248 nm as a function of impacting laser fluence and number of pulsed irradiations at 1 s intervals. Above a threshold fluence of 0.7 J/cm 2 , material starts decomposing. At higher fluences, this decomposition develops and gives rise to (i) swelling of the irradiated surface and then (ii) emission of matter (ablation) at a rate that is not proportioned to the number of pulses. Taking into consideration the polymer structure and the foil lamination process, these results help defining the phenomenology of silicone ablation. The polymer decomposition results in two parts: one which is organic and volatile, and another part which is inorganic and remains, forming an ever thickening screen to light penetration as the number of light pulses increases. A mathematical model is developed that accounts successfully for this physical screening effect

  7. Decomposing Nekrasov decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, A. [ITEP,25 Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Institute for Information Transmission Problems,19-1 Bolshoy Karetniy, Moscow, 127051 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI,31 Kashirskoe highway, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Zenkevich, Y. [ITEP,25 Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI,31 Kashirskoe highway, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences,6a Prospekt 60-letiya Oktyabrya, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-16

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions — this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition — into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair “interaction” is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  8. Decomposing Nekrasov decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Zenkevich, Y.

    2016-01-01

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions — this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition — into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair “interaction” is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  9. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brachat, Jerome; Comon, Pierre; Mourrain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for decomposing a symmetric tensor, of dimension n and order d, as a sum of rank-1 symmetric tensors, extending the algorithm of Sylvester devised in 1886 for binary forms. We recall the correspondence between the decomposition of a homogeneous polynomial in n variables...... of polynomial equations of small degree in non-generic cases. We propose a new algorithm for symmetric tensor decomposition, based on this characterization and on linear algebra computations with Hankel matrices. The impact of this contribution is two-fold. First it permits an efficient computation...... of the decomposition of any tensor of sub-generic rank, as opposed to widely used iterative algorithms with unproved global convergence (e.g. Alternate Least Squares or gradient descents). Second, it gives tools for understanding uniqueness conditions and for detecting the rank....

  10. FDG decomposition products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.; Buriova, E.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present the results of analysis of decomposition products of [ 18 ]fluorodexyglucose. It is concluded that the coupling of liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry with electrospray ionisation is a suitable tool for quantitative analysis of FDG radiopharmaceutical, i.e. assay of basic components (FDG, glucose), impurities (Kryptofix) and decomposition products (gluconic and glucuronic acids etc.); 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) is sufficiently stable and resistant towards autoradiolysis; the content of radiochemical impurities (2-[ 18 F]fluoro-gluconic and 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-glucuronic acids in expired FDG did not exceed 1%

  11. Crop residue decomposition in Minnesota biochar amended plots

    OpenAIRE

    S. L. Weyers; K. A. Spokas

    2014-01-01

    Impacts of biochar application at laboratory scales are routinely studied, but impacts of biochar application on decomposition of crop residues at field scales have not been widely addressed. The priming or hindrance of crop residue decomposition could have a cascading impact on soil processes, particularly those influencing nutrient availability. Our objectives were to evaluate biochar effects on field decomposition of crop residue, using plots that were amended with ...

  12. Novel techniques for data decomposition and load balancing for parallel processing of vision systems: Implementation and evaluation using a motion estimation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Alok Nidhi; Leung, Mun K.; Huang, Thomas S.; Patel, Janak H.

    1989-01-01

    Computer vision systems employ a sequence of vision algorithms in which the output of an algorithm is the input of the next algorithm in the sequence. Algorithms that constitute such systems exhibit vastly different computational characteristics, and therefore, require different data decomposition techniques and efficient load balancing techniques for parallel implementation. However, since the input data for a task is produced as the output data of the previous task, this information can be exploited to perform knowledge based data decomposition and load balancing. Presented here are algorithms for a motion estimation system. The motion estimation is based on the point correspondence between the involved images which are a sequence of stereo image pairs. Researchers propose algorithms to obtain point correspondences by matching feature points among stereo image pairs at any two consecutive time instants. Furthermore, the proposed algorithms employ non-iterative procedures, which results in saving considerable amounts of computation time. The system consists of the following steps: (1) extraction of features; (2) stereo match of images in one time instant; (3) time match of images from consecutive time instants; (4) stereo match to compute final unambiguous points; and (5) computation of motion parameters.

  13. Basis of the biological decomposition of xenobiotica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R. von

    1993-01-01

    The ability of micro-organisms to decompose different molecules and to use them as a source of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur or energy is the basis for all biological processes for cleaning up contaminated soil. Therefore, the knowledge of these decomposition processes is an important precondition for judging which contamination can be treated biologically at all and which materials can be decomposed biologically. The decomposition schemes of the most important harmful material classes (aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons) are introduced and the consequences which arise for the practical application in biological cleaning up of contaminated soils are discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2007-11-01

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution

  15. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2007-11-15

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution.

  16. Thermal Plasma decomposition of fluoriated greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Seok; Watanabe, Takayuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Park, Dong Wha [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Fluorinated compounds mainly used in the semiconductor industry are potent greenhouse gases. Recently, thermal plasma gas scrubbers have been gradually replacing conventional burn-wet type gas scrubbers which are based on the combustion of fossil fuels because high conversion efficiency and control of byproduct generation are achievable in chemically reactive high temperature thermal plasma. Chemical equilibrium composition at high temperature and numerical analysis on a complex thermal flow in the thermal plasma decomposition system are used to predict the process of thermal decomposition of fluorinated gas. In order to increase economic feasibility of the thermal plasma decomposition process, increase of thermal efficiency of the plasma torch and enhancement of gas mixing between the thermal plasma jet and waste gas are discussed. In addition, noble thermal plasma systems to be applied in the thermal plasma gas treatment are introduced in the present paper.

  17. Preparation of Ti/IrO2 Anode with Low Iridium Content by Thermal Decomposition Process: Electrochemical removal of organic pollutants in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqub, Asim; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ajab, Huma; Kutty, S. R. M.; Ezechi, Ezerie H.; Farooq, Robina

    2018-04-01

    In this study IrO2 (Iridium oxide) was coated onto a titanium plate anode from a dilute (50 mg/10 ml) IrCl3×H2O salt solution. Coating was done at high temperature (550∘C) using thermal decomposition. Surface morphology and characteristics of coated surface of Ti/IrO2 anode were examined by FESEM and XRD. The coated anode was applied for electrochemical removal of organic pollutants from synthetic water samples in 100 mL compartment of batch electrochemical cell. About 50% COD removal was obtained at anode prepared with low Ir content solution while 72% COD removal was obtained with anode prepared at high Ir content. Maximum COD removal was obtained at 10 mA/cm2 current density.

  18. Thermal decomposition of zirconium compounds with some aromatic hydroxycarboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshel, A V; Malinko, L A; Karlysheva, K F; Sheka, I A; Shchepak, N I [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii

    1980-02-01

    By the thermogravimetry method investigated are processes of thermal decomposition of different zirconium compounds with mandelic, parabromomandelic, salicylic and sulphosalicylic acids. For identification of decomposition products the specimens have been kept at the temperature of effects up to the constant weight. Taken are IR-spectra, rentgenoarams, carried out is elementary analysis of decomposition products. It is stated that thermal decomposition of the investigated compounds passes in stages; the final product of thermolysis is ZrO/sub 2/. Nonhydrolized compounds are stable at heating in the air up to 200-265 deg. Hydroxy compounds begin to decompose at lower temperature (80-100 deg).

  19. 1.7. Acid decomposition of kaolin clays of Ziddi Deposit. 1.7.1. The hydrochloric acid decomposition of kaolin clays and siallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Mirzoev, D.Kh.; Boboev, Kh.E.

    2016-01-01

    Present article of book is devoted to hydrochloric acid decomposition of kaolin clays and siallites. The chemical composition of kaolin clays and siallites was determined. The influence of temperature, process duration, acid concentration on hydrochloric acid decomposition of kaolin clays and siallites was studied. The optimal conditions of hydrochloric acid decomposition of kaolin clays and siallites were determined.

  20. The platinum catalysed decomposition of hydrazine in acidic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananiev, A.V.; Tananaev, I.G.; Brossard, Ph.; Broudic, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic study of the hydrazine decomposition in the solutions of HClO 4 , H 2 SO 4 and HNO 3 in the presence of Pt/SiO 2 catalyst has been undertaken. It was shown that the kinetics of the hydrazine catalytic decomposition in HClO 4 and H 2 SO 4 are identical. The process is determined by the heterogeneous catalytic auto-decomposition of N 2 H 4 on the catalyst's surface. The platinum catalysed hydrazine decomposition in the nitric acid solutions is a complex process, including heterogeneous catalytic auto-decomposition of N 2 H 4 , reaction of hydrazine with catalytically generated nitrous acid and the catalytic oxidation of hydrazine by nitric acid. The kinetic parameters of these reactions have been determined. The contribution of each reaction in the total process is determined by the liquid phase composition and by the temperature. (authors)

  1. Interacting effects of insects and flooding on wood decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Ulyshen

    2014-01-01

    Saproxylic arthropods are thought to play an important role in wood decomposition but very few efforts have been made to quantify their contributions to the process and the factors controlling their activities are not well understood. In the current study, mesh exclusion bags were used to quantify how arthropods affect loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) decomposition rates...

  2. Inverse scale space decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marie Foged; Benning, Martin; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the inverse scale space flow as a decomposition method for decomposing data into generalised singular vectors. We show that the inverse scale space flow, based on convex and even and positively one-homogeneous regularisation functionals, can decompose data represented...... by the application of a forward operator to a linear combination of generalised singular vectors into its individual singular vectors. We verify that for this decomposition to hold true, two additional conditions on the singular vectors are sufficient: orthogonality in the data space and inclusion of partial sums...... of the subgradients of the singular vectors in the subdifferential of the regularisation functional at zero. We also address the converse question of when the inverse scale space flow returns a generalised singular vector given that the initial data is arbitrary (and therefore not necessarily in the range...

  3. Magic Coset Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciatori, Sergio L; Marrani, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting a "mixed" non-symmetric Freudenthal-Rozenfeld-Tits magic square, two types of coset decompositions are analyzed for the non-compact special K\\"ahler symmetric rank-3 coset E7(-25)/[(E6(-78) x U(1))/Z_3], occurring in supergravity as the vector multiplets' scalar manifold in N=2, D=4 exceptional Maxwell-Einstein theory. The first decomposition exhibits maximal manifest covariance, whereas the second (triality-symmetric) one is of Iwasawa type, with maximal SO(8) covariance. Generalizations to conformal non-compact, real forms of non-degenerate, simple groups "of type E7" are presented for both classes of coset parametrizations, and relations to rank-3 simple Euclidean Jordan algebras and normed trialities over division algebras are also discussed.

  4. Gamma ray induced decomposition of lanthanide nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, N.G.; Garg, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Gamma ray induced decomposition of the lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO 3 ) 3 .xH 2 O where Ln=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Tm and Yb has been studied at different absorbed doses up to 600 kGy. G(NO 2 - ) values depend on the absorbed dose and the nature of the outer cation. It has been observed that those lanthanides which exhibit variable valency (Ce and Eu) show lower G-values. An attempt has been made to correlate thermal and radiolytic decomposition processes. (author). 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Multiresolution signal decomposition transforms, subbands, and wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Akansu, Ali N; Haddad, Paul R

    2001-01-01

    The uniqueness of this book is that it covers such important aspects of modern signal processing as block transforms from subband filter banks and wavelet transforms from a common unifying standpoint, thus demonstrating the commonality among these decomposition techniques. In addition, it covers such ""hot"" areas as signal compression and coding, including particular decomposition techniques and tables listing coefficients of subband and wavelet filters and other important properties.The field of this book (Electrical Engineering/Computer Science) is currently booming, which is, of course

  6. Preparation, Structure Characterization and Thermal Decomposition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Decomposition Process of the Dysprosium(III) m-Methylbenzoate 1 ... A dinuclear complex [Dy(m-MBA)3phen]2·H2O was prepared by the reaction of DyCl3·6H2O, m-methylbenzoic acid and .... ing rate of 10 °C min–1 are illustrated in Fig. 4.

  7. A Martingale Decomposition of Discrete Markov Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard

    We consider a multivariate time series whose increments are given from a homogeneous Markov chain. We show that the martingale component of this process can be extracted by a filtering method and establish the corresponding martingale decomposition in closed-form. This representation is useful fo...

  8. Radiolytic decomposition of 4-bromodiphenyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Liang; Xu Gang; Wu Wenjing; Shi Wenyan; Liu Ning; Bai Yulei; Wu Minghong

    2010-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) spread widely in the environment are mainly removed by photochemical and anaerobic microbial degradation. In this paper, the decomposition of 4-bromodiphenyl ether (BDE -3), the PBDEs homologues, is investigated by electron beam irradiation of its ethanol/water solution (reduction system) and acetonitrile/water solution (oxidation system). The radiolytic products were determined by GC coupled with electron capture detector, and the reaction rate constant of e sol - in the reduction system was measured at 2.7 x 10 10 L · mol -1 · s -1 by pulsed radiolysis. The results show that the BDE-3 concentration affects strongly the decomposition ratio in the alkali solution, and the reduction system has a higher BDE-3 decomposition rate than the oxidation system. This indicates that the BDE-3 was reduced by effectively capturing e sol - in radiolytic process. (authors)

  9. Decomposition in pelagic marine ecosytems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    During the decomposition of plant detritus, complex microbial successions develop which are dominated in the early stages by a number of distinct bacterial morphotypes. The microheterotrophic community rapidly becomes heterogenous and may include cyanobacteria, fungi, yeasts and bactivorous protozoans. Microheterotrophs in the marine environment may have a biomass comparable to that of all other heterotrophs and their significance as a resource to higher trophic orders, and in the regeneration of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, that support 'regenerated' primary production, has aroused both attention and controversy. Numerous methods have been employed to measure heterotrophic bacterial production and activity. The most widely used involve estimates of 14 C-glucose uptake; the frequency of dividing cells; the incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and exponential population growth in predator-reduced filtrates. Recent attempts to model decomposition processes and C and N fluxes in pelagic marine ecosystems are described. This review examines the most sensitive components and predictions of the models with particular reference to estimates of bacterial production, net growth yield and predictions of N cycling determined by 15 N methodology. Directed estimates of nitrogen (and phosphorus) flux through phytoplanktonic and bacterioplanktonic communities using 15 N (and 32 P) tracer methods are likely to provide more realistic measures of nitrogen flow through planktonic communities

  10. Infrared multiphoton absorption and decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.; McAlpine, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The discovery of infrared laser induced multiphoton absorption (IRMPA) and decomposition (IRMPD) by Isenor and Richardson in 1971 generated a great deal of interest in these phenomena. This interest was increased with the discovery by Ambartzumian, Letokhov, Ryadbov and Chekalin that isotopically selective IRMPD was possible. One of the first speculations about these phenomena was that it might be possible to excite a particular mode of a molecule with the intense infrared laser beam and cause decomposition or chemical reaction by channels which do not predominate thermally, thus providing new synthetic routes for complex chemicals. The potential applications to isotope separation and novel chemistry stimulated efforts to understand the underlying physics and chemistry of these processes. At ICOMP I, in 1977 and at ICOMP II in 1980, several authors reviewed the current understandings of IRMPA and IRMPD as well as the particular aspect of isotope separation. There continues to be a great deal of effort into understanding IRMPA and IRMPD and we will briefly review some aspects of these efforts with particular emphasis on progress since ICOMP II. 31 references

  11. Ecotoxicity effects triggered in aquatic organisms by invasive Acer negundo and native Alnus glutinosa leaf leachates obtained in the process of aerobic decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manusadžianas, Levonas; Darginavičienė, Jūratė; Gylytė, Brigita; Jurkonienė, Sigita; Krevš, Alina; Kučinskienė, Alė; Mačkinaitė, Rimutė; Pakalnis, Romas; Sadauskas, Kazys; Sendžikaitė, Jūratė; Vitkus, Rimantas

    2014-10-15

    The replacement of autochthonous tree species by invasive ones in coastal zones of freshwater bodies induces additional alteration of hydrochemical and microbiological characteristics due to decomposition of fallen leaves of non-indigenous species, which can lead to ecotoxic response of the littoral biota. Leaves of invasive to Lithuania boxelder maple (Acer negundo) and autochthonous black alder (Alnus glutinosa) lost more than half of biomass and released stable amount of DOC (60-70 mg/L) throughout 90-day mesocosm experiment under aerobic conditions. This, along with the relatively small BOD7 values detected after some variation within the first month confirms effective biodegradation by fungi and bacteria. The ambient water was more enriched with different forms of N and P by decomposing boxelder maple than by alder leaves. During the first month, both leachates were more toxic to charophyte (Nitellopsis obtusa) at mortality and membrane depolarization levels, while later to two crustacean species. Biomarker response, H(+)-ATPase activity in membrane preparations from N. obtusa, was stronger for A. negundo. Generally, boxelder maple leaf leachates were more toxic to tested hydrobionts and this coincides with previous study on leaves of the same pair of tree species conducted under microaerobic conditions (Krevš et al., 2013). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Fusion Approach to Feature Extraction by Wavelet Decomposition and Principal Component Analysis in Transient Signal Processing of SAW Odor Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant SINGH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents theoretical analysis of a new approach for development of surface acoustic wave (SAW sensor array based odor recognition system. The construction of sensor array employs a single polymer interface for selective sorption of odorant chemicals in vapor phase. The individual sensors are however coated with different thicknesses. The idea of sensor coating thickness variation is for terminating solvation and diffusion kinetics of vapors into polymer up to different stages of equilibration on different sensors. This is expected to generate diversity in information content of the sensors transient. The analysis is based on wavelet decomposition of transient signals. The single sensor transients have been used earlier for generating odor identity signatures based on wavelet approximation coefficients. In the present work, however, we exploit variability in diffusion kinetics due to polymer thicknesses for making odor signatures. This is done by fusion of the wavelet coefficients from different sensors in the array, and then applying the principal component analysis. We find that the present approach substantially enhances the vapor class separability in feature space. The validation is done by generating synthetic sensor array data based on well-established SAW sensor theory.

  13. Three-dimensional decomposition models for carbon productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Ming; Niu, Dongxiao

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents decomposition models for the change in carbon productivity, which is considered a key indicator that reflects the contributions to the control of greenhouse gases. Carbon productivity differential was used to indicate the beginning of decomposition. After integrating the differential equation and designing the Log Mean Divisia Index equations, a three-dimensional absolute decomposition model for carbon productivity was derived. Using this model, the absolute change of carbon productivity was decomposed into a summation of the absolute quantitative influences of each industrial sector, for each influence factor (technological innovation and industrial structure adjustment) in each year. Furthermore, the relative decomposition model was built using a similar process. Finally, these models were applied to demonstrate the decomposition process in China. The decomposition results reveal several important conclusions: (a) technological innovation plays a far more important role than industrial structure adjustment; (b) industry and export trade exhibit great influence; (c) assigning the responsibility for CO 2 emission control to local governments, optimizing the structure of exports, and eliminating backward industrial capacity are highly essential to further increase China's carbon productivity. -- Highlights: ► Using the change of carbon productivity to measure a country's contribution. ► Absolute and relative decomposition models for carbon productivity are built. ► The change is decomposed to the quantitative influence of three-dimension. ► Decomposition results can be used for improving a country's carbon productivity.

  14. Clustering via Kernel Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Girolami, Mark A.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Methods for spectral clustering have been proposed recently which rely on the eigenvalue decomposition of an affinity matrix. In this work it is proposed that the affinity matrix is created based on the elements of a non-parametric density estimator. This matrix is then decomposed to obtain...... posterior probabilities of class membership using an appropriate form of nonnegative matrix factorization. The troublesome selection of hyperparameters such as kernel width and number of clusters can be obtained using standard cross-validation methods as is demonstrated on a number of diverse data sets....

  15. Decomposition kinetics of plutonium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, J.M.; Stakebake, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic data for decomposition of PuH/sub 1/ /sub 95/ provides insight into a possible mechanism for the hydriding and dehydriding reactions of plutonium. The fact that the rate of the hydriding reaction, K/sub H/, is proportional to P/sup 1/2/ and the rate of the dehydriding process, K/sub D/, is inversely proportional to P/sup 1/2/ suggests that the forward and reverse reactions proceed by opposite paths of the same mechanism. The P/sup 1/2/ dependence of hydrogen solubility in metals is characteristic of the dissociative absorption of hydrogen; i.e., the reactive species is atomic hydrogen. It is reasonable to assume that the rates of the forward and reverse reactions are controlled by the surface concentration of atomic hydrogen, (H/sub s/), that K/sub H/ = c'(H/sub s/), and that K/sub D/ = c/(H/sub s/), where c' and c are proportionality constants. For this surface model, the pressure dependence of K/sub D/ is related to (H/sub s/) by the reaction (H/sub s/) reversible 1/2H/sub 2/(g) and by its equilibrium constant K/sub e/ = (H/sub 2/)/sup 1/2//(H/sub s/). In the pressure range of ideal gas behavior, (H/sub s/) = K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/ and the decomposition rate is given by K/sub D/ = cK/sub e/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. For an analogous treatment of the hydriding process with this model, it can be readily shown that K/sub H/ = c'K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. The inverse pressure dependence and direct temperature dependence of the decomposition rate are correctly predicted by this mechanism which is most consistent with the observed behavior of the Pu--H system.

  16. Thermal decomposition of lutetium propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of lutetium(III) propionate monohydrate (Lu(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dehydration takes place around 90 °C. It is followed by the decomposition of the anhydrous...... °C. Full conversion to Lu2O3 is achieved at about 1000 °C. Whereas the temperatures and solid reaction products of the first two decomposition steps are similar to those previously reported for the thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) propionate monohydrate, the final decomposition...... of the oxycarbonate to the rare-earth oxide proceeds in a different way, which is here reminiscent of the thermal decomposition path of Lu(C3H5O2)·2CO(NH2)2·2H2O...

  17. Soil fauna and plant litter decomposition in tropical and subalpine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Gonzalez; T.R. Seastedt

    2001-01-01

    The decomposition of plant residues is influenced by their chemical composition, the physical-chemical environment, and the decomposer organisms. Most studies interested in latitudinal gradients of decomposition have focused on substrate quality and climate effects on decomposition, and have excluded explicit recognition of the soil organisms involved in the process....

  18. Radiation decomposition of alcohols and chloro phenols in micellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno A, J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of surfactants on the radiation decomposition yield of alcohols and chloro phenols has been studied with gamma doses of 2, 3, and 5 KGy. These compounds were used as typical pollutants in waste water, and the effect of the water solubility, chemical structure, and the nature of the surfactant, anionic or cationic, was studied. The results show that anionic surfactant like sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), improve the radiation decomposition yield of ortho-chloro phenol, while cationic surfactant like cetyl trimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), improve the radiation decomposition yield of butyl alcohol. A similar behavior is expected for those alcohols with water solubility close to the studied ones. Surfactant concentrations below critical micellar concentration (CMC), inhibited radiation decomposition for both types of alcohols. However radiation decomposition yield increased when surfactant concentrations were bigger than the CMC. Aromatic alcohols decomposition was more marked than for linear alcohols decomposition. On a mixture of alcohols and chloro phenols in aqueous solution the radiation decomposition yield decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. Nevertheless, there were competitive reactions between the alcohols, surfactants dimers, hydroxyl radical and other reactive species formed on water radiolysis, producing a catalytic positive effect in the decomposition of alcohols. Chemical structure and the number of carbons were not important factors in the radiation decomposition. When an alcohol like ortho-chloro phenol contained an additional chlorine atom, the decomposition of this compound was almost constant. In conclusion the micellar effect depend on both, the nature of the surfactant (anionic or cationic) and the chemical structure of the alcohols. The results of this study are useful for wastewater treatment plants based on the oxidant effect of the hydroxyl radical, like in advanced oxidation processes, or in combined treatment such as

  19. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the thermal decomposition behaviour of the aforementioned powder at high heating rates was taken into considera- ... does not change the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride ... from titanium hydride in a sequence of steps.

  20. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of titanium hydride ... hydride powder, while switching it from internal diffusion to chemical reaction. ... TiH phase and oxides form on the powder surface, controlling the process.

  1. Decomposition of oxalate precipitates by photochemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae-Hyung Yoo; Eung-Ho Kim

    1999-01-01

    A photo-radiation method was applied to decompose oxalate precipitates so that it can be dissolved into dilute nitric acid. This work has been studied as a part of partitioning of minor actinides. Minor actinides can be recovered from high-level wastes as oxalate precipitates, but they tend to be coprecipitated together with lanthanide oxalates. This requires another partitioning step for mutual separation of actinide and lanthanide groups. In this study, therefore, some experimental work of photochemical decomposition of oxalate was carried out to prove its feasibility as a step of partitioning process. The decomposition of oxalic acid in the presence of nitric acid was performed in advance in order to understand the mechanistic behaviour of oxalate destruction, and then the decomposition of neodymium oxalate, which was chosen as a stand-in compound representing minor actinide and lanthanide oxalates, was examined. The decomposition rate of neodymium oxalate was found as 0.003 mole/hr at the conditions of 0.5 M HNO 3 and room temperature when a mercury lamp was used as a light source. (author)

  2. Proton mass decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Chen, Ying; Draper, Terrence; Liang, Jian; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2018-03-01

    We report the results on the proton mass decomposition and also on the related quark and glue momentum fractions. The results are based on overlap valence fermions on four ensembles of Nf = 2 + 1 DWF configurations with three lattice spacings and volumes, and several pion masses including the physical pion mass. With 1-loop pertur-bative calculation and proper normalization of the glue operator, we find that the u, d, and s quark masses contribute 9(2)% to the proton mass. The quark energy and glue field energy contribute 31(5)% and 37(5)% respectively in the MS scheme at µ = 2 GeV. The trace anomaly gives the remaining 23(1)% contribution. The u, d, s and glue momentum fractions in the MS scheme are consistent with the global analysis at µ = 2 GeV.

  3. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  4. Art of spin decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangsong; Sun Weimin; Wang Fan; Goldman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the problem of spin decomposition for an interacting system from a natural perspective of constructing angular-momentum eigenstates. We split, from the total angular-momentum operator, a proper part which can be separately conserved for a stationary state. This part commutes with the total Hamiltonian and thus specifies the quantum angular momentum. We first show how this can be done in a gauge-dependent way, by seeking a specific gauge in which part of the total angular-momentum operator vanishes identically. We then construct a gauge-invariant operator with the desired property. Our analysis clarifies what is the most pertinent choice among the various proposals for decomposing the nucleon spin. A similar analysis is performed for extracting a proper part from the total Hamiltonian to construct energy eigenstates.

  5. Decomposition methods for unsupervised learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the application and development of decomposition methods for Unsupervised Learning. It covers topics from classical factor analysis based decomposition and its variants such as Independent Component Analysis, Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Sparse Coding...... methods and clustering problems is derived both in terms of classical point clustering but also in terms of community detection in complex networks. A guiding principle throughout this thesis is the principle of parsimony. Hence, the goal of Unsupervised Learning is here posed as striving for simplicity...... in the decompositions. Thus, it is demonstrated how a wide range of decomposition methods explicitly or implicitly strive to attain this goal. Applications of the derived decompositions are given ranging from multi-media analysis of image and sound data, analysis of biomedical data such as electroencephalography...

  6. Wood decomposition as influenced by invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyshen, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    The diversity and habitat requirements of invertebrates associated with dead wood have been the subjects of hundreds of studies in recent years but we still know very little about the ecological or economic importance of these organisms. The purpose of this review is to examine whether, how and to what extent invertebrates affect wood decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. Three broad conclusions can be reached from the available literature. First, wood decomposition is largely driven by microbial activity but invertebrates also play a significant role in both temperate and tropical environments. Primary mechanisms include enzymatic digestion (involving both endogenous enzymes and those produced by endo- and ectosymbionts), substrate alteration (tunnelling and fragmentation), biotic interactions and nitrogen fertilization (i.e. promoting nitrogen fixation by endosymbiotic and free-living bacteria). Second, the effects of individual invertebrate taxa or functional groups can be accelerative or inhibitory but the cumulative effect of the entire community is generally to accelerate wood decomposition, at least during the early stages of the process (most studies are limited to the first 2-3 years). Although methodological differences and design limitations preclude meta-analysis, studies aimed at quantifying the contributions of invertebrates to wood decomposition commonly attribute 10-20% of wood loss to these organisms. Finally, some taxa appear to be particularly influential with respect to promoting wood decomposition. These include large wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera) and termites (Termitoidae), especially fungus-farming macrotermitines. The presence or absence of these species may be more consequential than species richness and the influence of invertebrates is likely to vary biogeographically. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Decomposition of monolithic web application to microservices

    OpenAIRE

    Zaymus, Mikulas

    2017-01-01

    Solteq Oyj has an internal Wellbeing project for massage reservations. The task of this thesis was to transform the monolithic architecture of this application to microservices. The thesis starts with a detailed comparison between microservices and monolithic application. It points out the benefits and disadvantages microservice architecture can bring to the project. Next, it describes the theory and possible strategies that can be used in the process of decomposition of an existing monoli...

  8. Decomposition of aboveground biomass of a herbaceous wetland stand

    OpenAIRE

    KLIMOVIČOVÁ, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    The master?s thesis is part of the project GA ČR č. P504/11/1151- Role of plants in the greenhouse gas budget of a sedge fen. This thesis deals with the decomposition of aboveground vegetation in a herbaceous wetland. The decomposition rate was established on the flooded part of the Wet Meadows near Třeboň. The rate of the decomposition processes was evaluated using the litter-bag method. Mesh bags filled with dry plant matter were located in the vicinity of the automatic meteorological stati...

  9. Separable processes before, during, and after the N400 elicited by previously inferred and new information: evidence from time-frequency decompositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Vaughn R; Bernat, Edward M; van den Broek, Paul; Collins, Paul F; Patrick, Christopher J; Marsolek, Chad J

    2013-01-25

    Successful comprehension during reading often requires inferring information not explicitly presented. This information is readily accessible when subsequently encountered, and a neural correlate of this is an attenuation of the N400 event-related potential (ERP). We used ERPs and time-frequency (TF) analysis to investigate neural correlates of processing inferred information after a causal coherence inference had been generated during text comprehension. Participants read short texts, some of which promoted inference generation. After each text, they performed lexical decisions to target words that were unrelated or inference-related to the preceding text. Consistent with previous findings, inference-related words elicited an attenuated N400 relative to unrelated words. TF analyses revealed unique contributions to the N400 from activity occurring at 1-6 Hz (theta) and 0-2 Hz (delta), supporting the view that multiple, sequential processes underlie the N400. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Decomposition of residual oil by large scale HSC plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washimi, Koichi; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Limmer, H.; Schuetter, H. (Toyo Engineering Corp., funabashi, Japan VEB Petrolchemisches Kombinat Schwedt, Schwedt (East Germany))

    1989-07-01

    Regarding large scale and high decomposition ratio visbreaker HSC, characteristic points and operation conditions of a new plant in East Germany were introduced. As for the characteristics of the process, high decomposition ratio and stable decpmposed oil, availability of high sulfur content oil or even decomposed residuum of visbreaker, stableness of produced light oil with low content of unsaturated components, low investment with low running cost, were indicated. For the realization of high decomposition ratio, designing for suppressing the decomposition in heating furnace and accelaration of it in soaking drum, high space velocity of gas phase for better agitation, were raised. As the main subject of technical development, design of soaking drum was indicated with main dimensions for the designing. Operation conditions of the process in East Germany using residual oil supplied from already working visbreaker for USSR crude oil were introduced. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  12. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes

  13. Foreword - Acid decomposition of borosilicate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    The elaboration and development of technology of processing of mineral raw materials have an important role for the industry of Tajikistan. The results of researches of the staff of Institute of Chemistry and Nuclear and Radiation Safety Agency of the Republic of Tajikistan were considered in present monograph. The physicochemical and technological aspects of processing of borosilicate raw materials of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan were considered. The necessary conditions of acid decomposition of raw materials were defined. The flowsheets for the processing of boron raw materials were proposed.

  14. Memory effect and fast spinodal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, T.; Krein, G.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the modification of the Cahn-Hilliard equation when a time delay process through a memory function is taken into account. We then study the process of spinodal decomposition in fast phase transitions associated with a conserved order parameter. The introduced memory effect plays an important role to obtain a finite group velocity. Then, we discuss the constraint for the parameters to satisfy causality. The memory effect is seen to affect the dynamics of phase transition at short times and have the effect of delaying, in a significant way, the process of rapid growth of the order parameter that follows a quench into the spinodal region. (author)

  15. Thermal decomposition of supported lithium nitrate catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Maria Lucia [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Lick, Ileana Daniela [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, Marta Isabel [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, 5730, San Luis (Argentina); Castellon, Enrique Rodriguez; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ponzi, Esther Natalia, E-mail: eponzi@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP), Calle 47 No 257, La Plata, 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-02-20

    New catalysts for soot combustion were prepared by impregnation of different supports (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) with a LiNO{sub 3} solution and then characterized by means of FTIR, XPS, TGA and UV-vis spectroscopy, whereby the presence of lithium nitrate in the prepared catalysts was identified and quantified. The soot combustion rate using this series of catalysts (LiNO{sub 3}/support) was compared with the activity of a series of impregnated catalysts prepared using LiOH (Li{sub 2}O/supports). Catalysts prepared using LiNO{sub 3} are found to be more active than those prepared using LiOH. The catalytic performance was also studied with a NO/O{sub 2} mixture in the feed, demonstrating that NO increases the combustion rate of soot, probably as a consequence of lithium oxide forming an 'in situ' nitrate ion.

  16. Decomposition of aluminosilicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamatov, E.D.; Khomidi, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of aluminosilicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid. The physicochemical properties of initial aluminosilicate ores were studied by means of X-ray phase, differential-thermal analysis methods. The chemical and mineral composition of aluminosilicate ores was considered. The kinetics of acid decomposition of aluminosilicate ores composed of two stages was studied as well. The flowsheets of complex processing of aluminium comprising ores by means of chloric and acid methods were proposed.

  17. Catalytic activity of metal borides in the reaction of decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labodi, I.; Korablev, L.I.; Tavadyan, L.A.; Blyumberg, Eh.A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic effect of CoB, MoB 2 , ZrB 2 and NbB 2 , prepared by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, on decomposition of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide has been studied. A technigue of determination of action mechanism of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid-phase process is suggested. It is established that CoB in contrast to other metal borides catalyzes only hydroperoxide decomposition into radicals

  18. Advanced Oxidation: Oxalate Decomposition Testing With Ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  19. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration

  20. Decomposition and reduction of AUC in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Qingren; Kang Shifang; Zhou Meng

    1987-01-01

    AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate) conversion processes have been adopted extensively in nuclear fuel cycle. The kinetics investigation of these processes, however, has not yet been reported in detail at the published literatures. In the present work, the decomposition kinetics of AUC in hydrogen has been determined by non-isothermal method. DSC curves are solved with computer by Ge Qingren method. The results show that the kinetics obeys Avrami-Erofeev equation within 90% conversion. The apparent activation energy and preexponent are found to be 113.0 kJ/mol and 7.11 x 10 11 s -1 respectively. The reduction kinetics of AUC decomposition product in hydrogen at the range of 450 - 600 deg C has been determined by isothermal thermogravimetric method. The results show that good linear relationship can be obtained from the plot of conversion vs time, and that the apparent activation energy is found to be 113.9 kJ/mol. The effects of particle size and partial pressure of hydrogen are examined in reduction of AUC decomposition product. The reduction mechanism and the structure of particle are discussed according to the kinetics behaviour and SEM (scanning electron microscope) photograph

  1. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  2. Investigation into kinetics of decomposition of nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, B.A.; Gorozhankin, Eh.V.; Efremov, V.N.; Sal'nikova, N.S.; Suris, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    Using the method of thermogravimetry, the decomposition of nitrates, Cd(NO 3 ) 2 x4H 2 O, La(NO 3 ) 2 x6H 2 O, Sr(NO 3 ) 2 , ZrO(NO 3 ) 2 x2H 2 O, Y(NO 3 ) 3 x6H 2 O, in particular, is studied in the 20-1000 deg C range. It is shown, that gaseous pyrolysis, products, remaining in the material, hamper greatly the heat transfer required for the decomposition which reduces the reaction order. An effective activation energy of the process is in a satisfactory agreement with the characteristic temperature of the last endotherm. Kinetic parameters are calculated by the minimization method using a computer

  3. Multiple Shooting and Time Domain Decomposition Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, Michael; Körkel, Stefan; Rannacher, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive collection of the most advanced numerical techniques for the efficient and effective solution of simulation and optimization problems governed by systems of time-dependent differential equations. The contributions present various approaches to time domain decomposition, focusing on multiple shooting and parareal algorithms.  The range of topics covers theoretical analysis of the methods, as well as their algorithmic formulation and guidelines for practical implementation. Selected examples show that the discussed approaches are mandatory for the solution of challenging practical problems. The practicability and efficiency of the presented methods is illustrated by several case studies from fluid dynamics, data compression, image processing and computational biology, giving rise to possible new research topics.  This volume, resulting from the workshop Multiple Shooting and Time Domain Decomposition Methods, held in Heidelberg in May 2013, will be of great interest to applied...

  4. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  5. Some nonlinear space decomposition algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Xue-Cheng; Espedal, M. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    Convergence of a space decomposition method is proved for a general convex programming problem. The space decomposition refers to methods that decompose a space into sums of subspaces, which could be a domain decomposition or a multigrid method for partial differential equations. Two algorithms are proposed. Both can be used for linear as well as nonlinear elliptic problems and they reduce to the standard additive and multiplicative Schwarz methods for linear elliptic problems. Two {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} algorithms are also presented. They converge faster than the additive one and have better parallelism than the multiplicative method. Numerical tests with a two level domain decomposition for linear, nonlinear and interface elliptic problems are presented for the proposed algorithms.

  6. Analysis of microvascular perfusion with multi-dimensional complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with adaptive noise algorithm: Processing of laser speckle contrast images recorded in healthy subjects, at rest and during acetylcholine stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Marche, Pauline; Dubois, Severine; Mahe, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a full-field imaging modality to monitor microvascular blood flow. It is able to give images with high temporal and spatial resolutions. However, when the skin is studied, the interpretation of the bidimensional data may be difficult. This is why an averaging of the perfusion values in regions of interest is often performed and the result is followed in time, reducing the data to monodimensional time series. In order to avoid such a procedure (that leads to a loss of the spatial resolution), we propose to extract patterns from LSCI data and to compare these patterns for two physiological states in healthy subjects: at rest and at the peak of acetylcholine-induced perfusion peak. For this purpose, the recent multi-dimensional complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with adaptive noise (MCEEMDAN) algorithm is applied to LSCI data. The results show that the intrinsic mode functions and residue given by MCEEMDAN show different patterns for the two physiological states. The images, as bidimensional data, can therefore be processed to reveal microvascular perfusion patterns, hidden in the images themselves. This work is therefore a feasibility study before analyzing data in patients with microvascular dysfunctions.

  7. Decomposition of lake phytoplankton. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.; Krog, G.F.; Soendergaard, M.

    1986-01-01

    Short-time (24 h) and long-time (4-6 d) decomposition of phytoplankton cells were investigasted under in situ conditions in four Danish lakes. Carbon-14-labelled, dead algae were exposed to sterile or natural lake water and the dynamics of cell lysis and bacterial utilization of the leached products were followed. The lysis process was dominated by an initial fast water extraction. Within 2 to 4 h from 4 to 34% of the labelled carbon leached from the algal cells. After 24 h from 11 to 43% of the initial particulate carbon was found as dissolved carbon in the experiments with sterile lake water; after 4 to 6 d the leaching was from 67 to 78% of the initial 14 C. The leached compounds were utilized by bacteria. A comparison of the incubations using sterile and natural water showed that a mean of 71% of the lysis products was metabolized by microorganisms within 24 h. In two experiments the uptake rate equalled the leaching rate. (author)

  8. Decomposition of lake phytoplankton. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.; Krog, G.F.; Soendergaard, M.

    1986-01-01

    The lysis process of phytoplankton was followed in 24 h incubations in three Danish lakes. By means of gel-chromatography it was shown that the dissolved carbon leaching from different algal groups differed in molecular weight composition. Three distinct molecular weight classes (>10,000; 700 to 10,000 and < 700 Daltons) leached from blue-green algae in almost equal proportion. The lysis products of spring-bloom diatoms included only the two smaller size classes, and the molecules between 700 and 10,000 Daltons dominated. Measurements of cell content during decomposition of the diatoms revealed polysaccharides and low molecular weight compounds to dominate the lysis products. No proteins were leached during the first 24 h after cell death. By incubating the dead algae in natural lake water, it was possible to detect a high bacterial affinity towards molecules between 700 and 10,000 Daltons, although the other size classes were also utilized. Bacterial transformation of small molecules to larger molecules could be demonstrated. (author)

  9. DECOMPOSITION OF TARS IN MICROWAVE PLASMA – PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Wnukowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the main problem connected with biomass gasification - a presence of tar in a product gas. This paper presents preliminary results of tar decomposition in a microwave plasma reactor. It gives a basic insight into the construction and work of the plasma reactor. During the experiment, researches were carried out on toluene as a tar surrogate. As a carrier gas for toluene and as a plasma agent, nitrogen was used. Flow rates of the gases and the microwave generator’s power were constant during the whole experiment. Results of the experiment showed that the decomposition process of toluene was effective because the decomposition efficiency attained above 95%. The main products of tar decomposition were light hydrocarbons and soot. The article also gives plans for further research in a matter of tar removal from the product gas.

  10. New kinetic insight into the spontaneous oxidation process of lithium in air by EPMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero, Manuel [IFEG, Facultad de Matemáticas, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); INFICQ, Departamento de Matemáticas y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); Lener, German [INFAP, Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Trincavelli, Jorge, E-mail: trincavelli@famaf.unc.edu.ar [IFEG, Facultad de Matemáticas, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); Barraco, Daniel [IFEG, Facultad de Matemáticas, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina); Nazzarro, Marcelo Sandro; Furlong, Octavio [INFAP, Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Leiva, Ezequiel Pedro Marcos [INFICQ, Departamento de Matemáticas y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • EPMA measurements and Monte Carlo simulations were applied to study the corrosion process of Li in air. • The kinetic mechanism of corrosion was discussed. • A diffusion process of water through LiOH was found and quantitatively studied. - Abstract: The exposure of metallic lithium to ambient air produces a fast corrosion reaction of the surface that continues to the bulk of the material. This spontaneous process was explored by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EPMA). The combination of these techniques and Monte Carlo simulations allowed observing the formation of a film of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and studying the growth within the material during the first 300 s. The corrosion is mainly due to the reaction of lithium with water and the diffusion of water through the growing LiOH film is the rate determining step. On the basis of a kinetic analysis we studied the mechanism of reaction and inferred a diffusion coefficient of D = (5.1 ± 0.4) × 10{sup −12} cm{sup 2}/s in agreement with results from the literature obtained using different techniques.

  11. Real interest parity decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Luiz Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the general causes of real interest rate differentials (rids for a sample of emerging markets for the period of January 1996 to August 2007. To this end, two methods are applied. The first consists of breaking the variance of rids down into relative purchasing power pariety and uncovered interest rate parity and shows that inflation differentials are the main source of rids variation; while the second method breaks down the rids and nominal interest rate differentials (nids into nominal and real shocks. Bivariate autoregressive models are estimated under particular identification conditions, having been adequately treated for the identified structural breaks. Impulse response functions and error variance decomposition result in real shocks as being the likely cause of rids.O objetivo deste artigo é investigar as causas gerais dos diferenciais da taxa de juros real (rids para um conjunto de países emergentes, para o período de janeiro de 1996 a agosto de 2007. Para tanto, duas metodologias são aplicadas. A primeira consiste em decompor a variância dos rids entre a paridade do poder de compra relativa e a paridade de juros a descoberto e mostra que os diferenciais de inflação são a fonte predominante da variabilidade dos rids; a segunda decompõe os rids e os diferenciais de juros nominais (nids em choques nominais e reais. Sob certas condições de identificação, modelos autorregressivos bivariados são estimados com tratamento adequado para as quebras estruturais identificadas e as funções de resposta ao impulso e a decomposição da variância dos erros de previsão são obtidas, resultando em evidências favoráveis a que os choques reais são a causa mais provável dos rids.

  12. Acid decomposition processing system for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oomine, Toshimitsu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To perform plutonium recovery at a low energy consumption irrespective of the plutonium density within the wastes. Method: In a decomposing and volume-reducing device for combustible or less combustible wastes containing transuranic elements using an acid, the wastes are in contact with nitric acid before feeding to a reactor. Then, the transuranic elements are transferred into the nitric acid, which is then in contact with ion exchange resins. After adsorbing the transuranic elements to the ion exchange resins, the nitric acid removed with the transuranic elements is caused to flow into a reaction vessel or heating vessel and used as a decomposing and oxidizing agent. (Seki, T.)

  13. The Living Dead: Bacterial Community Structure of a Cadaver at the Onset and End of the Bloat Stage of Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Hyde, Embriette R.; Haarmann, Daniel P.; Lynne, Aaron M.; Bucheli, Sibyl R.; Petrosino, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    Human decomposition is a mosaic system with an intimate association between biotic and abiotic factors. Despite the integral role of bacteria in the decomposition process, few studies have catalogued bacterial biodiversity for terrestrial scenarios. To explore the microbiome of decomposition, two cadavers were placed at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility and allowed to decompose under natural conditions. The bloat stage of decomposition, a stage easily identified in taphono...

  14. Reaction mechanism of reductive decomposition of FGD gypsum with anthracite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Da; Lu, Hailin; Sun, Xiuyun; Liu, Xiaodong; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The reaction mechanism was different if the molar ratio of C/CaSO 4 was different. • The yield of CaO rises with an increase in temperature. • The optimal ratio of C/CaSO 4 = 1.2:1. • The decomposition process is mainly apparent solid–solid reaction with liquid-phase involved. - Abstract: The process of decomposition reaction between flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum and anthracite is complex, which depends on the reaction conditions and atmosphere. In this study, thermogravimetric analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the experiment in a tubular reactor were used to characterize the decomposition reaction in a nitrogen atmosphere under different conditions. The reaction mechanism analysis showed that the decomposition reaction process and mechanism were different when the molar proportion of C/CaSO 4 was changed. The experiment results showed that appropriate increase in the C/CaSO 4 proportion and higher temperatures were suitable for the formation of the main production of CaO, which can help us to understand the solid state reaction mechanism better. Via kinetic analysis of the reaction between anthracite and FGD gypsum under the optimal molar ratio of C/CaSO 4 , the mechanism model of the reaction was confirmed and the decomposition process was a two-step reaction which was in accordance with apparent solid–solid reaction

  15. The nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.; Suleymani, M.; Borudzherdi, A.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan. The obtaining of boric acid from pre backed danburite concentrate by decomposition of nitric acid was studied. The chemical composition of danburite concentrate was determined. The laboratory study of danburite leaching by nitric acid was conducted. The influence of temperature, process duration, nitric acid concentration on nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit was studied as well. The optimal conditions of nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit, including temperature, process duration, nitric acid concentration and particle size were proposed.

  16. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-09-22

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn(2+) provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn(3+) species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn(3+/4+) oxides. Formation of reactive Mn(3+) species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn(3+)-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn(3+) species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant-soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates.

  17. On the hadron mass decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We argue that the standard decompositions of the hadron mass overlook pressure effects, and hence should be interpreted with great care. Based on the semiclassical picture, we propose a new decomposition that properly accounts for these pressure effects. Because of Lorentz covariance, we stress that the hadron mass decomposition automatically comes along with a stability constraint, which we discuss for the first time. We show also that if a hadron is seen as made of quarks and gluons, one cannot decompose its mass into more than two contributions without running into trouble with the consistency of the physical interpretation. In particular, the so-called quark mass and trace anomaly contributions appear to be purely conventional. Based on the current phenomenological values, we find that in average quarks exert a repulsive force inside nucleons, balanced exactly by the gluon attractive force.

  18. On the hadron mass decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorce, Cedric [Universite Paris-Saclay, Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2018-02-15

    We argue that the standard decompositions of the hadron mass overlook pressure effects, and hence should be interpreted with great care. Based on the semiclassical picture, we propose a new decomposition that properly accounts for these pressure effects. Because of Lorentz covariance, we stress that the hadron mass decomposition automatically comes along with a stability constraint, which we discuss for the first time. We show also that if a hadron is seen as made of quarks and gluons, one cannot decompose its mass into more than two contributions without running into trouble with the consistency of the physical interpretation. In particular, the so-called quark mass and trace anomaly contributions appear to be purely conventional. Based on the current phenomenological values, we find that in average quarks exert a repulsive force inside nucleons, balanced exactly by the gluon attractive force. (orig.)

  19. Abstract decomposition theorem and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grossberg, R; Grossberg, Rami; Lessmann, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    Let K be an Abstract Elementary Class. Under the asusmptions that K has a nicely behaved forking-like notion, regular types and existence of some prime models we establish a decomposition theorem for such classes. The decomposition implies a main gap result for the class K. The setting is general enough to cover \\aleph_0-stable first-order theories (proved by Shelah in 1982), Excellent Classes of atomic models of a first order tehory (proved Grossberg and Hart 1987) and the class of submodels of a large sequentially homogenuus \\aleph_0-stable model (which is new).

  20. Thermal decomposition of biphenyl (1963); Decomposition thermique du biphenyle (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerc, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-06-15

    The rates of formation of the decomposition products of biphenyl; hydrogen, methane, ethane, ethylene, as well as triphenyl have been measured in the vapour and liquid phases at 460 deg. C. The study of the decomposition products of biphenyl at different temperatures between 400 and 460 deg. C has provided values of the activation energies of the reactions yielding the main products of pyrolysis in the vapour phase. Product and Activation energy: Hydrogen 73 {+-} 2 kCal/Mole; Benzene 76 {+-} 2 kCal/Mole; Meta-triphenyl 53 {+-} 2 kCal/Mole; Biphenyl decomposition 64 {+-} 2 kCal/Mole; The rate of disappearance of biphenyl is only very approximately first order. These results show the major role played at the start of the decomposition by organic impurities which are not detectable by conventional physico-chemical analysis methods and the presence of which accelerates noticeably the decomposition rate. It was possible to eliminate these impurities by zone-melting carried out until the initial gradient of the formation curves for the products became constant. The composition of the high-molecular weight products (over 250) was deduced from the mean molecular weight and the dosage of the aromatic C - H bonds by infrared spectrophotometry. As a result the existence in tars of hydrogenated tetra, penta and hexaphenyl has been demonstrated. (author) [French] Les vitesses de formation des produits de decomposition du biphenyle: hydrogene, methane, ethane, ethylene, ainsi que des triphenyles, ont ete mesurees en phase vapeur et en phase liquide a 460 deg. C. L'etude des produits de decomposition du biphenyle a differentes temperatures comprises entre 400 et 460 deg. C, a fourni les valeurs des energies d'activation des reactions conduisant aux principaux produits de la pyrolyse en phase vapeur. Produit et Energie d'activation: Hydrogene 73 {+-} 2 kcal/Mole; Benzene 76 {+-} 2 kcal/Mole; Metatriphenyle, 53 {+-} 2 kcal/Mole; Decomposition du biphenyle 64 {+-} 2 kcal/Mole; La

  1. Influence of nitrogen dioxide on the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    Igor L. Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper results of experimental studies of ammonium nitrate thermal decomposition in an open system under normal conditions and in NO2 atmosphere are presented. It is shown that nitrogen dioxide is the initiator of ammonium nitrate self-accelerating exothermic cyclic decomposition process. The insertion of NO2 from outside under the conditions of nonisothermal experiment reduces the characteristic temperature of the beginning of self-accelerating decomposition by 50...70 °C. Using metho...

  2. 1.7.2. The hydrochloric acid decomposition of pre-baked kaolin clays and siallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Mirzoev, D.Kh.; Boboev, Kh.E.

    2016-01-01

    Present article of book is devoted to hydrochloric acid decomposition of pre-baked kaolin clays and siallites. The chemical composition of kaolin clays and siallites was determined. The influence of temperature, process duration, acid concentration on hydrochloric acid decomposition of pre-baked kaolin clays and siallites was studied. The optimal conditions of hydrochloric acid decomposition of pre-baked kaolin clays and siallites were determined.

  3. Multiresolution signal decomposition transforms, subbands, and wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Akansu, Ali N

    1992-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth, integrated, and up-to-date exposition of the topic of signal decomposition techniques. Application areas of these techniques include speech and image processing, machine vision, information engineering, High-Definition Television, and telecommunications. The book will serve as the major reference for those entering the field, instructors teaching some or all of the topics in an advanced graduate course and researchers needing to consult an authoritative source.n The first book to give a unified and coherent exposition of multiresolutional signal decompos

  4. Fringe pattern denoising via image decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shujun; Zhang, Caiming

    2012-02-01

    Filtering off noise from a fringe pattern is one of the key tasks in optical interferometry. In this Letter, using some suitable function spaces to model different components of a fringe pattern, we propose a new fringe pattern denoising method based on image decomposition. In our method, a fringe image is divided into three parts: low-frequency fringe, high-frequency fringe, and noise, which are processed in different spaces. An adaptive threshold in wavelet shrinkage involved in this algorithm improves its denoising performance. Simulation and experimental results show that our algorithm obtains smooth and clean fringes with different frequencies while preserving fringe features effectively.

  5. Kinetics of the decomposition reaction of phosphorite concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Run

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apatite is the raw material, which is mainly used in phosphate fertilizer, and part are used in yellow phosphorus, red phosphorus, and phosphoric acid in the industry. With the decrease of the high grade phosphorite lump, the agglomeration process is necessary for the phosphorite concentrate after beneficiation process. The decomposition behavior and the phase transformation are of vital importance for the agglomeration process of phosphorite. In this study, the thermal kinetic analysis method was used to study the kinetics of the decomposition of phosphorite concentrate. The phosphorite concentrate was heated under various heating rate, and the phases in the sample heated were examined by the X-ray diffraction method. It was found that the main phases in the phosphorite are fluorapatiteCa5(PO43F, quartz SiO2,and dolomite CaMg(CO32.The endothermic DSC peak corresponding to the mass loss caused by the decomposition of dolomite covers from 600°C to 850°C. The activation energy of the decomposition of dolomite, which increases with the increase in the extent of conversion, is about 71.6~123.6kJ/mol. The mechanism equation for the decomposition of dolomite agrees with the Valensi equation and G-B equation.

  6. Formation and decomposition of ammoniated ammonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Suzuki, Kazuya; Nakashima, Mikio; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Hirotsugu; Ohno, Shin-ichi

    1998-09-01

    Structures, frequencies, and chemical reactions of ammoniated ammonium ions (NH 4 + .nNH 3 ) were investigated theoretically by ab initio molecular orbital calculations and experimentally by observing their formation and decomposition in a corona discharge-jet expansion process. The ab initio calculations were carried out using a Gaussian 94 program, which gave optimized structures, binding energies and harmonic vibrational frequencies of NH 4 + .nNH 3 . Effects of discharge current, the reactant gas and the diameter of the gas expanding pinhole were examined on the size n distribution of NH 4 + .nNH 3 . The results indicated that the cluster ion, in the jet expansion process, grew in size mostly equal to or less than one unit under experimental conditions employed. Effects of discharge current, pinhole diameter, flight time in vacuum and cluster size were examined on the decomposition rate of cluster ions formed. In our experimental conditions, the internal energies of cluster ions were mainly determined through exo- and/or endo-thermic reactions involved in the cluster formation process. (author)

  7. Lie bialgebras with triangular decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andruskiewitsch, N.; Levstein, F.

    1992-06-01

    Lie bialgebras originated in a triangular decomposition of the underlying Lie algebra are discussed. The explicit formulas for the quantization of the Heisenberg Lie algebra and some motion Lie algebras are given, as well as the algebra of rational functions on the quantum Heisenberg group and the formula for the universal R-matrix. (author). 17 refs

  8. Decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Oxides in powder form are obtained from aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates (e.g. U, Pu, Th, Ce) by thermal decomposition at 300 to 800 deg C in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal. (author)

  9. Probability inequalities for decomposition integrals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agahi, H.; Mesiar, Radko

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 315, č. 1 (2017), s. 240-248 ISSN 0377-0427 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Decomposition integral * Superdecomposition integral * Probability inequalities Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0470959.pdf

  10. Thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachloroosmate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asanova, T I; Kantor, Innokenty; Asanov, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes of (NH4)2[OsCl6] occurring during thermal decomposition in a reduction atmosphere have been studied in situ using combined energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (ED-XAFS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). According to PXRD, (NH4)2[OsCl6] transforms directly to meta...

  11. Aging-driven decomposition in zolpidem hemitartrate hemihydrate and the single-crystal structure of its decomposition products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Daniel R; Baggio, Ricardo; Roca, Mariana; Tombari, Dora

    2011-04-01

    The "aging-driven" decomposition of zolpidem hemitartrate hemihydrate (form A) has been followed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and the crystal and molecular structures of the decomposition products studied by single-crystal methods. The process is very similar to the "thermally driven" one, recently described in the literature for form E (Halasz and Dinnebier. 2010. J Pharm Sci 99(2): 871-874), resulting in a two-phase system: the neutral free base (common to both decomposition processes) and, in the present case, a novel zolpidem tartrate monohydrate, unique to the "aging-driven" decomposition. Our room-temperature single-crystal analysis gives for the free base comparable results as the high-temperature XRPD ones already reported by Halasz and Dinnebier: orthorhombic, Pcba, a = 9.6360(10) Å, b = 18.2690(5) Å, c = 18.4980(11) Å, and V = 3256.4(4) Å(3) . The unreported zolpidem tartrate monohydrate instead crystallizes in monoclinic P21 , which, for comparison purposes, we treated in the nonstandard setting P1121 with a = 20.7582(9) Å, b = 15.2331(5) Å, c = 7.2420(2) Å, γ = 90.826(2)°, and V = 2289.73(14) Å(3) . The structure presents two complete moieties in the asymmetric unit (z = 4, z' = 2). The different phases obtained in both decompositions are readily explained, considering the diverse genesis of both processes. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Cyanides: decomposition and determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilath, I.; Cohen, L.

    1977-08-01

    Different cyanide destruction methods such as electrolysis (with and without the addition of salt), hypochlorite treatment and ion exchange detoxication were evaluated on a laboratory scale using model solutions. Parameters were determined for the optimal operation of the investigated processes. Analytical methods were adapted for concentrations and compositions of interest. An easy and rapid method of complex cyanide breakdown by ion exchange treatment was developed for analytical purposes. (author)

  13. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalf, J. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Weiss, S.; Lax, S.; Van Treuren, W.; Hyde, E. R.; Song, S. J.; Amir, A.; Larsen, P.; Sangwan, N.; Haarmann, D.; Humphrey, G. C.; Ackermann, G.; Thompson, L. R.; Lauber, C.; Bibat, A.; Nicholas, C.; Gebert, M. J.; Petrosino, J. F.; Reed, S. C.; Gilbert, J. A.; Lynne, A. M.; Bucheli, S. R.; Carter, D. O.; Knight, R.

    2015-12-10

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  14. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R.; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C.; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  15. Theoretical and experimental study: the size dependence of decomposition thermodynamics of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Zixiang; Duan, Huijuan; Li, Wenjiao; Xue, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    In the processes of preparation and application of nanomaterials, the decomposition reactions of nanomaterials are often involved. However, there is a dramatic difference in decomposition thermodynamics between nanomaterials and the bulk counterparts, and the difference depends on the size of the particles that compose the nanomaterials. In this paper, the decomposition model of a nanoparticle was built, the theory of decomposition thermodynamics of nanomaterials was proposed, and the relations of the size dependence of thermodynamic quantities for the decomposition reactions were deduced. In experiment, taking the thermal decomposition of nano-Cu 2 (OH) 2 CO 3 with different particle sizes (the range of radius is at 8.95–27.4 nm) as a system, the reaction thermodynamic quantities were determined, and the regularities of size dependence of the quantities were summarized. These experimental regularities consist with the above thermodynamic relations. The results show that there is a significant effect of the size of particles composing a nanomaterial on the decomposition thermodynamics. When all the decomposition products are gases, the differences in thermodynamic quantities of reaction between the nanomaterials and the bulk counterparts depend on the particle size; while when one of the decomposition products is a solid, the differences depend on both the initial particle size of the nanoparticle and the decomposition ratio. When the decomposition ratio is very small, these differences are only related to the initial particle size; and when the radius of the nanoparticles approaches or exceeds 10 nm, the reaction thermodynamic functions and the logarithm of the equilibrium constant are linearly associated with the reciprocal of radius, respectively. The thermodynamic theory can quantificationally describe the regularities of the size dependence of thermodynamic quantities for decomposition reactions of nanomaterials, and contribute to the researches and the

  16. Reactivity continuum modeling of leaf, root, and wood decomposition across biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Birgit; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2015-07-01

    Large carbon dioxide amounts are released to the atmosphere during organic matter decomposition. Yet the large-scale and long-term regulation of this critical process in global carbon cycling by litter chemistry and climate remains poorly understood. We used reactivity continuum (RC) modeling to analyze the decadal data set of the "Long-term Intersite Decomposition Experiment," in which fine litter and wood decomposition was studied in eight biome types (224 time series). In 32 and 46% of all sites the litter content of the acid-unhydrolyzable residue (AUR, formerly referred to as lignin) and the AUR/nitrogen ratio, respectively, retarded initial decomposition rates. This initial rate-retarding effect generally disappeared within the first year of decomposition, and rate-stimulating effects of nutrients and a rate-retarding effect of the carbon/nitrogen ratio became more prevalent. For needles and leaves/grasses, the influence of climate on decomposition decreased over time. For fine roots, the climatic influence was initially smaller but increased toward later-stage decomposition. The climate decomposition index was the strongest climatic predictor of decomposition. The similar variability in initial decomposition rates across litter categories as across biome types suggested that future changes in decomposition may be dominated by warming-induced changes in plant community composition. In general, the RC model parameters successfully predicted independent decomposition data for the different litter-biome combinations (196 time series). We argue that parameterization of large-scale decomposition models with RC model parameters, as opposed to the currently common discrete multiexponential models, could significantly improve their mechanistic foundation and predictive accuracy across climate zones and litter categories.

  17. Reaction of LiD with moisture by temperature programmed reaction (TPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, L N; Balooch, M; Cecala, C M; Leckey, J H

    2000-01-01

    The temperature programmed reaction technique was performed on LiOH powders and LiD single crystals previously exposed to different moisture levels. Our results show that the LiOH decomposition process has an activation energy barrier of 30 to 33.1 kcal/mol. The LiOH structure is stable at 320 K for 100 years. However, LiOH structures formed on the surface of LiD during moisture exposure at low dosages may have multiple activation energy barriers, some of which may be much lower than 30 kcal/mol. We attribute the lowering of the activation energy barrier for the LiOH decomposition to the existence of dangling bonds, cracks, and other long range disorders in the LiOH structures formed at low levels of moisture exposure. These defective LiOH structures may decompose significantly over the next 100 years of storage even at room temperature. At high moisture exposure levels, LiOH.H 2 O formation is observed. The release of H 2 O molecules from LiOH.H 2 O structure has small activation energy barriers in the range of 13.8 kcal/mol to 16.0 kcal/mol. The loosely bonded H 2 O molecules in the LiOH.H 2 O structure can be easily pumped away at room temperature in a reasonable amount of time. Our experiments also suggest that handling LiD single crystals at an elevated temperature of 340 K or more reduces the growth of LiOH and LiOH.H 2 O significantly

  18. DECOMPOSITION STUDY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE IN COCKLE SHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSTAKIMAH MOHAMED

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxide (CaO is recognized as an efficient carbon dioxide (CO2 adsorbent and separation of CO2 from gas stream using CaO based adsorbent is widely applied in gas purification process especially at high temperature reaction. CaO is normally been produced via thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 sources such as limestone which is obtained through mining and quarrying limestone hill. Yet, this study able to exploit the vast availability of waste resources in Malaysia which is cockle shell, as the potential biomass resources for CaCO3 and CaO. In addition, effect of particle size towards decomposition process is put under study using four particle sizes which are 0.125-0.25 mm, 0.25-0.5 mm, 1-2 mm, and 2-4 mm. Decomposition reactivity is conducted using Thermal Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA at heating rate of 20°C/minutes in inert (Nitrogen atmosphere. Chemical property analysis using x-ray fluorescence (XRF, shows cockle shell is made up of 97% Calcium (Ca element and CaO is produced after decomposition is conducted, as been analyzed by x-ray diffusivity (XRD analyzer. Besides, smallest particle size exhibits the highest decomposition rate and the process was observed to follow first order kinetics. Activation energy, E, of the process was found to vary from 179.38 to 232.67 kJ/mol. From Arrhenius plot, E increased when the particle size is larger. To conclude, cockle shell is a promising source for CaO and based on four different particles sizes used, sample at 0.125-0.25 mm offers the highest decomposition rate.

  19. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products

  20. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the

  1. Kinetics of Roasting Decomposition of the Rare Earth Elements by CaO and Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The roasting method of magnetic tailing mixed with CaO and coal was used to recycle the rare earth elements (REE in magnetic tailing. The phase transformation and decomposition process were researched during the roasting processes. The results showed that the decomposition processes of REE in magnetic tailing were divided into two steps. The first step from 380 to 431 °C mainly entailed the decomposition of bastnaesite (REFCO3. The second step from 605 to 716 °C mainly included the decomposition of monazite (REPO4. The decomposition products were primarily RE2O3, Ce0.75Nd0.25O1.875, CeO2, Ca5F(PO43, and CaF2. Adding CaO could reduce the decomposition temperature of REFCO3 and REPO4. Meanwhile, the decomposition effect of CaO on bastnaesite and monazite was significant. Besides, the effects of the roasting time, roasting temperature, and CaO addition level on the decomposition rate were studied. The optimum technological conditions were a roasting time of 60 min; roasting temperature of 750 °C; and CaO addition level of 20% (w/w. The maximum decomposition rate of REFCO3 and REPO4 was 99.87%. The roasting time and temperature were the major factors influencing the decomposition rate. The kinetics process of the decomposition of REFCO3 and REPO4 accorded with the interfacial reaction kinetics model. The reaction rate controlling steps were divided into two steps. The first step (at low temperature was controlled by a chemical reaction with an activation energy of 52.67 kJ/mol. The second step (at high temperature was controlled by diffusion with an activation energy of 8.5 kJ/mol.

  2. Changes in bacterial and eukaryotic communities during sewage decomposition in Mississippi River water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial decay processes are one of the mechanisms whereby sewage contamination is reduced in the environment. This decomposition process involves a highly complex array of bacterial and eukaryotic communities from both sewage and ambient waters. However, relatively little is kn...

  3. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  4. Long-term decomposition of grass roots as affected by elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van J.H.; Gorissen, A.; Veen, van J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon input into the soil and decomposition processes under elevated CO2 are highly relevant for C sequestering in the soil. Plant growth and decomposition of root material under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations were monitored in wind tunnels. Grass roots (Lolium perenne L.) were

  5. Porous layered double hydroxides synthesized using oxygen generated by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.; de Ruiter, M.P.; Wijnands, Tom; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2017-01-01

    Porous magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxides (LDH) were prepared through intercalation and decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This process generates oxygen gas nano-bubbles that pierce holes in the layered structure of the material by local pressure build-up. The decomposition of the

  6. Termites amplify effects of wood traits on decomposition rates among multiple bamboo and dicot woody species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Guofang; Cornwell, W.K.; Cao, Kunfang; Hu, Yukun; van Logtestijn, R.S.P; Yang, Shijian; Xie, Xiufang; Zhang, Yalin; Ye, Duo; Pan, Xu; Ye, Xuehua; Huang, Zhenying; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Wood decomposition is a key process in the terrestrial carbon cycle, controlling carbon storage with feedback to climate. In (sub) tropical forest, termites are major players in wood decomposition, but their role relative to that of microbial decomposers and wood traits of different tree species is

  7. Dictionary-Based Tensor Canonical Polyadic Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy Emile; Gillis, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    To ensure interpretability of extracted sources in tensor decomposition, we introduce in this paper a dictionary-based tensor canonical polyadic decomposition which enforces one factor to belong exactly to a known dictionary. A new formulation of sparse coding is proposed which enables high dimensional tensors dictionary-based canonical polyadic decomposition. The benefits of using a dictionary in tensor decomposition models are explored both in terms of parameter identifiability and estimation accuracy. Performances of the proposed algorithms are evaluated on the decomposition of simulated data and the unmixing of hyperspectral images.

  8. Decomposition of diesel oil by various microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Netzsch-Lehner, A

    1969-01-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated the decomposition of diesel oil in different soils. In this experiment the decomposition of /sup 14/C-n-Hexadecane labelled diesel oil by special microorganisms was studied. The results were as follows: (1) In the experimental soils the microorganisms Mycoccus ruber, Mycobacterium luteum and Trichoderma hamatum are responsible for the diesel oil decomposition. (2) By adding microorganisms to the soil an increase of the decomposition rate was found only in the beginning of the experiments. (3) Maximum decomposition of diesel oil was reached 2-3 weeks after incubation.

  9. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of aluminium hydride: I-non-isothermal decomposition under vacuum and in inert atmosphere (argon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, I.M.K.; Hawkins, T.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, interest in aluminium hydride (alane) as a rocket propulsion ingredient has been renewed due to improvements in its manufacturing process and an increase in thermal stability. When alane is added to solid propellant formulations, rocket performance is enhanced and the specific impulse increases. Preliminary work was performed at AFRL on the characterization and evaluation of two alane samples. Decomposition kinetics were determined from gravimetric TGA data and volumetric vacuum thermal stability (VTS) results. Chemical analysis showed the samples had 88.30% (by weight) aluminium and 9.96% hydrogen. The average density, as measured by helium pycnometery, was 1.486 g/cc. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the particles were mostly composed of sharp edged crystallographic polyhedral such as simple cubes, cubic octahedrons and hexagonal prisms. Thermogravimetric analysis was utilized to investigate the decomposition kinetics of alane in argon atmosphere and to shed light on the mechanism of alane decomposition. Two kinetic models were successfully developed and used to propose a mechanism for the complete decomposition of alane and to predict its shelf-life during storage. Alane decomposes in two steps. The slowest (rate-determining) step is solely controlled by solid state nucleation of aluminium crystals; the fastest step is due to growth of the crystals. Thus, during decomposition, hydrogen gas is liberated and the initial polyhedral AlH 3 crystals yield a final mix of amorphous aluminium and aluminium crystals. After establishing the kinetic model, prediction calculations indicated that alane can be stored in inert atmosphere at temperatures below 10 deg. C for long periods of time (e.g., 15 years) without significant decomposition. After 15 years of storage, the kinetic model predicts ∼0.1% decomposition, but storage at higher temperatures (e.g. 30 deg. C) is not recommended

  10. LEAF RESIDUE DECOMPOSITION OF SELECTED ATLANTIC FOREST TREE SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Dias Arato

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Biogeochemical cycling is essential to establish and maintain plant and animal communities. Litter is one of main compartments of this cycle, and the kinetics of leaf decomposition in forest litter depend on the chemical composition and environmental conditions. This study evaluated the effect of leaf composition and environmental conditions on leaf decomposition of native Atlantic Forest trees. The following species were analyzed: Mabea fistulifera Mart., Bauhinia forficata Link., Aegiphila sellowiana Cham., Zeyheria tuberculosa (Vell, Luehea grandiflora Mart. et. Zucc., Croton floribundus Spreng., Trema micrantha (L Blume, Cassia ferruginea (Schrad Schrad ex DC, Senna macranthera (DC ex Collad. H. S. Irwin and Barney and Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae. For each species, litter bags were distributed on and fixed to the soil surface of soil-filled pots (in a greenhouse, or directly to the surface of the same soil type in a natural forest (field. Every 30 days, the dry weight and soil basal respiration in both environments were determined. The cumulative decomposition of leaves varied according to the species, leaf nutrient content and environment. In general, the decomposition rate was lowest for Aegiphila sellowiana and fastest for Bauhinia forficate and Schinus terebinthifolius. This trend was similar under the controlled conditions of a greenhouse and in the field. The selection of species with a differentiated decomposition pattern, suited for different stages of the recovery process, can help improve soil restoration.

  11. Crop residue decomposition in Minnesota biochar-amended plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, S. L.; Spokas, K. A.

    2014-06-01

    Impacts of biochar application at laboratory scales are routinely studied, but impacts of biochar application on decomposition of crop residues at field scales have not been widely addressed. The priming or hindrance of crop residue decomposition could have a cascading impact on soil processes, particularly those influencing nutrient availability. Our objectives were to evaluate biochar effects on field decomposition of crop residue, using plots that were amended with biochars made from different plant-based feedstocks and pyrolysis platforms in the fall of 2008. Litterbags containing wheat straw material were buried in July of 2011 below the soil surface in a continuous-corn cropped field in plots that had received one of seven different biochar amendments or a uncharred wood-pellet amendment 2.5 yr prior to start of this study. Litterbags were collected over the course of 14 weeks. Microbial biomass was assessed in treatment plots the previous fall. Though first-order decomposition rate constants were positively correlated to microbial biomass, neither parameter was statistically affected by biochar or wood-pellet treatments. The findings indicated only a residual of potentially positive and negative initial impacts of biochars on residue decomposition, which fit in line with established feedstock and pyrolysis influences. Overall, these findings indicate that no significant alteration in the microbial dynamics of the soil decomposer communities occurred as a consequence of the application of plant-based biochars evaluated here.

  12. Crop residue decomposition in Minnesota biochar amended plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, S. L.; Spokas, K. A.

    2014-02-01

    Impacts of biochar application at laboratory scales are routinely studied, but impacts of biochar application on decomposition of crop residues at field scales have not been widely addressed. The priming or hindrance of crop residue decomposition could have a cascading impact on soil processes, particularly those influencing nutrient availability. Our objectives were to evaluate biochar effects on field decomposition of crop residue, using plots that were amended with biochars made from different feedstocks and pyrolysis platforms prior to the start of this study. Litterbags containing wheat straw material were buried below the soil surface in a continuous-corn cropped field in plots that had received one of seven different biochar amendments or a non-charred wood pellet amendment 2.5 yr prior to start of this study. Litterbags were collected over the course of 14 weeks. Microbial biomass was assessed in treatment plots the previous fall. Though first-order decomposition rate constants were positively correlated to microbial biomass, neither parameter was statistically affected by biochar or wood-pellet treatments. The findings indicated only a residual of potentially positive and negative initial impacts of biochars on residue decomposition, which fit in line with established feedstock and pyrolysis influences. Though no significant impacts were observed with field-weathered biochars, effective soil management may yet have to account for repeat applications of biochar.

  13. Hourly forecasting of global solar radiation based on multiscale decomposition methods: A hybrid approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monjoly, Stéphanie; André, Maïna; Calif, Rudy; Soubdhan, Ted

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for the forecasting of solar radiation series at 1 h ahead. We investigated on several techniques of multiscale decomposition of clear sky index K_c data such as Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and Wavelet Decomposition. From these differents methods, we built 11 decomposition components and 1 residu signal presenting different time scales. We performed classic forecasting models based on linear method (Autoregressive process AR) and a non linear method (Neural Network model). The choice of forecasting method is adaptative on the characteristic of each component. Hence, we proposed a modeling process which is built from a hybrid structure according to the defined flowchart. An analysis of predictive performances for solar forecasting from the different multiscale decompositions and forecast models is presented. From multiscale decomposition, the solar forecast accuracy is significantly improved, particularly using the wavelet decomposition method. Moreover, multistep forecasting with the proposed hybrid method resulted in additional improvement. For example, in terms of RMSE error, the obtained forecasting with the classical NN model is about 25.86%, this error decrease to 16.91% with the EMD-Hybrid Model, 14.06% with the EEMD-Hybid model and to 7.86% with the WD-Hybrid Model. - Highlights: • Hourly forecasting of GHI in tropical climate with many cloud formation processes. • Clear sky Index decomposition using three multiscale decomposition methods. • Combination of multiscale decomposition methods with AR-NN models to predict GHI. • Comparison of the proposed hybrid model with the classical models (AR, NN). • Best results using Wavelet-Hybrid model in comparison with classical models.

  14. The Lévy-Itô decomposition in free probability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Thorbjørnsen, Steen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we prove the free analog of the Lévy-Itô decomposition for Lévy processes. A significant part of the proof consists of introducing free Poisson random measures, proving their existence and developing a theory of integration with respect to such measures. The existence of free Poisso...

  15. Synthesis and thermal decomposition study of dysprosium trifluoroacetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opata, Y. A.; Grivel, J.-C.

    2018-01-01

    A study of the thermal decomposition process of dysprosium trifluoroacetate hydrate under flowing argon is presented. Thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, evolved gas analysis and ex-situ x-ray diffraction techniques have been employed in the investigation. Three main stages were...

  16. Introduction - Acid decomposition of borosilicate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    The complex processing of mineral raw materials is an effective way for the extraction of valuable components. One of these raw materials are borosilicate ores from which the boric acid, aluminium and iron salts and building materials can be obtained. In the Institute of Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan the flowsheets of the processing of borosilicate raw materials by acid and chloric methods were elaborated. The acid methods of decomposition of borosilicate ores of Ak-Arkhar Deposit were considered in present monograph. The carried out researches on elaboration of physicochemical aspects and technological acid methods allowed to define the optimal ways of extraction of valuable products from borosilicate raw materials of Tajikistan.

  17. Universality of Schmidt decomposition and particle identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciara, Stefania; Lo Franco, Rosario; Compagno, Giuseppe

    2017-03-01

    Schmidt decomposition is a widely employed tool of quantum theory which plays a key role for distinguishable particles in scenarios such as entanglement characterization, theory of measurement and state purification. Yet, its formulation for identical particles remains controversial, jeopardizing its application to analyze general many-body quantum systems. Here we prove, using a newly developed approach, a universal Schmidt decomposition which allows faithful quantification of the physical entanglement due to the identity of particles. We find that it is affected by single-particle measurement localization and state overlap. We study paradigmatic two-particle systems where identical qubits and qutrits are located in the same place or in separated places. For the case of two qutrits in the same place, we show that their entanglement behavior, whose physical interpretation is given, differs from that obtained before by different methods. Our results are generalizable to multiparticle systems and open the way for further developments in quantum information processing exploiting particle identity as a resource.

  18. Microbial community functional change during vertebrate carrion decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Pechal

    Full Text Available Microorganisms play a critical role in the decomposition of organic matter, which contributes to energy and nutrient transformation in every ecosystem. Yet, little is known about the functional activity of epinecrotic microbial communities associated with carrion. The objective of this study was to provide a description of the carrion associated microbial community functional activity using differential carbon source use throughout decomposition over seasons, between years and when microbial communities were isolated from eukaryotic colonizers (e.g., necrophagous insects. Additionally, microbial communities were identified at the phyletic level using high throughput sequencing during a single study. We hypothesized that carrion microbial community functional profiles would change over the duration of decomposition, and that this change would depend on season, year and presence of necrophagous insect colonization. Biolog EcoPlates™ were used to measure the variation in epinecrotic microbial community function by the differential use of 29 carbon sources throughout vertebrate carrion decomposition. Pyrosequencing was used to describe the bacterial community composition in one experiment to identify key phyla associated with community functional changes. Overall, microbial functional activity increased throughout decomposition in spring, summer and winter while it decreased in autumn. Additionally, microbial functional activity was higher in 2011 when necrophagous arthropod colonizer effects were tested. There were inconsistent trends in the microbial function of communities isolated from remains colonized by necrophagous insects between 2010 and 2011, suggesting a greater need for a mechanistic understanding of the process. These data indicate that functional analyses can be implemented in carrion studies and will be important in understanding the influence of microbial communities on an essential ecosystem process, carrion decomposition.

  19. Scoring of Decomposition: A Proposed Amendment to the Method When Using a Pig Model for Human Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, Natalie; Myburgh, Jolandie; Steyn, Maryna

    2017-07-01

    Decomposition studies often use pigs as proxies for human cadavers. However, differences in decomposition sequences/rates relative to humans have not been scientifically examined. Descriptions of five main decomposition stages (humans) were developed and refined by Galloway and later by Megyesi. However, whether these changes/processes are alike in pigs is unclear. Any differences can have significant effects when pig models are used for human PMI estimation. This study compared human decomposition models to the changes observed in pigs. Twenty pigs (50-90 kg) were decomposed over five months and decompositional features recorded. Total body scores (TBS) were calculated. Significant differences were observed during early decomposition between pigs and humans. An amended scoring system to be used in future studies was developed. Standards for PMI estimation derived from porcine models may not directly apply to humans and may need adjustment. Porcine models, however, remain valuable to study variables influencing decomposition. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Thermic decomposition of biphenyl; Decomposition thermique du biphenyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-03-01

    Liquid and vapour phase pyrolysis of very pure biphenyl obtained by methods described in the text was carried out at 400 C in sealed ampoules, the fraction transformed being always less than 0.1 per cent. The main products were hydrogen, benzene, terphenyls, and a deposit of polyphenyls strongly adhering to the walls. Small quantities of the lower aliphatic hydrocarbons were also found. The variation of the yields of these products with a) the pyrolysis time, b) the state (gas or liquid) of the biphenyl, and c) the pressure of the vapour was measured. Varying the area and nature of the walls showed that in the absence of a liquid phase, the pyrolytic decomposition takes place in the adsorbed layer, and that metallic walls promote the reaction more actively than do those of glass (pyrex or silica). A mechanism is proposed to explain the results pertaining to this decomposition in the adsorbed phase. The adsorption seems to obey a Langmuir isotherm, and the chemical act which determines the overall rate of decomposition is unimolecular. (author) [French] Du biphenyle tres pur, dont la purification est decrite, est pyrolyse a 400 C en phase vapeur et en phase liquide dans des ampoules scellees sous vide, a des taux de decomposition n'ayant jamais depasse 0,1 pour cent. Les produits provenant de la pyrolyse sont essentiellement: l' hydrogene, le benzene, les therphenyles, et un depot de polyphenyles adherant fortement aux parois. En plus il se forme de faibles quantites d'hydrocarbures aliphatiques gazeux. On indique la variation des rendements des differents produits avec la duree de pyrolyse, l'etat gazeux ou liquide du biphenyle, et la pression de la vapeur. Variant la superficie et la nature des parois, on montre qu'en absence de liquide la pyrolyse se fait en phase adsorbee. La pyrolyse est plus active au contact de parois metalliques que de celles de verres (pyrex ou silice). A partir des resultats experimentaux un mecanisme de degradation du biphenyle en phase

  1. Evaluating litter decomposition and soil organic matter dynamics in earth system models: contrasting analysis of long-term litter decomposition and steady-state soil carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.; Wieder, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    litterfall and model-derived climatic decomposition index. While comparison with the LIDET 10-year litterbag study reveals sharp contrasts between CLM4 and DAYCENT, simulations of steady-state soil carbon show less difference between models. Both CLM4 and DAYCENT significantly underestimate soil carbon. Sensitivity analyses highlight causes of the low soil carbon bias. The terrestrial biogeochemistry of earth system models must be critically tested with observations, and the consequences of particular model choices must be documented. Long-term litter decomposition experiments such as LIDET provide a real-world process-oriented benchmark to evaluate models and can critically inform model development. Analysis of steady-state soil carbon estimates reveal additional, but here different, inferences about model performance.

  2. Dolomite decomposition under CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerfa, F.; Bensouici, F.; Barama, S.E.; Harabi, A.; Achour, S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Dolomite (MgCa (CO 3 ) 2 is one of the most abundant mineral species on the surface of the planet, it occurs in sedimentary rocks. MgO, CaO and Doloma (Phase mixture of MgO and CaO, obtained from the mineral dolomite) based materials are attractive steel-making refractories because of their potential cost effectiveness and world wide abundance more recently, MgO is also used as protective layers in plasma screen manufacture ceel. The crystal structure of dolomite was determined as rhombohedral carbonates, they are layers of Mg +2 and layers of Ca +2 ions. It dissociates depending on the temperature variations according to the following reactions: MgCa (CO 3 ) 2 → MgO + CaO + 2CO 2 .....MgCa (CO 3 ) 2 → MgO + Ca + CaCO 3 + CO 2 .....This latter reaction may be considered as a first step for MgO production. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) are used to control dolomite decomposition and the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) was used to elucidate thermal decomposition of dolomite according to the reaction. That required samples were heated to specific temperature and holding times. The average particle size of used dolomite powders is 0.3 mm, as where, the heating temperature was 700 degree celsius, using various holding times (90 and 120 minutes). Under CO 2 dolomite decomposed directly to CaCO 3 accompanied by the formation of MgO, no evidence was offered for the MgO formation of either CaO or MgCO 3 , under air, simultaneous formation of CaCO 3 , CaO and accompanied dolomite decomposition

  3. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT...... adaptive Smolyak approach. The method is also used to approximate the solution of an elliptic PDE with random input data. The open source software and examples presented in this work are available online (http://pypi.python.org/pypi/TensorToolbox/)....

  4. Nanoscale decomposition of Nb-Ru-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Chen, Yen-Ting

    2016-11-01

    A correlative theoretical and experimental methodology has been employed to explore the decomposition of amorphous Nb-Ru-O at elevated temperatures. Density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations reveal that amorphous Nb-Ru-O is structurally modified within 10 ps at 800 K giving rise to an increase in the planar metal - oxygen and metal - metal population and hence formation of large clusters, which signifies atomic segregation. The driving force for this atomic segregation process is 0.5 eV/atom. This is validated by diffraction experiments and transmission electron microscopy of sputter-synthesized Nb-Ru-O thin films. Room temperature samples are amorphous, while at 800 K nanoscale rutile RuO2 grains, self-organized in an amorphous Nb-O matrix, are observed, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. This amorphous/crystalline interplay may be of importance for next generation of thermoelectric devices.

  5. Decomposition of argentiferous plumbojarosite in Ca O media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, F.; Arenas, A.; Rivera, I.; Cordoba, D.A.; Hernandez, L.; Salinas, E.

    1998-01-01

    The decomposition of argentiferous plumbojarosite in CaO media is studied to determine the rates dependences with respect to concentration, energetic request and particle size. The alkaline decomposition process of jarosite phase can be represented by: Pb .05 Fe 3 (SO 4 ) 2 (OH) 6 (s) + 4 (OH) - (aq) → 0.5 Pb (OH) 2 (s) + 3 Fe (OH) 3 (s) + 2 SO 4 2- (aq). The resultant solids of the decomposition formed by a gel of iron and lead hydroxides, are amorphous and do not evolve to crystalline phases of lead ferrite type in the studied conditions. The alkaline decomposition process in CaO media is of zero order with respect to the OH - concentration for [OH - ] > 10 -3 M, presenting an order of ≅ 0.5 at lower concentrations. The temperature effect indicates an activation energy of 45 KJ/mol, while the observed rates in different sizes of aggregate, as well as the whole-one are practically identical. These dependences are indicative of chemical control of the reaction because they are incompatible with a control by diffusion in ashes cape. (Author)

  6. Hydrothermal decomposition of liquid crystal in subcritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Xuning; He, Wenzhi; Li, Guangming; Huang, Juwen; Lu, Shangming; Hou, Lianjiao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal technology can effectively decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl. • The decomposition rate reached 97.6% under the optimized condition. • Octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl was mainly decomposed into simple and innocuous products. • The mechanism analysis reveals the decomposition reaction process. - Abstract: Treatment of liquid crystal has important significance for the environment protection and human health. This study proposed a hydrothermal process to decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl. Experiments were conducted with a 5.7 mL stainless tube reactor and heated by a salt-bath. Factors affecting the decomposition rate of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl were evaluated with HPLC. The decomposed liquid products were characterized by GC-MS. Under optimized conditions i.e., 0.2 mL H 2 O 2 supply, pH value 6, temperature 275 °C and reaction time 5 min, 97.6% of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl was decomposed into simple and environment-friendly products. Based on the mechanism analysis and products characterization, a possible hydrothermal decomposition pathway was proposed. The results indicate that hydrothermal technology is a promising choice for liquid crystal treatment

  7. High Performance Polar Decomposition on Distributed Memory Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal E.

    2016-08-08

    The polar decomposition of a dense matrix is an important operation in linear algebra. It can be directly calculated through the singular value decomposition (SVD) or iteratively using the QR dynamically-weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH). The former is difficult to parallelize due to the preponderant number of memory-bound operations during the bidiagonal reduction. We investigate the latter scenario, which performs more floating-point operations but exposes at the same time more parallelism, and therefore, runs closer to the theoretical peak performance of the system, thanks to more compute-bound matrix operations. Profiling results show the performance scalability of QDWH for calculating the polar decomposition using around 9200 MPI processes on well and ill-conditioned matrices of 100K×100K problem size. We study then the performance impact of the QDWH-based polar decomposition as a pre-processing step toward calculating the SVD itself. The new distributed-memory implementation of the QDWH-SVD solver achieves up to five-fold speedup against current state-of-the-art vendor SVD implementations. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016.

  8. Energetic contaminants inhibit plant litter decomposition in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Roman G; Checkai, Ronald T; Simini, Michael; Sunahara, Geoffrey I; Hawari, Jalal

    2018-05-30

    Individual effects of nitrogen-based energetic materials (EMs) 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-ADNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT), nitroglycerin (NG), and 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) on litter decomposition, an essential biologically-mediated soil process, were assessed using Orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata) straw in Sassafras sandy loam (SSL) soil, which has physicochemical characteristics that support "very high" qualitative relative bioavailability for organic chemicals. Batches of SSL soil were separately amended with individual EMs or acetone carrier control. To quantify the decomposition rates, one straw cluster was harvested from a set of randomly selected replicate containers from within each treatment, after 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 months of exposure. Results showed that soil amended with 2,4-DNT or NG inhibited litter decomposition rates based on the median effective concentration (EC50) values of 1122 mg/kg and 860 mg/kg, respectively. Exposure to 2-ADNT, 4-ADNT or CL-20 amended soil did not significantly affect litter decomposition in SSL soil at ≥ 10,000 mg/kg. These ecotoxicological data will be helpful in identifying concentrations of EMs in soil that present an acceptable ecological risk for biologically-mediated soil processes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Decomposition of Multi-player Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dengji; Schiffel, Stephan; Thielscher, Michael

    Research in General Game Playing aims at building systems that learn to play unknown games without human intervention. We contribute to this endeavour by generalising the established technique of decomposition from AI Planning to multi-player games. To this end, we present a method for the automatic decomposition of previously unknown games into independent subgames, and we show how a general game player can exploit a successful decomposition for game tree search.

  10. Constructive quantum Shannon decomposition from Cartan involutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, Byron; Love, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The work presented here extends upon the best known universal quantum circuit, the quantum Shannon decomposition proposed by Shende et al (2006 IEEE Trans. Comput.-Aided Des. Integr. Circuits Syst. 25 1000). We obtain the basis of the circuit's design in a pair of Cartan decompositions. This insight gives a simple constructive factoring algorithm in terms of the Cartan involutions corresponding to these decompositions

  11. Constructive quantum Shannon decomposition from Cartan involutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, Byron; Love, Peter [Department of Physics, 370 Lancaster Ave., Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States)], E-mail: plove@haverford.edu

    2008-10-03

    The work presented here extends upon the best known universal quantum circuit, the quantum Shannon decomposition proposed by Shende et al (2006 IEEE Trans. Comput.-Aided Des. Integr. Circuits Syst. 25 1000). We obtain the basis of the circuit's design in a pair of Cartan decompositions. This insight gives a simple constructive factoring algorithm in terms of the Cartan involutions corresponding to these decompositions.

  12. Challenges of including nitrogen effects on decomposition in earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the importance of litter decomposition for ecosystem fertility and carbon balance, key uncertainties remain about how this fundamental process is affected by nitrogen (N) availability. Nevertheless, resolving such uncertainties is critical for mechanistic inclusion of such processes in earth system models, towards predicting the ecosystem consequences of increased anthropogenic reactive N. Towards that end, we have conducted a series of experiments examining nitrogen effects on litter decomposition. We found that both substrate N and externally supplied N (regardless of form) accelerated the initial decomposition rate. Faster initial decomposition rates were linked to the higher activity of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes associated with externally supplied N and the greater relative abundances of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria associated with green leaves and externally supplied organic N (assessed using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA). By contrast, later in decomposition, externally supplied N slowed decomposition, increasing the fraction of slowly decomposing litter and reducing lignin-degrading enzyme activity and relative abundances of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Our results suggest that elevated atmospheric N deposition may have contrasting effects on the dynamics of different soil carbon pools, decreasing mean residence times of active fractions comprising very fresh litter, while increasing those of more slowly decomposing fractions including more processed litter. Incorporating these contrasting effects of N on decomposition processes into models is complicated by lingering uncertainties about how these effects generalize across ecosystems and substrates.

  13. Decomposition of Diethylstilboestrol in Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers-Hansen, Birte

    1964-01-01

    The rate of decomposition of DES-monoethyl-1-C14 in soil was followed by measurement of C14O2 released. From 1.6 to 16% of the added C14 was recovered as C14O2 during 3 months. After six months as much as 12 to 28 per cent was released as C14O2.Determination of C14 in the soil samples after the e...... not inhibit the CO2 production from the soil.Experiments with γ-sterilized soil indicated that enzymes present in the soil are able to attack DES.......The rate of decomposition of DES-monoethyl-1-C14 in soil was followed by measurement of C14O2 released. From 1.6 to 16% of the added C14 was recovered as C14O2 during 3 months. After six months as much as 12 to 28 per cent was released as C14O2.Determination of C14 in the soil samples after...

  14. Basic dye decomposition kinetics in a photocatalytic slurry reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.-H.; Chang, H.-W.; Chern, J.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Wastewater effluent from textile plants using various dyes is one of the major water pollutants to the environment. Traditional chemical, physical and biological processes for treating textile dye wastewaters have disadvantages such as high cost, energy waste and generating secondary pollution during the treatment process. The photocatalytic process using TiO 2 semiconductor particles under UV light illumination has been shown to be potentially advantageous and applicable in the treatment of wastewater pollutants. In this study, the dye decomposition kinetics by nano-size TiO 2 suspension at natural solution pH was experimentally studied by varying the agitation speed (50-200 rpm), TiO 2 suspension concentration (0.25-1.71 g/L), initial dye concentration (10-50 ppm), temperature (10-50 deg. C), and UV power intensity (0-96 W). The experimental results show the agitation speed, varying from 50 to 200 rpm, has a slight influence on the dye decomposition rate and the pH history; the dye decomposition rate increases with the TiO 2 suspension concentration up to 0.98 g/L, then decrease with increasing TiO 2 suspension concentration; the initial dye decomposition rate increases with the initial dye concentration up to a certain value depending upon the temperature, then decreases with increasing initial dye concentration; the dye decomposition rate increases with the UV power intensity up to 64 W to reach a plateau. Kinetic models have been developed to fit the experimental kinetic data well

  15. Alkaloids May Not be Responsible for Endophyte Associated Reductions in Tall Fescue Decomposition Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Fungal endophyte - grass symbioses can have dramatic ecological effects, altering individual plant physiology, plant and animal community structure and function, and ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. 2. Within the tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus) - funga...

  16. Litter Decomposition Rate of Avicennia marina and Rhizophora apiculata in Pulau Dua Nature Reserve, Banten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriana Siska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Litter decomposition rate is useful method to determine forest fertility level. The aims of this study were to measure decomposition rate, and analyze the nutrient content released organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphor from Avicennia marina and Rhizophora apiculata litters during the decomposition process. The research was conducted in the Pulau Dua Nature Reserve, Serang-Banten on A. marina and R. apiculata forest communities. Litter decomposition rate measurements performed in the field. Litter that has been obtained with the trap system is inserted into litter bag and than tied to the roots or trees to avoid drifting sea water. Litter decomposition rate was measured every 15 days and is accompanied by analysis of the content of organic C , total N and P. Our research results showed decomposition rate of A. marina (k= 0.83 was higher than that of R. apiculata (k= 0.41. Differences of  leaf anatomical structure and sea water salinity  influenced to the rate of litter decomposition. Organic C released was declined with longer of litter decomposition, on the contrary of releasing N and P nutrients.

  17. Mechanism and kinetics of thermal decomposition of ammoniacal complex of copper oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, R.

    2003-01-01

    A complex precursor has been synthesized by dissolving copper oxalate in liquor ammonia followed by drying. The thermal decomposition of the precursor has been studied in different atmospheres, air/nitrogen. The mechanism of decomposition of the precursor in air is not as simple one as in nitrogen. In nitrogen, it involves endothermic deammoniation followed by decomposition to finely divided elemental particles of copper. Whereas in air, decomposition and simultaneous oxidation of the residual products (oxidative decomposition), make the process complex and relatively bigger particle of cupric oxide are obtained as final product. The products of decomposition in different atmospheres have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis. The stoichiometric formula, Cu(NH 3 ) 2 C 2 O 4 of the precursor is established from elemental analysis and TG measurements, and it is designated as copper amino oxalate (CAO). In nitrogen atmosphere, the deammoniation and decomposition have been found to be zero and first order, respectively. The values of activation energy have been found to be 102.52 and 95.38 kJ/mol for deammoniation and decomposition, respectively

  18. Characteristic of root decomposition in a tropical rainforest in Sarawak, Malaysi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Mizue; Makita, Naoki; Katayam, Ayumi; Kume, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Khoon Kho, L.

    2016-04-01

    Woody roots play a significant role in forest carbon cycling, as up to 60 percent of tree photosynthetic production can be allocated to belowground. Root decay is one of the main processes of soil C dynamics and potentially relates to soil C sequestration. However, much less attention has been paid for root litter decomposition compared to the studies of leaf litter because roots are hidden from view. Previous studies have revealed that physico-chemical quality of roots, climate, and soil organisms affect root decomposition significantly. However, patterns and mechanisms of root decomposition are still poorly understood because of the high variability of root properties, field environment and potential decomposers. For example, root size would be a factor controlling decomposition rates, but general understanding of the difference between coarse and fine root decompositions is still lacking. Also, it is known that root decomposition is performed by soil animals, fungi and bacteria, but their relative importance is poorly understood. In this study, therefore, we aimed to characterize the root decomposition in a tropical rainforest in Sarawak, Malaysia, and clarify the impact of soil living organisms and root sizes on root litter decomposition. We buried soil cores with fine and coarse root litter bags in soil in Lambir Hills National Park. Three different types of soil cores that are covered by 1.5 cm plastic mesh, root-impermeable sheet (50um) and fungi-impermeable sheet (1um) were prepared. The soil cores were buried in February 2013 and collected 4 times, 134 days, 226 days, 786 days and 1151 days after the installation. We found that nearly 80 percent of the coarse root litter was decomposed after two years, whereas only 60 percent of the fine root litter was decomposed. Our results also showed significantly different ratio of decomposition between different cores, suggesting the different contribution of soil living organisms to decomposition process.

  19. Generative Temporal Modelling of Neuroimaging - Decomposition and Nonparametric Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Ditte Høvenhoff

    The goal of this thesis is to explore two improvements for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis; namely our proposed decomposition method and an extension to the non-parametric testing framework. Analysis of fMRI allows researchers to investigate the functional processes...... of the brain, and provides insight into neuronal coupling during mental processes or tasks. The decomposition method is a Gaussian process-based independent components analysis (GPICA), which incorporates a temporal dependency in the sources. A hierarchical model specification is used, featuring both...... instantaneous and convolutive mixing, and the inferred temporal patterns. Spatial maps are seen to capture smooth and localized stimuli-related components, and often identifiable noise components. The implementation is freely available as a GUI/SPM plugin, and we recommend using GPICA as an additional tool when...

  20. A novel method for EMG decomposition based on matched filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Luiz Dias Siqueira Júnior

    Full Text Available Introduction Decomposition of electromyography (EMG signals into the constituent motor unit action potentials (MUAPs can allow for deeper insights into the underlying processes associated with the neuromuscular system. The vast majority of the methods for EMG decomposition found in the literature depend on complex algorithms and specific instrumentation. As an attempt to contribute to solving these issues, we propose a method based on a bank of matched filters for the decomposition of EMG signals. Methods Four main units comprise our method: a bank of matched filters, a peak detector, a motor unit classifier and an overlapping resolution module. The system’s performance was evaluated with simulated and real EMG data. Classification accuracy was measured by comparing the responses of the system with known data from the simulator and with the annotations of a human expert. Results The results show that decomposition of non-overlapping MUAPs can be achieved with up to 99% accuracy for signals with up to 10 active motor units and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of 10 dB. For overlapping MUAPs with up to 10 motor units per signal and a SNR of 20 dB, the technique allows for correct classification of approximately 71% of the MUAPs. The method is capable of processing, decomposing and classifying a 50 ms window of data in less than 5 ms using a standard desktop computer. Conclusion This article contributes to the ongoing research on EMG decomposition by describing a novel technique capable of delivering high rates of success by means of a fast algorithm, suggesting its possible use in future real-time embedded applications, such as myoelectric prostheses control and biofeedback systems.

  1. 1.6. The kinetics of hydrochloric acid decomposition of argillite of Chashma-Sang Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Mirzoev, D.Kh.; Boboev, Kh.E.

    2016-01-01

    Present article of book is devoted to kinetics of hydrochloric acid decomposition of argillite of Chashma-Sang Deposit. It was defined that with temperature increasing the extraction rate of Al_2O_3 and Fe_2O_3 increases. The dependence of extraction rate of Al_2O_3 and Fe_2O_3 on process duration at hydrochloric acid decomposition of argillite was studied. The activation energy of the process was defined.

  2. A Decomposition-Based Pricing Method for Solving a Large-Scale MILP Model for an Integrated Fishery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Babul Hasan

    2007-01-01

    The IFP can be decomposed into a trawler-scheduling subproblem and a fish-processing subproblem in two different ways by relaxing different sets of constraints. We tried conventional decomposition techniques including subgradient optimization and Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition, both of which were unacceptably slow. We then developed a decomposition-based pricing method for solving the large fishery model, which gives excellent computation times. Numerical results for several planning horizon models are presented.

  3. Advances in hydrogen production by thermochemical water decomposition: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen demand as an energy currency is anticipated to rise significantly in the future, with the emergence of a hydrogen economy. Hydrogen production is a key component of a hydrogen economy. Several production processes are commercially available, while others are under development including thermochemical water decomposition, which has numerous advantages over other hydrogen production processes. Recent advances in hydrogen production by thermochemical water decomposition are reviewed here. Hydrogen production from non-fossil energy sources such as nuclear and solar is emphasized, as are efforts to lower the temperatures required in thermochemical cycles so as to expand the range of potential heat supplies. Limiting efficiencies are explained and the need to apply exergy analysis is illustrated. The copper-chlorine thermochemical cycle is considered as a case study. It is concluded that developments of improved processes for hydrogen production via thermochemical water decomposition are likely to continue, thermochemical hydrogen production using such non-fossil energy will likely become commercial, and improved efficiencies are expected to be obtained with advanced methodologies like exergy analysis. Although numerous advances have been made on sulphur-iodine cycles, the copper-chlorine cycle has significant potential due to its requirement for process heat at lower temperatures than most other thermochemical processes.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms in the shock induced decomposition of FOX-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ankit; Tiwari, Subodh C.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv; CACS Team

    Experimental and first principle computational studies on FOX 7 have either involved a very small system consisting of a few atoms or they did not take into account the decomposition mechanisms under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. We have performed a large-scale reactive MD simulation using ReaxFF-lg force field to study the shock decomposition of FOX 7. The chemical composition of the principal decomposition products correlates well with experimental observations. Furthermore, we observed that the production of N2 and H2O was inter molecular in nature and was through different chemical pathways. Moreover, the production of CO and CO2 was delayed due to production of large stable C,O atoms cluster. These critical insights into the initial processes involved in the shock induced decomposition of FOX-7 will greatly help in understanding the factors playing an important role in the insensitiveness of this high energy material. This research is supported by AFOSR Award No. FA9550-16-1-0042.

  5. Evaluation of Polarimetric SAR Decomposition for Classifying Wetland Vegetation Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Hoon Hong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Florida Everglades is the largest subtropical wetland system in the United States and, as with subtropical and tropical wetlands elsewhere, has been threatened by severe environmental stresses. It is very important to monitor such wetlands to inform management on the status of these fragile ecosystems. This study aims to examine the applicability of TerraSAR-X quadruple polarimetric (quad-pol synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR data for classifying wetland vegetation in the Everglades. We processed quad-pol data using the Hong & Wdowinski four-component decomposition, which accounts for double bounce scattering in the cross-polarization signal. The calculated decomposition images consist of four scattering mechanisms (single, co- and cross-pol double, and volume scattering. We applied an object-oriented image analysis approach to classify vegetation types with the decomposition results. We also used a high-resolution multispectral optical RapidEye image to compare statistics and classification results with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR observations. The calculated classification accuracy was higher than 85%, suggesting that the TerraSAR-X quad-pol SAR signal had a high potential for distinguishing different vegetation types. Scattering components from SAR acquisition were particularly advantageous for classifying mangroves along tidal channels. We conclude that the typical scattering behaviors from model-based decomposition are useful for discriminating among different wetland vegetation types.

  6. Kinetics of the thermal decomposition of nickel iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hayato; Shimizu, Saburo; Onuki, Kaoru; Ikezoe, Yasumasa; Sato, Shoichi

    1984-01-01

    Thermal decomposition kinetics of NiI 2 under constant I 2 partial pressure was studied by thermogravimetry. The reaction is considered as a reaction step of the thermochemical hydrogen production process in the Ni-I-S system. At temperatures from 775K to 869K and under I 2 pressures from 0 to 960Pa, the decomposition started at the NiI 2 pellet surface and the reactant-product interface moved interior at a constant rate until the decomposed fraction, α, reached 0.6. The overall reaction rate at a constant temperature can be expressed as the difference of the constant decomposition (forward) rate, which is proportional to the equilibrium dissociation pressure of NiI 2 , and the iodide formation (backward) rate, which is proportional to the I 2 pressure. The apparent activation energy of the decomposition was 147 kJ.mol -1 , which is very close to the heat of reaction, 152 kJ.mol -1 calculated from the equilibrium dissociation pressure. The electron microscopic observations, revealed that the reaction product obtained by decomposing NiI 2 under pure He atomosphere was composed of relatively well grown cubic Ni crystals. Whereas, the decomposed product obtained under I 2 -He mixture was composed of larger but disordered crystals. (author)

  7. An optimization approach for fitting canonical tensor decompositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlavy, Daniel M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2009-02-01

    Tensor decompositions are higher-order analogues of matrix decompositions and have proven to be powerful tools for data analysis. In particular, we are interested in the canonical tensor decomposition, otherwise known as the CANDECOMP/PARAFAC decomposition (CPD), which expresses a tensor as the sum of component rank-one tensors and is used in a multitude of applications such as chemometrics, signal processing, neuroscience, and web analysis. The task of computing the CPD, however, can be difficult. The typical approach is based on alternating least squares (ALS) optimization, which can be remarkably fast but is not very accurate. Previously, nonlinear least squares (NLS) methods have also been recommended; existing NLS methods are accurate but slow. In this paper, we propose the use of gradient-based optimization methods. We discuss the mathematical calculation of the derivatives and further show that they can be computed efficiently, at the same cost as one iteration of ALS. Computational experiments demonstrate that the gradient-based optimization methods are much more accurate than ALS and orders of magnitude faster than NLS.

  8. Spinodal decomposition in fluid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Kyozi; Koga, Tsuyoshi

    1993-01-01

    We study the late stage dynamics of spinodal decomposition in binary fluids by the computer simulation of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation. We obtain a temporary linear growth law of the characteristic length of domains in the late stage. This growth law has been observed in many real experiments of binary fluids and indicates that the domain growth proceeds by the flow caused by the surface tension of interfaces. We also find that the dynamical scaling law is satisfied in this hydrodynamic domain growth region. By comparing the scaling functions for fluids with that for the case without hydrodynamic effects, we find that the scaling functions for the two systems are different. (author)

  9. Nutrient Dynamics and Litter Decomposition in Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrient contents and rate of litter decomposition were investigated in Leucaena leucocephala plantation in the University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria. Litter bag technique was used to study the pattern and rate of litter decomposition and nutrient release of Leucaena leucocephala. Fifty grams of oven-dried ...

  10. Climate history shapes contemporary leaf litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Strickland; Ashley D. Keiser; Mark A. Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is mediated by multiple variables, of which climate is expected to be a dominant factor at global scales. However, like other organisms, traits of decomposers and their communities are shaped not just by the contemporary climate but also their climate history. Whether or not this affects decomposition rates is underexplored. Here we source...

  11. The decomposition of estuarine macrophytes under different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the decomposition characteristics of the most dominant submerged macrophyte and macroalgal species in the Great Brak Estuary. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of different temperature regimes on the rate of decomposition of 3 macrophyte species ...

  12. Decomposition and flame structure of hydrazinium nitroformate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwers, J.; Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D.

    1999-01-01

    The decomposition of hydrazinium nitroformate (HNF) was studied in a hot quartz cell and by dropping small amounts of HNF on a hot plate. The species formed during the decomposition were identified by ultraviolet-visible absorption experiments. These experiments reveal that first HONO is formed. The

  13. Multilevel index decomposition analysis: Approaches and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Y.; Ang, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing interest in using the technique of index decomposition analysis (IDA) in energy and energy-related emission studies, such as to analyze the impacts of activity structure change or to track economy-wide energy efficiency trends, the conventional single-level IDA may not be able to meet certain needs in policy analysis. In this paper, some limitations of single-level IDA studies which can be addressed through applying multilevel decomposition analysis are discussed. We then introduce and compare two multilevel decomposition procedures, which are referred to as the multilevel-parallel (M-P) model and the multilevel-hierarchical (M-H) model. The former uses a similar decomposition procedure as in the single-level IDA, while the latter uses a stepwise decomposition procedure. Since the stepwise decomposition procedure is new in the IDA literature, the applicability of the popular IDA methods in the M-H model is discussed and cases where modifications are needed are explained. Numerical examples and application studies using the energy consumption data of the US and China are presented. - Highlights: • We discuss the limitations of single-level decomposition in IDA applied to energy study. • We introduce two multilevel decomposition models, study their features and discuss how they can address the limitations. • To extend from single-level to multilevel analysis, necessary modifications to some popular IDA methods are discussed. • We further discuss the practical significance of the multilevel models and present examples and cases to illustrate

  14. In situ study of glasses decomposition layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarembowitch-Deruelle, O.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the involved mechanisms during the decomposition of glasses by water and the consequences on the morphology of the decomposition layer, in particular in the case of a nuclear glass: the R 7 T 7 . The chemical composition of this glass being very complicated, it is difficult to know the influence of the different elements on the decomposition kinetics and on the resulting morphology because several atoms have a same behaviour. Glasses with simplified composition (only 5 elements) have then been synthesized. The morphological and structural characteristics of these glasses have been given. They have then been decomposed by water. The leaching curves do not reflect the decomposition kinetics but the solubility of the different elements at every moment. The three steps of the leaching are: 1) de-alkalinization 2) lattice rearrangement 3) heavy elements solubilization. Two decomposition layer types have also been revealed according to the glass heavy elements rate. (O.M.)

  15. Multilinear operators for higher-order decompositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-04-01

    We propose two new multilinear operators for expressing the matrix compositions that are needed in the Tucker and PARAFAC (CANDECOMP) decompositions. The first operator, which we call the Tucker operator, is shorthand for performing an n-mode matrix multiplication for every mode of a given tensor and can be employed to concisely express the Tucker decomposition. The second operator, which we call the Kruskal operator, is shorthand for the sum of the outer-products of the columns of N matrices and allows a divorce from a matricized representation and a very concise expression of the PARAFAC decomposition. We explore the properties of the Tucker and Kruskal operators independently of the related decompositions. Additionally, we provide a review of the matrix and tensor operations that are frequently used in the context of tensor decompositions.

  16. Management intensity alters decomposition via biological pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickings, Kyle; Grandy, A. Stuart; Reed, Sasha; Cleveland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Current conceptual models predict that changes in plant litter chemistry during decomposition are primarily regulated by both initial litter chemistry and the stage-or extent-of mass loss. Far less is known about how variations in decomposer community structure (e.g., resulting from different ecosystem management types) could influence litter chemistry during decomposition. Given the recent agricultural intensification occurring globally and the importance of litter chemistry in regulating soil organic matter storage, our objectives were to determine the potential effects of agricultural management on plant litter chemistry and decomposition rates, and to investigate possible links between ecosystem management, litter chemistry and decomposition, and decomposer community composition and activity. We measured decomposition rates, changes in litter chemistry, extracellular enzyme activity, microarthropod communities, and bacterial versus fungal relative abundance in replicated conventional-till, no-till, and old field agricultural sites for both corn and grass litter. After one growing season, litter decomposition under conventional-till was 20% greater than in old field communities. However, decomposition rates in no-till were not significantly different from those in old field or conventional-till sites. After decomposition, grass residue in both conventional- and no-till systems was enriched in total polysaccharides relative to initial litter, while grass litter decomposed in old fields was enriched in nitrogen-bearing compounds and lipids. These differences corresponded with differences in decomposer communities, which also exhibited strong responses to both litter and management type. Overall, our results indicate that agricultural intensification can increase litter decomposition rates, alter decomposer communities, and influence litter chemistry in ways that could have important and long-term effects on soil organic matter dynamics. We suggest that future

  17. Direct observation of thermal disorder and decomposition of black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Heejin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical research has been devoted to reveal the properties of black phosphorus as a two-dimensional nanomaterial, but little attention has been paid for the experimental characterization. In this study, the thermal disorder and decomposition of black phosphorus were examined using in situ heating transmission electron microscopy experiments. We observed that the breaking of crystallographic symmetry begins at 380 °C under vacuum condition, followed by the phosphorus evaporates after long-term heating at 400 °C. This decomposition process can be initiated by the surficial vacancy and proceeds toward both interlayer ([010]) and intralayer ([001]) directions. The results on the thermal behavior of black phosphorus provide useful guidance for thin film deposition and fabrication processes with black phosphorus.

  18. Cellulose and cutisin decomposition in soil of Alopecuretum meadow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hrevušová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant litter decomposition is a fundamental process to ecosystem functioning regulated by both abiotic and biotic factors. The aim of this study was to determine the decomposition of cellulose and protein (cutisin substrates on permanent Alopecuretum meadow under different methods of management. The treatments were following: 2 × cut, 2 × cut + NPK, 2 × mulch, 1 × cut, 1 × mulch (frequency of mowing per year and no-treated plots. Cutting or mulching was carried out in October, under the 2 × cut management also in May. In 2007–2009, cellulose and cutisin in mesh bags were placed in the soil and kept from April to October. Total mean ratios of decomposed cellulose and cutisin were 83 % and 40 % of primal substrate weight, respectively. The cellulose decomposition was affected by weather conditions, but not by applied management. The highest mean ratio of decomposed cellulose was found in 2009 (with increased amount of precipitation in May and July, the lowest in 2007. Coefficients of variation within a year and over the years were up to 22 % and 20 %, respectively. The cutisin decomposition was significantly affected by applied management in all three years. Higher rates of decomposition were noted in two times mowed treatments compared to one or not mowed treatments. Significant differences were found between years in 2× cut and 2 × cut + NPK treatments. Coefficients of variation within the year and over the years were both higher by cutisin than by cellulose samples (up to 50 and 42 %, respectively.

  19. Interacting effects of insects and flooding on wood decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Ulyshen

    Full Text Available Saproxylic arthropods are thought to play an important role in wood decomposition but very few efforts have been made to quantify their contributions to the process and the factors controlling their activities are not well understood. In the current study, mesh exclusion bags were used to quantify how arthropods affect loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. decomposition rates in both seasonally flooded and unflooded forests over a 31-month period in the southeastern United States. Wood specific gravity (based on initial wood volume was significantly lower in bolts placed in unflooded forests and for those unprotected from insects. Approximately 20.5% and 13.7% of specific gravity loss after 31 months was attributable to insect activity in flooded and unflooded forests, respectively. Importantly, minimal between-treatment differences in water content and the results from a novel test carried out separately suggest the mesh bags had no significant impact on wood mass loss beyond the exclusion of insects. Subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae: Reticulitermes spp. were 5-6 times more active below-ground in unflooded forests compared to flooded forests based on wooden monitoring stakes. They were also slightly more active above-ground in unflooded forests but these differences were not statistically significant. Similarly, seasonal flooding had no detectable effect on above-ground beetle (Coleoptera richness or abundance. Although seasonal flooding strongly reduced Reticulitermes activity below-ground, it can be concluded from an insignificant interaction between forest type and exclusion treatment that reduced above-ground decomposition rates in seasonally flooded forests were due largely to suppressed microbial activity at those locations. The findings from this study indicate that southeastern U.S. arthropod communities accelerate above-ground wood decomposition significantly and to a similar extent in both flooded and unflooded forests

  20. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, R.M.; Sims, H.E.; Taylor, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or ‘finishing’ processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO_2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles. - Highlights: • Critical review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions. • New analysis of relationship between SSA and calcination temperature. • New SEM

  1. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, R.M.; Sims, H.E.; Taylor, R.J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk

    2015-10-15

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or ‘finishing’ processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO{sub 2} product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles. - Highlights: • Critical review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions. • New analysis of relationship between SSA and calcination temperature.

  2. Biological decomposition of aqueous solutions from soil cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniebusch, M.M.; Sekoulov, I.

    1993-01-01

    The biological cleaning of process water from soil cleaning and from contaminated groundwater required the development of new types of reaction systems. With the introduced membrane biofilm reactor, even substances difficult to decompose can be removed from contaminated water. Previous investigations of the elimination of pyrene in the presence of n-hexadecane show an optimum temperature at 30 C. An increase of scale is possible based on the invesstigations carried out on the aerobic biological decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (orig.) [de

  3. A stochastic model for an urea decomposition system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VSS Yadavalli

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Availability is an important measure in describing the performance of a system. The availability of a decomposition process in an urea production system in the fertilizer industry is considered in this paper. The system contains four subsystems and is supported by a standby unit. An estimation study of the steady state availability of the system is performed and illustrated by means of a numerical example.

  4. Synthesis, thermal decomposition and sensitivity study of CsDNBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaozong; Zhang, Tonglai; Yang, Li; Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Yuanhua [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2007-02-15

    CsDNBF (cesium 7-hydroxy-4,6-dinitro-5,7-dihydrobenzofuroxanide) was synthesized from the sodium salt of DNBF and cesium nitrate. The thermal decomposition process has been investigated and the results show that the solid residues at 240 C are RCOOCs, CsNCO, RNO{sub 2} and CsNO{sub 3}. The sensitivity results demonstrate that CsDNBF has better properties than KDNBF, which has been widely used. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Player Skill Decomposition in Multiplayer Online Battle Arenas

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhengxing; Sun, Yizhou; El-nasr, Magy Seif; Nguyen, Truong-Huy D.

    2017-01-01

    Successful analysis of player skills in video games has important impacts on the process of enhancing player experience without undermining their continuous skill development. Moreover, player skill analysis becomes more intriguing in team-based video games because such form of study can help discover useful factors in effective team formation. In this paper, we consider the problem of skill decomposition in MOBA (MultiPlayer Online Battle Arena) games, with the goal to understand what player...

  6. Subspace-Based Noise Reduction for Speech Signals via Diagonal and Triangular Matrix Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    We survey the definitions and use of rank-revealing matrix decompositions in single-channel noise reduction algorithms for speech signals. Our algorithms are based on the rank-reduction paradigm and, in particular, signal subspace techniques. The focus is on practical working algorithms, using both...... diagonal (eigenvalue and singular value) decompositions and rank-revealing triangular decompositions (ULV, URV, VSV, ULLV and ULLIV). In addition we show how the subspace-based algorithms can be evaluated and compared by means of simple FIR filter interpretations. The algorithms are illustrated...... with working Matlab code and applications in speech processing....

  7. Preliminary assessment of the possibility of supporting the decomposition of biodegradable packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niekraś Lidia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a preliminary evaluation of the possibility of using grass biomass from a sports field as a compost ingredient which positively affects the degree of decomposition of the biodegradable wrappings. For 5 months the biodegradable bags were stored, both empty and filled with organic waste in the heap of grass clippings. After that period, fragments of the bags were observed under the microscope and then assessed the state of their decomposition. The results indicate that the biomass used favourably affected the process of bag degradation, however the speed of decomposition of the empty bags was quicker than the bags filled with the organic waste.

  8. Energy index decomposition methodology at the plant level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumphai, Wisit

    Scope and method of study. The dissertation explores the use of a high level energy intensity index as a facility-level energy performance monitoring indicator with a goal of developing a methodology for an economically based energy performance monitoring system that incorporates production information. The performance measure closely monitors energy usage, production quantity, and product mix and determines the production efficiency as a part of an ongoing process that would enable facility managers to keep track of and, in the future, be able to predict when to perform a recommissioning process. The study focuses on the use of the index decomposition methodology and explored several high level (industry, sector, and country levels) energy utilization indexes, namely, Additive Log Mean Divisia, Multiplicative Log Mean Divisia, and Additive Refined Laspeyres. One level of index decomposition is performed. The indexes are decomposed into Intensity and Product mix effects. These indexes are tested on a flow shop brick manufacturing plant model in three different climates in the United States. The indexes obtained are analyzed by fitting an ARIMA model and testing for dependency between the two decomposed indexes. Findings and conclusions. The results concluded that the Additive Refined Laspeyres index decomposition methodology is suitable to use on a flow shop, non air conditioned production environment as an energy performance monitoring indicator. It is likely that this research can be further expanded in to predicting when to perform a recommissioning process.

  9. LMDI decomposition approach: A guide for implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    Since it was first used by researchers to analyze industrial electricity consumption in the early 1980s, index decomposition analysis (IDA) has been widely adopted in energy and emission studies. Lately its use as the analytical component of accounting frameworks for tracking economy-wide energy efficiency trends has attracted considerable attention and interest among policy makers. The last comprehensive literature review of IDA was reported in 2000 which is some years back. After giving an update and presenting the key trends in the last 15 years, this study focuses on the implementation issues of the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) decomposition methods in view of their dominance in IDA in recent years. Eight LMDI models are presented and their origin, decomposition formulae, and strengths and weaknesses are summarized. Guidelines on the choice among these models are provided to assist users in implementation. - Highlights: • Guidelines for implementing LMDI decomposition approach are provided. • Eight LMDI decomposition models are summarized and compared. • The development of the LMDI decomposition approach is presented. • The latest developments of index decomposition analysis are briefly reviewed.

  10. Thermal decomposition of gaseous ammonium nitrate at low pressure: kinetic modeling of product formation and heterogeneous decomposition of nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Lin, M C

    2009-12-03

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH(4)NO(3) (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH(4)NO(3) at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH(3) and HNO(3), followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO(3), HNO(3) + M --> OH + NO(2) + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, and NH(3), which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH(3)-NO(2) (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO(3) itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO(3) in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO(3), HNO(3) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)) --> OH + NO(2) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH(3) and H(2)O; the rate could be represented by k(2b) = 7.91 x 10(7) exp(-12 600/T) s(-1), which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO(3) decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  11. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  12. Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

    A process is described for the production of hydrogen from water by a sulfuric acid process employing electrolysis and thermo-chemical decomposition. The water containing SO/sub 2/ is electrolyzed to produce H/sub 2/ at the cathode and to oxidize the SO/sub 2/ to form H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at the anode. After the H/sub 2/ has been separated, a compound of the type M/sub r/X/sub s/ is added to produce a water insoluble sulfate of M and a water insoluble oxide of the metal in the radical X. In the compound M/sub r/X/sub s/, M is at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Ba/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Sr/sup 2 +/, La/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; X is at least one radical selected from the group consisting of molybdate (MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), tungstate (WO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and metaborate (BO/sub 2//sup 1 -/); and r and s are either 1, 2, or 3 depending upon the valence of M and X. The precipitated mixture is filtered and heated to a temperature sufficiently high to form SO/sub 3/ gas and to reform M/sub r/X/sub s/. The SO/sub 3/ is dissolved in a small amount of H/sub 2/O to produce concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the M/sub r/X/sub s/ is recycled to the process. Alternatively, the SO/sub 3/ gas can be recycled to the beginning of the process to provide a continuous process for the production of H/sub 2/ in which only water need be added in a substantial amount. (BLM)

  13. Microbial biomass and soil fauna during the decomposition of cover crops in no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Colpo Gatiboni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The decomposition of plant residues is a biological process mediated by soil fauna, but few studies have been done evaluating its dynamics in time during the process of disappearance of straw. This study was carried out in Chapecó, in southern Brazil, with the objective of monitoring modifications in soil fauna populations and the C content in the soil microbial biomass (C SMB during the decomposition of winter cover crop residues in a no-till system. The following treatments were tested: 1 Black oat straw (Avena strigosa Schreb.; 2 Rye straw (Secale cereale L.; 3 Common vetch straw (Vicia sativa L.. The cover crops were grown until full flowering and then cut mechanically with a rolling stalk chopper. The soil fauna and C content in soil microbial biomass (C SMB were assessed during the period of straw decomposition, from October 2006 to February 2007. To evaluate C SMB by the irradiation-extraction method, soil samples from the 0-10 cm layer were used, collected on eight dates, from before until 100 days after residue chopping. The soil fauna was collected with pitfall traps on seven dates up to 85 days after residue chopping. The phytomass decomposition of common vetch was faster than of black oat and rye residues. The C SMB decreased during the process of straw decomposition, fastest in the treatment with common vetch. In the common vetch treatment, the diversity of the soil fauna was reduced at the end of the decomposition process.

  14. Analysis of sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle for solar hydrogen production. Part 1: decomposition of sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Central Florida Univ., Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2005-05-01

    The sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle is one of the most studied cycles for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production. S-I cycle consists of four sections: (I) acid production and separation and oxygen purification, (II) sulfuric acid concentration and decomposition, (III) hydroiodic acid (HI) concentration, and (IV) HI decomposition and H{sub 2} purification. Section II of the cycle is an endothermic reaction driven by the heat input from a high temperature source. Analysis of the S-I cycle in the past thirty years have been focused mostly on the utilization of nuclear power as the high temperature heat source for the sulfuric acid decomposition step. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic considerations indicate that both the extent and rate of sulfuric acid decomposition can be improved at very high temperatures (in excess of 1000 deg C) available only from solar concentrators. The beneficial effect of high temperature solar heat for decomposition of sulfuric acid in the S-I cycle is described in this paper. We used Aspen Technologies' HYSYS chemical process simulator (CPS) to develop flowsheets for sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) decomposition that include all mass and heat balances. Based on the HYSYS analyses, two new process flowsheets were developed. These new sulfuric acid decomposition processes are simpler and more stable than previous processes and yield higher conversion efficiencies for the sulfuric acid decomposition and sulfur dioxide and oxygen formation. (Author)

  15. Comparison of decomposition rates between autopsied and non-autopsied human remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lennon N; Wescott, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Penetrating trauma has been cited as a significant factor in the rate of decomposition. Therefore, penetrating trauma may have an effect on estimations of time-since-death in medicolegal investigations and on research examining decomposition rates and processes when autopsied human bodies are used. The goal of this study was to determine if there are differences in the rate of decomposition between autopsied and non-autopsied human remains in the same environment. The purpose is to shed light on how large incisions, such as those from a thorocoabdominal autopsy, effect time-since-death estimations and research on the rate of decomposition that use both autopsied and non-autopsied human remains. In this study, 59 non-autopsied and 24 autopsied bodies were studied. The number of accumulated degree days required to reach each decomposition stage was then compared between autopsied and non-autopsied remains. Additionally, both types of bodies were examined for seasonal differences in decomposition rates. As temperature affects the rate of decomposition, this study also compared the internal body temperatures of autopsied and non-autopsied remains to see if differences between the two may be leading to differential decomposition. For this portion of this study, eight non-autopsied and five autopsied bodies were investigated. Internal temperature was collected once a day for two weeks. The results showed that differences in the decomposition rate between autopsied and non-autopsied remains was not statistically significant, though the average ADD needed to reach each stage of decomposition was slightly lower for autopsied bodies than non-autopsied bodies. There was also no significant difference between autopsied and non-autopsied bodies in the rate of decomposition by season or in internal temperature. Therefore, this study suggests that it is unnecessary to separate autopsied and non-autopsied remains when studying gross stages of human decomposition in Central Texas

  16. Measurement of the energy dependence of X-ray-induced decomposition of potassium chlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Sneed, Daniel; Park, Changyong

    2013-03-21

    We report the first measurements of the X-ray induced decomposition of KClO3 as a function of energy in two experiments. KClO3 was pressurized to 3.5 GPa and irradiated with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays ranging in energy from 15 to 35 keV in 5 keV increments. A systematic increase in the decomposition rate as the energy was decreased was observed, which agrees with the 1/E(3) trend for the photoelectric process, except at the lowest energy studied. A second experiment was performed to access lower energies (10 and 12 keV) using a beryllium gasket; suggesting an apparent resonance near 15 keV or 0.83 Ǻ maximizing the chemical decomposition rate. A third experiment was performed using KIO3 to ascertain the anionic dependence of the decomposition rate, which was observed to be far slower than in KClO3, suggesting that the O-O distance is the critical factor in chemical reactions. These results will be important for more efficiently initiating chemical decomposition in materials using selected X-ray wavelengths that maximize decomposition to aid useful hard X-ray-induced chemistry and contribute understanding of the mechanism of X-ray-induced decomposition of the chlorates.

  17. 3.6. The kinetics of sulfuric acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of borosilicate ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to kinetics of sulfuric acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of borosilicate ore. The experimental data of kinetics of extraction of boron oxide from danburite at sulfuric acid decomposition were obtained at 20-90 deg C temperature range and process duration 15-90 minutes. The flowsheet of obtaining of boric acid from borosilicate ores of Ak-Arkhar Deposit by sulfuric acid method was proposed.

  18. Decomposition of silica-alumina ores of Afghanistan by sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomidi, A.K.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2016-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of silica-alumina ores of Afghanistan by sulfuric acid. Physicochemical properties of initial silica-alumina ores were studied by means of X-ray phase, differential thermal and silicate analysis. The influence of temperature, process duration and acid concentration on extraction rate of valuable components was considered. The optimal conditions of decomposition of silica-alumina ores of Afghanistan by sulfuric acid were proposed.

  19. Catalytic Decomposition of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate Ionic Liquid: Enhancement of NO Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-24

    decomposition due to reduction in the acidity (i.e., [HNO3]) in the mixture. Reaction 2 has an activation barrier of Ea = 105 kJ/mol and is dominant at low...Propellants. Appl . Catal., B 2006, 62, 217−225. (15) Amariei, D.; Courtheóux, L.; Rossignol, S.; Kappenstein, C. Catalytic and Thermal Decomposition...Monopropellants: Thermal and Catalytic Decom- position Processes. Appl . Catal., B 2012, 127, 121−128. (19) Amrousse, R.; Katsumi, T.; Itouyama, N.; Azuma

  20. The rate of synthesis and decomposition of tissue proteins in hypokinesia and increased muscular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, I. V.; Chernyy, A. V.; Fedorov, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    During hypokinesia and physical loading (swimming) of rats, the radioactivity of skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, and blood proteins was determined after administration of radioactive amino acids. Tissue protein synthesis decreased during hypokinesia, and decomposition increased. Both synthesis and decomposition increased during physical loading, but anabolic processes predominated in the total tissue balance. The weights of the animals decreased in hypokinesia and increased during increased muscle activity.

  1. Effects of radionuclide contamination on leaf litter decomposition in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    OpenAIRE

    Bonzom , Jean-Marc; Hättenschwiler , Stephan; Lecomte-Pradines , Catherine; Chauvet , Eric; Gaschak , Sergey; Beaugelin-Seiller , Karine; Della-Vedova , Claire; Dubourg , Nicolas; Maksimenko , Andrey; Garnier-Laplace , Jacqueline; Adam-Guillermin , Christelle

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The effects of radioactive contamination on ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition remain largely un- known. Because radionuclides accumulated in soil and plant biomass can be harmful for organisms, the function- ing of ecosystems may be altered by radioactive contamination. Here, we tested the hypothesis that decomposition is impaired by increasing levels of radioactivity in the environment by exposing uncontaminated leaf litter from silver birch and black a...

  2. 1-Chloronaphthalene decomposition in air using electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Sun, Y.; Bulka, S.; Zimek, Z.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the preparation of model gas containing 1-chloronaphthalene can be referred to 1,1-DCE (dichloroethene). A pulsed electron beam (EB) accelerator ILU-6 (2.0 MeV max., 20 kW max.) was used as an irradiation source. The absorbed dose rate inside the irradiation vessel was 10.835 kGy/min. Total absorbed dose was adjusted by changing irradiation time of the Pyrex glass vessels. 1-Chloronaphthalene concentration was analyzed using gas-chromatography. It has been found, that 1-chloronaphthalene can be decomposed in air or N 2 using EB irradiation. Decomposition efficiency of 1-chloronaphthalene in air is higher than that in N 2 . Positive charge transfer reactions and OH radicals' reaction may play a main role in 1-chloronaphthalene decomposition process

  3. Scalable Domain Decomposition Preconditioners for Heterogeneous Elliptic Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Jolivet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Domain decomposition methods are, alongside multigrid methods, one of the dominant paradigms in contemporary large-scale partial differential equation simulation. In this paper, a lightweight implementation of a theoretically and numerically scalable preconditioner is presented in the context of overlapping methods. The performance of this work is assessed by numerical simulations executed on thousands of cores, for solving various highly heterogeneous elliptic problems in both 2D and 3D with billions of degrees of freedom. Such problems arise in computational science and engineering, in solid and fluid mechanics. While focusing on overlapping domain decomposition methods might seem too restrictive, it will be shown how this work can be applied to a variety of other methods, such as non-overlapping methods and abstract deflation based preconditioners. It is also presented how multilevel preconditioners can be used to avoid communication during an iterative process such as a Krylov method.

  4. Investigation into Seasonal Scavenging Patterns of Raccoons on Human Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yangseung; Jantz, Lee Meadows; Smith, Jake

    2016-03-01

    Although raccoons are known as one of the most common scavengers in the U.S., scavenging by these animals has seldom been studied in terms of forensic significance. In this research, the seasonal pattern of raccoon scavenging and its effect on human decomposition was investigated using 178 human cadavers placed at the Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) between February 2011 and December 2013. The results reveal that (i) the frequency of scavenging increases during summer, (ii) scavenging occurs relatively immediately and lasts shorter in summer months, and (iii) scavenging influences the decomposition process by hollowing limbs and by disturbing insect activities, both of which eventually increases the chance of mummification on the affected body. This information is expected to help forensic investigators identify raccoon scavenging as well as make a more precise interpretation of the effect of raccoon scavenging on bodies at crime scenes. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Domain decomposition methods for solving an image problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, W.K.; Tong, C.S. [Hong Kong Baptist College (Hong Kong)

    1994-12-31

    The domain decomposition method is a technique to break up a problem so that ensuing sub-problems can be solved on a parallel computer. In order to improve the convergence rate of the capacitance systems, pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods are commonly used. In the last decade, most of the efficient preconditioners are based on elliptic partial differential equations which are particularly useful for solving elliptic partial differential equations. In this paper, the authors apply the so called covering preconditioner, which is based on the information of the operator under investigation. Therefore, it is good for various kinds of applications, specifically, they shall apply the preconditioned domain decomposition method for solving an image restoration problem. The image restoration problem is to extract an original image which has been degraded by a known convolution process and additive Gaussian noise.

  6. A Decomposition Theorem for Finite Automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Coloma, Teresa L.; Tucci, Ralph P.

    1990-01-01

    Described is automata theory which is a branch of theoretical computer science. A decomposition theorem is presented that is easier than the Krohn-Rhodes theorem. Included are the definitions, the theorem, and a proof. (KR)

  7. Spatial domain decomposition for neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, M.; Larsen, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    A spatial Domain Decomposition method is proposed for modifying the Source Iteration (SI) and Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) algorithms for solving discrete ordinates problems. The method, which consists of subdividing the spatial domain of the problem and performing the transport sweeps independently on each subdomain, has the advantage of being parallelizable because the calculations in each subdomain can be performed on separate processors. In this paper we describe the details of this spatial decomposition and study, by numerical experimentation, the effect of this decomposition on the SI and DSA algorithms. Our results show that the spatial decomposition has little effect on the convergence rates until the subdomains become optically thin (less than about a mean free path in thickness)

  8. Aligning observed and modelled behaviour based on workflow decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Du, YuYue; Liu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    When business processes are mostly supported by information systems, the availability of event logs generated from these systems, as well as the requirement of appropriate process models are increasing. Business processes can be discovered, monitored and enhanced by extracting process-related information. However, some events cannot be correctly identified because of the explosion of the amount of event logs. Therefore, a new process mining technique is proposed based on a workflow decomposition method in this paper. Petri nets (PNs) are used to describe business processes, and then conformance checking of event logs and process models is investigated. A decomposition approach is proposed to divide large process models and event logs into several separate parts that can be analysed independently; while an alignment approach based on a state equation method in PN theory enhances the performance of conformance checking. Both approaches are implemented in programmable read-only memory (ProM). The correctness and effectiveness of the proposed methods are illustrated through experiments.

  9. An Efficient Local Correlation Matrix Decomposition Approach for the Localization Implementation of Ensemble-Based Assimilation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongqin; Tian, Xiangjun

    2018-04-01

    Ensemble-based data assimilation methods often use the so-called localization scheme to improve the representation of the ensemble background error covariance (Be). Extensive research has been undertaken to reduce the computational cost of these methods by using the localized ensemble samples to localize Be by means of a direct decomposition of the local correlation matrix C. However, the computational costs of the direct decomposition of the local correlation matrix C are still extremely high due to its high dimension. In this paper, we propose an efficient local correlation matrix decomposition approach based on the concept of alternating directions. This approach is intended to avoid direct decomposition of the correlation matrix. Instead, we first decompose the correlation matrix into 1-D correlation matrices in the three coordinate directions, then construct their empirical orthogonal function decomposition at low resolution. This procedure is followed by the 1-D spline interpolation process to transform the above decompositions to the high-resolution grid. Finally, an efficient correlation matrix decomposition is achieved by computing the very similar Kronecker product. We conducted a series of comparison experiments to illustrate the validity and accuracy of the proposed local correlation matrix decomposition approach. The effectiveness of the proposed correlation matrix decomposition approach and its efficient localization implementation of the nonlinear least-squares four-dimensional variational assimilation are further demonstrated by several groups of numerical experiments based on the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting model.

  10. Joint Matrices Decompositions and Blind Source Separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chabriel, G.; Kleinsteuber, M.; Moreau, E.; Shen, H.; Tichavský, Petr; Yeredor, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2014), s. 34-43 ISSN 1053-5888 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/1278 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : joint matrices decomposition * tensor decomposition * blind source separation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 5.852, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/SI/tichavsky-0427607.pdf

  11. Review on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shalini; Dave, Pragnesh N.

    2013-01-01

    In this review data from the literature on thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate (AN) and the effect of additives to their thermal decomposition are summarized. The effect of additives like oxides, cations, inorganic acids, organic compounds, phase-stablized CuO, etc., is discussed. The effect of an additive mainly occurs at the exothermic peak of pure AN in a temperature range of 200°C to 140°C.

  12. Note on Symplectic SVD-Like Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGOUJIL Said

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to introduce a constructive method to compute a symplectic singular value decomposition (SVD-like decomposition of a 2n-by-m rectangular real matrix A, based on symplectic refectors.This approach used a canonical Schur form of skew-symmetric matrix and it allowed us to compute eigenvalues for the structured matrices as Hamiltonian matrix JAA^T.

  13. Vegetation exerts a greater control on litter decomposition than climate warming in peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Susan E; Orwin, Kate H; Ostle, Nicholas J; Briones, J I; Thomson, Bruce C; Griffiths, Robert I; Oakley, Simon; Quirk, Helen; Bardget, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Historically, slow decomposition rates have resulted in the accumulation of large amounts of carbon in northern peatlands. Both climate warming and vegetation change can alter rates of decomposition, and hence affect rates of atmospheric CO2 exchange, with consequences for climate change feedbacks. Although warming and vegetation change are happening concurrently, little is known about their relative and interactive effects on decomposition processes. To test the effects of warming and vegetation change on decomposition rates, we placed litter of three dominant species (Calluna vulgaris, Eriophorum vaginatum, Hypnum jutlandicum) into a peatland field experiment that combined warming.with plant functional group removals, and measured mass loss over two years. To identify potential mechanisms behind effects, we also measured nutrient cycling and soil biota. We found that plant functional group removals exerted a stronger control over short-term litter decomposition than did approximately 1 degrees C warming, and that the plant removal effect depended on litter species identity. Specifically, rates of litter decomposition were faster when shrubs were removed from the plant community, and these effects were strongest for graminoid and bryophyte litter. Plant functional group removals also had strong effects on soil biota and nutrient cycling associated with decomposition, whereby shrub removal had cascading effects on soil fungal community composition, increased enchytraeid abundance, and increased rates of N mineralization. Our findings demonstrate that, in addition to litter quality, changes in vegetation composition play a significant role in regulating short-term litter decomposition and belowground communities in peatland, and that these impacts can be greater than moderate warming effects. Our findings, albeit from a relatively short-term study, highlight the need to consider both vegetation change and its impacts below ground alongside climatic effects when

  14. Empirical projection-based basis-component decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Bernhard; Roessl, Ewald; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Proksa, Roland

    2009-02-01

    Advances in the development of semiconductor based, photon-counting x-ray detectors stimulate research in the domain of energy-resolving pre-clinical and clinical computed tomography (CT). For counting detectors acquiring x-ray attenuation in at least three different energy windows, an extended basis component decomposition can be performed in which in addition to the conventional approach of Alvarez and Macovski a third basis component is introduced, e.g., a gadolinium based CT contrast material. After the decomposition of the measured projection data into the basis component projections, conventional filtered-backprojection reconstruction is performed to obtain the basis-component images. In recent work, this basis component decomposition was obtained by maximizing the likelihood-function of the measurements. This procedure is time consuming and often unstable for excessively noisy data or low intrinsic energy resolution of the detector. Therefore, alternative procedures are of interest. Here, we introduce a generalization of the idea of empirical dual-energy processing published by Stenner et al. to multi-energy, photon-counting CT raw data. Instead of working in the image-domain, we use prior spectral knowledge about the acquisition system (tube spectra, bin sensitivities) to parameterize the line-integrals of the basis component decomposition directly in the projection domain. We compare this empirical approach with the maximum-likelihood (ML) approach considering image noise and image bias (artifacts) and see that only moderate noise increase is to be expected for small bias in the empirical approach. Given the drastic reduction of pre-processing time, the empirical approach is considered a viable alternative to the ML approach.

  15. Microbiological decomposition of bagasse after radiation pasteurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1987-01-01

    Microbiological decomposition of bagasse was studied for upgrading to animal feeds after radiation pasteurization. Solid-state culture media of bagasse were prepared with addition of some amount of inorganic salts for nitrogen source, and after irradiation, fungi were infected for cultivation. In this study, many kind of cellulosic fungi such as Pleurotus ostreatus, P. flavellatus, Verticillium sp., Coprinus cinereus, Lentinus edodes, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma koningi, T. viride were used for comparison of decomposition of crude fibers. In alkali nontreated bagasse, P. ostreatus, P. flavellatus, C. cinereus and Verticillium sp. could decompose crude fibers from 25 to 34 % after one month of cultivation, whereas other fungi such as A. niger, T. koningi, T. viride, L. edodes decomposed below 10 %. On the contrary, alkali treatment enhanced the decomposition of crude fiber by A. niger, T. koningi and T. viride to be 29 to 47 % as well as Pleurotus species or C. cinereus. Other species of mushrooms such as L. edodes had a little ability of decomposition even after alkali treatment. Radiation treatment with 10 kGy could not enhance the decomposition of bagasse compared with steam treatment, whereas higher doses of radiation treatment enhanced a little of decomposition of crude fibers by microorganisms. (author)

  16. Decomposition of tetrachloroethylene by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakoda, T.; Hirota, K.; Hashimoto, S.

    1998-01-01

    Decomposition of tetrachloroethylene and other chloroethenes by ionizing radiation were examined to get information on treatment of industrial off-gas. Model gases, airs containing chloroethenes, were confined in batch reactors and irradiated with electron beam and gamma ray. The G-values of decomposition were larger in the order of tetrachloro- > trichloro- > trans-dichloro- > cis-dichloro- > monochloroethylene in electron beam irradiation and tetrachloro-, trichloro-, trans-dichloro- > cis-dichloro- > monochloroethylene in gamma ray irradiation. For tetrachloro-, trichloro- and trans-dichloroethylene, G-values of decomposition in EB irradiation increased with increase of chlorine atom in a molecule, while those in gamma ray irradiation were almost kept constant. The G-value of decomposition for tetrachloroethylene in EB irradiation was the largest of those for all chloroethenes. In order to examine the effect of the initial concentration on G-value of decomposition, airs containing 300 to 1,800 ppm of tetrachloroethylene were irradiated with electron beam and gamma ray. The G-values of decomposition in both irradiation increased with the initial concentration. Those in electron beam irradiation were two times larger than those in gamma ray irradiation

  17. Microbiological decomposition of bagasse after radiation pasteurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1987-11-01

    Microbiological decomposition of bagasse was studied for upgrading to animal feeds after radiation pasteurization. Solid-state culture media of bagasse were prepared with addition of some amount of inorganic salts for nitrogen source, and after irradiation, fungi were infected for cultivation. In this study, many kind of cellulosic fungi such as Pleurotus ostreatus, P. flavellatus, Verticillium sp., Coprinus cinereus, Lentinus edodes, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma koningi, T. viride were used for comparison of decomposition of crude fibers. In alkali nontreated bagasse, P. ostreatus, P. flavellatus, C. cinereus and Verticillium sp. could decompose crude fibers from 25 to 34 % after one month of cultivation, whereas other fungi such as A. niger, T. koningi, T. viride, L. edodes decomposed below 10 %. On the contrary, alkali treatment enhanced the decomposition of crude fiber by A. niger, T. koningi and T. viride to be 29 to 47 % as well as Pleurotus species or C. cinereus. Other species of mushrooms such as L. edodes had a little ability of decomposition even after alkali treatment. Radiation treatment with 10 kGy could not enhance the decomposition of bagasse compared with steam treatment, whereas higher doses of radiation treatment enhanced a little of decomposition of crude fibers by microorganisms.

  18. Prepared by Thermal Hydro-decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasoetsopha, N.; Pinitsoontorn, S.; Kamwanna, T.; Kurosaki, K.; Ohishi, Y.; Muta, H.; Yamanaka, S.

    2014-06-01

    The polycrystalline samples of Ca3Co4- x Ga x O9+ δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) were prepared by a simple thermal hydro-decomposition method. The high density ceramics were fabricated using a spark plasma sintering technique. The crystal structure of calcined powders was characterized by x-ray diffraction. The single phase of Ca3Co4- x Ga x O9+ δ was obtained. The scanning electron micrograph illustrated the grain alignment perpendicular to the direction of the pressure in the sintering process. The evidence from x-ray absorption near edge spectra were used to confirm the oxidation state of the Ga dopant. The thermoelectric properties of the misfit-layered of Ca3Co4- x Ga x O9+ δ were investigated. Seebeck coefficient tended to decrease with increasing Ga content due to the hole-doping effect. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity were monotonically decreased with increasing Ga content. The Ga doping of x = 0.15 showed the highest power factor of 3.99 × 10-4 W/mK2 at 1,023 K and the lowest thermal conductivity of 1.45 W/mK at 1,073 K. This resulted in the highest ZT of 0.29 at 1,073 K. From the optical absorption spectra, the electronic structure near the Fermi level show no significant change with Ga doping.

  19. Decomposition Technique for Remaining Useful Life Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bhaskar (Inventor); Goebel, Kai F. (Inventor); Saxena, Abhinav (Inventor); Celaya, Jose R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic tool disclosed here decomposes the problem of estimating the remaining useful life (RUL) of a component or sub-system into two separate regression problems: the feature-to-damage mapping and the operational conditions-to-damage-rate mapping. These maps are initially generated in off-line mode. One or more regression algorithms are used to generate each of these maps from measurements (and features derived from these), operational conditions, and ground truth information. This decomposition technique allows for the explicit quantification and management of different sources of uncertainty present in the process. Next, the maps are used in an on-line mode where run-time data (sensor measurements and operational conditions) are used in conjunction with the maps generated in off-line mode to estimate both current damage state as well as future damage accumulation. Remaining life is computed by subtracting the instance when the extrapolated damage reaches the failure threshold from the instance when the prediction is made.

  20. 4.3. Decomposition of danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkar Deposit by nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkar Deposit by nitric acid. The influence of temperature on reaction process was studied. The dependence of extraction rate of oxides (B 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 and Ca O) at nitric acid processing on temperature ranges from 25 to 95 deg C was defined. The dependence of extraction rate of oxides (B 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 and Ca O) at nitric acid processing on process duration (5-60 minutes) was defined as well. The optimal conditions of decomposition of danburite concentrate by nitric acid were proposed.

  1. Comparison of the decomposition VOC profile during winter and summer in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari L Forbes

    Full Text Available The investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs associated with decomposition is an emerging field in forensic taphonomy due to their importance in locating human remains using biological detectors such as insects and canines. A consistent decomposition VOC profile has not yet been elucidated due to the intrinsic impact of the environment on the decomposition process in different climatic zones. The study of decomposition VOCs has typically occurred during the warmer months to enable chemical profiling of all decomposition stages. The present study investigated the decomposition VOC profile in air during both warmer and cooler months in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb climate as decomposition occurs year-round in this environment. Pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L. were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their VOC profile was monitored during the winter and summer months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the natural VOC profile of the surrounding soil and vegetation. VOC samples were collected onto sorbent tubes and analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography--time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS. The summer months were characterized by higher temperatures and solar radiation, greater rainfall accumulation, and comparable humidity when compared to the winter months. The rate of decomposition was faster and the number and abundance of VOCs was proportionally higher in summer. However, a similar trend was observed in winter and summer demonstrating a rapid increase in VOC abundance during active decay with a second increase in abundance occurring later in the decomposition process. Sulfur-containing compounds, alcohols and ketones represented the most abundant classes of compounds in both seasons, although almost all 10 compound classes identified contributed to discriminating the stages of decomposition throughout both seasons. The advantages of GC × GC-TOFMS were

  2. Modeling of ferric sulfate decomposition and sulfation of potassium chloride during grate‐firing of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Jespersen, Jacob Boll; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Ferric sulfate is used as an additive in biomass combustion to convert the released potassium chloride to the less harmful potassium sulfate. The decomposition of ferric sulfate is studied in a fast heating rate thermogravimetric analyzer and a volumetric reaction model is proposed to describe...... the process. The yields of sulfur oxides from ferric sulfate decomposition under boiler conditions are investigated experimentally, revealing a distribution of approximately 40% SO3 and 60% SO2. The ferric sulfate decomposition model is combined with a detailed kinetic model of gas‐phase KCl sulfation...... and a model of K2SO4 condensation to simulate the sulfation of KCl by ferric sulfate addition. The simulation results show good agreements with experiments conducted in a biomass grate‐firing reactor. The results indicate that the SO3 released from ferric sulfate decomposition is the main contributor to KCl...

  3. Influence of nitrogen dioxide on the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor L. Kovalenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of experimental studies of ammonium nitrate thermal decomposition in an open system under normal conditions and in NO2 atmosphere are presented. It is shown that nitrogen dioxide is the initiator of ammonium nitrate self-accelerating exothermic cyclic decomposition process. The insertion of NO2 from outside under the conditions of nonisothermal experiment reduces the characteristic temperature of the beginning of self-accelerating decomposition by 50...70 °C. Using method of isothermal exposures it is proved that thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate in nitrogen dioxide atmosphere at 210 °C is autocatalytic (zero-order reaction. It was suggested that there is possibility of increasing the sensitivity and detonation characteristics of energy condensed systems based on ammonium nitrate by the insertion of additives which provide an earlier appearance of NO2 in the system.

  4. Nanocrystalline transition metal oxides as catalysts in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Inder Pal Singh; Srivastava, Pratibha; Singh, Gurdip [Department of Chemistry, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India)

    2009-08-15

    Nanocrystalline transition metal oxides (NTMOs) have been successfully prepared by three different methods: novel quick precipitation method (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}); surfactant mediated method (CuO), and reduction of metal complexes with hydrazine as reducing agent (Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The nano particles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) which shows an average particle diameter of 35-54 nm. Their catalytic activity was measured in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). AP decomposition undergoes a two step process where the addition of metal oxide nanocrystals led to a shifting of the high temperature decomposition peak toward lower temperature. The kinetics of the thermal decomposition of AP and catalyzed AP has also been evaluated using model fitting and isoconversional method. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Ultrafine ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Facile synthesis by low temperature decomposition of iron glycerolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartůněk, Vilém, E-mail: vilem.bartunek@vscht.cz [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Průcha, David [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Švecová, Marie [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, Pavel [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Huber, Štěpán; Sedmidubský, David; Jankovský, Ondřej [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-01

    We synthesized dark colored ultrafine – sub 10 nm iron oxide nanoparticles by a facile and low temperature process based on thermal decomposition of an affordable precursor – iron glycerolate. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) was used to study the thermal behaviour during the decomposition. The iron glycerolate was thoroughly analysed by various methods. The size of the iron nanoparticles was determined from XRD patterns and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their composition has been confirmed by XPS. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared single phase material exhibiting ferromagnetic properties is usable in a wide range of applications and may be suitable even for large scale industrial applications. - Highlights: • Iron glycerolate prepared and characterised. • Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by thermal decomposition of iron glycerolate. • STA used to study the decomposition. • Products characterised by XRD, XPS, FT-IR, SEM and TEM. • Magnetic behaviour of monophasic samples determined.

  6. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co 3 O 4 . The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co 3 O 4 phase.

  7. Rate of litter decomposition and microbial activity in an area of Caatinga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Carneiro Souto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the decomposition of litter and microbial activity in an area of preserved Caatinga, an experiment was conducted in the Natural Heritage Private Reserve Tamanduá Farm in Santa Terezinha county, State of Paraiba. The decomposition rate was determined by using litter bags containing 30 g of litter, which were arranged on the soil surface in September 2003 and 20 bags were taken each month until September 2005. The collected material was oven dried and weighed to assess weight loss compared to initial weight. Microbial activity was estimated monthly by the quantification of carbon dioxide (CO2 released into the edaphic breathing process from the soil surface, and captured by KOH solution. Weight loss of litter after one year was 41.19% and, after two years, was 48.37%, indicating a faster decomposition in the first year. Data analysis showed the influence of season on litter decomposition and temperature on microbial activity.

  8. Trophic roles of scavenger beetles in relation to decomposition stages and seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia I. Zanetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carcasses represent a trophic and reproductive resource or shelter for arthropods, which are a representative component of the decomposition process. Four experiments, one per season, were conducted in a semi-rural area of Bahía Blanca, Argentina, to study the trophic roles of cadaveric beetles, evaluating the abundance, composition and dominance during all decomposition stages and seasons. Species of necrophagous, necrophilous and omnivorous habits were found. Abundance, composition and dominance of beetles in relation to their trophic roles changed according to seasons and decomposition stages. Guilds and patterns of succession were established in relation to those periods. Trophic roles could be an indicator of beetle associations with decomposition stages and seasons.

  9. Fast heap transform-based QR-decomposition of real and complex matrices: algorithms and codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Artyom M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a new look on the application of Givens rotations to the QR-decomposition problem, which is similar to the method of Householder transformations. We apply the concept of the discrete heap transform, or signal-induced unitary transforms which had been introduced by Grigoryan (2006) and used in signal and image processing. Both cases of real and complex nonsingular matrices are considered and examples of performing QR-decomposition of square matrices are given. The proposed method of QR-decomposition for the complex matrix is novel and differs from the known method of complex Givens rotation and is based on analytical equations for the heap transforms. Many examples illustrated the proposed heap transform method of QR-decomposition are given, algorithms are described in detail, and MATLAB-based codes are included.

  10. Detecting the Extent of Cellular Decomposition after Sub-Eutectoid Annealing in Rolled UMo Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautz, Elizabeth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sweet, Lucas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This report presents an automated image processing approach to quantifying microstructure image data, specifically the extent of eutectoid (cellular) decomposition in rolled U-10Mo foils. An image processing approach is used here to be able to quantitatively describe microstructure image data in order to relate microstructure to processing parameters (time, temperature, deformation).

  11. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-10-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained.

  12. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained

  13. Radiolysis of lignin: Prospective mechanism of high-temperature decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The range of the radiation-thermal processes resulting in conversion of lignin into monomeric phenols is considered. Statistically the most probable places of macromolecule ionization are aromatic units. Release of phenolic products from a lignin macromolecule is the multistage process beginning via fragmentation of primary cation-radicals. Reactions of electrons and small radicals with macromolecules, also as degradation of cation-radicals, result in formation of phenoxyl radicals. Macroradicals possess lower heat stability in comparison with macromolecules. Thermal decomposition of macroradicals leads to release of monohydric and dihydric phenols. The probability of benzenediols formation increases in the presence of alkanes. As noted, partial transformation of lignin into charcoal is inevitable.

  14. Young Children's Thinking About Decomposition: Early Modeling Entrees to Complex Ideas in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ero-Tolliver, Isi; Lucas, Deborah; Schauble, Leona

    2013-10-01

    This study was part of a multi-year project on the development of elementary students' modeling approaches to understanding the life sciences. Twenty-three first grade students conducted a series of coordinated observations and investigations on decomposition, a topic that is rarely addressed in the early grades. The instruction included in-class observations of different types of soil and soil profiling, visits to the school's compost bin, structured observations of decaying organic matter of various kinds, study of organisms that live in the soil, and models of environmental conditions that affect rates of decomposition. Both before and after instruction, students completed a written performance assessment that asked them to reason about the process of decomposition. Additional information was gathered through one-on-one interviews with six focus students who represented variability of performance across the class. During instruction, researchers collected video of classroom activity, student science journal entries, and charts and illustrations produced by the teacher. After instruction, the first-grade students showed a more nuanced understanding of the composition and variability of soils, the role of visible organisms in decomposition, and environmental factors that influence rates of decomposition. Through a variety of representational devices, including drawings, narrative records, and physical models, students came to regard decomposition as a process, rather than simply as an end state that does not require explanation.

  15. Effect of catalyst for the decomposition of VOCs in a NTP reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Suchitra; Das, Smrutiprava; Paikaray, Rita; Sahoo, Gourishankar; Samantaray, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution has become a major cause of human distress both directly and indirectly. VOCs are becoming the major air pollutants. So the decomposition of VOCs is present need of our society. Non-thermal plasma reactor (NTP) is proven to be effective for low concentration VOCs decomposition. For safe and effective application of DBD, optimization of treatment process requires different plasma parameter characterization. So electron temperature and electron density parameters of VOCs show the decomposition path ways. In this piece of work by taking the emission spectra and comparing the line intensity ratios, the electron temperature and density were determined. Also the decomposition rate in terms of the deposited products on the dielectric surface was studied. Decomposition rate increases in presence of catalyst as compared to the pure compound in presence of a carrier gas. Decomposition process was studied by UV-VIS, FTIR, OES Spectroscopic methods and by GCMS. Deposited products are analyzed by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopy. Plasma parameters like electron temperature, density are studied with OES. And gaseous products are studied by GCMS showing the peaks for the by products. (author)

  16. Decomposition of rice residue in tropical soils, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Yoshida, Tomio

    1977-01-01

    The decomposition processes of intact rice residue (leaf blades) in the Maahas soil in the Philippines were investigated. Three sets of beakers simulating both lowland and upland conditions were incubated in the dark at 30 deg. C. One set of beakers had neither rice residue nor fertilizer. Pieces of leaf blades weighing 204 mg (dry weight) were inserted in the second set. Pieces of leaf blades were inserted in the third set, and 200 ppm of fertilizer nitrogen as 15 N-labelled ammonium sulfate was added. The experiment dealt with the nitrogen immobilization by rice residue under lowland and upland conditions. The rice residue which has contained low nitrogen absorbed nitrogen from the soil and from the added fertilizer (ammonium sulfate) during its decomposition under both conditions. Under the lowland condition, the amount of nitrogen immobilized was small during the first week, but became large after 2 or 3 weeks. Under the upland condition, the immobilized nitrogen reached its maximum during the first week, but the amount was not so large as that under the lowland condition. The added fertilizer stimulated the decrease of weight of the rice residue in the early incubation period, but retarded it later under both conditions. The absorption of fertilizer by the rice residue ceased at the early stage of residue decomposition, but the nitrogen content of the residue continued to increase. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Trace Norm Regularized CANDECOMP/PARAFAC Decomposition With Missing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Shang, Fanhua; Jiao, Licheng; Cheng, James; Cheng, Hong

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, low-rank tensor completion (LRTC) problems have received a significant amount of attention in computer vision, data mining, and signal processing. The existing trace norm minimization algorithms for iteratively solving LRTC problems involve multiple singular value decompositions of very large matrices at each iteration. Therefore, they suffer from high computational cost. In this paper, we propose a novel trace norm regularized CANDECOMP/PARAFAC decomposition (TNCP) method for simultaneous tensor decomposition and completion. We first formulate a factor matrix rank minimization model by deducing the relation between the rank of each factor matrix and the mode- n rank of a tensor. Then, we introduce a tractable relaxation of our rank function, and then achieve a convex combination problem of much smaller-scale matrix trace norm minimization. Finally, we develop an efficient algorithm based on alternating direction method of multipliers to solve our problem. The promising experimental results on synthetic and real-world data validate the effectiveness of our TNCP method. Moreover, TNCP is significantly faster than the state-of-the-art methods and scales to larger problems.

  18. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadhri, Comandur [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catalyurek, Umit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  19. Initial insights into bacterial succession during human decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Embriette R; Haarmann, Daniel P; Petrosino, Joseph F; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R

    2015-05-01

    Decomposition is a dynamic ecological process dependent upon many factors such as environment, climate, and bacterial, insect, and vertebrate activity in addition to intrinsic properties inherent to individual cadavers. Although largely attributed to microbial metabolism, very little is known about the bacterial basis of human decomposition. To assess the change in bacterial community structure through time, bacterial samples were collected from several sites across two cadavers placed outdoors to decompose and analyzed through 454 pyrosequencing and analysis of variable regions 3-5 of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. Each cadaver was characterized by a change in bacterial community structure for all sites sampled as time, and decomposition, progressed. Bacteria community structure is variable at placement and before purge for all body sites. At bloat and purge and until tissues began to dehydrate or were removed, bacteria associated with flies, such as Ignatzschineria and Wohlfahrtimonas, were common. After dehydration and skeletonization, bacteria associated with soil, such as Acinetobacter, were common at most body sites sampled. However, more cadavers sampled through multiple seasons are necessary to assess major trends in bacterial succession.

  20. A comparison between decomposition rates of buried and surface remains in a temperate region of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais-Werner, Anátulie; Myburgh, J; Becker, P J; Steyn, M

    2018-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted on decomposition patterns and rates of surface remains; however, much less are known about this process for buried remains. Understanding the process of decomposition in buried remains is extremely important and aids in criminal investigations, especially when attempting to estimate the post mortem interval (PMI). The aim of this study was to compare the rates of decomposition between buried and surface remains. For this purpose, 25 pigs (Sus scrofa; 45-80 kg) were buried and excavated at different post mortem intervals (7, 14, 33, 92, and 183 days). The observed total body scores were then compared to those of surface remains decomposing at the same location. Stages of decomposition were scored according to separate categories for different anatomical regions based on standardised methods. Variation in the degree of decomposition was considerable especially with the buried 7-day interval pigs that displayed different degrees of discolouration in the lower abdomen and trunk. At 14 and 33 days, buried pigs displayed features commonly associated with the early stages of decomposition, but with less variation. A state of advanced decomposition was reached where little change was observed in the next ±90-183 days after interment. Although the patterns of decomposition for buried and surface remains were very similar, the rates differed considerably. Based on the observations made in this study, guidelines for the estimation of PMI are proposed. This pertains to buried remains found at a depth of approximately 0.75 m in the Central Highveld of South Africa.

  1. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M.; Powell, John S.; Barlaz, Morton A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g −1 dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than

  2. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoming, E-mail: xwang25@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Padgett, Jennifer M. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Powell, John S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Campus Box 7905, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7905 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g{sup −1} dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than

  3. Local Fractional Adomian Decomposition and Function Decomposition Methods for Laplace Equation within Local Fractional Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ping Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform a comparison between the local fractional Adomian decomposition and local fractional function decomposition methods applied to the Laplace equation. The operators are taken in the local sense. The results illustrate the significant features of the two methods which are both very effective and straightforward for solving the differential equations with local fractional derivative.

  4. Global decomposition experiment shows soil animal impacts on decomposition are climate-dependent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wall, D.H.; Bradford, M.A.; John, M.G.St.; Trofymow, J.A.; Behan-Pelletier, V.; Bignell, D.E.; Dangerfield, J.M.; Parton, W.J.; Rusek, Josef; Voigt, W.; Wolters, V.; Gardel, H.Z.; Ayuke, F. O.; Bashford, R.; Beljakova, O.I.; Bohlen, P.J.; Brauman, A.; Flemming, S.; Henschel, J.R.; Johnson, D.L.; Jones, T.H.; Kovářová, Marcela; Kranabetter, J.M.; Kutny, L.; Lin, K.-Ch.; Maryati, M.; Masse, D.; Pokarzhevskii, A.; Rahman, H.; Sabará, M.G.; Salamon, J.-A.; Swift, M.J.; Varela, A.; Vasconcelos, H.L.; White, D.; Zou, X.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 11 (2008), s. 2661-2677 ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : climate decomposition index * decomposition * litter Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.876, year: 2008

  5. Hydrothermal decomposition of TBP and fixation of its decomposed residue by HHP technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, N.; Fujiki, M.; Nishioka, M.; Ioku, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Kozai, N.; Muraoka, S.

    1991-01-01

    The tributyl phosphate (TBP) used for the fuel reprocessing by Purex process is discharged as spent solvent because of the chemical decomposition and the damage due to radiation. Alkaline hydrothermal treatment in oxygen which is the reaction in a closed system is effective for the decomposition of TBP as it can transform organic materials to stable inorganic ions. Hydrothermal hot pressing technique has been applied to the immobilization of various radioactive wastes. This work deals with the continuous treatment process for the decomposition of TBP waste and the immobilization of its decomposed residue under hydrothermal condition. These processes are outlined. The experiment and the results are reported. TBP was completely decomposed above 200degC, and COD value showed the maximum at 250degC. The reaction process consists of two steps of the hydrolysis of TBP and the oxidation of the formed organic material. (K.I.)

  6. Steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Alan Anwar; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on steganography based on pixel intensity value decomposition. A number of existing schemes such as binary, Fibonacci, Prime, Natural, Lucas, and Catalan-Fibonacci (CF) are evaluated in terms of payload capacity and stego quality. A new technique based on a specific representation is proposed to decompose pixel intensity values into 16 (virtual) bit-planes suitable for embedding purposes. The proposed decomposition has a desirable property whereby the sum of all bit-planes does not exceed the maximum pixel intensity value, i.e. 255. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique offers an effective compromise between payload capacity and stego quality of existing embedding techniques based on pixel intensity value decomposition. Its capacity is equal to that of binary and Lucas, while it offers a higher capacity than Fibonacci, Prime, Natural, and CF when the secret bits are embedded in 1st Least Significant Bit (LSB). When the secret bits are embedded in higher bit-planes, i.e., 2nd LSB to 8th Most Significant Bit (MSB), the proposed scheme has more capacity than Natural numbers based embedding. However, from the 6th bit-plane onwards, the proposed scheme offers better stego quality. In general, the proposed decomposition scheme has less effect in terms of quality on pixel value when compared to most existing pixel intensity value decomposition techniques when embedding messages in higher bit-planes.

  7. Microbial Signatures of Cadaver Gravesoil During Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Sheree J; Pechal, Jennifer L; Benbow, M Eric; Robertson, B K; Javan, Gulnaz T

    2016-04-01

    Genomic studies have estimated there are approximately 10(3)-10(6) bacterial species per gram of soil. The microbial species found in soil associated with decomposing human remains (gravesoil) have been investigated and recognized as potential molecular determinants for estimates of time since death. The nascent era of high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the conserved 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene region of gravesoil microbes is allowing research to expand beyond more subjective empirical methods used in forensic microbiology. The goal of the present study was to evaluate microbial communities and identify taxonomic signatures associated with the gravesoil human cadavers. Using 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based sequencing, soil microbial communities were surveyed from 18 cadavers placed on the surface or buried that were allowed to decompose over a range of decomposition time periods (3-303 days). Surface soil microbial communities showed a decreasing trend in taxon richness, diversity, and evenness over decomposition, while buried cadaver-soil microbial communities demonstrated increasing taxon richness, consistent diversity, and decreasing evenness. The results show that ubiquitous Proteobacteria was confirmed as the most abundant phylum in all gravesoil samples. Surface cadaver-soil communities demonstrated a decrease in Acidobacteria and an increase in Firmicutes relative abundance over decomposition, while buried soil communities were consistent in their community composition throughout decomposition. Better understanding of microbial community structure and its shifts over time may be important for advancing general knowledge of decomposition soil ecology and its potential use during forensic investigations.

  8. Radiation decomposition of alcohols and chloro phenols in micellar systems; Descomposicion por irradiacion de alcoholes y clorofenoles en sistemas micelares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno A, J

    1999-12-31

    The effect of surfactants on the radiation decomposition yield of alcohols and chloro phenols has been studied with gamma doses of 2, 3, and 5 KGy. These compounds were used as typical pollutants in waste water, and the effect of the water solubility, chemical structure, and the nature of the surfactant, anionic or cationic, was studied. The results show that anionic surfactant like sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), improve the radiation decomposition yield of ortho-chloro phenol, while cationic surfactant like cetyl trimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), improve the radiation decomposition yield of butyl alcohol. A similar behavior is expected for those alcohols with water solubility close to the studied ones. Surfactant concentrations below critical micellar concentration (CMC), inhibited radiation decomposition for both types of alcohols. However radiation decomposition yield increased when surfactant concentrations were bigger than the CMC. Aromatic alcohols decomposition was more marked than for linear alcohols decomposition. On a mixture of alcohols and chloro phenols in aqueous solution the radiation decomposition yield decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. Nevertheless, there were competitive reactions between the alcohols, surfactants dimers, hydroxyl radical and other reactive species formed on water radiolysis, producing a catalytic positive effect in the decomposition of alcohols. Chemical structure and the number of carbons were not important factors in the radiation decomposition. When an alcohol like ortho-chloro phenol contained an additional chlorine atom, the decomposition of this compound was almost constant. In conclusion the micellar effect depend on both, the nature of the surfactant (anionic or cationic) and the chemical structure of the alcohols. The results of this study are useful for wastewater treatment plants based on the oxidant effect of the hydroxyl radical, like in advanced oxidation processes, or in combined treatment such as

  9. Radiation decomposition of alcohols and chloro phenols in micellar systems; Descomposicion por irradiacion de alcoholes y clorofenoles en sistemas micelares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno A, J

    1998-12-31

    The effect of surfactants on the radiation decomposition yield of alcohols and chloro phenols has been studied with gamma doses of 2, 3, and 5 KGy. These compounds were used as typical pollutants in waste water, and the effect of the water solubility, chemical structure, and the nature of the surfactant, anionic or cationic, was studied. The results show that anionic surfactant like sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), improve the radiation decomposition yield of ortho-chloro phenol, while cationic surfactant like cetyl trimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), improve the radiation decomposition yield of butyl alcohol. A similar behavior is expected for those alcohols with water solubility close to the studied ones. Surfactant concentrations below critical micellar concentration (CMC), inhibited radiation decomposition for both types of alcohols. However radiation decomposition yield increased when surfactant concentrations were bigger than the CMC. Aromatic alcohols decomposition was more marked than for linear alcohols decomposition. On a mixture of alcohols and chloro phenols in aqueous solution the radiation decomposition yield decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. Nevertheless, there were competitive reactions between the alcohols, surfactants dimers, hydroxyl radical and other reactive species formed on water radiolysis, producing a catalytic positive effect in the decomposition of alcohols. Chemical structure and the number of carbons were not important factors in the radiation decomposition. When an alcohol like ortho-chloro phenol contained an additional chlorine atom, the decomposition of this compound was almost constant. In conclusion the micellar effect depend on both, the nature of the surfactant (anionic or cationic) and the chemical structure of the alcohols. The results of this study are useful for wastewater treatment plants based on the oxidant effect of the hydroxyl radical, like in advanced oxidation processes, or in combined treatment such as

  10. Generalized requirements and decompositions for the design of test parts for micro additive manufacturing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2015-01-01

    The design of experimental test parts to characterize micro additive manufacturing (AM) processes is challenging due to the influence of the manufacturing and metrology processes. This work builds on the lessons learned from a case study in the literature to derive generalized requirements and high...... level decompositions for the design of test parts and the design of experiments to characterize micro additive manufacturing processes. While the test parts and the experiments described are still work in progress, the generic requirements derived from them can serve as a starting point for the design...... of other micro additive manufacturing related studies and their decompositions can help structure future work....

  11. Decomposition mechanisms and non-isothermal kinetics of LiHC_2O_4·H_2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The thermal decomposition process of LiHC2O4·H2O from 30 to 600 ℃ was investigated by the thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The phases decomposited at different temperature were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated the decompositions at 150, 170, and 420℃, relating to LiHC2O4, Li2C2O4, Li2C2O4, and Li2CO3, respectively. Reaction mechanisms in the whole sintering process were determined, and the model fitting kinetic approaches were applied to data for non...

  12. Influence of Cu(NO32 initiation additive in two-stage mode conditions of coal pyrolytic decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-stage process (pyrolysis and oxidation of brown coal sample with Cu(NO32 additive pyrolytic decomposition was studied. Additive was introduced by using capillary wetness impregnation method with 5% mass concentration. Sample reactivity was studied by thermogravimetric analysis with staged gaseous medium supply (argon and air at heating rate 10 °C/min and intermediate isothermal soaking. The initiative additive introduction was found to significantly reduce volatile release temperature and accelerate thermal decomposition of sample. Mass-spectral analysis results reveal that significant difference in process characteristics is connected to volatile matter release stage which is initiated by nitrous oxide produced during copper nitrate decomposition.

  13. Thermal decomposition of organic solvent with nitric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Tadao; Nishio, Gunji; Takada, Junichi; Tukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Kouji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Miyata, Sadaichirou

    1995-02-01

    Since a thermal decomposition of organic solvent containing TBP (tributyl phosphate) with nitric acid and heavy metal nitrates is an exothermic reaction, it is possible to cause an explosive decomposition of TBP-complex materials formed by a nitration between the solvent and nitric acid, if the solvent involving TBP-complex is heated upto a thermal limit in an evaporator to concentrate a fuel liquid solution from the extraction process in the reprocessing plant. In JAERI, the demonstration test for explosive decomposition of TBP-complex by the nitration was performed to elucidate the safety margin of the evaporator in the event of hypothetical explosion under auspices of the Science and Technology Agency. The demonstration test was carried out by heating TBP/n-dodecane solvent mixed with nitric acid and uranium nitrate. In the test, the thermal decomposition behavior of the solvent was examined, and also a kinematic reaction constant and a heat formation of the TBP-complex decomposition were measured by the test. In the paper, a safety analysis of a model evaporator was conducted during accidental conditions under the explosive decomposition of the solvent. (author).

  14. Treatment of off-gas evolved from thermal decomposition of sludge waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doo-Seong Hwang; Yun-Dong Choi; Gyeong-Hwan Jeong; Jei-Kwon Moon

    2013-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started a decommissioning program of a uranium conversion plant. The treatment of the sludge waste, which was generated during the operation of the plant, is one of the most important tasks in the decommissioning program of the plant. The major compounds of sludge waste are nitrate salts and uranium. The sludge waste is denitrated by thermal decomposition. The treatment of off-gas evolved from the thermal decomposition of nitrate salts in the sludge waste is investigated. The nitrate salts in the sludge were decomposed in two steps: the first decomposition is due to the ammonium nitrate, and the second is due to the sodium and calcium nitrate and calcium carbonate. The components of off-gas from the decomposition of ammonium nitrate at low temperature are NH 3 , N 2 O, NO 2 , and NO. In addition, the components from the decomposition of sodium and calcium nitrate at high temperature are NO 2 and NO. Off-gas from the thermal decomposition is treated by the catalytic oxidation of ammonia and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Ammonia is converted into nitrogen oxides through the oxidation catalyst and all nitrogen oxides are removed by SCR treatment besides nitrous oxide, which is greenhouse gas. An additional process is needed to remove nitrous oxide, and the feeding rate of ammonia in SCR should be controlled properly for evolved nitrogen oxides. (author)

  15. Bimetallic catalysts for HI decomposition in the iodine-sulfur thermochemical cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Laijun; Hu Songzhi; Xu Lufei; Li Daocai; Han Qi; Chen Songzhe; Zhang Ping; Xu Jingming

    2014-01-01

    Among the different kinds of thermochemical water-splitting cycles, the iodine-sulfur (IS) cycle has attracted more and more interest because it is one of the promising candidates for economical and massive hydrogen production. However, there still exist some science and technical problems to be solved before industrialization of the IS process. One such problem is the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen iodide. Although the active carbon supported platinum has been verified to present the excellent performance for HI decomposition, it is very expensive and easy to agglomerate under the harsh condition. In order to decrease the cost and increase the stability of the catalysts for HI decomposition, a series of bimetallic catalysts were prepared and studied at INET. This paper summarized our present research advances on the bimetallic catalysts (Pt-Pd, Pd-Ir and Pt-Ir) for HI decomposition. In the course of the study, the physical properties, structure, and morphology of the catalysts were characterized by specific surface area, X-ray diffractometer; and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The catalytic activity for HI decomposition was investigated in a fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure. The results show that due to the higher activity and better stability, the active carbon supported bimetallic catalyst is more potential candidate than mono metallic Pt catalyst for HI decomposition in the IS thermochemical cycle. (author)

  16. Xylanase and cellulase activities during anaerobic decomposition of three aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Maíra F; da Cunha-Santino, Marcela B; Bianchini, Irineu

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic activity during decomposition is extremely important to hydrolyze molecules that are assimilated by microorganisms. During aquatic macrophytes decomposition, enzymes act mainly in the breakdown of lignocellulolytic matrix fibers (i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) that encompass the refractory fraction from organic matter. Considering the importance of enzymatic activities role in decomposition processes, this study aimed to describe the temporal changes of xylanase and cellulose activities during anaerobic decomposition of Ricciocarpus natans (freely-floating), Oxycaryum cubense (emergent) and Cabomba furcata (submersed). The aquatic macrophytes were collected in Óleo Lagoon, Luiz Antonio, São Paulo, Brazil and bioassays were accomplished.  Decomposition chambers from each species (n = 10) were set up with dried macrophyte fragments and filtered Óleo Lagoon water. The chambers were incubated at 22.5°C, in the dark and under anaerobic conditions. Enzymatic activities and remaining organic matter were measured periodically during 90 days. The temporal variation of enzymes showed that C. furcata presented the highest decay and the highest maximum enzyme production. Xylanase production was higher than cellulase production for the decomposition of the three aquatic macrophytes species.

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Decomposition Odour in Soil Using Sorbent Tubes and Solid Phase Microextraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelynn A. Perrault

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Odour profiling of decomposed remains is important for understanding the mechanisms that cadaver dogs and forensically-relevant insects use to locate decomposed remains. The decomposition odour profile is complex and has been documented in outdoor terrestrial environments. The purpose of this study was to perform longitudinal analysis of the volatile organic compound (VOC profile in soils associated with decomposed remains across all stages of decomposition. Two VOC collection techniques (sorbent tubes and solid phase microextraction were used to collect a wider analyte range and to investigate differences in collection techniques. Pig carcasses were placed in an outdoor research facility in Australia to model the decomposition process and VOCs were collected intermittently over two months. VOCs of interest were identified over the duration of the trial, showing distinct trends in compound evolution and disappearance. The collection techniques were complementary, representing different subsets of VOCs from the overall profile. Sorbent tubes collected more decomposition-specific VOCs and these compounds were more effective at characterising the matrix over an extended period. Using both collection techniques improves the likelihood of identifying the complete VOC profile of decomposition odour. Such information is important for the search and recovery of victim remains in various stages of decomposition.

  18. Can visible light impact litter decomposition under pollution of ZnO nanoparticles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuyan; Liu, Lina; Qv, Mingxiang; Lv, Yanna; Yin, Yifei; Zhou, Yinfei; Cui, Minghui; Zhu, Yanfeng; Zhang, Hongzhong

    2017-11-01

    ZnO nanoparticles is one of the most used materials in a wide range including antibacterial coating, electronic device, and personal care products. With the development of nanotechnology, ecotoxicology of ZnO nanoparticles has been received increasing attention. To assess the phototoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in aquatic ecosystem, microcosm experiments were conducted on Populus nigra L. leaf litter decomposition under combined effect of ZnO nanoparticles and visible light radiation. Litter decomposition rate, pH value, extracellular enzyme activity, as well as the relative contributions of fungal community to litter decomposition were studied. Results showed that long-term exposure to ZnO nanoparticles and visible light led to a significant decrease in litter decomposition rate (0.26 m -1 vs 0.45 m -1 ), and visible light would increase the inhibitory effect (0.24 m -1 ), which caused significant decrease in pH value of litter cultures, fungal sporulation rate, as well as most extracellular enzyme activities. The phototoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles also showed impacts on fungal community composition, especially on the genus of Varicosporium, whose abundance was significantly and positively related to decomposition rate. In conclusion, our study provides the evidence for negatively effects of ZnO NPs photocatalysis on ecological process of litter decomposition and highlights the contribution of visible light radiation to nanoparticles toxicity in freshwater ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of liquid-phase decomposition species and reactions for guanidinium azotetrazolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbhakarna, Neeraj R.; Shah, Kaushal J.; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Thynell, Stefan T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Guanidinium azotetrazolate (GzT) is a high-nitrogen energetic material. • FTIR spectroscopy and ToFMS spectrometry were used for species identification. • Quantum mechanics was used to identify transition states and decomposition pathways. • Important reactions in the GzT liquid-phase decomposition process were identified. • Initiation of decomposition occurs via ring opening, releasing N 2 . - Abstract: The objective of this work is to analyze the decomposition of guanidinium azotetrazolate (GzT) in the liquid phase by using a combined experimental and computational approach. The experimental part involves the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to acquire the spectral transmittance of the evolved gas-phase species from rapid thermolysis, as well as to acquire spectral transmittance of the condensate and residue formed from the decomposition. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) is also used to acquire mass spectra of the evolved gas-phase species. Sub-milligram samples of GzT were heated at rates of about 2000 K/s to a set temperature (553–573 K) where decomposition occurred under isothermal conditions. N 2 , NH 3 , HCN, guanidine and melamine were identified as products of decomposition. The computational approach is based on using quantum mechanics for confirming the identity of the species observed in experiments and for identifying elementary chemical reactions that formed these species. In these ab initio techniques, various levels of theory and basis sets were used. Based on the calculated enthalpy and free energy values of various molecular structures, important reaction pathways were identified. Initiation of decomposition of GzT occurs via ring opening to release N 2

  20. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    during the HP decomposition. The model assumes that the enzyme decay is controlled by an inactivation stoichiometry related to the HP decomposition. In order to make the model easily applicable, it is furthermore assumed that the COD is a proxy of the active biomass concentration of the water and thereby......Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...

  1. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrault, M.; Cances, E.; Hager, W.W.; Le Bris, C.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure

  2. Fast approximate convex decomposition using relative concavity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Mukulika; Amato, Nancy M.; Lu, Yanyan; Lien, Jyh-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Approximate convex decomposition (ACD) is a technique that partitions an input object into approximately convex components. Decomposition into approximately convex pieces is both more efficient to compute than exact convex decomposition and can also generate a more manageable number of components. It can be used as a basis of divide-and-conquer algorithms for applications such as collision detection, skeleton extraction and mesh generation. In this paper, we propose a new method called Fast Approximate Convex Decomposition (FACD) that improves the quality of the decomposition and reduces the cost of computing it for both 2D and 3D models. In particular, we propose a new strategy for evaluating potential cuts that aims to reduce the relative concavity, rather than absolute concavity. As shown in our results, this leads to more natural and smaller decompositions that include components for small but important features such as toes or fingers while not decomposing larger components, such as the torso, that may have concavities due to surface texture. Second, instead of decomposing a component into two pieces at each step, as in the original ACD, we propose a new strategy that uses a dynamic programming approach to select a set of n c non-crossing (independent) cuts that can be simultaneously applied to decompose the component into n c+1 components. This reduces the depth of recursion and, together with a more efficient method for computing the concavity measure, leads to significant gains in efficiency. We provide comparative results for 2D and 3D models illustrating the improvements obtained by FACD over ACD and we compare with the segmentation methods in the Princeton Shape Benchmark by Chen et al. (2009) [31]. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast approximate convex decomposition using relative concavity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Mukulika

    2013-02-01

    Approximate convex decomposition (ACD) is a technique that partitions an input object into approximately convex components. Decomposition into approximately convex pieces is both more efficient to compute than exact convex decomposition and can also generate a more manageable number of components. It can be used as a basis of divide-and-conquer algorithms for applications such as collision detection, skeleton extraction and mesh generation. In this paper, we propose a new method called Fast Approximate Convex Decomposition (FACD) that improves the quality of the decomposition and reduces the cost of computing it for both 2D and 3D models. In particular, we propose a new strategy for evaluating potential cuts that aims to reduce the relative concavity, rather than absolute concavity. As shown in our results, this leads to more natural and smaller decompositions that include components for small but important features such as toes or fingers while not decomposing larger components, such as the torso, that may have concavities due to surface texture. Second, instead of decomposing a component into two pieces at each step, as in the original ACD, we propose a new strategy that uses a dynamic programming approach to select a set of n c non-crossing (independent) cuts that can be simultaneously applied to decompose the component into n c+1 components. This reduces the depth of recursion and, together with a more efficient method for computing the concavity measure, leads to significant gains in efficiency. We provide comparative results for 2D and 3D models illustrating the improvements obtained by FACD over ACD and we compare with the segmentation methods in the Princeton Shape Benchmark by Chen et al. (2009) [31]. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decomposition sludge and decomposition gas for agricultural use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poepel, F

    1954-01-01

    Agricultural gas containing CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/ is produced by anaerobic fermentation of wastes. The decomposed material is a valuable fertilizer which, by means of aerobic composting with refuse or peat, can be converted into a true humus substance. The operation of small-scale plant for processing agricultural wastes is described.

  5. Ocean Models and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-de-Leon, D. A.

    2007-05-01

    The increasing computational developments and the better understanding of mathematical and physical systems resulted in an increasing number of ocean models. Long time ago, modelers were like a secret organization and recognize each other by using secret codes and languages that only a select group of people was able to recognize and understand. The access to computational systems was reduced, on one hand equipment and the using time of computers were expensive and restricted, and on the other hand, they required an advance computational languages that not everybody wanted to learn. Now a days most college freshman own a personal computer (PC or laptop), and/or have access to more sophisticated computational systems than those available for research in the early 80's. The resource availability resulted in a mayor access to all kind models. Today computer speed and time and the algorithms does not seem to be a problem, even though some models take days to run in small computational systems. Almost every oceanographic institution has their own model, what is more, in the same institution from one office to the next there are different models for the same phenomena, developed by different research member, the results does not differ substantially since the equations are the same, and the solving algorithms are similar. The algorithms and the grids, constructed with algorithms, can be found in text books and/or over the internet. Every year more sophisticated models are constructed. The Proper Orthogonal Decomposition is a technique that allows the reduction of the number of variables to solve keeping the model properties, for which it can be a very useful tool in diminishing the processes that have to be solved using "small" computational systems, making sophisticated models available for a greater community.

  6. Prediction of electronically nonadiabatic decomposition mechanisms of isolated gas phase nitrogen-rich energetic salt: Guanidium-triazolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Jayanta; Bhattacharya, Atanu, E-mail: atanub@ipc.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-01-13

    Highlights: • Decomposition mechanisms of model energetic salt, guanidium triazolate, are explored. • Decomposition pathways are electronically nonadiabatic. • CASPT2, CASMP2 and CASSCF methodologies are employed. • N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} are predicted to be the most possible initial decomposition products. - Abstract: Electronically nonadiabatic decomposition pathways of guanidium triazolate are explored theoretically. Nonadiabatically coupled potential energy surfaces are explored at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level of theory. For better estimation of energies complete active space second order perturbation theories (CASPT2 and CASMP2) are also employed. Density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and MP2 level of theory are used to explore subsequent ground state decomposition pathways. In comparison with all possible stable decomposition products (such as, N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, HNC, HCN, NH{sub 2}CN and CH{sub 3}NC), only NH{sub 3} (with NH{sub 2}CN) and N{sub 2} are predicted to be energetically most accessible initial decomposition products. Furthermore, different conical intersections between the S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} surfaces, which are computed at the CASSCF(14,10)/6-31G(d) level of theory, are found to play an essential role in the excited state deactivation process of guanidium triazolate. This is the first report on the electronically nonadiabatic decomposition mechanisms of isolated guanidium triazolate salt.

  7. Insight into litter decomposition driven by nutrient demands of symbiosis system through the hypha bridge of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangshi; Jia, Yanyan; Song, Fuqiang; Tian, Kai; Lin, Hong; Bei, Zhanlin; Jia, Xiuqin; Yao, Bei; Guo, Peng; Tian, Xingjun

    2018-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an important role in litter decomposition. This study investigated how soil nutrient level affected the process. Results showed that AMF colonization had no significant effect on litter decomposition under normal soil nutrient conditions. However, litter decomposition was accelerated significantly under lower nutrient conditions. Soil microbial biomass in decomposition system was significantly increased. Especially, in moderate lower nutrient treatment (condition of half-normal soil nutrient), litters exhibited the highest decomposition rate, AMF hypha revealed the greatest density, and enzymes (especially nitrate reductase) showed the highest activities as well. Meanwhile, the immobilization of nitrogen (N) in the decomposing litter remarkably decreased. Our results suggested that the roles AMF played in ecosystem were largely affected by soil nutrient levels. At normal soil nutrient level, AMF exhibited limited effects in promoting decomposition. When soil nutrient level decreased, the promoting effect of AMF on litter decomposition began to appear, especially on N mobilization. However, under extremely low nutrient conditions, AMF showed less influence on decomposition and may even compete with decomposer microorganisms for nutrients.

  8. Separable decompositions of bipartite mixed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Li; Qiao, Cong-Feng

    2018-04-01

    We present a practical scheme for the decomposition of a bipartite mixed state into a sum of direct products of local density matrices, using the technique developed in Li and Qiao (Sci. Rep. 8:1442, 2018). In the scheme, the correlation matrix which characterizes the bipartite entanglement is first decomposed into two matrices composed of the Bloch vectors of local states. Then, we show that the symmetries of Bloch vectors are consistent with that of the correlation matrix, and the magnitudes of the local Bloch vectors are lower bounded by the correlation matrix. Concrete examples for the separable decompositions of bipartite mixed states are presented for illustration.

  9. Vector domain decomposition schemes for parabolic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabishchevich, P. N.

    2017-09-01

    A new class of domain decomposition schemes for finding approximate solutions of timedependent problems for partial differential equations is proposed and studied. A boundary value problem for a second-order parabolic equation is used as a model problem. The general approach to the construction of domain decomposition schemes is based on partition of unity. Specifically, a vector problem is set up for solving problems in individual subdomains. Stability conditions for vector regionally additive schemes of first- and second-order accuracy are obtained.

  10. Two Notes on Discrimination and Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    1998-01-01

    1. It turns out that the Oaxaca-Blinder wage decomposition is inadequate when it comes to calculation of separate contributions for indicator variables. The contributions are not robust against a change of reference group. I extend the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition to handle this problem. 2. The p....... The paper suggests how to use the logit model to decompose the gender difference in the probability of an occurrence. The technique is illustrated by an analysis of discrimination in child labor in rural Zambia....

  11. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-12-07

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variable on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB.

  12. Eigenvalue Decomposition-Based Modified Newton Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When the Hessian matrix is not positive, the Newton direction may not be the descending direction. A new method named eigenvalue decomposition-based modified Newton algorithm is presented, which first takes the eigenvalue decomposition of the Hessian matrix, then replaces the negative eigenvalues with their absolute values, and finally reconstructs the Hessian matrix and modifies the searching direction. The new searching direction is always the descending direction. The convergence of the algorithm is proven and the conclusion on convergence rate is presented qualitatively. Finally, a numerical experiment is given for comparing the convergence domains of the modified algorithm and the classical algorithm.

  13. Ecological Stoichiometry Characteristics of Aquatic Macrophytes in the Decomposition Process%水生植物分解过程中生态化学计量学特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雷燕; 关保华; 程寒飞; 詹茂华

    2017-01-01

    Plant matter from three macrophytes from different environments was dried and analyzed over time to in-vestigate macrophyte stoichiometry during decomposition and the effect of environment on macrophyte stoichiometry . A floating plant, Lemna minor, and two submerged plants, Vallisneria natans and Potamogeton malaianus, were prepared and placed in three water environments:Treatment A:beaker with 200 mL tap water +3 cm of sediment in a greenhouse;Treatment B: beaker with 200 mL tap water in a greenhouse; Treatment C: in situ in a pond. Each treatment was run in triplicate with six plants per trial.Each week for five weeks, one plant was randomly se-lected from each treatment for determination of dry weight, TN, TC and TP.The C/N range in the three macro-phytes was 7.43-10.06, much lower than the global level of 22.5, and the C/P range was 43.09-91.77, sig-nificantly higher than the global level of 23.2.The results indicate that, with the same assimilation capacity of C, the utilization efficiency of N is higher than that of P.The N/P range (4.71-9.24) in the three macrophytes was lower than the global level of 14, showing that N was the limiting nutrient for the macrophytes.Furthermore, the submerged plants V.natans, and P.malaianus exhibited similar C/N ratios in the greenhouse and under natural conditions, indicating a consistent release rate of C and N from the submerged macrophytes and implying a small environmental effect.However, the C/N ratio of L.minor varied markedly between treatments, implying a large environmental effect.The C/N ratio in L.minor and V.natans increased rapidly at the beginning, indicating that the release rate of N from both macrophytes was higher than the release rate of C.The C/P and N/P ratio in the three macrophytes increased rapidly in the first week and the ratios varied significantly among the three groups.This indicates that the P release rate from the three macrophytes was higher than the release rates of C and N during the first

  14. Expert vs. novice: Problem decomposition/recomposition in engineering design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ting

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the differences of using problem decomposition and problem recomposition among dyads of engineering experts, dyads of engineering seniors, and dyads of engineering freshmen. Fifty participants took part in this study. Ten were engineering design experts, 20 were engineering seniors, and 20 were engineering freshmen. Participants worked in dyads to complete an engineering design challenge within an hour. The entire design process was video and audio recorded. After the design session, members participated in a group interview. This study used protocol analysis as the methodology. Video and audio data were transcribed, segmented, and coded. Two coding systems including the FBS ontology and "levels of the problem" were used in this study. A series of statistical techniques were used to analyze data. Interview data and participants' design sketches also worked as supplemental data to help answer the research questions. By analyzing the quantitative and qualitative data, it was found that students used less problem decomposition and problem recomposition than engineer experts in engineering design. This result implies that engineering education should place more importance on teaching problem decomposition and problem recomposition. Students were found to spend less cognitive effort when considering the problem as a whole and interactions between subsystems than engineer experts. In addition, students were also found to spend more cognitive effort when considering details of subsystems. These results showed that students tended to use dept-first decomposition and experts tended to use breadth-first decomposition in engineering design. The use of Function (F), Behavior (B), and Structure (S) among engineering experts, engineering seniors, and engineering freshmen was compared on three levels. Level 1 represents designers consider the problem as an integral whole, Level 2 represents designers consider interactions between

  15. An investigation on thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jiangning; Ren, Xiaoning; Zhang, Laying; Zhou, Yanshui [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants was investigated by pressure differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The results show that there is only one decomposition peak on DSC curves, because the decomposition peak of DNTF cannot be separated from that of the NC/NG binder. The decomposition of DNTF can be obviously accelerated by the decomposition products of the NC/NG binder. The kinetic parameters of thermal decompositions for four DNTF-CMDB propellants at 6 MPa were obtained by the Kissinger method. It is found that the reaction rate decreases with increasing content of DNTF. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Thermal Plasma Decomposition Of Nickel And Cobalt Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woch M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study on manufacturing of nickel and cobalt powders by thermal plasma decomposition of the carbonates of these metals. It was shown the dependence of process parameters and grain size of initial powder on the composition of final product which was ether metal powder, collected in the container as well as the nanopowder with crystallite size of 70 - 90 nm, collected on the inner wall of the reaction chamber. The occurrence of metal oxides in the final products was confirmed and discussed.

  17. Thermal decomposition of anhydrous zinc and cadmium salicylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.; Tujebakhova, Z.K.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of studying thermograms, thermogravigrams, IR absorption spectra, X-rayograms of anhydrous znc and cadmium salicylate complexes of the M(HSal) 2 composition, (where M=Zn, Cd; HSal is an anion of once deprotonated salicyclic acid H 2 Sal) and products of their thermal transformations, the processes are characterized of stage-by-stage thermal decomposition of these compounds under continuous heating in the air from room temperature to approximately 1000 deg C. It is shown that the Cd(HSal) 2 pyrolysis proceeds with the formation of CdSal at 170-250 deg C and CdO - at 320-460 deg C

  18. Thermal Decomposition Of Hydroxylamine Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Jimmie C.; Brower, Kay R.

    1988-05-01

    used hydroxylamine nitrate decomposes within a few minutes in the temperature range 130-140°C. Added ammonium ion is converted to N2, while hydrazinium ion is converted to HN3. Nitrous acid is an intermediate and its formation is rate-determining. A hygride transfer process is postulated. The reaction pathways have been elucidated by use of N tracers.

  19. Kosambi and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    any meteorological station, or process and control pa- rameters in a chemical plant. All these are .... The power spectrum of turbulent kinetic energy is usu- ally expressed in ... to have been inspired by Kelvin's tidal machine, with templates and ...

  20. Thermal decomposition of rhenium (5) complexes with 1,2,4-triazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amindzhanov, A.A.; Gagieva, S.Ch.; Kotegov, K.V.

    1991-01-01

    Processes of thermal decomposition of rhenium (5) complexes with 1,2,4-triazole were studied. Thermolysis products were identified on the basis of data of the element analysis, IR spectra, conductometry and other methods. It is ascertained that at the first stage of thermolysis of hydroxyl-containing monomer complexes removal of water molecules occurs, and at the second one - dimerization process with formation of Re-O-Re group. It is shown that the nature of halide ion practically does not affect the temperature of the start of intensive thermal decomposition of the complexes

  1. Energetic materials under high pressures and temperatures: stability, polymorphism and decomposition of RDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreger, Z A

    2012-01-01

    A recent progress in understanding the response of energetic crystal of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) to high pressures and temperatures is summarized. The optical spectroscopy and imaging studies under static compression and high temperatures provided new insight into phase diagram, polymorphism and decomposition mechanisms at pressures and temperatures relevant to those under shock compression. These results have been used to aid the understanding of processes under shock compression, including the shock-induced phase transition and identification of the crystal phase at decomposition. This work demonstrates that studies under static compression and high temperatures provide important complementary route for elucidating the physical and chemical processes in shocked energetic crystals.

  2. Exact complexity: The spectral decomposition of intrinsic computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutchfield, James P.; Ellison, Christopher J.; Riechers, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    We give exact formulae for a wide family of complexity measures that capture the organization of hidden nonlinear processes. The spectral decomposition of operator-valued functions leads to closed-form expressions involving the full eigenvalue spectrum of the mixed-state presentation of a process's ϵ-machine causal-state dynamic. Measures include correlation functions, power spectra, past-future mutual information, transient and synchronization informations, and many others. As a result, a direct and complete analysis of intrinsic computation is now available for the temporal organization of finitary hidden Markov models and nonlinear dynamical systems with generating partitions and for the spatial organization in one-dimensional systems, including spin systems, cellular automata, and complex materials via chaotic crystallography. - Highlights: • We provide exact, closed-form expressions for a hidden stationary process' intrinsic computation. • These include information measures such as the excess entropy, transient information, and synchronization information and the entropy-rate finite-length approximations. • The method uses an epsilon-machine's mixed-state presentation. • The spectral decomposition of the mixed-state presentation relies on the recent development of meromorphic functional calculus for nondiagonalizable operators.

  3. Decomposition of jellyfish carrion in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chelsky, Ariella; Pitt, Kylie A.; Ferguson, Angus J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Jellyfish often form blooms that persist for weeks to months before they collapse en masse, resulting in the sudden release of large amounts of organic matter to the environment. This study investigated the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the decomposition of jellyfish in a shallow coast...

  4. Compactly supported frames for decomposition spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Rasmussen, Kenneth Niemann

    2012-01-01

    In this article we study a construction of compactly supported frame expansions for decomposition spaces of Triebel-Lizorkin type and for the associated modulation spaces. This is done by showing that finite linear combinations of shifts and dilates of a single function with sufficient decay in b...

  5. Thermal Decomposition of Aluminium Chloride Hexahydrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Trnka, Otakar; Šolcová, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 17 (2005), s. 6591-6598 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aluminum chloride hexahydrate * thermal decomposition * reaction kinetics Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.504, year: 2005

  6. A decomposition of pairwise continuity via ideals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahes Wari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce and study the notions of (i, j - regular - ℐ -closed sets, (i, j - Aℐ -sets, (i, j - ℐ -locally closed sets, p- Aℐ -continuous functions and p- ℐ -LC-continuous functions in ideal bitopological spaces and investigate some of their properties. Also, a new decomposition of pairwise continuity is obtained using these sets.

  7. Nested grids ILU-decomposition (NGILU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, A. van der; Botta, E.F.F.; Wubs, F.W.

    1996-01-01

    A preconditioning technique is described which shows, in many cases, grid-independent convergence. This technique only requires an ordering of the unknowns based on the different levels of multigrid, and an incomplete LU-decomposition based on a drop tolerance. The method is demonstrated on a

  8. Triboluminescence and associated decomposition of solid methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trout, G.J.; Moore, D.E.; Hawke, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    The decomposition is initiated by the cooling of solid methanol through the β → α transiRon at 157.8K, producing the gases hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane. The passage through this lambda transition causes the breakup of large crystals of β-methanol into crystallites of α-methanol and is accompanied by light emission as well as decomposition. This triboluminescence is accompanied by, and apparently produced by, electrical discharges through methanol vapor in the vicinity of the solid. The potential differences needed to produce the electrical breakdown of the methanol vapor apparently arise from the disruption of the long hydrogen bonded chains of methanol molecules present in crystalline methanol. Charge separation following crystal deformation is a characteristic of substances which exhibit gas discharge triboluminescence; solid methanol has been found to emit such luminescence when mechanically deformed in the absence of the β → α transition The decomposition products are not produced directly by the breaking up of the solid methanol but from the vapor phase methanol by the electrical discharges. That gas phase decomposition does occur was confirmed by observing that the vapors of C 2 H 5 OH, CH 3 OD, and CD 3 OD decompose on being admitted to a vessel containing methanol undergoing the β → α phase transition. (U.S.)

  9. On Orthogonal Decomposition of a Sobolev Space

    OpenAIRE

    Lakew, Dejenie A.

    2016-01-01

    The theme of this short article is to investigate an orthogonal decomposition of a Sobolev space and look at some properties of the inner product therein and the distance defined from the inner product. We also determine the dimension of the orthogonal difference space and show the expansion of spaces as their regularity increases.

  10. TP89 - SIRZ Decomposition Spectral Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetho, Isacc M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, Jerel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, William D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Jr., Harry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-08

    The primary objective of this test plan is to provide X-ray CT measurements of known materials for the purposes of generating and testing MicroCT and EDS spectral estimates. These estimates are to be used in subsequent Ze/RhoE decomposition analyses of acquired data.

  11. Methodologies in forensic and decomposition microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culturable microorganisms represent only 0.1-1% of the total microbial diversity of the biosphere. This has severely restricted the ability of scientists to study the microbial biodiversity associated with the decomposition of ephemeral resources in the past. Innovations in technology are bringing...

  12. Organic matter decomposition in simulated aquaculture ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Beristain, B.

    2005-01-01

    Different kinds of organic and inorganic compounds (e.g. formulated food, manures, fertilizers) are added to aquaculture ponds to increase fish production. However, a large part of these inputs are not utilized by the fish and are decomposed inside the pond. The microbiological decomposition of the

  13. Wood decomposition as influenced by invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen

    2014-01-01

    The diversity and habitat requirements of invertebrates associated with dead wood have been the subjects of hundreds of studies in recent years but we still know very little about the ecological or economic importance of these organisms. The purpose of this review is to examine whether, how and to what extent invertebrates affect wood decomposition in terrestrial...

  14. Linear, Constant-rounds Bit-decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reistad, Tord; Toft, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    When performing secure multiparty computation, tasks may often be simple or difficult depending on the representation chosen. Hence, being able to switch representation efficiently may allow more efficient protocols. We present a new protocol for bit-decomposition: converting a ring element x ∈ ℤ M...

  15. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrazine Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Nancy E.; Bates, Kami R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop and validate a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. Hydrazine is used extensively in aerospace propulsion, and although liquid hydrazine is not considered detonable, many fuel handling systems create multiphase mixtures of fuels and fuel vapors during their operation. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the decomposition chemistry of hydrazine under a variety of conditions can be of value in assessing potential operational hazards in hydrazine fuel systems. To gain such knowledge, a reasonable starting point is the development and validation of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. A reasonably complete mechanism was published in 1996, however, many of the elementary steps included had outdated rate expressions and a thorough investigation of the behavior of the mechanism under a variety of conditions was not presented. The current work has included substantial revision of the previously published mechanism, along with a more extensive examination of the decomposition behavior of hydrazine. An attempt to validate the mechanism against the limited experimental data available has been made and was moderately successful. Further computational and experimental research into the chemistry of this fuel needs to be completed.

  16. Decomposition approaches to integration without a measure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Greco, S.; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, F.; Sipeky, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 1 (2016), s. 37-47 ISSN 0165-0114 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Choquet integral * Decision making * Decomposition integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/E/mesiar-0457408.pdf

  17. Radiolytic decomposition of dioxins in liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Changli; Taguchi, M.; Hirota, K.; Takigami, M.; Kojima, T.

    2006-01-01

    The dioxins including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are some of the most toxic persistent organic pollutants. These chemicals have widely contaminated the air, water, and soil. They would accumulate in the living body through the food chains, leading to a serious public health hazard. In the present study, radiolytic decomposition of dioxins has been investigated in liquid wastes, including organic waste and waste-water. Dioxin-containing organic wastes are commonly generated in nonane or toluene. However, it was found that high radiation doses are required to completely decompose dioxins in the two solvents. The decomposition was more efficient in ethanol than in nonane or toluene. The addition of ethanol to toluene or nonane could achieve >90% decomposition of dioxins at the dose of 100 kGy. Thus, dioxin-containing organic wastes can be treated as regular organic wastes after addition of ethanol and subsequent γ-ray irradiation. On the other hand, radiolytic decomposition of dioxins easily occurred in pure-water than in waste-water, because the reaction species is largely scavenged by the dominant organic materials in waste-water. Dechlorination was not a major reaction pathway for the radiolysis of dioxin in water. In addition, radiolytic mechanism and dechlorinated pathways in liquid wastes were also discussed. (authors)

  18. Strongly \\'etale difference algebras and Babbitt's decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Tomašić, Ivan; Wibmer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a class of strongly \\'{e}tale difference algebras, whose role in the study of difference equations is analogous to the role of \\'{e}tale algebras in the study of algebraic equations. We deduce an improved version of Babbitt's decomposition theorem and we present applications to difference algebraic groups and the compatibility problem.

  19. Thermal decomposition of barium valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, P.; Norby, Poul; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of barium valerate (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2)/Ba-pentanoate) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage optical microscopy. Melting takes place in two different steps, at 200 degrees C and 280...

  20. A framework for bootstrapping morphological decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joubert, LJ

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for a bootstrapping approach to the morphological decomposition of words in agglutinative languages such as isiZulu is motivated, and the complexities of such an approach are described. The authors then introduce a generic framework which...

  1. A Systolic Architecture for Singular Value Decomposition,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Presented at the 1 st International Colloquium on Vector and Parallel Computing in Scientific Applications, Paris, March 191J Contract N00014-82-K.0703...Gene Golub. Private comunication . given inputs x and n 2 , compute 2 2 2 2 /6/ G. H. Golub and F. T. Luk : "Singular Value I + X1 Decomposition

  2. Direct observation of nanowire growth and decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Shandakov, Sergey D; Jiang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    knowledge, so far this has been only postulated, but never observed at the atomic level. By means of in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy we monitored and examined the atomic layer transformation at the conditions of the crystal growth and its decomposition using CuO nanowires selected...

  3. Nash-Williams’ cycle-decomposition theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We give an elementary proof of the theorem of Nash-Williams that a graph has an edge-decomposition into cycles if and only if it does not contain an odd cut. We also prove that every bridgeless graph has a collection of cycles covering each edge at least once and at most 7 times. The two results...

  4. Distributed Model Predictive Control via Dual Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents dual decomposition as a means to coordinate a number of subsystems coupled by state and input constraints. Each subsystem is equipped with a local model predictive controller while a centralized entity manages the subsystems via prices associated with the coupling constraints...

  5. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R. M.; Sims, H. E.; Taylor, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or 'finishing' processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles.

  6. Decomposition characteristics of three different kinds of aquatic macrophytes and their potential application as carbon resource in constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suqing; He, Shengbing; Zhou, Weili; Gu, Jianya; Huang, Jungchen; Gao, Lei; Zhang, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Decomposition of aquatic macrophytes usually generates significant influence on aquatic environment. Study on the aquatic macrophytes decomposition may help reusing the aquatic macrophytes litters, as well as controlling the water pollution caused by the decomposition process. This study verified that the decomposition processes of three different kinds of aquatic macrophytes (water hyacinth, hydrilla and cattail) could exert significant influences on water quality of the receiving water, including the change extent of pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), the contents of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, etc. The influence of decomposition on water quality and the concentrations of the released chemical materials both followed the order of water hyacinth > hydrilla > cattail. Greater influence was obtained with higher dosage of plant litter addition. The influence also varied with sediment addition. Moreover, nitrogen released from the decomposition of water hyacinth and hydrilla were mainly NH 3 -N and organic nitrogen while those from cattail litter included organic nitrogen and NO 3 - -N. After the decomposition, the average carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) in the receiving water was about 2.6 (water hyacinth), 5.3 (hydrilla) and 20.3 (cattail). Therefore, cattail litter might be a potential plant carbon source for denitrification in ecological system of a constructed wetland. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Slice Algorithm For Irreducible Decomposition of Monomial Ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roune, Bjarke Hammersholt

    2009-01-01

    Irreducible decomposition of monomial ideals has an increasing number of applications from biology to pure math. This paper presents the Slice Algorithm for computing irreducible decompositions, Alexander duals and socles of monomial ideals. The paper includes experiments showing good performance...

  8. High Performance Polar Decomposition on Distributed Memory Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal E.; Ltaief, Hatem; Keyes, David E.

    2016-01-01

    The polar decomposition of a dense matrix is an important operation in linear algebra. It can be directly calculated through the singular value decomposition (SVD) or iteratively using the QR dynamically-weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH). The former

  9. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous periodate with VUV and UV light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, M.H.; Wang, B.B.; Yu, H.S.; Wang, L.L.; Yuan, S.H.; Chen, J.

    2010-01-01

    The photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous periodate (IO 4 - ) was investigated under two types of low-pressure mercury lamps: one emits at 254 nm light (UV light) and the other emits both 254 nm and 185 nm light (VUV light). PFOA decomposed efficiently under VUV light irradiation while it decomposed poorly under UV light irradiation. The addition of IO 4 - significantly increased the rate of decomposition and defluorination of PFOA irradiated with UV light whereas it decreased both processes under VUV irradiation. Reactive radical (IO 3 ·) generated by photolysis of IO 4 - initiated the oxidation of PFOA in UV process. Aquated electrons (e aq - ), generated from water homolysis, scavenged IO 4 - resulting in decrease of reactive radical species production and PFOA decomposition. The shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) formed in a stepwise manner from long-chain PFCAs.

  10. H2O2 can Increase Lignin Disintegration and Decrease Cellulose Decomposition in the Process of Solid-State Fermentation (SSF) by Aspergillus oryzae Using Corn Stalk as Raw Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhicai Zhang; Jun Jia; Ming Li; Qiaoxia Pang

    2014-01-01

    H2O2 is both bactericidal and the main oxidant responsible for lignin degradation reaction catalyzed by manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). Thus, H2O2 treatment of corn stalk and the implementation of solid-substrate fermentation (SSF) is possible to increase the removal rate of lignin from stalk in the process of SSF and after SSF, while avoiding the need to sterilize the raw materials. To demonstrate this approach, SSF was initially carried out using corn stalk pretreate...

  11. Leaf Litter Decomposition and Nutrient Dynamics Associated with Common Horticultural Cropland Agroforest Tree Species of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Hasanuzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangifera indica, Zizyphus jujuba, Litchi chinensis, and Artocarpus heterophyllus are the most common cropland agroforest horticultural tree species of Bangladesh. This study focused on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient (N, P, and K dynamics during the decomposition process. This experiment was conducted for 180 days by using litter bag technique during dry and wet seasons. Mass loss was the highest (49% and 57% for A. heterophyllus and the lowest (25% was found for L. chinensis. The highest initial rates (0.75% and 2.35%/day of decomposition were observed for Z. jujuba and the lowest (0.50% and 0.79%/day for L. chinensis. The highest decay constant was observed for A. heterophyllus (2.14 and 2.34 and the lowest (0.88 and 0.94 for L. chinensis. Leaf litter of all the studied species showed a similar pattern (K > N > P of nutrient release during the decomposition process. Zizyphus jujuba showed comparatively higher return of N, P, and K than others. However, a significant (P<0.05 higher amount of mass loss, rate of decomposition, decay constant, and amount of nutrient return from leaf litter were observed during the wet season.

  12. A simple method for decomposition of peracetic acid in a microalgal cultivation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Min-Gyu; Lee, Hansol; Nam, Kibok; Rexroth, Sascha; Rögner, Matthias; Kwon, Jong-Hee; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-03-01

    A cost-efficient process devoid of several washing steps was developed, which is related to direct cultivation following the decomposition of the sterilizer. Peracetic acid (PAA) is known to be an efficient antimicrobial agent due to its high oxidizing potential. Sterilization by 2 mM PAA demands at least 1 h incubation time for an effective disinfection. Direct degradation of PAA was demonstrated by utilizing components in conventional algal medium. Consequently, ferric ion and pH buffer (HEPES) showed a synergetic effect for the decomposition of PAA within 6 h. On the contrary, NaNO3, one of the main components in algal media, inhibits the decomposition of PAA. The improved growth of Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis PCC6803 was observed in the prepared BG11 by decomposition of PAA. This process involving sterilization and decomposition of PAA should help cost-efficient management of photobioreactors in a large scale for the production of value-added products and biofuels from microalgal biomass.

  13. Thermal decomposition kinetics of strontium permanganate trihydrate, cadmium permanganate hexahydrate and calcium permanganate pentahydrate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, K.R.; Schaeffer, D.A.; Herley, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    A thermogravimetric study of the kinetics of thermal nuclei formation and growth has been carried out for the dehydration and decomposition of single crystal strontium permanganate trihydrate, cadmium permanganate hexahydrate, and calcium permanganate pentahydrate. The isothermal dehydration of strontium parmanganate trihydrate occurs in two stages between 50 and 100 0 C. The dehydration kinetics suggest that the two dehydration stages are based on a single-step nucleation process followed by a growth process without nuclei overlap. The resulting activation energies are consistent with the proposed nucleation theory. For the dehydration kinetics of cadmium permanganate hexahydrate, an overlapping nucleation growth mechanism appears to be operating between 30 and 60 0 C. The results are irreproducible for the dehydration of calcium permanganate pentahydrate at 100 0 C. The thermal decomposition studies indicate that the data of the sigmoidal, isothermal fractional decomposition vs. time curves are reproducible for whole and ground crystals of each dehydrated permanganate. All of the data plots contain an induction or slow rate period, an acceleratory and a decay period. The induction period can be shortened by irradiation with 60 Co γ-rays prior to decomposition. Activation energies obtained for all three materials for the various thermal decomposition periods are found to be similar to those published previously on other alkali and alkaline-earth permanganates. (Auth.)

  14. Responses of primary production, leaf litter decomposition and associated communities to stream eutrophication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunck, Bárbara; Lima-Fernandes, Eva; Cássio, Fernanda; Cunha, Ana; Rodrigues, Liliana; Pascoal, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the eutrophication effects on leaf litter decomposition and primary production, and on periphytic algae, fungi and invertebrates. According to the subsidy-stress model, we expected that when algae and decomposers were nutrient limited, their activity and diversity would increase at moderate levels of nutrient enrichment, but decrease at high levels of nutrients, because eutrophication would lead to the presence of other stressors and overwhelm the subsidy effect. Chestnut leaves (Castanea sativa Mill) were enclosed in mesh bags and immersed in five streams of the Ave River basin (northwest Portugal) to assess leaf decomposition and colonization by invertebrates and fungi. In parallel, polyethylene slides were attached to the mesh bags to allow colonization by algae and to assess primary production. Communities of periphytic algae and decomposers discriminated the streams according to the trophic state. Primary production decomposition and biodiversity were lower in streams at both ends of the trophic gradient. - Highlights: • Algae and decomposers discriminated the streams according to the eutrophication level. • Primary production and litter decomposition are stimulated by moderate eutrophication. • Biodiversity and process rates were reduced in highly eutrophic streams. • Subsidy-stress model explained biodiversity and process rates under eutrophication. - Rates of leaf litter decomposition, primary production and richness of periphytic algae, fungi and invertebrates were lower in streams at both ends of the trophic gradient

  15. Thermal decomposition of γ-irradiated lead nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; Kumar, T.S.S.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of unirradiated and γ-irradiated lead nitrate was studied by the gas evolution method. The decomposition proceeds through initial gas evolution, a short induction period, an acceleratory stage and a decay stage. The acceleratory and decay stages follow the Avrami-Erofeev equation. Irradiation enhances the decomposition but does not affect the shape of the decomposition curve. (author) 10 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Implementation of domain decomposition and data decomposition algorithms in RMC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.G.; Cai, Y.; Wang, K.; She, D.

    2013-01-01

    The applications of Monte Carlo method in reactor physics analysis is somewhat restricted due to the excessive memory demand in solving large-scale problems. Memory demand in MC simulation is analyzed firstly, it concerns geometry data, data of nuclear cross-sections, data of particles, and data of tallies. It appears that tally data is dominant in memory cost and should be focused on in solving the memory problem. Domain decomposition and tally data decomposition algorithms are separately designed and implemented in the reactor Monte Carlo code RMC. Basically, the domain decomposition algorithm is a strategy of 'divide and rule', which means problems are divided into different sub-domains to be dealt with separately and some rules are established to make sure the whole results are correct. Tally data decomposition consists in 2 parts: data partition and data communication. Two algorithms with differential communication synchronization mechanisms are proposed. Numerical tests have been executed to evaluate performance of the new algorithms. Domain decomposition algorithm shows potentials to speed up MC simulation as a space parallel method. As for tally data decomposition algorithms, memory size is greatly reduced

  17. Decompositional equivalence: A fundamental symmetry underlying quantum theory

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Decompositional equivalence is the principle that there is no preferred decomposition of the universe into subsystems. It is shown here, by using simple thought experiments, that quantum theory follows from decompositional equivalence together with Landauer's principle. This demonstration raises within physics a question previously left to psychology: how do human - or any - observers agree about what constitutes a "system of interest"?

  18. Climate fails to predict wood decomposition at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Bradford; Robert J. Warren; Petr Baldrian; Thomas W. Crowther; Daniel S. Maynard; Emily E. Oldfield; William R. Wieder; Stephen A. Wood; Joshua R. King

    2014-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter strongly influences ecosystem carbon storage1. In Earth-system models, climate is a predominant control on the decomposition rates of organic matter2, 3, 4, 5. This assumption is based on the mean response of decomposition to climate, yet there is a growing appreciation in other areas of global change science that projections based on...

  19. In situ XAS of the solvothermal decomposition of dithiocarbamate complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, H.-U.; Roffey, A.; Hollingsworth, N.; Catlow, R.; Wolthers, M.; de Leeuw, N.H.; Bras, W.; Sankar, G.; Hogarth, G.

    2012-01-01

    An in situ XAS study of the solvothermal decomposition of iron and nickel dithiocarbamate complexes was performed in order to gain understanding of the decomposition mechanisms. This work has given insight into the steps involved in the decomposition, showing variation in reaction pathways between

  20. Oxidative decomposition of aromatic hydrocarbons by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Do-Hung; Stuchinskaya, Tatiana; Won, Yang-Soo; Park, Wan-Sik; Lim, Jae-Kyong

    2003-05-01

    Decomposition of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under electron beam irradiation was studied in order to examine the kinetics of the process, to characterize the reaction product distribution and to develop a process of waste gas control technology. Toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m-, p-xylenes and chlorobenzene were used as target materials. The experiments were carried out at doses ranging from 0.5 to 10 kGy, using a flow reactor utilized under electron beam irradiation. Maximum degrees of decomposition carried out at 10 kGy in air environment were 55-65% for “non-chlorinated” aromatic VOC and 85% for chlorobenzene. It was found that a combination of aromatic pollutants with chlorobenzene would considerably increase the degradation value up to nearly 50% compared to the same compounds in the absence of chlorine groups. Based on our experimental observation, the degradation mechanism of the aromatic compounds combined with chloro-compound suggests that a chlorine radical, formed from EB irradiation, induces a chain reaction, resulting in an accelerating oxidative destruction of aromatic VOCs.

  1. Decomposition dynamic of two aquatic macrophytes Trapa bispinosa Roxb. and Nelumbo nucifera detritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaohong; Feng, Deyou; Wen, Chunzi; Liu, Dan

    2018-03-29

    In freshwater ecosystems, aquatic macrophytes play significant roles in nutrient cycling. One problem in this process is nutrient loss in the tissues of untimely harvested plants. In this study, we used two aquatic species, Nelumbo nucifera and Trapa bispinosa Roxb., to investigate the decomposition dynamics and nutrient release from detritus. Litter bags containing 10 g of stems (plus petioles) and leaves for each species detritus were incubated in the pond from November 2016 to May 2017. Nine times litterbags were retrieved on days 6, 14, 25, 45, 65, 90, 125, 145, and 165 after the decomposition experiment for the monitoring of biomass loss and nutrient release. The results suggested that the dry masses of N. nucifera and T. bispinosa decomposed by 49.35-69.40 and 82.65-91.65%, respectively. The order of decomposition rate constants (k) is as follows: leaves of T. bispinosa (0.0122 day -1 ) > stems (plus petioles) of T. bispinosa (0.0090 day -1 ) > leaves of N. nucifera (0.0060 day -1 ) > stems (plus petioles) of N. nucifera (0.0030 day -1 ). Additionally, the orders of time for 50% dry mass decay, time for 95% dry mass decay, and turnover rate are as follows: leaves  0.05). In addition, the decomposition time had also significant effects on the detritus decomposition dynamic and nutrient release. However, the contributors of species and decomposition time on detritus decomposition were significantly different on the basis of their F values of two-way ANOVA results. This study can provide scientific bases for the aquatic plant scientific management in freshwater ecosystems of the East region of China.

  2. Litter Decomposition Rate of Karst Ecosystem at Gunung Cibodas, Ciampea Bogor Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethyo Vieni Sari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to know the productivity of litter and litter decomposition rate in karst ecosystem. This study was conducted on three altitude of 200 meter above sea level (masl, 250 masl and 300 masl in karst ecosystem at Gunung Cibodas, Ciampea, Bogor. Litter productivity measurement performed using litter-trap method and litter-bag method was used to know the rate of decomposition. Litter productivity measurement results showed that the highest total of litter productivity measurement results was on altitude of 200 masl (90.452 tons/ha/year and the lowest was on altitude of 300 masl (25.440 tons/ha/year. The litter productivity of leaves (81.425 ton/ha/year showed the highest result than twigs (16.839 ton/ha/year, as well as flowers and fruits (27.839 ton/ha/year. The rate of decomposition was influenced by rainfall. The decomposition rate and the decrease of litter dry weight on altitude of 250 masl was faster than on the altitude of 200 masl and 300 masl. The dry weight was positively correlated to the rate of decomposition. The lower of dry weight would affect the rate of decomposition become slower. The average of litter C/N ratio were ranged from 28.024%--28.716% and categorized as moderate (>25. The finding indicate that the rate of decomposition in karst ecosystem at Gunung Cibodas was slow and based on C/N ratio of litter showed the mineralization process was also slow.

  3. Thermal decomposition of chromite spinel with chlorite admixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Ramos, S. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, C/Doctor Moliner 50, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Escuela Superior de Ceramica, C/Ceramista A. Blat 22, 46940 Manises, Valencia (Spain); Domenech-Carbo, A. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, C/Doctor Moliner 50, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Gimeno-Adelantado, J.V. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, C/Doctor Moliner 50, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jose.v.gimeno@uv.es; Peris-Vicente, J.; Valle-Algarra, F.M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia, C/Doctor Moliner 50, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2008-09-30

    The behaviour of minerals in a South African chromite ore during the increasing of the temperature has been studied. Firstly, the changes produced during the ignition process have been examined by means of thermal and differential analysis (TGA-DTA) until 1200 deg. C. The characterization of the initial mineral and those obtained after heating at several temperatures in room atmosphere has been performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Moreover, voltammetric analyses have allowed to determine the variation of the iron oxidation degree in the studied materials. Light microscopy was applied to find more information about the different phases by their colour. During the heating, a wide range of complex exothermic and endothermic transformations take place. Decomposition compounds were identified, which were produced by heat decomposition, loss of structural water, element substitutions and oxygen absorptions and desorptions, caused mainly by the variation of the iron oxidation degree. The spinels of the chromite ore decompose in other spinels, with a partial change of the iron oxidation degree. From nearly 800 deg. C, chrome oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) comes off from the chromite forming another phase, and almost at 1000 deg. C, a slow decrease of weight was detected, caused among others to the formation of a magnetite phase. Simultaneously, the silicates undergo strong modifications, including decompositions and incorporation of iron (II) in their structure and producing other silicates stable at high temperatures, which modify the behaviour of the pure spinels. Moreover, at 1200 deg. C these silicates decompose to cristobalite (SiO{sub 2})

  4. Isotopic Discrimination During Leaf Litter Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngao, J.; Rubino, M.

    2006-12-01

    Methods involving stable isotopes have been successfully applied since decades in various research fields. Tracing 13C natural abundance in ecosystem compartments greatly enhanced the understanding of the C fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere C exchanges when compartments present different C isotopic signatures (i.e. atmospheric CO2 vs photosynthetic leaves, C3 vs C4; etc.). However, the assumption that no isotopic discrimination occurs during respiration is commonly made in numbers of C isotope-based ecological studies. Furthermore, verifications of such assumption are sparse and not enough reliable. The aim of our study is to assess the potential isotopic discrimination that may occur during litter decomposition. Leaf litter from an Arbutus unedo (L.) stand (Tolfa, Italy) was incubated in 1L jars, under constant laboratory conditions (i.e. 25 ° C and 135% WC). During the entire incubation period, gravimetric mass loss, litter respiration rates and the isotopic composition of respired CO2 are monitored at regular intervals. Data from 7 months of incubation will be presented and discussed. After two months, the litter mass loss averaged 16% of initial dry mass. During the same time-period, the respiration rate decreased significantly by 58% of the initial respiration rate. Isotopic compositions of respired CO2 ranged between -27.95‰ and - 25.69‰. Mean values did not differ significantly among the sampling days, in spite of an apparent enrichment in 13C of respired CO2 with time. The significance of these isotopic enrichment will be determined at a longer time scale. They may reveal both/either a direct microbial discrimination during respiration processes and/or a use of different litter compounds as C source along time. Further chemical and compound-specific isotopic analysis of dry matter will be performed in order to clarify these hypotheses. This work is part of the "ALICE" project, funded by the European Union's Marie Curie Fellowship Actions that aims to

  5. H2O2 can Increase Lignin Disintegration and Decrease Cellulose Decomposition in the Process of Solid-State Fermentation (SSF by Aspergillus oryzae Using Corn Stalk as Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicai Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available H2O2 is both bactericidal and the main oxidant responsible for lignin degradation reaction catalyzed by manganese peroxidase (MnP and lignin peroxidase (LiP. Thus, H2O2 treatment of corn stalk and the implementation of solid-substrate fermentation (SSF is possible to increase the removal rate of lignin from stalk in the process of SSF and after SSF, while avoiding the need to sterilize the raw materials. To demonstrate this approach, SSF was initially carried out using corn stalk pretreated with different concentrations of H2O2 as a substrate. A. oryzae was found to grow well in the 3% H2O2-pretreated corn stalk. H2O2-pretreated corn stalk showed increased MnP and LiP synthesis and disintegration of lignin, but inhibited cellulase synthesis and cellulose degradation. Production of the SSF (200 g on the 10th day was hydrolyzed in the presence of additional 600 mL different concentration of H2O2 aqueous solution. The total removal of lignin (73.15% of hydrolysis for 10 h at 3% H2O2 solution was highest and far higher than that at the 12th day, as achieved by conventional SSF. Applying this strategy in practice may shorten the time of lignin degradation, increase the removal of lignin, and decrease the loss of cellulose. Thus, this study has provided a foundation for further study saccharification of corn stalk.

  6. Decomposition of methane hydrate for hydrogen production using microwave and radio frequency in-liquid plasma methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, Ismail; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi

    2015-01-01

    This research involves two in-liquid plasma methods of methane hydrate decomposition, one using radio frequency wave (RF) irradiation and the other microwave radiation (MW). The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a practical process for decomposition of methane hydrate directly at the subsea site for fuel gas production. The mechanism for methane hydrate decomposition begins with the dissociation process of methane hydrate formed by CH_4 and water. The process continues with the simultaneously occurring steam methane reforming process and methane cracking reaction, during which the methane hydrate is decomposed releasing CH_4 into H_2, CO and other by-products. It was found that methane hydrate can be decomposed with a faster rate of CH_4 release using microwave irradiation over that using radio frequency irradiation. However, the radio frequency plasma method produces hydrogen with a purity of 63.1% and a CH conversion ratio of 99.1%, which is higher than using microwave plasma method which produces hydrogen with a purity of 42.1% and CH_4 conversion ratio of 85.5%. - Highlights: • The decomposition of methane hydrate is proposed using plasma in-liquid method. • Synthetic methane hydrate is used as the sample for decomposition in plasma. • Hydrogen can be produced from decomposition of methane hydrate. • Hydrogen purity is higher when using radio frequency stimulation.

  7. Thermal decomposition of ammonium diuranate, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and uranyl peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulianto, T.; Mutiara, E.

    2011-01-01

    The behaviors of three types of starting powder had been investigated during their thermal decomposition processes in nitrogen, air, and hydrogen. The powder types were the products of uranyl nitrate precipitation, i.e. ADU (ammonium diuranate), UNH (uranyl nitrate hexahydrate), and UPO (uranyl peroxide). The objective of the investigation was to find out the best atmosphere that would result in good quality powder in a thermal decomposition process with the lowest temperature and the shortest period of time in order to reduce the cost of UO 2 powder preparation. Before the thermal decomposition process was initiated, all powder types were characterized for their crystal structures. The investigation was conducted by TG-DTA instrument at temperature up to 800°C and the heating rate of 10°C/minute. The crystal structures were identified by X-Ray Diffractometer with Cu-Ka radiation. The specific surface area of the powder was also observed using BET method, especially for the powder that underwent the process in hydrogen heated up to 800°C. The Results showed that the process took place faster in hydrogen, and UNH required lower thermal decomposition temperature in relations with other types of powder. (author)

  8. Technical Note: Linking climate change and downed woody debris decomposition across forests of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Matthew B.; Woodall, Christopher W.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Fraver, Shawn; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Forest ecosystems play a critical role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Forest carbon (C) is stored through photosynthesis and released via decomposition and combustion. Relative to C fixation in biomass, much less is known about C depletion through decomposition of woody debris, particularly under a changing climate. It is assumed that the increased temperatures and longer growing seasons associated with projected climate change will increase the decomposition rates (i.e., more rapid C cycling) of downed woody debris (DWD); however, the magnitude of this increase has not been previously addressed. Using DWD measurements collected from a national forest inventory of the eastern United States, we show that the residence time of DWD may decrease (i.e., more rapid decomposition) by as much as 13% over the next 200 years, depending on various future climate change scenarios and forest types. Although existing dynamic global vegetation models account for the decomposition process, they typically do not include the effect of a changing climate on DWD decomposition rates. We expect that an increased understanding of decomposition rates, as presented in this current work, will be needed to adequately quantify the fate of woody detritus in future forests. Furthermore, we hope these results will lead to improved models that incorporate climate change scenarios for depicting future dead wood dynamics in addition to a traditional emphasis on live-tree demographics.

  9. Rolling Element Bearing Performance Degradation Assessment Using Variational Mode Decomposition and Gath-Geva Clustering Time Series Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaolong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By focusing on the issue of rolling element bearing (REB performance degradation assessment (PDA, a solution based on variational mode decomposition (VMD and Gath-Geva clustering time series segmentation (GGCTSS has been proposed. VMD is a new decomposition method. Since it is different from the recursive decomposition method, for example, empirical mode decomposition (EMD, local mean decomposition (LMD, and local characteristic-scale decomposition (LCD, VMD needs a priori parameters. In this paper, we will propose a method to optimize the parameters in VMD, namely, the number of decomposition modes and moderate bandwidth constraint, based on genetic algorithm. Executing VMD with the acquired parameters, the BLIMFs are obtained. By taking the envelope of the BLIMFs, the sensitive BLIMFs are selected. And then we take the amplitude of the defect frequency (ADF as a degradative feature. To get the performance degradation assessment, we are going to use the method called Gath-Geva clustering time series segmentation. Afterwards, the method is carried out by two pieces of run-to-failure data. The results indicate that the extracted feature could depict the process of degradation precisely.

  10. Insulation Strength and Decomposition Characteristics of a C6F12O and N2 Gas Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the decomposition characteristics of a new type of environmentally friendly insulating gas C6F12O and N2 mixed gas under AC voltage. The breakdown behavior of 3% C6F12O and N2 mixed gas in quasi-uniform field was investigated through a breakdown experiment. The self-recovery of the mixed gas was analyzed by 100 breakdown experiments. The decomposition products of C6F12O and N2 under breakdown voltage were determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometer (GC-MS. Finally, the decomposition process of the products was calculated by density functional theory, and the ionization energy, affinity, and molecular orbital gap of the decomposition products were also calculated. The properties of the decomposition products were analyzed from the aspects of insulation and environmental protection. The experimental results show that the 3% C6F12O and N2 mixed gas did not show a downward trend over 100 breakdown tests under a 0.10 MPa breakdown voltage. The decomposition products after breakdown were CF4, C2F6, C3F6, C3F8, C4F10, and C5F12. The ionization energies of several decomposition products are more than 10 eV. The Global Warming Potential (GWP values of the main products are lower than SF6. C2F6, C3F8, and C4F10 have better insulation properties.

  11. Keratin subsidies promote feather decomposition via an increase in keratin-consuming arthropods and microorganisms in bird breeding colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Masuya, Hayato

    2015-06-01

    Resource subsidies are well known to increase population densities of consumers. The decomposition process of these subsidised resources can be influenced by increasing consumer abundance. However, few studies have assessed whether resource subsidies can promote resource decomposition via a population increase in consumers. Here, we examined the effects of keratin subsidies on feather decomposition in egret and heron breeding colonies. Egrets and herons (Ardeidae) frequently breed in inland forests and provide large amounts of keratin materials to the forest floor in the form of feathers of chicks (that die). We compared the decrease in the weights of egret and heron feathers (experimentally placed on the forest floor) over a 12-month period among egret/heron breeding colonies (five sites) and areas outside of colonies (five sites) in central Japan. Of the feathers placed experimentally on forest floors, 92-97 % and 99-100 % in colonies and 47-50 % and 71-90 % in non-colony areas were decomposed after 4 and 12 months, respectively. Then, decomposition rates of feathers were faster in colonies than in areas outside of colonies, suggesting that keratin subsidies can promote feather decomposition in colonies. Field observations and laboratory experiments indicated that keratin-feeding arthropods and keratinophilic fungi played important roles in feather decomposition. Therefore, scavenging arthropods and keratinophilic fungi, which dramatically increased in egret and heron breeding colonies, could accelerate the decomposition of feathers supplied to the forest floor of colonies.

  12. Self-decomposition of radiochemicals. Principles, control, observations and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the booklet is to remind the established user of radiochemicals of the problems of self-decomposition and to inform those investigators who are new to the applications of radiotracers. The section headings are: introduction; radionuclides; mechanisms of decomposition; effects of temperature; control of decomposition; observations of self-decomposition (sections for compounds labelled with (a) carbon-14, (b) tritium, (c) phosphorus-32, (d) sulphur-35, (e) gamma- or X-ray emitting radionuclides, decomposition of labelled macromolecules); effects of impurities in radiotracer investigations; stability of labelled compounds during radiotracer studies. (U.K.)

  13. Pitfalls in VAR based return decompositions: A clarification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard; Tanggaard, Carsten

    in their analysis is not "cashflow news" but "inter- est rate news" which should not be zero. Consequently, in contrast to what Chen and Zhao claim, their decomposition does not serve as a valid caution against VAR based decompositions. Second, we point out that in order for VAR based decompositions to be valid......Based on Chen and Zhao's (2009) criticism of VAR based return de- compositions, we explain in detail the various limitations and pitfalls involved in such decompositions. First, we show that Chen and Zhao's interpretation of their excess bond return decomposition is wrong: the residual component...

  14. hermal decomposition of irradiated casein molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.A.; Elsayed, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    NON-Isothermal studies were carried out using the derivatograph where thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG) measurements were used to obtain the activation energies of the first and second reactions for casein (glyco-phospho-protein) decomposition before and after exposure to 1 Gy γ-rays and up to 40 x 1 04 μg Gy fast neutrons. 25C f was used as a source of fast neutrons, associated with γ-rays. 137 Cs source was used as pure γ-source. The activation energies for the first and second reactions for casein decomposition were found to be smaller at 400 μGy than that at lower and higher fast neutron doses. However, no change in activation energies was observed after γ-irradiation. it is concluded from the present study that destruction of casein molecules by low level fast neutron doses may lead to changes of shelf storage period of milk

  15. 4.2. The kinetics of nitric acid decomposition of calcined borosilicate raw material of Ak-Arkhar Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to kinetics of nitric acid decomposition of calcined borosilicate raw material of Ak-Arkhar Deposit. The dependence of nitric acid decomposition of calcined boric raw material for extraction of boron oxide on temperature (20-100 deg C) and process duration (15-60 minutes) was defined. It was defined that at temperature increasing the extraction rate of boron oxide increases from 20.8 to 78.6%.

  16. Changes in eucalypt litter quality during the first three months of field decomposition in a Congolese plantation

    OpenAIRE

    Ngao, Jérôme; Bernhard Reversat, France; Loumeto, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    In fast-growing tree plantations, decomposition of leaf litter is considered as a key process of soil fertility. A three-month field experiment, spanning both rainy and dry seasons, was conducted to determine how changes in litter decomposition affect the main parameters of litter quality-namely, the concentrations of phenolic and non-phenolic carbon (C) compounds, nitrogen (N), and fibres, and the litter C mineralization rate. This Study was conducted to test (1) if these changes vary accord...

  17. Mobility Modelling through Trajectory Decomposition and Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Faghihi, Farbod

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquity of mobile devices with positioning sensors make it possible to derive user's location at any time. However, constantly sensing the position in order to track the user's movement is not feasible, either due to the unavailability of sensors, or computational and storage burdens. In this thesis, we present and evaluate a novel approach for efficiently tracking user's movement trajectories using decomposition and prediction of trajectories. We facilitate tracking by taking advantage ...

  18. Thermal decomposition kinetics of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.H.; Park, J.J.; Park, J.H.; Chang, I.S.; Choi, C.S.; Kim, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The thermal decomposition kinetics of AUC [ammonium uranyl carbonate; (NH 4 ) 4 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 [ in an isothermal thermogravimetric (TG) reactor under N 2 atmosphere has been determined. The kinetic data can be represented by the two-dimensional nucleation and growth model. The reaction rate increases and activation energy decreases with increasing particle size and precipitation time which appears in the particle size larger than 30 μm in the mechano-chemical phenomena. (orig.)

  19. Radiation decomposition of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Rempel, S.; Westendorf, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals are shown to be subject to autoradiation-induced decomposition, which results in increasing abundance of pertechnetate in the preparation. This autodecomposition is catalyzed by the presence of oxygen, although the removal of oxygen does not prevent its occurrence. The initial appearance of pertechnetate in the radiopharmaceutical is shown to be a function of the amount of radioactivity, the quantity of stannous ion used, and the ratio of /sup 99m/Tc to total technetium in the preparation

  20. Information decomposition method to analyze symbolical sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkov, E.V.; Korotkova, M.A.; Kudryashov, N.A.

    2003-01-01

    The information decomposition (ID) method to analyze symbolical sequences is presented. This method allows us to reveal a latent periodicity of any symbolical sequence. The ID method is shown to have advantages in comparison with application of the Fourier transformation, the wavelet transform and the dynamic programming method to look for latent periodicity. Examples of the latent periods for poetic texts, DNA sequences and amino acids are presented. Possible origin of a latent periodicity for different symbolical sequences is discussed

  1. Domain decomposition methods for fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, S.

    1995-01-01

    A domain decomposition method for steady-state, subsonic fluid dynamics calculations, is proposed. The method is derived from the Schwarz alternating method used for elliptic problems, extended to non-linear hyperbolic problems. Particular emphasis is given on the treatment of boundary conditions. Numerical results are shown for a realistic three-dimensional two-phase flow problem with the FLICA-4 code for PWR cores. (from author). 4 figs., 8 refs

  2. Domain decomposition multigrid for unstructured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapira, Yair

    1997-01-01

    A two-level preconditioning method for the solution of elliptic boundary value problems using finite element schemes on possibly unstructured meshes is introduced. It is based on a domain decomposition and a Galerkin scheme for the coarse level vertex unknowns. For both the implementation and the analysis, it is not required that the curves of discontinuity in the coefficients of the PDE match the interfaces between subdomains. Generalizations to nonmatching or overlapping grids are made.

  3. Numerical CP Decomposition of Some Difficult Tensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichavský, Petr; Phan, A. H.; Cichocki, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 317, č. 1 (2017), s. 362-370 ISSN 0377-0427 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-13713S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Small matrix multiplication * Canonical polyadic tensor decomposition * Levenberg-Marquardt method Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/SI/tichavsky-0468385. pdf

  4. Influence of Family Structure on Variance Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    Partitioning genetic variance by sets of randomly sampled genes for complex traits in D. melanogaster and B. taurus, has revealed that population structure can affect variance decomposition. In fruit flies, we found that a high likelihood ratio is correlated with a high proportion of explained ge...... capturing pure noise. Therefore it is necessary to use both criteria, high likelihood ratio in favor of a more complex genetic model and proportion of genetic variance explained, to identify biologically important gene groups...

  5. Nonconformity problem in 3D Grid decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolcun, Alexej

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2002), s. 249-253 ISSN 1213-6972. [International Conference in Central Europe on Computer Graphics, Visualization and Computer Vision 2002/10./. Plzeň, 04.02.2002-08.02.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/99/1229; GA ČR GA105/01/1242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3086906 Keywords : structured mesh * decomposition * nonconformity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  6. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  7. Increased rainfall variability and N addition accelerate litter decomposition in a restored prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition and projected increases in rainfall variability (the frequency of drought and heavy rainfall events) are expected to strongly influence ecosystem processes such as litter decomposition. However, how these two global change factors interact to influence litter decomposition is largely unknown. I examined how increased rainfall variability and nitrogen addition affected mass and nitrogen loss of litter from two tallgrass prairie species, Schizachyrium scoparium and Solidago canadensis, and isolated the effects of each during plant growth and during litter decomposition. I increased rainfall variability by consolidating ambient rainfall into larger events and simulated chronic nitrogen deposition using a slow-release urea fertilizer. S. scoparium litter decay was more strongly regulated by the treatments applied during plant growth than by those applied during decomposition. During plant growth, increased rainfall variability resulted in S. scoparium litter that subsequently decomposed more slowly and immobilized more nitrogen than litter grown under ambient conditions, whereas nitrogen addition during plant growth accelerated subsequent mass loss of S. scoparium litter. In contrast, S. canadensis litter mass and N losses were enhanced under either N addition or increased rainfall variability both during plant growth and during decomposition. These results suggest that ongoing changes in rainfall variability and nitrogen availability are accelerating nutrient cycling in tallgrass prairies through their combined effects on litter quality, environmental conditions, and plant community composition.

  8. Dynamics of root and leaf decomposition in chronosequence of rubber plantation (Hevea brasilensis) in SW China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moazzam, N.S.; Yiping, Z.; Liqing, S.; Moazzam, N.S.

    2018-01-01

    This study highlighted the dynamics of stand parameters as well as root and leaf litter decomposition in the chronosequence (49, 32, 24 and 12 years old plantations established in the year 1965, 1982, 1990 and 2002) of the rubber plantation in Xishuangbanna SW China. Litter trappers were installed on the study site to collect the leaf litter and litter bag experiment was carried out to investigate the rate of root and leaf litter decomposition. The study revealed significant variation of stand characteristics during the decomposition process. The monthly litter fall and root biomass (all categories; kg m-3) showed positive correlation with stand characteristics and age. Remaining leaf litter mass % in the litter bags reduced with the passage of time and was significantly different in the chronosequence. The highest root decomposition rate (55%) was shown by fine roots and minimum (32%) by coarse roots during the study period. The investigations on elemental composition of the leaf and root provides basic important information for rate of nutrient cycle along with decomposition rate in rubber plantation and result are quite helpful for simulating the below ground carbon stock of rubber plantation in SW China. (author)

  9. Sponge-like silver obtained by decomposition of silver nitrate hexamethylenetetramine complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasiev, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Silver nitrate hexamethylenetetramine [Ag(NO 3 )·N 4 (CH 2 ) 6 ] coordination compound has been prepared via aqueous route and characterized by chemical analysis, XRD and electron microscopy. Decomposition of [Ag(NO 3 )·N 4 (CH 2 ) 6 ] under hydrogen and under inert has been studied by thermal analysis and mass spectrometry. Thermal decomposition of [Ag(NO 3 )·N 4 (CH 2 ) 6 ] proceeds in the range 200–250 °C as a self-propagating rapid redox process accompanied with the release of multiple gases. The decomposition leads to formation of sponge-like silver having hierarchical open pore system with pore size spanning from 10 µm to 10 nm. The as-obtained silver sponges exhibited favorable activity toward H 2 O 2 electrochemical reduction, making them potentially interesting as non-enzyme hydrogen peroxide sensors. - Graphical abstract: Thermal decomposition of silver nitrate hexamethylenetetramine coordination compound [Ag(NO 3 )·N 4 (CH 2 ) 6 ] leads to sponge like silver that possesses open porous structure and demonstrates interesting properties as an electrochemical hydrogen peroxide sensor. Display Omitted - Highlights: • [Ag(NO 3 )·N 4 (CH 2 ) 6 ] orthorhombic phase prepared and characterized. • Decomposition of [Ag(NO 3 )·N 4 (CH 2 ) 6 ] leads to metallic silver sponge with opened porosity. • Ag sponge showed promising properties as a material for hydrogen peroxide sensors.

  10. [Litter decomposition and nutrient release in Acacia mangium plantations established on degraded soils of Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Barliza, Jeiner; León Peláez, Juan Diego

    2011-03-01

    Several factors control the decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems such as humidity, temperature, quality of litter and microbial activity. We investigated the effects of rainfall and soil plowing prior to the establishment of Acacia mangium plantations, using the litterbag technique, during a six month period, in forests plantations in Bajo Cauca region, Colombia. The annual decomposition constants (k) of simple exponential model, oscillated between 1.24 and 1.80, meanwhile k1 y k2 decomposition constants of double exponential model were 0.88-1.81 and 0.58-7.01. At the end of the study, the mean residual dry matter (RDM) was 47% of the initial value for the three sites. We found a slow N, Ca and Mg release pattern from the A. mangium leaf litter, meanwhile, phosphorus (P) showed a dominant immobilization phase, suggesting its low availability in soils. Chemical leaf litter quality parameters (e.g. N and P concentrations, C/N, N/P ratios and phenols content) showed an important influence on decomposition rates. The results of this study indicated that rainfall plays an important role on the decomposition process, but not soil plowing.

  11. Thermal Decomposition Behaviors and Burning Characteristics of AN/Nitramine-Based Composite Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naya, Tomoki; Kohga, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) has attracted much attention due to its clean burning nature as an oxidizer. However, an AN-based composite propellant has the disadvantages of low burning rate and poor ignitability. In this study, we added nitramine of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) or cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) as a high-energy material to AN propellants to overcome these disadvantages. The thermal decomposition and burning rate characteristics of the prepared propellants were examined as the ratio of AN and nitramine was varied. In the thermal decomposition process, AN/RDX propellants showed unique mass loss peaks in the lower temperature range that were not observed for AN or RDX propellants alone. AN and RDX decomposed continuously as an almost single oxidizer in the AN/RDX propellant. In contrast, AN/HMX propellants exhibited thermal decomposition characteristics similar to those of AN and HMX, which decomposed almost separately in the thermal decomposition of the AN/HMX propellant. The ignitability was improved and the burning rate increased by the addition of nitramine for both AN/RDX and AN/HMX propellants. The increased burning rates of AN/RDX propellants were greater than those of AN/HMX. The difference in the thermal decomposition and burning characteristics was caused by the interaction between AN and RDX.

  12. Influence of concentration on the radiolytic decomposition of thiamine, riboflavin, and pyridoxine in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Albarrán

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin loss during irradiation has been claimed as a critical area in food irradiation technology, especially that of thiamine (B1, which has been considered as the most sensitive to radiation. Although it has been suggested that no vitamin deficiency could result from consuming irradiated food, a long debate on the loss of vitamins and other nutrients during food irradiation has been maintained by the lack of experimental studies monitoring decomposition rates at different concentrations and doses. Since thiamine, riboflavin, and pyridoxine are labile vitamins, this study has focused on their radiolytic decomposition in dilute aqueous solutions in the presence of air. The decomposition process was followed by HPLC and UV-spectroscopy. The results obtained in aqueous solutions showed a dependence of the decomposition as a nonlinear function of the dose. Of these three compounds, the decomposition was higher for thiamine than for riboflavin and even less in pyridoxine.

  13. Thermal decomposition behaviors of magnesium borohydride doped with metal fluoride additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.G.; Wang, H.; Liu, J.W.; Zhu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The decomposition proceeded through several distinct steps. • The mixed materials show a dramatically low initial hydrogen release temperature. • The additives react with the Mg–B–H compounds rather than acting as catalysts. • The reaction process was studied using an in situ TEM. - Abstract: The thermal decomposition behaviors of Magnesium borohydride [Mg(BH 4 ) 2 ] and metal fluoride doped mixtures were studied by temperature programmed desorption measurement/mass spectrometry (TPD/MS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. The decomposition and release of hydrogen proceeded through several distinct steps, including two polymorphic transitions, ionic Mg(BH 4 ) 2 melting with solid Mg–B–H amorphous phase formation and Mg–B–H decomposition. The addition of additives such as CaF 2 , ZnF 2 and TiF 3 resulted in a decrease in the hydrogen release temperature. ZnF 2 and TiF 3 reduced the initial hydrogen release temperature to ca. 50 °C. However, hydrogen release during the transformation from γ-Mg(BH 4 ) 2 to the amorphous Mg–B–H compounds at ca. 300 °C was only 4.5 wt.% in contrast to 9.8 wt.% for the direct decomposition of pure Mg(BH 4 ) 2 . TEM observations confirmed that ZnF 2 and TiF 3 reacted with amorphous Mg–B–H compounds rather than acting as catalysts

  14. Kinetics of methanol decomposition on Cu/ZnO/ZrO2 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, R.; Kozlowska, A.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of methanol with Cu/ZnO/ZrO 2 (with different copper content) has been investigated by gravimetric and TPD methods. The TPD measurements of methanol adsorption on these catalysis show that it forms the complexes of two types. The first complex (I) decomposes at low temperature (453 K) yielding H 2 and CO 2 and second (II) decomposes at temperature (573 K) giving CO and H 2 . In the process of decomposition of the complex (I) takes part water which is adsorbed on the surface of the catalyst and the decomposition of the complex (II) occurs without participation of adsorbed water. Gravimetric measurements of methanol and that an increase of copper content leads to the changes in the kinetics of methanol adsorption and its decomposition. On the basis of gravimetric measurements a model of methanol adsorption and decomposition on Cu/ZnO/ZrO 2 catalyst has been proposed and the rate constants of methanol adsorption (k a ) and decomposition with and without participation of water (k 1 and k 2 ) have been determined. (author)

  15. Litter production and decomposition in Eucalyptus urophylla x Eucalyptus globulus maidenii stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Valdir Schumacher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available he sustainable wood production in commercial plantations requires knowledge of the nutrient cycling process, which also involves the production and decomposition of litter. This study verified the influence of climatic variables on litter production and t evaluated the rate of leaf litter decomposition in a stand of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. globulus maidenii. There were installed 4 plots of 20 m x 20 m, in each plot four litter traps to collect leaves were placed, thin branches and miscellaneous, beside this, each plot received 3 areas for coarse branches collection. The litter collected was used to calculate the deposition and the correlation between climate variables and deposition. The climatic variables used, on a monthly basis, were average temperature, average maximum temperature, average minimum temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, average wind speed, average solar radiation and average evapotranspiration, both supplied by an experimental station. For evaluation of the litter decomposition rate, four square samples of 0.25 m side in each plot were randomly collected and used for determining the decay coefficient (K, half life (t0,5 and decomposition time of 95% of litter (t0,95 . The monthly litter production was weakly correlated with climatic variables and the annual production was 7.4 Mg ha-1, with leaves as the major fraction (60%. The litter decomposition rate was considered slow.

  16. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C 6 H 5 CH 3 ) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C 6 H 5 CH 3 removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N 2 : O 2 : H 2 O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C 6 H 5 CH 3 decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C 6 H 5 CH 3 is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  17. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S.

    2013-02-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C6H5CH3) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C6H5CH3 removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N2: O2: H2O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C6H5CH3 decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C6H5CH3 is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  18. Laser-induced diffusion decomposition in Fe–V thin-film alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polushkin, N.I., E-mail: nipolushkin@fc.ul.pt [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Duarte, A.C.; Conde, O. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, E. [Associação Euratom/IST e Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Barradas, N.P. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); García-García, A.; Kakazei, G.N.; Ventura, J.O.; Araujo, J.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade do Porto e IFIMUP, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Oliveira, V. [Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Vilar, R. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Irradiation of an Fe–V alloy by femtosecond laser triggers diffusion decomposition. • The decomposition occurs with strongly enhanced (∼4 orders) atomic diffusivity. • This anomaly is associated with the metallic glassy state achievable under laser quenching. • The ultrafast diffusion decomposition is responsible for laser-induced ferromagnetism. - Abstract: We investigate the origin of ferromagnetism induced in thin-film (∼20 nm) Fe–V alloys by their irradiation with subpicosecond laser pulses. We find with Rutherford backscattering that the magnetic modifications follow a thermally stimulated process of diffusion decomposition, with formation of a-few-nm-thick Fe enriched layer inside the film. Surprisingly, similar transformations in the samples were also found after their long-time (∼10{sup 3} s) thermal annealing. However, the laser action provides much higher diffusion coefficients (∼4 orders of magnitude) than those obtained under standard heat treatments. We get a hint that this ultrafast diffusion decomposition occurs in the metallic glassy state achievable in laser-quenched samples. This vitrification is thought to be a prerequisite for the laser-induced onset of ferromagnetism that we observe.

  19. Decomposition Methods For a Piv Data Analysis with Application to a Boundary Layer Separation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav URUBA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Separation of the turbulent boundary layer (BL on a flat plate under adverse pressure gradient was studied experimentally using Time-Resolved PIV technique. The results of spatio-temporal analysis of flow-field in the separation zone are presented. For this purpose, the POD (Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and its extension BOD (Bi-Orthogonal Decomposition techniques are applied as well as dynamical approach based on POPs (Principal Oscillation Patterns method. The study contributes to understanding physical mechanisms of a boundary layer separation process. The acquired information could be used to improve strategies of a boundary layer separation control.

  20. Using dynamic mode decomposition for real-time background/foreground separation in video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Jose Nathan; Grosek, Jacob; Brunton, Steven; Fu, Xing; Pendergrass, Seth

    2017-06-06

    The technique of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is disclosed herein for the purpose of robustly separating video frames into background (low-rank) and foreground (sparse) components in real-time. Foreground/background separation is achieved at the computational cost of just one singular value decomposition (SVD) and one linear equation solve, thus producing results orders of magnitude faster than robust principal component analysis (RPCA). Additional techniques, including techniques for analyzing the video for multi-resolution time-scale components, and techniques for reusing computations to allow processing of streaming video in real time, are also described herein.