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Sample records for link structure introduction

  1. Introduction to stellar structure

    Maciel, Walter J

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of this book, the author presents the basic properties of the stellar interior and describes them thoroughly, along with deriving the main stellar structure equations of temperature, density, pressure and luminosity, among others. The process and application of solving these equations is explained, as well as linking these results with actual observations.  The second part of the text describes what happens to a star over time, and how to determine this by solving the same equations at different points during a star’s lifetime. The fate of various stars is quite different depending on their masses, and this is described in the final parts of the book. This text can be used for an upper level undergraduate course or an introductory graduate course on stellar physics.

  2. Introduction to structure functions

    Kwiecinski, J.

    1996-07-01

    The theory of deep inelastic scattering structure functions is reviewed with an emphasis put on the QCD expectations of their behaviour in the region of small values of Bjorken parameter x. (author). 56 refs

  3. Open data structures an introduction

    Morin, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Offered as an introduction to the field of data structures and algorithms, Open Data Structures covers the implementation and analysis of data structures for sequences (lists), queues, priority queues, unordered dictionaries, ordered dictionaries, and graphs. Analyzed and implemented in Java, with a mathematically rigorous approach, Morin clearly and briskly presents instruction along with source code. A modern treatment of an essential computer science topic, this text is a measured balance between classical topics and state-of-the-art structures that will serve the needs of all undergraduate

  4. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  5. Innovations in structuring article introductions: The case of Applied Linguistics

    Ling Lin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the rhetorical structure of introductions that are followed by an independent Literature Review (L section. It is motivated by an increasing use or even the prevalent use of both the introduction and L sections in the opening phase of empirical research articles in many disciplines and the lack of systematic genre-based investigation of introductions with a following L section. Based on a detailed examination of 30 introductions with a subsequent L section in Applied Linguistics, this study found that they generally can be classified into two categories according to their communicative functions and structures. They are the traditional CARS type that largely follows the classic “Create a Research Space” (CARS model and the innovative Two-move Orientation type. Some featured elements used in the introductions with a subsequent L are identified and the “Two-move Orientation” approach is formulated for the rhetorical structure of this new type of introductions. The interesting links between introduction and L are also suggested. The study contributes to our understanding of the structure and function of this important part-genre in a new generic context (that is, introductions being followed by an independent L section and illuminates the current genre-based teaching of introduction writing.

  6. Preface to Introduction to Structural Bioinformatics

    Feenstra, K. Anton; Abeln, Sanne

    2018-01-01

    While many good textbooks are available on Protein Structure, Molecular Simulations, Thermodynamics and Bioinformatics methods in general, there is no good introductory level book for the field of Structural Bioinformatics. This book aims to give an introduction into Structural Bioinformatics, which

  7. Is Wikipedia link structure different?

    Kamps, J.; Koolen, M.; Baeza-Yates, R.; Boldi, P.; Ribeiro-Neto, B.; Cambazoglu, B.B.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the difference between Wikipedia and Web link structure with respect to their value as indicators of the relevance of a page for a given topic of request. Our experimental evidence is from two IR test-collections: the .GOV collection used at the TREC Web tracks and the

  8. 40 CFR 86.1405 - Introduction; structure of subpart.

    2010-07-01

    ...-Duty Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1405 Introduction; structure of subpart. (a) This... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Introduction; structure of subpart. 86.1405 Section 86.1405 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  9. Mapping strategy, structure, ownership and performance in European corporations : Introduction

    Colli, A.; Iversen, M.J.; de Jong, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the introduction to the Business History special issue on European Business Models. The volume presents results of the international project about mapping European corporations, within the strategy, structure, ownership and performance (SSOP) framework. The paper describes the

  10. Introduction

    Donatella Abbate Badin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The introduction to the monographic section Italy-Ireland: Cultural Inter-Relations, gives a brief account of how this part of the journal tries to fill a gap in transcultural studies by investigating the hitherto relatively underexplored relationship of Ireland with Italy. The editors argue that the topic deserves special attention because throughout the centuries, owing to a shared religion and Ireland’s colonial and postcolonial status, a special relationship was established. Without neglecting the many contributions published on this topic over the past thirty years, the papers collected in this first issue of SIJIS offer an overall view of the relations between Italy and Ireland from the Middle Ages to the present day demonstrating this special relationship. The opening essay, drawing an ample and interdisciplinary panorama of the representations of Ireland in Italy over the centuries, and  the concluding one, introducing new issues and suggestions for further investigations, frame seven papers organized thematically in subsections.  The translation studies section highlights some specific problems presented to the translator because of the Irish nature of the translated texts. Exploration of the links between some major figures and Italy opens up new perspectives even regarding much studied figures such as Joyce while  the time-honoured comparative method of studying influences yields ground-breaking insights as in the study of links between Commedia dell’Arte and Clarke or Mahon and Pasolini. Representations of Italy and  the presence of Italian settings and characters acquire  a specific Irish edge in the writings of Synge, Lady Morgan and Edward Maturin especially when both countries were still in search  of their identities.

  11. Introduction

    Kørnøv, Lone; Lund, Henrik; Remmen, Arne

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Environmental planning and management : tools for a sustainable development".......The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Environmental planning and management : tools for a sustainable development"....

  12. Introduction

    2000-01-01

    In the Introduction a brief review on application of high-current electron beams (HEB) and powerful pulse ion beams (PPB) is given. It is noted that at present the following principal trends on HEB and PPB application in technologies are formed: production of super-dense plasma for controlled thermonuclear synthesis; implantation and annealing of semiconductors; modification of metals and alloys properties: strength, tribo-technical and anticorrosion ones; synthesis of new composite materials, including metastable phases and compounds; manufacture of thin films and coverings with preset structure and properties by means of ablation plasma deposition; cleaning, polishing and glancing of surfaces; synthesis of ultra-disperse and nano-sized powders; destruction and cutting of solid materials

  13. Introduction

    Høgfeldt Hansen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to South Korean architecture gives an overall view of the architecture done in the country in historic times as well as a general introduction to the culture of the country.......This introduction to South Korean architecture gives an overall view of the architecture done in the country in historic times as well as a general introduction to the culture of the country....

  14. Introduction

    Toropila, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this introduction to The Third Radiobiological Conference author give a short retrospective review of reactor accidents (26 th April 1986, Chernobyl NPP, 1979 in Three Mile Island). In former Czechoslovakia an attention has been paid to the questions of the effects of radiation on organism from the 1950's. After discharge of Commonwealth the Radiobiological Association. that facilitated interchange of the results of research work among various national and foreign institutions. was also abolished. After establishment of the autonomous Slovak Republic the University of Veterinary Medicine (UVM) in Kosice in collaboration with Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice linked to tradition of radiobiology and organized the the First Radiobiological Conference in Slovakia. At this conference 37 lectures of home and 9 of Czech authors were presented. At the end of conference the agreement was made to held this conference every second year. The 2 nd Radiobiological Conference was held in 2004 at the occasion of the 55 st anniversary of the UVM establishment in Kosice. The 3 rd Conference held on 25 tb May 2006 in UVM in Kosice was inscribed to the 20 th anniversary of Chernobyl disaster. Selected articles dealing with this problem create contents of Supplement inscribed to the 50 th anniversary of the scientific journal Folia Veterinaria

  15. Introduction

    Cohen, E. G. D.

    deduced for irreversible processes (C. Jarzynski). The survey of non-equilibrium steady states in statistical mechanics of classical and quantum systems employs heat bath models and the random matrix theory input. The quantum heat bath analysis and derivation of fluctuation-dissipation theorems is performed by means of the influence functional technique adopted to solve quantum master equations (D. Kusnezov). Chapter II deals with an issue of relaxation and its dynamical theory in both classical and quantum contexts. Pollicott-Ruelle resonance background for the exponential decay scenario is discussed for irreversible processes of diffusion in the Lorentz gas and multibaker models (P. Gaspard). The Pollicott-Ruelle theory reappears as a major inspiration in the survey of the behaviour of ensembles of chaotic systems, with a focus on model systems for which no rigorous results concerning the exponential decay of correlations in time is available (S. Fishman). The observation, that non-equilibrium transport processes in simple classical chaotic systems can be described in terms of fractal structures developing in the system phase space, links their formation and properties with the entropy production in the course of diffusion processes displaying a low dimensional deterministic (chaotic) origin (J. R. Dorfman). Chapter III offers an introduction to the theory of dynamical semigroups. Asymptotic properties of Markov operators and Markov semigroups acting in the set of probability densities (statistical ensemble notion is implicit) are analyzed. Ergodicity, mixing, strong (complete) mixing and sweeping are discussed in the familiar setting of "noise, chaos and fractals" (R. Rudnicki). The next step comprises a passage to quantum dynamical semigroups and completely positive dynamical maps, with an ultimate goal to introduce a consistent framework for the analysis of irreversible phenomena in open quantum systems, where dissipation and decoherence are crucial concepts (R

  16. Introduction

    2002-01-01

    In the Introduction a common data about the monograph are presented. It is noted that results of α-particles elastic and inelastic scattering angular distribution with energies 40.0 and 50.1 MeV on 90,94 Zr carried out on the Kazakhstan isochronous cyclotron U-150M. A new data on total reaction cross sections at α-particles energies 96(1) MeV and 3 He ions 95(1) MeV on 90 Zr isotope, obtained on the Kiev isochronous cyclotron U-240 are given. Within framework of unified approach the experimental data analysis for α-particles quasi-elastic scattering with energies 35.4, 40.0 and 50.1, 65.0 MeV on odd zirconium isotopes as well as their reaction total cross sections is carried out. With use of α-particles scattering at low and middle energies the excited states transitions isospin character for odd tin isotopes is studied in detail with application of up-to date analysis methods. The monograph consists of introduction, four chapters and Conclussion. The chapters are as follows: (1) Experimental measurement methods of differential and total reaction cross sections with complicated particles at low and middle energies; (2) Macroscopic and semi-microscopic optical-potential approaches; (3) Peculiarities of experimental angular distribution of alpha particles at energies up to 12.5 MeV/nucleon, total reaction cross sections and results their optical potential analysis; (4) Structure characteristics of odd-odd nuclei and their comparative analysis

  17. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    Bassett, Danielle S., E-mail: dsb@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Sage Center for the Study of the Mind, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T. [Department of Psychology and UCSB Brain Imaging Center, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Porter, Mason A. [Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 1HP (United Kingdom); Mucha, Peter J. [Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  18. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    Bassett, Danielle S.; Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T.; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks

  19. Introduction

    Jensen, Rasmus Thybo; Moran, Dermot

    2012-01-01

    An introduction to a special issue of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences dedicated to empathy and the direct perception approach to other minds......An introduction to a special issue of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences dedicated to empathy and the direct perception approach to other minds...

  20. Introduction

    Søbjerg, Lene Mosegaard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction to anthology which provides the theoretical basis of an Erasmus+ project involving marginalised young people, practitioners, students and academics in co-creating a teaching module for the social professions.......Introduction to anthology which provides the theoretical basis of an Erasmus+ project involving marginalised young people, practitioners, students and academics in co-creating a teaching module for the social professions....

  1. Introduction

    Kadirov, A.Kh.; Khaydarov, K.Kh.; Giyosov, A.Sh.

    2000-01-01

    In the introduction authors describe book in general and in particular describe the ways and methods of direct synthesis on the base of different derivatives of cholanic acids and receiving of line of corresponding ethers which have practical properties

  2. Introduction

    Henkel, Anna; Åkerstrøm Andersen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    An introduction is presented in which the authors discuss various reports within the issue on topics including the concept of responsibility, the discourse about responsibility, and the attribution of responsibility in an interdisciplinary context.......An introduction is presented in which the authors discuss various reports within the issue on topics including the concept of responsibility, the discourse about responsibility, and the attribution of responsibility in an interdisciplinary context....

  3. Linking advanced fracture models to structural analysis

    Chiesa, Matteo

    2001-07-01

    Shell structures with defects occur in many situations. The defects are usually introduced during the welding process necessary for joining different parts of the structure. Higher utilization of structural materials leads to a need for accurate numerical tools for reliable prediction of structural response. The direct discretization of the cracked shell structure with solid finite elements in order to perform an integrity assessment of the structure in question leads to large size problems, and makes such analysis infeasible in structural application. In this study a link between local material models and structural analysis is outlined. An ''ad hoc'' element formulation is used in order to connect complex material models to the finite element framework used for structural analysis. An improved elasto-plastic line spring finite element formulation, used in order to take cracks into account, is linked to shell elements which are further linked to beam elements. In this way one obtain a global model of the shell structure that also accounts for local flexibilities and fractures due to defects. An important advantage with such an approach is a direct fracture mechanics assessment e.g. via computed J-integral or CTOD. A recent development in this approach is the notion of two-parameter fracture assessment. This means that the crack tip stress tri-axiality (constraint) is employed in determining the corresponding fracture toughness, giving a much more realistic capacity of cracked structures. The present thesis is organized in six research articles and an introductory chapter that reviews important background literature related to this work. Paper I and II address the performance of shell and line spring finite elements as a cost effective tool for performing the numerical calculation needed to perform a fracture assessment. In Paper II a failure assessment, based on the testing of a constraint-corrected fracture mechanics specimen under tension, is

  4. An introduction to partial structure factors in the nineties

    Egelstaff, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The idea of a partial structure factor has proved to be a very useful scientific concept in the discussion of disordered systems. After a general introduction comments on the experiments, some specific examples are given: heteronuclear diatomic fluids and static structure factors for molecular systems, development of dynamic structure factors. With the development of new techniques on neutron and synchrotron sources, spectrometers and samples, the development of improved theories and methods of computer simulation for simple liquids, it is expected that this field will continue to have a significant and growing scientific impact through the 90's. 6 figs., 3 tabs., 16 refs

  5. Introduction

    Ashbee, Edward; Dumbrell, John

    2017-01-01

    The introduction sets a framework for subsequent chapters by considering theories of change and the extent to which there was consequential change during the Obama years. It draws upon earlier scholarship to suggest that although there certainly was no “transformation” (when new interests secure...... Congress. Nonetheless, although recent literature within historical institutionalism has stressed the importance of incrementalism, it is vulnerable to rollback. Against this background, the introduction sets questions about the character of change that are addressed in the case studies included...

  6. Introduction

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Thusgaard Pedersen, Janni

    2013-01-01

    An introduction is presented in which the editors discuss various reports within the issue on topics including the shared value concept in the education and business, the role of corporate foundations in establishing cross-sector partnerships, and the mechanisms of governance in the cross...

  7. Introduction

    Pop, Paul; Alistar, Mirela; Stuart, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to the microfluidics field and microfluidic biochips. We discuss the main fluid propulsion principles used by modern microfluidic platforms, with a focus on “digital” microfluidic biochips, which are the topic of this book. Digital microfluidic biochips...

  8. Introduction

    Barwell, Richard; Clarkson, Philip; Halai, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides the introduction to this ICMI Study 21 volume. It includes: a discussion of the place of this study and its topic within ICME; a discussion of what is meant by the study title; and a brief historical account of research on this topic in mathematics education. The chapter also...

  9. Introduction

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk; Berg, Torsten Rødel

    2012-01-01

    The chapter includes a discussion about the play by Henrik Ibsen from 1879, A Doll's House, how it still proves to be relevant today to gender relations not only in Denmark but in Nepal as well. The introduction explains how Ibsen's play inspired two theater directors from Denmark and Nepal...

  10. Introduction

    Raeder, J.

    1975-01-01

    The introduction to this monography gives a brief survey of the history of the MHD generator, outlines the fundamental questioning of the research concerned and then deals with the combustion gas MHD generator research programme of the working society MPI for plasma physics (IPP)/Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nuernberg AG (M.A.N.). (GG/LH) [de

  11. Introduction

    Dieci, R.; He, X.-Z.; Hommes, C.; Dieci, R.; He, X.-Z.; Hommes, C.

    2014-01-01

    This introduction summarises the main contributions of 18 chapters in this book, in addition to two articles (Part I) reflecting Carl's view on a broad range of research-related issues originally published in Italian. The contributed chapters cover the latest developments in Nonlinear Economic

  12. Introduction

    Doreian, Patrick; Stokman, Frans N.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction to: The proceedings of a conference that was held on the analysis of repeated cross sections at the University of Nijmegen on June 15±16, 2000. This two-days meeting was attended by 75 participants from seven different countries (AUS, B, F, GER, NL, USA, UK) and from a wide array of

  13. Introduction

    Salverda, W.; Nolan, B.; Checchi, D.; Marx, I.; McKnight, A.; Tóth, I.G.; van de Werfhorst, H.; Salverda, W.; Nolan, B.; Checchi, D.; Marx, I.; McKnight, A.; Tóth, I.G.; van de Werfhorst, H.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides the introduction to a collection of 11 comparative chapters and a concluding chapter which, based on 30 country studies (25 European, USA, Canada, Australia, Japan, Korea; reported in the companion volume Nolan et al. 2013), look at the evolution of inequalities, their social

  14. Introduction

    Petersen, Nils Holger; Sandbeck, Lars; Solten, Therese Bering

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to the Special Issue of Literature and Theology publishing articles based on selected papers from the international conference of the International Society for Religion, Literature and Culture (ISRLC) conference held at the Theological Faculty of the University of Copenhagen 19...

  15. Introduction

    Bandak, Andreas; Janeja, Manpreet Kaur

    2018-01-01

    This introduction foregrounds waiting as a central analytical category to make way for ethnographic attention to uncertain interplays between doubting and hoping. Using a range of focused ethnographies which explore the centrality of waiting in social life, it offers a critical lens...

  16. Introduction

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk; Rasiah, Rajah

    2010-01-01

    This is a very interesting book. It is topical and is one of the few volumes that attempts to treat Southeast Asia as an integrated whole. The editors are methodologically ambitious, and they skillfully integrate a very large amount of diverse material in their introduction. I imagine that the bo...... working on the economics and development of Southeast Asia....

  17. Introduction

    Jacquinot, J.

    1997-01-01

    An introduction to the symposium on nuclear fusion and the CEA researches on magnetic confinement, is presented, with a review of the future energy capacities that fusion could deliver, the technological developments on superconductors, robots, etc. that will assist fusion development, and the european and international cooperation programs on the subject

  18. Introduction

    Van Walle, E.

    2007-01-01

    The introduction to the annual report 2006 of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN highlights the reorganisation of SCK-CEN that became effective in 2006. An overview is given of the principal activities of Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, the Institute for Advanced Nuclear Systems, the Institute for Environment, Health and Safety and the Institute for Communication, Services and Administration

  19. Introduction

    Seeberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    states, the Introduction emphasizes the continued relevance of focusing on a repoliticized MENA reality. The Middle East is still on the move away from the established image of unshakeable authoritarianism attributed to the region, which made the upgrading authoritarianism paradigm seem forever relevant......The Introduction briefly presents the ideas behind this collection of articles, namely to analyze popular mobilization and the role of civil society, political parties, and regional organizations in relation to the developments in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) over the last years......, and to discuss theoretical approaches and paradigms of relevance for the analysis of these new regional dynamics. The MENA region experienced, in connection with and following the Arab uprisings, a hitherto unseen popular mobilization. Despite the recent highly problematic situation in several Middle Eastern...

  20. Introduction

    Schubart, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    This special issue of the journal Refractory explores identity in the Penny Dreadful.The introduction introduces the show, themes and the six articles. In Season Two of television horror-drama, Penny Dreadful (Showtime/Sky, 2014-16), Ethan Chandler (Josh Hartnett), American sharpshooter and werew......This special issue of the journal Refractory explores identity in the Penny Dreadful.The introduction introduces the show, themes and the six articles. In Season Two of television horror-drama, Penny Dreadful (Showtime/Sky, 2014-16), Ethan Chandler (Josh Hartnett), American sharpshooter...... and werewolf, asks Vanessa Ives (Eva Green), a British heiress with supernatural powers and a troubled past, what happens when the monsters inside of them are released? She says: “We’re most who we are. Unrestrained. Ourselves.” Summing up a central concern of the series, she confirms the view of its creator...

  1. Introduction

    Brake, Laurel; Mussell, James

    2013-01-01

    When W. T. Stead died on the Titanic he was the most famous Englishman on board. A mass of contradictions and a crucial figure in the history of the British press, Stead was a towering presence in the cultural life of late-Victorian and Edwardian society. In this introduction, we consider Stead as a ‘mass of contradictions’ and offer a few ways in which his prodigious output and activity might be understood.

  2. Introduction

    Laurel Brake

    2013-04-01

    mso-fareast-language:JA;} When W. T. Stead died on the 'Titanic' he was the most famous Englishman on board. A mass of contradictions and a crucial figure in the history of the British press, Stead was a towering presence in the cultural life of late-Victorian and Edwardian society. In this introduction, we consider Stead as a ‘mass of contradictions’ and offer a few ways in which his prodigious output and activity might be understood.

  3. Introduction

    Høst, Jeppe Engset

    2015-01-01

    This chapter introduces the notion and theme of market-based fisheries management. The introduction of market mechanisms to distribute and manage fishing quota has internationally occurred since the 1980s but is increasingly on the political agenda. As privatization and transferability are promoted...... internationally, and by big players, it becomes even more crucial to understand its social and environmental implications. This chapter looks at the broader lines in the fisheries research and discusses the diverging views on market-based fisheries management. On one side market mechanisms are promoted...... for efficiency and fleet adaptation, and on the other, quota markets are accused of causing concentration and disturbing social relations....

  4. Introduction

    Davies, L.M.; Ianko, L.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In the introduction the historic context is established, spanning a bow from the first sustained fission reactor in 1942 to contemporary developments. The subjects 'Irradiation Effects on Mechanical Properties', 'Neutron Fluence', 'Irradiation Effect Trends', 'Empirical Modelling of Irradiation Effects' and 'Mechanical Modelling' are addressed. There are also some remarks about the current state of the art, the migration of irradiation effects and about international programmes

  5. Introduction

    Peder Pedersen, Claus; Dehs, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to When Architects and Designers Write / Draw / Build / ? This anthology highlights the potentials and challenges for research in architecture and design. The included essays are based on papers given at a symposium held at the Aarhus School of Architecture in 2011 and contain a number...... of topical positions ranging from the activist and academic to practice-based and artistically-based research by international and Danish researchers. The anthology is aimed at architects and designers, as well as others with an interest in the discussion of the concept of research in the fields...

  6. Introduction

    de Goede, Marieke; Leander, Anna; Sullivan, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    This articles introduces the special issue on ‘The Politics of the List.’ We observe that lists proliferate as a technique of governance across multiple domains, including health, security, and commerce. We argue that it is important to take seriously the form and technique of the list itself...... and engage the knowledge practices, governance effects and ways of ordering the world that the list format enables. In other words, the special issue seeks to ‘remain in the register of the list,’ to unpack its technological arrangements and juridical power. This introduction sets out the key themes...

  7. Introduction

    Ribeiro, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    This volume is a documentation of experiences of academics from five institutions of higher education in Denmark (namely Roskilde University, Copenhagen Business School, Technical University of Denmark, Ålborg University and The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts) linked under the so-called Danish...

  8. PREFACE: Open Problems in Nuclear Structure Theory: Introduction Open Problems in Nuclear Structure Theory: Introduction

    Dobaczewski, Jacek

    2010-06-01

    Nuclear structure theory is a domain of physics faced at present with great challenges and opportunities. A larger and larger body of high-precision experimental data has been and continues to be accumulated. Experiments on very exotic short-lived isotopes are the backbone of activity at numerous large-scale facilities. Over the years, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the basic features of nuclei. However, the theoretical description of nuclear systems is still far from being complete and is often not very precise. Many questions, both basic and practical, remain unanswered. The goal of publishing this special focus issue of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics on Open Problems in Nuclear Structure Theory (OPeNST) is to construct a fundamental inventory thereof, so that the tasks and available options become more clearly exposed and that this will help to stimulate a boost in theoretical activity, commensurate with the experimental progress. The requested format and scope of the articles on OPeNST was quite flexible. The journal simply offered the possibility to provide a forum for the material, which is very often discussed at conferences during the coffee breaks but does not normally have sufficient substance to form regular publications. Nonetheless, very often formulating a problem provides a major step towards its solution, and it may constitute a scientific achievement on its own. Prospective authors were therefore invited to find their own balance between the two extremes of very general problems on the one hand (for example, to solve exactly the many-body equations for a hundred particles) and very specific problems on the other hand (for example, those that one could put in one's own grant proposal). The authors were also asked not to cover results already obtained, nor to limit their presentations to giving a review of the subject, although some elements of those could be included to properly introduce the subject matter

  9. Introduction to structural failure modes for nuclear power facilities

    Reed, J.W.; Gurbuz, O.

    1993-01-01

    This introduction provides a background of the evaluation methods for earthquakes larger than design basis. Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) and seismic margin assessment (SMA) methods are introduced to the reader. The basic parameters used to define seismic capacity for each method are explained. The objectives of both evaluation methods and how they can be used to evaluate the adequacy of a seismic design are discussed. General issues related to computing seismic capacity are reviewed relative to SPRA and SMA. Four companion papers presented in the journal following this introduction discuss the types of information (i.e., dynamic tests, earthquake experience, and analytical data) that are used to determine the real capacity of structures and equipment in nuclear power plants to resist earthquakes. The motivation for discussing these three types of information is presented as an introduction to these papers that following in this journal edition. The purpose of the present paper is to lay the groundwork and provide motivation for these papers

  10. Introduction

    Kirby, Evan N.

    2018-06-01

    Dwarf galaxies are excellent laboratories of chemical evolution. Many dwarf galaxies have simple star formation histories with very low average star formation rates. These conditions simplify models of chemical evolution and facilitate the identification of sites of nucleosynthesis. Dwarf galaxies also host extremely metal-poor stars, which sample the ejecta of the first generations of supernovae in the universe. This meeting-in-a-meeting, "Stellar Abundances in Dwarf Galasxies," will recognize the importance of dwarf galaxies in learning about the creation and evolution of the elements. Topics include: * the most metal-poor stars * the connection between dwarf galaxies and the Milky Way halo * dwarf galaxies as the paragons of r-process nucleosynthesis * modern techniques in stellar abundance measurements * recent advances in chemical evolution modelingI will give a very brief introduction to set the stage for the meeting.

  11. Introduction

    Wells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    The methods of preparing and the chemical properties of different boron compounds including simple and complex boron halides, boron oxides and sulfides, boron organic compounds are briefly described. The main features of their crystal and molecular structure, as well as the effect of structure their properties and stability of boron compounds are discussed

  12. Introduction

    Grossi, Giuseppe; Hansen, Morten Balle; Johanson, Jan-Erik

    2016-01-01

    , Houlberg, and Bækgaard study the link between fiscal austerity and politicians’ use of performance information by using survey and documentary data from Danish municipalities. Grossi, Reichard, and Ruggiero examine the interest of politicians and public managers in the use of performance information......The five articles in this symposium examine the issues of comparative performance management and accountability in the age of austerity from different vantage points. Brusca and Montesinos carry out an international comparison of 17 countries studying key issues in the implementation of performance...... for decisionmaking and monitoring the budget cycle provided in the newly established performance budgets of municipalities in Germany and Italy. Poocharoen examines performance management in different types of interagency collaborations, presenting six case studies of management projects in the field of natural...

  13. Introduction

    Jonathan Carson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: Written as Carson & Miller, collaborative artists who explore narrative and the places where narrative intersects with material culture and everyday experience, this introduction presents the stakes of the larger project that entails the exhibition The Story of Things (2009, the conference The Story of Things: reading narrative in the visual (2010 and the double issue of Image (& Narrative. It mainly focuses on the interdisciplinary approaches to the relationship between object and storytelling.

     

    Résumé: Portant la double signature de Carson & Miller, un duo d'artistes avec un intérêt particulier pour la narration et les rapports entre les interaction entre culture ordinaire et  manières de raconter, cette introduction présente les enjeux du projet plus large qui regroupe une exposition

  14. Introduction

    Zapata, F.; Garcia-Agudo, E.; Ritchie, J.C.; Appleby, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Soil erosion and associated sedimentation are natural processes caused by water, wind and ice. Several of man's activities such as deforestation, overgrazing, changes in land use, and non-sustainable farming practices tend to accelerate soil erosion. Soil erosion and sedimentation cause not only on-site degradation of a non-renewable natural resource, but also off-site problems such as downstream sediment deposition in fields, floodplains and water streams. These problems and concern over the degradation of the landscape by erosion, and their impacts on soil fertility and crop productivity in agricultural land, water pollution, and sedimentation in lakes, reservoirs, and floodplains are well documented. Global estimates of economic damage from soil erosion and sedimentation have also been made. Recent focus on sustainability issues has resulted in increased attention on soil-degradation problems, in particular soil erosion and sedimentation. In view of increasing water scarcity and limited land resources to feed an ever-growing world population, there is an urgent need to obtain reliable quantitative data on the extent and rates of soil erosion worldwide to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the problem and to underpin the selection of effective soil-conservation technologies and sedimentation remediation strategies, including assessment of their economic and environmental impacts. This chapter describes the use of fallout 137 Cs as a tracer for measuring soil erosion and sedimentation, and the potential use of other radionuclides such as 210 Pb, and 7 Be for these studies. It provides an overview of the 137 Cs technique describing key assumptions and requirements, and advantages and limitations of the technique. Also, applications, recent developments, and future trends of the technique are covered. The chapter is completed with an introduction to the handbook and a list of selected references

  15. Introduction

    Anuparna Mukherjee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The city as a mosaic of anarchic diversity and messy contradictions has always been a rich source of inspiration for practitioners of creative arts. Writers, painters, planners, photographers, performers have deemed the city as the loci of their desire, conflict, passion and memory to chart the minutes of quotidian life in various intricate forms and configurations. “The city came into being when a surplus of food allowed a diversity of tasks”, Lehan asserts in his introduction to The City in Literature. “Diversity is a key to urban beginnings and continuities, and diversity is also the snake in the urban garden, challenging systems of order and encouraging disorder and chaos” (8. As an eclectic site of cultural friction and contamination that simultaneously oscillates between polarities of belonging and non-belonging, order and chaos, the city unlocks myriad windows to the chroniclers of urban realities. The cities in their perpetual making and dismantling, bear an impression of what Amit Chaudhuri terms in a recent talk as the “unfinished-ness” in the context of modern cities[1]. The “unfinished” is a slippery term as Chaudhuri explains, while it may suggest the Modernist artists’ proclivity towards dereliction, ruin or fragmentation in metropolitan landscape, it also speaks of the “half-made”[2], the backward, or the liminal spaces within an urban conurbation. However, this “unfinished-ness” or the fact that “cities are not finished products” as Chaudhuri posits, is also indicative of their “radical openness” and their inexhaustible potentials for reinventing themselves.

  16. Introduction

    Leschke, Janine; Jepsen, Maria

    2012-01-01

    and governments' policy responses have also been widening labour market inequalities between different groups within countries, the authors argue, as illustrated by the disproportionate growth of youth employment and their specific focus on gender inequality. Cross-national variations in the content and structure...

  17. Introduction

    Helming, K.; Pérez-Soba, M.; Tabbush, P.

    2008-01-01

    Land use is a key human activity, which, through the exploitation of natural resources, fosters socio-economic development and alters structures and processes in the environment. At the European level, the Sustainable Development Strategy stresses the need for real integration of economic,

  18. Introduction

    Ainul Hayati Daud; Hazmimi Kasim

    2010-01-01

    Since the Atoms for Peace program in 1950s, peaceful applications of nuclear technology has been at the forefront of the development of many countries. In Malaysia, the development of nuclear technology began in earnest with the setting-up of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in 1972, then known as CRANE. More than thirty years later, today, the technology has gained footing and made impact to the development of the country. Her role in regional and international scenes in nuclear-related matters and nuclear technology was noticed and being given due attention. It is time to take stock of this development and assess its impact upon which further developments can be planned and strategized. That was the genesis of this study. This chapter presents a review of the status and development of nuclear technology globally and in Malaysia to provide a background for the report and the study. This is followed by an introduction to the study: its objectives, scope, methods of research, total population, sampling frame, selection procedures, target groups and data analysis. The chapter concludes with a guide to the organization of this report. The study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the impact and contribution of nuclear technology to socio-economic development of the country. It is also expected to identify issues and challenges faced by users of this technology. Even though the applications of nuclear technology encompass diverse human endeavors, this study focuses only in industrial, medical and agriculture sectors. The applications of nuclear technology in both public agencies and private companies in those sectors are considered. This is the first time such a study is being undertaken in Malaysia, and as a starting point, the three year period spanning 2006-2008 are taken as the time frame for discerning trends of nuclear technology development in the country. This study was also in an indirect sense motivated by similar studies conducted in the USA

  19. Introduction

    Muchie, Mammo; Baskaran, Angathevar

    2013-01-01

    African countries, taken separately, or grouped together as a unit, still largely remain resource-based economies. The challenge is to change the resource-based economic structure into a science, technology, engineering and innovation driven knowledge based economic system. Taking this challenge...... head on means African countries have to organise their science, technology, engineering and innovation for a development agenda systematically, more in collaboration than in competition with one another. What appears to remain a deficit is the vast collaborative distance that still exists on matters...

  20. Introduction

    Jana S. ROŠKER

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality plays a significant role in shaping the cohesion of communities, their values, and their structures across the globe. Various religious practices and ideational systems are particularly complex in Asia. Home to some of the world major spiritual traditions such as Hinduism and Buddhism, Daoism and Confucianism, as well as to a relevant number of practicing Christians, Muslims, and self-identified atheists and agnostics, Asia provides us with an intense and extraordinarily rich tapestry of different religious and spiritual practices...

  1. Introduction

    2012-01-01

    Why yet another dead French thinker'.' We already have Althusser. Foucault and Derrida. Docs International Relations (I R) really need Pierre Bourdieu! The short answer is yes. The slightly longer answer is that Bourdieu's sociology provides us with an opportunity to rethink international politics....... In short. Bourdieu helps us to take the discursive, visual and embodied practices in international politics more seriously....... in ways not offered by these other thinkers. Bourdieu helps us rediscover the everyday practices. symbolic structures and arenas of conflict that bring many other actors into perspective. rather than just focusing on nation slates that produce (what we call) international politics. All engagement with his...

  2. The landscape of nonlinear structural dynamics: an introduction.

    Butlin, T; Woodhouse, J; Champneys, A R

    2015-09-28

    Nonlinear behaviour is ever-present in vibrations and other dynamical motions of engineering structures. Manifestations of nonlinearity include amplitude-dependent natural frequencies, buzz, squeak and rattle, self-excited oscillation and non-repeatability. This article primarily serves as an extended introduction to a theme issue in which such nonlinear phenomena are highlighted through diverse case studies. More ambitiously though, there is another goal. Both the engineering context and the mathematical techniques that can be used to identify, analyse, control or exploit these phenomena in practice are placed in the context of a mind-map, which has been created through expert elicitation. This map, which is available in software through the electronic supplementary material, attempts to provide a practitioner's guide to what hitherto might seem like a vast and complex research landscape. © 2015 The Authors.

  3. Tertiary structure in N-linked oligosaccharides.

    Homans, S W; Dwek, R A; Rademacher, T W

    1987-10-06

    Distance constraints derived from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect measurements have been used to define the orientation of the Man alpha 1-3Man beta linkage in seven different N-linked oligosaccharides, all containing the common pentasaccharide core Man alpha 1-6(Man alpha 1-3)Man beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-4GlcNAc. Conformational invariance of the Man alpha 1-3Man beta linkage was found for those structures bearing substitutions on the Man alpha 1-3Man beta antenna. However, the presence of either a GlcNAc residue in the beta 1-4 linkage to Man beta ("bisecting GlcNAc") or a xylose residue in the beta 1-2 linkage to Man beta of the trimannosyl core was found to generate conformational transitions that were similar. These transitions were accompanied by characteristic chemical shift perturbations of proton resonances in the vicinity of the Man alpha 1-3Man beta linkage. Molecular orbital energy calculations suggest that the conformational transition between the unsubstituted and substituted cores arises from energetic constraints in the vicinity of the Man alpha 1-3Man beta linkage, rather than specific long-range interactions. These data taken together with our previous results on the Man alpha 1-6Man beta linkage [Homans, S. W., Dwek R. A., Boyd, J., Mahmoudian, M., Richards, W. G., & Rademacher, T. W. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 6342] allow us to discuss the consequences of the modulation of oligosaccharide solution conformations.

  4. Introduction

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    referred to as “everyday life” provides a useful starting point for research into media use. It guides us towards a number of considerations, from how we structure our day through certain habits and patterns of media consumption; to the development of technology and the formation of new rituals...... century history. Indeed, a quick Google Scholar search of “everyday life” takes us on whirlwind interdisciplinary tour of academia, from sociology to cultural studies, psychology to political science, anthropology to economics. There is good reason for this, in that thinking through consistency and change...... – patterns and disruptions – across the passage of time forms the analytic foundation for much scientific research. But while “everyday life” adorns the cover of many a noted book (e.g. Goffman 1959; de Certeau 1984), a comparable term is almost nowhere to be found. “Everywhere life” not only draws...

  5. Introduction

    Kristiansen, Tore; Sandøy, Helge

    2010-01-01

    1. Background: the laboratory As is well-known from the literature on language contact (e.g. Weinreich 1953; Thomason and Kaufman 1988) the factors and forces that are in play in close and longstanding contact between (speakers of ) two languages are both linguistic and social in nature......, and involve both quantitative and qualitative relationships. Indeed, the outcome of language contact is a question of numbers and frequencies in terms of use and users, of sameness vs. differencein terms of linguistic structure, of dominance vs. subordination in terms of socio-historical contexts, etc...... in Norway, the Faroes, Iceland and Greenland — eastwards in the case of Sweden and Swedish with a long history in Finland. And we may add the linguistic and socio-historical complexities that relate the Sami people in the far north to the southern majority populations of Norway, Sweden and Finland...

  6. Introduction

    Friend, Milton; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    This is the third iteration of the National Wildlife Health Center's (NWHC) field guide developed primarily to assist field managers and biologists address diseases they encounter. By itself, the first iteration, “Field Guide of Wildlife Diseases: General Field Procedures and Diseases of Migratory Birds,” was simply another addition to an increasing array of North American field guides and other publications focusing on disease in free-ranging wildlife populations. Collectively, those publications were reflecting the ongoing transition in the convergence of wildlife management and wildlife disease as foundational components within the structure of wildlife conservation as a social enterprise serving the stewardship of our wildlife resources. For context, it is useful to consider those publications relative to a timeline of milestones involving the evolution of wildlife conservation in North America.

  7. Introduction to the Special Section: Linking the MMPI-2-RF to Contemporary Models of Psychopathology.

    Sellbom, Martin; Arbisi, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    This special section considers 9 independent articles that seek to link the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/ 2011 ) to contemporary models of psychopathology. Sellbom ( this issue ) maps the Specific Problems scales onto hierarchical psychopathology structures, whereas Romero, Toorabally, Burchett, Tarescavage, and Glassmire ( this issue ) and Shkalim, Almagor, and Ben-Porath ( this issue ) show evidence of linking the instruments' scales to diagnostic representations of common higher order psychopathology constructs. McCord, Achee, Cannon, Harrop, and Poynter ( this issue ) link the MMPI-2-RF scales to psychophysiological constructs inspired by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria. Sellbom and Smith ( this issue ) find support for MMPI-2-RF scale hypotheses in covering personality psychopathology in general, whereas Klein Haneveld, Kamphuis, Smid, and Forbey ( this issue ) and Kutchen et al. ( this issue ) demonstrate the utility of the MMPI-2-RF in capturing contemporary conceptualizations of the psychopathic personality. Finally, Franz, Harrop, and McCord ( this issue ) and Rogers et al. ( this issue ) mapped the MMPI-2-RF scales onto more specific transdiagnostic constructs reflecting interpersonal functioning and suicide behavior proneness, respectively.

  8. Introduction

    Ariel Jerez Novara

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this text, we introduce the structure and logic of the monograph, which consists of five dialogues with activists of Podemos (Karpeta section and nine commentaries in the form of debate (A des/propósito section on the subject of this phenomenon realized by social researchers and media professionals. In the dialogues at the beginning of this issue of Teknokultura, we talk with some of the leaders of Podemos about their plan to confront the power of the establishments’politically, which has been intensified by the social and political discontent created by the crisis. The critical essays included in the second part, analyze this phenomenon drawing from two principal lines of discussion. The first is based on the technological and media dynamics which are part of the organization and its political project. The second responds to theoretical and political aspects, related to Podemos’ emergence and its capacity to intervene in a complex historical context, through the participatory and representative processes they have promoted.

  9. Introduction

    Jastrzebski, J.

    2007-01-01

    -ray spectra. An irradiation facility for radiobiological studies described in details in the last year Annual Report was also presented in a recent publication. Finally, after many years of unsuccessful applications, 50% of funds necessary for the acquisition of a new ECR ion source were allocated by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education at the end of 2006. At present commercial offers are evaluated. Besides running of the U-200P cyclotron, educational activity, development of new experimental tools, and participation in experiments using local and European facilities, the Laboratory team is strongly involved in many new projects. Basing on funds allocated by the Ministry of Scientific Research and Information Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, and the Ministry of Health, the project of the installation in the Laboratory building of a second p/d cyclotron for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals is in progress. The short history and current situation of this project is presented in the following pages of this report. The Laboratory is also involved in the Polish Hadron-Therapy Consortium, contributing to the preparation of the project of the National Hadron-Therapy Center in Warsaw. European Structural Funds allocated to Poland for 2007-2013 open a possibility to acquire funds for realization of such an initiative. Basing on the same source of funding, plus the resources of 7FP, the Laboratory launched the idea of the preparatory program for constructing in Poland a demonstration facility for High Temperature Nuclear Reactor in synergy with coal. The Consortium of Polish Universities and industrial partners was organized. The project was accepted by Polish Government and placed in the first place of the list of Large Projects in the '' Innovative Economy Programme ''. It will be discussed with European Commission. More information on this project can be found on the Laboratory web pages. (author)

  10. Extracting central places from the link structure in Wikipedia

    Kessler, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    of the German language edition of Wikipedia. The official upper and middle centers declared, based on German spatial laws, are used as a reference dataset. The characteristics of the link structure around their Wikipedia pages, which link to each other or mention each other, and how often, are used to develop...... a bottom-up method for extracting central places from Wikipedia. The method relies solely on the structure and number of links and mentions between the corresponding Wikipedia pages; no spatial information is used in the extraction process. The output of this method shows significant overlap...... with the official central place structure, especially for the upper centers. The results indicate that real-world relationships are in fact reflected in the link structure on the web in the case of Wikipedia....

  11. Brain structure links loneliness to social perception.

    Kanai, Ryota; Bahrami, Bahador; Duchaine, Brad; Janik, Agnieszka; Banissy, Michael J; Rees, Geraint

    2012-10-23

    Loneliness is the distressing feeling associated with the perceived absence of satisfying social relationships. Loneliness is increasingly prevalent in modern societies and has detrimental effects on health and happiness. Although situational threats to social relationships can transiently induce the emotion of loneliness, susceptibility to loneliness is a stable trait that varies across individuals [6-8] and is to some extent heritable. However, little is known about the neural processes associated with loneliness (but see [12-14]). Here, we hypothesized that individual differences in loneliness might be reflected in the structure of the brain regions associated with social processes. To test this hypothesis, we used voxel-based morphometry and showed that lonely individuals have less gray matter in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS)--an area implicated in basic social perception. As this finding predicted, we further confirmed that loneliness was associated with difficulty in processing social cues. Although other sociopsychological factors such as social network size, anxiety, and empathy independently contributed to loneliness, only basic social perception skills mediated the association between the pSTS volume and loneliness. Taken together, our results suggest that basic social perceptual abilities play an important role in shaping an individual's loneliness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Formaldehyde cross-linking and structural proteomics: Bridging the gap.

    Srinivasa, Savita; Ding, Xuan; Kast, Juergen

    2015-11-01

    Proteins are dynamic entities constantly moving and altering their structures based on their functions and interactions inside and outside the cell. Formaldehyde cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry can accurately capture interactions of these rapidly changing biomolecules while maintaining their physiological surroundings. Even with its numerous established uses in biology and compatibility with mass spectrometry, formaldehyde has not yet been applied in structural proteomics. However, formaldehyde cross-linking is moving toward analyzing tertiary structure, which conventional cross-linkers have already accomplished. The purpose of this review is to describe the potential of formaldehyde cross-linking in structural proteomics by highlighting its applications, characteristics and current status in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Introduction of a child and adolescent mental health link worker: education and health staff focus group findings.

    Hunter, A; Playle, J; Sanchez, P; Cahill, J; McGowan, L

    2008-10-01

    Policy guidance suggests that outcomes for adolescents with mental health problems can be improved by secondary education services (SES) and child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) working more closely. This study reports on staff experiences of the introduction of a mental health link worker (MHLW). The findings of two focus groups are presented, conducted with staff from CAMHS and SES. These focus groups formed part of the overall wider evaluation of the MHLW role. The groups explored staff perceptions and experiences following the introduction of the MHLW, and elicited their views on the effectiveness of this innovative role. Qualitative methods were employed, and analysis was conducted using the principles of grounded theory and the constant comparative method. The findings revealed that the MHLW was well received by both groups, despite the identification of potential barriers. A number of key themes emerged, which included the ability of the link worker to improve communication and to encourage mutual understanding between services. The issues raised by these themes are discussed and recommendations are made for future practice and research.

  14. Deployment of a multi-link flexible structure

    Na, Kyung-Su; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2006-06-01

    Deployment of a multi-link beam structure undergoing locking is analyzed in the Timoshenko beam theory. In the modeling of the system, dynamic forces are assumed to be torques and restoring forces due to the torsion spring at each joint. Hamilton's principle is used to determine the equations of motion and the finite element method is adopted to analyze the system. Newmark time integration and Newton-Raphson iteration methods are used to solve for the non-linear equations of motion at each time step. The locking at the joints of the multi-link flexible structure is analyzed by the momentum balance method. Numerical results are compared with the previous experimental data. The angles and angular velocities of each joint, tip displacement, and velocity of each link are investigated to study the motions of the links at each time step. To analyze the effect of thickness on the motion of the link, the angle and the tip displacement of each link are compared according to the various slenderness ratios. Additionally, in order to investigate the effect of shear, the tip displacements of a Timoshenko beam are compared with those of an Euler-Bernoulli beam.

  15. Chapter 1: A Brief Introduction to Lignin Structure

    Katahira, Rui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beckham, Gregg T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elder, Thomas J. [USDA-Forest Service

    2018-04-03

    Lignin is an alkyl-aromatic polymer found in the cell walls of terrestrial plants. Lignin provides structure and rigidity to plants, is a natural, highly effective barrier against microbial attack, and enables water and nutrient transport through plant tissues. Depending on the plant species, the constituents of lignin can vary considerably, leading to substantial diversity in lignin chemistry and structure. Despite nearly a century of research and development attempting to convert lignin into valuable products, lignin in most current and planned biorefinery contexts remains underutilized, most often being burned to generate heat and power. However, the drive towards effective lignin valorization processes has witnessed a significant resurgence in the past decade, catalyzed by advances in improved understanding of lignin chemistry, structure, and plasticity in parallel with new catalytic and biological approaches to valorize this important, prevalent biopolymer. As a preface to the subsequent chapters in this book, this chapter briefly highlights the known aspects of lignin structure.

  16. An introduction about precise measurements of QED γ structure functions

    Courau, A.

    1989-11-01

    Pure QED processes are theoretically exactly computable. However precise measurements and theoretical expectations of QED γ structure functions within a given experimental acceptance are not so trivial. Yet such a study is quite interesting. It supplies on the one hand a good QED test and, on the other hand, a good exercise for testing the procedure used for the determination of the hadronic γ structure functions

  17. Introduction of Functional Structures in Nano-Scales into Engineering Polymer Films Using Radiation Technique

    Maekawa, Y., E-mail: maekawa.yasunari@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Quantum Beam Science Directorate, High Performance Polymer Group, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma-ken 370-1292 (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Introduction of functional regions in nanometer scale in polymeric films using γ-rays, EB, and ion beams are proposed. Two approaches to build nano-scale functional domains in polymer substrates are proposed: 1) Radiation-induced grafting to transfer nano-scale polymer crystalline structures (morphology), acting as a nano-template, to nano-scale graft polymer regions. The obtained polymers with nano structures can be applied to high performance polymer membranes. 2) Fabrication of nanopores and functional domains in engineering plastic films using ion beams, which deposit the energy in very narrow region of polymer films. Hydrophilic grafting polymers are introduced into hydrophobic fluorinated polymers, cross-linked PTFE (cPTFE) and aromatic hydrocarbon polymer, poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK), which is known to have lamella and crystallite in the polymer films. Then, the hierarchical structures of graft domains are analyzed by a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. From these analyses, the different structures and the different formation of graft domains were observed in fluorinated and hydrocarbon polymer substrates. the grafted domains in the cPTFE film, working as an ion channel, grew as covering the crystallite and the size of domain seems to be similar to that of crystallite. On the other hand, the PEEK-based PEM has a smaller domain size and it seems to grow independently on the crystallites of PEEK substrate. For nano-fabrication of polymer films using heavy ion beams, the energy distribution in radial direction, which is perpendicular to ion trajectory, is mainly concerned. For penumbra, we re-estimated effective radius of penumbra, in which radiation induced grafting took place, for several different ion beams. We observed the different diameters of the ion channels consisting of graft polymers. The channel sizes were quite in good agreement with the effective penumbra which possess the absorption doses more than 1 kGy. (author)

  18. Introduction of Functional Structures in Nano-Scales into Engineering Polymer Films Using Radiation Technique

    Maekawa, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction of functional regions in nanometer scale in polymeric films using γ-rays, EB, and ion beams are proposed. Two approaches to build nano-scale functional domains in polymer substrates are proposed: 1) Radiation-induced grafting to transfer nano-scale polymer crystalline structures (morphology), acting as a nano-template, to nano-scale graft polymer regions. The obtained polymers with nano structures can be applied to high performance polymer membranes. 2) Fabrication of nanopores and functional domains in engineering plastic films using ion beams, which deposit the energy in very narrow region of polymer films. Hydrophilic grafting polymers are introduced into hydrophobic fluorinated polymers, cross-linked PTFE (cPTFE) and aromatic hydrocarbon polymer, poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK), which is known to have lamella and crystallite in the polymer films. Then, the hierarchical structures of graft domains are analyzed by a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. From these analyses, the different structures and the different formation of graft domains were observed in fluorinated and hydrocarbon polymer substrates. the grafted domains in the cPTFE film, working as an ion channel, grew as covering the crystallite and the size of domain seems to be similar to that of crystallite. On the other hand, the PEEK-based PEM has a smaller domain size and it seems to grow independently on the crystallites of PEEK substrate. For nano-fabrication of polymer films using heavy ion beams, the energy distribution in radial direction, which is perpendicular to ion trajectory, is mainly concerned. For penumbra, we re-estimated effective radius of penumbra, in which radiation induced grafting took place, for several different ion beams. We observed the different diameters of the ion channels consisting of graft polymers. The channel sizes were quite in good agreement with the effective penumbra which possess the absorption doses more than 1 kGy. (author)

  19. Riparian ecosystems and buffers - multiscale structure, function, and management: introduction

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Richard R. Lowrance

    2006-01-01

    Given the importance of issues related to improved understanding and management of riparian ecosystems and buffers, the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) sponsored a Summer Specialty Conference in June 2004 at Olympic Valley, California, entitled 'Riparian Ecosystems and Buffers: Multiscale Structure, Function, and Management.' The primary objective...

  20. Medial/skeletal linking structures for multi-region configurations

    Damon, James

    2018-01-01

    The authors consider a generic configuration of regions, consisting of a collection of distinct compact regions \\{ \\Omega_i\\} in \\mathbb{R}^{n+1} which may be either regions with smooth boundaries disjoint from the others or regions which meet on their piecewise smooth boundaries \\mathcal{B}_i in a generic way. They introduce a skeletal linking structure for the collection of regions which simultaneously captures the regions' individual shapes and geometric properties as well as the "positional geometry" of the collection. The linking structure extends in a minimal way the individual "skeletal structures" on each of the regions. This allows the authors to significantly extend the mathematical methods introduced for single regions to the configuration of regions.

  1. Differentiable dynamical systems an introduction to structural stability and hyperbolicity

    Wen, Lan

    2016-01-01

    This is a graduate text in differentiable dynamical systems. It focuses on structural stability and hyperbolicity, a topic that is central to the field. Starting with the basic concepts of dynamical systems, analyzing the historic systems of the Smale horseshoe, Anosov toral automorphisms, and the solenoid attractor, the book develops the hyperbolic theory first for hyperbolic fixed points and then for general hyperbolic sets. The problems of stable manifolds, structural stability, and shadowing property are investigated, which lead to a highlight of the book, the \\Omega-stability theorem of Smale. While the content is rather standard, a key objective of the book is to present a thorough treatment for some tough material that has remained an obstacle to teaching and learning the subject matter. The treatment is straightforward and hence could be particularly suitable for self-study. Selected solutions are available electronically for instructors only. Please send email to textbooks@ams.org for more informatio...

  2. Introduction to string theory: its structure and its uses

    Olive, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    Over five years ago experiments at CERN confirmed that the weak (radioactive) interactions of elementary particles are mediated by gauge particles that are heavy relatives of the photon, namely the quantum of light and radio wave propagation. Gauge particles have to belong to a pattern given by the structure of a compact Lie group. Mathematicians listed such patterns at the beginning of the century and it seems that nature favours one of the 'exceptional' possibilities when nuclear forces are included. Twenty years ago a picture of elementary particles as quantums of the excitations of a one-dimensional string was developed. Consistency with the principles of relativity and quantum mechanics seemed to require the aforementioned exceptional gauge structure as well as gravitational forces in Einstein's formulation. Thus a simple 'string' principle promised to explain and unify all the diverse fundamental forces of nature: electromagnetic, weak, nuclear and gravitational. Unfortunately, there remain detailed questions still to be resolved. Nevertheless, the theory possesses rich mathematical structure encompassing Lie algebras and infinite-dimensional generalizations and complex algebraic geometry in a way which sheds valuable new perspectives on modern pure mathematics. At the same time it has unexpected applications in describing and classifying the modes of phase transition in two-dimensional materials, a classical problem in statistical physics. (author)

  3. Sensory Hair Cells: An Introduction to Structure and Physiology.

    McPherson, Duane R

    2018-06-18

    Sensory hair cells are specialized secondary sensory cells that mediate our senses of hearing, balance, linear acceleration, and angular acceleration (head rotation). In addition, hair cells in fish and amphibians mediate sensitivity to water movement through the lateral line system, and closely related electroreceptive cells mediate sensitivity to low-voltage electric fields in the aquatic environment of many fish species and several species of amphibian.Sensory hair cells share many structural and functional features across all vertebrate groups, while at the same time they are specialized for employment in a wide variety of sensory tasks. The complexity of hair cell structure is large, and the diversity of hair cell applications in sensory systems exceeds that seen for most, if not all, sensory cell types. The intent of this review is to summarize the more significant structural features and some of the more interesting and important physiological mechanisms that have been elucidated thus far. Outside vertebrates, hair cells are only known to exist in the coronal organ of tunicates. Electrical resonance, electromotility, and their exquisite mechanical sensitivity all contribute to the attractiveness of hair cells as a research subject.

  4. Modern quantum chemistry introduction to advanced electronic structure theory

    Szabo, Attila

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this graduate-level textbook is to present and explain, at other than a superficial level, modem ab initio approaches to the calculation of the electronic structure and properties of molecules. The first three chapters contain introductory material culminating in a thorough discussion of the Hartree-Fock approximation.The remaining four chapters describe a variety of more sophisticated approaches, which improve upon this approximation.Among the highlights of the seven chapters are (1) a review of the mathematics (mostly matrix algebra) required for the rest of the book, (2) an intr

  5. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA: INTRODUCTION TO RELEVANT WEB PAGES

    BURROWS, T.W.; MCLAUGHLIN, P.D.; NICHOLS, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description is given of the nuclear data centres around the world able to provide access to those databases and programs of highest relevance to nuclear structure and decay data specialists. A number of Web-page addresses are also provided for the reader to inspect and investigate these data and codes for study, evaluation and calculation. These instructions are not meant to be comprehensive, but should provide the reader with a reasonable means of electronic access to the most important data sets and programs

  6. Identifying structural variants using linked-read sequencing data.

    Elyanow, Rebecca; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Raphael, Benjamin J

    2017-11-03

    Structural variation, including large deletions, duplications, inversions, translocations, and other rearrangements, is common in human and cancer genomes. A number of methods have been developed to identify structural variants from Illumina short-read sequencing data. However, reliable identification of structural variants remains challenging because many variants have breakpoints in repetitive regions of the genome and thus are difficult to identify with short reads. The recently developed linked-read sequencing technology from 10X Genomics combines a novel barcoding strategy with Illumina sequencing. This technology labels all reads that originate from a small number (~5-10) DNA molecules ~50Kbp in length with the same molecular barcode. These barcoded reads contain long-range sequence information that is advantageous for identification of structural variants. We present Novel Adjacency Identification with Barcoded Reads (NAIBR), an algorithm to identify structural variants in linked-read sequencing data. NAIBR predicts novel adjacencies in a individual genome resulting from structural variants using a probabilistic model that combines multiple signals in barcoded reads. We show that NAIBR outperforms several existing methods for structural variant identification - including two recent methods that also analyze linked-reads - on simulated sequencing data and 10X whole-genome sequencing data from the NA12878 human genome and the HCC1954 breast cancer cell line. Several of the novel somatic structural variants identified in HCC1954 overlap known cancer genes. Software is available at compbio.cs.brown.edu/software. braphael@princeton.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Introduction to the structures and processes of subduction zones

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2017-09-01

    Subduction zones have been the focus of many studies since the advent of plate tectonics in 1960s. Workings within subduction zones beneath volcanic arcs have been of particular interest because they prime the source of arc magmas. The results from magmatic products have been used to decipher the structures and processes of subduction zones. In doing so, many progresses have been made on modern oceanic subduction zones, but less progresses on ancient oceanic subduction zones. On the other hand, continental subduction zones have been studied since findings of coesite in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal origin in 1980s. It turns out that high-pressure to ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks in collisional orogens provide a direct target to investigate the tectonism of subduction zones, whereas oceanic and continental arc volcanic rocks in accretionary orogens provide an indirect target to investigate the geochemistry of subduction zones. Nevertheless, metamorphic dehydration and partial melting at high-pressure to ultrahigh-pressure conditions are tectonically applicable to subduction zone processes at forearc to subarc depths, and crustal metasomatism is the physicochemical mechanism for geochemical transfer from the slab to the mantle in subduction channels. Taken together, these provide us with an excellent opportunity to find how the metamorphic, metasomatic and magmatic products are a function of the structures and processes in both oceanic and continental subduction zones. Because of the change in the thermal structures of subduction zones, different styles of metamorphism, metasomatism and magmatism are produced at convergent plate margins. In addition, juvenile and ancient crustal rocks have often suffered reworking in episodes independent of either accretionary or collisional orogeny, leading to continental rifting metamorphism and thus rifting orogeny for mountain building in intracontinental settings. This brings complexity to distinguish the syn

  8. Introduction Introduction

    Andrew Ives

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploring the links between religion and politics in the early 21st century seems at once both arcane and of pragmatic interest. Certainly, in the United States, the relationship is of practical importance: it has become one of the key elements in deciding electoral outcomes. However, seen from a continental European perspective, still grounded in the French Enlightenment tradition, the growing importance of religion in the American political landscape would seem to be an unfathomable mystery...

  9. Introduction to the CEA family: structure, function and secretion.

    Von Kleist, S

    1992-01-01

    Due to the phenomenal progress in the field of tumor immunology that took place during the last twenty years, we dispose today of highly specific and sensitive techniques and reagents like monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In this context the discovery in human carcinomas of tumor-associated antigens, such as CEA, was of primary importance, especially since the latter was found to have clinical relevance as a tumor marker. Based on animal models, a new in vivo technology for the detection of tumors and metastases was developed in recent years, that uses anti-CEA MAbs, or fragments of them, coupled to radio-isotopes. This technique, called radio-immunodetection (RAID), also paved the way for immunotherapeutic procedures, where again CEA served as the target-antigen. This new technique holds great promise, provided the epitope-specificity of the MAbs is well-controlled: it has been shown that CEA belongs to a large gene-family of at least 22 members, which can be subdivided into two subgroups (i.e., the CEA- and the PSG-subgroup) and which in turn belongs to the immunoglobulin-supergene family. Great structural similarities render the distinction of the various cross-reactive molecules by immunological means rather difficult.

  10. Coevolution of game and network structure with adjustable linking

    Qin, Shao-Meng; Zhang, Guo-Yong; Chen, Yong

    2009-12-01

    Most papers about the evolutionary game on graph assume the statistic network structure. However, in the real world, social interaction could change the relationship among people. And the change of social structure will also affect people’s strategies. We build a coevolution model of prisoner’s dilemma game and network structure to study the dynamic interaction in the real world. Differing from other coevolution models, players rewire their network connections according to the density of cooperation and other players’ payoffs. We use a parameter α to control the effect of payoff in the process of rewiring. Based on the asynchronous update rule and Monte Carlo simulation, we find that, when players prefer to rewire their links to those who are richer, the temptation can increase the cooperation density.

  11. Subharmonic energy-gap structure in superconducting weak links

    Flensberg, K.; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Octavio, M.

    1988-01-01

    We present corrected calculations of the subharmonic energy-gap structure using the model of Octavio, Tinkham, Blonder, and Klapwijk, which includes the effect of normal scattering in the weak link. We show that while the overall predictions of this model do not change qualitatively, the details...... of the predicted curves are different and in better agreement with experiment. We also present calculation of the current-voltage characteristics and of the excess currents for T=0, as the normal scattering parameter Z is varied. We also show how the calculation can be shortened using symmetry arguments...

  12. APPLICATION OF RIGID LINKS IN STRUCTURAL DESIGN MODELS

    Sergey Yu. Fialko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A special finite element modelling rigid links is proposed for the linear static and buckling analysis. Unlike the classical approach based on the theorems of rigid body kinematics, the proposed approach preserves the similarity between the adjacency graph for a sparse matrix and the adjacency graph for nodes of the finite element model, which allows applying sparse direct solvers more effectively. Besides, the proposed approach allows significantly reducing the number of nonzero entries in the factored stiffness matrix in comparison with the classical one, which greatly reduces the duration of the solution. For buckling problems of structures containing rigid bodies, this approach gives correct results. Several examples demonstrate its efficiency.

  13. An Introduction to Operational Modal Identification of Offshore Wind Turbine Structures

    Damgaard, Mads

    excitation originating from the rotating rotor and broadband excitation from air turbulence is present, which sets limitations on the applicability of operational modal analysis to wind turbine structures. The technical memorandum contains an introduction to the theory within experimental modal analysis and......The present technical memorandum “An Introduction to Operational Modal Identification of Offshore Wind Turbine Structures” is prepared in connection with an ongoing Ph.D study at Aalborg University. The memorandum is intended for use in the civil engineering field and may serve as an inspiration...

  14. Linking structure and activity in nonlinear spiking networks.

    Gabriel Koch Ocker

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental advances are producing an avalanche of data on both neural connectivity and neural activity. To take full advantage of these two emerging datasets we need a framework that links them, revealing how collective neural activity arises from the structure of neural connectivity and intrinsic neural dynamics. This problem of structure-driven activity has drawn major interest in computational neuroscience. Existing methods for relating activity and architecture in spiking networks rely on linearizing activity around a central operating point and thus fail to capture the nonlinear responses of individual neurons that are the hallmark of neural information processing. Here, we overcome this limitation and present a new relationship between connectivity and activity in networks of nonlinear spiking neurons by developing a diagrammatic fluctuation expansion based on statistical field theory. We explicitly show how recurrent network structure produces pairwise and higher-order correlated activity, and how nonlinearities impact the networks' spiking activity. Our findings open new avenues to investigating how single-neuron nonlinearities-including those of different cell types-combine with connectivity to shape population activity and function.

  15. Linking structure and activity in nonlinear spiking networks.

    Ocker, Gabriel Koch; Josić, Krešimir; Shea-Brown, Eric; Buice, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    Recent experimental advances are producing an avalanche of data on both neural connectivity and neural activity. To take full advantage of these two emerging datasets we need a framework that links them, revealing how collective neural activity arises from the structure of neural connectivity and intrinsic neural dynamics. This problem of structure-driven activity has drawn major interest in computational neuroscience. Existing methods for relating activity and architecture in spiking networks rely on linearizing activity around a central operating point and thus fail to capture the nonlinear responses of individual neurons that are the hallmark of neural information processing. Here, we overcome this limitation and present a new relationship between connectivity and activity in networks of nonlinear spiking neurons by developing a diagrammatic fluctuation expansion based on statistical field theory. We explicitly show how recurrent network structure produces pairwise and higher-order correlated activity, and how nonlinearities impact the networks' spiking activity. Our findings open new avenues to investigating how single-neuron nonlinearities-including those of different cell types-combine with connectivity to shape population activity and function.

  16. Introduction to structural and mechanical failure modes for nuclear power facilities

    Reed, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The three papers presented in this section discuss the types of information (i.e., dynamic tests, earthquake experience and analytical data) which are used in predicting the capacity of structures and equipment in nuclear power plants to resist earthquakes. The background and motivation for discussing these three types of information is presented in this paper as an introduction to the papers which follow in this section

  17. Brain structure links everyday creativity to creative achievement.

    Zhu, Wenfeng; Chen, Qunlin; Tang, Chaoying; Cao, Guikang; Hou, Yuling; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Although creativity is commonly considered to be a cornerstone of human progress and vital to all realms of our lives, its neural basis remains elusive, partly due to the different tasks and measurement methods applied in research. In particular, the neural correlates of everyday creativity that can be experienced by everyone, to some extent, are still unexplored. The present study was designed to investigate the brain structure underlying individual differences in everyday creativity, as measured by the Creative Behavioral Inventory (CBI) (N=163). The results revealed that more creative activities were significantly and positively associated with larger gray matter volume (GMV) in the regional premotor cortex (PMC), which is a motor planning area involved in the creation and selection of novel actions and inhibition. In addition, the gray volume of the PMC had a significant positive relationship with creative achievement and Art scores, which supports the notion that training and practice may induce changes in brain structures. These results indicate that everyday creativity is linked to the PMC and that PMC volume can predict creative achievement, supporting the view that motor planning may play a crucial role in creative behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Brain Structure Linking Delay Discounting and Academic Performance.

    Wang, Song; Kong, Feng; Zhou, Ming; Chen, Taolin; Yang, Xun; Chen, Guangxiang; Gong, Qiyong

    2017-08-01

    As a component of self-discipline, delay discounting refers to the ability to wait longer for preferred rewards and plays a pivotal role in shaping students' academic performance. However, the neural basis of the association between delay discounting and academic performance remains largely unknown. Here, we examined the neuroanatomical substrates underlying delay discounting and academic performance in 214 adolescents via voxel-based morphometry (VBM) by performing structural magnetic resonance imaging (S-MRI). Behaviorally, we confirmed the significant correlation between delay discounting and academic performance. Neurally, whole-brain regression analyses indicated that regional gray matter volume (rGMV) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was associated with both delay discounting and academic performance. Furthermore, delay discounting partly accounted for the association between academic performance and brain structure. Differences in the rGMV of the left DLPFC related to academic performance explained over one-third of the impact of delay discounting on academic performance. Overall, these results provide the first evidence for the common neural basis linking delay discounting and academic performance. Hum Brain Mapp 38:3917-3926, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Optimal optical communication terminal structure for maximizing the link budget

    Huang, Jian; Jiang, Dagang; Deng, Ke; Zhang, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Ordinary inter-satellite optical includes at least three optical paths for acquisition, tracking and communication, the three optical paths work simultaneously and share the received power. An optimal structure of inter-satellite optical communication terminal with single working optical path at each of working stages of acquisition and communication is introduced. A space optical switch based on frustrated total internal reflection effect is applied to switch the received laser power between the acquisition sensor and the communication sensor between the stages of acquisition and communication, this is named as power fusion which means power is transferred for shutting down unused optical path. For the stages of tracking and communication, a multiple cells sensor is used to accomplish the operation of tracking while communication, this is named as function fusion which means accomplishing multiple functions by one device to reduce the redundant optical paths. For optical communication terminal with single working path structure, the total received laser power would be detected by one sensor for each different stages of acquisition, tracking and communication, the link budget would be maximized, and this design would help to enlarge the system tolerance and reduce the acquisition time.

  20. Structure/Psychophysical Relationships in X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    Bennett, Lea D; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Klein, Martin; Pennesi, Mark E; Jayasundera, Thiran; Birch, David G

    2016-02-01

    To compare structural properties from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) and psychophysical measures from a subset of patients enrolled in a larger multicenter natural history study of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS). A subset of males (n = 24) participating in a larger natural history study of XLRS underwent high-resolution SDOCT. Total retina (TR) thickness and outer segment (OS) thickness were measured manually. Shape discrimination hyperacuity (SDH) and contour integration perimetry (CIP) were performed on an iPad with the myVisionTrack application. Sensitivity was measured with fundus-guided perimetry (4-2 threshold testing strategy; 10-2 grid, spot size 3, 68 points). Correlation was determined with Pearson's r correlation. Values are presented as the mean ± SD. Mean macular OS thickness was less in XLRS patients (17.2 ± 8.1 μm) than in controls (37.1 ± 5.7 μm; P weak correlation with TR thickness (R(2) = 0.22, P = 0.0158). The XLRS subjects had a logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 ± 0.3 that was associated with OS (R(2) = 0.79, P < 0.0001) but not TR thickness (R(2) = 0.01, P = 0.6166). Shape DH and CIP inner ring correlated with OS (R(2) = 0.33, P = 0.0085 and R(2) = 0.47, P = 0.0001, respectively) but not TR thickness (R(2) = 0.0004, P = 0.93; R(2) = 0.0043, P = 0.75, respectively). When considered from a single visit, OS thickness within the macula is more closely associated with macular function than TR thickness within the macula in patients with XLRS.

  1. Structural investigation of nitrogen-linked saccharinate-tetrazole

    Gómez-Zavaglia, A.; Ismael, A.; Cabral, L. I. L.; Kaczor, A.; Paixão, J. A.; Fausto, R.; Cristiano, M. L. S.

    2011-09-01

    The molecular structure of nitrogen-linked saccharinate-tetrazole, N-(1,1-dioxo-1,2-benzisothiazol-3-yl)-amine-1 H-tetrazole (BAT), was investigated in the crystalline state using X-ray crystallography and infrared and Raman spectroscopies, and isolated in argon matrix by infrared spectroscopy. Interpretation of the experimental results was supported by quantum chemical calculations undertaken at the DFT(B3LYP)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. In the neat crystalline solid (space group C2/ c, a = 21.7493(3) Å, b = 8.85940(10) Å, c = 10.76900(10) Å, β = 103.3300(10) deg; Z = 8), BAT units exist in the (1 H)-tetrazole aminosaccharin tautomeric form, with the NH spacer establishing a hydrogen bond to the nitrogen in position-4 of the tetrazole group of a neighbour molecule, and the NH group of the tetrazole fragment forming a bifurcated H-bond to the saccharyl nitrogen of the same molecule and to one of the oxygen atoms of a second neighbour molecule. On the other hand, according to both the matrix isolation infrared studies and the theoretical calculations, the isolated BAT molecule exists preferentially as the (1 H)-tetrazole iminosaccharin tautomer, where the main stabilizing interaction is the intramolecular H-bond established between the NH group of the saccharyl ring and the tetrazole nitrogen atom in position 4. A detailed conformational analysis of the studied molecule and full assignment of the vibrational spectra for both the matrix-isolated compound and crystalline sample were undertaken.

  2. Garter snakes distributions in high elevation aquatic ecosystems: Is there a link with declining amphibian populations and nonnative trout introductions?

    K.R. Matthews; R.A. Knapp; K.L. Pope

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT.—The dramatic amphibian population declines reported worldwide likely have important effects on their predators. In the Sierra Nevada, where amphibian declines are well documented and some are closely tied to the introduction of nonnative trout, the mountain garter snake, Thamnophis elegans elegans, preys predominately on amphibians. We surveyed 2103 high-...

  3. Multiple regression and beyond an introduction to multiple regression and structural equation modeling

    Keith, Timothy Z

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Regression and Beyond offers a conceptually oriented introduction to multiple regression (MR) analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM), along with analyses that flow naturally from those methods. By focusing on the concepts and purposes of MR and related methods, rather than the derivation and calculation of formulae, this book introduces material to students more clearly, and in a less threatening way. In addition to illuminating content necessary for coursework, the accessibility of this approach means students are more likely to be able to conduct research using MR or SEM--and more likely to use the methods wisely. Covers both MR and SEM, while explaining their relevance to one another Also includes path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and latent growth modeling Figures and tables throughout provide examples and illustrate key concepts and techniques For additional resources, please visit: http://tzkeith.com/.

  4. Introduction to First-Principles Electronic Structure Methods: Application to Actinide Materials

    Klepeis, J E

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction for non-experts to first-principles electronic structure methods that are widely used in condensed-matter physics. Particular emphasis is placed on giving the appropriate background information needed to better appreciate the use of these methods to study actinide and other materials. Specifically, I describe the underlying theory sufficiently to enable an understanding of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the methods. I also explain the meaning of commonly used terminology, including density functional theory (DFT), local density approximation (LDA), and generalized gradient approximation (GGA), as well as linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO), linear augmented plane wave (LAPW), and pseudopotential methods. I also briefly discuss methodologies that extend the basic theory to address specific limitations. Finally, I describe a few illustrative applications, including quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations and studies of surfaces, impurities, and defects. I conclude by addressing the current controversy regarding magnetic calculations for actinide materials

  5. Potential effects of the introduction of the discrete address beacon system data link on air/ground information transfer problems

    Grayson, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    This study of Aviation Safety Reporting System reports suggests that benefits should accure from implementation of discrete address beacon system data link. The phase enhanced terminal information system service is expected to provide better terminal information than present systems by improving currency and accuracy. In the exchange of air traffic control messages, discrete address insures that only the intended recipient receives and acts on a specific message. Visual displays and printer copy of messages should mitigate many of the reported problems associated with voice communications. The problems that remain unaffected include error in addressing the intended recipient and messages whose content is wrong but are otherwise correct as to format and reasonableness.

  6. Mapping protein structural changes by quantitative cross-linking

    Kukačka, Zdeněk; Strohalm, Martin; Kavan, Daniel; Novák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 89, NOV 2015 (2015), s. 112-120 ISSN 1046-2023 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chemical cross-linking * Proteolysis * Mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.503, year: 2015

  7. Linking Neural and Symbolic Representation and Processing of Conceptual Structures

    Frank van der Velde

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We compare and discuss representations in two cognitive architectures aimed at representing and processing complex conceptual (sentence-like structures. First is the Neural Blackboard Architecture (NBA, which aims to account for representation and processing of complex and combinatorial conceptual structures in the brain. Second is IDyOT (Information Dynamics of Thinking, which derives sentence-like structures by learning statistical sequential regularities over a suitable corpus. Although IDyOT is designed at a level more abstract than the neural, so it is a model of cognitive function, rather than neural processing, there are strong similarities between the composite structures developed in IDyOT and the NBA. We hypothesize that these similarities form the basis of a combined architecture in which the individual strengths of each architecture are integrated. We outline and discuss the characteristics of this combined architecture, emphasizing the representation and processing of conceptual structures.

  8. Linking neural and symbolic representation and processing of conceptual structures

    van der Velde, Frank; Forth, Jamie; Nazareth, Deniece S.; Wiggins, Geraint A.

    2017-01-01

    We compare and discuss representations in two cognitive architectures aimed at representing and processing complex conceptual (sentence-like) structures. First is the Neural Blackboard Architecture (NBA), which aims to account for representation and processing of complex and combinatorial conceptual

  9. Forging the link between nuclear reactions and nuclear structure.

    Mahzoon, M H; Charity, R J; Dickhoff, W H; Dussan, H; Waldecker, S J

    2014-04-25

    A comprehensive description of all single-particle properties associated with the nucleus Ca40 is generated by employing a nonlocal dispersive optical potential capable of simultaneously reproducing all relevant data above and below the Fermi energy. The introduction of nonlocality in the absorptive potentials yields equivalent elastic differential cross sections as compared to local versions but changes the absorption profile as a function of angular momentum suggesting important consequences for the analysis of nuclear reactions. Below the Fermi energy, nonlocality is essential to allow for an accurate representation of particle number and the nuclear charge density. Spectral properties implied by (e, e'p) and (p, 2p) reactions are correctly incorporated, including the energy distribution of about 10% high-momentum nucleons, as experimentally determined by data from Jefferson Lab. These high-momentum nucleons provide a substantial contribution to the energy of the ground state, indicating a residual attractive contribution from higher-body interactions for Ca40 of about 0.64  MeV/A.

  10. Genetic diversity and population structure of Lantana camara in India indicates multiple introductions and gene flow.

    Ray, A; Quader, S

    2014-05-01

    Lantana camara is a highly invasive plant, which has spread over 60 countries and island groups of Asia, Africa and Australia. In India, it was introduced in the early nineteenth century, since when it has expanded and gradually established itself in almost every available ecosystem. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this plant in India in order to understand its introduction, subsequent range expansion and gene flow. A total of 179 individuals were sequenced at three chloroplast loci and 218 individuals were genotyped for six nuclear microsatellites. Both chloroplasts (nine haplotypes) and microsatellites (83 alleles) showed high genetic diversity. Besides, each type of marker confirmed the presence of private polymorphism. We uncovered low to medium population structure in both markers, and found a faint signal of isolation by distance with microsatellites. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic clusters. Taken together, these findings (i.e. high genetic diversity with private alleles and multiple genetic clusters) suggest that Lantana was introduced multiple times and gradually underwent spatial expansion with recurrent gene flow. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. Introduction to First-Principles Electronic Structure Methods: Application to Actinide Materials

    Klepeis, J E

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction for non-experts to first-principles electronic structure methods that are widely used in the field of condensed-matter physics, including applications to actinide materials. The methods I describe are based on density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In addition to explaining the meaning of this terminology I also describe the underlying theory itself in some detail in order to enable a better understanding of the relative strengths and weaknesses of the methods. I briefly mention some particular numerical implementations of DFT, including the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO), linear augmented plane wave (LAPW), and pseudopotential methods, as well as general methodologies that go beyond DFT and specifically address some of the weaknesses of the theory. The last third of the paper is devoted to a few selected applications that illustrate the ideas discussed in the first two-thirds. In particular, I conclude by addressing the current controversy regarding magnetic DFT calculations for actinide materials. Throughout this paper particular emphasis is placed on providing the appropriate background to enable the non-expert to gain a better appreciation of the application of first-principles electronic structure methods to the study of actinide and other materials

  12. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either by facilitat...... describes the steps in the analysis of the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA and its possible relation to splicing. As a working example, we use the case of yeast and the problem of the recognition of the 3' splice site (3'ss).......In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either...

  13. A Case Study of the Introduction of RISC-based Computing and a Telecommunications Link to a Suburban High School.

    Hakerem, Gita; And Others

    This study reports the efforts of the Water and Molecular Networks Project (WAMNet), a program in which high school chemistry students use computer simulations developed at Boston University (Massachusetts) to model the three-dimensional structure of molecules and the hydrogen bond network that holds water molecules together. This case study…

  14. Water linked 3D coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and applications

    Singh, Suryabhan; Bhim, Anupam

    2016-12-01

    Three new coordination polymers (CPs) based on Cd and Pb, [Cd(OBA)(μ-H2O)(H2O)]n1, [Pb(OBA)(μ-H2O)]n2 [where OBA=4,4'-Oxybis(benzoate)] and [Pb(SDBA)(H2O)]n.1/4DMF 3 (SDBA=4,4'-Sulfonyldibenzoate), have been synthesized and characterized. The single crystal structural studies reveal that CPs 1 and 2 have three dimensional structure. A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. Compound 3 has a supramolecular 3D structure involving water molecule and hydrogen bonds. A structural transformation is observed when 3 was heated at 100 °C or kept in methanol, forming [Pb(SDBA)]n4. Compound 4 is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. The PdNPs@4 exhibits good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH4 at room temperature. Luminescence studies revealed that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives.

  15. Exploiting link structure for web page genre identification

    Zhu, Jia; Xie, Qing; Yu, Shoou I.; Wong, Wai Hung

    2015-01-01

    As the World Wide Web develops at an unprecedented pace, identifying web page genre has recently attracted increasing attention because of its importance in web search. A common approach for identifying genre is to use textual features that can be extracted directly from a web page, that is, On-Page features. The extracted features are subsequently inputted into a machine learning algorithm that will perform classification. However, these approaches may be ineffective when the web page contains limited textual information (e.g., the page is full of images). In this study, we address genre identification of web pages under the aforementioned situation. We propose a framework that uses On-Page features while simultaneously considering information in neighboring pages, that is, the pages that are connected to the original page by backward and forward links. We first introduce a graph-based model called GenreSim, which selects an appropriate set of neighboring pages. We then construct a multiple classifier combination module that utilizes information from the selected neighboring pages and On-Page features to improve performance in genre identification. Experiments are conducted on well-known corpora, and favorable results indicate that our proposed framework is effective, particularly in identifying web pages with limited textual information. © 2015 The Author(s)

  16. Exploiting link structure for web page genre identification

    Zhu, Jia

    2015-07-07

    As the World Wide Web develops at an unprecedented pace, identifying web page genre has recently attracted increasing attention because of its importance in web search. A common approach for identifying genre is to use textual features that can be extracted directly from a web page, that is, On-Page features. The extracted features are subsequently inputted into a machine learning algorithm that will perform classification. However, these approaches may be ineffective when the web page contains limited textual information (e.g., the page is full of images). In this study, we address genre identification of web pages under the aforementioned situation. We propose a framework that uses On-Page features while simultaneously considering information in neighboring pages, that is, the pages that are connected to the original page by backward and forward links. We first introduce a graph-based model called GenreSim, which selects an appropriate set of neighboring pages. We then construct a multiple classifier combination module that utilizes information from the selected neighboring pages and On-Page features to improve performance in genre identification. Experiments are conducted on well-known corpora, and favorable results indicate that our proposed framework is effective, particularly in identifying web pages with limited textual information. © 2015 The Author(s)

  17. Water linked 3D coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and applications

    Singh, Suryabhan, E-mail: sbs.bhu@gmail.com; Bhim, Anupam

    2016-12-15

    Three new coordination polymers (CPs) based on Cd and Pb, [Cd(OBA)(μ-H{sub 2}O)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}1, [Pb(OBA)(μ-H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}2 [where OBA=4,4’-Oxybis(benzoate)] and [Pb(SDBA)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}.1/4DMF 3 (SDBA=4,4’-Sulfonyldibenzoate), have been synthesized and characterized. The single crystal structural studies reveal that CPs 1 and 2 have three dimensional structure. A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. Compound 3 has a supramolecular 3D structure involving water molecule and hydrogen bonds. A structural transformation is observed when 3 was heated at 100 °C or kept in methanol, forming [Pb(SDBA)]{sub n}4. Compound 4 is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. The PdNPs@4 exhibits good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH{sub 4} at room temperature. Luminescence studies revealed that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives. - Graphical abstract: Three new CPs based on Cd and Pb, have been synthesized and characterized. A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. One of the CP is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. The PdNPs@4 exhibits good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. Luminescence studies shown that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives. - Highlights: • Three new CPs based on Cd and Pb, have been synthesized and characterized. • A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. • One of the CP is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. • Luminescence studies shown that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives.

  18. An introduction to tree-structured modeling with application to quality of life data.

    Su, Xiaogang; Azuero, Andres; Cho, June; Kvale, Elizabeth; Meneses, Karen M; McNees, M Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Investigators addressing nursing research are faced increasingly with the need to analyze data that involve variables of mixed types and are characterized by complex nonlinearity and interactions. Tree-based methods, also called recursive partitioning, are gaining popularity in various fields. In addition to efficiency and flexibility in handling multifaceted data, tree-based methods offer ease of interpretation. The aims of this study were to introduce tree-based methods, discuss their advantages and pitfalls in application, and describe their potential use in nursing research. In this article, (a) an introduction to tree-structured methods is presented, (b) the technique is illustrated via quality of life (QOL) data collected in the Breast Cancer Education Intervention study, and (c) implications for their potential use in nursing research are discussed. As illustrated by the QOL analysis example, tree methods generate interesting and easily understood findings that cannot be uncovered via traditional linear regression analysis. The expanding breadth and complexity of nursing research may entail the use of new tools to improve efficiency and gain new insights. In certain situations, tree-based methods offer an attractive approach that help address such needs.

  19. Linking structural features of protein complexes and biological function.

    Sowmya, Gopichandran; Breen, Edmond J; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2015-09-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) establishes the central basis for complex cellular networks in a biological cell. Association of proteins with other proteins occurs at varying affinities, yet with a high degree of specificity. PPIs lead to diverse functionality such as catalysis, regulation, signaling, immunity, and inhibition, playing a crucial role in functional genomics. The molecular principle of such interactions is often elusive in nature. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of known protein complexes from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is essential for the characterization of structural interface features to determine structure-function relationship. Thus, we analyzed a nonredundant dataset of 278 heterodimer protein complexes, categorized into major functional classes, for distinguishing features. Interestingly, our analysis has identified five key features (interface area, interface polar residue abundance, hydrogen bonds, solvation free energy gain from interface formation, and binding energy) that are discriminatory among the functional classes using Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Significant correlations between these PPI interface features amongst functional categories are also documented. Salt bridges correlate with interface area in regulator-inhibitors (r = 0.75). These representative features have implications for the prediction of potential function of novel protein complexes. The results provide molecular insights for better understanding of PPIs and their relation to biological functions. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  20. Linking the Pilot Structural Model and Pilot Workload

    Bachelder, Edward; Hess, Ronald; Aponso, Bimal; Godfroy-Cooper, Martine

    2018-01-01

    Behavioral models are developed that closely reproduced pulsive control response of two pilots using markedly different control techniques while conducting a tracking task. An intriguing find was that the pilots appeared to: 1) produce a continuous, internally-generated stick signal that they integrated in time; 2) integrate the actual stick position; and 3) compare the two integrations to either issue or cease a pulse command. This suggests that the pilots utilized kinesthetic feedback in order to sense and integrate stick position, supporting the hypothesis that pilots can access and employ the proprioceptive inner feedback loop proposed by Hess's pilot Structural Model. A Pilot Cost Index was developed, whose elements include estimated workload, performance, and the degree to which the pilot employs kinesthetic feedback. Preliminary results suggest that a pilot's operating point (parameter values) may be based on control style and index minimization.

  1. Linking vegetation structure, function and physiology through spectroscopic remote sensing

    Serbin, S.; Singh, A.; Couture, J. J.; Shiklomanov, A. N.; Rogers, A.; Desai, A. R.; Kruger, E. L.; Townsend, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem process models require detailed information on ecosystem states and canopy properties to properly simulate the fluxes of carbon (C), water and energy from the land to the atmosphere and assess the vulnerability of ecosystems to perturbations. Current models fail to adequately capture the magnitude, spatial variation, and seasonality of terrestrial C uptake and storage, leading to significant uncertainties in the size and fate of the terrestrial C sink. By and large, these parameter and process uncertainties arise from inadequate spatial and temporal representation of plant traits, vegetation structure, and functioning. With increases in computational power and changes to model architecture and approaches, it is now possible for models to leverage detailed, data rich and spatially explicit descriptions of ecosystems to inform parameter distributions and trait tradeoffs. In this regard, spectroscopy and imaging spectroscopy data have been shown to be invaluable observational datasets to capture broad-scale spatial and, eventually, temporal dynamics in important vegetation properties. We illustrate the linkage of plant traits and spectral observations to supply key data constraints for model parameterization. These constraints can come either in the form of the raw spectroscopic data (reflectance, absorbtance) or physiological traits derived from spectroscopy. In this presentation we highlight our ongoing work to build ecological scaling relationships between critical vegetation characteristics and optical properties across diverse and complex canopies, including temperate broadleaf and conifer forests, Mediterranean vegetation, Arctic systems, and agriculture. We focus on work at the leaf, stand, and landscape scales, illustrating the importance of capturing the underlying variability in a range of parameters (including vertical variation within canopies) to enable more efficient scaling of traits related to functional diversity of ecosystems.

  2. Identifying the Critical Links in Road Transportation Networks: Centrality-based approach utilizing structural properties

    Chinthavali, Supriya [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Surface transportation road networks share structural properties similar to other complex networks (e.g., social networks, information networks, biological networks, and so on). This research investigates the structural properties of road networks for any possible correlation with the traffic characteristics such as link flows those determined independently. Additionally, we define a criticality index for the links of the road network that identifies the relative importance in the network. We tested our hypotheses with two sample road networks. Results show that, correlation exists between the link flows and centrality measures of a link of the road (dual graph approach is followed) and the criticality index is found to be effective for one test network to identify the vulnerable nodes.

  3. Computational investigation of kinetics of cross-linking reactions in proteins: importance in structure prediction.

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta; Kuntz, Irwin D

    2009-01-01

    The determination of protein structure using distance constraints is a new and promising field of study. One implementation involves attaching residues of a protein using a cross-linking agent, followed by protease digestion, analysis of the resulting peptides by mass spectroscopy, and finally sequence threading to detect the protein folds. In the present work, we carry out computational modeling of the kinetics of cross-linking reactions in proteins using the master equation approach. The rate constants of the cross-linking reactions are estimated using the pKas and the solvent-accessible surface areas of the residues involved. This model is tested with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and cytochrome C. It is consistent with the initial experimental rate data for individual lysine residues for cytochrome C. Our model captures all observed cross-links for FGF and almost 90% of the observed cross-links for cytochrome C, although it also predicts cross-links that were not observed experimentally (false positives). However, the analysis of the false positive results is complicated by the fact that experimental detection of cross-links can be difficult and may depend on specific experimental conditions such as pH, ionic strength. Receiver operator characteristic plots showed that our model does a good job in predicting the observed cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that for cytochrome C, in general, the two lysines come closer for the observed cross-links as compared to the false positive ones. For FGF, no such clear pattern exists. The kinetic model and MD simulation can be used to study proposed cross-linking protocols.

  4. Role of special cross-links in structure formation of bacterial DNA polymer

    Agarwal, Tejal; Manjunath, G. P.; Habib, Farhat; Lakshmi Vaddavalli, Pavana; Chatterji, Apratim

    2018-01-01

    Using data from contact maps of the DNA-polymer of Escherichia coli (E. Coli) (at kilobase pair resolution) as an input to our model, we introduce cross-links between monomers in a bead-spring model of a ring polymer at very specific points along the chain. Via suitable Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the presence of these cross-links leads to a particular organization of the chain at large (micron) length scales of the DNA. We also investigate the structure of a ring polymer with an equal number of cross-links at random positions along the chain. We find that though the polymer does get organized at the large length scales, the nature of the organization is quite different from the organization observed with cross-links at specific biologically determined positions. We used the contact map of E. Coli bacteria which has around 4.6 million base pairs in a single circular chromosome. In our coarse-grained flexible ring polymer model, we used 4642 monomer beads and observed that around 80 cross-links are enough to induce the large-scale organization of the molecule accounting for statistical fluctuations caused by thermal energy. The length of a DNA chain even of a simple bacterial cell such as E. Coli is much longer than typical proteins, hence we avoided methods used to tackle protein folding problems. We define new suitable quantities to identify the large scale structure of a polymer chain with a few cross-links.

  5. Influence of boron introduction on structure and electrochemical hydrogen storage properties of Ti–V-based alloys

    Qiu, Shujun; Huang, Jianling; Chu, Hailiang; Zou, Yongjin; Xiang, Cuili; Zhang, Huanzhi; Xu, Fen; Sun, Lixian; Zhou, Huaiying

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the properties of Ti–V-based alloys in the electrochemical system, Ti 0.17 Zr 0.08 V 0.35 Cr 0.1 Ni 0.3 B x (x = 0–0.04) alloys were prepared and their structural and electrochemical performances had been systematically investigated in this study. XRD patterns show that they are mainly comprised of a C14 Laves phase and a body centered cubic (BCC) solid solution phase. The introduction of boron has little effect on the structure, while it remarkably influences the electrochemical performances. The cycle life of each electrode made from the studied alloy is obviously improved. For instance, the cycle retention after 200 charge–discharge cycles is more than 90%. Furthermore, high rate dischargeability (HRD) is also enhanced after boron introduction. It is also found that the charge-transfer reaction resistance R ct , the limiting current density I L, and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient D are first decreased and then increased with the increase of boron amount. Taking into consideration various factors, the introduction of boron in the alloy has an optimal value of x = 0.01. - Graphical abstract: Trace amounts of B element was introduced into Ti 0.17 Zr 0.08 V 0.35 Cr 0.1 Ni 0.3 alloys. XRD patterns show that the introduction of B has little effect on the structure, while it remarkably influences the electrochemical performances. The cycle life and the high rate dischargeability (HRD) are obviously improved. - Highlights: • Trace amounts of B element was introduced into Ti–V-based alloys. • Ti 0.17 Zr 0.08 V 0.35 Cr 0.1 Ni 0.3 B 0.01 has an optimal property. • At x = 0.01, C 200 /C max is 89.4% and HRD 800 is 72.5%

  6. Vision-based stress estimation model for steel frame structures with rigid links

    Park, Hyo Seon; Park, Jun Su; Oh, Byung Kwan

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a stress estimation model for the safety evaluation of steel frame structures with rigid links using a vision-based monitoring system. In this model, the deformed shape of a structure under external loads is estimated via displacements measured by a motion capture system (MCS), which is a non-contact displacement measurement device. During the estimation of the deformed shape, the effective lengths of the rigid link ranges in the frame structure are identified. The radius of the curvature of the structural member to be monitored is calculated using the estimated deformed shape and is employed to estimate stress. Using MCS in the presented model, the safety of a structure can be assessed gauge-freely. In addition, because the stress is directly extracted from the radius of the curvature obtained from the measured deformed shape, information on the loadings and boundary conditions of the structure are not required. Furthermore, the model, which includes the identification of the effective lengths of the rigid links, can consider the influences of the stiffness of the connection and support on the deformation in the stress estimation. To verify the applicability of the presented model, static loading tests for a steel frame specimen were conducted. By comparing the stress estimated by the model with the measured stress, the validity of the model was confirmed.

  7. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 3. Aerobasics - An Introduction to Aeronautics - The Airplane Structure. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 15 Issue 3 March 2010 pp 206-222. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Revealing the Link between Structural Relaxation and Dynamic Heterogeneity in Glass-Forming Liquids.

    Wang, Lijin; Xu, Ning; Wang, W H; Guan, Pengfei

    2018-03-23

    Despite the use of glasses for thousands of years, the nature of the glass transition is still mysterious. On approaching the glass transition, the growth of dynamic heterogeneity has long been thought to play a key role in explaining the abrupt slowdown of structural relaxation. However, it still remains elusive whether there is an underlying link between structural relaxation and dynamic heterogeneity. Here, we unravel the link by introducing a characteristic time scale hiding behind an identical dynamic heterogeneity for various model glass-forming liquids. We find that the time scale corresponds to the kinetic fragility of liquids. Moreover, it leads to scaling collapse of both the structural relaxation time and dynamic heterogeneity for all liquids studied, together with a characteristic temperature associated with the same dynamic heterogeneity. Our findings imply that studying the glass transition from the viewpoint of dynamic heterogeneity is more informative than expected.

  9. Revealing the Link between Structural Relaxation and Dynamic Heterogeneity in Glass-Forming Liquids

    Wang, Lijin; Xu, Ning; Wang, W. H.; Guan, Pengfei

    2018-03-01

    Despite the use of glasses for thousands of years, the nature of the glass transition is still mysterious. On approaching the glass transition, the growth of dynamic heterogeneity has long been thought to play a key role in explaining the abrupt slowdown of structural relaxation. However, it still remains elusive whether there is an underlying link between structural relaxation and dynamic heterogeneity. Here, we unravel the link by introducing a characteristic time scale hiding behind an identical dynamic heterogeneity for various model glass-forming liquids. We find that the time scale corresponds to the kinetic fragility of liquids. Moreover, it leads to scaling collapse of both the structural relaxation time and dynamic heterogeneity for all liquids studied, together with a characteristic temperature associated with the same dynamic heterogeneity. Our findings imply that studying the glass transition from the viewpoint of dynamic heterogeneity is more informative than expected.

  10. Electronic structure and self-assembly of cross-linked semiconductor nanocrystal arrays

    Steiner, Dov; Azulay, Doron; Aharoni, Assaf; Salant, Assaf; Banin, Uri; Millo, Oded

    2008-01-01

    We studied the electronic level structure of assemblies of InAs quantum dots and CdSe nanorods cross-linked by 1,4-phenylenediamine molecules using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We found that the bandgap in these arrays is reduced with respect to the corresponding ligand-capped nanocrystal arrays. In addition, a pronounced sub-gap spectral structure commonly appeared which can be attributed to unpassivated nanocrystal surface states or associated with linker-molecule-related levels. The exchange of the ligands by the linker molecules also affected the structural array properties. Most significantly, clusters of close-packed standing CdSe nanorods were formed

  11. Introduction to crystal structure determination methods using x-ray diffraction: application to some rare earth complexes

    Oliveira, M.A. de.

    1986-01-01

    This work is composed by a theoretical introduction studying crystal concept, interaction between X-ray and crystal medium, and methods for determining small molecular structures applied in solution of crystal structures of praseodymium, neodymium and europium complexes with perrhenate and trans - 1,4 - dithiane - 1,4 - dioxide, (TDTD), which general formula is [ Ln (H sub(2) O) sub(4) (η-TDTD) (η'Re O sub(4)) (μ-η sup(2)-TDTD)] sub(n) (Re O sub(4)) sub(2n). nTDTD, where, Ln = Eu, Pr, Nd and methyl-2,6-anhydrous-3-azido-4-0-benzoyl-3-deoxy-α-D-iodo pyranoside. The structure of C sub(14) H sub(15) N sub(3) O sub(5) organic complex was determined using direct methods. (M.C.K.)

  12. Structure of shocks in solids and liquids: Six reprints with an introduction

    Wallace, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This monograph consists of six papers on the theory of shocks in solids and liquids, reprinted from Physical Review, together with an introduction summarizing the complete shock theory and its limitations. The shock theory of this monograph is based on the principles of irreversible thermodynamics, characterized as follows. First, in equilibrium thermodynamics, materials are required to pass through states which lie on the equilibrium surface. In irreversible thermodynamics, materials pass through nonequilibrium states, but only those states which are close to the equilibrium surface, specifically, those states for which the equilibrium properties of temperature and entropy are still reasonably well defined. To construct an irreversible thermodynamic theory it is necessary to define the variables which measure the departure from equilibrium, to express the effect of these variables by a modification of the equilibrium thermodynamic equations, and to write an equation for the (irreversible) entropy generation. These principles are applied to planar shocks in the reprints collected here

  13. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry as structure determination tools

    Novák, Petr; Giannakopulos, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2007), s. 105-113 ISSN 1469-0667 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400200501; GA MŠk LC545 Grant - others:SE(XE) Marie Curie Actions TOK, Contract No. MTKD-CT-2004-014407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cross-linking * protein * high order structure Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.198, year: 2007

  14. Geochip: A high throughput genomic tool for linking community structure to functions

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Liang, Yuting; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-30

    GeoChip is a comprehensive functional gene array that targets key functional genes involved in the geochemical cycling of N, C, and P, sulfate reduction, metal resistance and reduction, and contaminant degradation. Studies have shown the GeoChip to be a sensitive, specific, and high-throughput tool for microbial community analysis that has the power to link geochemical processes with microbial community structure. However, several challenges remain regarding the development and applications of microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  15. Blooming Knit Flowers: Loop-Linked Soft Morphing Structures for Soft Robotics.

    Han, Min-Woo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    A loop-linked structure, which is capable of morphing in various modes, including volumetric transformation, is developed based on knitting methods. Morphing flowers (a lily-like, a daffodil-like, gamopetalous, and a calla-like flower) are fabricated using loop patterning, and their blooming motion is demonstrated by controlling a current that selectively actuates the flowers petals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Introduction of structural health and safety monitoring warning systems for Shenzhen-Hong Kong Western Corridor Shenzhen Bay Bridge

    Li, N.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhou, X. T.; Leng, J.; Liang, Z.; Zheng, C.; Sun, X. F.

    2008-03-01

    Though the brief introduction of the completed structural health and safety monitoring warning systems for Shenzhen-Hongkong western corridor Shenzhen bay highway bridge (SZBHMS), the self-developed system frame, hardware and software scheme of this practical research project are systematically discussed in this paper. The data acquisition and transmission hardware and the basic software based on the NI (National Instruments) Company virtual instruments technology were selected in this system, which adopted GPS time service receiver technology and so on. The objectives are to establish the structural safety monitoring and status evaluation system to monitor the structural responses and working conditions in real time and to analyze the structural working statue using information obtained from the measured data. It will be also provided the scientific decision-making bases for the bridge management and maintenance. Potential technical approaches to the structural safety warning systems, status identification and evaluation method are presented. The result indicated that the performance of the system has achieved the desired objectives, ensure the longterm high reliability, real time concurrence and advanced technology of SZBHMS. The innovate achievement which is the first time to implement in domestic, provide the reference for long-span bridge structural health and safety monitoring warning systems design.

  17. Introduction of electronic journal of advanced maintenance website structure and editorial operation

    Ito, Takashi; Nakamura, Mayu

    2009-01-01

    Electronic Journal of Advanced Maintenance (EJAM) has been issued on the website of Japan Society of Maintenology (JSM) on May 25th, 2009. This report introduces EJAM website structure and Editorial Operation. (author)

  18. Synthesis of modified proanthocyanidins: introduction of acyl substituents at C-8 of catechin. Selective synthesis of a C-4-->O-->C-3 ether-linked procyanidin-like dimer.

    Beauhaire, Josiane; Es-Safi, Nour-Eddine; Boyer, François-Didier; Kerhoas, Lucien; Guernevé, Christine le; Ducrot, Paul-Henri

    2005-02-01

    The regioselective introduction of substituents at C-8 of (+)-catechin is described, leading to the synthesis of several catechin derivatives with various substitution patterns to be used for the further synthesis of modified proanthocyanidins. Thereafter, a new 3-O-4 ether-linked procyanidin-like derivative was synthesized. Its formation was selectively achieved through TiCl(4)-catalyzed condensation of 4-(2-hydroxyethoxy)tetra-O-benzyl catechin with the 8-trifluoroacetyl adduct of tetra-O-benzyl catechin.

  19. The Analysis and Structuring of the Causes Impeding the Introduction of Advanced Technologies for Exchange Grain Trading

    Vinnychenko Olena V

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the main causes impeding the development and introduction of advanced technologies for grain trading on commodity exchanges in Ukraine have been identified and structured. The generalization of existing shortcomings in operation of the domestic commodity exchanges has served the basis for the model, within which there were built: a directed graph of correlations between the above mentioned shortcomings in the operation of exchanges, the matrix of dependency and reachability. The causes have been identified and structured, the main ones being determined, which, in turn, makes it possible to carry out the correct sequence of actions and emphasize the primary issues requiring priority solutions at making management decisions in order to promote the grain exchange market. The suggested approach clearly shows the correlation between the existing causes and sequence of their elimination.

  20. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-30

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e⁺/e⁻ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  1. Introduction to Superconducting RF Structures and the Effect of High Pressure Rinsing

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This presentation begins by describing RF superconductivity and SRF accelerating structures. Then the use of superconducting RF structures in a number of accelerators around the world is reviewed; for example, the International Linear Collider (ILC) will use ~16,000 SRF cavities with ~2,000 cryomodules to get 500 GeV e@@@/e@@@ colliding energy. Field emission control was (and still is) a very important practical issue for SRF cavity development. It has been found that high-pressure ultrapure water rinsing as a final cleaning step after chemical surface treatment resulted in consistent performance of single- and multicell superconducting cavities.

  2. Crystallography and surface structure an introduction for surface scientists and nanoscientists

    Hermann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    A valuable learning tool as well as a reference, this book provides students and researchers in surface science and nanoscience with the theoretical crystallographic foundations, which are necessary to understand local structure and symmetry of bulk crystals, including ideal and real single crystal surfaces. The author deals with the subject at an introductory level, providing numerous graphic examples to illustrate the mathematical formalism. The book brings together and logically connects many seemingly disparate structural issues and notations used frequently by surface scientists and nanoscientists. Numerous exercises of varying difficulty, ranging from simple questions to small research projects, are included to stimulate discussions about the different subjects.

  3. BIGIF: fracture mechanics code for structures. Manual 1: introduction and theoretical background

    Besuner, P.M.; Rau, S.A.; Davis, C.S.; Rogers, G.W.; Grover, J.L.; Peters, D.C.

    1981-04-01

    This report is a general description manual documenting the current version of BIGIF, a computer program designed to calculate cracked growth in a flawed structure. The first of three, this manual provides a general understanding of the program's present capabilities and includes enough information to decide whether or not to use BIGIF

  4. Verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance as indicators for changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility.

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Soares, Tielle; Rossetto, Raffaella; van Veen, Johannes Antonie; Tsai, Siu Mui; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance are extremely sensitive to changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint and real-time quantitative PCR assay were used to analyze changes in verrucomicrobial communities associated with contrasting soil nutrient conditions in tropical regions. In case study Model I ("Slash-and-burn deforestation") the verrucomicrobial community structures revealed disparate patterns in nutrient-enriched soils after slash-and-burn deforestation and natural nutrient-poor soils under an adjacent primary forest in the Amazonia (R = 0.819, P = 0.002). The relative proportion of Verrucomicrobia declined in response to increased soil fertility after slash-and-burn deforestation, accounting on average, for 4 and 2 % of the total bacterial signal, in natural nutrient-poor forest soils and nutrient-enriched deforested soils, respectively. In case study Model II ("Management practices for sugarcane") disparate patterns were revealed in sugarcane rhizosphere sampled on optimal and deficient soil fertility for sugarcane (R = 0.786, P = 0.002). Verrucomicrobial community abundance in sugarcane rhizosphere was negatively correlated with soil fertility, accounting for 2 and 5 % of the total bacterial signal, under optimal and deficient soil fertility conditions for sugarcane, respectively. In nutrient-enriched soils, verrucomicrobial community structures were related to soil factors linked to soil fertility, such as total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sum of bases, i.e., the sum of calcium, magnesium and potassium contents. We conclude that community structure and abundance represent important ecological aspects in soil verrucomicrobial communities for tracking the changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility under tropical environmental conditions.

  5. Introduction to the Wetland Book 1: Wetland structure and function, management, and nethods

    Davidson, Nick C.; Middleton, Beth A.; McInnes, Robert J.; Everard, Mark; Irvine, Kenneth; Van Dam, Anne A.; Finlayson, C. Max; Finlayson, C. Max; Everard, Mark; Irvine, Kenneth; McInnes, Robert J.; Middleton, Beth A.; Van Dam, Anne A.; Davidson, Nick C.

    2016-01-01

    The Wetland Book 1 is designed as a ‘first port-of-call’ reference work for information on the structure and functions of wetlands, current approaches to wetland management, and methods for researching and understanding wetlands. Contributions by experts summarize key concepts, orient the reader to the major issues, and support further research on such issues by individuals and multidisciplinary teams. The Wetland Book 1 is organized in three parts - Wetland structure and function; Wetland management; and Wetland methods - each of which is divided into a number of thematic Sections. Each Section starts with one or more overview chapters, supported by chapters providing further information and case studies on different aspects of the theme.

  6. Atomic physics. Introduction to quantum physics and structure of the atomic system. 2. ed.

    Cagnac, Bernard; Pebay-Peyroula, J.-C.

    1975-01-01

    This lecture is intended for providing experimental foundations to the basic principles of quantum mechanics, from descriptions of some characteristic experiments which emphasize the limitations of the classical theory. The basic laws that govern the internal structure of atomic systems are exposed (waves and photons, the planetary model and principal quantum number, and the spatial classification of kinetic momenta and magnetic moments). Experimental studies presently in progress are reviewed and their aims are outlined [fr

  7. River channel morphology and hydraulics properties due to introduction of plant basket hydraulic structures for river channel management

    Kałuża, Tomasz; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur; Plesiński, Karol; Walczak, Natalia; Szoszkiewicz, Krzysztof; Radecki-Pawlik, Bartosz

    2016-04-01

    In the present time integrated water management is directly connected with management and direct works in river channels themselves which are taking into account morphological processes in rivers and improve flow conditions. Our work focused on the hydraulic and hydrodynamic consequences upon the introduction of the concept of the improvement of the hydromorphological conditions of the Flinta River in a given reach following river channel management concept. Based on a comprehensive study of the hydromorphological state of the river, four sections were selected where restoration measures can efficiently improve river habitat conditions in the river. For each section a set of technical and biological measures were proposed and implemented in practice. One of the proposed solutions was to construct plant basket hydraulic structures (PBHS) within the river channel, which are essentially plant barriers working as sediment traps, changing river channel morphology and are in line with concepts of Water Framework Directive. These relatively small structures work as crested weirs and unquestionably change the channel morphology. Along our work we show the results of three-year long (2013-2015) systematic measurements that provided information on the morphological consequences of introducing such structures into a river channel. Our main conclusions are as follows: 1. Plant basket hydraulic structures cause changes in hydrodynamic conditions and result in sediment accumulation and the formation of river backwaters upstream and downstream the obstacle; 2. The introduced plant basket hydraulic structures cause plant debris accumulation which influences the hydrodynamic flow conditions; 3. The installation of plant basket hydraulic structures on the river bed changes flow pattern as well as flow hydrodynamic conditions causing river braiding process; 4. The erosion rate below the plant basket hydraulic structures is due to the hydraulic work conditions of the PBHS and its

  8. Linking Wave Forcing to Coral Cover and Structural Complexity Across Coral Reef Flats

    Harris, D. L.; Rovere, A.; Parravicini, V.; Casella, E.

    2015-12-01

    The hydrodynamic regime is a significant component in the geomorphic and ecological development of coral reefs. The energy gradients and flow conditions generated by the breaking and transformation of waves across coral reef crests and flats drive changes in geomorphic structure, and coral growth form and distribution. One of the key aspects in regulating the wave energy propagating across reef flats is the rugosity or roughness of the benthic substrate. Rugosity and structural complexity of coral reefs is also a key indicator of species diversity, ecological functioning, and reef health. However, the links between reef rugosity, coral species distribution and abundance, and hydrodynamic forcing are poorly understood. In this study we examine this relationship by using high resolution measurement of waves in the surf zone and coral reef benthic structure.Pressure transducers (logging at 4 Hz) were deployed in cross reef transects at two sites (Tiahura and Ha'apiti reef systems) in Moorea, French Polynesia with wave characteristics determined on a wave by wave basis. A one dimensional hydrodynamic model (XBeach) was calibrated from this data to determine wave processes on the reef flats under average conditions. Transects of the reef benthic structure were conducted using photographic analysis and the three dimensional reef surface was constructed using structure from motion procedures. From this analysis reef rugosity, changes in coral genus and growth form, and across reef shifts in benthic community were determined. The results show clear changes in benthic assemblages along wave energy gradients with some indication of threshold values of wave induced bed shear stress above which live coral cover was reduced. Reef rugosity was shown to be significantly along the cross-reef transect which has important implications for accurate assessment of wave dissipation across coral reef flats. Links between reef rugosity and coral genus were also observed and may indicate

  9. Introduction of a new structural material for spent nuclear fuel transportation casks

    Severson, W.J.; Mello, R.M.; Ciez, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    The From-Reactor Transportation Cask Initiative of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, since 1988, supported the development of cask systems for the shipment of spent nuclear fuel by both legal weight truck (LWT) and rail or barge. The design basis fuel to be transported would be 10 years out-of-reactor with maximum burnups of 35 and 30 GWD/MTU for PWR and BWR assemblies, respectively. Westinghouse's work on the program led to the development of a common use LWT cask design capable of transporting either three PWR or seven BWR assemblies. This payload in a common use cask is achieved by the use of depleted uranium for the gamma shielding material and Grade 9 titanium as the principal structural material. The use of Grade 9 titanium for cask structures has no certification precedent. This paper describes the work performed to characterize the material and the status of steps taken to gain its acceptance by the NRC, which includes ASME approval of its use in the construction of Section 3 Class 1 components. 9 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  10. Introduction to the nuclear structure studies of exotic nuclei by using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics method

    Kimura, Masaaki; Dote, Akinobu; Ohnishi, Akira; Matsumiya, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    This article is originally prepared as the course text for the practice of the AMD course of 'studies of the strangeness nuclei by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) method' in the Summer School held at KEK and IPCR in 2006-8 for postgraduate as well as undergraduate students and to foster young physicists in the titled area. The fundamental principle and the formalism of the AMD method which have been commonly used in the nuclear physics are explained at first, and it is described how to extend the AMD method to the studies of exotic nuclei especially to hypernuclei. Then calculation procedure is explained in detail so that the readers can understand the structure of exotic nuclei as they follow the process by themselves. It is intended here that they will be able not only to become familiar with the research by using the AMD method but also to visually enjoy the structure of exotic nuclei and will have further interest in this field. (S. Funahashi)

  11. An Introduction to Zeolite Synthesis Using Imidazolium-Based Cations as Organic Structure-Directing Agents.

    Vinaches, Paloma; Bernardo-Gusmão, Katia; Pergher, Sibele B C

    2017-08-06

    Zeolite synthesis is a wide area of study with increasing popularity. Several general reviews have already been published, but they did not summarize the study of imidazolium species in zeolite synthesis. Imidazolium derivatives are promising compounds in the search for new zeolites and can be used to help understand the structure-directing role. Nearly 50 different imidazolium cations have already been used, resulting in a variety of zeolitic types, but there are still many derivatives to be studied. In this context, the purpose of this short review is to help researchers starting in this area by summarizing the most important concepts related to imidazolium-based zeolite studies and by presenting a table of recent imidazolium derivatives that have been recently studied to facilitate filling in the knowledge gaps.

  12. Operational modal analysis of civil engineering structures an introduction and guide for applications

    Rainieri, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of operational modal analysis for civil engineering, from theoretical background to applications, including measurement hardware, software development, and data processing. In particular, this book provides an extensive description and discussion of OMA methods, their classification and relationship, and advantages and drawbacks. The authors cover both the well-established theoretical background of OMA methods and the most recent developments in the field, providing detailed examples to help the reader better understand the concepts and potentialities of the technique. Additional material is provided (data, software) to help practitioners and students become familiar with OMA. Covering a range of different aspects of OMA, always with the application in mind, the practical perspective adopted in this book makes it ideal for a wide range of readers from researchers to field engineers; graduate and undergraduate students; and technicians interested in structural dynamics, system iden...

  13. Causal Models for Mediation Analysis: An Introduction to Structural Mean Models.

    Zheng, Cheng; Atkins, David C; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Rhew, Isaac C

    2015-01-01

    Mediation analyses are critical to understanding why behavioral interventions work. To yield a causal interpretation, common mediation approaches must make an assumption of "sequential ignorability." The current article describes an alternative approach to causal mediation called structural mean models (SMMs). A specific SMM called a rank-preserving model (RPM) is introduced in the context of an applied example. Particular attention is given to the assumptions of both approaches to mediation. Applying both mediation approaches to the college student drinking data yield notable differences in the magnitude of effects. Simulated examples reveal instances in which the traditional approach can yield strongly biased results, whereas the RPM approach remains unbiased in these cases. At the same time, the RPM approach has its own assumptions that must be met for correct inference, such as the existence of a covariate that strongly moderates the effect of the intervention on the mediator and no unmeasured confounders that also serve as a moderator of the effect of the intervention or the mediator on the outcome. The RPM approach to mediation offers an alternative way to perform mediation analysis when there may be unmeasured confounders.

  14. Structuring of Amide Cross-Linked Non-Bridged and Bridged Alkyl-Based Silsesquioxanes.

    Nunes, S C; de Zea Bermudez, V

    2018-02-06

    The development of sophisticated organized materials exhibiting enhanced properties is a challenging topic of the domain of organic/inorganic hybrid materials. This review, composed of four sections, reports the work we have carried out over the last 10 years on the synthesis of amide cross-linked alkyl/siloxane hybrids by means of sol-gel chemistry and self-directed assembly/self-organization routes relying on weak interactions (hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding). The various as-produced lamellar structures displaying a myriad of morphologies, often closely resembling those found in natural materials, are discussed. The major role played by the synthetic conditions (pH, water content, co-solvent(s) nature/concentration and dopant presence/concentration), the alkyl chains (length and presence of ramification or not) and the number of the amide cross-links present in the precursor, is evidenced. Examples of highly organized hybrids structures incorporating ionic species (alkali and alkaline earth metal salts) and optically-active centers (organic dyes and lanthanide ions) are described. A useful qualitative relationship deduced between the emission quantum yield of the ordered hybrid materials and the degree of order of the hydrogen-bonded network is highlighted. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Symbolic structure in the architecture of the temple – introduction into theology of the sacred art

    Jerzy Uścinowicz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Symbol has always been an intrinsic part of a person. The human being – homo religiosus – is by nature also a homo symbolicus, who thinks and feels symbolically, who lives symbolically. In the domain of sacrum, in the temple, life is realized through holy symbols.In the past, this was directly reflected in the architecture and in the art of all religions. They have their special compensation in the temple and vice versa; the temple is a concrete manifestation of the function of a symbol. Thanks to them, art could manifest itself, could naturally pass from the level of aesthetics to the level of religion. Nowadays we face a kind of crisis of symbol in the sphere of art, certain reluctance towards symbols. The language of symbols seems to be dying out.Two thousand years of history of Christianity proved that a main criterion of a value of church architecture was not based on architectural precursors. This architecture was sacred because it was a carrier of a „truth of God” and – like a liturgical mysterion and iconography art – it was a theological comment. It was a codified language of the transposes of religions essences and orders, into the form of architectural expression. This was in a East Christianity and this happens there up to this day.One of the proofs to confirmate this thesis is an example of dome. It has been in existence since the beginning of forming the traditional architecture structure of the orthodox temple; it manifested symbolical and archetype essence – as an interior space and as an exterior form. In the history of architecture as well as the history of religion it had precisely defined symbolic meanings. They designated its significance in the temple, they gave rise to its long duration in the history, and eventually they gave it a status of an essential element, an everlasting witness of Divine mystery”. Presentation of this essence and orders constructs indispensable context to a value of the

  16. Sharp kink of DNA at psoralen-cross-link site deduced from crystal structure of psoralen-thymine monoadduct

    Kim, S.H.; Peckler, S.; Graves, B.; Kanne, D.; Rapoport, H.; Hearst, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Light-induced cross-linking of double-stranded nucleic acids by psoralens has been exploited to locate, in vivo or in vitro, those double-helical regions of DNA or RNA that can accommodate any structural changes caused by the psoralen cross-links. To determine three-dimensional structural parameters of the cross-link, we have solved the crystal structure of the psoralen-thymine monoadduct formed in photoreaction between calf thymus DNA and 8-methoxypsoralen (8MOP). There are eight possible configurations for psoralen-thymine monoadducts and 64 for diadducts. We describe here the structural details of a psoralen-thymine monoadduct obtained in a biological environment and the consequences of the photo-cross-link between 8MOP and double-helical DNA

  17. Design and fabrication of a chitosan hydrogel with gradient structures via a step-by-step cross-linking process.

    Xu, Yongxiang; Yuan, Shenpo; Han, Jianmin; Lin, Hong; Zhang, Xuehui

    2017-11-15

    The development of scaffolds to mimic the gradient structure of natural tissue is an important consideration for effective tissue engineering. In the present study, a physical cross-linking chitosan hydrogel with gradient structures was fabricated via a step-by-step cross-linking process using sodium tripolyphosphate and sodium hydroxide as sequential cross-linkers. Chitosan hydrogels with different structures (single, double, and triple layers) were prepared by modifying the gelling process. The properties of the hydrogels were further adjusted by varying the gelling conditions, such as gelling time, pH, and composition of the crosslinking solution. Slight cytotoxicity was showed in MTT assay for hydrogels with uncross-linking chitosan solution and non-cytotoxicity was showed for other hydrogels. The results suggest that step-by-step cross-linking represents a practicable method to fabricate scaffolds with gradient structures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. New parasites and predators follow the introduction of two fish species to a subarctic lake: implications for food-web structure and functioning

    Amundsen, Per-Arne; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Knudsen, Rune; Primicerio, Raul; Kristoffersen, Roar; Klemetsen, Anders; Kuris, Armand M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduced species can alter the topology of food webs. For instance, an introduction can aid the arrival of free-living consumers using the new species as a resource, while new parasites may also arrive with the introduced species. Food-web responses to species additions can thus be far more complex than anticipated. In a subarctic pelagic food web with free-living and parasitic species, two fish species (arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus and three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus) have known histories as deliberate introductions. The effects of these introductions on the food web were explored by comparing the current pelagic web with a heuristic reconstruction of the pre-introduction web. Extinctions caused by these introductions could not be evaluated by this approach. The introduced fish species have become important hubs in the trophic network, interacting with numerous parasites, predators and prey. In particular, five parasite species and four predatory bird species depend on the two introduced species as obligate trophic resources in the pelagic web and could therefore not have been present in the pre-introduction network. The presence of the two introduced fish species and the arrival of their associated parasites and predators increased biodiversity, mean trophic level, linkage density, and nestedness; altering both the network structure and functioning of the pelagic web. Parasites, in particular trophically transmitted species, had a prominent role in the network alterations that followed the introductions.

  19. A simple structure wavelet transform circuit employing function link neural networks and SI filters

    Mu, Li; Yigang, He

    2016-12-01

    Signal processing by means of analog circuits offers advantages from a power consumption viewpoint. Implementing wavelet transform (WT) using analog circuits is of great interest when low-power consumption becomes an important issue. In this article, a novel simple structure WT circuit in analog domain is presented by employing functional link neural network (FLNN) and switched-current (SI) filters. First, the wavelet base is approximated using FLNN algorithms for giving a filter transfer function that is suitable for simple structure WT circuit implementation. Next, the WT circuit is constructed with the wavelet filter bank, whose impulse response is the approximated wavelet and its dilations. The filter design that follows is based on a follow-the-leader feedback (FLF) structure with multiple output bilinear SI integrators and current mirrors as the main building blocks. SI filter is well suited for this application since the dilation constant across different scales of the transform can be precisely implemented and controlled by the clock frequency of the circuit with the same system architecture. Finally, to illustrate the design procedure, a seventh-order FLNN-approximated Gaussian wavelet is implemented as an example. Simulations have successfully verified that the designed simple structure WT circuit has low sensitivity, low-power consumption and litter effect to the imperfections.

  20. Structuring scientific works in the “Introduction, Methods, Results and Discussion” format – what a beginner ought to know

    N. V. Avdeeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reference materials about the “Introduction, Methods, Results and Discussion”, which is a commonly used international format for scientific works, have become available for Russian authors nowadays, still lack of knowledge about the format would pop up here or there, especially when we speak about beginners. The faults which would appear regularly in work structuring prompted the present research, the aim of which is to compare the information about the IMRAD format with the specific difficulties beginning authors would often face when preparing their works for publication.The main materials to be studied were sources in Russian and in English published mostly in 2010s and devoted to the problems of structuring works according to the meant above format. Besides, the present research considered the results of plagiarism tests (such tests used to be carried out at the Russia State Library within the period of 2013 – 2015 with the help of software “Automated system of specialized processing of textual documents”. The main methods of our research would remain structural and comparative analysis of texts.As a result, our research revealed the fact of inconsistency of the available information on the IMRAD structure. It would often demand deep thinking and explanations. Different authors of reference editions would as a rule differ one from another in their interpretation of the degree of necessity of this or that composition element, of the amount of details in descriptions, etc. Moreover, the very structure of scientific work looks differently for different authors. More often the structure supposes the integrity of the contents and its form, still sometimes its description would be replaced by outer elements, such as, for example, language clichés. The analysis of the most common faults in text structuring points that authors do not often have a clear idea of how to understand the different demands which are so obscurely described

  1. Structural design of DEMO Divertor Cassette Body: provisional FEM analysis and introductive application of RCC-MRx design rules

    Frosi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.frosi@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mazzone, Giuseppe [Unità Tecnica Fusione-ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); You, Jeong-Ha [Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics, Boltzmann Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with the early steps in developing a structural fem model of DEMO Divertor. The study is focused on the thermal and structural analysis of the Cassette Body: a new geometry has been developed for this component: it is foreseen that the plasma facing component (PFC) will be directly placed on the cassette but for the Dome no choice has been adopted yet. For now the model contains only a suitable schematization of the Cassette Body and its objective is to analyze the effect produced by the main loads (electromagnetic loads, coolant pressure, thermal neutron and convective loads) on itself: an available estimate of loads is that one derived from ITER: for a proper translation some assumptions have been made and they are described in the paper. Now it is not a primary purpose to obtain some definitive statements about stresses, displacements, temperatures and so on; the authors want to construct a set of FEM models that will help all the decisions of DEMO Divertor design in its future development. This set is conceived as a tool that shall be improved to account for all the main enhancements that will be found in geometry, in material properties data and in load evaluations. Moreover, the main design variables (loads, material properties, some geometric items, mesh element size) are defined as parameters. This work considers also an introductive approach for future structural verification of the Divertor Cassette Body: so a concern of the Design and Construction Rules for Mechanical Components of Nuclear Installation (RCC-MRx) has been implemented. The FEM code used is Ansys rel. 15.

  2. Impact of nutrient enrichment and fish introductions on the structure and function of experimental shallow littoral lagoons

    Oriol Cano-Rocabayera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean coastal lagoons are probably one of the most singular and endangered ecosystems worldwide. Common threats to other aquatic ecosystems are nutrient enrichment and species introductions. In shallow and warm areas, the environmental concern may be even exacerbated by an increase in nutrient levels and biotic interactions due to the low water flow, coupled to the temperature-sensitivity of ectotherms’ metabolism and hence ecological processes. Nutrient enrichment can benefit ecosystem productivity when the bottom-up effect of nutrients is counteracted by top-down controllers such as macro-invertebrates and/or fish. This balance can, however, be directly and indirectly disrupted by excessive fertilization and/or the release of exotic species. Ammonia and nitrite has long been considered a water quality hazard but the toxic effects of nitrates are still poorly studied. The present study examined experimentally the multi-trophic impacts of chronic nitrate exposure and/or the invasive eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki on the structure and function of shallow littoral lagoons. Specifically, we monitored ecosystem metabolism (primary production and leaf litter decomposition and the community structure of pelagic and benthonic macro-invertebrates during 2 months. Preliminary results show that chronic nitrate pollution and/or G. holbrooki can profoundly alter the structure and function of coastal lagoon ecosystems, and that pelagic and benthonic sub-systems are coupled in response to these anthropogenic stressors. Although the long-term consequences of these findings remain to be examined in detail, this study will increase our mechanistic understanding of how the top-down and bottom-up controllers of aquatic ecosystems are affected by major drivers of global change typified by nitrate pollution and an invasive species.

  3. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  4. Linking perception and action by structure or process? Toward an integrative perspective.

    Herwig, Arvid

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decades cognitive neuroscience's renewed interest in action has intensified the search of principles explaining how the cognitive system links perception to action and vice versa. To date, at least two seemingly alternative approaches can be distinguished. Perception and action might be linked either by common representational structures, as assumed by the ideomotor approach, or by common attentional processes, as assumed by the attention approach. This article first reviews the evidence from different paradigms supporting each approach. It becomes clear that most studies selectively focus either on actions directed at goals outside the actors' perceptual range (supporting the ideomotor approach) or on actions directed at targets within the actors' perceptual range (supporting the attention approach). In a second step, I will try to reconcile both approaches by reviewing recent eye movement studies that abolish the classical combination of approach and goals under study. Demonstrating that both approaches cover target- as well as goal-directed actions, it is proposed that operations addressed in both conceptual frameworks interact with each other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Vertical Structure of Radiation-pressure-dominated Thin Disks: Link between Vertical Advection and Convective Stability

    Gong, Hong-Yu; Gu, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    In the classic picture of standard thin accretion disks, viscous heating is balanced by radiative cooling through the diffusion process, and the radiation-pressure-dominated inner disk suffers convective instability. However, recent simulations have shown that, owing to the magnetic buoyancy, the vertical advection process can significantly contribute to energy transport. In addition, in comparing the simulation results with the local convective stability criterion, no convective instability has been found. In this work, following on from simulations, we revisit the vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated thin disks and include the vertical advection process. Our study indicates a link between the additional energy transport and the convectively stable property. Thus, the vertical advection not only significantly contributes to the energy transport, but it also plays an important role in making the disk convectively stable. Our analyses may help to explain the discrepancy between classic theory and simulations on standard thin disks.

  6. A didactical structural model – linking analysis of teaching and analysis of educational media

    Graf, Stefan Ting

    1. Gap between general didactics and textbook/media research There seems to be a gap between general didactics (theory of teaching) and research in textbooks or educational media in general at least in the Nordic and German speaking countries. General didactic and their models seem to underestimate...... related questions (e.g. readability) without establishing a link to what is useful for the teacher’s tasks both on the level of preparation, practice and reflection, i.e. without an explicit theory of teaching. 2. Media in general didactics I will discuss the status of media in some current models...... of reflection in general didactics (Hiim/Hippe, Meyer, Klafki) and present a reconstruction of a didactical model of structure (Strukturmodel), whose counterstones are ‘intentional content’, ‘media/expression’ and ‘teaching method/activity’. The inclusion of media/expression in the model resumes a seemingly...

  7. Random blebbing motion: A simple model linking cell structural properties to migration characteristics

    Woolley, Thomas E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Goriely, Alain

    2017-07-01

    If the plasma membrane of a cell is able to delaminate locally from its actin cortex, a cellular bleb can be produced. Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions, which are noteworthy for their ability to produce cellular motion. Starting from a general continuum mechanics description, we restrict ourselves to considering cell and bleb shapes that maintain approximately spherical forms. From this assumption, we obtain a tractable algebraic system for bleb formation. By including cell-substrate adhesions, we can model blebbing cell motility. Further, by considering mechanically isolated blebbing events, which are randomly distributed over the cell, we can derive equations linking the macroscopic migration characteristics to the microscopic structural parameters of the cell. This multiscale modeling framework is then used to provide parameter estimates, which are in agreement with current experimental data. In summary, the construction of the mathematical model provides testable relationships between the bleb size and cell motility.

  8. Random blebbing motion: A simple model linking cell structural properties to migration characteristics.

    Woolley, Thomas E; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Goriely, Alain

    2017-07-01

    If the plasma membrane of a cell is able to delaminate locally from its actin cortex, a cellular bleb can be produced. Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions, which are noteworthy for their ability to produce cellular motion. Starting from a general continuum mechanics description, we restrict ourselves to considering cell and bleb shapes that maintain approximately spherical forms. From this assumption, we obtain a tractable algebraic system for bleb formation. By including cell-substrate adhesions, we can model blebbing cell motility. Further, by considering mechanically isolated blebbing events, which are randomly distributed over the cell, we can derive equations linking the macroscopic migration characteristics to the microscopic structural parameters of the cell. This multiscale modeling framework is then used to provide parameter estimates, which are in agreement with current experimental data. In summary, the construction of the mathematical model provides testable relationships between the bleb size and cell motility.

  9. On the decoupling of relaxation modes in a molecular liquid caused by isothermal introduction of 2 nm structural inhomogeneities.

    Ueno, Kazuhide; Angell, C Austen

    2011-12-08

    To support a new interpretation of the origin of the dynamic heterogeneity observed pervasively in fragile liquids as they approach their glass transition temperatures T(g), we demonstrate that the introduction of ~2 nm structural inhomogeneities into a homogeneous glass former leads to a decoupling of diffusion from viscosity similar to that observed during the cooling of orthoterphenyl (OTP) below T(A,) where Arrhenius behavior is lost. Further, the decoupling effect grows stronger as temperature decreases (and viscosity increases). The liquid is cresol, and the ~2 nm inhomogeneities are cresol-soluble asymmetric derivatized tetrasiloxy-based (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)) molecules. The decoupling is the phenomenon predicted by Onsager in discussing the approach to a liquid-liquid phase separation with decreasing temperature. In the present case the observations support the notion of a polyamorphic transition in fragile liquids that is hidden below the glass transition. A similar decoupling can be expected as a globular protein is dissolved in dilute aqueous solutions or in protic ionic liquids. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Introduction to wireless sensor networks

    Forster, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Explores real-world wireless sensor network development, deployment, and applications. The book begins with an introduction to wireless sensor networks and their fundamental concepts. Hardware components, operating systems, protocols, and algorithms that make up the anatomy of a sensor node are described in chapter two. Properties of wireless communications, medium access protocols, wireless links, and link estimation protocols are described in chapter three and chapter four. Routing basics and metrics, clustering techniques, time synchronization and localization protocols, as well as sensing techniques are introduced in chapter five to nine. The concluding chapter summarizes the learnt methods and shows how to use them to deploy real-world sensor networks in a structured way.

  11. Avatars of a semiological adventure: the critical legacy of Roland Barthes and the drift of the structural / post-structural paradigm. An Introduction

    María Lourdes Gasillón

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of Roland Barthes (1915-1980 is abundant and varied to the point where critical studies about his writing –and even, according to the own semiologist– have established different “phases” in the development of his thought. In this paper, we intend to observe two of those moments in Barthes´ theorizing, which coincide with the prevailing theoretical currents in France between the ´60s and ´70s: the structuralism and the post-structuralism. With this goal, we will analize two central texts in the semiotics of Barthes: “Introduction to the structural analysis of narratives” (1966 and “From work to text” (1971. The comparison of both works will allow us to observe the epistemological point of view and the model which the author adopted in each moment. It includes a change of perspective on the language, setting the concept of “story” (and others related as “levels of consciousness”, “the story grammar”, distortion and expansion operations, etc. aside and using “text” as a methodological field held in language and his associated notions: game, practice, production, death of the author, among others.

  12. Using a Social Science--Fictional Play to Teach about Global Capitalism and Macro-Structural Systems in Introduction to Sociology

    Pelak, Cynthia Fabrizio; Duncan, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the use of a social science-fictional play to teach macro-structural concepts related to global capitalism and surplus labor in a small and large Introduction to Sociology course. Relying on a cross-disciplinary and critical pedagogical approach that combines theory and practice to empower students to develop a critical…

  13. Ecological-network models link diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web

    D'Alelio, Domenico; Libralato, Simone; Wyatt, Timothy; Ribera D'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    A planktonic food-web model including sixty-three functional nodes (representing auto- mixo- and heterotrophs) was developed to integrate most trophic diversity present in the plankton. The model was implemented in two variants - which we named ‘green’ and ‘blue’ - characterized by opposite amounts of phytoplankton biomass and representing, respectively, bloom and non-bloom states of the system. Taxonomically disaggregated food-webs described herein allowed to shed light on how components of the plankton community changed their trophic behavior in the two different conditions, and modified the overall functioning of the plankton food web. The green and blue food-webs showed distinct organizations in terms of trophic roles of the nodes and carbon fluxes between them. Such re-organization stemmed from switches in selective grazing by both metazoan and protozoan consumers. Switches in food-web structure resulted in relatively small differences in the efficiency of material transfer towards higher trophic levels. For instance, from green to blue states, a seven-fold decrease in phytoplankton biomass translated into only a two-fold decrease in potential planktivorous fish biomass. By linking diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web, we discuss the role of internal mechanisms, relying on species-specific functionalities, in driving the ‘adaptive’ responses of plankton communities to perturbations.

  14. Linking habitat structure to life history strategy: Insights from a Mediterranean killifish

    Cavraro, Francesco; Daouti, Irini; Leonardos, Ioannis; Torricelli, Patrizia; Malavasi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Modern theories of life history evolution deal with finding links between environmental factors, demographic structure of animal populations and the optimal life history strategy. Small-sized teleost fish, occurring in fragmented populations under contrasting environments, have been widely used as study models to investigate these issues. In the present study, the Mediterranean killifish Aphanius fasciatus was used to investigate the relationships between some habitat features and life history strategy. We selected four sites in the Venice lagoon inhabited by this species, exhibiting different combinations of two factors: overall adult mortality, related to intertidal water coverage and a consequent higher level of predator exposure, and the level of sediment organic matter, as indicator of habitat trophic richness. Results showed that these were the two most important factors influencing demography and life history traits in the four sites. Fish from salt marshes with high predator pressure were smaller and produced a higher number of eggs, whereas bigger fish and a lower reproductive investment were found in the two closed, not tidally influenced habitats. Habitat richness was positively related with population density, but negatively related with growth rate. In particular the synergy between high resources and low predation level was found to be important in shaping peculiar life history traits. Results were discussed in the light of the interactions between selective demographic forces acting differentially on age/size classes, such as predation, and habitat trophic richness that may represent an important energetic constraint on life history traits. The importance to link habitat productivity and morphology to demographic factors for a better understanding of the evolution of life history strategy under contrasting environments was finally suggested.

  15. Linking epigenetic function to electrostatics: The DNMT2 structural model example.

    Vieira, Gilberto Cavalheiro; Vieira, Gustavo Fioravanti; Sinigaglia, Marialva; Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia da

    2017-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of DNMT2 is very similar to the catalytic domains of bacterial and eukaryotic proteins. However, there is great variability in the region of recognition of the target sequence. While bacterial DNMT2 acts as a DNA methyltransferase, previous studies have indicated low DNA methylation activity in eukaryotic DNMT2, with preference by tRNA methylation. Drosophilids are known as DNMT2-only species and the DNA methylation phenomenon is a not elucidated case yet, as well as the ontogenetic and physiologic importance of DNMT2 for this species group. In addition, more recently study showed that methylation in the genome in Drosophila melanogaster is independent in relation to DNMT2. Despite these findings, Drosophilidae family has more than 4,200 species with great ecological diversity and historical evolution, thus we, therefore, aimed to examine the drosophilids DNMT2 in order to verify its conservation at the physicochemical and structural levels in a functional context. We examined the twenty-six DNMT2 models generated by molecular modelling and five crystallographic structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) using different approaches. Our results showed that despite sequence and structural similarity between species close related, we found outstanding differences when they are analyzed in the context of surface distribution of electrostatic properties. The differences found in the electrostatic potentials may be linked with different affinities and processivity of DNMT2 for its different substrates (DNA, RNA or tRNA) and even for interactions with other proteins involved in the epigenetic mechanisms.

  16. Effects of Thermal Cross-Linking on the Structure and Property of Asymmetric Membrane Prepared from the Polyacrylonitrile

    Xin Jin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Improving the thermal and chemical stabilities of classical polymer membranes will be beneficial to extend their applications in the high temperature or aggressive environment. In this work, the asymmetric ultrafiltration membranes prepared from the polyacrylonitrile (PAN were used to fabricate the cross-linking asymmetric (CLA PAN membranes via thermal cross-linking in air to improve their thermal and chemical stabilities. The effects of thermal cross-linking parameters such as temperature and holding time on the structure, gas separation performance, thermal and chemical stabilities of PAN membranes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetic analysis (TGA and gas permeation test. The thermal cross-linking significantly influences the chemical structure, microstructure and pore structure of PAN membrane. During the thermal cross-linking, the shrinkage of membrane and coalescence or collapse of pore and microstructure make large pores diminish, small pores disappear and pore volumes reduce. The gas permeances of CLA-PAN membranes increase as the increasing of cross-linking temperature and holding time due to the volatilization of small molecules. The CLA-PAN membranes demonstrate excellent thermal and chemical stabilities and present good prospects for application in ultrafiltration for water treatment and for use as a substrate for nanofiltration or gas separation with an aggressive and demanding environment.

  17. Examining the Link between Patient Satisfaction and Adherence to HIV Care: A Structural Equation Model

    Dang, Bich N.; Westbrook, Robert A.; Black, William C.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. Objective To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey (“Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, (“Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?”). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported “excellent” adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all pPatient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes. PMID:23382948

  18. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. OBJECTIVE: To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM, a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV? and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?". A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA <48 copies/mL at the time of the survey. We used SEM to test hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: The analyses included 489 patients (94% of eligible patients. The patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2 on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all p<.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Patient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  19. Effects of introduction of argon on structural and transparent conducting properties of ZnO-In2O3 thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    Moriga, Toshihiro; Mikawa, Michio; Sakakibara, Yuji; Misaki, Yukinori; Murai, Kei-ichiro; Nakabayashi, Ichiro; Tominaga, Kikuo; Metson, James B.

    2005-01-01

    Indium-zinc oxide thin films were deposited on a glass substrate from a ZnO and In 2 O 3 mixed target by a pulsed laser deposition technique. The effects on surface texture, structure and transparent conducting properties of the introduction of argon into the chamber during the depositions of amorphous and homologous ZnO-In 2 O 3 thin films were examined. The compositional range where amorphous films formed was widened by the introduction of argon. Resistivity in the region where the amorphous phase appeared increased slightly, with an increase of zinc content, due to the counteractions of decreased Hall mobility and increased carrier concentration. Introduction of argon improved surface roughness of the films and reduced and regulated particle and/or crystallite sizes of the films

  20. Behavior of Shear Link of WF Section with Diagonal Web Stiffener of Eccentrically Braced Frame (EBF of Steel Structure

    Yurisman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of numerical and experimental study of shear link behavior, utilizing diagonal stiffener on web of steel profile to increase shear link performance in an eccentric braced frame (EBF of a steel structure system. The specimen is to examine the behavior of shear link by using diagonal stiffener on web part under static monotonic and cyclic load. The cyclic loading pattern conducted in the experiment is adjusted according to AISC loading standards 2005. Analysis was carried out using non-linear finite element method using MSC/NASTRAN software. Link was modeled as CQUAD shell element. Along the boundary of the loading area the nodal are constraint to produce only one direction loading. The length of the link in this analysis is 400mm of the steel profile of WF 200.100. Important parameters considered to effect significantly to the performance of shear link have been analyzed, namely flange and web thicknesses, , thickness and length of web stiffener, thickness of diagonal stiffener and geometric of diagonal stiffener. The behavior of shear link with diagonal web stiffener was compared with the behavior of standard link designed based on AISC 2005 criteria. Analysis results show that diagonal web stiffener is capable to increase shear link performance in terms of stiffness, strength and energy dissipation in supporting lateral load. However, differences in displacement ductility’s between shear links with diagonal stiffener and shear links based on AISC standards have not shown to be significant. Analysis results also show thickness of diagonal stiffener and geometric model of stiffener to have a significant influence on the performance of shear links. To perform validation of the numerical study, the research is followed by experimental work conducted in Structural Mechanic Laboratory Center for Industrial Engineering ITB. The Structures and Mechanics Lab rotary PAU-ITB. The experiments were carried out using three test

  1. Modeling the Link between Left Ventricular Flow and Thromboembolic Risk Using Lagrangian Coherent Structures

    Karen May-Newman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A thrombus is a blood clot that forms on a surface, and can grow and detach, presenting a high risk for stroke and pulmonary embolism. This risk increases with blood-contacting medical devices, due to the immunological response to foreign surfaces and altered flow patterns that activate the blood and promote thromboembolism (TE. Abnormal blood transport, including vortex behavior and regional stasis, can be assessed from Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS. LCS are flow structures that bound transport within a flow field and divide the flow into regions with maximally attracting/repelling surfaces that maximize local shear. LCS can be identified from finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE fields, which are computed from velocity field data. In this study, the goal was to use FTLE analysis to evaluate LCS in the left ventricle (LV using velocity data obtained from flow visualization of a mock circulatory loop. A model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM was used to investigate the effect of left ventricular assist device (LVAD support on diastolic filling and transport in the LV. A small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract was also considered using data from a corresponding LV model. The DCM LV exhibited a direct flow of 0.8 L/cardiac cycle, which was tripled during LVAD support Delayed ejection flow was doubled, further illustrating the impact of LVAD support on blood transport. An examination of the attracting LCS ridges during diastolic filling showed that the increase is due primarily to augmentation of A wave inflow, which is associated with increased vortex circulation, kinetic energy and Forward FTLE. The introduction of a small thrombus in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT of the LV had a minimal effect on diastolic inflow, but obstructed systolic outflow leading to decreased transport compared with the unobstructed LVOT geometry. Localized FTLE in the LVOT increased dramatically with the small thrombus model, which reflects

  2. Function of dynamic models in systems biology: linking structure to behaviour.

    Knüpfer, Christian; Beckstein, Clemens

    2013-10-08

    Dynamic models in Systems Biology are used in computational simulation experiments for addressing biological questions. The complexity of the modelled biological systems and the growing number and size of the models calls for computer support for modelling and simulation in Systems Biology. This computer support has to be based on formal representations of relevant knowledge fragments. In this paper we describe different functional aspects of dynamic models. This description is conceptually embedded in our "meaning facets" framework which systematises the interpretation of dynamic models in structural, functional and behavioural facets. Here we focus on how function links the structure and the behaviour of a model. Models play a specific role (teleological function) in the scientific process of finding explanations for dynamic phenomena. In order to fulfil this role a model has to be used in simulation experiments (pragmatical function). A simulation experiment always refers to a specific situation and a state of the model and the modelled system (conditional function). We claim that the function of dynamic models refers to both the simulation experiment executed by software (intrinsic function) and the biological experiment which produces the phenomena under investigation (extrinsic function). We use the presented conceptual framework for the function of dynamic models to review formal accounts for functional aspects of models in Systems Biology, such as checklists, ontologies, and formal languages. Furthermore, we identify missing formal accounts for some of the functional aspects. In order to fill one of these gaps we propose an ontology for the teleological function of models. We have thoroughly analysed the role and use of models in Systems Biology. The resulting conceptual framework for the function of models is an important first step towards a comprehensive formal representation of the functional knowledge involved in the modelling and simulation process

  3. Allocating structure to function: the strong links between neuroplasticity and natural selection

    Michael L Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A central question in brain evolution is how species-typical behaviors, and the neural function-structure mappings supporting them, can be acquired and inherited. Advocates of brain modularity, in its different incarnations across scientific subfields, argue that natural selection must target domain-dedicated, separately modifiable neural subsystems, resulting in genetically-specified functional modules. In such modular systems, specification of neuron number and functional connectivity are necessarily linked. Mounting evidence, however, from allometric, developmental, comparative, systems-physiological, neuroimaging and neurological studies suggests that brain elements are used and reused in multiple functional systems. This variable allocation can be seen in short-term neuromodulation, in neuroplasticity over the lifespan and in response to damage. We argue that the same processes are evident in brain evolution. Natural selection must preserve behavioral functions that may co-locate in variable amounts with other functions. In genetics, the uses and problems of pleiotropy, the re-use of genes in multiple networks have been much discussed, but this issue has been sidestepped in neural systems by the invocation of modules. Here we highlight the interaction between evolutionary and developmental mechanisms to produce distributed and overlapping functional architectures in the brain. These adaptive mechanisms must be robust to perturbations that might disrupt critical information processing and action selection, but must also recognize useful new sources of information arising from internal genetic or environmental variability, when those appear. These contrasting properties of robustness and evolvability have been discussed for the basic organization of body plan and fundamental cell physiology. Here we extend them to the evolution and development, evo-devo, of brain structure.

  4. Structure of a DNA glycosylase that unhooks interstrand cross-links

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Warren, Garrett M.; Bradley, Noah P.; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt)

    2017-04-10

    DNA glycosylases are important editing enzymes that protect genomic stability by excising chemically modified nucleobases that alter normal DNA metabolism. These enzymes have been known only to initiate base excision repair of small adducts by extrusion from the DNA helix. However, recent reports have described both vertebrate and microbial DNA glycosylases capable of unhooking highly toxic interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and bulky minor groove adducts normally recognized by Fanconi anemia and nucleotide excision repair machinery, although the mechanisms of these activities are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of Streptomyces sahachiroi AlkZ (previously Orf1), a bacterial DNA glycosylase that protects its host by excising ICLs derived from azinomycin B (AZB), a potent antimicrobial and antitumor genotoxin. AlkZ adopts a unique fold in which three tandem winged helix-turn-helix motifs scaffold a positively charged concave surface perfectly shaped for duplex DNA. Through mutational analysis, we identified two glutamine residues and a β-hairpin within this putative DNA-binding cleft that are essential for catalytic activity. Additionally, we present a molecular docking model for how this active site can unhook either or both sides of an AZB ICL, providing a basis for understanding the mechanisms of base excision repair of ICLs. Given the prevalence of this protein fold in pathogenic bacteria, this work also lays the foundation for an emerging role of DNA repair in bacteria-host pathogenesis.

  5. Fine-particle Mn and other metals linked to the introduction of MMT into gasoline in Sydney, Australia: Results of a natural experiment

    Cohen, D. D.; Gulson, B. L.; Davis, J. M.; Stelcer, E.; Garton, D.; Hawas, O.; Taylor, A.

    Using a combination of accelerator-based ion beam methods we have analysed PM 2.5 particulates for a suite of 21 species (H, C, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Pb) to evaluate the contribution to Sydney (New South Wales, Australia) air associated with the introduction of MMT as a replacement for lead. MMT was discontinued in 2004. Teflon filters representing continuous sampling for a 7 year period from 1998 to 2004 were analysed from two sites: one from Mascot, a suburb close to the Central Business District [CBD ( n=718)] and a high trafficked area, and the other, a relatively rural (background) setting at Richmond, ˜20 km west of the CBD ( n=730). Manganese concentrations in air at the background site increased from a mean of 1.5-1.6 ng m -3 to less than 2 ng m -3 at the time of greatest MMT use whereas those at Mascot increased from about 2 to 5 ng m -3. From the maximum values, the Mn showed a steady decrease at both sites concomitant with the decreasing use of MMT. Lead concentrations in air at both sites decreased from 1998 onwards, concomitant with the phase out of leaded gasoline, attained in 2002. Employing previously determined elemental signatures it was possible to adjust effects from season along with auto emissions and soil. A high correlation was obtained for the relationship between Mn in air and lead replacement gasoline use ( R2 0.83) and an improved correlation for Mn/ Al+Si+K and lead replacement gasoline use ( R2 0.93). In addition, using Mn concentrations normalized to background values of Al+Si+K or Ti to account for the lithogenically derived Mn, the proportion of anthropogenic Mn was approximately 70%. The changes for Mn and Pb detected in the particulates are attributed to the before-during-after use of MMT and decreasing use of lead in gasoline. The values measured in Sydney air are well below the reference concentration of 50 ng Mn m -3. The incremental increases in air, however, are larger than

  6. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of amniotic membranes affects their nanofibrous structures and limbal epithelial cell culture characteristics.

    Lai, Jui-Yang; Ma, David Hui-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Given that the cells can sense nanometer dimensions, the chemical cross-linking-mediated alteration in fibrillar structure of collagenous tissue scaffolds is critical to determining their cell culture performances. This article explores, for the first time, the effect of nanofibrous structure of glutaraldehyde (GTA) cross-linked amniotic membrane (AM) on limbal epithelial cell (LEC) cultivation. Results of ninhydrin assays demonstrated that the amount of new cross-links formed between the collagen chains is significantly increased with increasing the cross-linking time from 1 to 24 hours. By transmission electron microscopy, the AM treated with GTA for a longer duration exhibited a greater extent of molecular aggregation, thereby leading to a considerable increase in nanofiber diameter and resistance against collagenase degradation. In vitro biocompatibility studies showed that the samples cross-linked with GTA for 24 hours are not well-tolerated by the human corneal epithelial cell cultures. When the treatment duration is less than 6 hours, the biological tissues cross-linked with GTA for a longer time may cause slight reductions in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt, and anti-inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, significant collagen molecular aggregation also enhances the stemness gene expression, indicating a high ability of these AM matrices to preserve the progenitors of LECs in vitro. It is concluded that GTA cross-linking of collagenous tissue materials may affect their nanofibrous structures and corneal epithelial stem cell culture characteristics. The AM treated with GTA for 6 hours holds promise for use as a niche for the expansion and transplantation of limbal epithelial progenitor cells.

  7. Introduction to UAV systems

    Fahlstrom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been widely adopted in the military world over the last decade and the success of these military applications is increasingly driving efforts to establish unmanned aircraft in non-military roles. Introduction to UAV Systems, 4th edition provides a comprehensive introduction to all of the elements of a complete Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS). It addresses the air vehicle, mission planning and control, several types of mission payloads, data links and how they interact with mission performance, and launch and recovery concepts. This

  8. Magnet Cycles and Stability Periods of the CMS Structures from 2008 to 2013 as Observed by the Link Alignment System

    Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this document Magnet Cycles and Stability Periods of the CMS Experiment are studied with the recorded Alignment Link System data along the 2008 to 2013 years of operation. The motions of the mechanical structures due to the magnetic field forces are studied including an in-depth analysis of the relative distance between the endcap structures and the central Tracker body during the Stability Periods to verify the mechanical stability of the detector during the physics data taking.

  9. Operative Links

    Wistoft, Karen; Højlund, Holger

    2012-01-01

    educational goals, learning content, or value clarification. Health pedagogy is often a matter of retrospective rationalization rather than the starting point of planning. Health and risk behaviour approaches override health educational approaches. Conclusions: Operational links between health education......, health professionalism, and management strategies pose the foremost challenge. Operational links indicates cooperative levels that facilitate a creative and innovative effort across traditional professional boundaries. It is proposed that such links are supported by network structures, shared semantics...

  10. The energy band structure of ultra small capacitance weak links - QED in condensed matter circuits

    Prance, H.; Clark, T.D.; Prance, R.J.; Spiller, T.P.; Diggins, J.; Ralph, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    We consider various superconducting weak link circuits in which quantum effects dominate. We show that in this quantum regime these circuits take on a quantum electrodynamic description, at least as far as the electromagnetic field contribution is concerned. (orig.)

  11. Structure of the Dispase Autolysis-inducing Protein from Streptomyces mobaraensis and Glutamine Cross-linking Sites for Transglutaminase.

    Fiebig, David; Schmelz, Stefan; Zindel, Stephan; Ehret, Vera; Beck, Jan; Ebenig, Aileen; Ehret, Marina; Fröls, Sabrina; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Kolmar, Harald; Fuchsbauer, Hans-Lothar; Scrima, Andrea

    2016-09-23

    Transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis (MTG) is an important enzyme for cross-linking and modifying proteins. An intrinsic substrate of MTG is the dispase autolysis-inducing protein (DAIP). The amino acid sequence of DAIP contains 5 potential glutamines and 10 lysines for MTG-mediated cross-linking. The aim of the study was to determine the structure and glutamine cross-linking sites of the first physiological MTG substrate. A production procedure was established in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) to obtain high yields of recombinant DAIP. DAIP variants were prepared by replacing four of five glutamines for asparagines in various combinations via site-directed mutagenesis. Incorporation of biotin cadaverine revealed a preference of MTG for the DAIP glutamines in the order of Gln-39 ≫ Gln-298 > Gln-345 ∼ Gln-65 ≫ Gln-144. In the structure of DAIP the preferred glutamines do cluster at the top of the seven-bladed β-propeller. This suggests a targeted cross-linking of DAIP by MTG that may occur after self-assembly in the bacterial cell wall. Based on our biochemical and structural data of the first physiological MTG substrate, we further provide novel insight into determinants of MTG-mediated modification, specificity, and efficiency. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Graphical linking of MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. II-5-c rings and 6-c heterocyclic rings

    Bollini, Carlos Guido; Giambiagi, Mario; Giambiagi, Myriam Segre de; Figueiredo, Aloysio Paiva de

    2001-02-01

    Through the graphical method proposed it is possible to set a link between an MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. The value of the index depends on the order of the atoms involved if they are more than three. For 5-c rings three basic structures are required; the eventually different values are 12. Unlike the 6-c case it may happen that different pairs of basic structures are used to build the same polygon. For the 6-c rings including heteroatoms the original degeneracy of benzene splits leading eventually to 60 different I ring values. (author)

  13. Graphical linking of MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. II-5-c rings and 6-c heterocyclic rings

    Bollini, C G; Giambiagi, M

    2001-01-01

    Through the graphical method proposed it is possible to set a link between an MO multicenter bond index and VB structures. The value of the index depends on the order of the atoms involved if they are more than three. For 5-c rings three basic structures are required; the eventually different values are 12. Unlike the 6-c case it may happen that different pairs of basic structures are used to build the same polygon. For the 6-c rings including heteroatoms the original degeneracy of benzene splits leading eventually to 60 different I sub r sub i sub n sub g values.

  14. A structural and kinetic study on myofibrils prevented from shortening by chemical cross-linking.

    Herrmann, C; Sleep, J; Chaussepied, P; Travers, F; Barman, T

    1993-07-20

    In previous work, we studied the early steps of the Mg(2+)-ATPase activity of Ca(2+)-activated myofibrils [Houadjeto, M., Travers, F., & Barman, T. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 1564-1569]. The myofibrils were free to contract, and the results obtained refer to the ATPase cycle of myofibrils contracting with no external load. Here we studied the ATPase of myofibrils contracting isometrically. To prevent shortening, we cross-linked them with 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC). SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses showed that the myosin rods were extensively cross-linked and that 8% of the myosin heads were cross-linked to the thin filament. The transient kinetics of the cross-linked myofibrils were studied in 0.1 M potassium acetate, pH 7.4 and 4 degrees C, by the rapid-flow quench method. The ATP binding steps were studied by the cold ATP chase and the cleavage and release of products steps by the Pi burst method. In Pi burst experiments, the sizes of the bursts were equal within experimental error to the ATPase site concentrations (as determined by the cold ATP chase methods) for both cross-linked (isometric) and un-cross-linked (isotonic) myofibrils. This shows that in both cases the rate-limiting step is after the cleavage of ATP. When cross-linked, the kcat of Ca(2+)-activated myofibrils was reduced from 1.7 to 0.8 s-1. This is consistent with the observation that fibers shortening at moderate velocity have a higher ATPase activity than isometric fibers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Cone photoreceptor structure in patients with x-linked cone dysfunction and red-green color vision deficiency

    Patterson, Emily J.; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    encoded by exon 4, and two with a novel insertion in exon 2. Foveal cone structure and retinal thickness was disrupted to a variable degree, even among related individuals with the same L/M array. CONCLUSIONS. Our findings provide a direct link between disruption of the cone mosaic and L/ M opsin variants......PURPOSE. Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/ M opsin gene mutations...... to clarify the link between color vision deficiency and cone dysfunction.  METHODS. We recruited 17 males for imaging. The thickness and integrity of the photoreceptor layers were evaluated using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Cone density was measured using high-resolution images of the cone...

  16. From the genome to the phenome and back: linking genes with human brain function and structure using genetically informed neuroimaging

    Siebner, H R; Callicott, J H; Sommer, T

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, an array of brain mapping techniques has been successfully employed to link individual differences in circuit function or structure in the living human brain with individual variations in the human genome. Several proof-of-principle studies provided converging evidence that brain...... imaging can establish important links between genes and behaviour. The overarching goal is to use genetically informed brain imaging to pinpoint neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to behavioural intermediate phenotypes or disease states. This special issue on "Linking Genes to Brain Function...... in Health and Disease" provides an overview over how the "imaging genetics" approach is currently applied in the various fields of systems neuroscience to reveal the genetic underpinnings of complex behaviours and brain diseases. While the rapidly emerging field of imaging genetics holds great promise...

  17. Elastic dynamic research of high speed multi-link precision press considering structural stiffness of rotation joints

    Hu, Feng Feng; Sun, Yu; Peng, Bin Bin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

    2016-10-15

    An elastic dynamic model of high-speed multi-link precision press considering structural stiffness of rotation joints was established by the finite element method. In the finite element model, rotation joint was established by four bar elements with equivalent stiffness, and connected link was established by beam element. Then, the elastic dynamics equation of the system was established, and modal superposition method was used to solve the dynamic response. Compared with the traditional elastic dynamic model with perfect constraint of the rotation joints, the elastic dynamic response value of the improved model is larger. To validate the presented new method of elastic dynamics analysis with stiffness of rotation joints, a related test of slider Bottom dead center (BDC) position in different speed was designed. The test shows that the model with stiffness of rotation joints is more reasonable. So it provides a reasonable theory and method for dynamic characteristics research of such a multi-link machine.

  18. ADAMS - Introduction

    Song, Cheol Gi

    2003-06-01

    This book introduces ADAMS, which is composed of 20 modules ; stamping mechanism, ADAMS introduction, GUI overview failing stone project motion one DOF pendulum inclined plane lift mechanism I mechanism II mechanism III suspension subsystem suspension-steering system spring-damper I spring-damper II hatchback I hatchback II hatchback III cam-rocker-valve target practice recommended practice and switch mechanism workshop.

  19. Introduction; Vvedenie

    Nikitin, V I

    1961-07-01

    Introduction describes the present book. Its includes seven chapters. First four from them touch with glycerin of acetylene line-their receiving, studying their oxidation reactions, transformations under the influence of dehydrating methods. Last three chapters dedicated to glycerin of ethylen line-synthesis, their cyclization into substituted dihydropyran.

  20. Elementary introduction to conformal invariance

    Grandati, Y.

    1992-01-01

    These notes constitute an elementary introduction to the concept of conformal invariance and its applications to the study of bidimensional critical phenomena. The aim is to give an access as pedestrian as possible to this vast subject. After a brief account of the general properties of conformal transformation in D dimensions, we study more specifically the case D = 2. The center of the discussion is then the consequences of the action of this symmetry group on bidimensional field theories, and in particular the links between the representations of the Virasoro algebra and the structure of the correlation functions of conformal field theories. Finally after showing how the Ising model reduces to a Majorana fermionic field theory, we see how the general formalism previously discussed can be applied to the Ising case at the critical point. (orig.)

  1. How do SMA-linked mutations of SMN1 lead to structural/functional deficiency of the SMA protein?

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease with dysfunctional α-motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMA is caused by loss (∼95% of SMA cases or mutation (∼5% of SMA cases of the survival motor neuron 1 gene SMN1. As the product of SMN1, SMN is a component of the SMN complex, and is also involved in the biosynthesis of the small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which play critical roles in pre-mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of SMA. To investigate how SMA-linked mutations of SMN1 lead to structural/functional deficiency of SMN, a set of computational analysis of SMN-related structures were conducted and are described in this article. Of extraordinary interest, the structural analysis highlights three SMN residues (Asp44, Glu134 and Gln136 with SMA-linked missense mutations, which cause disruptions of electrostatic interactions for Asp44, Glu134 and Gln136, and result in three functionally deficient SMA-linked SMN mutants, Asp44Val, Glu134Lys and Gln136Glu. From the computational analysis, it is also possible that SMN's Lys45 and Asp36 act as two electrostatic clips at the SMN-Gemin2 complex structure interface.

  2. The structural role of weak and strong links in a financial market network

    Garas, A.; Argyrakis, P.; Havlin, S.

    2008-05-01

    We investigate the properties of correlation based networks originating from economic complex systems, such as the network of stocks traded at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). The weaker links (low correlation) of the system are found to contribute to the overall connectivity of the network significantly more than the strong links (high correlation). We find that nodes connected through strong links form well defined communities. These communities are clustered together in more complex ways compared to the widely used classification according to the economic activity. We find that some companies, such as General Electric (GE), Coca Cola (KO), and others, can be involved in different communities. The communities are found to be quite stable over time. Similar results were obtained by investigating markets completely different in size and properties, such as the Athens Stock Exchange (ASE). The present method may be also useful for other networks generated through correlations.

  3. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of amniotic membranes affects their nanofibrous structures and limbal epithelial cell culture characteristics

    Lai JY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jui-Yang Lai,1–3 David Hui-Kang Ma4,5 1Institute of Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering, 2Biomedical Engineering Research Center, 3Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Limbal Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract: Given that the cells can sense nanometer dimensions, the chemical cross-linking-mediated alteration in fibrillar structure of collagenous tissue scaffolds is critical to determining their cell culture performances. This article explores, for the first time, the effect of nanofibrous structure of glutaraldehyde (GTA cross-linked amniotic membrane (AM on limbal epithelial cell (LEC cultivation. Results of ninhydrin assays demonstrated that the amount of new cross-links formed between the collagen chains is significantly increased with increasing the cross-linking time from 1 to 24 hours. By transmission electron microscopy, the AM treated with GTA for a longer duration exhibited a greater extent of molecular aggregation, thereby leading to a considerable increase in nanofiber diameter and resistance against collagenase degradation. In vitro biocompatibility studies showed that the samples cross-linked with GTA for 24 hours are not well-tolerated by the human corneal epithelial cell cultures. When the treatment duration is less than 6 hours, the biological tissues cross-linked with GTA for a longer time may cause slight reductions in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt, and anti-inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, significant collagen molecular aggregation also enhances the stemness gene expression, indicating a high ability of these AM matrices to preserve the progenitors of LECs in vitro. It is concluded that GTA cross-linking of collagenous tissue materials may affect their nanofibrous

  4. Linking landscape structure and rainfall runoff behaviour in a thermodynamic optimality context

    Zehe, Erwin; Ehret, Uwe; Blume, Theresa; Kleidon, Axel; Scherer, Ulrike; Westhoff, Martijn

    2015-04-01

    The fact that persistent spatial organization in catchments exists has inspired many scientists to speculate whether this is the manifestation of an underlying organizing principle. In line with these studies we developed and tested a thermodynamic framework to link rainfall runoff generation and self-organization in catchments. From a thermodynamic perspective any water mass flux is equal to a "potential gradient" divided by a "resistance", and fluxes deplete due to the second law of thermodynamics their driving gradients. Relevant potentials controlling rainfall runoff are soil water potentials, piezometric heads and surface water levels and their gradients are associated with spatial differences in associated forms of free energy. Rainfall runoff processes thus are associated with conversions of capillary binding energy, potential energy and kinetic energy. These conversions reflect energy conservation and irreversibility as they imply small amounts of dissipation of free energy into heat and thus production of entropy. Energy conversions during rainfall runoff transformation are, though being small, nevertheless of key importance, because they are related to the partitioning of incoming rainfall mass into runoff components and storage dynamics. This splitting and the subsequent subsurface dynamics is strongly controlled by preferential flow paths, which in turn largely influence hydrologically relevant resistance fields in larger control volumes. The field of subsurface flow resistances depends for instance on soil hydraulic conductivity, its spatial covariance and soil moisture. Apparent preferential pathways reduce, depending on their density, topology and spatial extent, subsurface flow resistances along their main extent, resulting in accelerated fluxes against the driving gradient. This implies an enlarged power in the subsurface flux thereby either an enlarged free energy export from the control volume or an increased depletion of internal driving

  5. Examining Culturally Structured Learning Environments with Different Types of Music-Linked Movement Opportunity

    Cole, Juanita M.; Boykin, A. Wade

    2008-01-01

    This study describes two experiments that extended earlier work on the Afrocultural theme Movement Expression. The impact of various learning conditions characterized by different types of music-linked movement on story recall performance was examined. African American children were randomly assigned to a learning condition, presented a story, and…

  6. Mesoscale structure and techno-functional properties of enzymatically cross-linked a-lactalbumin nanoparticles

    Dhayal, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the connection between molecular, meso and macroscales of enzymatically cross-linked proteins. It was hypothesised that the techno-functional properties at macroscale, such as bulk rheology and foam stability, are affected

  7. Structures linking physical and biological processes in headwater streams of the Maybeso watershed, Southeast Alaska

    Mason D. Bryant; Takashi Gomi; Jack J. Piccolo

    2007-01-01

    We focus on headwater streams originating in the mountainous terrain of northern temperate rain forests. These streams rapidly descend from gradients greater than 20% to less than 5% in U-shaped glacial valleys. We use a set of studies on headwater streams in southeast Alaska to define headwater stream catchments, link physical and biological processes, and describe...

  8. Driving innovation through big open linked data (BOLD) : Exploring antecedents using interpretive structural modelling

    Dwivedi, Yogesh K.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Slade, Emma L.; Rana, Nripendra P.; Weerakkody, Vishanth; Millard, Jeremy; Hidders, Jan; Snijders, D.

    2016-01-01

    Innovation is vital to find new solutions to problems, increase quality, and improve profitability. Big open linked data (BOLD) is a fledgling and rapidly evolving field that creates new opportunities for innovation. However, none of the existing literature has yet considered the

  9. In search of new lead compounds for trypanosomiasis drug design: A protein structure-based linked-fragment approach

    Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Rudenko, Gabrielle; Hol, Wim G. J.

    1992-04-01

    A modular method for pursuing structure-based inhibitor design in the framework of a design cycle is presented. The approach entails four stages: (1) a design pathway is defined in the three-dimensional structure of a target protein; (2) this pathway is divided into subregions; (3) complementary building blocks, also called fragments, are designed in each subregion; complementarity is defined in terms of shape, hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond properties and electrostatics; and (4) fragments from different subregions are linked into potential lead compounds. Stages (3) and (4) are qualitatively guided by force-field calculations. In addition, the designed fragments serve as entries for retrieving existing compounds from chemical databases. This linked-fragment approach has been applied in the design of potentially selective inhibitors of triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of sleeping sickness.

  10. Version of the galaxy spiral structure model with opposite-directed arms and inter-arm links

    Dolidze, M V [AN Gruzinskoj SSR, Abastumani. Abastumanskaya Astrofizicheskaya Observatoriya

    1963-05-01

    An attempt is made to explain some peculiarities of the local spiral structure and large-scale distribution of HII regions in the Galaxy by coexistence of the trailing and leading arm systems of different power and development. The existence of opposite-directed arms and inter-arm links in the circular zone (5-15 kpc) is analysed from the point of view of different Galaxy models.

  11. Influence of 1,2-PB matrix cross-linking on structure and properties of selectively etched 1,2-PB-b-PDMS block copolymers

    Guo, Fengxiao; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    2007-01-01

    of the cross-linked samples in toluene was converted into a degree of cross-linking following the Flory scheme; a simple relation between the Flory cross-linking degree and the fraction of consumed double bonds during the cross-linking reaction followed. The structure of the block copolymer at different stages...... of preparation was characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave direct images of the nanoporous polymer structure. Nanocavities are accessible to methanol, and observations of methanol uptake were combined with structural information from SAXS...

  12. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Ancient Bacterial Transglutaminase Sheds Light on the Minimal Requirements for Protein Cross-Linking.

    Fernandes, Catarina G; Plácido, Diana; Lousa, Diana; Brito, José A; Isidro, Anabela; Soares, Cláudio M; Pohl, Jan; Carrondo, Maria A; Archer, Margarida; Henriques, Adriano O

    2015-09-22

    Transglutaminases are best known for their ability to catalyze protein cross-linking reactions that impart chemical and physical resilience to cellular structures. Here, we report the crystal structure and characterization of Tgl, a transglutaminase from the bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Tgl is produced during sporulation and cross-links the surface of the highly resilient spore. Tgl-like proteins are found only in spore-forming bacteria of the Bacillus and Clostridia classes, indicating an ancient origin. Tgl is a single-domain protein, produced in active form, and the smallest transglutaminase characterized to date. We show that Tgl is structurally similar to bacterial cell wall endopeptidases and has an NlpC/P60 catalytic core, thought to represent the ancestral unit of the cysteine protease fold. We show that Tgl functions through a unique partially redundant catalytic dyad formed by Cys116 and Glu187 or Glu115. Strikingly, the catalytic Cys is insulated within a hydrophobic tunnel that traverses the molecule from side to side. The lack of similarity of Tgl to other transglutaminases together with its small size suggests that an NlpC/P60 catalytic core and insulation of the active site during catalysis may be essential requirements for protein cross-linking.

  13. Site-directed cross-linking: establishing the dimeric structure of the aspartate receptor of bacterial chemotaxis

    Milligan, D.L.; Koshland, D.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Cysteine residues introduced at specific locations in the aspartate receptor of Salmonella typhimurium provide anchor points for cross-linking and serve as chemical markers for structural studies of this oligomeric receptor. These markers have been used to measure the rate of subunit exchange between oligomeric receptors and to show that ligand binding inhibits this exchange. The cysteine-containing receptors can be oxidatively cross-linked to completion within the oligomeric receptor, indicating that the receptor has an even number of subunits. Based on this observation, a technique has been developed that can be used to determine the oligomeric structure of proteins under a variety of experimental conditions. The technique involves the measurement of the effect of dilution by cysteineless receptor subunits on cross-linking and reveals that the aspartate receptor is dimeric in detergent solution, in a mixed-micelle system, and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Binding of aspartate does not change the oligomeric structure of the receptor, indicating that transmembrane signaling occurs within an oligomeric receptor of constant size

  14. Fusion: introduction

    Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's research programme on fusion. The decision to construct the ITER international nuclear fusion experiment in Cadarache is highlighted. A summary of the Belgian contributions to fusion research is given with particular emphasis on studies of radiation effects on diagnostics systems, radiation effects on remote handling sensing systems, fusion waste management and socio-economic studies

  15. A structural and kinetic link between membrane association and amyloid fibril formation of α-Synuclein

    Heise, Henrike; Etzkorn, Manuel; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Buell, Alexander; Strodel, Birgit; Willbold, Dieter; Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Poojari, Chetan; Uluca, Boran; Wördehoff, Michael; Viennet, Thibault

    2017-01-01

    The protein α-Synuclein (αS) is linked to Parkinson's disease through its abnormal aggregation, which is thought to involve an interplay between cytosolic and membrane-bound forms of αS. Therefore, better insights into the molecular determinants of membrane association and their implications for protein aggregation may help deciphering the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Following previous studies using micelles and vesicles, we present a comprehensive study of αS interaction with phosph...

  16. Structure-activity relationship of carbamate-linked cationic lipids bearing hydroxyethyl headgroup for gene delivery.

    Zhi, Defu; Zhang, Shubiao; Qureshi, Farooq; Zhao, Yinan; Cui, Shaohui; Wang, Bing; Chen, Huiying; Yang, Baoling; Zhao, Defeng

    2013-12-01

    A novel series of carbamate-linked cationic lipids containing hydroxyl headgroup were synthesized and included in formulations for transfection assays. The DNA-lipid complexes were characterized for their ability to bind DNA, their size, ζ-potential and cytotoxicity. Compared with our previously reported cationic transfection lipid DDCDMA lacking the hydroxyl group and the commercially available, these cationic liposomes exhibited relatively higher transfection efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Letter: The link between the Reynolds shear stress and the large structures of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow

    Gandía-Barberá, Sergio; Hoyas, Sergio; Oberlack, Martin; Kraheberger, Stefanie

    2018-04-01

    The length and width of the long and wide structures appearing in turbulent Couette flows are studied by means of a new dataset of direct numerical simulation covering a stepped transition from pure Couette flow to pure Poiseuille one, at Reτ ≈ 130, based on the stationary wall. The existence of these structures is linked to the averaged Reynolds stress, u v ¯ : as soon as in any part of the channel u v ¯ changes its sign, the structures disappear. The length and width of the rolls are found to be, approximately, 50h and 2.5h, respectively. For this Reynolds number, simulations with a domain shorter than 100h cannot properly describe the behaviour of the longest structures of the flow.

  18. Introduction to Computational Plasticity

    Hartley, P

    2006-01-01

    The focus of the book on computational plasticity embodies techniques of relevance not only to academic researchers, but also of interest to industrialists engaged in the production of components using bulk or sheet forming processes. Of particular interest is the guidance on how to create modules for use with the commercial system Abaqus for specific types of material behaviour. The book is in two parts, the first of which contains six chapters, starting with microplasticity, but predominantly on continuum plasticity. The first chapter on microplasticty gives a brief description of the grain structure of metals and the existence of slip systems within the grains. This provides an introduction to the concept of incompressibility during plastic deformation, the nature of plastic yield and the importance of the critically resolved shear stress on the slip planes (Schmid's law). Some knowledge of the notation commonly used to describe slip systems is assumed, which will be familiar to students of metallurgy, but anyone with a more general engineering background may need to undertake additional reading to understand the various descriptions. Chapter two introduces one of several yield criteria, that normally attributed to von Mises (though historians of mechanics might argue over who was first to develop the theory of yielding associated with strain energy density), and its two or three-dimensional representation as a yield surface. The expansion of the yield surface during plastic deformation, its translation due to kinematic hardening and the Bauschinger effect in reversed loading are described with a direct link to the material stress-strain curve. The assumption, that the increment of strain is normal to the yield surface, the normality principle, is introduced. Uniaxial loading of an elastic-plastic material is used as an example in which to develop expressions to describe increments in stress and strain. The full presentation of numerous expressions, tensors and

  19. RIKEN WINTER SCHOOL: STRUCTURE OF HADRONS - INTRODUCTION TO QCD HARD PROCESSES. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, DECEMBER 9-12, 1998

    Saito, N.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture I give a pedagogical introduction to the Perturbative QCD to understand the short-distance dynamics of the strong interaction. Starting with fundamental concepts such as the color degree of freedom of QCD, non-abelian gauge field theory, renormalization group equation etc., I explain a basic idea of the perturbative QCD and apply this idea to the e + e - processes and the structure functions. The notion of mass singularity and the necessity of its factorization is discussed in some detail

  20. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    Wei, Shuai; Stolpe, Moritz; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-01-01

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T g . The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure

  1. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    Wei, Shuai, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Stolpe, Moritz, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Evenson, Zach [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), 51170 Köln (Germany); Bednarcik, Jozef [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kruzic, Jamie J. [Material Science, School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T{sub g}. The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure.

  2. Introduction to Film.

    Burns, Gary

    There are numerous ways to structure the introduction to film course so as to meet the needs of the different types of students who typically enroll. Assuming there is no production component in the course, the teacher is left with two major approaches to choose from--historical and aesthetic. The units in the course will typically be built around…

  3. CNA web server: rigidity theory-based thermal unfolding simulations of proteins for linking structure, (thermo-)stability, and function.

    Krüger, Dennis M; Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Pfleger, Christopher; Gohlke, Holger

    2013-07-01

    The Constraint Network Analysis (CNA) web server provides a user-friendly interface to the CNA approach developed in our laboratory for linking results from rigidity analyses to biologically relevant characteristics of a biomolecular structure. The CNA web server provides a refined modeling of thermal unfolding simulations that considers the temperature dependence of hydrophobic tethers and computes a set of global and local indices for quantifying biomacromolecular stability. From the global indices, phase transition points are identified where the structure switches from a rigid to a floppy state; these phase transition points can be related to a protein's (thermo-)stability. Structural weak spots (unfolding nuclei) are automatically identified, too; this knowledge can be exploited in data-driven protein engineering. The local indices are useful in linking flexibility and function and to understand the impact of ligand binding on protein flexibility. The CNA web server robustly handles small-molecule ligands in general. To overcome issues of sensitivity with respect to the input structure, the CNA web server allows performing two ensemble-based variants of thermal unfolding simulations. The web server output is provided as raw data, plots and/or Jmol representations. The CNA web server, accessible at http://cpclab.uni-duesseldorf.de/cna or http://www.cnanalysis.de, is free and open to all users with no login requirement.

  4. Cyclen-based double-tailed lipids for DNA delivery: Synthesis and the effect of linking group structures.

    Zhang, Yi-Mei; Chang, De-Chun; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Yan-Hong; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-09-01

    The gene transfection efficiency (TE) of cationic lipids is largely influenced by the lipid structure. Six novel 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen)-based cationic lipids L1-L6, which contain double oleyl as hydrophobic tails, were designed and synthesized. The difference between these lipids is their diverse backbone. Liposomes prepared by the lipids and DOPE showed good DNA affinity, and full DNA condensation could be achieved at N/P of 4 to form lipoplexes with proper size and zeta-potentials for gene transfection. Structure-activity relationship of these lipids as non-viral gene delivery vectors was investigated. It was found that minor backbone structural variations, including linking group and the structural symmetry would affect the TE. The diethylenetriamine derived lipid L4 containing amide linking bonds gave the best TE, which was several times higher than commercially available transfection reagent lipofectamine 2000. Besides, these lipids exhibited low cytotoxicity, suggesting their good biocompatibility. Results reveal that such type of cationic lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, and also afford us clues for the design of novel vectors with higher TE and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry for protein structural modeling

    Back, Jaap Willem; de Jong, Luitzen; Muijsers, Anton O.; de Koster, Chris G.

    2003-01-01

    The growth of gene and protein sequence information is currently so rapid that three-dimensional structural information is lacking for the overwhelming majority of known proteins. In this review, efforts towards rapid and sensitive methods for protein structural characterization are described,

  6. The Effect of Knowledge Linking Levels in Biology Lessons upon Students' Knowledge Structure

    Wadouh, Julia; Liu, Ning; Sandmann, Angela; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge structure is an important aspect for defining students' competency in biology learning, but how knowledge structure is influenced by the teaching process in naturalistic biology classroom settings has scarcely been empirically investigated. In this study, 49 biology lessons in the teaching unit "blood and circulatory system" in…

  7. The link between the cognitive structure and modelling to improve mathematics education

    van de Weerd, Laura; Verhoef, Neeltje Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the aspects in the cognitive structure that should be trained to develop Dutch students modelling without actual modelling lessons. The research used 16 fifth-grade beta coursed students, to study the development of the cognitive structure and its relation to modelling. The

  8. Links between nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy; Structuration des liens entre medecine nucleaire et radiopharmacie

    Pelegrin, M. [Inserm, U896, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier (IRCM), universite Montpellier 1, 34 - Montpellier (France); Francois-Joubert, A. [Service de medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambery (France); Chassel, M.L. [Radiopharmacie, service de pharmacie, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambrry (France); Desruet, M.D. [Service de radiopharmacie et service pharmaceutique, clinique universitaire de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Grenoble, 38 - Grenoble (France); Bolot, C. [Service de radiopharmacie, service pharmaceutique, centre de medecine nucleaire, groupement hospitalier Est, 69 - Bron (France); Lao, S. [Service de radiopharmacie, medecine nucleaire, hopital de l' Archet, 06 - Nice (France)

    2010-11-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are nowadays under the responsibility of the radio-pharmacist because of their medicinal product status. Radiopharmacy belongs to the hospital pharmacy department, nevertheless, interactions with nuclear medicine department are important: rooms are included or located near nuclear medicine departments in order to respect radiation protection rules, more over staff, a part of the material and some activities are shared between the two departments. Consequently, it seems essential to formalize links between the radiopharmacy and the nuclear medicine department, setting the goals to avoid conflicts and to ensure patients' security. Modalities chosen for this formalization will depend on the establishment's organization. (authors)

  9. Time Spent on Dedicated Patient Care and Documentation Tasks Before and After the Introduction of a Structured and Standardized Electronic Health Record.

    Joukes, Erik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Cornet, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2018-01-01

    Physicians spend around 35% of their time documenting patient data. They are concerned that adopting a structured and standardized electronic health record (EHR) will lead to more time documenting and less time for patient care, especially during consultations. This study measures the effect of the introduction of a structured and standardized EHR on documentation time and time for dedicated patient care during outpatient consultations. We measured physicians' time spent on four task categories during outpatient consultations: documentation, patient care, peer communication, and other activities. Physicians covered various specialties from two university hospitals that jointly implemented a structured and standardized EHR. Preimplementation, one hospital used a legacy-EHR, and one primarily paper-based records. The same physicians were observed 2 to 6 months before and 6 to 8 months after implementation.We analyzed consultation duration, and percentage of time spent on each task category. Differences in time distribution before and after implementation were tested using multilevel linear regression. We observed 24 physicians (162 hours, 439 consultations). We found no significant difference in consultation duration or number of consultations per hour. In the legacy-EHR center, we found the implementation associated with a significant decrease in time spent on dedicated patient care (-8.5%). In contrast, in the previously paper-based center, we found a significant increase in dedicated time spent on documentation (8.3%) and decrease in time on combined patient care and documentation (-4.6%). The effect on dedicated documentation time significantly differed between centers. Implementation of a structured and standardized EHR was associated with 8.5% decrease in time for dedicated patient care during consultations in one center and 8.3% increase in dedicated documentation time in another center. These results are in line with physicians' concerns that the introduction

  10. Linked data management

    Hose, Katja; Schenkel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Linked Data Management presents techniques for querying and managing Linked Data that is available on today’s Web. The book shows how the abundance of Linked Data can serve as fertile ground for research and commercial applications. The text focuses on aspects of managing large-scale collections of Linked Data. It offers a detailed introduction to Linked Data and related standards, including the main principles distinguishing Linked Data from standard database technology. Chapters also describe how to generate links between datasets and explain the overall architecture of data integration systems based on Linked Data. A large part of the text is devoted to query processing in different setups. After presenting methods to publish relational data as Linked Data and efficient centralized processing, the book explores lookup-based, distributed, and parallel solutions. It then addresses advanced topics, such as reasoning, and discusses work related to read-write Linked Data for system interoperation. Desp...

  11. Review of English Language Library and Information Science Weblogs: Analyzing the Link between Weblog Types and Their Technical /Content Structure

    Tahereh Karami

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Weblog has become well established as one of the Web 2.0 products. Given the essential nature of their job, librarians and information professionals, can use weblog as a quick and easy mean for information and knowledge sharing. The present study reviews some 150 LIS weblogs in order to examine and analyze the link between weblog types (personal, library-owned or group operated with their content and technical structure. Webometric methods were deployed for selection of the sample. The findings indicated that there is a significant correlation between the weblog types and their update frequency. The same holds between the weblog types and their content. But no such significance was observed with respect to the weblog publishing tools. The investigators believe that the links uncovered could also hold true for Iranian LIS weblogs.

  12. Introduction to abstract algebra

    Nicholson, W Keith

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Third Edition ". . . an expository masterpiece of the highest didactic value that has gained additional attractivity through the various improvements . . ."-Zentralblatt MATH The Fourth Edition of Introduction to Abstract Algebra continues to provide an accessible approach to the basic structures of abstract algebra: groups, rings, and fields. The book's unique presentation helps readers advance to abstract theory by presenting concrete examples of induction, number theory, integers modulo n, and permutations before the abstract structures are defined. Readers can immediately be

  13. Test-Retest Intervisit Variability of Functional and Structural Parameters in X-Linked Retinoschisis.

    Jeffrey, Brett G; Cukras, Catherine A; Vitale, Susan; Turriff, Amy; Bowles, Kristin; Sieving, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    To examine the variability of four outcome measures that could be used to address safety and efficacy in therapeutic trials with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. Seven men with confirmed mutations in the RS1 gene were evaluated over four visits spanning 6 months. Assessments included visual acuity, full-field electroretinograms (ERG), microperimetric macular sensitivity, and retinal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Eyes were separated into Better or Worse Eye groups based on acuity at baseline. Repeatability coefficients were calculated for each parameter and jackknife resampling used to derive 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The threshold for statistically significant change in visual acuity ranged from three to eight letters. For ERG a-wave, an amplitude reduction greater than 56% would be considered significant. For other parameters, variabilities were lower in the Worse Eye group, likely a result of floor effects due to collapse of the schisis pockets and/or retinal atrophy. The criteria for significant change (Better/Worse Eye) for three important parameters were: ERG b/a-wave ratio (0.44/0.23), point wise sensitivity (10.4/7.0 dB), and central retinal thickness (31%/18%). The 95% CI range for visual acuity, ERG, retinal sensitivity, and central retinal thickness relative to baseline are described for this cohort of participants with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS). A quantitative understanding of the variability of outcome measures is vital to establishing the safety and efficacy limits for therapeutic trials of XLRS patients.

  14. Leisure activities are linked to mental health benefits by providing time structure: comparing employed, unemployed and homemakers.

    Goodman, William K; Geiger, Ashley M; Wolf, Jutta M

    2017-01-01

    Unemployment has consistently been linked to negative mental health outcomes, emphasising the need to characterise the underlying mechanisms. The current study aimed at testing whether compared with other employment groups, fewer leisure activities observed in unemployment may contribute to elevated risk for negative mental health via loss of time structure. Depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression), leisure activities (exercise, self-focused, social), and time structure (Time Structure Questionnaire (TSQ)) were assessed cross-sectionally in 406 participants (unemployed=155, employed=140, homemakers=111) recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Controlling for gender and age, structural equation modelling revealed time structure partially (employed, homemakers) and fully (unemployed) mediated the relationship between leisure activities and depressive symptoms. With the exception of differential effects for structured routines, all other TSQ factors (sense of purpose, present orientation, effective organisation and persistence) contributed significantly to all models. These findings support the idea that especially for the unemployed, leisure activities impose their mental health benefits through increasing individuals' perception of spending their time effectively. Social leisure activities that provide a sense of daily structure may thereby be a particularly promising low-cost intervention to improve mental health in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Introduction to magnetochemistry

    Earnshaw, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Magnetochemistry provides an introduction to the more important aspects of magnetochemistry. The measurement of magnetic moment has been one of the most consistently useful to coordination chemists. For teaching purposes it provides a simple method of illustrating the ideas of electronic structure, and in research it can provide fundamental information about the bonding and stereochemistry of complexes. The book contains six chapters covering topics such as free atoms and ions, transition metal complexes, crystal field theory, second and third row transition metal complexes, a

  16. Introduction to quantum groups

    Chaichian, Masud

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade there has been an extemely rapid growth in the interest and development of quantum group theory.This book provides students and researchers with a practical introduction to the principal ideas of quantum groups theory and its applications to quantum mechanical and modern field theory problems. It begins with a review of, and introduction to, the mathematical aspects of quantum deformation of classical groups, Lie algebras and related objects (algebras of functions on spaces, differential and integral calculi). In the subsequent chapters the richness of mathematical structure

  17. Small vessel disease is linked to disrupted structural network covariance in Alzheimer's disease.

    Nestor, Sean M; Mišić, Bratislav; Ramirez, Joel; Zhao, Jiali; Graham, Simon J; Verhoeff, Nicolaas P L G; Stuss, Donald T; Masellis, Mario; Black, Sandra E

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) through abnormalities in white matter networks. Gray matter (GM) hub covariance networks share only partial overlap with white matter connectivity, and their relationship with SVD has not been examined in AD. We developed a multivariate analytical pipeline to elucidate the cortical GM thickness systems that covary with major network hubs and assessed whether SVD and neurodegenerative pathologic markers were associated with attenuated covariance network integrity in mild AD and normal elderly control subjects. SVD burden was associated with reduced posterior cingulate corticocortical GM network integrity and subneocorticocortical hub network integrity in AD. These findings provide evidence that SVD is linked to the selective disruption of cortical hub GM networks in AD brains and point to the need to consider GM hub covariance networks when assessing network disruption in mixed disease. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biophysics an introduction

    Cotteril, Rodney

    2002-01-01

    Biophysics: An Introduction, is a concise balanced introduction to this subject. Written in an accessible and readable style, the book takes a fresh, modern approach with the author successfully combining key concepts and theory with relevant applications and examples drawn from the field as a whole. Beginning with a brief introduction to the origins of biophysics, the book takes the reader through successive levels of complexity, from atoms to molecules, structures, systems and ultimately to the behaviour of organisms. The book also includes extensive coverage of biopolymers, biomembranes, biological energy, and nervous systems. The text not only explores basic ideas, but also discusses recent developments, such as protein folding, DNA/RNA conformations, molecular motors, optical tweezers and the biological origins of consciousness and intelligence.

  19. In vitro reconstitution of sortase-catalyzed pilus polymerization reveals structural elements involved in pilin cross-linking.

    Chang, Chungyu; Amer, Brendan R; Osipiuk, Jerzy; McConnell, Scott A; Huang, I-Hsiu; Hsieh, Van; Fu, Janine; Nguyen, Hong H; Muroski, John; Flores, Erika; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Loo, Joseph A; Putkey, John A; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Clubb, Robert T; Ton-That, Hung

    2018-06-12

    Covalently cross-linked pilus polymers displayed on the cell surface of Gram-positive bacteria are assembled by class C sortase enzymes. These pilus-specific transpeptidases located on the bacterial membrane catalyze a two-step protein ligation reaction, first cleaving the LPXTG motif of one pilin protomer to form an acyl-enzyme intermediate and then joining the terminal Thr to the nucleophilic Lys residue residing within the pilin motif of another pilin protomer. To date, the determinants of class C enzymes that uniquely enable them to construct pili remain unknown. Here, informed by high-resolution crystal structures of corynebacterial pilus-specific sortase (SrtA) and utilizing a structural variant of the enzyme (SrtA 2M ), whose catalytic pocket has been unmasked by activating mutations, we successfully reconstituted in vitro polymerization of the cognate major pilin (SpaA). Mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and biochemical experiments authenticated that SrtA 2M synthesizes pilus fibers with correct Lys-Thr isopeptide bonds linking individual pilins via a thioacyl intermediate. Structural modeling of the SpaA-SrtA-SpaA polymerization intermediate depicts SrtA 2M sandwiched between the N- and C-terminal domains of SpaA harboring the reactive pilin and LPXTG motifs, respectively. Remarkably, the model uncovered a conserved TP(Y/L)XIN(S/T)H signature sequence following the catalytic Cys, in which the alanine substitutions abrogated cross-linking activity but not cleavage of LPXTG. These insights and our evidence that SrtA 2M can terminate pilus polymerization by joining the terminal pilin SpaB to SpaA and catalyze ligation of isolated SpaA domains in vitro provide a facile and versatile platform for protein engineering and bio-conjugation that has major implications for biotechnology.

  20. The link between capital structure and banking sector performance in an emerging economy

    Refilwe Maduane

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available South African banks are small compared to the international standards and this necessitates them to remain efficient and competitive at both national and international levels. Such competitiveness shelter them from global competitors wishing to enter into the South African market. Putting in mind the critical role played by banks in the economic development of every country, managers in the banking industry should ensure they make sound financial decisions in order to remain profitable and competitive amidst challenges of the debt-equity choice. This study seeks to determine the influence of capital structure on profitability of banks listed at the Johannesburg stock exchange (JSE using the random effect regression model. Empirical studies that studies the impact of capital structure on profitability of the banking sector in emerging markets and Africa are very scant. The few empirical studies that focused on the banking sector are yet to focus on African and to agree on the relationship between capital structure and profitability. It is against these reasons that the current study chose to investigate how profitability of South African banks is affected by their capital structure. The study found out that capital structure is a key determinant of profitability of banks in South Africa. As such, the study recommends that optimal capital policies need to be pursued if banks are to not only to increase profitability but ensure long term stability and sound performance

  1. Linking Resource-Based Strategies to Customer-Focused Performance for Professional Services: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    Ming-Lu Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper links professional service firms’ resource-based strategies to their customer-focused performance for formulating service quality improvement priorities. The research applies the structural equation modelling approach to survey data from Hong Kong construction consultants to test some hypotheses. The study validates the various measures of firms’ resource-based strategies and customer-focused performance and bridges the gaps in firms’ organizational learning, core competences and customer-focused performance mediated by their strategic flexibility. The research results have practical implications for professional service firms to deploy resources appropriately to first enhance different competences and then improve customerfocused performance using their different competences.

  2. Comparison of Assemblies of Four-Link Structural Groups of 3rd Class on the Transmission Angle

    Matsyuk I.N.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of various assemblies of four-link structural group of 3rd class with revolute joints on the transmission angle is performed. Equations of the trajectories of plug points of one of the groups of joint are obtained to determine transmission angles. Derived functions of these equations enable to determine the values of transmission angles for each assembly group. It is shown that only two assemblies of maximum possible assembling number of such group (six have practical value. The solution of this problem was performed with the help of Mathcad program.

  3. Ethyne-linked push-pull chromophores: implications of crystal structure and molecular electronics on the quadric nonlinear activity

    Kautny, P.; Kriegner, H.; Bader, D.; Dušek, Michal; Reider, G.A.; Froehlich, J.; Stoeger, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 8 (2017), s. 4124-4136 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12653S; GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ethyne-linked materials * nonlinear optical chromophores * molecular structure * optical activity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2016

  4. NMR solution structure of poliovirus uridylyated peptide linked to the genome (VPgpU)

    Schein, Catherine H.; Oezguen, Numan; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Filippov, Dmitri V.; Paul, Aniko; Kumar, Eric; Braun, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Picornaviruses have a 22–24 amino acid peptide, VPg, bound covalently at the 5’ end of their RNA, that is essential for replication. VPgs are uridylylated at a conserved Tyrosine to form VPgpU, the primer of RNA synthesis by the viral polymerase. This first complete structure for any uridylylated VPg, of poliovirus type 1 (PV1)-VPgpU, shows that conserved amino acids in VPg stabilize the bound UMP, with the uridine atoms involved in base pairing and chain elongation projected outward. Comparing this structure to PV1-VPg and partial structures of VPg/VPgpU from other picornaviruses suggests that enteroviral polymerases require a more stable VPg structure than does the distantly related aphthovirus, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). The glutamine residue at the C-terminus of PV1-VPgpU lies in back of the uridine base and may stabilize its position during chain elongation and/or contribute to base specificity. Under in vivo-like conditions with the authentic cre(2C) hairpin RNA and Mg++, 5-methylUTP cannot compete with UTP for VPg uridylyation in an in vitro uridylyation assay, but both nucleotides are equally incorporated by PV1-polymerase with Mn++ and a poly-A RNA template. This indicates the 5 position is recognized under in vivo conditions. The compact VPgpU structure docks within the active site cavity of the PV-polymerase, close to the position seen for the fragment of FMDV-VPgpU with its polymerase. This structure could aid in design of novel enterovirus inhibitors, and stabilization upon uridylylation may also be pertinent for post-translational uridylylation reactions that underlie other biological processes. PMID:20441784

  5. Constraint Network Analysis (CNA): a Python software package for efficiently linking biomacromolecular structure, flexibility, (thermo-)stability, and function.

    Pfleger, Christopher; Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Klein, Doris L; Radestock, Sebastian; Gohlke, Holger

    2013-04-22

    For deriving maximal advantage from information on biomacromolecular flexibility and rigidity, results from rigidity analyses must be linked to biologically relevant characteristics of a structure. Here, we describe the Python-based software package Constraint Network Analysis (CNA) developed for this task. CNA functions as a front- and backend to the graph-based rigidity analysis software FIRST. CNA goes beyond the mere identification of flexible and rigid regions in a biomacromolecule in that it (I) provides a refined modeling of thermal unfolding simulations that also considers the temperature-dependence of hydrophobic tethers, (II) allows performing rigidity analyses on ensembles of network topologies, either generated from structural ensembles or by using the concept of fuzzy noncovalent constraints, and (III) computes a set of global and local indices for quantifying biomacromolecular stability. This leads to more robust results from rigidity analyses and extends the application domain of rigidity analyses in that phase transition points ("melting points") and unfolding nuclei ("structural weak spots") are determined automatically. Furthermore, CNA robustly handles small-molecule ligands in general. Such advancements are important for applying rigidity analysis to data-driven protein engineering and for estimating the influence of ligand molecules on biomacromolecular stability. CNA maintains the efficiency of FIRST such that the analysis of a single protein structure takes a few seconds for systems of several hundred residues on a single core. These features make CNA an interesting tool for linking biomacromolecular structure, flexibility, (thermo-)stability, and function. CNA is available from http://cpclab.uni-duesseldorf.de/software for nonprofit organizations.

  6. History as Modernity. Introduction

    Pierangelo Schiera

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction starts from the exhaustion of modernity, drawing the fundamental lines of its development inside Western historical experience. The end of the political nexus between theology and politics, the evanescence of nation-state sovereignty, the check of great historical interpretations reveal the necessity of new categories and new organizational models, able to make us answer to the violence that the ongoing processes are liberating. Schiera underlines in particular the relevance of the administrative apparatus because of its capacity to link the global government with global organization, human rights and the commons.

  7. High Energy Moisture Characteristics: Linking Between Soil Physical Processes and Structure Stability

    Water storage and flow in soils is usually complicated by the intricate nature of and changes in soil pore size distribution (PSD) due to modifications in soil structure following changes in agricultural management. The paper presents the Soil High Energy Moisture Characteristic (Soil-HEMC) method f...

  8. Structure Activity Relationships of N-linked and Diglycosylated Glucosamine-Based Antitumor Glycerolipids

    Makanjuola Ogunsina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 1-O-Hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-3-O-(2'-amino-2'-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (1 was previously reported to show potent in vitro antitumor activity on a range of cancer cell lines derived from breast, pancreas and prostate cancer. This compound was not toxic to mice and was inactive against breast tumor xenografts in mice. This inactivity was attributed to hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkage by glycosidases. Here three N-linked (glycosylamide analogs 2–4, one triazole-linked analog 5 of 1 as well as two diglycosylated analogs 6 and 7 with different stereochemistry at the C2-position of the glycerol moiety were synthesized and their antitumor activity against breast (JIMT-1, BT-474, MDA-MB-231, pancreas (MiaPaCa2 and prostrate (DU145, PC3 cancer cell lines was determined. The diglycosylated analogs 1-O-hexadecyl-2(R-, 3-O-di-(2'-amino-2'-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (7 and the 1:1 diastereomeric mixture of 1-O-hexadecyl-2(R/S, 3-O-di-(2'-amino-2'-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl-sn-glycerol (6 showed the most potent cytotoxic activity at CC50 values of 17.5 µM against PC3 cell lines. The replacement of the O-glycosidic linkage by a glycosylamide or a glycosyltriazole linkage showed little or no activity at highest concentration tested (30 µM, whereas the replacement of the glycerol moiety by triazole resulted in CC50 values in the range of 20 to 30 µM. In conclusion, the replacement of the O-glycosidic linkage by an N-glycosidic linkage or triazole-linkage resulted in about a two to three fold loss in activity, whereas the replacement of the methoxy group on the glycerol backbone by a second glucosamine moiety did not improve the activity. The stereochemistry at the C2-position of the glycero backbone has minimal effect on the anticancer activities of these diglycosylated analogs.

  9. Structural characterization of complex O-linked glycans from insect-derived material.

    Garenaux, Estelle; Maes, Emmanuel; Levêque, S; Brassart, Colette; Guerardel, Yann

    2011-07-01

    Although insects are among the most diverse groups of the animal kingdom and may be found in nearly all environments, one can observe an obvious lack of structural data on their glycosylation ability. Hymenoptera is the second largest of all insect orders with more than 110,000 identified species and includes the most famous examples of social insects' species such as wasps, bees and ants. In this report, the structural variety of O-glycans has been studied in two Hymenoptera species. In a previous study, we showed that major O-glycans from common wasp (Vespula germanica) salivary mucins correspond to T and Tn antigen, eventually substituted by phosphoethanolamine or phosphate groups. More detailed structural analysis performed by mass spectrometry revealed numerous minor O-glycan structures bearing Gal, GlcNAc, GalNAc and Fuc residues. Thus, in order to investigate glycosylation diversity in insects, we used common wasp nest (V. germanica) and hornet nest (Vespa cabro) as starting materials. These materials were submitted to reductive β-elimination and the released oligosaccharide-alditols further fractionated by multidimensional HPLC. Tandem mass spectrometry analyses combined with NMR data revealed the presence of various families of complex O-glycans differing accordingly to both core structures and external motifs. Glycans from wasp were characterized by the presence of core types 1 and 2, Lewis X and internal Gal-Gal motifs. We also observed unusual O-glycans containing a reducing GalNAc unit directly substituted by a fucose residue. In contrast, hornet O-glycans appeared as a rather homogeneous family of core 1 type O-glycans extended by galactose oligomers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The application of a mathematical model linking structural and functional connectomes in severe brain injury

    A. Kuceyeski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following severe injuries that result in disorders of consciousness, recovery can occur over many months or years post-injury. While post-injury synaptogenesis, axonal sprouting and functional reorganization are known to occur, the network-level processes underlying recovery are poorly understood. Here, we test a network-level functional rerouting hypothesis in recovery of patients with disorders of consciousness following severe brain injury. This hypothesis states that the brain recovers from injury by restoring normal functional connections via alternate structural pathways that circumvent impaired white matter connections. The so-called network diffusion model, which relates an individual's structural and functional connectomes by assuming that functional activation diffuses along structural pathways, is used here to capture this functional rerouting. We jointly examined functional and structural connectomes extracted from MRIs of 12 healthy and 16 brain-injured subjects. Connectome properties were quantified via graph theoretic measures and network diffusion model parameters. While a few graph metrics showed groupwise differences, they did not correlate with patients' level of consciousness as measured by the Coma Recovery Scale — Revised. There was, however, a strong and significant partial Pearson's correlation (accounting for age and years post-injury between level of consciousness and network diffusion model propagation time (r = 0.76, p < 0.05, corrected, i.e. the time functional activation spends traversing the structural network. We concluded that functional rerouting via alternate (and less efficient pathways leads to increases in network diffusion model propagation time. Simulations of injury and recovery in healthy connectomes confirmed these results. This work establishes the feasibility for using the network diffusion model to capture network-level mechanisms in recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury.

  11. Data transmission optical link for LLRF TESLA project part I: hardware structure of OPT0 module

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Olowski, Krzysztof; Perkuszewski, Karol; Zielinski, Jerzy; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof

    2006-03-01

    It may be predicted now, even assuming a very conservative approach, that the next generation of the Low Level RF control systems for future accelerators will use extensively such technologies like: very fast programmable circuits equipped with DSP, embedded PC and optical communication I/O functionalities, as well as multi-gigabit optical transmission of measurement data and control signals. The paper presents the idea and realization of a gigabit synchronous data distributor designed to work in the LLRF control system of TESLA technology based X-ray FEL. The design bases on a relatively simple and cheap FPGA chip Cyclone. Commercially available SERDES (serializer/deserializer) and optical transceiver chips were applied. The optoelectronic module is embedded on the main LLRF BMB (backbone mother board). The MB provides communication with the outside computer control system, programmable chip configuration, integration with other functional modules and power supply. The hardware implementation is here described and the used software for BER (bit-error-rate) testing of the multi-gigabit optical link. The measurement results are presented. The appendix contains a comparison between the available protocols of serial data transmission for FPGA technology. This paper is a partial contribution to the next version of the SIMCON system which is expected to be released this year. The SIMCON, ver 3.0 will contain 8 channels and multi-gigabit optical transmission capability. It will be a fully modular construction.

  12. Linking lowermost mantle structure, core-mantle boundary heat flux and mantle plume formation

    Li, Mingming; Zhong, Shijie; Olson, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of Earth's lowermost mantle exert significant control on the formation of mantle plumes and the core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux. However, it is not clear if and how the variation of CMB heat flux and mantle plume activity are related. Here, we perform geodynamic model experiments that show how temporal variations in CMB heat flux and pulses of mantle plumes are related to morphologic changes of the thermochemical piles of large-scale compositional heterogeneities in Earth's lowermost mantle, represented by the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). We find good correlation between the morphologic changes of the thermochemical piles and the time variation of CMB heat flux. The morphology of the thermochemical piles is significantly altered during the initiation and ascent of strong mantle plumes, and the changes in pile morphology cause variations in the local and the total CMB heat flux. Our modeling results indicate that plume-induced episodic variations of CMB heat flux link geomagnetic superchrons to pulses of surface volcanism, although the relative timing of these two phenomena remains problematic. We also find that the density distribution in thermochemical piles is heterogeneous, and that the piles are denser on average than the surrounding mantle when both thermal and chemical effects are included.

  13. Jazz of physics the secret link between music and the structure of the Universe

    Alexander, Stephon

    2016-01-01

    More than fifty years ago, John Coltrane drew the twelve musical notes in a circle and connected them by straight lines, forming a five-pointed star. Inspired by Einstein, Coltrane had put physics and geometry at the core of his music. Physicist and jazz musician Stephon Alexander returns the favor, using jazz to answer physics’ most vexing questions about the past and future of the universe. Following the great minds that first drew the links between music and physics—a list including Pythagoras, Kepler, Newton, Einstein, and Rakim—The Jazz of Physics revisits the ancient realm where music, physics, and the cosmos were one. This cosmological journey accompanies Alexander’s own tale of struggling to reconcile his passion for music and physics, from taking music lessons as a boy in the Bronx to studying theoretical physics at Imperial College, London’s inner sanctum of string theory. Playing the saxophone and improvising with equations, Alexander uncovered the connection between the fundamental wave...

  14. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action.

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  15. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens. PMID:27625608

  16. Vacuum structure revealed by over-improved stout-link smearing compared with the overlap analysis for quenched QCD

    Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Leinweber, D.; Moran, P.; Koller, K.; Weinberg, V.; Freie Univ. Berlin

    2008-01-01

    A detailed comparison is made between the topological structure of quenched QCD as revealed by the recently proposed over-improved stout-link smearing in conjunction with an improved gluonic definition of the topological density on one hand and a similar analysis made possible by the overlap-fermionic topological charge density both with and without variable ultraviolet cutoff λ cut . The matching is twofold, provided by fitting the density-density two-point functions on one hand and by a point-by-point fitting of the topological densities according to the two methods. We point out the similar cluster structure of the topological density for moderate smearing and 200 MeV cut <600 MeV, respectively. We demonstrate the relation of the gluonic topological density for extensive smearing to the location of the overlap zero modes and the lowest overlap non-zero mode as found for the unsmeared configurations. (orig.)

  17. Vacuum structure revealed by over-improved stout-link smearing compared with the overlap analysis for quenched QCD

    Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Leinweber, D.; Moran, P. [Adelaide Univ., SA (AU). Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM); Koller, K. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Sektion Physik; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Weinberg, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-01-11

    A detailed comparison is made between the topological structure of quenched QCD as revealed by the recently proposed over-improved stout-link smearing in conjunction with an improved gluonic definition of the topological density on one hand and a similar analysis made possible by the overlap-fermionic topological charge density both with and without variable ultraviolet cutoff {lambda}{sub cut}. The matching is twofold, provided by fitting the density-density two-point functions on one hand and by a point-by-point fitting of the topological densities according to the two methods. We point out the similar cluster structure of the topological density for moderate smearing and 200 MeV<{lambda}{sub cut}<600 MeV, respectively. We demonstrate the relation of the gluonic topological density for extensive smearing to the location of the overlap zero modes and the lowest overlap non-zero mode as found for the unsmeared configurations. (orig.)

  18. Chemical structure, biosynthesis and synthesis of free and glycosylated pyridinolines formed by cross-link of bone and synovium collagen.

    Anastasia, Luigi; Rota, Paola; Anastasia, Mario; Allevi, Pietro

    2013-09-21

    This review focuses on the chemical structure, biosynthesis and synthesis of free and glycosylated pyridinolines (Pyds), fluorescent collagen cross-links, with a pyridinium salt structure. Pyds derive from the degradation of bone collagen and have attracted attention for their use as biochemical markers of bone resorption and to assess fracture risk prediction in persons suffering from osteoporosis, bone cancer and other bone or collagen diseases. We consider and critically discuss all reported syntheses of free and glycosylated Pyds evidencing an unrevised chemistry, original and of general utility, analysis of which allows us to also support a previously suggested non-enzymatic formation of Pyds in collagen better rationalizing and justifying the chemical events.

  19. Linking didactics and research in instructional material: A new structural model

    Graf, Stefan Ting

    2009-01-01

    How can research in instructional materials become more relevant for didactics and instruction planning? And how can general didactics reflect questions developed from a media perspective. These are the guiding questions of the article, which assumes a gap between general didactics and research...... and theory of instructional material. General didactics does not sufficiently incorporate a theory of media, and research and theory in instructional material do not recognise general didactics and apply very different conceptions of instruction in their studies – if at all. Through two approaches we argue...... for a new basic structure in didactics in order to bridge the gap when relevant conclusions for pragmatic didactics are in question. The first approach accounts for the place and status of media in the most known structural theories in general didactics. The second approach argues from another angle...

  20. Intellectual capital disclosure and corporate governance structure among Malaysian government-linked companies

    Rashidah Abdul Rahman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the level of intellectual capital disclosure among the 32 Malaysian GLCs by comparing with the Non-GLCs for the period 2007-2009. In addition, this study also investigates the impact of board structure on the intellectual capital disclosure of Malaysian GLCs. The board structure mechanisms comprise; board composition, role duality, board size and cross directorship. The control variables consist of the company-specific characteristics –leverage, profitability and age of the company. The content analysis is used to extract the intellectual capital disclosure items from the annual report. The results show that the GLCs disclosed more intellectual capital information than Non-GLCs. Board size and leverage are significant and positively related to the intellectual capital disclosure of Malaysian GLCs.

  1. Balanced translocation linked to psychiatric disorder, glutamate, and cortical structure/function

    Thomson, Pippa A; Duff, Barbara; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Romaniuk, Liana; Watson, Andrew; Whalley, Heather C; Li, Xiang; Dauvermann, Maria R; Moorhead, T William J; Bois, Catherine; Ryan, Niamh M; Redpath, Holly; Hall, Lynsey; Morris, Stewart W; van Beek, Edwin J R

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic variants of large effect can help elucidate the pathophysiology of brain disorders. Here we expand the clinical and genetic analyses of a family with a (1;11)(q42;q14.3) translocation multiply affected by major psychiatric illness and test the effect of the translocation on the structure and function of prefrontal, and temporal brain regions. The translocation showed significant linkage (LOD score 6.1) with a clinical phenotype that included schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorde...

  2. Carotenoid-bearing structures in fruit chromoplasts of Solatium capsicastrum Link.

    Ljubešić, Nikola; Wrischer, Mercedes; Prebeg, Tatjana; Brkić, Dragomir

    2001-01-01

    The fine structure, pigment content and protein profile of chromoplasts in fruit of Solatium capsicastrum were studied during the various stages of ripening. Plastid metamorphosis is synchronized with the disappearance of chlorophylls and intense synthesis of carotenoids. The chloro-chromoplasts observed in the first stages of fruit ripening accumulated large groups of plastoglobules. As the ripening process proceeded, the plastoglobules transformed into small crystalloids and tubules. In red...

  3. Remote sensing of Essential Biodiversity Variables: new measurements linking ecosystem structure, function and composition

    Schimel, D.; Pavlick, R.; Stavros, E. N.; Townsend, P. A.; Ustin, S.; Thompson, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing can inform a wide variety of essential biodiversity variables, including measurements that define primary productivity, forest structure, biome distribution, plant communities, land use-land cover change and climate drivers of change. Emerging remote sensing technologies can add significantly to remote sensing of EBVs, providing new, large scale insights on plant and habitat diversity itself, as well as causes and consequences of biodiversity change. All current biodiversity assessments identify major data gaps, with insufficient coverage in critical regions, limited observations to monitor change over time, with very limited revisit of sample locations, as well as taxon-specific biased biases. Remote sensing cannot fill many of the gaps in global biodiversity observations, but spectroscopic measurements in terrestrial and marine environments can aid in assessing plant/phytoplankton functional diversity and efficiently reveal patterns in space, as well as changes over time, and, by making use of chlorophyll fluorescence, reveal associated patterns in photosynthesis. LIDAR and RADAR measurements quantify ecosystem structure, and can precisely define changes due to growth, disturbance and land use. Current satellite-based EBVs have taken advantage of the extraordinary time series from LANDSAT and MODIS, but new measurements more directly reveal ecosystem structure, function and composition. We will present results from pre-space airborne studies showing the synergistic ability of a suite of new remote observation techniques to quantify biodiversity and ecosystem function and show how it changes during major disturbance events.

  4. Structure of superhard tungsten tetraboride: A missing link between MB2 and MB12 higher borides

    Lech, Andrew T.; Turner, Christopher L.; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Superhard metals are of interest as possible replacements with enhanced properties over the metal carbides commonly used in cutting, drilling, and wear-resistant tooling. Of the superhard metals, the highest boride of tungsten—often referred to as WB4 and sometimes as W1–xB3—is one of the most promising candidates. The structure of this boride, however, has never been fully resolved, despite the fact that it was discovered in 1961—a fact that severely limits our understanding of its structure–property relationships and has generated increasing controversy in the literature. Here, we present a new crystallographic model of this compound based on refinement against time-of-flight neutron diffraction data. Contrary to previous X-ray–only structural refinements, there is strong evidence for the presence of interstitial arrangements of boron atoms and polyhedral bonding. The formation of these polyhedra—slightly distorted boron cuboctahedra—appears to be dependent upon the defective nature of the tungsten-deficient metal sublattice. This previously unidentified structure type has an intermediary relationship between MB2 and MB12 type boride polymorphs. Manipulation of the fractionally occupied metal and boron sites may provide insight for the rational design of new superhard metals. PMID:25733870

  5. Attachment quality of children with ID and its link to maternal sensitivity and structuring.

    Feniger-Schaal, Rinat; Joels, Tirtsa

    2018-05-01

    Attachment theory produced a fertile field of research and clinical application. Although the topic of attachment of children with intellectual disability (ID) has received increasing research attention over the past 15 years, the empirical evidence is still limited. We applied theoretical and empirical knowledge of parenting typically developing children to examine the mother-child relationship in the ID population. The aim was to examine maternal sensitivity and structuring and its association with children's attachment classification and their disability. Forty preschool children (mean age 47.25, range 26-75 months) with non-specific ID and their mothers participated in the study. The mean developmental age was 25.92 months (SD = 10.89), The DQ mean score was 55.45 (SD = 17.28). We assessed children's quality of attachment using the SSP and maternal interactive behavior using the Emotional Availability Scales. Forty percent of children showed secure attachment, and 32.5% showed disorganized attachment. Attachment classifications correlated significantly with maternal sensitivity and maternal structuring but not with the child's cognitive disability. The results point to the importance of maternal interactive behavior for children with ID. Clinical implication may consider interventions aiming to enhance maternal sensitivity and structuring to improve children's quality of attachment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring protein dynamics space: the dynasome as the missing link between protein structure and function.

    Ulf Hensen

    Full Text Available Proteins are usually described and classified according to amino acid sequence, structure or function. Here, we develop a minimally biased scheme to compare and classify proteins according to their internal mobility patterns. This approach is based on the notion that proteins not only fold into recurring structural motifs but might also be carrying out only a limited set of recurring mobility motifs. The complete set of these patterns, which we tentatively call the dynasome, spans a multi-dimensional space with axes, the dynasome descriptors, characterizing different aspects of protein dynamics. The unique dynamic fingerprint of each protein is represented as a vector in the dynasome space. The difference between any two vectors, consequently, gives a reliable measure of the difference between the corresponding protein dynamics. We characterize the properties of the dynasome by comparing the dynamics fingerprints obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of 112 proteins but our approach is, in principle, not restricted to any specific source of data of protein dynamics. We conclude that: 1. the dynasome consists of a continuum of proteins, rather than well separated classes. 2. For the majority of proteins we observe strong correlations between structure and dynamics. 3. Proteins with similar function carry out similar dynamics, which suggests a new method to improve protein function annotation based on protein dynamics.

  7. Chemical cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol/cellulose nanocrystal composite films with high structural stability by spraying Fenton reagent as initiator.

    Song, Meili; Yu, Houyong; Gu, Jiping; Ye, Shounuan; Zhou, Yuwei

    2018-07-01

    Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composite films with high structural stability were prepared by free radical copolymerization between cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) and maleic anhydride (MAH) modified PVA through spraying Fenton free radical as initiator. The influence of chemical cross-linked and physical network structure on mechanical, thermal and water absorption properties of the composite films were investigated. Compared to PVA and PVA/CNC composite film, significant improvements in the mechanical, thermal and water uptake properties of the cross-linked composite film were found. The tensile strength of the cross-linked composite film was enhanced from 23.1MPa (neat PVA film) and 32.6MPa (PVA/CNC-10%) to 42.5MPa, and the maximum thermal degradation temperature was increased from 266.8°C and 281.2°C to 366.7°C (cross-linked composite film). Besides, the water absorption was reduced from 385.9% and 220.6% to 175.7% for cross-linked composite film. It indicates that compared with physical network structure in PVA/CNC composite film, the multiple cross-linked networks showed excellent thermal stability, resistance of water swelling and structural stability at the same CNC loading level. Thus, the PVA/CNC composite film with the multiple cross-linked network shows greater property reinforcements. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. LP-LPA: A link influence-based label propagation algorithm for discovering community structures in networks

    Berahmand, Kamal; Bouyer, Asgarali

    2018-03-01

    Community detection is an essential approach for analyzing the structural and functional properties of complex networks. Although many community detection algorithms have been recently presented, most of them are weak and limited in different ways. Label Propagation Algorithm (LPA) is a well-known and efficient community detection technique which is characterized by the merits of nearly-linear running time and easy implementation. However, LPA has some significant problems such as instability, randomness, and monster community detection. In this paper, an algorithm, namely node’s label influence policy for label propagation algorithm (LP-LPA) was proposed for detecting efficient community structures. LP-LPA measures link strength value for edges and nodes’ label influence value for nodes in a new label propagation strategy with preference on link strength and for initial nodes selection, avoid of random behavior in tiebreak states, and efficient updating order and rule update. These procedures can sort out the randomness issue in an original LPA and stabilize the discovered communities in all runs of the same network. Experiments on synthetic networks and a wide range of real-world social networks indicated that the proposed method achieves significant accuracy and high stability. Indeed, it can obviously solve monster community problem with regard to detecting communities in networks.

  9. Linking natural microstructures with numerical modeling of pinch-and-swell structures

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    For a variety of geological problems, the change from homogeneous to localized deformation and the establishment of steady-state conditions are equally important. Here, we show that pinch-and-swell structures are ideal candidates for the study of the switch in deformation style and mechanism during ductile creep. We present an interdisciplinary approach to the onset of pinch-and-swell structures and to the flow conditions during pre- to post-localization stages in ductile rocks. For this reason, naturally boudinaged calcite veins, embedded in a calc-mylonite, and their microfabrics were investigated quantitatively. Remnants of slightly deformed calcite hosts build up the swells, showing twinning and minor dislocation glide as crystal plastic deformation mechanisms which are accompanied by subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Towards the pinches, we find a gradient of severe grain size reduction through progressive SGR, developing a characteristic dislocation creep crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Along this gradient, the finest recrystallized calcite grains appear randomly oriented, expressed by a "smearing-out" of the CPO and missing systematics of misorientation angles in the most extended areas. We interpret this microstructure as a switch from dislocation dominated creep to grain boundary sliding processes. Further, we show that the onset of boudinage is independent on both the original orientation and grain size of calcite hosts. We implemented these microstructural observations into a layered elasto-visco-plastic finite element framework, tracing variations in grain size (Peters et al., 2015). We base the microstructural evolution on thermo-mechanical-chemical principles and end-member flow laws (Herwegh et al., 2014). The simulated pinch-and-swell structures indicate that low strain rates in the swells favor dislocation creep, whereas accelerated rates provoke continuous grain size reduction allowing strain accommodation by diffusion creep

  10. Investigating the link between fish community structure and environmental state in deep-time

    Sibert, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    In the modern ocean, a bottom-up ecological viewpoint posits that the composition of plankton communities is often a function of ambient oceanographic conditions, including nutrient concentrations and water temperature. Thus, certain plankton species or communities can be associated with specific oceanographic conditions, giving them potential as carriers of paleoceanographic information. Furthermore, consumer groups, such as fish, depend on the structure and composition of these plankton, and therefore different plankton communities will support different types of fish. In addition, fish have their own physiological constraints for surviving in particular environments, such as oxygen demand, and metabolic rate, causing certain clades to be selectively associated with different water mass characteristics. Thus, the relative or absolute abundances of different fish species or groups could shed light on shifting oxygen concentrations, temperature, or primary productivity in the past. To assess whether fish communities have sufficient environmental control to provide paleoceanographic insights, I use a variety of morphological, phylogenetic, and ecological statistical approaches, to correlate modern fish communities from around the world with environmental variables. I then apply these principles to a series of ichthyolith assemblages from the Cretaceous and Cenozoic, across both space and time, to assess whether fish community composition, abundance, or other characteristics can be predictive of ocean temperature or export productivity. I find that while the abundance of fish fossils in deep-sea cores is often, though not always, correlated with certain export production and temperature proxies, community composition appears to vary independently of these variables on long timescales, driven more by evolutionary processes. However, there are distinct differences in contemporary communities in different locations, suggesting that there is potential in using fish

  11. Linking interfacial chemistry of CO2 to surface structures of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles: hematite.

    Chernyshova, Irina V; Ponnurangam, Sathish; Somasundaran, Ponisseril

    2013-05-14

    A better understanding of interaction with dissolved CO2 is required to rationally design and model the (photo)catalytic and sorption processes on metal (hydr)oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous media. Using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, we address this problem for rhombohedral 38 nm hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a model. We not only resolve the structures of the adsorbed carbonate species, but also specify their adsorption sites and their location on the nanoparticle surface. The spectral relationships obtained present a basis for a new method of characterizing the microscopic structural and acid-base properties (related to individual adsorption sites) of hydrated metal (hydr)oxide NPs using atmospherically derived CO2 as a probe. Specifically, we distinguish two carbonate species suggesting two principally different adsorption mechanisms. One species, which is more weakly adsorbed, has an inner-sphere mononuclear monodentate structure which is formed by a conventional ligand-exchange mechanism. At natural levels of dissolved carbonate and pH from 3 to 11, this species is attached to the most acidic/reactive surface cations (surface states) associated with ferrihydrite-like surface defects. The second species, which is more strongly adsorbed, presents a mixed C and O coordination of bent CO2. This species uniquely recognizes the stoichiometric rhombohedral {104} facets in the NP texture. Like in gas phase, it is formed through the surface coordination of molecular CO2. We address how the adsorption sites hosting these two carbonate species are affected by the annealing and acid etching of the NPs. These results support the nanosize-induced phase transformation of hematite towards ferrihydrite under hydrous conditions, and additionally show that the process starts from the roughened areas of the facet intersections.

  12. Becker muscular dystrophy severity is linked to the structure of dystrophin.

    Nicolas, Aurélie; Raguénès-Nicol, Céline; Ben Yaou, Rabah; Ameziane-Le Hir, Sarah; Chéron, Angélique; Vié, Véronique; Claustres, Mireille; Leturcq, France; Delalande, Olivier; Hubert, Jean-François; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie; Giudice, Emmanuel; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    In-frame exon deletions of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produce internally truncated proteins that typically lead to Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), a milder allelic disorder of DMD. We hypothesized that differences in the structure of mutant dystrophin may be responsible for the clinical heterogeneity observed in Becker patients and we studied four prevalent in-frame exon deletions, i.e. Δ45-47, Δ45-48, Δ45-49 and Δ45-51. Molecular homology modelling revealed that the proteins corresponding to deletions Δ45-48 and Δ45-51 displayed a similar structure (hybrid repeat) than the wild-type dystrophin, whereas deletions Δ45-47 and Δ45-49 lead to proteins with an unrelated structure (fractional repeat). All four proteins in vitro expressed in a fragment encoding repeats 16-21 were folded in α-helices and remained highly stable. Refolding dynamics were slowed and molecular surface hydrophobicity were higher in fractional repeat containing Δ45-47 and Δ45-49 deletions compared with hybrid repeat containing Δ45-48 and Δ45-51 deletions. By retrospectively collecting data for a series of French BMD patients, we showed that the age of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) onset was delayed by 11 and 14 years in Δ45-48 and Δ45-49 compared with Δ45-47 patients, respectively. A clear trend toward earlier wheelchair dependency (minimum of 11 years) was also observed in Δ45-47 and Δ45-49 patients compared with Δ45-48 patients. Muscle dystrophin levels were moderately reduced in most patients without clear correlation with the deletion type. Disease progression in BMD patients appears to be dependent on the deletion itself and associated with a specific structure of dystrophin at the deletion site. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Structural changes in microferrogels cross-linked by magnetically anisotropic particles

    Ryzhkov, A.V., E-mail: ryzhkov.a@icmm.ru [Perm National Research Polytechnic University, Perm 614990 (Russian Federation); Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, Perm 614013 (Russian Federation); Raikher, Yu. L. [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, Perm 614013 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    Chaining of magnetic nanoparticles in a microscopic ferrogel (MFG) due to interparticle interaction and external field is analyzed by the coarse-grained molecular dynamics. The embedded nanoparticles, unlike existing conventional models, are assumed to possess uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. By that, the consideration is brought closer to reality. Evolution of particle chains, both in length and straightness, is handled with the aid of “axial” radial distribution function that is sensitive to orientation of the aggregates. The effect of the particle magnetic anisotropy on the structural alterations as well as on volume changes of MFGs is demonstrated.

  14. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  15. The story turned upside down: Meaning effects linked to variations on narrative structure

    Bundgaard, Peer; Østergaard, Svend

    2007-01-01

    be subject to variations in view of yielding specific meaning effects. This is because the production and reception of a narrative is a dynamic process where physical forces, modal forces and intentions set up a space of possibilities for the narrative trajectory. We therefore propose a determination...... structure is indeed driven by an inverted narrative schema and each significant event in the story but one (as well as each physical paragraph but one) has its rigorously symmetrical counterpart. Moreover, this inverted schema can be explained in terms of the modal forces at stake in the narrative....

  16. Structural interactions in ionic liquids linked to higher-order Poisson-Boltzmann equations

    Blossey, R.; Maggs, A. C.; Podgornik, R.

    2017-06-01

    We present a derivation of generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations starting from classical theories of binary fluid mixtures, employing an approach based on the Legendre transform as recently applied to the case of local descriptions of the fluid free energy. Under specific symmetry assumptions, and in the linearized regime, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation reduces to a phenomenological equation introduced by Bazant et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 046102 (2011)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.046102, whereby the structuring near the surface is determined by bulk coefficients.

  17. Linking Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure on the Way to the Drip Line

    Dickhoff, Willem

    2012-10-01

    The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied on data from the (e,e'p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The dispersive optical model (DOM), originally conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. The DOM provides the starting point to provide a framework in which nuclear reactions and structure data can be analyzed consistently to provide unambiguous spectroscopic information including its asymmetry dependence. Recent extensions of this approach include the treatment of non-locality to describe experimental data like the nuclear charge density based on information of the spectral density below the Fermi energy, the application of the DOM ingredients to the description of transfer reactions, a comparison of the microscopic content of the nucleon self-energy based on Faddeev-RPA calculations emphasizing long-range correlations with DOM potentials, and a study of the relation between a self-energy which includes the effect of short-range correlations with DOM potentials. The most recent Dom implementation currently in progress abandons the constraint of local potentials completely to allow an accurate description of various properties of the nuclear ground state.

  18. Linking the planktonic and benthic habitat: genetic structure of the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi.

    Godhe, Anna; Härnström, Karolina

    2010-10-01

    Dormant life stages are important strategies for many aquatic organisms. The formation of resting stages will provide a refuge from unfavourable conditions in the water column, and their successive accumulation in the benthos will constitute a genetic reservoir for future planktonic populations. We have determined the genetic structure of a common bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema marinoi, in the sediment and the plankton during spring, summer and autumn two subsequent years (2007-2009) in Gullmar Fjord on the Swedish west coast. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were used to assess the level of genetic differentiation and the respective gene diversity of the two different habitats. We also determined the degree of genetic differentiation between the seed banks inside the fjord and the open sea. The results indicate that Gullmar Fjord has one dominant endogenous population of S. marinoi, which is genetically differentiated from the open sea population. The fjord population is encountered in the plankton and in the sediment. Shifts from the dominant population can happen, and in our study, two genetically differentiated plankton populations, displaying reduced genetic diversity, occurred in September 2007 and 2008. Based on our results, we suggest that sill fjords maintain local long-lived and well-adapted protist populations, which continuously shift between the planktonic and benthic habitats. Intermittently, short-lived and mainly asexually reproducing populations can replace the dominant population in the water column, without influencing the genetic structure of the benthic seed bank. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k c and k ¯ and the preferred monolayer curvature J 0 m , and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k c and the area compression modulus k A are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k ¯ and J 0 m can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k ¯ and J 0 m change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k ¯ 0 m ≫0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks

  20. Structural coupling of SH2-kinase domains links Fes and Abl substrate recognition and kinase activation.

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Kofler, Michael; Hantschel, Oliver; Gish, Gerald D; Grebien, Florian; Salah, Eidarus; Neudecker, Philipp; Kay, Lewis E; Turk, Benjamin E; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Pawson, Tony; Knapp, Stefan

    2008-09-05

    The SH2 domain of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases can enhance catalytic activity and substrate recognition, but the molecular mechanisms by which this is achieved are poorly understood. We have solved the structure of the prototypic SH2-kinase unit of the human Fes tyrosine kinase, which appears specialized for positive signaling. In its active conformation, the SH2 domain tightly interacts with the kinase N-terminal lobe and positions the kinase alphaC helix in an active configuration through essential packing and electrostatic interactions. This interaction is stabilized by ligand binding to the SH2 domain. Our data indicate that Fes kinase activation is closely coupled to substrate recognition through cooperative SH2-kinase-substrate interactions. Similarly, we find that the SH2 domain of the active Abl kinase stimulates catalytic activity and substrate phosphorylation through a distinct SH2-kinase interface. Thus, the SH2 and catalytic domains of active Fes and Abl pro-oncogenic kinases form integrated structures essential for effective tyrosine kinase signaling.

  1. Scandinavian links

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    are impressive mega structures spanning international waterways. These waterways between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea have played major roles in history. The length of each of the crossings are around 20 km. The fixed links closes gaps between the Scandinavian and European motorway and rail networks...

  2. Machine Translation - A Gentle Introduction

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. Machine Translation - A Gentle Introduction. Durgesh D Rao. General Article Volume 3 Issue 7 July 1998 pp 61-70. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/003/07/0061-0070 ...

  3. The story turned upside down: Meaning effects linked to variations on narrative structure

    Bundgaard, Peer; Østergaard, Svend

    2007-01-01

    This text has two parts. In the first section we intend to define the narrative schema—the canonical plot structure—as a symbolic form in Ernst Cassirer’s sense of the term. This basically implies that the narrative schema is not an invariant higher order combinatorial form, but may itself...... be subject to variations in view of yielding specific meaning effects. This is because the production and reception of a narrative is a dynamic process where physical forces, modal forces and intentions set up a space of possibilities for the narrative trajectory. We therefore propose a determination...... of the narrative schema in terms of “force dynamics.” In the next section we proceed to an analysis of Ernst Hemingway’s A Very Short Storyin order to illustrate this point. We lay down the main elements of its remarkable, if not simply outstanding both narrative and semantic-configurational structure: its plot...

  4. Linking empowering leadership to safety participation in nuclear power plants: a structural equation model.

    Martínez-Córcoles, Mario; Schöbel, Markus; Gracia, Francisco J; Tomás, Inés; Peiró, José M

    2012-07-01

    Safety participation is of paramount importance in guaranteeing the safe running of nuclear power plants. The present study examined the effects of empowering leadership on safety participation. Based on a sample of 495 employees from two Spanish nuclear power plants, structural equation modeling showed that empowering leadership has a significant relationship with safety participation, which is mediated by collaborative team learning. In addition, the results revealed that the relationship between empowering leadership and collaborative learning is partially mediated by the promotion of dialogue and open communication. The implications of these findings for safety research and their practical applications are outlined. An empowering leadership style enhances workers' safety performance, particularly safety participation behaviors. Safety participation is recommended to detect possible rule inconsistencies or misunderstood procedures and make workers aware of critical safety information and issues. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Introduction to parallel programming

    Brawer, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Introduction to Parallel Programming focuses on the techniques, processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in parallel programming. The book first offers information on Fortran, hardware and operating system models, and processes, shared memory, and simple parallel programs. Discussions focus on processes and processors, joining processes, shared memory, time-sharing with multiple processors, hardware, loops, passing arguments in function/subroutine calls, program structure, and arithmetic expressions. The text then elaborates on basic parallel programming techniques, barriers and race

  6. Introduction to microfabrication

    Franssila, Sami

    2005-01-01

    Microfabrication is the key technology behind integrated circuits, microsensors, photonic crystals, ink jet printers, solar cells and flat panel displays. Microsystems can be complex, but the basic microstructures and processes of microfabrication are fairly simple. Introduction to Microfabrication shows how the common microfabrication concepts can be applied over and over again to create devices with a wide variety of structures and functions.Featuring:* A comprehensive presentation of basic fabrication processes* An emphasis on materials and microstructures, rather than devic

  7. Quantitative structure-retention relationship studies using immobilized artificial membrane chromatography I: amended linear solvation energy relationships with the introduction of a molecular electronic factor.

    Li, Jie; Sun, Jin; Cui, Shengmiao; He, Zhonggui

    2006-11-03

    Linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) amended by the introduction of a molecular electronic factor were employed to establish quantitative structure-retention relationships using immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatography, in particular ionizable solutes. The chromatographic indices, log k(IAM), were determined by HPLC on an IAM.PC.DD2 column for 53 structurally diverse compounds, including neutral, acidic and basic compounds. Unlike neutral compounds, the IAM chromatographic retention of ionizable compounds was affected by their molecular charge state. When the mean net charge per molecule (delta) was introduced into the amended LSER as the sixth variable, the LSER regression coefficient was significantly improved for the test set including ionizable solutes. The delta coefficients of acidic and basic compounds were quite different indicating that the molecular electronic factor had a markedly different impact on the retention of acidic and basic compounds on IAM column. Ionization of acidic compounds containing a carboxylic group tended to impair their retention on IAM, while the ionization of basic compounds did not have such a marked effect. In addition, the extra-interaction with the polar head of phospholipids might cause a certain change in the retention of basic compounds. A comparison of calculated and experimental retention indices suggested that the semi-empirical LSER amended by the addition of a molecular electronic factor was able to reproduce adequately the experimental retention factors of the structurally diverse solutes investigated.

  8. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  9. A cyber-linked undergraduate research experience in computational biomolecular structure prediction and design.

    Alford, Rebecca F; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Gonzales, Lynda; Dolan, Erin L; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2017-12-01

    Computational biology is an interdisciplinary field, and many computational biology research projects involve distributed teams of scientists. To accomplish their work, these teams must overcome both disciplinary and geographic barriers. Introducing new training paradigms is one way to facilitate research progress in computational biology. Here, we describe a new undergraduate program in biomolecular structure prediction and design in which students conduct research at labs located at geographically-distributed institutions while remaining connected through an online community. This 10-week summer program begins with one week of training on computational biology methods development, transitions to eight weeks of research, and culminates in one week at the Rosetta annual conference. To date, two cohorts of students have participated, tackling research topics including vaccine design, enzyme design, protein-based materials, glycoprotein modeling, crowd-sourced science, RNA processing, hydrogen bond networks, and amyloid formation. Students in the program report outcomes comparable to students who participate in similar in-person programs. These outcomes include the development of a sense of community and increases in their scientific self-efficacy, scientific identity, and science values, all predictors of continuing in a science research career. Furthermore, the program attracted students from diverse backgrounds, which demonstrates the potential of this approach to broaden the participation of young scientists from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in computational biology.

  10. Getting connected: Both associative and semantic links structure semantic memory for newly learned persons.

    Wiese, Holger; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined whether semantic memory for newly learned people is structured by visual co-occurrence, shared semantics, or both. Participants were trained with pairs of simultaneously presented (i.e., co-occurring) preexperimentally unfamiliar faces, which either did or did not share additionally provided semantic information (occupation, place of living, etc.). Semantic information could also be shared between faces that did not co-occur. A subsequent priming experiment revealed faster responses for both co-occurrence/no shared semantics and no co-occurrence/shared semantics conditions, than for an unrelated condition. Strikingly, priming was strongest in the co-occurrence/shared semantics condition, suggesting additive effects of these factors. Additional analysis of event-related brain potentials yielded priming in the N400 component only for combined effects of visual co-occurrence and shared semantics, with more positive amplitudes in this than in the unrelated condition. Overall, these findings suggest that both semantic relatedness and visual co-occurrence are important when novel information is integrated into person-related semantic memory.

  11. Shaping intercellular channels of plasmodesmata: the structure-to-function missing link.

    Nicolas, William J; Grison, Magali S; Bayer, Emmanuelle M

    2017-12-18

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are a hallmark of the plant kingdom and a cornerstone of plant biology and physiology, forming the conduits for the cell-to-cell transfer of proteins, RNA and various metabolites, including hormones. They connect the cytosols and endomembranes of cells, which allows enhanced cell-to-cell communication and synchronization. Because of their unique position as intercellular gateways, they are at the frontline of plant defence and signalling and constitute the battleground for virus replication and spreading. The membranous organization of PD is remarkable, where a tightly furled strand of endoplasmic reticulum comes into close apposition with the plasma membrane, the two connected by spoke-like elements. The role of these structural features is, to date, still not completely understood. Recent data on PD seem to point in an unexpected direction, establishing a close parallel between PD and membrane contact sites and defining plasmodesmal membranes as microdomains. However, the implications of this new viewpoint are not fully understood. Aided by available phylogenetic data, this review attempts to reassess the function of the different elements comprising the PD and the relevance of membrane lipid composition and biophysics in defining specialized microdomains of PD, critical for their function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Structural brain changes linked to delayed first language acquisition in congenitally deaf individuals.

    Pénicaud, Sidonie; Klein, Denise; Zatorre, Robert J; Chen, Jen-Kai; Witcher, Pamela; Hyde, Krista; Mayberry, Rachel I

    2013-02-01

    Early language experience is essential for the development of a high level of linguistic proficiency in adulthood and in a recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiment, we showed that a delayed acquisition of a first language results in changes in the functional organization of the adult brain (Mayberry et al., 2011). The present study extends the question to explore if delayed acquisition of a first language also modulates the structural development of the brain. To this end, we carried out anatomical MRI in the same group of congenitally deaf individuals who varied in the age of acquisition of a first language, American Sign Language -ASL (Mayberry et al., 2011) and used a neuroanatomical technique, Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM), to explore changes in gray and white matter concentrations across the brain related to the age of first language acquisition. The results show that delayed acquisition of a first language is associated with changes in tissue concentration in the occipital cortex close to the area that has been found to show functional recruitment during language processing in these deaf individuals with a late age of acquisition. These findings suggest that a lack of early language experience affects not only the functional but also the anatomical organization of the brain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A cyber-linked undergraduate research experience in computational biomolecular structure prediction and design.

    Rebecca F Alford

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational biology is an interdisciplinary field, and many computational biology research projects involve distributed teams of scientists. To accomplish their work, these teams must overcome both disciplinary and geographic barriers. Introducing new training paradigms is one way to facilitate research progress in computational biology. Here, we describe a new undergraduate program in biomolecular structure prediction and design in which students conduct research at labs located at geographically-distributed institutions while remaining connected through an online community. This 10-week summer program begins with one week of training on computational biology methods development, transitions to eight weeks of research, and culminates in one week at the Rosetta annual conference. To date, two cohorts of students have participated, tackling research topics including vaccine design, enzyme design, protein-based materials, glycoprotein modeling, crowd-sourced science, RNA processing, hydrogen bond networks, and amyloid formation. Students in the program report outcomes comparable to students who participate in similar in-person programs. These outcomes include the development of a sense of community and increases in their scientific self-efficacy, scientific identity, and science values, all predictors of continuing in a science research career. Furthermore, the program attracted students from diverse backgrounds, which demonstrates the potential of this approach to broaden the participation of young scientists from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in computational biology.

  14. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    Haverkamp, Thomas H A; Hammer, Øyvind; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2014-01-01

    Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm) sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment.

  15. Linking geology and microbiology: inactive pockmarks affect sediment microbial community structure.

    Thomas H A Haverkamp

    Full Text Available Pockmarks are geological features that are found on the bottom of lakes and oceans all over the globe. Some are active, seeping oil or methane, while others are inactive. Active pockmarks are well studied since they harbor specialized microbial communities that proliferate on the seeping compounds. Such communities are not found in inactive pockmarks. Interestingly, inactive pockmarks are known to have different macrofaunal communities compared to the surrounding sediments. It is undetermined what the microbial composition of inactive pockmarks is and if it shows a similar pattern as the macrofauna. The Norwegian Oslofjord contains many inactive pockmarks and they are well suited to study the influence of these geological features on the microbial community in the sediment. Here we present a detailed analysis of the microbial communities found in three inactive pockmarks and two control samples at two core depth intervals. The communities were analyzed using high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA V3 region. Microbial communities of surface pockmark sediments were indistinguishable from communities found in the surrounding seabed. In contrast, pockmark communities at 40 cm sediment depth had a significantly different community structure from normal sediments at the same depth. Statistical analysis of chemical variables indicated significant differences in the concentrations of total carbon and non-particulate organic carbon between 40 cm pockmarks and reference sample sediments. We discuss these results in comparison with the taxonomic classification of the OTUs identified in our samples. Our results indicate that microbial communities at the sediment surface are affected by the water column, while the deeper (40 cm sediment communities are affected by local conditions within the sediment.

  16. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Dang, Bich N; Westbrook, Robert A; Black, William C; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?"). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all psatisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  17. Operative Links

    Wistoft, Karen; Højlund, Holger

    2012-01-01

    and have been the object of great expectations concerning the ability to incorporate health concerns into every welfare area through health promotion strategies. The paper draws on results and analyses of a collective research project funded by the Danish National Research Council and carried out...... links' that indicate cooperative levels which facilitate a creative and innovative effort in disease prevention and health promotion targeted at children and adolescents - across traditional professional boundaries. It is proposed that such links are supported by network structures, shared semantics...

  18. Influence of Hypothyroidism on Separate Links of Metabolism, Structure and Function of the Heart in Insulin Resistance

    T.Yu. Yuzvenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research findings of reduced thyroid function impact on the background of insulin resistance on the specific links of metabolism, structure and function of the heart. It is found that in thyroid dysfunction, the main nosological form of myocardial lesion in female patients without concomitant cardiovascular disease is the development of metabolic endocrine cardiomyopathy. Feature of cardiac lesion is the absence of cardiosclerotic, myocardial and ischemic processes in hypothyroidism. Obscure clinical symptoms of the heart both in apparent and subclinical hypothyroidism are detected. Features of clinical, instrumental and laboratory changes in female patients with impaired thyroid function are a trend to systolic blood pressure increase, the absence of significant dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, and cardiocytolysis and hepatocytolysis. Thyroid hormone deficiency is associated with increased myocardial repolarization heterogeneity: subclinical hypothyroidism is accompanied by violation of repolarization processes and the development of electrical heterogeneity of ventricular myocardium, and in the apparent hypothyroidism changes are more linked with the violation of the homogeneity of the electrical impulse to the atria.

  19. Introduction to real analysis

    Schramm, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    This text forms a bridge between courses in calculus and real analysis. It focuses on the construction of mathematical proofs as well as their final content. Suitable for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students of real analysis, it also provides a vital reference book for advanced courses in mathematics.The four-part treatment begins with an introduction to basic logical structures and techniques of proof, including discussions of the cardinality concept and the algebraic and order structures of the real and rational number systems. Part Two presents in-depth examinations of the compl

  20. Introduction pages

    Radu E. Sestras

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pages and Table of Contents Research ArticlesInsulin Requirements in Relation to Insulin Pump Indications in Type 1 DiabetesPDFGabriela GHIMPEŢEANU,\tSilvia Ş. IANCU,\tGabriela ROMAN,\tAnca M. ALIONESCU259-263Comparative Antibacterial Efficacy of Vitellaria paradoxa (Shea Butter Tree Extracts Against Some Clinical Bacterial IsolatesPDFKamoldeen Abiodun AJIJOLAKEWU,\tFola Jose AWARUN264-268A Murine Effort Model for Studying the Influence of Trichinella on Muscular Activity of MicePDFIonut MARIAN,\tCălin Mircea GHERMAN,\tAndrei Daniel MIHALCA269-271Prevalence and Antibiogram of Generic Extended-Spectrum β-Lactam-Resistant Enterobacteria in Healthy PigsPDFIfeoma Chinyere UGWU,\tMadubuike Umunna ANYANWU,\tChidozie Clifford UGWU,\tOgbonna Wilfred UGWUANYI272-280Index of Relative Importance of the Dietary Proportions of Sloth Bear (Melursus ursinus in Semi-Arid RegionPDFTana P. MEWADA281-288Bioaccumulation Potentials of Momordica charantia L. Medicinal Plant Grown in Lead Polluted Soil under Organic Fertilizer AmendmentPDFOjo Michael OSENI,\tOmotola Esther DADA,\tAdekunle Ajayi ADELUSI289-294Induced Chitinase and Chitosanase Activities in Turmeric Plants by Application of β-D-Glucan NanoparticlesPDFSathiyanarayanan ANUSUYA,\tMuthukrishnan SATHIYABAMA295-298Present or Absent? About a Threatened Fern, Asplenium adulterinum Milde, in South-Eastern Carpathians (RomaniaPDFAttila BARTÓK,\tIrina IRIMIA299-307Comparative Root and Stem Anatomy of Four Rare Onobrychis Mill. (Fabaceae Taxa Endemic in TurkeyPDFMehmet TEKİN,\tGülden YILMAZ308-312Propagation of Threatened Nepenthes khasiana: Methods and PrecautionsPDFJibankumar S. KHURAIJAM,\tRup K. ROY313-315Alleviate Seed Ageing Effects in Silybum marianum by Application of Hormone Seed PrimingPDFSeyed Ata SIADAT,\tSeyed Amir MOOSAVI,\tMehran SHARAFIZADEH316-321The Effect of Halopriming and Salicylic Acid on the Germination of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum under Different Cadmium

  1. IAEA introduction

    Zeman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Physics Section supports the IAEA Member States regarding utilization of: Accelerators; Research reactors; Cross-cutting material research; Controlled fusion. The activities in the field of material science include studies of present NPP structural materials; investigation of degradation mechanisms and contribution to research programs of new materials, as well as education and training activities. The Section is participating in the coordinated research projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modeling of Radiation Effects' (Jointly NA-NE) and 'Benchmarking of advanced materials pre-selected for innovative nuclear reactors' (Jointly NA and NE)

  2. Surface morphology, structural and electrical properties of RF ...

    2018-05-19

    May 19, 2018 ... ITO thin films; sputtering; structure; electrical properties; AFM; Hall effect. 1. Introduction ... ness range (61–768 nm) and to see if this system present properties that .... using the Bragg equation, and the relation linking the inter-.

  3. A comparative study of the DG-OMEGA (DG Omega), DGII, and GAT method for the structure elucidation of a methylene-acetal linked thymine dinucleotide

    van Kampen, A. H. C.; Beckers, M. L. M.; Buydens, L. M. C.

    1997-01-01

    This research continues the investigation of the properties of the recently developed structure elucidation method DG-OMEGA (DG Omega). Towards this end it was applied for the structure determination of a methylene-acetal linked thymine dinucleotide. The performance of DG Omega was compared to the

  4. Introduction to bioinformatics.

    Can, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Bioinformatics is an interdisciplinary field mainly involving molecular biology and genetics, computer science, mathematics, and statistics. Data intensive, large-scale biological problems are addressed from a computational point of view. The most common problems are modeling biological processes at the molecular level and making inferences from collected data. A bioinformatics solution usually involves the following steps: Collect statistics from biological data. Build a computational model. Solve a computational modeling problem. Test and evaluate a computational algorithm. This chapter gives a brief introduction to bioinformatics by first providing an introduction to biological terminology and then discussing some classical bioinformatics problems organized by the types of data sources. Sequence analysis is the analysis of DNA and protein sequences for clues regarding function and includes subproblems such as identification of homologs, multiple sequence alignment, searching sequence patterns, and evolutionary analyses. Protein structures are three-dimensional data and the associated problems are structure prediction (secondary and tertiary), analysis of protein structures for clues regarding function, and structural alignment. Gene expression data is usually represented as matrices and analysis of microarray data mostly involves statistics analysis, classification, and clustering approaches. Biological networks such as gene regulatory networks, metabolic pathways, and protein-protein interaction networks are usually modeled as graphs and graph theoretic approaches are used to solve associated problems such as construction and analysis of large-scale networks.

  5. An introduction to algebraic structures

    Landin, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    As the author notes in the preface, ""The purpose of this book is to acquaint a broad spectrum of students with what is today known as 'abstract algebra.'"" Written for a one-semester course, this self-contained text includes numerous examples designed to base the definitions and theorems on experience, to illustrate the theory with concrete examples in familiar contexts, and to give the student extensive computational practice.The first three chapters progress in a relatively leisurely fashion and include abundant detail to make them as comprehensible as possible. Chapter One provides a short

  6. Structural and metabolic studies of O-linked fucose-containing proteins of normal and virally-transformed rat fibroblasts

    Morton, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that cultured human and rodent cells contain a series of low molecular weight glycosylated amino acids of unusual structure, designated amino acid fucosides. The incorporation of radiolabelled-fucose into one of these components, designated FL4a (glucosylfucosylthreonine), is markedly-reduced in transformed epithelial and fibroblastic cells. The authors have examined fucose-labelled normal and virally-transformed rat fibroblast cell lines for glycoproteins which might be precursors to amino acid fucosides. Using milk alkaline/borohydride treatment (the beta-elimination reaction) to release O-linked oligosaccharides from proteins, they have isolated and partially characterized two low M/sub r/ reaction products (designated DS-ol and TS-ol) released from macromolecular cell material. The identity of one of these components (DS-ol, glucosylfucitol) suggested the existence in these cells of a direct protein precursor to FL4a. They examined fucose-labelled macromolecular cell material for proteins which release DS-ol (DS-proteins.). Using gel filtration chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with subsequent autoradiography, they have observed DS-proteins which appear to exhibit a broad molecular weight size range, and are also present in culture medium from normal and transformed cells. The findings suggest that mammalian cells contain DS-proteins and TS-proteins with a novel carbohydrate-peptide linkage wherein L-fucose is O-linked to a polypeptide backbone. Metabolic studies were undertaken to examine both the relationship between DS-protein and FL4a and the biochemical basis for the decreased level of FL4a and the biochemical basis for the decreased level of FL4a observed in transformed cells

  7. Introduction to cosmology

    Ryden, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This second edition of Introduction to Cosmology is an exciting update of an award-winning textbook. It is aimed primarily at advanced undergraduate students in physics and astronomy, but is also useful as a supplementary text at higher levels. It explains modern cosmological concepts, such as dark energy, in the context of the Big Bang theory. Its clear, lucid writing style, with a wealth of useful everyday analogies, makes it exceptionally engaging. Emphasis is placed on the links between theoretical concepts of cosmology and the observable properties of the universe, building deeper physical insights in the reader. The second edition includes recent observational results, fuller descriptions of special and general relativity, expanded discussions of dark energy, and a new chapter on baryonic matter that makes up stars and galaxies. It is an ideal textbook for the era of precision cosmology in the accelerating universe.

  8. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Kosobrodova, E., E-mail: elenak@physics.usyd.edu.au [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kondyurin, A. [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Chrzanowski, W. [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); McCulloch, D.G. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M. [Department of Applied Plasma and Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Structure and properties of polycarbonate films spin-coated on silicon are studied. • The films have two thicknesses: thicker and thinner than a depth of ion penetration. • Effect of radio frequency plasma and plasma immersion ion implantation is compared. - Abstract: At ion fluences higher than 5 · 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of C=O bonds and much lower concentration of O–H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. At

  9. Population genetic structure of Phytophthora cinnamomi associated with avocado in California and the discovery of a potentially recent introduction of a new clonal lineage.

    Pagliaccia, D; Pond, E; McKee, B; Douhan, G W

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) of avocado (Persea americana), caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, is the most serious disease of avocado worldwide. Previous studies have determined that this pathogen exhibits a primarily clonal reproductive mode but no population level studies have been conducted in the avocado-growing regions of California. Therefore, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism based on 22 polymorphic loci and mating type to investigate pathogen diversity from 138 isolates collected in 2009 to 2010 from 15 groves from the Northern and Southern avocado-growing regions. Additional isolates collected from avocado from 1966 to 2007 as well as isolates from other countries and hosts were also used for comparative purposes. Two distinct clades of A2 mating-type isolates from avocado were found based on neighbor joining analysis; one clade contained both newer and older collections from Northern and Southern California, whereas the other clade only contained isolates collected in 2009 and 2010 from Southern California. A third clade was also found that only contained A1 isolates from various hosts. Within the California population, a total of 16 genotypes were found with only one to four genotypes identified from any one location. The results indicate significant population structure in the California avocado P. cinnamomi population, low genotypic diversity consistent with asexual reproduction, potential evidence for the movement of clonal genotypes between the two growing regions, and a potential introduction of a new clonal lineage into Southern California.

  10. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  11. Cartesian tensors an introduction

    Temple, G

    2004-01-01

    This undergraduate text provides an introduction to the theory of Cartesian tensors, defining tensors as multilinear functions of direction, and simplifying many theorems in a manner that lends unity to the subject. The author notes the importance of the analysis of the structure of tensors in terms of spectral sets of projection operators as part of the very substance of quantum theory. He therefore provides an elementary discussion of the subject, in addition to a view of isotropic tensors and spinor analysis within the confines of Euclidean space. The text concludes with an examination of t

  12. Theoretical astrophysics an introduction

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A concise yet comprehensive introduction to the central theoretical concepts of modern astrophysics, presenting hydrodynamics, radiation, and stellar dynamics all in one textbook. Adopting a modular structure, the author illustrates a small number of fundamental physical methods and principles, which are sufficient to describe and understand a wide range of seemingly very diverse astrophysical phenomena and processes. For example, the formulae that define the macroscopic behavior of stellar systems are all derived in the same way from the microscopic distribution function. This function it

  13. An introduction to cosmology

    Narlikar, Jayant Vishnu

    2002-01-01

    The third edition of this successful textbook is fully updated and includes important recent developments in cosmology. It begins with an introduction to cosmology and general relativity, and goes on to cover the mathematical models of standard cosmology. The physical aspects of cosmology, including primordial nucleosynthesis, the astroparticle physics of inflation, and the current ideas on structure formation are discussed. Alternative models of cosmology are reviewed, including the model of Quasi-Steady State Cosmology, which has recently been proposed as an alternative to Big Bang Cosmology.

  14. Introduction to differentiable manifolds

    Auslander, Louis

    2009-01-01

    The first book to treat manifold theory at an introductory level, this text surveys basic concepts in the modern approach to differential geometry. The first six chapters define and illustrate differentiable manifolds, and the final four chapters investigate the roles of differential structures in a variety of situations.Starting with an introduction to differentiable manifolds and their tangent spaces, the text examines Euclidean spaces, their submanifolds, and abstract manifolds. Succeeding chapters explore the tangent bundle and vector fields and discuss their association with ordinary diff

  15. Structural analysis of PseH, the Campylobacter jejuni N-acetyltransferase involved in bacterial O-linked glycosylation

    Song, Wan Seok; Nam, Mi Sun; Namgung, Byeol [Department of Systems Immunology, College of Biomedical Science, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung-il, E-mail: sungil@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Systems Immunology, College of Biomedical Science, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-20

    Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterium that uses flagella for motility and causes worldwide acute gastroenteritis in humans. The C. jejuni N-acetyltransferase PseH (cjPseH) is responsible for the third step in flagellin O-linked glycosylation and plays a key role in flagellar formation and motility. cjPseH transfers an acetyl group from an acetyl donor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to the amino group of UDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-N-acetyl-β-L-altrosamine to produce UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-β-L-altropyranose. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of cjPseH, crystal structures of cjPseH alone and in complex with AcCoA were determined at 1.95 Å resolution. cjPseH folds into a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by four α-helices with two continuously connected grooves. A deep groove (groove-A) accommodates the AcCoA molecule. Interestingly, the acetyl end of AcCoA points toward an open space in a neighboring shallow groove (groove-S), which is occupied by extra electron density that potentially serves as a pseudosubstrate, suggesting that the groove-S may provide a substrate-binding site. Structure-based comparative analysis suggests that cjPseH utilizes a unique catalytic mechanism of acetylation that has not been observed in other glycosylation-associated acetyltransferases. Thus, our studies on cjPseH will provide valuable information for the design of new antibiotics to treat C. jejuni-induced gastroenteritis. - Highlights: • cjPseH adopts a single-domain structure of a central β-sheet decorated by α-helices. • cjPseH features two continuously connected grooves on the protein surface. • Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) binds into a deep groove of cjPseH in an ‘L’ shape. • The acetyl end of AcCoA points to a wide groove, a potential substrate-binding site.

  16. Red Phosphorus-Embedded Cross-Link-Structural Carbon Films as Flexible Anodes for Highly Reversible Li-Ion Storage

    Ruan, Jiafeng [School of Materials; Yuan, Tao [School of Materials; Pang, Yuepeng [School of Materials; Xu, Xinbo [School of Materials; Yang, Junhe [School of Materials; Hu, Wenbin; Zhong, Cheng; Ma, Zi-Feng [Shanghai Electrochemical Energy Devices Research Center,; Bi, Xuanxuan [Chemical; Zheng, Shiyou [School of Materials

    2017-10-06

    Red phosphorus (P) is considered to be one of the most attractive anodic materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to its high theoretical capacity of 2596 mAh g–1. However, intrinsic characteristics such as the poor electronic conductivity and large volume expansion at lithiation impede the development of red P. Here, we design a new strategy to embed red P particles into a cross-link-structural carbon film (P–C film), in order to improve the electronic conductivity and accommodate the volume expansion. The red P/carbon film is synthesized via vapor phase polymerization (VPP) followed by the pyrolysis process, working as a flexible binder-free anode for LIBs. High cycle stability and good rate capability are achieved by the P–C film anode. With 21% P content in the film, it displays a capacity of 903 mAh g–1 after 640 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g–1 and a capacity of 460 mAh g–1 after 1000 cycles at 2.0 A g–1. Additionally, the Coulombic efficiency reaches almost 100% for each cycle. The superior properties of the P–C films together with their facile fabrication make this material attractive for further flexible and high energy density LIB applications.

  17. Function and structure in social brain regions can link oxytocin-receptor genes with autistic social behavior.

    Yamasue, Hidenori

    2013-02-01

    Difficulties in appropriate social and communicative behaviors are the most prevalent and core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Although recent intensive research has focused on the neurobiological background of these difficulties, many aspects of them were not yet elucidated. Recent studies have employed multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indices as intermediate phenotypes of this behavioral phenotype to link candidate genes with the autistic social difficulty. As MRI indices, functional MRI (fMRI), structural MRI, and MR-spectroscopy have been examined in subjects with autism spectrum disorders. As candidate genes, this mini-review has much interest in oxytocin-receptor genes (OXTR), since recent studies have repeatedly reported their associations with normal variations in social cognition and behavior as well as with their extremes, autistic social dysfunction. Through previous increasing studies, medial prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus and amygdala have repeatedly been revealed as neural correlates of autistic social behavior by MRI multimodalities and their relationship to OXTR. For further development of this research area, this mini-review integrates recent accumulating evidence about human behavioral and neural correlates of OXTR. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics

    Morrill, Bernard; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics discusses classical thermodynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. It introduces the laws of thermodynamics and the connection between statistical concepts and observable macroscopic properties of a thermodynamic system. Chapter 1 discusses the first law of thermodynamics while Chapters 2 through 4 deal with statistical concepts. The succeeding chapters describe the link between entropy and the reversible heat process concept of entropy; the second law of thermodynamics; Legendre transformations and Jacobian algebra. Finally, Chapter 10 provides a

  19. Understanding viscoelasticity an introduction to rheology

    Phan-Thien, Nhan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to viscoelasticity, in particular, to the theories of dilute polymer solutions and dilute suspensions of rigid particles in viscous and incompressible fluids. These theories are important, not just because they apply to practical problems of industrial interest, but because they form a solid theoretical base upon which mathematical techniques can be built, from which more complex theories can be constructed, to better mimic material behaviour. The emphasis of this book is not on the voluminous current topical research, but on the necessary tools to understand viscoelasticity. This is a compact book for a first year graduate course in viscoelasticity and modelling of viscoelastic multiphase fluids. The Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is introduced as a particle-based method, relevant in modelling of complex-structured fluids. All the basic ideas in DPD are reviewed. The third edition has been updated and expanded with new results in the meso-scale modelling, links between...

  20. Linking foraging behaviour to physical oceanographic structures: Southern elephant seals and mesoscale eddies east of Kerguelen Islands

    Dragon, Anne-Cecile; Monestiez, P.; Bar-Hen, A.; Guinet, C.

    2010-10-01

    In the Southern Ocean, mesoscale features, such as fronts and eddies, have been shown to have a significant impact in structuring and enhancing primary productivity. They are therefore likely to influence the spatial structure of prey fields and play a key role in the creation of preferred foraging regions for oceanic top-predators. Optimal foraging theory predicts that predators should adjust their movement behaviour in relation to prey density. While crossing areas with sufficient prey density, we expect predators would change their behaviour by, for instance, decreasing their speed and increasing their turning frequency. Diving predators would as well increase the useful part of their dive i.e. increase bottom-time thereby increasing the fraction of time spent capturing prey. Southern elephant seals from the Kerguelen population have several foraging areas: in Antarctic waters, on the Kerguelen Plateau and in the interfrontal zone between the Subtropical and Polar Fronts. This study investigated how the movement and diving behaviour of 22 seals equipped with satellite-relayed data loggers changed in relation to mesoscale structures typical of the interfrontal zone. We studied the links between oceanographic variables including temperature and sea level anomalies, and diving and movement behaviour such as displacement speed, diving duration and bottom-time. Correlation coefficients between each of the time series were calculated and their significance tested with a parametric bootstrap. We focused on oceanographic changes, both temporal and spatial, occurring during behavioural transitions in order to clarify the connections between the behaviour and the marine environment of the animals. We showed that a majority of seals displayed a specific foraging behaviour related to the presence of both cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies. We characterized mesoscale oceanographic zones as either favourable or unfavourable based on the intensity of foraging activity as

  1. Linked Learning as a High School Transformation Strategy: Organizational Structures and Leadership Behaviors That Support Lasting Change

    Weiss, Elizabeth Rocio

    2016-01-01

    Linked Learning is an approach that has proven effective in transforming the learning experiences for high school students. An instrumental case study was conducted in a large urban district in Southern California where district and school leaders implemented Linked Learning as a systemic high school reform initiative. Analysis of the data…

  2. Introduction to morphogenetic computing

    Resconi, Germano; Xu, Guanglin

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to morphogenetic computing, showing that its use makes global and local relations, defects in crystal non-Euclidean geometry databases with source and sink, genetic algorithms, and neural networks more stable and efficient. It also presents applications to database, language, nanotechnology with defects, biological genetic structure, electrical circuit, and big data structure. In Turing machines, input and output states form a system – when the system is in one state, the input is transformed into output. This computation is always deterministic and without any possible contradiction or defects. In natural computation there are defects and contradictions that have to be solved to give a coherent and effective computation. The new computation generates the morphology of the system that assumes different forms in time. Genetic process is the prototype of the morphogenetic computing. At the Boolean logic truth value, we substitute a set of truth (active sets) values with...

  3. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy links structural moieties of soil organic matter to the temperature sensitivity of its decomposition

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    be recognized. It was hence possible to follow the fate of specific structural moieties in soils. We observed differences between litter and soil samples, and were able to relate them to the decomposition of identifiable moieties. Using multivariate data analysis, we aimed at linking the detailed chemical fingerprints of SOM to turnover rates in a soil incubation experiment. With the multivariate models, we were able to relate signal patterns in the 2D spectra and intensities of identifiable molecular moieties to variability in the temperature response of organic matter decomposition, as assessed by Q10. In conclusion, the characterization of SOM composition at the molecular level by solution-state 2D NMR spectroscopy is highly promising; it offers unprecedented possibilities to link SOM molecular composition to ecosystem processes, and their responses to environmental changes.

  4. The naphthoquinones, vitamin K3 and its structural analog plumbagin, are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ABC drug transporter ABCG2

    Shukla, Suneet; Wu, Chung-Pu; Nandigama, Krishnamachary; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin K3 (Menadione; 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a structural precursor of vitamins K1 and K2 which are essential for blood clotting. The naturally occurring structural analog of this vitamin, plumbagin (5-hydroxy-menadione), is known to modulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, and radioresistance. We, here, report that both vitamin K3 and plumbagin are substrates of the multidrug resistance-linked ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter, ABCG2. Vitamin K3 and plu...

  5. Linking canopy reflectance to crop structure and photosynthesis to capture and interpret spatiotemporal dimensions of per-field photosynthetic productivity

    Xue, Wei; Jeong, Seungtaek; Ko, Jonghan; Tenhunen, John

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen and water availability alter canopy structure and physiology, and thus crop growth, yielding large impacts on ecosystem-regulating/production provisions. However, to date, explicitly quantifying such impacts remains challenging partially due to lack of adequate methodology to capture spatial dimensions of ecosystem changes associated with nitrogen and water effects. A data fitting, where close-range remote-sensing measurements of vegetation indices derived from a handheld instrument and an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system are linked to in situ leaf and canopy photosynthetic traits, was applied to capture and interpret inter- and intra-field variations in gross primary productivity (GPP) in lowland rice grown under flooded conditions (paddy rice, PD) subject to three nitrogen application rates and under rainfed conditions (RF) in an East Asian monsoon region of South Korea. Spatial variations (SVs) in both GPP and light use efficiency (LUEcabs) early in the growing season were enlarged by nitrogen addition. The nutritional effects narrowed over time. A shift in planting culture from flooded to rainfed conditions strengthened SVs in GPP and LUEcabs. Intervention of prolonged drought late in the growing season dramatically intensified SVs that were supposed to seasonally decrease. Nevertheless, nitrogen addition effects on SV of LUEcabs at the early growth stage made PD fields exert greater SVs than RF fields. SVs of GPP across PD and RF rice fields were likely related to leaf area index (LAI) development less than to LUEcabs, while numerical analysis suggested that considering strength in LUEcabs and its spatial variation for the same crop type tends to be vital for better evaluation in landscape/regional patterns of ecosystem photosynthetic productivity at critical phenology stages.

  6. MgADP-induced changes in the structure of myosin S1 near the ATPase-related thiol SH1 probed by cross-linking

    Rajasekharan, K.N.; Mayadevi, M.; Agarwal, R.; Burke, M.

    1990-01-01

    The structural consequence of MgADP binding at the vicinity of the ATPase-related thiol SH1 (Cys-707) have been examined by subjecting myosin subfragment 1, premodified at SH2 (Cys-697) with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), to reaction with the bifunctional reagent p-phenylenedimaleimide (pPDM) in the presence and absence of MgADP. By monitoring the changes in the Ca 2+ -ATPase activity as a function of reaction time, it appears that the reagent rapidly modifies SH1 irrespective of whether MgADP is present or not. In the absence of nucleotide, only extremely low levels of cross-linking to the 50-kDa middle segment of S1 can be detected, while in the presence of MgADP substantial cross-linking to this segment is observed. A similar cross-link is also formed if MgADP is added subsequent to the reaction of the SH2-NEM-premodified S1 with pPDM in the absence of nucleotide. Isolation of the labeled tryptic peptide from the cross-linked adduct formed with [ 14 C]pPDM, and subsequent partial sequence analyses, indicates that the cross-link is made from SH1 to Cys-522. Moreover, it appears that this cross-link results in the trapping of MgADP in this S1 species. These data suggest that the binding of MgADP results in a change in the structure of S1 in the vicinity of the SH1 thiol relative to the 50-kDa domain which enables Cys-522 to adopt the appropriate configuration to enable it to be cross-linked to SH1 by pPDM

  7. Using invertebrate remains and pigments in the sediment to infer changes in trophic structure after fish introduction in Lake Fogo: a crater lake in the Azores

    Skov, Tue; Buchaca, T; Amsinck, Susanne Lildal

    2010-01-01

    Fish introduction may have marked effects on the trophic dynamics and ecological state of former fishless lakes, but due to scarcity of historical data this can seldom be documented. We used remains of cladoceran, chironomid and pigment assemblages in the sediment archive to unravel the effect...... to a pelagic dominated ecosystem, as cryptophytes became markedly more abundant at the expense of benthic diatoms. Trout introduction was followed by a return to a more benthic cladoceran and benthic algae (pigments) dominated state, which we attribute to trout predation on carp leading to improved water...

  8. Introduction to IBS

    ... Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Search Introduction to IBS Details What is IBS? Last Updated: ... tax-deductible donation. Make Donation What is IBS? Introduction to IBS Symptoms of IBS What Causes IBS? ...

  9. Introduction to dynamics

    Pfeiffer, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This concise textbook for students preferably of a postgraduate level, but also for engineers in practice, contains the basic kinematical and kinetic structures of dynamics together with carefully selected applications. The book is a condensed introduction to the fundamental laws of kinematics and kinetics, on the most important principles of mechanics and presents the equations of motion in the form of Lagrange and Newton-Euler. Selected problems of linear and nonlinear dynamics are treated, as well as problems of vibration formation. The presented selection of topics gives a useful basis for stepping into more advanced problems of dynamics. The contents of this book represent the result of a regularly revised course, which has been and still is given for masters students at the Technische Universität München. .

  10. Semiconductor physics an introduction

    Seeger, Karlheinz

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor Physics - An Introduction - is suitable for the senior undergraduate or new graduate student majoring in electrical engineering or physics. It will also be useful to solid-state scientists and device engineers involved in semiconductor design and technology. The text provides a lucid account of charge transport, energy transport and optical processes, and a detailed description of many devices. It includes sections on superlattices and quantum well structures, the effects of deep-level impurities on transport, the quantum Hall effect and the calculation of the influence of a magnetic field on the carrier distribution function. This 6th edition has been revised and corrected, and new sections have been added to different chapters.

  11. Introduction to representation theory

    Etingof, Pavel; Hensel, Sebastian; Liu, Tiankai; Schwendner, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Very roughly speaking, representation theory studies symmetry in linear spaces. It is a beautiful mathematical subject which has many applications, ranging from number theory and combinatorics to geometry, probability theory, quantum mechanics, and quantum field theory. The goal of this book is to give a "holistic" introduction to representation theory, presenting it as a unified subject which studies representations of associative algebras and treating the representation theories of groups, Lie algebras, and quivers as special cases. Using this approach, the book covers a number of standard topics in the representation theories of these structures. Theoretical material in the book is supplemented by many problems and exercises which touch upon a lot of additional topics; the more difficult exercises are provided with hints. The book is designed as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. It should be accessible to students with a strong background in linear algebra and a basic k...

  12. History and General Introduction

    Dunbar, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    In the domain of analytical mass spectrometry (MS), FT-ICR's place is established as combining particular advantages of extraordinary mass resolution and accuracy, a wide array of sample-ionization techniques, and a uniquely wide range of methods for structure characterization of the primary sample ions. Costs are already attractive compared with other high-performance alternatives, and as both magnets and computers (which comprise much of the expense of FT-ICR hardware) become cheaper and more powerful, the performance/cost ratio for the technique will continue to improve. This paper will provide an introduction to those who have little previous knowledge of the technique; provide an overview of the technique's outstanding areas of scientific and analytical application; and provide some historical perspective on how we reached the present state of the art

  13. Introduction to tropical geometry

    Maclagan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Tropical geometry is a combinatorial shadow of algebraic geometry, offering new polyhedral tools to compute invariants of algebraic varieties. It is based on tropical algebra, where the sum of two numbers is their minimum and the product is their sum. This turns polynomials into piecewise-linear functions, and their zero sets into polyhedral complexes. These tropical varieties retain a surprising amount of information about their classical counterparts. Tropical geometry is a young subject that has undergone a rapid development since the beginning of the 21st century. While establishing itself as an area in its own right, deep connections have been made to many branches of pure and applied mathematics. This book offers a self-contained introduction to tropical geometry, suitable as a course text for beginning graduate students. Proofs are provided for the main results, such as the Fundamental Theorem and the Structure Theorem. Numerous examples and explicit computations illustrate the main concepts. Each of t...

  14. Introduction to information retrieval

    Manning, Christopher D; Schütze, Hinrich

    2008-01-01

    Class-tested and coherent, this textbook teaches classical and web information retrieval, including web search and the related areas of text classification and text clustering from basic concepts. It gives an up-to-date treatment of all aspects of the design and implementation of systems for gathering, indexing, and searching documents; methods for evaluating systems; and an introduction to the use of machine learning methods on text collections. All the important ideas are explained using examples and figures, making it perfect for introductory courses in information retrieval for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in computer science. Based on feedback from extensive classroom experience, the book has been carefully structured in order to make teaching more natural and effective. Slides and additional exercises (with solutions for lecturers) are also available through the book's supporting website to help course instructors prepare their lectures.

  15. Introduction to singularities

    Ishii, Shihoko

    2014-01-01

    This book is an introduction to singularities for graduate students and researchers. It is said that algebraic geometry originated in the seventeenth century with the famous work Discours de la méthode pour bien conduire sa raison, et chercher la vérité dans les sciences by Descartes. In that book he introduced coordinates to the study of geometry. After its publication, research on algebraic varieties developed steadily. Many beautiful results emerged in mathematicians’ works. Most of them were about non-singular varieties. Singularities were considered “bad” objects that interfered with knowledge of the structure of an algebraic variety. In the past three decades, however, it has become clear that singularities are necessary for us to have a good description of the framework of varieties. For example, it is impossible to formulate minimal model theory for higher-dimensional cases without singularities. Another example is that the moduli spaces of varieties have natural compactification, the boundar...

  16. Faunal Assemblage Structure Suggests a Limited Impact of the Introduction of Domestic Stock on Later Stone Age Subsistence Economies in South Africa

    Dusseldorp, G.L.

    2016-01-01

    Livestock remains appear in the South African archaeological record around 2100 years ago. However, the economic importance of domestic animals in Later Stone Age subsistence is debated. This paper adopts an approach rooted in Optimal Foraging Theory to examine if the introduction of livestock is

  17. [The effect of structure of benzimidazoles on the character of forming intramolecular cross-links in DNA and chromatin].

    Mil', E M; Zhil'tsova, V M; Biniukov, V I; Zhizhina, G P; Stoliarova, L G; Kuznetsov, Iu P

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of a number of benzimidazole class preparations, being distinguished by a position of aminomethyl substitutes, has been carried out. It has been shown, that the non-substituted preparation BIO-10 does not form UV-cross-links in DNA and chromatine; BIO-40, having one substitute in the position 2, causes the formation of inter-molecular cross-links DNA-DNA. The preparation BIO-50, having 2 aminomethyl groups in the imidazole nucleus positions 2 and 6, forms cross-links DNA-DNA and DNA-protein in chromatine. The generation of radicals by the preparations BIO-10 and BIO-50 has been studied by the EPR-method by use of spin trap. It has been demonstrated, that BIO-10, unlike BIO-50, actively generates superoxide. A supposition has been made, that an UV-formation of superoxide-radical in the presence of BIO-10 might be a reason of DNA-macromolecule destruction.

  18. Introduction to the Fastbus

    Gustavson, D.B.

    1979-08-01

    The Fastbus is a modular data bus system for data acquisition and data processing. It is a multiprocessor system with multiple bus segments which operate independently but link together for passing data. It operates asynchronously to accommodate very high- and very low-speed devices over long or short paths, and uses handshake protocols for reliability. It can also operate synchronously without handshakes for transfer of data blocks at maximum speed. The goals, history, and motivation for the Fastbus are summarized briefly. The structure of the Fastbus system is described in general, and some details of its operation are introduced

  19. Examining the Temporal Structure of the Perception-Production Link in Second Language Acquisition: A Longitudinal Study

    Nagle, Charles L.

    2018-01-01

    Most studies on the perception-production link have assumed a synchronous relationship according to which gains in perception transfer to production rapidly and efficiently. However, time-lagged and asymptotic relationships are also possible, where perception would guide production at a later stage or production would improve only once perception…

  20. Linking movement behavior and fine-scale genetic structure to model landscape connectivity for bobcats (Lynx rufus)

    Dawn M. Reding; Samuel A. Cushman; Todd E. Gosselink; William R. Clark

    2013-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity can constrain the movement of individuals and consequently genes across a landscape, influencing demographic and genetic processes. In this study, we linked information on landscape composition, movement behavior, and genetic differentiation to gain a mechanistic understanding of how spatial heterogeneity may influence movement and gene flow of...

  1. Introduction to Nuclear Physics (4/4)

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    This lecture will be an introduction to the open questions and key issues on the properties and structure of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter. No particular prerequisite. It might be interesting to give a look to an introduction to nuclear physics. A look at the web might give the students an ...

  2. Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/4)

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    This lecture will be an introduction to the open questions and key issues on the properties and structure of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter. No particular prerequisite. It might be interesting to give a look to an introduction to nuclear physics. A look at the web might give the students an ...

  3. Introduction to Nuclear Physics (3/4)

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    This lecture will be an introduction to the open questions and key issues on the properties and structure of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter. No particular prerequisite. It might be interesting to give a look to an introduction to nuclear physics. A look at the web might give the students an ...

  4. Introduction to Nuclear Physics (2/4)

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    This lecture will be an introduction to the open questions and key issues on the properties and structure of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter. No particular prerequisite. It might be interesting to give a look to an introduction to nuclear physics. A look at the web might give the students an ...

  5. Crystal structure of a Fanconi anemia-associated nuclease homolog bound to 5' flap DNA: basis of interstrand cross-link repair by FAN1

    Gwon, Gwang Hyeon; Kim, Youngran; Liu, Yaqi; Watson, Adam T.; Jo, Aera; Etheridge, Thomas J.; Yuan, Fenghua; Zhang, Yanbin; Kim, YoungChang; Carr, Anthony M.; Cho, Yunje

    2014-10-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defects in any of 15 FA genes responsible for processing DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). The ultimate outcome of the FA pathway is resolution of cross-links, which requires structure-selective nucleases. FA-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1) is believed to be recruited to lesions by a monoubiquitinated FANCI–FANCD2 (ID) complex and participates in ICL repair. Here, we determined the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa FAN1 (PaFAN1) lacking the UBZ (ubiquitin-binding zinc) domain in complex with 5' flap DNA. All four domains of the right-hand-shaped PaFAN1 are involved in DNA recognition, with each domain playing a specific role in bending DNA at the nick. The six-helix bundle that binds the junction connects to the catalytic viral replication and repair (VRR) nuclease (VRR nuc) domain, enabling FAN1 to incise the scissile phosphate a few bases distant from the junction. The six-helix bundle also inhibits the cleavage of intact Holliday junctions. PaFAN1 shares several conserved features with other flap structure-selective nucleases despite structural differences. A clamping motion of the domains around the wedge helix, which acts as a pivot, facilitates nucleolytic cleavage. The PaFAN1 structure provides insights into how archaeal Holliday junction resolvases evolved to incise 5' flap substrates and how FAN1 integrates with the FA complex to participate in ICL repair.

  6. Quaternary structure of the ATPase complex of human 26S proteasomes determined by chemical cross-linking

    Hartmann-Petersen, R; Tanaka, K; Hendil, K B

    2001-01-01

    and substrate specificity. Among the approximately 18 subunits of PA700 regulator, six are ATPases. The ATPases presumably recognize, unfold, and translocate substrates into the interior of the 26S proteasome. It is generally believed that the ATPases form a hexameric ring. By means of chemical cross......-linking, immunoprecipitation, and blotting, we have determined that the ATPases are organized in the order S6-S6'-S10b-S8-S4-S7. Additionally, we found cross-links between the ATPase S10b and the 20S proteasome subunit alpha6. Together with the previously known interaction between S8 and alpha1 and between S4 and alpha7......, these data establish the relative orientations of ATPases with respect to the 20S proteasome....

  7. Introduction to graph theory

    Trudeau, Richard J

    1994-01-01

    Preface1. Pure Mathematics Introduction; Euclidean Geometry as Pure Mathematics; Games; Why Study Pure Mathematics?; What's Coming; Suggested Reading2. Graphs Introduction; Sets; Paradox; Graphs; Graph diagrams; Cautions; Common Graphs; Discovery; Complements and Subgraphs; Isomorphism; Recognizing Isomorphic Graphs; Semantics The Number of Graphs Having a Given nu; Exercises; Suggested Reading3. Planar Graphs Introduction; UG, K subscript 5, and the Jordan Curve Theorem; Are there More Nonplanar Graphs?; Expansions; Kuratowski's Theorem; Determining Whether a Graph is Planar or

  8. Bayesian Networks An Introduction

    Koski, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian Networks: An Introduction provides a self-contained introduction to the theory and applications of Bayesian networks, a topic of interest and importance for statisticians, computer scientists and those involved in modelling complex data sets. The material has been extensively tested in classroom teaching and assumes a basic knowledge of probability, statistics and mathematics. All notions are carefully explained and feature exercises throughout. Features include:.: An introduction to Dirichlet Distribution, Exponential Families and their applications.; A detailed description of learni

  9. Introduction to imprecise probabilities

    Augustin, Thomas; de Cooman, Gert; Troffaes, Matthias C M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the theory has become widely accepted and has been further developed, but a detailed introduction is needed in order to make the material available and accessible to a wide audience. This will be the first book providing such an introduction, covering core theory and recent developments which can be applied to many application areas. All authors of individual chapters are leading researchers on the specific topics, assuring high quality and up-to-date contents. An Introduction to Imprecise Probabilities provides a comprehensive introduction to imprecise probabilities, includin

  10. Introduction to clinical nutrition

    Sardesai, Vishwanath M

    2012-01-01

    .... Introduction to Clinical Nutrition, Third edition discusses the physiologic and metabolic interrelationships of all nutrients and their roles in health maintenance and the prevention of various...

  11. Structural Feature Ions for Distinguishing N- and O-Linked Glycan Isomers by LC-ESI-IT MS/MS

    Everest-Dass, Arun V.; Abrahams, Jodie L.; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H.; Campbell, Matthew P.

    2013-06-01

    Glycomics is the comprehensive study of glycan expression in an organism, cell, or tissue that relies on effective analytical technologies to understand glycan structure-function relationships. Owing to the macro- and micro-heterogeneity of oligosaccharides, detailed structure characterization has required an orthogonal approach, such as a combination of specific exoglycosidase digestions, LC-MS/MS, and the development of bioinformatic resources to comprehensively profile a complex biological sample. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) has emerged as a key tool in the structural analysis of oligosaccharides because of its high sensitivity, resolution, and robustness. Here, we present a strategy that uses LC-ESI-MS/MS to characterize over 200 N- and O-glycans from human saliva glycoproteins, complemented by sequential exoglycosidase treatment, to further verify the annotated glycan structures. Fragment-specific substructure diagnostic ions were collated from an extensive screen of the literature available on the detailed structural characterization of oligosaccharides and, together with other specific glycan structure feature ions derived from cross-ring and glycosidic-linkage fragmentation, were used to characterize the glycans and differentiate isomers. The availability of such annotated mass spectrometric fragmentation spectral libraries of glycan structures, together with such substructure diagnostic ions, will be key inputs for the future development of the automated elucidation of oligosaccharide structures from MS/MS data.

  12. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 9. Aerobasics: An Introduction to Aeronautics - Airplane Performance. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 14 Issue 9 September 2009 pp 916-928. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 1. Aerobasics - An Introduction to Aeronautics - Safety in Aviation. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 15 Issue 1 January 2010 pp 64-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 5. Aerobasics - An Introduction to Aeronautics - Mini and Micro Airplanes. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 15 Issue 5 May 2010 pp 400-410. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Aerobasics – An Introduction to Aeronautics - The Airplane Configuration. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 328-345. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Aerobasics–An Introduction to Aeronautics

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 11. Aerobasics – An Introduction to Aeronautics - Airplane Basics. S P Govinda Raju. Series Article Volume 13 Issue 11 November 2008 pp 1009-1019. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. 13 CFR 130.100 - Introduction.

    2010-01-01

    ....100 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS § 130.100 Introduction. (a) Objective. The SBDC Program creates a broad-based system of assistance for the small business community by linking the resources of Federal, State and local governments with the...

  18. Know Your Personal Computer Introduction to Computers

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 1. Know Your Personal Computer Introduction to Computers. Siddhartha Kumar Ghoshal. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 48-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Introduction to solar cell production

    Kim, Gyeong Hae; Lee, Jun Sin

    2009-08-01

    This book introduces solar cell production. It is made up eight chapters, which are summary of solar cell with structure and prospect of the business, special variable of solar cell on light of the sun and factor causing variable of solar cell, production of solar cell with surface texturing, diffusion, metal printing dry and firing and edge isolation, process of solar cell on silicone wafer for solar cell, forming of electrodes, introduction of thin film solar cell on operating of solar cell, process of production and high efficiency of thin film solar cell, sorting of solar cell and production with background of silicone solar cell and thin film solar cell, structure and production of thin film solar cell and compound solar cell, introduction of solar cell module and the Industrial condition and prospect of solar cell.

  20. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a 4,4'-bipyridine Linked Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex Derived from 2-{[2-(2-hydroxyethylamino)ethylimino]methyl}-6-methylphenol.

    Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Gu, Yitong; Li, Yuntong; Liu, Andong; Liu, Fuyao; You, Zhonglu; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-12-01

    A novel 4,4'-bipyridine linked dinuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu2L2(bipy)](NO3)2·bipy (L = 2-[2-(2-hydroxyethylamino) ethylimino]methyl-6-methylphenol; bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine), was prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Cu···Cu distance is 11.129(2) Å. The CuII atom is coordinated by one phenolate O, one imine N, and one amine N atoms of a Schiff base ligand, and one N atom of the bridging 4,4'-bipyridine ligand, forming a square planar geometry. In the crystal structure of the complex, the dinuclear copper complex cations are linked by 4,4'-bipyridine molecules through intermolecular O-H···N hydrogen bonds, to form 1D chains running in the [2 0 -1] direction.

  1. Crystal structure of a samarium(III nitrate chain cross-linked by a bis-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide ligand

    Julie A. Stoscup

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound poly[aquabis(μ-nitrato-κ4O,O′:O,O′′tetrakis(nitrato-κ2O,O′{μ4-tetraethyl [(ethane-1,2-diylbis(azanediylbis(2-oxoethane-2,1-diyl]diphosphonate-κ2O,O′}disamarium(III], [Sm2(NO36(C14H30N2O8P2(H2O]n, a 12-coordinate SmIII and a nine-coordinate SmIII cation are alternately linked via shared bis-bidentate nitrate anions into a corrugated chain extending parallel to the a axis. The nine-coordinate SmIII atom of this chain is also chelated by a bidentate, yet flexible, carbamoylmethylphoshine oxide (CMPO ligand and bears one water molecule. This water molecule is hydrogen bonded to nitrate groups bonded to the 12-coordinate SmIII cation. The CMPO ligand, which lies about an inversion center, links neighboring chains along the c axis, forming sheets parallel to the ac plane. Hydrogen bonds between the amide NH group and metal-bound nitrate anions are also present in these sheets. The sheets are packed along the b axis through only van der Waals interactions.

  2. Mutation of the mouse Syce1 gene disrupts synapsis and suggests a link between synaptonemal complex structural components and DNA repair.

    Ewelina Bolcun-Filas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the synaptonemal complex is a structure required to complete crossover recombination. Although suggested by cytological work, in vivo links between the structural proteins of the synaptonemal complex and the proteins of the recombination process have not previously been made. The central element of the synaptonemal complex is traversed by DNA at sites of recombination and presents a logical place to look for interactions between these components. There are four known central element proteins, three of which have previously been mutated. Here, we complete the set by creating a null mutation in the Syce1 gene in mouse. The resulting disruption of synapsis in these animals has allowed us to demonstrate a biochemical interaction between the structural protein SYCE2 and the repair protein RAD51. In normal meiosis, this interaction may be responsible for promoting homologous synapsis from sites of recombination.

  3. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2014-03-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and

  4. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and experimental

  5. Structural crossover in a supercooled metallic liquid and the link to a liquid-to-liquid phase transition

    Lan, S.; Ma, J. L.; Fan, J. [Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong 83 Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon (Hong Kong); Blodgett, M.; Kelton, K. F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130-4899 (United States); Wang, X.-L., E-mail: xlwang@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong 83 Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon (Hong Kong); City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2016-05-23

    Time-resolved synchrotron measurements were carried out to capture the structure evolution of an electrostatically levitated metallic-glass-forming liquid during free cooling. The experimental data shows a crossover in the liquid structure at ∼1000 K, about 115 K below the melting temperature and 150 K above the crystallization temperature. The structure change is characterized by a dramatic growth in the extended-range order below the crossover temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations have identified that the growth of the extended-range order was due to an increased correlation between solute atoms. These results provide structural evidence for a liquid-to-liquid-phase-transition in the supercooled metallic liquid.

  6. Garbage Can Decision-Making in a Matrix Structure : A Case Study of Linköping University

    Delgoshaei, Bahareh; Fatahi, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: A university is characterized as organized anarchy. According to Cohen, et al. (1972) decision-making occurs in form of A Garbage Can Model (GCM) in such organizations. This model is influenced by some factors such as organizational structure. The influences of some types of organizational structure have been studied based on a computer simulation by Cohen and his colleagues in 1972. However, the study was based on numerical statistics and excluded the influence of genuine charact...

  7. Introduction to surveillance studies

    Petersen, JK

    2012-01-01

    Introduction & OverviewIntroduction Brief History of Surveillance Technologies & TechniquesOptical SurveillanceAerial Surveillance Audio Surveillance Radio-Wave SurveillanceGlobal Positioning Systems Sensors Computers & the Internet Data Cards Biochemical Surveillance Animal Surveillance Biometrics Genetics Practical ConsiderationsPrevalence of Surveillance Effectiveness of Surveillance Freedom & Privacy IssuesConstitutional Freedoms Privacy Safeguards & Intrusions ResourcesReferences Glossary Index

  8. Introduction to Part 3

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2015-01-01

    A brief contextualising discussion of Western Music History and its relations to Theological Aesthetical Thought since Carolingian Times as an introduction to 3 music articles in Part 3 of the volume.......A brief contextualising discussion of Western Music History and its relations to Theological Aesthetical Thought since Carolingian Times as an introduction to 3 music articles in Part 3 of the volume....

  9. Environmental Psychology: An Introduction

    Steg, L.; Berg, van den A.E.; Groot, de J.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Psychology: An Introduction offers a research-based introduction to the psychological relationship between humans and their built and natural environments and discusses how sustainable environments can be created to the benefit of both people and nature •Explores the environment's

  10. Chemical thermodynamics. An introduction

    Keszei, Ernoe [Budapest Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Physical Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    Eminently suitable as a required textbook comprising complete material for or an undergraduate chemistry major course in chemical thermodynamics. Clearly explains details of formal derivations that students can easily follow and so master applied mathematical operations. Offers problems and solutions at the end of each chapter for self-test and self- or group study. This course-derived undergraduate textbook provides a concise explanation of the key concepts and calculations of chemical thermodynamics. Instead of the usual 'classical' introduction, this text adopts a straightforward postulatory approach that introduces thermodynamic potentials such as entropy and energy more directly and transparently. Structured around several features to assist students' understanding, Chemical Thermodynamics: - Develops applications and methods for the ready treatment of equilibria on a sound quantitative basis. - Requires minimal background in calculus to understand the text and presents formal derivations to the student in a detailed but understandable way. - Offers end-of-chapter problems (and answers) for self-testing and review and reinforcement, of use for self- or group study. This book is suitable as essential reading for courses in a bachelor and master chemistry program and is also valuable as a reference or textbook for students of physics, biochemistry and materials science.

  11. Serial lectin affinity chromatography with concavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin demonstrates altered asparagine-linked sugar-chain structures of prostatic acid phosphatase in human prostate carcinoma.

    Yoshida, K I; Honda, M; Arai, K; Hosoya, Y; Moriguchi, H; Sumi, S; Ueda, Y; Kitahara, S

    1997-08-01

    Differences between human prostate carcinoma (PCA, five cases) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, five cases) in asparagine-linked (Asn) sugar-chain structure of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) were investigated using lectin affinity chromatography with concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). PAP activities were significantly decreased in PCA-derived PAP, while no significant differences between the two PAP preparations were observed in the enzymatic properties (Michaelis-Menten value, optimal pH, thermal stability, and inhibition study). In these PAP preparations, all activities were found only in the fractions which bound strongly to the Con A column and were undetectable in the Con A unbound fractions and in the fractions which bound weakly to the Con A column. The relative amounts of PAP which bound strongly to the Con A column but passed through the WGA column, were significantly greater in BPH-derived PAP than in PCA-derived PAP. In contrast, the relative amounts of PAP which bound strongly to the Con A column and bound to the WGA column, were significantly greater in PCA-derived PAP than in BPH-derived PAP. The findings suggest that Asn-linked sugar-chain structures are altered during oncogenesis in human prostate and also suggest that studies of qualitative differences of sugar-chain structures of PAP might lead to a useful diagnostic tool for PCA.

  12. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin: structural elucidation of the sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides on bovine, ovine, and human pituitary glycoprotein hormones

    Green, E.D.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have elucidated the structures of the anionic asparagine-linked oligosaccharides present on the glycoprotein hormones lutropin (luteinizing hormone), follitropin (follicle-stimulating hormone), and thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone). Purified hormones, isolated from bovine, ovine, and human pituitaries, were digested with N-glycanase, and the released oligosaccharides were reduced with NaB[ 3 H] 4 . The 3 H-labeled oligosaccharides from each hormone were then fractionated by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) into populations differing in the number of sulfate and/or sialic acid moieties. The sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures, which together comprised 67-90% of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones, were highly heterogeneous and displayed hormone- as well as animal species-specific features. A previously uncharacterized dibranched oligosaccharide, bearing one residue each of sulfate and sialic acid, was found on all of the hormones except bovine lutropin. In this study, they describe the purification and detailed structural characterizations of the sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated oligosaccharides found on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin from several animal species

  13. Linking open vocabularies

    Greifender, Elke; Seadle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Linked Data (LD), Linked Open Data (LOD) and generating a web of data, present the new knowledge sharing frontier. In a philosophical context, LD is an evolving environment that reflects humankinds' desire to understand the world by drawing on the latest technologies and capabilities of the time. LD, while seemingly a new phenomenon did not emerge overnight; rather it represents the natural progression by which knowledge structures are developed, used, and shared. Linked Open Vocabularies is a significant trajectory of LD. Linked Open Vocabularies targets vocabularies that have traditionally b

  14. Motions of CMS Detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    Calderón, Alicia; González-Sánchez, F J; Martínez-Rivero, C; Matorras, Francisco; Rodrigo, Teresa; Martínez, P; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobrón, M; Vila, Ivan; Virto, A L; Alberdi, Javier; Arce, Pedro; Barcala, Jose Miguel; Calvo, Enrique; Ferrando, Antonio; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Molinero, Antonio; Navarrete, Jose Javier; Oller, Juan Carlos; Yuste, Ceferino

    2008-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  15. Motions of CMS Detector Structures as Observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferramdp, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martin-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.

    2008-07-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micro metres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. In addition, a comparison of the reconstructed position of active element sensors with respect to their position as measured by photogrammetry is made and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described. (Author) 19 refs.

  16. The CMS Experiment: on and under Ground Motions of Structures Due to the Magnetic Field Forces as Observed by the Link Alignment System

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Brochero, J.; Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M. G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martinez-Ribero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Rui-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Fernandez, J.

    2010-05-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test (at SX5 on ground Hall) and the CRAFT08 and 09 periods data taking in the point P5 (UX5), 100 m underground. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed motions are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. Comparisons between recorded data on and under ground are made. (Author) 23 refs.

  17. The CMS Experiment: on and under Ground Motions of Structures Due to the Magnetic Field Forces as Observed by the Link Alignment System

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Brochero, J.; Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M. G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martinez-Ribero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Rui-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Fernandez, J.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test (at SX5 on ground Hall) and the CRAFT08 and 09 periods data taking in the point P5 (UX5), 100 m underground. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed motions are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. Comparisons between recorded data on and under ground are made. (Author) 23 refs.

  18. Motions of CMS Detector Structures as Observed by the Link Alignment System during the Test of the 4 Tesla Magnet Solenoid

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martin-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micro metres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. In addition, a comparison of the reconstructed position of active element sensors with respect to their position as measured by photogrammetry is made and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described. (Author) 19 refs

  19. Motions of CMS detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link alignment system during the test of the 4 T magnet solenoid

    Garcia-Moral, L.A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Martinez, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain)], E-mail: sobron@ifca.unican.es; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain)] (and others)

    2009-07-21

    This document describes results obtained from the Link alignment system data recorded during the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by a discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  20. Motions of CMS detector structures due to the magnetic field forces as observed by the Link alignment system during the test of the 4 T magnet solenoid

    Garcia-Moral, L.A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Martinez, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.; Sobron, M.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link alignment system data recorded during the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Magnet Test. A brief description of the system is followed by a discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotations of detector structures (from microradians to milliradians). Observed displacements are studied as functions of the magnetic field intensity. In addition, the reconstructed positions of active element sensors are compared to their positions as measured by photogrammetry and the reconstructed motions due to the magnetic field strength are described.

  1. Structural origin of dynamic heterogeneity in three-dimensional colloidal glass formers and its link to crystal nucleation.

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-06-16

    The physical understanding of glass transition remains a major challenge of physics and materials science. Among various glass-forming liquids, a colloidal liquid interacting with hard-core repulsion is now regarded as one of the most ideal model systems. Here we study the structure and dynamics of three-dimensional polydisperse colloidal liquids by Brownian dynamics simulations. We reveal that medium-range crystalline bond orientational order of the hexagonal close packed structure grows in size and lifetime with increasing packing fraction. We show that dynamic heterogeneity may be a direct consequence of this transient structural ordering, which suggests its origin is thermodynamic rather than kinetic. We also reveal that nucleation of crystals preferentially occurs in regions of high medium-range order, reflecting the low crystal-liquid interfacial energy there. These findings may shed new light not only on the fundamental nature of the glass transition, but also the mechanism of crystal nucleation.

  2. Analysis of bacterial core communities in the central Baltic by comparative RNA-DNA-based fingerprinting provides links to structure-function relationships.

    Brettar, Ingrid; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-01-01

    Understanding structure-function links of microbial communities is a central theme of microbial ecology since its beginning. To this end, we studied the spatial variability of the bacterioplankton community structure and composition across the central Baltic Sea at four stations, which were up to 450 km apart and at a depth profile representative for the central part (Gotland Deep, 235 m). Bacterial community structure was followed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)- and 16S rRNA gene-based fingerprints using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis. Species composition was determined by sequence analysis of SSCP bands. High similarities of the bacterioplankton communities across several hundred kilometers were observed in the surface water using RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints. In these surface communities, the RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints resulted in very different pattern, presumably indicating large difference between the active members of the community as represented by RNA-based fingerprints and the present members represented by the DNA-based fingerprints. This large discrepancy changed gradually over depth, resulting in highly similar RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints in the anoxic part of the water column below 130 m depth. A conceivable mechanism explaining this high similarity could be the reduced oxidative stress in the anoxic zone. The stable communities on the surface and in the anoxic zone indicate the strong influence of the hydrography on the bacterioplankton community structure. Comparative analysis of RNA- and DNA-based community structure provided criteria for the identification of the core community, its key members and their links to biogeochemical functions.

  3. An introduction to mathematical epidemiology

    Martcheva, Maia

    2015-01-01

    The book is a comprehensive, self-contained introduction to the mathematical modeling and analysis of infectious diseases. It includes model building, fitting to data, local and global analysis techniques. Various types of deterministic dynamical models are considered: ordinary differential equation models, delay-differential equation models, difference equation models, age-structured PDE models and diffusion models. It includes various techniques for the computation of the basic reproduction number as well as approaches to the epidemiological interpretation of the reproduction number. MATLAB code is included to facilitate the data fitting and the simulation with age-structured models.

  4. How Should School Districts Shape Teacher Salary Schedules? Linking School Performance to Pay Structure in Traditional Compensation Schemes

    Grissom, Jason A.; Strunk, Katharine O.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relative distribution of salary schedule returns to experience for beginning and veteran teachers. We argue that districts are likely to benefit from structuring salary schedules with greater experience returns early in the teaching career. To test this hypothesis, we match salary data to school-level student performance…

  5. Observed Lesson Structure during the First Year of Secondary Education: Exploration of Change and Link with Academic Engagement

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Stroet, Kim; Bosker, Roel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether lesson structure (LS) matters and which components are important for academic engagement during the first grade of secondary education. Data from videoed lessons of 10 Dutch and 12 Indonesian teachers analyzed using an observation protocol show that six LS components are found, that between class and over…

  6. Observed lesson structure during the first year of secondary education : Exploration of change and link with academic engagement

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Stroet, Kim; Bosker, Roel

    This study investigates whether lesson structure (LS) matters and which components are important for academic engagement during the first grade of secondary education. Data from videoed lessons of 10 Dutch and 12 Indonesian teachers analyzed using an observation protocol show that six LS components

  7. Linking phytoplankton community size composition with temperature, plankton food web structure and sea–air CO2 flux

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Data collected at open water stations (depth>400m) in all major ocean basins in 2006–2008 are used to examine the relationship between the size structure of the phytoplankton community (determined by size fractionated chlorophyll filtration), temperature and inorganic nutrient availability...

  8. Effect of Elevated Salt Concentrations on the Aerobic Granular Sludge Process : Linking Microbial Activity with Microbial Community Structure

    Bassin, J.P.; Pronk, M.; Muyzer, G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Dezotti, M.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The long- and short-term effects of salt on biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes were studied in an aerobic granular sludge reactor. The microbial community structure was investigated by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on 16S rRNA and amoA genes. PCR products

  9. Introduction to renewable energy

    Nelson, Vaughn C

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionEnergy and SocietyTypes of EnergyRenewable EnergyAdvantages/DisadvantagesEconomicsGlobal WarmingOrder of Magnitude EstimatesGrowth (Exponential)SolutionsEnergyIntroductionDefinition of Energy and PowerHeatThermodynamicsEnergy Dilemma in Light of the Laws of ThermodynamicsUse of Fossil FuelsNuclearFinite ResourceSummarySunSolar PowerElectromagnetic SpectrumEnergy Balance of the EarthEarth-Sun MotionInsolationSolar ResourceGreenhouse EffectHeat Transfer and StorageIntroductionConductionConvectionRadiationThermal MassSeasonal Heating or CoolingThermal ComfortSolar Heating and CoolingB

  10. Introduction to quantum mechanics

    Phillips, A C

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to Quantum Mechanics is an introduction to the power and elegance of quantum mechanics. Assuming little in the way of prior knowledge, quantum concepts are carefully and precisely presented, and explored through numerous applications and problems. Some of the more challenging aspects that are essential for a modern appreciation of the subject have been included, but are introduced and developed in the simplest way possible.Undergraduates taking a first course on quantum mechanics will find this text an invaluable introduction to the field and help prepare them for more adv

  11. Structural differences between glycosylated, disulfide-linked heterodimeric Knob-into-Hole Fc fragment and its homodimeric Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products.

    Kuglstatter, A; Stihle, M; Neumann, C; Müller, C; Schaefer, W; Klein, C; Benz, J

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of bispecific therapeutic antibodies are progressing through clinical development. The Knob-into-Hole (KiH) technology uses complementary mutations in the CH3 region of the antibody Fc fragment to achieve heavy chain heterodimerization. Here we describe the X-ray crystal structures of glycosylated and disulfide-engineered heterodimeric KiH Fc fragment and its homodimeric Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products. The heterodimer structure confirms the KiH design principle and supports the hypothesis that glycosylation stabilizes a closed Fc conformation. Both homodimer structures show parallel Fc fragment architectures, in contrast to recently reported crystal structures of the corresponding aglycosylated Fc fragments which in the absence of disulfide mutations show an unexpected antiparallel arrangement. The glycosylated Knob-Knob Fc fragment is destabilized as indicated by variability in the relative orientation of its CH3 domains. The glycosylated Hole-Hole Fc fragment shows an unexpected intermolecular disulfide bond via the introduced Y349C Hole mutation which results in a large CH3 domain shift and a new CH3-CH3 interface. The crystal structures of glycosylated, disulfide-linked KiH Fc fragment and its Knob-Knob and Hole-Hole side products reported here will facilitate further design of highly efficient antibody heterodimerization strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A chemometric analysis of ligand-induced changes in intrinsic fluorescence of folate binding protein indicates a link between altered conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics

    Bruun, Susanne W; Holm, Jan; Hansen, Steen Ingemann

    2009-01-01

    Ligand binding alters the conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics of bovine folate binding protein (FBP). For the purpose of achieving further information we analyzed ligand (folate and methotrexate)-induced changes in the fluorescence landscape of FBP. Fluorescence excitation...... of folate accords fairly well with the disappearance of strongly hydrophobic tryptophan residues from the solvent-exposed surface of FBP. The PARAFAC has thus proven useful to establish a hitherto unexplained link between parallel changes in conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics...... of FBP induced by folate binding. Parameters for ligand binding derived from PARAFAC analysis of the fluorescence data were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those obtained from binding of radiofolate to FBP. Herein, methotrexate exhibited a higher affinity for FBP than in competition...

  13. Genre analysis of linguistics research introductions

    Anthony Porras

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of exploring genre analysis has been a trend in Applied Linguistics, not only for its interesting factor, but also because of its pedagogical implications. This study aimed to determine the overall structure, specifically the presence and conformity of moves and steps of the research introductions in the field of Linguistics. Twelve (12 available research introductions were analyzed using Create-A-Research-Space (CARS model. The findings revealed that moves and steps across the research introductions are present. Majority of the research introductions conformed to the CARS model, but did not necessarily follow the suggested sequence. Results imply that teachers of research writing should acknowledge and introduce the CARS model as a basis for teaching the method of writing research introductions effectively.

  14. Linking process and structure in the friction stir scribe joining of dissimilar materials: A computational approach with experimental support

    Gupta, Varun; Upadhyay, Piyush; Fifield, Leonard S.; Roosendaal, Timothy; Sun, Xin; Nelaturu, Phalgun; Carlson, Blair

    2018-04-01

    The friction stir welding (FSW) is a popular technique to join dissimilar materials in numerous applications. The solid state nature of the process enables joining materials with strikingly different physical properties. For the welds in lap configuration, an enhancement to this technology is made by introducing a short hard insert, referred to as cutting-scribe, at the bottom of the tool pin. The cutting-scribe induces deformation in the bottom plate which leads to the formation of mechanical interlocks or hook like structures at the interface of two materials. A thermo-mechanically coupled computational model employing coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is developed to quantitatively capture the morphology of these interlocks during the FSW process. The simulations using developed model are validated by the experimental observations.The identified interface morphology coupled with the predicted temperature field from this process-structure model can then be used to estimate the post-weld microstructure and joint strength.

  15. Changes in the Austrian structure of wages, 1996-2002: evidence from linked employer-employee data

    Pointner, Wolfgang; Stiglbauer, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing data from the Structure of Earnings Surveys we find that wage dispersion in Austria increased marginally between 1996 and 2002. There was an increase in the returns to education which accrued only to male workers. The positive effects of tenure and especially of experience on wages decreased over time. We adopt the Machado-Mata (2005) counterfactual decomposition technique which allows to attribute changes in each wage decile to changes in worker and workplace characteristics and in...

  16. The structure of the small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor reveals a link between laccases and nitrite reductases

    Skálová, Tereza; Dohnálek, Jan; Ostergaard, L. H.; Ostergaard, P. R.; Kolenko, Petr; Dušková, Jarmila; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 385, č. 4 (2009), s. 1165-1178 ISSN 0022-2836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1K05008; GA ČR GA305/07/1073; GA AV ČR 1ET400500402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : laccase * oxidoreductase * multicopper blue protein * Streptomyces coelicolor * crystal structure Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.871, year: 2009

  17. Rheology for chemists an introduction

    Goodwin, J W

    2008-01-01

    Rheology is primarily concerned with materials: scientific, engineering and everyday products whose mechanical behaviour cannot be described using classical theories. From biological to geological systems, the key to understanding the viscous and elastic behaviour firmly rests in the relationship between the interactions between atoms and molecules and how this controls the structure, and ultimately the physical and mechanical properties. Rheology for Chemists An Introduction takes the reader through the range of rheological ideas without the use of the complex mathematics. The book gives particular emphasis on the temporal behaviour and microstructural aspects of materials, and is detailed in scope of reference. An excellent introduction to the newer scientific areas of soft matter and complex fluid research, the second edition also refers to system dimension and the maturing of the instrumentation market. This book is a valuable resource for practitioners working in the field, and offers a comprehensive int...

  18. Astrophysics a very short introduction

    Binney, James

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysics is the physics of the stars, and more widely the physics of the Universe. It enables us to understand the structure and evolution of planetary systems, stars, galaxies, interstellar gas, and the cosmos as a whole. In this Very Short Introduction, the leading astrophysicist James Binney shows how the field of astrophysics has expanded rapidly in the past century, with vast quantities of data gathered by telescopes exploiting all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, combined with the rapid advance of computing power, which has allowed increasingly effective mathematical modelling. He illustrates how the application of fundamental principles of physics - the consideration of energy and mass, and momentum - and the two pillars of relativity and quantum mechanics, has provided insights into phenomena ranging from rapidly spinning millisecond pulsars to the collision of giant spiral galaxies. This is a clear, rigorous introduction to astrophysics for those keen to cut their teeth on a conceptual trea...

  19. Nuclear links

    1981-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in sections: introduction; energy and the third world; world energy consumption 1978; oil -the energy dilemma; nuclear chains - introduction; uranium; Namibia; enrichment and reprocessing; countries with enrichment and reprocessing facilities; waste; conclusion; why take the nuclear option; third world countries with nuclear reactors; the arms connection; government spending and human resources 1977 (by countries); nuclear power - the final solution; the fascists; world bank; campaigns; community action in Plogoff; Australian labour movement; NUM against nuclear power; Scottish campaign; students against nuclear energy; anti-nuclear campaign; partizans; 3W1 disarmament and development; campaign ATOM; CANUC; 3W1; SANE. (U.K.)

  20. Introduction to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    ... page: Introduction to Pulmonary Fibrosis What Is Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis is a disease where there is scarring ... of pulmonary fibrosis. Learn more How Is Pulmonary Fibrosis Diagnosed? Pulmonary fibrosis can be difficult to diagnose, so it ...

  1. MOOC Introduction to Dutch

    den Hollander, Franciscus; Piersma, Kristien

    Interview met Margriet Hidding, Birgit Lijmbach en Jeroen van Engen, medewerkers van het Talencentrum en de makers van de Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Introduction to Dutch over het grote succes van deze cursus

  2. Radiation Protection: introduction

    Loos, M.

    2005-01-01

    The abstract gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection department. Main strategic developments and achievements in the field of life sciences, policy supports and medical applications are summarised

  3. Introduction: Ideologies of Youth

    seriane.camara

    2011-12-01

    Dec 1, 2011 ... target all age groups in their youth-oriented programmes. If the donor- ... van Dijk, de Bruijn, Cardoso, Butter: Introduction – Ideologies of Youth ...... Toward a Theory of Vital Conjunctures', American Anthropologist, vol. 104,.

  4. Complex Systems: An Introduction

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 9. Complex Systems: An Introduction - Anthropic Principle, Terrestrial Complexity, Complex Materials. V K Wadhawan. General Article Volume 14 Issue 9 September 2009 pp 894-906 ...

  5. Introduction: perspectives on Porter

    F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. Relevance of Strategy research: focus on Michael Porter's contributions Strategy is a fascinating field of enquiry, both for managers looking for a sustainable competitive advantage and for academic researchers looking for the reasons behind superior firm performance.

  6. Introduction to graph theory

    Wilson, Robin J

    1985-01-01

    Graph Theory has recently emerged as a subject in its own right, as well as being an important mathematical tool in such diverse subjects as operational research, chemistry, sociology and genetics. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject.

  7. Introduction to numerical analysis

    Hildebrand, F B

    1987-01-01

    Well-known, respected introduction, updated to integrate concepts and procedures associated with computers. Computation, approximation, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, smoothing of data, other topics in lucid presentation. Includes 150 additional problems in this edition. Bibliography.

  8. General introduction to glucosinolates

    Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    will be presented a general introduction to glucosinolates ranging from the evolution of glucosinolates to the many roles glucosinolates have for humans as well as an overview of the current knowledge on the orchestration of the glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The latter includes an introduction to the genes...... to the plasma membrane. Examples of how the knowledge gained from basic research has been translated into applied glucosinolate research through pathway and transport engineering will be presented....

  9. Stochastic processes an introduction

    Jones, Peter Watts

    2009-01-01

    Some Background on ProbabilityIntroduction Probability Conditional probability and independence Discrete random variables Continuous random variables Mean and variance Some standard discrete probability distributions Some standard continuous probability distributions Generating functions Conditional expectationSome Gambling ProblemsGambler's ruin Probability of ruin Some numerical simulations Duration of the game Some variations of gambler's ruinRandom WalksIntroduction Unrestricted random walks The probability distribution after n steps First returns of the symmetric random walkMarkov ChainsS

  10. Introduction to elementary particles

    Griffiths, David J

    2008-01-01

    This is the first quantitative treatment of elementary particle theory that is accessible to undergraduates. Using a lively, informal writing style, the author strikes a balance between quantitative rigor and intuitive understanding. The first chapter provides a detailed historical introduction to the subject. Subsequent chapters offer a consistent and modern presentation, covering the quark model, Feynman diagrams, quantum electrodynamics, and gauge theories. A clear introduction to the Feynman rules, using a simple model, helps readers learn the calculational techniques without the complicat

  11. Introduction to Geostatistics

    Kitanidis, P. K.

    1997-05-01

    Introduction to Geostatistics presents practical techniques for engineers and earth scientists who routinely encounter interpolation and estimation problems when analyzing data from field observations. Requiring no background in statistics, and with a unique approach that synthesizes classic and geostatistical methods, this book offers linear estimation methods for practitioners and advanced students. Well illustrated with exercises and worked examples, Introduction to Geostatistics is designed for graduate-level courses in earth sciences and environmental engineering.

  12. Introduction to remote sensing

    Cracknell, Arthur P

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the need for updated information in remote sensing, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Second Edition provides a full and authoritative introduction for scientists who need to know the scope, potential, and limitations in the field. The authors discuss the physical principles of common remote sensing systems and examine the processing, interpretation, and applications of data. This new edition features updated and expanded material, including greater coverage of applications from across earth, environmental, atmospheric, and oceanographic sciences. Illustrated with remotely sensed colo

  13. Plasma physics an introduction

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  14. Structural dynamics of the ΔE22 (Osaka) familial Alzheimer's disease-linked amyloid β-protein.

    Inayathullah, Mohammed; Teplow, David B

    2011-09-01

    A familial form of Alzheimer disease recently was described in a kindred in Osaka, Japan. This kindred possesses an amyloid β-protein (Aβ) precursor mutation within the Aβ coding region that results in the deletion of Glu22 (ΔE22). We report here results of studies of [ΔE22]Aβ40 and [ΔE22]Aβ42 that sought to elucidate the conformational dynamics, oligomerization behavior, fibril formation kinetics, fibril morphology, and fibril stability of these mutant peptides. Both [ΔE22]Aβ peptides had extraordinary β-sheet formation propensities. The [ΔE22]Aβ40 mutant formed β-sheet secondary structure elements ≈400-fold faster. Studies of β-sheet stability in the presence of fluorinated alcohol cosolvents or high pH revealed that the ΔE22 mutation substantially increased stability, producing a rank order of [ΔE22]Aβ42 >Aβ42 > [ΔE22]Aβ40 > Aβ40. The mutation facilitated formation of oligomers by [ΔE22]Aβ42 (dodecamers and octadecamers) that were not observed with Aβ42. Both Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides formed nebulous globular and small string-like structures immediately upon solvation from lyophilizates, whereas short protofibrillar and fibrillar structures were evident immediately in the ΔE22 samples. Determination of the critical concentration for fibril formation for the [ΔE22]Aβ peptides showed it to be ≈1/2 that of the wild type homologues, demonstrating that the mutations causes a modest increase in fibril stability. The magnitude of this increase, when considered in the context of the extraordinary increase in β-sheet propensity for the ΔE22 peptides, suggests that the primary biophysical effect of the mutation is to accelerate conformational changes in the peptide monomer that facilitate oligomerization and higher-order assembly.

  15. Linking Vegetation Structure and Spider Diversity in Riparian and Adjacent Habitats in Two Rivers of Central Argentina: An Analysis at Two Conceptual Levels.

    Griotti, Mariana; Muñoz-Escobar, Christian; Ferretti, Nelson E

    2017-08-01

    The link between vegetation structure and spider diversity has been well explored in the literature. However, few studies have compared spider diversity and its response to vegetation at two conceptual levels: assemblage (species diversity) and ensemble (guild diversity). Because of this, we studied spider diversity in riparian and adjacent habitats of a river system from the Chacoan subregion in central Argentina and evaluated their linkage with vegetation structure at these two levels. To assess vegetation structure, we measured plant species richness and vegetation cover in the herb and shrub - tree layers. We collected spiders for over 6 months by using vacuum netting, sweep netting and pitfall traps. We collected 3,808 spiders belonging to 119 morphospecies, 24 families and 9 guilds. At spider assemblage level, SIMPROF analysis showed significant differences among studied habitats. At spider ensemble level, nevertheless, we found no significant differences among habitats. Concerning the linkage with vegetation structure, BIOENV test showed that spider diversity at either assemblage or ensemble level was not significantly correlated with the vegetation variables assessed. Our results indicated that spider diversity was not affected by vegetation structure. Hence, even though we found a pattern in spider assemblages among habitats, this could not be attributed to vegetation structure. In this study, we show that analyzing a community at two conceptual levels will be useful for recognizing different responses of spider communities to vegetation structure in diverse habitat types. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Networks of networks – An introduction

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Perc, Matjaž; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Interdependent network reciprocity. Only those blue cooperative domains that are initially present on both networks survive. Abstract: This is an introduction to the special issue titled “Networks of networks” that is in the making at Chaos, Solitons & Fractals. Recent research and reviews attest to the fact that networks of networks are the next frontier in network science [1–7]. Not only are interactions limited and thus inadequately described by well-mixed models, it is also a fact that the networks that should be an integral part of such models are often interconnected, thus making the processes that are unfolding on them interdependent. From the World economy and transportation systems to social media, it is clear that processes taking place in one network might significantly affect what is happening in many other networks. Within an interdependent system, each type of interaction has a certain relevance and meaning, so that treating all the links identically inevitably leads to information loss. Networks of networks, interdependent networks, or multilayer networks are therefore a much better and realistic description of such systems, and this Special Issue is devoted to their structure, dynamics and evolution, as well as to the study of emergent properties in multi-layered systems in general. Topics of interest include but are not limited to the spread of epidemics and information, percolation, diffusion, synchronization, collective behavior, and evolutionary games on networks of networks. Interdisciplinary work on all aspects of networks of networks, regardless of background and motivation, is very welcome.

  17. Shifted energy fluxes, increased Bowen ratios, and reduced thaw depths linked with drainage-induced changes in permafrost ecosystem structure

    Göckede, Mathias; Kittler, Fanny; Kwon, Min Jung; Burjack, Ina; Heimann, Martin; Kolle, Olaf; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergey

    2017-12-01

    Hydrologic conditions are a key factor in Arctic ecosystems, with strong influences on ecosystem structure and related effects on biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes. With systematic changes in water availability expected for large parts of the northern high-latitude region in the coming centuries, knowledge on shifts in ecosystem functionality triggered by altered water levels is crucial for reducing uncertainties in climate change predictions. Here, we present findings from paired ecosystem observations in northeast Siberia comprising a drained and a control site. At the drainage site, the water table has been artificially lowered by up to 30 cm in summer for more than a decade. This sustained primary disturbance in hydrologic conditions has triggered a suite of secondary shifts in ecosystem properties, including vegetation community structure, snow cover dynamics, and radiation budget, all of which influence the net effects of drainage. Reduced thermal conductivity in dry organic soils was identified as the dominating drainage effect on energy budget and soil thermal regime. Through this effect, reduced heat transfer into deeper soil layers leads to shallower thaw depths, initially leading to a stabilization of organic permafrost soils, while the long-term effects on permafrost temperature trends still need to be assessed. At the same time, more energy is transferred back into the atmosphere as sensible heat in the drained area, which may trigger a warming of the lower atmospheric surface layer.

  18. Shifted energy fluxes, increased Bowen ratios, and reduced thaw depths linked with drainage-induced changes in permafrost ecosystem structure

    M. Göckede

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrologic conditions are a key factor in Arctic ecosystems, with strong influences on ecosystem structure and related effects on biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes. With systematic changes in water availability expected for large parts of the northern high-latitude region in the coming centuries, knowledge on shifts in ecosystem functionality triggered by altered water levels is crucial for reducing uncertainties in climate change predictions. Here, we present findings from paired ecosystem observations in northeast Siberia comprising a drained and a control site. At the drainage site, the water table has been artificially lowered by up to 30 cm in summer for more than a decade. This sustained primary disturbance in hydrologic conditions has triggered a suite of secondary shifts in ecosystem properties, including vegetation community structure, snow cover dynamics, and radiation budget, all of which influence the net effects of drainage. Reduced thermal conductivity in dry organic soils was identified as the dominating drainage effect on energy budget and soil thermal regime. Through this effect, reduced heat transfer into deeper soil layers leads to shallower thaw depths, initially leading to a stabilization of organic permafrost soils, while the long-term effects on permafrost temperature trends still need to be assessed. At the same time, more energy is transferred back into the atmosphere as sensible heat in the drained area, which may trigger a warming of the lower atmospheric surface layer.

  19. The organization structure and regulatory elements of Chlamydomonas histone genes reveal features linking plant and animal genes.

    Fabry, S; Müller, K; Lindauer, A; Park, P B; Cornelius, T; Schmitt, R

    1995-09-01

    The genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains approximately 15 gene clusters of the nucleosomal (or core) histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 genes and at least one histone H1 gene. Seven non-allelic histone gene loci were isolated from a genomic library, physically mapped, and the nucleotide sequences of three isotypes of each core histone gene species and one linked H1 gene determined. The core histone genes are organized in clusters of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 pairs, in which each gene pair shows outwardly divergent transcription from a short (< 300 bp) intercistronic region. These intercistronic regions contain typically conserved promoter elements, namely a TATA-box and the three motifs TGGCCAG-G(G/C)-CGAG, CGTTGACC and CGGTTG. Different from the genes of higher plants, but like those of animals and the related alga Volvox, the 3' untranslated regions contain no poly A signal, but a palindromic sequence (3' palindrome) essential for mRNA processing is present. One single H1 gene was found in close linkage to a H2A-H2B pair. The H1 upstream region contains the octameric promoter element GGTTGACC (also found upstream of the core histone genes) and two specific sequence motifs that are shared only with the Volvox H1 promoters. This suggests differential transcription of the H1 and the core histone genes. The H1 gene is interrupted by two introns. Unlike Volvox H3 genes, the three sequenced H3 isoforms are intron-free. Primer-directed PCR of genomic DNA demonstrated, however, that at least 8 of the about 15 H3 genes do contain one intron at a conserved position. In synchronized C. reinhardtii cells, H4 mRNA levels (representative of all core histone mRNAs) peak during cell division, suggesting strict replication-dependent gene control. The derived peptide sequences place C. reinhardtii core histones closer to plants than to animals, except that the H2A histones are more animal-like. The peptide sequence of histone H1 is closely related to the V. carteri VH1-II

  20. Linking Spatial Structure and Community-Level Biotic Interactions through Cooccurrence and Time Series Modeling of the Human Intestinal Microbiota.

    de Muinck, Eric J; Lundin, Knut E A; Trosvik, Pål

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome is a densely populated ecosystem where dynamics are determined by interactions between microbial community members, as well as host factors. The spatial organization of this system is thought to be important in human health, yet this aspect of our resident microbiome is still poorly understood. In this study, we report significant spatial structure of the GI microbiota, and we identify general categories of spatial patterning in the distribution of microbial taxa along a healthy human GI tract. We further estimate the biotic interaction structure in the GI microbiota, both through time series and cooccurrence modeling of microbial community data derived from a large number of sequentially collected fecal samples. Comparison of these two approaches showed that species pairs involved in significant negative interactions had strong positive contemporaneous correlations and vice versa, while for species pairs without significant interactions, contemporaneous correlations were distributed around zero. We observed similar patterns when comparing these models to the spatial correlations between taxa identified in the adherent microbiota. This suggests that colocalization of microbial taxon pairs, and thus the spatial organization of the GI microbiota, is driven, at least in part, by direct or indirect biotic interactions. Thus, our study can provide a basis for an ecological interpretation of the biogeography of the human gut. IMPORTANCE The human gut microbiome is the subject of intense study due to its importance in health and disease. The majority of these studies have been based on the analysis of feces. However, little is known about how the microbial composition in fecal samples relates to the spatial distribution of microbial taxa along the gastrointestinal tract. By characterizing the microbial content both in intestinal tissue samples and in fecal samples obtained daily, we provide a conceptual framework for how the spatial

  1. Membranes linked by trans-SNARE complexes require lipids prone to non-bilayer structure for progression to fusion.

    Zick, Michael; Stroupe, Christopher; Orr, Amy; Douville, Deborah; Wickner, William T

    2014-01-01

    Like other intracellular fusion events, the homotypic fusion of yeast vacuoles requires a Rab GTPase, a large Rab effector complex, SNARE proteins which can form a 4-helical bundle, and the SNARE disassembly chaperones Sec17p and Sec18p. In addition to these proteins, specific vacuole lipids are required for efficient fusion in vivo and with the purified organelle. Reconstitution of vacuole fusion with all purified components reveals that high SNARE levels can mask the requirement for a complex mixture of vacuole lipids. At lower, more physiological SNARE levels, neutral lipids with small headgroups that tend to form non-bilayer structures (phosphatidylethanolamine, diacylglycerol, and ergosterol) are essential. Membranes without these three lipids can dock and complete trans-SNARE pairing but cannot rearrange their lipids for fusion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01879.001.

  2. An introduction to the European Hydrological System — Systeme Hydrologique Europeen, ``SHE'', 2: Structure of a physically-based, distributed modelling system

    Abbott, M. B.; Bathurst, J. C.; Cunge, J. A.; O'Connell, P. E.; Rasmussen, J.

    1986-10-01

    The paper forms the second part of an introduction to the SHE, a physically-based, distributed catchment modelling system produced jointly by the Danish Hydraulic Institute, the British Institute of Hydrology and SOGREAH (France) with the financial support of the Commission of the European Communities. The SHE is physically-based in the sense that the hydrological processes of water movement are modelled either by finite difference representations of the partial differential equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation, or by empirical equations derived from independent experimental research. Spatial distribution of catchment parameters, rainfall input and hydrological response is achieved in the horizontal by an orthogonal grid network and in the vertical by a column of horizontal layers at each grid square. Each of the primary processes of the land phase of the hydrological cycle is modelled in a separate component as follows: interception, by the Rutter accounting procedure; evapotranspiration, by the Penman-Monteith equation; overland and channel flow, by simplifications of the St. Venant equations; unsaturated zone flow, by the one-dimensional Richards equation; saturated zone flow, by the two-dimensional Boussinesq equation; snowmelt, by an energy budget method. Overall control of the parallel running of the components and the information exchanges between them is managed by a FRAME component. Careful attention has been devoted to a modular construction so that improvements or additional components (e.g. water quality and sediment yield) can be added in the future. Considerable operating flexibility is provided through the ability to vary the level of sophistication of the calculation mode to match the availability or quality of the data.

  3. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of spore coat proteins in two Bacillus species groups are linked to a difference in cellular structure

    2013-01-01

    Background The Bacillus subtilis-group and the Bacillus cereus-group are two well-studied groups of species in the genus Bacillus. Bacteria in this genus can produce a highly resistant cell type, the spore, which is encased in a complex protective protein shell called the coat. Spores in the B. cereus-group contain an additional outer layer, the exosporium, which encircles the coat. The coat in B. subtilis spores possesses inner and outer layers. The aim of this study is to investigate whether differences in the spore structures influenced the divergence of the coat protein genes during the evolution of these two Bacillus species groups. Results We designed and implemented a computational framework to compare the evolutionary histories of coat proteins. We curated a list of B. subtilis coat proteins and identified their orthologs in 11 Bacillus species based on phylogenetic congruence. Phylogenetic profiles of these coat proteins show that they can be divided into conserved and labile ones. Coat proteins comprising the B. subtilis inner coat are significantly more conserved than those comprising the outer coat. We then performed genome-wide comparisons of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratio, dN/dS, and found contrasting patterns: Coat proteins have significantly higher dN/dS in the B. subtilis-group genomes, but not in the B. cereus-group genomes. We further corroborated this contrast by examining changes of dN/dS within gene trees, and found that some coat protein gene trees have significantly different dN/dS between the B subtilis-clade and the B. cereus-clade. Conclusions Coat proteins in the B. subtilis- and B. cereus-group species are under contrasting selective pressures. We speculate that the absence of the exosporium in the B. subtilis spore coat effectively lifted a structural constraint that has led to relaxed negative selection pressure on the outer coat. PMID:24283940

  4. Introduction to the "Evaluating the Impact of Structural Policies on Health Inequalities and Their Social Determinants and Fostering Change" (SOPHIE) Project.

    Borrell, Carme; Malmusi, Davide; Muntaner, Carles

    2017-01-01

    The SOPHIE Project (acronym for Structural Policies for Health Inequalities Evaluation) has focused on evaluating the impact of structural policies on health equity, considering as such all those policies that exert a powerful influence on the structural determinants of health (e.g., patterns of social stratification, living and working conditions) and thus on health-related exposures through intermediary determinants. In these sections of the International Journal of Health Services, we present some of the main findings of the SOPHIE Project. We include both articles that summarize all the evidence already published in the project on a thematic area (such as labor market, gender, or housing) and articles that present new, unpublished evidence on a specific health inequality or policy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Knots and links

    Rolfsen, Dale

    2003-01-01

    Rolfsen's beautiful book on knots and links can be read by anyone, from beginner to expert, who wants to learn about knot theory. Beginners with a basic background find an inviting introduction to the elements of topology, emphasizing the tools needed for understanding knots, the fundamental group and van Kampen's theorem, for example, which are then applied to concrete problems, such as computing knot groups. For experts, Rolfsen explains advanced topics, such as the connections between knot theory and surgery and how they are useful to understanding three-manifolds. Besides providing a guide

  6. Structure of "Ventilation and Warming" in Notes on Nursing Written by Florence Nightingale in 19th Century: Introduction of Basic Physics to Nursing Students

    Ogoh, Kazutoshi

    "Basic Natural Science" for freshmen at Miyazaki Prefectural Nursing University has a component including physics. Here students learn three principles of thermal transfer; conduction, radiation, and convection through a series of experiments. The purpose of these experiments is to understand the structure of a method for the caring of breathing and temperature of patients as written in "Ventilation and Warming", the first chapter of F. Nightingale's Notes on Nursing. Students can then apply this structure to retain fresh air in today's hospital rooms, and can then appreciate studying real physics incorporated into fundamental knowledge for nursing practice.

  7. An introduction to numerical methods and analysis

    Epperson, James F

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "". . . outstandingly appealing with regard to its style, contents, considerations of requirements of practice, choice of examples, and exercises.""-Zentralblatt MATH "". . . carefully structured with many detailed worked examples.""-The Mathematical Gazette The Second Edition of the highly regarded An Introduction to Numerical Methods and Analysis provides a fully revised guide to numerical approximation. The book continues to be accessible and expertly guides readers through the many available techniques of numerical methods and analysis. An Introduction to

  8. Introduction: transnational lesbian cultures.

    Bauer, Heike; Mahn, Churnjeet

    2014-01-01

    This special issue examines the transnational shape and shaping of lesbian lives and cultures in and across China, India, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It uses the expression "transnational lesbian cultures" to suggest that despite sometimes radically different sociopolitical and cultural contexts, the lived experiences of same-sex desire and their emotional attachments create particular affinities between women who love women, affinities that reach across the distinct cultural and social contexts that shape them. The articles brought together explore lesbian subcultures, film, graphic novels, music, and online intimacies. They show that as a cultural and political signifier and as an analytical tool, lesbian troubles and complicates contemporary sexual politics, not least by revealing some of the gendered structures that shape debates about sexuality in a range of critical, cultural and political contexts. While the individual pieces cover a wide range of issues and concerns-which are often highly specific to the historical, cultural, and political contexts they discuss-together they tell a story about contemporary transnational lesbian culture: one that is marked by intricate links between norms and their effects and shaped by the efforts to resist denial, discrimination, and sometimes even active persecution.

  9. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner

  10. Time Spent on Dedicated Patient Care and Documentation Tasks Before and After the Introduction of a Structured and Standardized Electronic Health Record

    Joukes, Erik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Cornet, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2018-01-01

    Physicians spend around 35% of their time documenting patient data. They are concerned that adopting a structured and standardized electronic health record (EHR) will lead to more time documenting and less time for patient care, especially during consultations.  This study measures the effect of the

  11. Introduction to natural disturbances and historic range of variation: type, frequency, severity, and post-disturbance structure in central hardwood forests

    Katie Greenberg; Beverly S. Collins; Henry McNab; Douglas K. Miller; Gary R. Wein

    2015-01-01

    EXCERPT FROM: Natural Disturbances and Historic Range Variation 2015. Throughout the history of upland hardwood forests of the Central Hardwood Region, natural disturbances have been integral to shaping forest structure and composition, and essential in maintaining diverse biotic...

  12. Linking temporal changes in the demographic structure and individual growth to the decline in the population of a tropical fish

    Sirot, Charlotte; Darnaude, Audrey M.; Guilhaumon, François; Ramos-Miranda, Julia; Flores-Hernandez, Domingo; Panfili, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    The exceptional biodiversity and productivity of tropical coastal lagoons can only be preserved by identifying the causes for the decline in the populations living in these vulnerable ecosystems. The Terminos lagoon in Mexico provided an opportunity for studying this issue as some of its fish populations, in particular the Silver Perch (Bairdiella chrysoura), have declined significantly since the 1980s. Fish sampling campaigns carried out over the whole lagoon area in 1979-81 and again in 2006-2011 revealed the mechanisms which may have been responsible for this decline. Based on biometrical data for 295 juveniles and adults from the two periods and on somatic growth derived from 173 otoliths, a study of the temporal changes in the demographic structure and life history traits (individual growth and body condition) made it possible to distinguish the causes of the decline in the B. chrysoura population. Growth models for the lagoon in 1980-1981 and 2006-2011 showed no significant change in the growth parameters of the population over the last 30 years with a logistic model giving an accurate estimate (R2 = 0.66) of the size-at-age for both periods. The decline in the B. chrysoura population could not be explained by an overall decrease in individual size and condition in the lagoon, the average standard length (SL) and Fulton index (FI) having increased slightly since 1980-1981 (4.6 mm and 0.02 for juveniles and 5.42 mm and 0.07 for adults). However, the size structure of the population in the lagoon has changed, with a significant shift in the size distribution of juveniles with a marked reduction in the proportion of juveniles ≤ 60 mm in the captures (90.9% fewer than in 1980-1981). As the otolith growth rate of fish during the first 4 months also decreased significantly between the two sampling periods (-15%), it is suggested that the main reason for the decline in the abundance and biomass of B. chrysoura within this system may be that its habitats are less

  13. Temporal variability of neustonic ichthyoplankton assemblages of the eastern Pacific warm pool: Can community structure be linked to climate variability?

    Ignacio Vilchis, L.; Ballance, Lisa T.; Watson, William

    2009-01-01

    Considerable evidence exists, showing an accelerated warming trend on earth during the past 40-50 years, attributed mainly to anthropogenic factors. Much of this excess heat is stored in the world's oceans, likely resulting in increased environmental variability felt by marine ecosystems. The long-term effects of this phenomenon on oceanic tropical ecosystems are largely unknown, and our understanding of its effects could be facilitated by long-term studies of how species compositions change with time. Ichthyoplankton, in particular, can integrate physical, environmental and ecological factors making them excellent model taxa to address this question. While on eight (1987-1990, 1992 and 1998-2000) NOAA Fisheries cruises to the eastern Pacific warm pool, we characterized the thermal and phytoplankton pigment structure of the water column, as well as the neustonic ichthyoplankton community using CTD casts and Manta (surface) net tows. Over the 13-year period, 852 CTD and Manta tow stations were completed. We divided the study area into three regions based on regional oceanography, thermocline depth and productivity, as well as a longitudinal gradient in species composition among stations. We then analyzed temporal trends of ichthyoplankton species composition within each region by pooling stations by region and year and making pairwise comparisons of community similarity between all combinations of the eight cruises within each region. We also identified environment-specific species assemblages and station groupings using hierarchical clustering and non-metric multi-dimensional scaling (MDS). Our analyses revealed a longitudinal gradient in community structure and temporal stability of ichthyoplankton species composition. Over the 13 years ichthyoplankton assemblages in the two westernmost regions varied less than in the eastern region. MDS and cluster analyses identified five ichthyoplankton assemblages that corresponded to oceanographic habitats and a gradient in

  14. Is there a link between the structural impact of thoracic outlet and the development of central venous stenosis?

    Kotoda, Atsushi; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sugase, Taro; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kusano, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (CVS) is a serious complication for chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Previous reports of CVS have focused on prior central venous catheterization, because of the higher prevalence and potential for prevention of such an event. However, recent studies have demonstrated that CVS may also develop without a history of central venous catheterization. Although information about the etiological backgrounds regarding the development of CVS without previous central venous catheterization have gradually accumulated, the clinical impact of the chronic compression of the central venous system by the surrounding structures, which may likely determine the central venous susceptibility to CVS, remains poorly understood. This study proposes the hypothesis that the combination of chronic venous compression at the level of thoracic outlet characterized by the natural physique and elevated venous flow induced by the creation of vascular access should be evaluated as a potential factor for the development of CVS, since they may accelerate the development of venous stenosis, presumably through the stimulation of intimal hyperplasia, and thereby the subclavian venous susceptibility to CVS should be determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting the biological effects of mobile phone radiation absorbed energy linked to the MRI-obtained structure.

    Krstić, Dejan; Zigar, Darko; Petković, Dejan; Sokolović, Dušan; Dinđić, Boris; Cvetković, Nenad; Jovanović, Jovica; Dinđić, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The nature of an electromagnetic field is not the same outside and inside a biological subject. Numerical bioelectromagnetic simulation methods for penetrating electromagnetic fields facilitate the calculation of field components in biological entities. Calculating energy absorbed from known sources, such as mobile phones when placed near the head, is a prerequisite for studying the biological influence of an electromagnetic field. Such research requires approximate anatomical models which are used to calculate the field components and absorbed energy. In order to explore the biological effects in organs and tissues, it is necessary to establish a relationship between an analogous anatomical model and the real structure. We propose a new approach in exploring biological effects through combining two different techniques: 1) numerical electromagnetic simulation, which is used to calculate the field components in a similar anatomical model and 2) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), which is used to accurately locate sites with increased absorption. By overlapping images obtained by both methods, we can precisely locate the spots with maximum absorption effects. This way, we can detect the site where the most pronounced biological effects are to be expected. This novel approach successfully overcomes the standard limitations of working with analogous anatomical models.

  16. On the link between the speckle free nature of optoacoustics and visibility of structures in limited-view tomography

    Xosé Luís Deán-Ben

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Similar to pulse-echo ultrasound, optoacoustic imaging encodes the location of optical absorbers by the time-of-flight of ultrasound waves. Yet, signal generation mechanisms are fundamentally different for the two modalities, leading to significant distinction between the optimum image formation strategies. While interference of back-scattered ultrasound waves with random phases causes speckle noise in ultrasound images, speckle formation is hindered by the strong correlation between the optoacoustic responses corresponding to individual sources. However, visibility of structures is severely hampered when attempting to acquire optoacoustic images under limited-view tomographic geometries. In this tutorial article, we systematically describe the basic principles of optoacoustic signal generation and image formation for objects ranging from individual sub-resolution absorbers to a continuous absorption distribution. The results are of relevance for the proper interpretation of optoacoustic images acquired under limited-view scenarios and may also serve as a basis for optimal design of tomographic acquisition geometries and image formation strategies.

  17. Blind testing cross-linking/mass spectrometry under the auspices of the 11th critical assessment of methods of protein structure prediction (CASP11 [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Adam Belsom

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Determining the structure of a protein by any method requires various contributions from experimental and computational sides. In a recent study, high-density cross-linking/mass spectrometry (HD-CLMS data in combination with ab initio structure prediction determined the structure of human serum albumin (HSA domains, with an RMSD to X-ray structure of up to 2.5 Å, or 3.4 Å in the context of blood serum. This paper reports the blind test on the readiness of this technology through the help of Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP. We identified between 201-381 unique residue pairs at an estimated 5% FDR (at link level albeit with missing site assignment precision evaluation, for four target proteins. HD-CLMS proved reliable once crystal structures were released. However, improvements in structure prediction using cross-link data were slight. We identified two reasons for this. Spread of cross-links along the protein sequence and the tightness of the spatial constraints must be improved. However, for the selected targets even ideal contact data derived from crystal structures did not allow modellers to arrive at the observed structure. Consequently, the progress of HD-CLMS in conjunction with computational modeling methods as a structure determination method, depends on advances on both arms of this hybrid approach.

  18. Morphology and behaviour : functional links in development and evolution Introduction

    Bertossa, Rinaldo C.

    2011-01-01

    Development and evolution of animal behaviour and morphology are frequently addressed independently, as reflected in the dichotomy of disciplines dedicated to their study distinguishing object of study (morphology versus behaviour) and perspective (ultimate versus proximate). Although traits are

  19. Linking bacterial community structure to advection and environmental impact along a coast-fjord gradient of the Sognefjord, western Norway

    Storesund, Julia E.; Sandaa, Ruth-Anne; Thingstad, T. Frede; Asplin, Lars; Albretsen, Jon; Erga, Svein Rune

    2017-12-01

    Here we present novel data on bacterial assemblages along a coast-fjord gradient in the Sognefjord, the deepest (1308 m) and longest (205 km) ice-free fjord in the world. Data were collected on two cruises, one in November 2012, and one in May 2013. Special focus was on the impact of advective processes and how these are reflected in the autochthonous and allochthonous fractions of the bacterial communities. Both in November and May bacterial community composition, determined by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analyses (ARISA), in the surface and intermediate water appeared to be highly related to bacterial communities originating from freshwater runoff and coastal water, whereas the sources in the basin water were mostly unknown. Additionally, the inner part of the Sognefjord was more influenced by side-fjords than the outer part, and changes in bacterial community structure along the coast-fjord gradient generally showed higher correlation with environmental variables than with geographic distances. High resolution model simulations indicated a surprisingly high degree of temporal and spatial variation in both current speed and direction. This led to a more episodic/discontinuous horizontal current pattern, with several vortices (10-20 km wide) being formed from time to time along the fjord. We conclude that during periods of strong wind forcing, advection led to allochthonous species being introduced to the surface and intermediate layers of the fjord, and also appeared to homogenize community composition in the basin water. We also expect vortices to be active mixing zones where inflowing bacterial populations on the southern side of the fjord are mixed with the outflowing populations on the northern side. On average, retention time of the fjord water was sufficient for bacterial communities to be established.

  20. Moons a very short introduction

    Rothery, David A

    2015-01-01

    Moons: A Very Short Introduction introduces the reader to the varied and fascinating moons of our Solar System. Beginning with the early discoveries of Galileo and others, it describes their variety of mostly mythological names, and the early use of Jupiter’s moons to establish position at sea and to estimate the speed of light. It discusses the structure, formation, and profound influence of our Moon, those of the other planets, and ends with the recent discovery of moons orbiting asteroids, whilst looking forward to the possibility of discovering microbial life beyond Earth and of finding moons of exoplanets in planetary systems far beyond our own.

  1. Nuclear chemistry on the Czech Technical University in Prague after introduction of structured study and foundation of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry

    John, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation the author (head of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry) give a short review of history of the Department of Nuclear Chemistry and of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Education in structured study in specialisation of nuclear chemistry in bachelor level, master level, as well as post-graduate study in nuclear chemistry with academic degree PhD. are realised. Some scientific results are presented

  2. Recent Structural Change in Remote Sensing Data Time Series Linked to Farm Management in Horn of Africa (1999-2009)

    Crisci, A.; Vignaroli, P.; Genesio, L.; Grasso, V.; Bacci, M.; Tarchiani, V.; Capecchi, V.

    2011-01-01

    Food security in East Africa region essentially depends on the stability of rain-fed crops farming, which renders its society vulnerable to climatic fluctuations. These ones in Africa are most widely and directly related to rainfall. In this study, the relation between recent spatial rainfall variability and vegetation dynamics has been investigated for East Africa territories. Satellite raster products SPOT-4 Vegetation 1 km resolution (Saint, 1995) and RFE (rainfall estimates) from Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) are used. The survey is carried out at administrative level scale using 10-day summaries extracted from raster data for each spatial area unit thanks to specific polygonal layers. Time series covers two different periods: 1996-2009 for rainfall estimates and 1999-2009 for NDVI. The first step of the analysis has been to build for each administrative unit a coherent set of data, along the time series, suitable to be processed with state-of-art statistical tools. The analysis is based on the assumption that every structural break in vegetation dynamics could be caused by two alternative/complementary causes, namely: (i) modifications in crop farming systems (adaptation strategy) related to eventual break-shift in rainfall regime and/or (ii) other socio-economic factors. BFAST (Verbesselt et al, 2010) R package are employed to lead a comprehensive breakpoint analysis on 10-day RFE (spatial mean and standard deviation) and 10-day NDVI ones (spatial mean, mode and standard deviation). The cross-viewing of the years where significant breaks have occurred, throughout opportune GIS layering, provides an explorative interpretation of spatial climate/vegetation dynamics in the whole area. Moreover, the spatial and temporal pattern of ecosystem dynamics in response to climatic variability has been investigated using wavelet coherency by SOWAS R package (Maraun, 2007). The wavelet coherency (WCOH) is a normalized time and scale resolved measure for

  3. Introduction to Network Simulator NS2

    Issariyakul, Teerawat

    2012-01-01

    "Introduction to Network Simulator NS2" is a primer providing materials for NS2 beginners, whether students, professors, or researchers for understanding the architecture of Network Simulator 2 (NS2) and for incorporating simulation modules into NS2. The authors discuss the simulation architecture and the key components of NS2 including simulation-related objects, network objects, packet-related objects, and helper objects. The NS2 modules included within are nodes, links, SimpleLink objects, packets, agents, and applications. Further, the book covers three helper modules: timers, ra

  4. An Introduction to Malware

    Sharp, Robin

    2007-01-01

    These notes intended for use in DTU course 02233 on Network Security give a short introduction to the topic of malware. The most important types of malware are described, together with their basic principles of operation and dissemination, and defences against malware are discussed.......These notes intended for use in DTU course 02233 on Network Security give a short introduction to the topic of malware. The most important types of malware are described, together with their basic principles of operation and dissemination, and defences against malware are discussed....

  5. An Introduction to Malware

    Sharp, Robin

    2017-01-01

    These notes, intended for use in DTU course 02233 on Network Security, give a short introduction to the topic of malware. The most important types of malware are described, together with their basic principles of operation and dissemination, and defenses against malware are discussed.......These notes, intended for use in DTU course 02233 on Network Security, give a short introduction to the topic of malware. The most important types of malware are described, together with their basic principles of operation and dissemination, and defenses against malware are discussed....

  6. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  7. Applied energy an introduction

    Abdullah, Mohammad Omar

    2012-01-01

    Introduction to Applied EnergyGeneral IntroductionEnergy and Power BasicsEnergy EquationEnergy Generation SystemsEnergy Storage and MethodsEnergy Efficiencies and LossesEnergy industry and Energy Applications in Small -Medium Enterprises (SME) industriesEnergy IndustryEnergy-Intensive industryEnergy Applications in SME Energy industriesEnergy Sources and SupplyEnergy SourcesEnergy Supply and Energy DemandEnergy Flow Visualization and Sankey DiagramEnergy Management and AnalysisEnergy AuditsEnergy Use and Fuel Consumption StudyEnergy Life-Cycle AnalysisEnergy and EnvironmentEnergy Pollutants, S

  8. Introduction to nonimaging optics

    Chaves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction to Nonimaging Optics covers the theoretical foundations and design methods of nonimaging optics, as well as key concepts from related fields. This fully updated, revised, and expanded Second Edition: Features a new and intuitive introduction with a basic description of the advantages of nonimaging opticsAdds new chapters on wavefronts for a prescribed output (irradiance or intensity), infinitesimal étendue optics (generalization of the aplanatic optics), and Köhler optics and color mixingIncorporates new material on the simultaneous multiple surface (SMS) design method in 3-D, int

  9. Introduction to fuzzy systems

    Chen, Guanrong

    2005-01-01

    Introduction to Fuzzy Systems provides students with a self-contained introduction that requires no preliminary knowledge of fuzzy mathematics and fuzzy control systems theory. Simplified and readily accessible, it encourages both classroom and self-directed learners to build a solid foundation in fuzzy systems. After introducing the subject, the authors move directly into presenting real-world applications of fuzzy logic, revealing its practical flavor. This practicality is then followed by basic fuzzy systems theory. The book also offers a tutorial on fuzzy control theory, based mainly on th

  10. Introduction to information processing

    Dietel, Harvey M

    2014-01-01

    An Introduction to Information Processing provides an informal introduction to the computer field. This book introduces computer hardware, which is the actual computing equipment.Organized into three parts encompassing 12 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the evolution of personal computing and includes detailed case studies on two of the most essential personal computers for the 1980s, namely, the IBM Personal Computer and Apple's Macintosh. This text then traces the evolution of modern computing systems from the earliest mechanical calculating devices to microchips. Other chapte

  11. Game theory an introduction

    Barron, E N

    2013-01-01

    An exciting new edition of the popular introduction to game theory and its applications The thoroughly expanded Second Edition presents a unique, hands-on approach to game theory. While most books on the subject are too abstract or too basic for mathematicians, Game Theory: An Introduction, Second Edition offers a blend of theory and applications, allowing readers to use theory and software to create and analyze real-world decision-making models. With a rigorous, yet accessible, treatment of mathematics, the book focuses on results that can be used to

  12. Acoustics an introduction

    Kuttruff, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    This definitive textbook provides students with a comprehensive introduction to acoustics. Beginning with the basic physical ideas, Acoustics balances the fundamentals with engineering aspects, applications and electroacoustics, also covering music, speech and the properties of human hearing. The concepts of acoustics are exposed and applied in:room acousticssound insulation in buildingsnoise controlunderwater sound and ultrasoundScientifically thorough, but with mathematics kept to a minimum, Acoustics is the perfect introduction to acoustics for students at any level of mechanical, electrical or civil engineering courses and an accessible resource for architects, musicians or sound engineers requiring a technical understanding of acoustics and their applications.

  13. Introduction to nuclear reactions

    Satchler, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This introduction to nuclear reaction phenomena is aimed primarily but not exclusively at readers at the undergraduate student level. An overview of the subject is presented in the first two chapters entitled - Some background information and Introduction to nuclear reactions. The third chapter reviews scattering theory with emphasis on the underlying physical ideas and also provides schematic entrees to the more advanced topics. The physical models which have been developed to account for the various aspects of nuclear phenomena are described in more detail in chapter 4. References and exercises are appended to each chapter. (U.K.)

  14. Introduction to the Project

    Kuhn, Johan M.; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    In this note a short introduction to the project “Employment Effects of Entrepreneurs” is presented. First, we describe the purpose of the project; second, we present the background; third, we briefly describe the three papers that constitute the output of the project, and fourth, we discuss two ...... important qualifications for the understanding of the contributions and results established in the project.......In this note a short introduction to the project “Employment Effects of Entrepreneurs” is presented. First, we describe the purpose of the project; second, we present the background; third, we briefly describe the three papers that constitute the output of the project, and fourth, we discuss two...

  15. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  16. Introduction to plasma dynamics

    Morozov, A I

    2013-01-01

    As the twenty-first century progresses, plasma technology will play an increasing role in our lives, providing new sources of energy, ion-plasma processing of materials, wave electromagnetic radiation sources, space plasma thrusters, and more. Studies of the plasma state of matter not only accelerate technological developments but also improve the understanding of natural phenomena. Beginning with an introduction to the characteristics and types of plasmas, Introduction to Plasma Dynamics covers the basic models of classical diffuse plasmas used to describe such phenomena as linear and shock w

  17. Chiropractic: An Introduction

    ... 354–362. Kaptchuk TJ, Eisenberg DM. Chiropractic: origins, controversies, and contributions. Archives of Internal Medicine . 1998;158( ... external links LinkedIn E-mail Updates NCCIH Home Privacy and Policies Accessibility en Español FOIA Site Map ...

  18. Linking the structures, free volumes, and properties of ionic liquid mixtures† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc01407d

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Castiglione, Franca; Doherty, Cara M.; Dolan, Andrew; Hill, Anita J.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Matthews, Richard P.; Mauri, Michele; Mele, Andrea; Simonutti, Roberto; Villar-Garcia, Ignacio J.; Weber, Cameron C.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of ionic liquid (IL) mixtures has been proposed as an approach to rationally fine-tune the physicochemical properties of ILs for a variety of applications. However, the effects of forming such mixtures on the resultant properties of the liquids are only beginning to be understood. Towards a more complete understanding of both the thermodynamics of mixing ILs and the effect of mixing these liquids on their structures and physicochemical properties, the spatial arrangement and free volume of IL mixtures containing the common [C4C1im]+ cation and different anions have been systematically explored using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and 129Xe NMR techniques. Anion size has the greatest effect on the spatial arrangement of the ILs and their mixtures in terms of the size of the non-polar domains and inter-ion distances. It was found that differences in coulombic attraction between oppositely charged ions arising from the distribution of charge density amongst the atoms of the anion also significantly influences these inter-ion distances. PALS and 129Xe NMR results pertaining to the free volume of these mixtures were found to strongly correlate with each other despite the vastly different timescales of these techniques. Furthermore, the excess free volumes calculated from each of these measurements were in excellent agreement with the excess volumes of mixing measured for the IL mixtures investigated. The correspondence of these techniques indicates that the static and dynamic free volume of these liquid mixtures are strongly linked. Consequently, fluxional processes such as hydrogen bonding do not significantly contribute to the free volumes of these liquids compared to the spatial arrangement of ions arising from their size, shape and coulombic attraction. Given the relationship between free volume and transport properties such as viscosity and conductivity, these results provide a link between the

  19. Perturbation of N-linked oligosaccharide structure results in an altered incorporation of [3H]palmitate into specific proteins in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Wellner, R.B.; Ghosh, P.C.; Roecklein, B.; Wu, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into specific cellular proteins has been reported to occur in Chinese hamster ovary and yeast mutant cells. In this paper we report studies concerning the relationship between N-linked oligosaccharide structure and [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into proteins of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We have compared the incorporation of [ 3 H]palmitate into proteins of wild-type and four different mutant CHO cell lines defective in various steps of N-linked protein glycosylation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoretic analysis showed that three of the mutants exhibited increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into several CHO cellular proteins (approximately 30,000-38,000 molecular weight) as compared to the wild-type cells. One of the affected mutants which accumulates the Man5Gn2Asn intermediate structure was examined in detail. In agreement with earlier reports, virtually all of the [ 3 H] palmitate-labeled proteins of both wild-type and mutant cell lines are membrane-bound. Pretreatment of the mutant cell line with tunicamycin blocked the increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into the two specific proteins (both of approximately 30,000 molecular weight) observed in untreated cells; the decreased incorporation of [ 3 H]palmitate into the 30,000 molecular weight species was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the incorporation of [ 3 H]palmitate into two proteins of approximately 20,000 molecular weight. Pretreatment of wild-type cells with tunicamycin also caused increased [ 3 H]palmitate incorporation into the 20,000 molecular weight species

  20. Immunolocalization of 8-5' and 8-8' linked structures of lignin in cell walls of Chamaecyparis obtusa using monoclonal antibodies.

    Kiyoto, Shingo; Yoshinaga, Arata; Tanaka, Naoyuki; Wada, Munehisa; Kamitakahara, Hiroshi; Takabe, Keiji

    2013-03-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies were generated against dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol- or pinoresinol-p-aminohippuric acid (pAHA)-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate as probes that specifically react with 8-5' or 8-8' linked structure of lignin in plant cell walls. Hybridoma clones were selected that produced antibodies that positively reacted with dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol- or pinoresinol-pAHA-BSA and negatively reacted with pAHA-BSA and guaiacylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether-pAHA-BSA conjugates containing 8-O-4' linkage. Eight clones were established for each antigen and one of each clone that positively reacted with wood sections was selected. The specificity of these antibodies was examined by competitive ELISA tests using various lignin dimers with different linkages. The anti-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol antibody reacted specifically with dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol and did not react with other model compounds containing 8-O-4', 8-8', or 5-5' linkages. The anti-pinoresinol antibody reacted specifically with pinoresinol and syringaresinol and did not react with the other model compounds containing 8-O-4', 8-5', or 5-5' linkages. The antibodies also did not react with dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol acetate or pinoresinol acetate, indicating that the presence of free phenolic or aliphatic hydroxyl group was an important factor in their reactivity. In sections of Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa), labeling by the anti-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol antibody was found in the secondary walls of phloem fibers and in the compound middle lamellae, and secondary walls of tracheids. Weak labeling by the anti-pinoresinol antibody was found in secondary walls of phloem fibers and secondary walls and compound middle lamellae of developed tracheids. These labelings show the localization of 8-5' and 8-8' linked structure of lignin in the cell walls.

  1. Structural analysis program of plant piping system. Introduction of AutoPIPE V8i new feature. JSME PPC-class 2 piping code

    Motohashi, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    After an integration with ADLPipe, AutoPIPE V8i (ver.9.1) became the structural analysis program of plant piping system featured with analysis capability for the ASME NB Class 1 and JSME PPC-Class 2 piping codes including ASME NC Class 2 and ASME ND Class 3. This article described analysis capability for the JSME PPC-Class 2 piping code as well as new general features such as static analysis up to 100 thermal, 10 seismic and 10 wind load cases including different loading scenarios and pipe segment edit function: join, split, reverse and re-order segments. (T. Tanaka)

  2. An Introduction to the Foundations of Chemical Information Theory. Tarski–Lesniewski Logical Structures and the Organization of Natural Sorts and Kinds

    Jerry L. R. Chandler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic mathematics is an applied mathematics of philosophical atomism. The order of the chemical elements in the table of elements is the source of order for the logical operations of addition and subtraction of atomic numbers. The inverse square laws of physics are the source of organization of subatomic structures of chemical atoms (atomic and molecular structures. These facts are foundational to the logic of the chemical sciences and are therefore the scientific basis for chemical information theory. The theories and facts of the chemical sciences are so perplex that several forms of symbolic representations are necessary to communicate the broad range of scientific concepts used to inquire into the nature of natural sorts and kinds. The logics proposed by Tarski, Lesniewski and Malatesta are applied to the construction of a numerical “spine” of perplex numbers representing atomic numbers as meta-symbols in meta-languages. The orbital angular momenta of certain collections of electrical particles (also known as “handedness” are critical components in constructing the logical propositions of the perplex number “spine”. Biological communication channels can function if and only if the natural sorts and kinds are consistent with the matching patterns of the optical isomers. The terms spinners and twisters are introduced to express the electro-mechanical torques necessary for encoding chemical information. This hypothesis can be tested by several categories of experiments, including clinical pharmaco-dynamics and clinical toxico-dynamics of dissymmetric isomers of different sorts and kinds.

  3. Introduction to quantum groups

    Monteiro, Marco A.R.

    1994-01-01

    An elementary introduction to quantum groups is presented. The example of Universal Enveloping Algebra of deformed SU(2) is analysed in detail. It is also discussed systems made up of bosonic q-oscillators at finite temperature within the formalism of Thermo-Field Dynamics. (author). 39 refs

  4. Introduction to nucleosynthesis

    Guasp, J.

    1975-01-01

    After a short introduction on stellar evolution, the physical foundations of nucleosynthesis are exposed: H, He, C and O fusion, Si burning and the equilibrium process. The effect of neutrinos in the last stages of stellar evolution and Supernova explosions are treated too. Afterwards the neutron capture process, fast and slow, are considerated concluding with cosmic nucleogenesis and nucleosynthesis in overmasive objects. (author)

  5. Russian: An Active Introduction.

    De La Cruz, Nina

    The Active Introduction is one of the modules in an array of materials used in Russian training for beginners at the Foreign Service Institute. It is essentially a catalog of sentences relating to typical daily activities which can be combined to form different communication sequences in dialog form. Students learn to speak Russian through…

  6. Introduction to the Project

    Kuhn, Johan M.; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    In this note a short introduction to the project “Employment Effects of Entrepreneurs” is presented. First, we describe the purpose of the project; second, we present the background; third, we briefly describe the three papers that constitute the output of the project, and fourth, we discuss two...... important qualifications for the understanding of the contributions and results established in the project....

  7. Introduction to LCA Methodology

    Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2018-01-01

    In order to offer the reader an overview of the LCA methodology in the preparation of the more detailed description of its different phases, a brief introduction is given to the methodological framework according to the ISO 14040 standard and the main elements of each of its phases. Emphasis...

  8. Introduction to Chiral Symmetry

    Koch, Volker [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-05-09

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. We will also discuss some effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. We will present some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisionsd.

  9. Introduction: Adapting Idols

    Joost Bruin; dr. Koos Zwaan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction book Adapting Idols Since the first series of Pop Idol aired in the UK just over a decade ago, Idols television shows have been broadcast in more than forty countries all over the world. In all those countries the global Idols format has been adapted to local cultures and production

  10. Introduction to topology

    Mendelson, Bert

    1990-01-01

    Highly regarded for its exceptional clarity, imaginative and instructive exercises, and fine writing style, this concise book offers an ideal introduction to the fundamentals of topology. It provides a simple, thorough survey of elementary topics, starting with set theory and advancing to metric and topological spaces, connectedness, and compactness. 1975 edition.

  11. Introduction to statistics

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    The three lectures will present an introduction to statistical methods as used in High Energy Physics. As the time will be very limited, the course will seek mainly to define the important issues and to introduce the most wide used tools. Topics will include the interpretation and use of probability, estimation of parameters and testing of hypotheses.

  12. Introduction to Statistics course

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    The four lectures will present an introduction to statistical methods as used in High Energy Physics. As the time will be very limited, the course will seek mainly to define the important issues and to introduce the most wide used tools. Topics will include the interpretation and use of probability, estimation of parameters and testing of hypotheses.

  13. Introduction: The Transparency Issue

    Teurlings, J.; Stauff, M.

    2014-01-01

    Besides giving an overview on the individual contributions, this introduction to the special issue on transparency delineates a conceptual context for a critical analysis of the contemporary discourse on transparency and the media mechanisms related to it. It focuses on three ambivalences inherent

  14. Introduction to International Trade.

    Crummett, Dan M.; Crummett, Jerrie

    This set of student and teacher guides is intended for use in a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in such occupational areas in international trade as business/finance, communications, logistics, and marketing. The following topics are covered in the course's five instructional units: introduction to careers in international…

  15. Introduction to association schemes

    Seidel, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper gives an introduction to the theory of association schemes, following Bose-Mesner (1959), Biggs (1974), Delsarte (1973), Bannai-Ito (1984) and Brouwer-Cohen-Neumaier (1989). Apart from definitions and many examples, also several proofs and some problems are included. The paragraphs

  16. An introduction to radiobiology

    Nias, A.H.W.; Dimbleby, R.

    1990-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to quantitative radiobiology with emphasis on practical aspects of the subject. Among the topics considered are reparable damage, densely ionizing radiation, normal and malignant cells, and whole body regulation. These and other aspects of radiation biology are described in detail

  17. Introduction to Shakespeare: English.

    Hargraves, Richard

    The "Introduction to Shakespeare" course in the Quinmester Program involves the careful study of the tragedy "Romeo and Juliet" and the comedy "The Taming of the Shrew," emphasizing language, development of character and theme. The course also includes the study of biographical data relevant to the evolution of…

  18. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-01

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented

  19. Introduction to HACCP.

    Introduction to HACCP Deana R. Jones, Ph.D. Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit USDA-Agricultural Research Service Russell Research Center Athens, GA Deana.Jones@ars.usda.gov HACCP is an acronym for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point and was initially developed by the Pillsbury Company a...

  20. An Introduction to Malware

    Sharp, Robin

    2017-01-01

    These notes, intended for use in DTU course 02233 on Network Security, give a short introduction to the topic of malware. The most important types of malware are described, together with their basic principles of operation and dissemination, and defenses against malware are discussed.

  1. Introduction to statistics

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The three lectures will present an introduction to statistical methods as used in High Energy Physics. As the time will be very limited, the course will seek mainly to define the important issues and to introduce the most wide used tools. Topics will include the interpretation and use of probability, estimation of parameters and testing of hypotheses.

  2. Introduction to ROC analysis

    Kelsey, C.A.; Mettler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    An elementary introduction to ROC analysis illustrates how ROC curves depend on observer threshold levels and discusses the relation between ROC curve parameters and other measures of observer performance including accuracy sensitivity specificity true positive fraction, true negative fraction, false positive fraction and false negative fraction

  3. Introduction and fundamentals

    Thomas, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This introduction discusses advances in the fundamental sciences which underlie the applied science of health physics and radiation protection. Risk assessments in nuclear medicine are made by defining the conditions of exposure, identification of adverse effects, relating exposure with effect, and estimation of the overall risk for ionizing radiations

  4. Labour and Passion. : Introduction

    Dr. Joke Hermes

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this introduction to the themed section on ‘Labour and passion’, it is argued that work has bled into all areas of life. Political economists and media production researchers have shown how both paid and unpaid labour are singularly important and build upon one another. The set of

  5. Diophantine geometry an introduction

    Hindry, Marc

    2000-01-01

    This is an introduction to diophantine geometry at the advanced graduate level. The book contains a proof of the Mordell conjecture which will make it quite attractive to graduate students and professional mathematicians. In each part of the book, the reader will find numerous exercises.

  6. Introduction to superstrings

    Kaku, M.

    1988-01-01

    This tutorial introduces the development of, and current trends in, superstring theory, a significant and still controversial attempt to unify general relatively and quantum field theory. Stressing current areas of research activity, Introduction to Superstrings addresses topics including string field theory, multi-loops and Teichmuller spaces, conformal field theory, and four-dimensional superstrings

  7. Introduction to number theory

    Vazzana, Anthony; Garth, David

    2007-01-01

    One of the oldest branches of mathematics, number theory is a vast field devoted to studying the properties of whole numbers. Offering a flexible format for a one- or two-semester course, Introduction to Number Theory uses worked examples, numerous exercises, and two popular software packages to describe a diverse array of number theory topics.

  8. Biorefineries: A Short Introduction.

    Wagemann, Kurt; Tippkötter, Nils

    2018-04-13

    The terms bioeconomy and biorefineries are used for a variety of processes and developments. This short introduction is intended to provide a delimitation and clarification of the terminology as well as a classification of current biorefinery concepts. The basic process diagrams of the most important biorefinery types are shown.

  9. Introduction to Film Making.

    Davis, Robert E.

    This booklet is intended for teachers who are now teaching units in film production as part of a program in communication or who wish to begin work with filmmaking in such a program. The first section is intended to serve as a brief introduction to film theory, while a major portion of the rest of the booklet is devoted to film projects which may…

  10. Introduction to particle physics

    Zitoun, R.

    2000-01-01

    This book proposes an introduction to particle physics that requires only a high-school level mathematical knowledge. Elementary particles (leptons, quarks, bosons) are presented according to a modern view taking into account of their symmetries and interactions. The author shows how physicists have elaborated the standard model and what are its implications in cosmology. (J.S.)

  11. Introduction to risk assessment

    Raina, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to risk assessment. It discusses the basic concepts of risk assessment, nuclear risk assessment process and products, the role of risk assessment products in nuclear safety assurance, the relationship between risk assessment and other safety analysis and risk assessment and safe operating envelope

  12. Successful introduction of innovations

    Schoots, K.; Jeeninga, H.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of new technology is sometimes troubled by discontinuity in incentive schemes. By making prior assessments of the necessary means, the real time span for the incentive scheme and by maintaining this scheme until the technology is mature enough to enter the market, the success of innovation trajectories can be increased significantly. [mk] [nl

  13. Successful introduction of innovation

    Schoots, K.; Jeeninga, H.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of new technology sometimes proceeds sluggishly due to discontinuity in incentive schemes. Estimating in advance which means are required, what a realistic time span is for the incentive scheme and continuing this scheme until the technology is marketable can significantly increase the success of innovation trajectories. [mk] [nl

  14. Chemical Safety – Introduction

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    A course of "Chemical Safety – Introduction" will be held in English on 29 May 2009, 9:30-12:00. There are some places left. If you are interested in participating, please register on the Training Catalogue. You will then receive an invitation by email.

  15. Small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking for data assisted protein structure prediction in CASP 12 with prospects for improved accuracy

    Ogorzalek, Tadeusz L.

    2018-01-04

    Experimental data offers empowering constraints for structure prediction. These constraints can be used to filter equivalently scored models or more powerfully within optimization functions toward prediction. In CASP12, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry (CLMS) data, measured on an exemplary set of novel fold targets, were provided to the CASP community of protein structure predictors. As HT, solution-based techniques, SAXS and CLMS can efficiently measure states of the full-length sequence in its native solution conformation and assembly. However, this experimental data did not substantially improve prediction accuracy judged by fits to crystallographic models. One issue, beyond intrinsic limitations of the algorithms, was a disconnect between crystal structures and solution-based measurements. Our analyses show that many targets had substantial percentages of disordered regions (up to 40%) or were multimeric or both. Thus, solution measurements of flexibility and assembly support variations that may confound prediction algorithms trained on crystallographic data and expecting globular fully-folded monomeric proteins. Here, we consider the CLMS and SAXS data collected, the information in these solution measurements, and the challenges in incorporating them into computational prediction. As improvement opportunities were only partly realized in CASP12, we provide guidance on how data from the full-length biological unit and the solution state can better aid prediction of the folded monomer or subunit. We furthermore describe strategic integrations of solution measurements with computational prediction programs with the aim of substantially improving foundational knowledge and the accuracy of computational algorithms for biologically-relevant structure predictions for proteins in solution. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking for data assisted protein structure prediction in CASP 12 with prospects for improved accuracy

    Ogorzalek, Tadeusz L.; Hura, Greg L.; Belsom, Adam; Burnett, Kathryn H.; Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Tainer, John A.; Rappsilber, Juri; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Fidelis, Krzysztof

    2018-01-01

    Experimental data offers empowering constraints for structure prediction. These constraints can be used to filter equivalently scored models or more powerfully within optimization functions toward prediction. In CASP12, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry (CLMS) data, measured on an exemplary set of novel fold targets, were provided to the CASP community of protein structure predictors. As HT, solution-based techniques, SAXS and CLMS can efficiently measure states of the full-length sequence in its native solution conformation and assembly. However, this experimental data did not substantially improve prediction accuracy judged by fits to crystallographic models. One issue, beyond intrinsic limitations of the algorithms, was a disconnect between crystal structures and solution-based measurements. Our analyses show that many targets had substantial percentages of disordered regions (up to 40%) or were multimeric or both. Thus, solution measurements of flexibility and assembly support variations that may confound prediction algorithms trained on crystallographic data and expecting globular fully-folded monomeric proteins. Here, we consider the CLMS and SAXS data collected, the information in these solution measurements, and the challenges in incorporating them into computational prediction. As improvement opportunities were only partly realized in CASP12, we provide guidance on how data from the full-length biological unit and the solution state can better aid prediction of the folded monomer or subunit. We furthermore describe strategic integrations of solution measurements with computational prediction programs with the aim of substantially improving foundational knowledge and the accuracy of computational algorithms for biologically-relevant structure predictions for proteins in solution. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Introduction to the structures determination methods using X-ray diffraction in monocrystals: application to some lanthanides and transition metals complexes with organic ligands

    Oliva, G.

    1983-01-01

    The crystal structure of the complexes Ln (Cl O 4 ) 3 .6[P O N H 2 (C 6 H 5 ) 2 ] where Ln = Eu, La, Cu[N H 2 (C H 3 ) 2 C C O 2 ] 2 , Ni Br 2 .4[As O(C 6 H 5 ) 3 ]. 8 H 2 O (green), Ni Br 2 .4[As O (C 6 H 5 ) 3 ]. 1,5 (C H 3 C 6 H 5 ).H 2 O (orange) and of the ligand P O N H 2 (C 6 H 5 ) 2 have been determined by X-ray diffraction. The complexes involving lanthanide ions refined to final R factors of R(Eu) = 0.125 and R(La) = 0.133 and the following main features were found: the crystal system is cubic; the cation is coordinated to six ligand oxygens in octahedral (Eu) and trigonal anti prismatic (La) configurations with the rate earths on positions of high symmetry (23 for Eu and 3-bar for La); the rest of the structures shows different degrees of disorder. In the light of the geometrical configuration, the occurrence of a strong band 5 D O - 7 F 2 in the fluorescence spectrum of the Eu complex, forbidden on symmetry grounds, is interpreted as a consequence of vibronic coupling. A splitting of the infrared ν P=0 band in the La complex is attributed to the presence of P = 0 groups non-equivalently bonded to the rare earth due to the disorder of this atom. (author)

  18. Potential link between plant and fungal distributions in a dipterocarp rainforest: community and phylogenetic structure of tropical ectomycorrhizal fungi across a plant and soil ecotone.

    Peay, Kabir G; Kennedy, Peter G; Davies, Stuart J; Tan, Sylvester; Bruns, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    *Relatively little is known about diversity or structure of tropical ectomycorrhizal communities or their roles in tropical ecosystem dynamics. In this study, we present one of the largest molecular studies to date of an ectomycorrhizal community in lowland dipterocarp rainforest. *We sampled roots from two 0.4 ha sites located across an ecotone within a 52 ha forest dynamics plot. Our plots contained > 500 tree species and > 40 species of ectomycorrhizal host plants. Fungi were identified by sequencing ribosomal RNA genes. *The community was dominated by the Russulales (30 species), Boletales (17), Agaricales (18), Thelephorales (13) and Cantharellales (12). Total species richness appeared comparable to molecular studies of temperate forests. Community structure changed across the ecotone, although it was not possible to separate the role of environmental factors vs host plant preferences. Phylogenetic analyses were consistent with a model of community assembly where habitat associations are influenced by evolutionary conservatism of functional traits within ectomycorrhizal lineages. *Because changes in the ectomycorrhizal fungal community parallel those of the tree community at this site, this study demonstrates the potential link between the distribution of tropical tree diversity and the distribution of tropical ectomycorrhizal diversity in relation to local-scale edaphic variation.

  19. The recognition unit of FIBCD1 organizes into a noncovalently linked tetrameric structure and uses a hydrophobic funnel (S1) for acetyl group recognition

    Thomsen, Theresa; Moeller, Jesper B; Schlosser, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We have recently identified FIBCD1 (Fibrinogen C domain containing 1) as a type II transmembrane endocytic receptor located primarily in the intestinal brush border. The ectodomain of FIBCD1 comprises a coiled coil, a polycationic region, and a C-terminal FReD (fibrinogen-related domain) that ass......We have recently identified FIBCD1 (Fibrinogen C domain containing 1) as a type II transmembrane endocytic receptor located primarily in the intestinal brush border. The ectodomain of FIBCD1 comprises a coiled coil, a polycationic region, and a C-terminal FReD (fibrinogen-related domain......) that assembles into disulfide-linked homotetramers. The FIBCD1-FReD binds Ca(2+) dependently to acetylated structures like chitin, N-acetylated carbohydrates, and amino acids. FReDs are present in diverse innate immune pattern recognition proteins including the ficolins and horseshoe crab TL5A. Here, we use...... combined with site-directed mutagenesis to define the binding site involved in the interaction of FIBCD1 with acetylated structures. We show that mutations of central residues (A432V and H415G) in the hydrophobic funnel (S1) abolish the binding of FIBCD1 to acetylated bovine serum albumin and chitin...

  20. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.