WorldWideScience

Sample records for line-by-line equivalent radiative

  1. Intercomparison of three microwave/infrared high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Milz, Mathias; Buehler, Stefan A.; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    An intercomparison of three line-by-line (lbl) codes developed independently for atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing - ARTS, GARLIC, and KOPRA - has been performed for a thermal infrared nadir sounding application assuming a HIRS-like (High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder) setup. Radiances for the 19 HIRS infrared channels and a set of 42 atmospheric profiles from the "Garand dataset" have been computed. The mutual differences of the equivalent brightness temperatures are presented and possible causes of disagreement are discussed. In particular, the impact of path integration schemes and atmospheric layer discretization is assessed. When the continuum absorption contribution is ignored because of the different implementations, residuals are generally in the sub-Kelvin range and smaller than 0.1 K for some window channels (and all atmospheric models and lbl codes). None of the three codes turned out to be perfect for all channels and atmospheres. Remaining discrepancies are attributed to different lbl optimization techniques. Lbl codes seem to have reached a maturity in the implementation of radiative transfer that the choice of the underlying physical models (line shape models, continua etc) becomes increasingly relevant.

  2. GARLIC - A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code - GARLIC - is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus.

  3. Performance Analysis of GFDL's GCM Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model on GPU and MIC Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, R.; Paynter, D.; Jones, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Due to their relatively low computational cost, radiative transfer models in global climate models (GCMs) run on traditional CPU architectures generally consist of shortwave and longwave parameterizations over a small number of wavelength bands. With the rise of newer GPU and MIC architectures, however, the performance of high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer models may soon approach those of the physical parameterizations currently employed in GCMs. Here we present an analysis of the current performance of a new line-by-line radiative transfer model currently under development at GFDL. Although originally designed to specifically exploit GPU architectures through the use of CUDA, the radiative transfer model has recently been extended to include OpenMP in an effort to also effectively target MIC architectures such as Intel's Xeon Phi. Using input data provided by the upcoming Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project (RFMIP, as part of CMIP 6), we compare model results and performance data for various model configurations and spectral resolutions run on both GPU and Intel Knights Landing architectures to analogous runs of the standard Oxford Reference Forward Model on traditional CPUs.

  4. Accelerated line-by-line calculations for the radiative transfer of trace gases related to climate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the present study we are studying the effects of including carbon dioxide, ozone, methane, and the halocarbons in addition to water vapor in the radiating atmosphere. The study has focused on two principal issues: the effect on the spectral fluxes and cooling rates of carbon dioxide, ozone and the halocarbons at 1990 concentration levels and the change in fluxes and cooling rates as a consequence of the anticipated ten year change in the profiles of these species. For the latter study the water vapor profiles have been taken as invariant in time. The radiative line-by-line calculations using LBLRTM (Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model) have been performed for tropical (TRP), mid-latitude winter (MLW) and mid-latitude summer (MLS) model atmospheres. The halocarbons considered in the present study are CCl 4 , CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-22. In addition to considering the radiative effects of carbon dioxide at 355 ppM, the assumed current level, we have also obtained results for doubled carbon dioxide at 710 ppM. An important focus of the current research effort is the effect of the ozone depletion profile on atmospheric radiative effects

  5. GARLIC — A general purpose atmospheric radiative transfer line-by-line infrared-microwave code: Implementation and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Hedelt, Pascal; Hess, Michael; Mendrok, Jana; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    A suite of programs for high resolution infrared-microwave atmospheric radiative transfer modeling has been developed with emphasis on efficient and reliable numerical algorithms and a modular approach appropriate for simulation and/or retrieval in a variety of applications. The Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code — GARLIC — is suitable for arbitrary observation geometry, instrumental field-of-view, and line shape. The core of GARLIC's subroutines constitutes the basis of forward models used to implement inversion codes to retrieve atmospheric state parameters from limb and nadir sounding instruments. This paper briefly introduces the physical and mathematical basics of GARLIC and its descendants and continues with an in-depth presentation of various implementation aspects: An optimized Voigt function algorithm combined with a two-grid approach is used to accelerate the line-by-line modeling of molecular cross sections; various quadrature methods are implemented to evaluate the Schwarzschild and Beer integrals; and Jacobians, i.e. derivatives with respect to the unknowns of the atmospheric inverse problem, are implemented by means of automatic differentiation. For an assessment of GARLIC's performance, a comparison of the quadrature methods for solution of the path integral is provided. Verification and validation are demonstrated using intercomparisons with other line-by-line codes and comparisons of synthetic spectra with spectra observed on Earth and from Venus. - Highlights: • High resolution infrared-microwave radiative transfer model. • Discussion of algorithmic and computational aspects. • Jacobians by automatic/algorithmic differentiation. • Performance evaluation by intercomparisons, verification, validation

  6. Recent developments in the line-by-line modeling of outgoing longwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, S.A.; Engeln, A. von; Brocard, E.; John, V.O.; Kuhn, T.; Eriksson, P.

    2006-01-01

    High frequency resolution radiative transfer model calculations with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) were used to simulate the clear-sky outgoing longwave radiative flux (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere. Compared to earlier calculations by Clough and coworkers the model used a spherical atmosphere instead of a plane parallel atmosphere, updated spectroscopic parameters from HITRAN, and updated continuum parameterizations from Mlawer and coworkers. These modifications lead to a reduction in simulated OLR by approximately 4.1%, the largest part, approximately 2.5%, being due to the absence of the plane parallel approximation. As a simple application of the new model, the sensitivity of OLR to changes in humidity, carbon dioxide concentration, and temperature were investigated for different cloud-free atmospheric scenarios. It was found that for the tropical scenario a 20% change in humidity has a larger impact than a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration. The sensitive altitude region for temperature and humidity changes is the entire free troposphere, including the upper troposphere where humidity data quality is poor

  7. Measurements of downwelling far-infrared radiance during the RHUBC-II campaign at Cerro Toco, Chile and comparisons with line-by-line radiative transfer calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Jeffrey C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Cageao, Richard P.; Kratz, David P.; Latvakoski, Harri; Johnson, David G.; Turner, David D.; Mlawer, Eli J.

    2017-09-01

    Downwelling radiances at the Earth's surface measured by the Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument in an environment with integrated precipitable water (IPW) as low as 0.03 cm are compared with calculated spectra in the far-infrared and mid-infrared. FIRST (a Fourier transform spectrometer) was deployed from August through October 2009 at 5.38 km MSL on Cerro Toco, a mountain in the Atacama Desert of Chile. There FIRST took part in the Radiative Heating in Unexplored Bands Campaign Part 2 (RHUBC-II), the goal of which is the assessment of water vapor spectroscopy. Radiosonde water vapor and temperature vertical profiles are input into the Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to compute modeled radiances. The LBLRTM minus FIRST residual spectrum is calculated to assess agreement. Uncertainties (1-σ) in both the measured and modeled radiances are also determined. Measured and modeled radiances nearly all agree to within combined (total) uncertainties. Features exceeding uncertainties can be corrected into the combined uncertainty by increasing water vapor and model continuum absorption, however this may not be necessary due to 1-σ uncertainties (68% confidence). Furthermore, the uncertainty in the measurement-model residual is very large and no additional information on the adequacy of current water vapor spectral line or continuum absorption parameters may be derived. Similar future experiments in similarly cold and dry environments will require absolute accuracy of 0.1% of a 273 K blackbody in radiance and water vapor accuracy of ∼3% in the profile layers contributing to downwelling radiance at the surface.

  8. Performance of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM for temperature, water vapor, and trace gas retrievals: recent updates evaluated with IASI case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Alvarado

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern data assimilation algorithms depend on accurate infrared spectroscopy in order to make use of the information related to temperature, water vapor (H2O, and other trace gases provided by satellite observations. Reducing the uncertainties in our knowledge of spectroscopic line parameters and continuum absorption is thus important to improve the application of satellite data to weather forecasting. Here we present the results of a rigorous validation of spectroscopic updates to an advanced radiative transfer model, the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM, against a global dataset of 120 near-nadir, over-ocean, nighttime spectra from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. We compare calculations from the latest version of LBLRTM (v12.1 to those from a previous version (v9.4+ to determine the impact of spectroscopic updates to the model on spectral residuals as well as retrieved temperature and H2O profiles. We show that the spectroscopy in the CO2 ν2 and ν3 bands is significantly improved in LBLRTM v12.1 relative to v9.4+, and that these spectroscopic updates lead to mean changes of ~0.5 K in the retrieved vertical temperature profiles between the surface and 10 hPa, with the sign of the change and the variability among cases depending on altitude. We also find that temperature retrievals using each of these two CO2 bands are remarkably consistent in LBLRTM v12.1, potentially allowing these bands to be used to retrieve atmospheric temperature simultaneously. The updated H2O spectroscopy in LBLRTM v12.1 substantially improves the a posteriori residuals in the P-branch of the H2O ν2 band, while the improvements in the R-branch are more modest. The H2O amounts retrieved with LBLRTM v12.1 are on average 14% lower between 100 and 200 hPa, 42% higher near 562 hPa, and 31% higher near the surface compared to the amounts retrieved with v9.4+ due to a combination of the different retrieved temperature profiles and the

  9. Attainment of radiation equivalency principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmelev, A.N.; Apseh, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Problems connected with the prospects for long-term development of the nuclear energetics are discussed. Basic principles of the future large-scale nuclear energetics are listed, primary attention is the safety of radioactive waste management of nuclear energetics. The radiation equivalence principle means close of fuel cycle and management of nuclear materials transportation with low losses on spent fuel and waste processing. Two aspects are considered: radiation equivalence in global and local aspects. The necessity of looking for other strategies of fuel cycle management in full-scale nuclear energy on radioactive waste management is supported [ru

  10. An ultrafast line-by-line algorithm for calculating spectral transmittance and radiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, X.

    2013-01-01

    An ultrafast line-by-line algorithm for calculating spectral transmittance and radiance of gases is presented. The algorithm is based on fast convolution of the Voigt line profile using Fourier transform and a binning technique. The algorithm breaks a radiative transfer calculation into two steps: a one-time pre-computation step in which a set of pressure independent coefficients are computed using the spectral line information; a normal calculation step in which the Fourier transform coefficients of the optical depth are calculated using the line of sight information and the coefficients pre-computed in the first step, the optical depth is then calculated using an inverse Fourier transform and the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated. The algorithm is significantly faster than line-by-line algorithms that do not employ special speedup techniques by a factor of 10 3 –10 6 . A case study of the 2.7 μm band of H 2 O vapor is presented. -- Highlights: •An ultrafast line-by-line model based on FFT and a binning technique is presented. •Computationally expensive calculations are factored out into a pre-computation step. •It is 10 3 –10 8 times faster than LBL algorithms that do not employ speedup techniques. •Good agreement with experimental data for the 2.7 μm band of H 2 O

  11. A new mathematical formulation of the line-by-line method in case of weak line overlapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishov, Alexander G.; Krymova, Natalie V.

    1994-01-01

    A rigorous mathematical proof is presented for multiline representation on the equivalent width of a molecular band which consists in the general case of n overlapping spectral lines. The multiline representation includes a principal term and terms of minor significance. The principal term is the equivalent width of the molecular band consisting of the same n nonoverlapping spectral lines. The terms of minor significance take into consideration the overlapping of two, three and more spectral lines. They are small in case of the weak overlapping of spectral lines in the molecular band. The multiline representation can be easily generalized for optically inhomogeneous gas media and holds true for combinations of molecular bands. If the band lines overlap weakly the standard formulation of line-by-line method becomes too labor-consuming. In this case the multiline representation permits line-by-line calculations to be performed more effectively. Other useful properties of the multiline representation are pointed out.

  12. Radiation equivalency: For the radiation recall phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.H.; Cole, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental and clinico-epidemiological investigations have unequivocally established the risk of an offspring in later years developing cancer after experiencing an in utero carcinogenic insult. The present studies have focused upon identifying whether the biological effects of iodine-131 and the colon carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) when administered during pregnancy in the Fischer F344 inbred rat are remembered in the offsprings at a later age. The investigations have been based upon the premise that after exposure to a carcinogen ''foreign-like'' tumor cells develop which result in the host mounting active antitumor immune responses. The authors have now measured at 2 to 3 months post-exposure, the antitumor cell-mediated immunity (CMI) induced by intraperitoneal administration of the radionuclide or chemical at 16-18 days of gestation. Their findings indicate a positive sex relationship existing in those offsprings exposed to the radioiodine with the female being much less sensitive. In contrast, no such difference was observed between responsiveness of the males and females born from dams exposed to the DMH. Significantly, the dams exposed to either the radionuclide or DMH expressed no measurable CMI suggesting that either the fetus acted as a carcinogen trap or else the state of pregnancy altered the mother's immune system in such a fashion to no longer respond to the insult. A Radiation Equivalency value has now been determined for the transplacental DMH exposures with the calculations suggesting the fetus is significantly more sensitive (over 10 times) than the adult animals. The results of this study now demonstrate that carcinogenic memory remains for exposures to both the iodine-131 and DMH in the first offspring generation and suggest that the effects may be recalled at a later age with the expected overt results being the development of cancer

  13. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  14. Extended equivalent dipole model for radiated emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Obiekezie, Chijioke S.

    2016-01-01

    This work is on the characterisation of radiated fields from electronic devices. An equivalent dipole approach is used. Previous work showed that this was an effective approach for single layer printed circuit boards where an infinite ground plane can be assumed. In this work, this approach is extended for the characterisation of more complex circuit boards or electronic systems.\\ud For complex electronic radiators with finite ground planes, the main challenge is characterising field diffract...

  15. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Reading Line-by-Line, but Analyzing by Meaningful Qualitative Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the first of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail points out the challenges of determining units to analyze qualitatively when dealing with text. He acknowledges that although we may read a document word-by-word or line-by-line, we need to adjust our focus when processing the text for purposes of…

  16. Characteristics of natural background external radiation and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kenzo

    1989-01-01

    The two sources of natural radiation - cosmic rays and primordial radionuclides - are described. The factors affecting radiation doses received from natural radiation and the calculation of effective dose equivalent due to natural radiation are discussed. 10 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Efficient algorithm for generating spectra using line-by-line methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnad, V.; Iglesias, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    A method is presented for efficient generation of spectra using line-by-line approaches. The only approximation is replacing the line shape function with an interpolation procedure, which makes the method independent of the line profile functional form. The resulting computational savings for large number of lines is proportional to the number of frequency points in the spectral range. Therefore, for large-scale problems the method can provide speedups of two orders of magnitude or more. A method was presented to generate line-by-line spectra efficiently. The first step was to replace the explicit calculation of the profile by the Newton divided-differences interpolating polynomial. The second step is to accumulate the lines effectively reducing their number to the number of frequency points. The final step is recognizing the resulting expression as a convolution and amenable to FFT methods. The reduction in computational effort for a configuration-to-configuration transition array with large number of lines is proportional to the number of frequency points. The method involves no approximations except for replacing the explicit profile evaluation by interpolation. Specifically, the line accumulation and convolution are exact given the interpolation procedure. Furthermore, the interpolation makes the method independent of the line profile functional form contrary to other schemes using FFT methods to generate line-by-line spectra but relying on the analytic form of the profile Fourier transform. Finally, the method relies on a uniform frequency mesh. For non-uniform frequency meshes, however, the method can be applied by using a suitable temporary uniform mesh and the results interpolated onto the final mesh with little additional cost.

  18. An empirical line-by-line model for the infrared solar transmittance spectrum from 700 to 5000cm{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, F. [Institut fuer Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: frank.hase@imk.fzk.de; Demoulin, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, allee du VI aout, 17, batiment B5a, B-4000, Liege (Belgium); Sauval, A.J. [Observatoire Royal de Belgique, avenue circulaire, 3, B-1180, Bruxelles (Belgium); Toon, G.C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bernath, P.F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada N2L3G1 (Canada); Goldman, A. [Department of Physics, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States); Hannigan, J.W. [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Rinsland, C.P. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681-2199 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    An empirical line-by-line model for the infrared solar transmittance spectrum is presented. The model can be incorporated into radiative transfer codes to allow fast calculation of all relevant emission and absorption features in the solar spectrum in the mid-infrared region from 700 to 5000cm{sup -1}. The transmittance is modelled as a function of the diameter of the field-of-view centered on the solar disk: the line broadening due to solar rotation as well as center-to-limb variations in strength and width are taken into account for stronger lines. Applications of the model presented here are in the fields of terrestrial remote sensing in the mid-infrared spectral region when the sun is used as radiation source or scattered solar radiation contributes to the measured signal and in the fields of atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms which compute the propagation of infrared solar radiation in the terrestrial atmosphere.

  19. Validity of the Aluminum Equivalent Approximation in Space Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Adams, Daniel O.; Wilson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the aluminum equivalent shield approximation in space radiation analysis can be traced back to its roots in the early years of the NASA space programs (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo) wherein the primary radiobiological concern was the intense sources of ionizing radiation causing short term effects which was thought to jeopardize the safety of the crew and hence the mission. Herein, it is shown that the aluminum equivalent shield approximation, although reasonably well suited for that time period and to the application for which it was developed, is of questionable usefulness to the radiobiological concerns of routine space operations of the 21 st century which will include long stays onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and perhaps the moon. This is especially true for a risk based protection system, as appears imminent for deep space exploration where the long-term effects of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) exposure is of primary concern. The present analysis demonstrates that sufficiently large errors in the interior particle environment of a spacecraft result from the use of the aluminum equivalent approximation, and such approximations should be avoided in future astronaut risk estimates. In this study, the aluminum equivalent approximation is evaluated as a means for estimating the particle environment within a spacecraft structure induced by the GCR radiation field. For comparison, the two extremes of the GCR environment, the 1977 solar minimum and the 2001 solar maximum, are considered. These environments are coupled to the Langley Research Center (LaRC) deterministic ionized particle transport code High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN), which propagates the GCR spectra for elements with charges (Z) in the range I aluminum equivalent approximation for a good polymeric shield material such as genetic polyethylene (PE). The shield thickness is represented by a 25 g/cm spherical shell. Although one could imagine the progression to greater

  20. Effective dose equivalents from external radiation due to Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkin, V.G.; Debedev, O.V.; Balonov, M.I.; Parkhomenko, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Summarized data on measurements of individual dose of external γ-sources in 1987-1990 of population of western areas of Bryansk region were presented. Type of distribution of effective dose equivalent, its significance for various professional and social groups of population depending on the type of the house was discussed. Dependences connecting surface soil activity in the populated locality with average dose of external radiation sources were presented. Tendency of dose variation in 1987-1990 was shown

  1. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio Henrique dos Santos

    2001-01-01

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  2. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M A; Abukassem, I

    2009-01-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  3. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, M. A.; Abukassem, I.

    2009-05-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  4. The effective dose equivalent from external and internal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, Soeren

    1989-01-01

    The various sources of low-level ionizing radiation are discussed and compared in terms of mean effective dose equivalent to man. For the most nonoccupationally exposed individuals, natural sources given the dominating contribution to the effective dose equivalent. The size of this contribution is strongly dependent on human activities. Natural sources contribution on average 2.4 mSV per year, of which half is due to irradiation of lungs and airways from short lived radon daughters present in indoor air. In Sweden this radon daughter contribution is considerably higher and contributes a mean of 3 mSv per year, thus giving a total contribution from natural radiation of about 4 mSV per year. In extreme cases, radon daughter contributions of several hundreds of mSv per year may be reached. Medical exposure, mainly diagnostic X-rays, contributes 0.4-1 mSv per year both in Sweden and as a world average. The testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere has given 1-2 mSv to each person in the world as a mean. The contribution from the routine operation of nuclear reactors is insignificant. The reactor accident in Chernobyl resulted in widely varying exposures of the European population. The average for Sweden is estimated to be 0.1 mSv during the first year and about 1 mSv during a 50-year period. For groups of Swedes who eat a considerable amount of game this contribution will be 10 times higher, and for the Lapps who breed reindeer in the most contaminated areas, typical values of 20-70 mSv and extreme values of about 1 Sv may be reached in 50 years. This means that the Chernobyl reactor accident for several years will be their dominating source of irradiation

  5. Ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ting; Zhang, Siyuan; Fu, Quanyou; Xu, Zhian; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping applicable in a liquid or liquid filled tissue cavities exposed by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Scattered signals from cavitation bubbles were obtained in a scan line immediately after one HIFU exposure, and then there was a waiting time of 2 s long enough to make the liquid back to the original state. As this pattern extended, an image was built up by sequentially measuring a series of such lines. The acquisition of the beamformed radiofrequency (RF) signals for a scan line was synchronized with HIFU exposure. The duration of HIFU exposure, as well as the delay of the interrogating pulse relative to the moment while HIFU was turned off, could vary from microseconds to seconds. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated in tap-water and a tap-water filled cavity in the tissue-mimicking gelatin-agar phantom as capable of observing temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud with temporal resolution of several microseconds, lateral and axial resolution of 0.50 mm and 0.29 mm respectively. The dissolution process of cavitation bubble cloud and spatial distribution affected by cavitation previously generated were also investigated. Although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid (e.g. tap water, etc.) that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, the technique may be a useful tool in spatial-temporal cavitation mapping for HIFU with high precision and resolution, providing a reference for clinical therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Examination of optimal radiation quality in the lead equivalent examination of x-ray protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shinichi; Matsuzawa, Rie; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effective lead thickness of the apron for radiation protective clothing, i.e., the lead equivalent, a method of performing the lead equivalent examination is provided in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). We proposed a method of computation using an attenuation coefficient, and examined the measurement accuracy and optimal radiation quality using both. We were able to compute the lead equivalent with sufficient accuracy when using radiation quality of about 60 keV in the range of radiation quality examined. This technique was also examined in the measurement used for the marketing of radiation protective clothing. (author)

  7. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  8. Determination of Dose-Equivalent Response of A Typical Diamond Microdosimeter in Space Radiation Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    firouz payervand

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The reasonable agreement between the dose equivalents calculated in this study and the results reported by other researchers confirmed that this type of microdosimeter could be a promising candidate suitable for the measurement of the dose equivalent in space radiation fields.

  9. Equivalence of some integrals of the radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, T.T.

    1977-01-01

    A definite integral which occurs in radiation theory is shown to be equal in value to another definite integral by evaluating the flux from a spherically symmetrical radiating sphere in two ways. As a corollary, an alternate proof of the invariance of the specific intensity of a ray in empty space along its path is presented. Furthermore, the equality of these two indefinite integrals leads to the conversion of members of a class of indefinite and definite integrals involving arbitrary functions of angle into other integrals. These transformations facilitate the calculation of some of these integrals which arise not only in the theory of radiation, but in other physical situations with spherical or axial symmetry - especially those in which inverse-square laws are involved. (Auth.)

  10. Risk equivalent of exposure versus dose of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation is perhaps unique among all agents of interest in the Health Sciences in that it alone is both a therapeutic agent for the control of cancer and an essentially ubiquitous environmental agent with a potential for increasing the cancer rate in human populations. Therapy of tumors is accomplished with the high-level exposure (HLE) to radiation in order to effect control or a cure. Thus, it conforms to the concepts and approaches of pharmacology, toxicology, and therapeutic medicine. Only one function, that which relates the object-oriented and nonstochastic independent variable organ dose to its effect on a cancer or an organ, is needed to estimate the probability, P 2 , of a quantal response. Only P 2 is needed because P 1 , that the cancer slated for such treatment will receive some amount of the agent and be affected to some degree, is effectively unity. The health problem involving low-level exposure (LLE) to radiation, in contrast, is not at all analogous to those of pharmacology, toxicology, and medicine. Rather, it presents a public health problem in that it is a health population, albeit of cells, that is exposed in a radiation field composed of moving radiation particles with some attendant low-order carcinogenic or mutagenic risk. Thus, the concepts, quantities, and terminology applied to low-level radiation must be modified from their present orientation toward pharmacology, toxicology, medicine, and dose to conform to those of public health and accident statistics, in which both P 1 and P 2 for the exposed cells must be estimated

  11. Applicability of ambient dose equivalent H*(d) in mixed radiation fields - a critical discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Vana, N.

    2004-01-01

    For purposes of routine radiation protection, it is desirable to characterize the potential irradiation of individuals in terms of a single dose equivalent quantity that would exist in a phantom approximating the human body. The phantom of choice is the ICRU sphere made of 30 cm diameter tissue-equivalent plastic with a density of 1 g.cm-3 and a mass composition of 76.2 % O, 11.1 % C, 10.1 % H and 2.6 % N. Ambient dose equivalent, H*(d), was defined in ICRU report 51 as the dose equivalent that would be produced by an expanded and aligned radiation field at a depth d in the ICRU sphere. The recommended reference depths are 10 mm for strongly penetrating radiation and 0.07 mm for weakly penetrating radiation, respectively. As an operational quantity in radiation protection, H*(d) shall serve as a conservative and directly measurable estimate of protection quantities, e.g. effective dose E, which in turn are intended to give an indication of the risk associated with radiation exposure. The situation attains increased complexity in radiation environments being composed of a variety of charged and uncharged particles in a broad energetic spectrum. Radiation fields of similarly complex nature are, for example, encountered onboard aircraft and in space. Dose equivalent was assessed as a function of depth in quasi tissue-equivalent spheres by means of thermoluminescent dosemeters evaluated according to the high-temperature ratio (HTR) method. The presented experiments were performed both onboard aircraft and the Russian space station Mir. As a result of interaction processes within the phantom body, the incident primary spectrum may be significantly modified with increasing depth. For the radiation field at aviation altitudes we found the maximum of dose equivalent in a depth of 60 mm which conflicts with the 10 mm value recommended by ICRU. Contrary, for the space radiation environment the maximum dose equivalent was found at the surface of the sphere. This suggests that

  12. Applicability of Ambient Dose Equivalent H (d) in Mixed Radiation Fields - A Critical Discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vana, R.; Hajek, M.; Bergerm, T.

    2004-01-01

    For purposes of routine radiation protection, it is desirable to characterize the potential irradiation of individuals in terms of a single dose equivalent quantity that would exist in a phantom approximating the human body. The phantom of choice is the ICRU sphere made of 30 cm diameter tissue-equivalent plastic with a density of 1 g/cm3 and a mass composition of 76.2% O, 11.1% C, 10.1% H and 2.6% N. Ambient dose equivalent, H(d), was defined in ICRU report 51 as the dose equivalent that would be produced by an expanded and aligned radiation field at a depth d in the ICRU sphere. The recommended reference depths are 10 mm for strongly penetrating radiation and 0.07 mm for weakly penetrating radiation, respectively. As an operational quantity in radiation protection, H(d) shall serve as a conservative and directly measurable estimate of protection quantities, e.g. effective dose E, which in turn are intended to give an indication of the risk associated with radiation exposure. The situation attains increased complexity in radiation environments being composed of a variety of charged and uncharged particles in a broad energetic spectrum. Radiation fields of similarly complex nature are, for example, encountered onboard aircraft and in space. Dose equivalent was assessed as a function of depth in quasi tissue-equivalent spheres by means of thermoluminescent dosemeters evaluated according to the high-temperature ratio (HTR) method. The presented experiments were performed both onboard aircraft and the Russian space station Mir. As a result of interaction processes within the phantom body, the incident primary spectrum may be significantly modified with increasing depth. For the radiation field at aviation altitudes we found the maximum of dose equivalent in a depth of 60 mm which conflicts with the 10 mm value recommended by ICRU. Contrary, for the space radiation environment the maximum dose equivalent was found at the surface of the sphere. This suggests that skin

  13. Transmission coefficients of radiation dose equivalents in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simovic, R.; Marinkovic, N.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper an exponential formula wa proposed for calculating transmission of neutron and secondary gamma radiation through soil slabs. Parameters α and A of the transmission formula are given as rational functions dependent on the percent of water in the soil. Results are compared to those obtained by SABINE-3 code and a satisfactory agreement is shown for soil slab thicknesses for 50 - 500 cm (author) [sr

  14. The ICRU dose equivalence quantities in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimbergen, T.W.M.

    1990-09-01

    The definitions and application of the new ICRU radiation protection quantities have been reviewed and studied in literature. Special emphasis was laid on the consequences of the use of the new quantities by personnel dosimetry services, and on the consequences of the use of the new quantities during an intercomparison programme for dosimetry services. The study shows that the recommendations of the ICRU are not yet complete and not fully realizable. This means that the dosimetry services always have to make certain approximations, when they use the new quantities. In literature, several approaches have been proposed. The feasibility of an approach depends on the characteristics of the dosimeters used. The use of different approaches by the dosimetry services is thought to be of possible influence on the results of an intercomparison programme. (author). 42 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Genetic effects of formaldehyde in yeast. Current status and limitations of the radiation equivalence concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanet, R.; Magana-Schwencke, N.; Moustacchi, E.

    1980-01-01

    Values of radiation equivalents of chemicals have been calculated for formaldehyde (FA) from detailed data on its genetic effects on yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and compared with the effects induced by gamma radiation. For the haploid yeast strain, 1 (mmol FA.ltr -1 ).min (i.e. 1 mM FA.min) is equivalent to 9.6 rad, and for diploid yeast it is equivalent to 33 rad. These values are within the range of values calculated for E. coli and mammalian cells. Some major differences in the response to FA and radiation are encountered, depending upon the cellular physiological conditions, the genetic background and the degree of ploidy (haploid versus diploid) and growth phase (exponential versus stationary), among others. Difficulties encountered in the estimation of rad-equivalent values for specific chemicals and for defined biological end-points (e.g. rate of reverse mutation in the specific biochemical loci) are discussed. It is concluded that by exercising appropriate caution relating to the differences in the mechanisms of action of the chemical mutagens and radiations, meaningful rad-equivalent values could be estimated that could help express the comparative biological effects of chemicals in terms of radiation unit. (author)

  16. Change of annual collective dose equivalent of radiation workers at KURRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1994-01-01

    The change of exposure dose equivalent of radiation workers at KURRI (Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute) in the past 30 years is reported together with the operational accomplishments. The reactor achieved criticality on June 24, 1964 and reached the normal power of 1000 kW on August 17 of the same year, and the normal power was elevated to 5000 kW on July 16, 1968 until today. The change of the annual effective dose equivalent, the collective dose equivalent, the average annual dose equivalent and the maximum dose equivalent are indicated in the table and the figure. The chronological table on the activities of the reactor is added. (T.H.)

  17. Application of the equivalent radiator method for radiative corrections to the spectra of elastic electron scattering by nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Timchenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For calculating the radiative tails in the spectra of inelastic electron scattering by nuclei, the approximation, namely, the equivalent radiator method (ERM, is used. However, the applicability of this method for evaluating the radiative tail from the elastic scattering peak has been little investigated, and therefore, it has become the subject of the present study for the case of light nuclei. As a result, spectral regions were found, where a significant discrepancy between the ERM calculation and the exact-formula calculation was observed. A link was established between this phenomenon and the diffraction minimum of the squared form-factor of the nuclear ground state. Varieties of calculations were carried out for different kinematics of electron scattering by nuclei. The analysis of the calculation results has shown the conditions, at which the equivalent radiator method can be applied for adequately evaluating the radiative tail of the elastic scattering peak.

  18. Application of the personnel photographic monitoring method to determine equivalent radiation dose beyond proton accelerator shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel'fand, E.K.; Komochkov, M.M.; Man'ko, B.V.; Salatskaya, M.I.; Sychev, B.S.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations of regularities to form radiation dose beyond proton accelerator shielding are carried out. Numerical data on photographic monitoring dosemeter in radiation fields investigated are obtained. It was shown how to determine the total equivalent dose of radiation fields beyond proton accelerator shielding by means of the photographic monitoring method by introduction into the procedure of considering nuclear emulsions of division of particle tracks into the black and grey ones. A comparison of experimental and calculational data has shown the applicability of the used calculation method for modelling dose radiation characteristics beyond proton accelerator shielding [ru

  19. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwen Ning

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal control system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the normal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indicate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection performance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 °C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large spacecraft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  20. Snowpack snow water equivalent measurement using the attenuation of cosmic gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterhuber, R.; Condreva, K.

    1998-01-01

    Incoming, background cosmic radiation constantly fluxes through the earth's atmosphere. The high energy gamma portion of this radiation penetrates many terrestrial objects, including the winter snowpack. The attenuation of this radiation is exponentially related to the mass of the medium through which it penetrates. For the past three winters, a device measuring cosmic gamma radiation--and its attenuation through snow--has been installed at the Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, near Donner Pass, California. This gamma sensor, measuring energy levels between 5 and 15 MeV, has proved to be an accurate, reliable, non-invasive, non-mechanical instrument with which to measure the total snow water equivalent of a snowpack. This paper analyzes three winters' worth of data and discusses the physics and practical application of the sensor for the collection of snow water equivalent data from a remote location

  1. Radiation equivalence of genotoxic chemicals - Validation in cultered mammalian cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1982-01-01

    Published data on mutations induced by ionizing radiation and 6 monofunctional alkylating agents, namely EMS, MMS, ENNG, MNNG, ENU and MNU, in different cell lines (Chinese hamster ovary, Chinese hamster lung V79, mouse lymphoma L5178 and human cells) were analysed so that radiation-equivalent chemical (REC) values could be calculated. REC values thus obtained for a given alkylating agent with different cell lines fall within a narrow range suggesting its validation in cultured mammalian cell systems including human. (orig.)

  2. Quantifying the Combined Effect of Radiation Therapy and Hyperthermia in Terms of Equivalent Dose Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, H. Petra; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Barendsen, Gerrit W.; Bel, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the therapeutic effect of radiosensitization by hyperthermia; to this end, a numerical method was proposed to convert radiation therapy dose distributions with hyperthermia to equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia. Methods and Materials: Clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created for 15 prostate cancer cases. To simulate a clinically relevant heterogeneous temperature distribution, hyperthermia treatment planning was performed for heating with the AMC-8 system. The temperature-dependent parameters α (Gy −1 ) and β (Gy −2 ) of the linear–quadratic model for prostate cancer were estimated from the literature. No thermal enhancement was assumed for normal tissue. The intensity modulated radiation therapy plans and temperature distributions were exported to our in-house-developed radiation therapy treatment planning system, APlan, and equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia were calculated voxel by voxel using the linear–quadratic model. Results: The planned average tumor temperatures T90, T50, and T10 in the planning target volume were 40.5°C, 41.6°C, and 42.4°C, respectively. The planned minimum, mean, and maximum radiation therapy doses were 62.9 Gy, 76.0 Gy, and 81.0 Gy, respectively. Adding hyperthermia yielded an equivalent dose distribution with an extended 95% isodose level. The equivalent minimum, mean, and maximum doses reflecting the radiosensitization by hyperthermia were 70.3 Gy, 86.3 Gy, and 93.6 Gy, respectively, for a linear increase of α with temperature. This can be considered similar to a dose escalation with a substantial increase in tumor control probability for high-risk prostate carcinoma. Conclusion: A model to quantify the effect of combined radiation therapy and hyperthermia in terms of equivalent dose distributions was presented. This model is particularly instructive to estimate the potential effects of interaction from different treatment

  3. Basis for calculating body equivalent doses after external radiation exposure. 3. rev. and enl. ed.; Berechnungsgrundlage fuer die Ermittlung von Koerper-Aequivalentdosen bei aeusserer Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarenio, O. (comp.) [Geschaeftsstelle der Strahlenschutzkommission beim Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    The book on the basis for calculating body equivalent doses after external radiation exposure includes the following issues: introduction covering the scope of coverage and body equivalent doses for radiation protection, terminology, photon radiation, neutron radiation, electron radiation, mixed radiation fields and the estimation of body equivalent doses for skin surface contamination.

  4. Development and Characterization of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter for Radiation Monitoring in International Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uk-Won Nam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC can measure the Linear Energy Transfer (LET spectrum and calculate the equivalent dose for the complicated radiation field in space. In this paper, we developed and characterized a TEPC for radiation monitoring in International Space Station (ISS. The prototype TEPC which can simulate a 2 μm of the site diameter for micro-dosimetry has been tested with a standard alpha source (241Am, 5.5 MeV. Also, the calibration of the TEPC was performed by the 252Cf neutron standard source in Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS. The determined calibration factor was kf = 3.59×10-7 mSv/R.

  5. Effective Dose Equivalent To The Cypriot Population Due To Natural Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christofides, S [Medical Physics Department, Nicosia General Hospital (Cyprus)

    1994-12-31

    A study was initiated by the Biomedical Research Foundation, two years ago, to estimate the various natural radiation components that contribute to the Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) to the Cypriot population. The present study has shown that the contribution due to cosmic radiation is estimated to be less than 270 microSiverts per annum, while that due to airborne Rn-222 concentration in Cypriot houses is estimated to be less then 330 microSieverts per annum. The contribution due to terrestrial gamma radiations, which is currently under investigation, is so far estimated to be around 108 microSieverts per annum. Therefore the EDE to the Cypriot population due to natural radiation is likely to be around 700 microSieverts per annum, not taking into account the internal exposure due to other naturally occuring radionuclides. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs.

  6. Radiation protection instruments based on tissue equivalent proportional counters: Part II of an international intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, W.G.; Dietz, E.; Guldbakke, S.; Kluge, H.; Schumacher, H.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the irradiation conditions and procedures of Part II of an international intercomparison of tissue-equivalent proportional counters used for radiation protection measurements. The irradiations took place in monoenergetic reference neutron fields produced by the research reactor and accelerator facilities of the PTB Braunschweig in the range from thermal neutrons to 14.8 MeV. In addition measurements were performed in 60 Co and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf radiation fields. Prototype instruments from 7 European groups were investigated. The results of the measurements are summarized and compared with the reference data of the irradiations. (orig.) [de

  7. The meaning and the principle of determination of the effective dose equivalent in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Williams, G.; Zankl, M.

    1985-01-01

    Since the introduction of the quantity ''effective dose equivalent'' within the framework of new radiation concepts, the meaning and interpretation of the quantity is often discussed and debated. Because of its adoption as a limiting quantity in many international and national laws, it is necessary to be able to interpret this main radiation protection quantity. Examples of organ doses and the related Hsub(E) values in occupational and medical exposures are presented and the meaning of the quantity is considered for whole body exposures to external and internal photon sources, as well as for partial body external exposures to photons. (author)

  8. Evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for high energy radiations, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Uehara, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki; Iwai, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi.

    1992-09-01

    Computer code system and basic data have been investigated for evaluating fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for photons and neutrons up to 10 GeV. The present work suggested that the conversion factors would be obtained by incorporating effective quality factors of charged particles into the HERMES (High Energy Radiation Monte Carlo Elaborate System) code system. The effective quality factors for charged particles were calculated on the basis of the Q-L relationships specified in the ICRP Publication-60. (author)

  9. Attainment of radiation equivalency in nuclear power plant radioactive product management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Ganev, I.Kh.; Orlov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Basic provisions for radiation equivalent radioactive waste disposal are formulated and conditions for its realization are considered. They include simultaneous removal of uranium and long-living products of its decay from the ore, separation of actinides from the fuel in the course of chemical reprocessing for burning in reactors, and possibly strontium and cesium with the purpose of their useful utilization and long-term controlled waste storage in the near-surface facilities

  10. Derivation of the blackbody radiation spectrum from the equivalence principle in classical physics with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    A derivation of Planck's spectrum including zero-point radiation is given within classical physics from recent results involving the thermal effects of acceleration through classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation. A harmonic electric-dipole oscillator undergoing a uniform acceleration a through classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation responds as would the same oscillator in an inertial frame when not in zero-point radiation but in a different spectrum of random classical radiation. Since the equivalence principle tells us that the oscillator supported in a gravitational field g = -a will respond in the same way, we see that in a gravitational field we can construct a perpetual-motion machine based on this different spectrum unless the different spectrum corresponds to that of thermal equilibrium at a finite temperature. Therefore, assuming the absence of perpetual-motion machines of the first kind in a gravitational field, we conclude that the response of an oscillator accelerating through classical zero-point radiation must be that of a thermal system. This then determines the blackbody radiation spectrum in an inertial frame which turns out to be exactly Planck's spectrum including zero-point radiation

  11. On the equivalence between the discrete ordinates and the spherical harmonics methods in radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barichello, L.B.; Siewert, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this work concerning steady-state radiative-transfer calculations in plane-parallel media, the equivalence between the discrete ordinates method and the spherical harmonics method is proved. More specifically, it is shown that for standard radiative-transfer problems without the imposed restriction of azimuthal symmetry the two methods yield identical results for the radiation intensity when the quadrature scheme for the discrete ordinates method is defined by the zeros of the associated Legendre functions and when generalized Mark boundary conditions are used to define the spherical harmonics solution. It is also shown that, with these choices for a quadrature scheme and for the boundary conditions, the two methods can be formulated so as to require the same computational effort. Finally a justification for using the generalized Mark boundary conditions in the spherical harmonics solution is given

  12. Improvement of the equivalent sphere model for better estimates of skin or eye dose in space radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.W.

    2011-01-01

    It is often useful to get a quick estimate of the dose or dose equivalent of an organ, such as blood-forming organs, the eye or the skin, in a radiation field. Sometimes an equivalent sphere is used to represent the organ for this purpose. For space radiation environments, recently it has been shown that the equivalent sphere model does not work for the eye or the skin in solar particle event environments. In this study, we improve the representation of the eye and the skin using a two-component equivalent sphere model. Motivated by the two-peak structure of the body organ shielding distribution for the eye and the skin, we use an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters, for example a partial spherical shell of a smaller thickness over a proper fraction of the full solid angle combined with a concentric partial spherical shell of a larger thickness over the rest of the full solid angle, to represent the eye or the skin. We find that using an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters instead of one drastically improves the accuracy of the estimates of dose and dose equivalent in space radiation environments. For example, in solar particle event environments the average error in the estimate of the skin dose equivalent using an equivalent sphere with two radius parameters is about 8%, while the average error of the conventional equivalent sphere model using one radius parameter is around 100%.

  13. Multiplicity of genome equivalents in the radiation-resistant bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M T

    1978-01-01

    The complexity of the genome of Micrococcus radiodurans was determined to be (2.0 +/- 0.3) X 10(9) daltons by DNA renaturation kinetics. The number of genome equivalents of DNA per cell was calculated from the complexity and the content of DNA. A lower limit of four genome equivalents per cell was approached with decreasing growth rate. Thus, no haploid stage appeared to be realized in this organism. The replication time was estimated from the kinetics and amount of residual DNA synthesis after inhibiting initiation of new rounds of replication. From this, the redundancy of terminal genetic markers was calculated to vary with growth rate from four to approximately eight copies per cell. All genetic material, including the least abundant, is thus multiply represented in each cell. The potential significance of the maintenance in each cell of multiple gene copies is discussed in relation to the extreme radiation resistance of M. radiodurans. PMID:649572

  14. Dose of radiation enhancement, using silver nanoparticles in a human tissue equivalent gel dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad; Waheed, Muhammad Mohsin; Anjum, Muhammad Naeem

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the radiation dose enhancement in a human tissue-equivalent polymer gel impregnated with silver nanoparticles. The case-control study was conducted at the Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology, Bahawalpur, Pakistan, in January 2014. Silver nanoparticles used in this study were prepared by wet chemical method. Polymer gel was prepared by known quantity of gelatine, methacrylic acid, ascorbic acid, copper sulphate pentahydrate, hydroquinone and water. Different concentrations of silver nanoparticles were added to the gel during its cooling process. The gel was cooled in six plastic vials of 50ml each. Two vials were used as a control sample while four vials were impregnated with silver nanoparticles. After 22 hours, the vials were irradiated with gamma rays by aCobalt-60 unit. Radiation enhancement was assessed by taking magnetic resonance images of the vials. The images were analysed using Image J software. The dose enhancement factor was 24.17% and 40.49% for 5Gy and 10Gy dose respectively. The dose enhancement factor for the gel impregnated with 0.10mM silver nanoparticles was 32.88% and 51.98% for 5Gy and 10Gy dose respectively. The impregnation of a tissue-equivalent gel with silver nanoparticles resulted in dose enhancement and this effect was magnified up to a certain level with the increase in concentration of silver nanoparticles.

  15. A Solar-Pumped Fluorescence Model for Line-By-Line Emission Intensities in the B-X, A-X, and X-X Band Systems of 12C14N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini, L.; Mumma, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new quantitative model for detailed solar-pumped fluorescent emission of the main isotopologue of CN. The derived fluorescence efficiencies permit estimation and interpretation of ro-vibrational infrared line intensities of CN in exospheres exposed to solar (or stellar) radiation. Our g-factors are applicable to astronomical observations of CN extending from infrared to optical wavelengths, and we compare them with previous calculations in the literature. The new model enables extraction of rotational temperature, column abundance, and production rate from astronomical observations of CN in the inner coma of comets. Our model accounts for excitation and de-excitation of rotational levels in the ground vibrational state by collisions, solar excitation to the A(sup 2)Pi(sub I) and B(sup 2)Sum(sup +) electronically excited states followed by cascade to ro-vibrational levels of X(sup 2)Sum(sup +), and direct solar infrared pumping of ro-vibrational levels in the X(sup 2)Sum(sup +) state. The model uses advanced solar spectra acquired at high spectral resolution at the relevant infrared and optical wavelengths and considers the heliocentric radial velocity of the comet (the Swings effect) when assessing the exciting solar flux for a given transition. We present model predictions for the variation of fluorescence rates with rotational temperature and heliocentric radial velocity. Furthermore, we test our fluorescence model by comparing predicted and measured line-by-line intensities for X(sup 2)Sum(sup +) (1-0) in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), thereby identifying multiple emission lines observed at IR wavelengths.

  16. Study of response of radiation monitors for environmental dose equivalent measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Macilene N.; Khoury, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental dose equivalent H * (10), is the magnitude recommended by ICRU 39 for environmental monitoring in fields of radiation of photons. Most of the equipment used for area monitoring, only quantifies the magnitudes exposure or dose not being designed to this new magnitude. In Brazil, particularly, is not yet regulated the use of H * (10). However, with the revision of the standard 3.01 it will necessary the use of monitors that allow the achievement of measures according to H * (10). The transition for using new magnitudes will be a slow process and the contribution that the laboratories of metrology of ionizing radiation in the country can give is, at first, promote and create the habit of using the unit Sievert (Sv) in the calibration of the instruments, and that is the unit recommended for H * (10). In a second step, the tests for determining the response of the instruments for H * (10) should be made and this is the harder step, taking into account the large number of area monitors around the country. These tests will provide information about the limitations of the instrument to the new magnitude, that is, the range where the instrument will have the best performance in quantification of new magnitude. This paper evaluates the performance for H * (10), with the variation of energy and angle of incidence of radiation, of three of the most used monitors in the country

  17. Redox-Phen solution: A water equivalent dosimeter for UVA, UVB and X-rays radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A.; Ciribolla, C.; Lazzeri, L.; d'Errico, F.

    2018-06-01

    Polysulphone films are the only type of UV passive dosimeters that are widely adopted for research and personal monitoring. Even though many studies concentrated on the development and characterization of these films, they still present some shortcomings. The more important limitations of them are that they can measure only UVB radiations and that they change color at 330 nm, requiring special equipment to read them. To overcome these limitations we developed an aqueous dosimeter that is sensitive to UVA, UVB and X-rays named Redox-Phen solution. This dosimeter is inexpensive and water equivalent, being made of more than 99 wt% of water. It changes color in the visible region upon irradiation, thus it can be measured via simple optical method, and an evaluation of the exposition can be made also by naked eyes.

  18. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  19. Automatic recording of the water equivalent of snow by means of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, T.

    1980-01-01

    This report is the first of three from the project 'Automatic recording of the water equivalent of snow'. It does not cover aerial monitoring. The object of the project is to evaluate the possibilities of applying radiometric instruments for this purpose. Following an introduction to the theoretical basis for the method, the development of radiometric instruments is described. In operational use two types dominate Electricite de France have developed one which is produced by Neyrtec and the other has been developed and is produced by Idaho Industrial Instruments. These are used in France, Italy, USA, Canada and a number of other countries. Experience reported is positive. Reliability depends on the correct choice of recording and data transmitting equipment. Accuracy is satisfactory. Both types use artificial sources, but some other types use natural background radiation. It is probable that use of an instrument with an artificial source could be approved in Norway, with simple precautions. (JIW)

  20. Comparison of adult and child radiation equivalent doses from 2 dental cone-beam computed tomography units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Najjar, Anas; Colosi, Dan; Dauer, Lawrence T; Prins, Robert; Patchell, Gayle; Branets, Iryna; Goren, Arthur D; Faber, Richard D

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, there has been a transition toward these scans' replacing traditional radiographs for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Children represent a significant proportion of orthodontic patients. Similar CBCT exposure settings are predicted to result in higher equivalent doses to the head and neck organs in children than in adults. The purpose of this study was to measure the difference in equivalent organ doses from different scanners under similar settings in children compared with adults. Two phantom heads were used, representing a 33-year-old woman and a 5-year-old boy. Optically stimulated dosimeters were placed at 8 key head and neck organs, and equivalent doses to these organs were calculated after scanning. The manufacturers' predefined exposure settings were used. One scanner had a pediatric preset option; the other did not. Scanning the child's phantom head with the adult settings resulted in significantly higher equivalent radiation doses to children compared with adults, ranging from a 117% average ratio of equivalent dose to 341%. Readings at the cervical spine level were decreased significantly, down to 30% of the adult equivalent dose. When the pediatric preset was used for the scans, there was a decrease in the ratio of equivalent dose to the child mandible and thyroid. CBCT scans with adult settings on both phantom heads resulted in higher radiation doses to the head and neck organs in the child compared with the adult. In practice, this might result in excessive radiation to children scanned with default adult settings. Collimation should be used when possible to reduce the radiation dose to the patient. While CBCT scans offer a valuable tool, use of CBCT scans should be justified on a specific case-by-case basis. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Equivalent doses of ionizing radiation received by medical staff at a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziuk, E.; Kowalczyk, A.; Siekierzynski, M.; Jazwinski, J.; Chas, J.; Janiak, M.K.; Palijczuk, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Total annual activity of I-131 used for the treatment of thyroid disorders at the Dept.of Nuclear Medicine, Central Clinical Hospital, Military University School of Medicine, in Warsaw, Poland, equal to 190 GBq; at the same time, total activity of Tc-99m utilized at the same Department for diagnostic purposes reached 1 TBq. As estimated from the radiometer readings, in extreme cases the equivalent at a couple of measurement points at this Department may exceed 200 mSv per year. Thus, in the present study we aimed to assess the potential risk of the exposure of medical personnel of the Department to ionizing radiation. Material and Methods: Polymethacrylate cases each housing four thermoluminescent dosimeters were continuously worn for one year by the nurses and doctors with the dosimeters being replaced by the new ones every three months. In addition, cases containing thermoluminescent dosimeters (three dosimeters per case) were placed in 20 different measurement points across the Department and the monitoring of the doses was carried out continuously for more than six years (from May 1995 to March 2002). Based on the quarterly readings of the dosimeters, equivalent doses were calculated for both the members of the personnel and the measurement space points. Results: The doses registered in the patient rooms ranged 5 to 90 mSv x y -1 , in the application room 10 to 15 mSv x y -1 , in the laboratory rooms 1.5 to 30 mSv x y -1 , and in the waiting room 2 to 6 mSv x y -1 ; no increment above the background level was detected in the nurses' station. Accordingly, the annual doses calculated from the dosimeters worn by the staff ranged 0.2 to 1.1 mSv x y -1 ; these latter findings were confirmed by direct readings from individual film dosimeters additionally worn by the staff members. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that it is unlikely for the personnel of the monitored Nuclear Medicine Department to receive doses of radiation exceeding 40% of the annual

  2. Estimation of collective effective dose equivalent from environmental radiation and radioactive materials in Japan. A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Noda, Yutaka; Takeshita, Mitsue; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1994-01-01

    The peaceful uses of nuclear power and radiations have been developed into a stage of practical applications for human life. Radiation causes harmful effects to human beings, although human beings receives a number of invaluable benefits from the nuclear energy and the uses of radiation. In order to examine the optimization of radiation protection in these practices, collective effective dose equivalent from environmental exposures due to natural and artificial radiations have been preliminarily evaluated using most recent data. The resultant collective doses were compared with those from medical and occupational exposures. It is noted that, in Japan, the collective effective dose from environmental radiation sources can be approximately same to that from medical exposure. (author)

  3. Ambient dose equivalent measurements in secondary radiation fields at proton therapy facility CCB IFJ PAN in Krakow using recombination chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowska Edyta A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents recombination methods used for secondary radiation measurements at the Facility for Proton Radiotherapy of Eye Cancer at the Institute for Nuclear Physics, IFJ, in Krakow (Poland. The measurements of H*(10 were performed, with REM-2 tissue equivalent chamber in two halls of cyclotrons AIC-144 and Proteus C-235 and in the corridors close to treatment rooms. The measurements were completed by determination of gamma radiation component, using a hydrogen-free recombination chamber. The results were compared with the measurements using rem meter types FHT 762 (WENDI-II and NM2 FHT 192 gamma probe and with stationary dosimetric system.

  4. Ambient dose equivalent H*(d) - an appropriate philosophy for radiation monitoring onboard aircraft and in space?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vana, N.; Hajek, M.; Berger, T.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper authors deals with the ambient dose equivalent H * (d) and their application for onboard Aircraft and Space station. The discussion and the carried out experiments demonstrated that the philosophy of H * (10) leads to an underestimation of the whole-body radiation exposure when applied onboard aircraft and in space. It therefore has to be considered to introduce a new concept that could be based on microdosimetric principles, offering the unique potential of a more direct correlation to radiobiological parameters

  5. Conversion factors for the ICRU dose equivalent quantities for calibrating radiation dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosswendt, B.; Hohlfeld, K.; Kramer, H.M.; Selbach, H.J.

    1985-02-01

    Report describing the application of conversion factors for monoenergetic photon radiation and for X and gamma reference radiation used for dosemeter calibration with the aid of spherical or rectangular phantoms (environmental and individual monitoring). (DG) [de

  6. Line by Line CO2 Absorption in the Atmosphere for Input Data to Calculate Global Warming, David C. Smith, DCS Lasers & Optics LLC, Old Saybrook CT 06475

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Compter modeling of global climate change require an input (asssumption) of the forcing function for CO2 absorption. All codes use a long term forcing function of ~ 4 W/M2. (IPCC 2007 Summary for Policymakers. In:Climate Change 2007. The Physical Sciences Basis.Contributions of Working Group 1 to the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC, Cambridge U. Press N.Y.)..This is based on a band model of the CO2 rotational/vibrational absorption where a band of absorption averages over all the rotational levels of the vibration transition. (Ramananathan,V.,et al, J. of Geophysical Research,Vol 84 C8,p4949,Aug.1979).. The model takes into account the line width,the spacing between lines and identifies 10 CO2 bands.. This approach neglects the possibility that the peak absorption transitions in a band can "use up" all of the earths IR radiation at that wavelength and does not contribute to global warming no matter how much the CO2 is increased. The lines in the wings of a band increase their absorption as the CO2 is increased. However, the lines that are lost are the strong absorbers and those that are added are the weaker absorption lines. When a band begins to use up the IR then the net result of increasing the atmospheric CO2 is a decrease in the absorption change. This presentation calculates the absorption of each line individualy using the Behr's Law Approach. The dependence of the absorption and line width of each transition as a function of altitude is accounted for. The temperature dependence of the absorption with altitude is not and an evaluation of this error is given. For doubling CO2 from 320ppm to 640 ppm, the calculation gives a forcing function of 1.1 W/M2. The results show the importance of using individual lines to calculate the CO2 contribution to global warming, We can speculate on the imact and anticipate a computer code calculation of a factor of 4 less global warming than the published results.

  7. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities, and tissue equivalence of some gases and mixtures for dosimetry of radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwanath P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mass attenuation coefficients, µm, effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Neff, of different gases - carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene, propane, butane, and pentane used in radiation detectors, have been calculated for the photon energy of 1 keV to 100 GeV. Each gas has constant Zeff values between 0.10 to 10 MeV photon energies; however, these values are way far away from ICRU tissue. Carbon dioxide gas shows the closest tissue equivalence in the entire photon energy spectrum. Relative tissue equivalences of the mixtures of gases with respect to ICRU tissue are in the range of 0.998-1.041 for air, argon (4.5% + methane (95.5%, argon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5%, and nitrogen (5% + methane (7% + carbon dioxide (88%. The gas composition of xenon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5% shows 1.605 times higher tissue equivalence compared to the ICRU tissue. The investigated photon interaction parameters are useful for exposure and energy absorption buildup factors calculation and design, and fabrication of gaseous detectors for ambient radiation measurement by the Geiger-Muller detector, ionization chambers and proportional counters.

  8. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Otto

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006, dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10 %. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal forcing by 55/5 % at the TOA over ocean/land and 15 % at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20 %. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported. They strongly enhance the absorbing properties and forward scattering in the solar and increase predominantly, e.g., the total TOA forcing of the dust over land.

  9. Tissue-Equivalent Radiation Dosimeter-On-A-Chip, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Many commercially available digital dosimeters are bulky and are unable to properly measure dose for space radiation. The complexity of space flight design requires...

  10. Tissue-Equivalent Radiation Dosimeter-On-A-Chip, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Available digital dosimeters are bulky and unable to provide real-time monitoring of dose for space radiation. The complexity of space-flight design requires...

  11. Radiation brain dose to vascular surgeons during fluoroscopically guided interventions is not effectively reduced by wearing lead equivalent surgical caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Melissa L; Arbique, Gary M; Guild, Jeffrey B; Zeng, Katie; Xi, Yin; Rectenwald, John; Anderson, Jon A; Timaran, Carlos

    2018-03-12

    Radiation to the interventionalist's brain during fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGIs) may increase the incidence of cerebral neoplasms. Lead equivalent surgical caps claim to reduce radiation brain doses by 50% to 95%. We sought to determine the efficacy of the RADPAD (Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Lenexa, Kan) No Brainer surgical cap (0.06 mm lead equivalent at 90 kVp) in reducing radiation dose to the surgeon's and trainee's head during FGIs and to a phantom to determine relative brain dose reductions. Optically stimulated, luminescent nanoDot detectors (Landauer, Glenwood, Ill) inside and outside of the cap at the left temporal position were used to measure cap attenuation during FGIs. To check relative brain doses, nanoDot detectors were placed in 15 positions within an anthropomorphic head phantom (ATOM model 701; CIRS, Norfolk, Va). The phantom was positioned to represent a primary operator performing femoral access. Fluorography was performed on a plastic scatter phantom at 80 kVp for an exposure of 5 Gy reference air kerma with or without the hat. For each brain location, the percentage dose reduction with the hat was calculated. Means and standard errors were calculated using a pooled linear mixed model with repeated measurements. Anatomically similar locations were combined into five groups: upper brain, upper skull, midbrain, eyes, and left temporal position. This was a prospective, single-center study that included 29 endovascular aortic aneurysm procedures. The average procedure reference air kerma was 2.6 Gy. The hat attenuation at the temporal position for the attending physician and fellow was 60% ± 20% and 33% ± 36%, respectively. The equivalent phantom measurements demonstrated an attenuation of 71% ± 2.0% (P < .0001). In the interior phantom locations, attenuation was statistically significant for the skull (6% ± 1.4%) and upper brain (7.2% ± 1.0%; P < .0001) but not for the middle brain (1.4% ± 1.0%; P = .15

  12. Assessment of Radiation-Equivalency of Favorite Foods Based on Apoptotic and Clonogenic Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seunghee; Park, Hyosung; Lee, Minho; Kim, Eunhee [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In this study, the cytotoxicity of favorite foods was investigated to provide chemical doses causing bio-effects comparable with those by radiation exposure. Extracts from alcohol, cigarette and coffee have been investigated for their cytotoxicity in terms of apoptosis induction and clonogenic cell killing. The comparison of familiar favorite food items with radiation in cellular toxicity might help the public have balanced judgment on the severity of radiation exposure. Future study pursues estimating dose-rate effect and the investigation will be continued with other cell lines. People fear that ionizing radiation, despite of its usefulness, bears significant risk factor. In particular, after Fukushima nuclear accident in March of 2011, people become over-sensitive to radiation exposure and nuclear power. Such fear by the public of nuclear power inevitably costs the nuclear industry a high expense for safety measures, not to mention brings the public uneasy life. It is important that the consequence of radiation exposure is conveyed to the public in a friendly way with actual data.

  13. Assessment of Radiation-Equivalency of Favorite Foods Based on Apoptotic and Clonogenic Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seunghee; Park, Hyosung; Lee, Minho; Kim, Eunhee

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the cytotoxicity of favorite foods was investigated to provide chemical doses causing bio-effects comparable with those by radiation exposure. Extracts from alcohol, cigarette and coffee have been investigated for their cytotoxicity in terms of apoptosis induction and clonogenic cell killing. The comparison of familiar favorite food items with radiation in cellular toxicity might help the public have balanced judgment on the severity of radiation exposure. Future study pursues estimating dose-rate effect and the investigation will be continued with other cell lines. People fear that ionizing radiation, despite of its usefulness, bears significant risk factor. In particular, after Fukushima nuclear accident in March of 2011, people become over-sensitive to radiation exposure and nuclear power. Such fear by the public of nuclear power inevitably costs the nuclear industry a high expense for safety measures, not to mention brings the public uneasy life. It is important that the consequence of radiation exposure is conveyed to the public in a friendly way with actual data

  14. Radiation beans characterization and implantation for study of lead equivalent individual protection device used in radiodiagnostic practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Leslie Silva

    2004-01-01

    The protective shielding (IPC) must be used by occupationally exposed professionals, patients and volunteers, in order to optimize the doses who receive due to radiological practices. International and national norms establish the methodology to be adopted for determination of the IPC attenuation. In this work, the IPC had been submitted to X-rays beams with known characteristics, standardized for determination of their attenuation equivalent thickness by comparison to an experimental lead attenuation slope. This comparison technique allowed insurance estimative of the IPC attenuation equivalent thickness in mm of lead. Thus, it was possible to verify the conformity of the attenuation equivalent thickness determined experimentally and the value of the thickness indicated by the manufacturer. To carry out this work, it was necessary the implementation of experimental setups stated in the specifics norms, the study of the X-rays beams original features and the determination of combined additional filters, in order to allow the X-ray equipment used operates in compliance with Norm IEC 61331-1 IEC. The radiation quality selected is characterized by a 100 kV voltage and a 0.25 mm of copper overall filtration. The implementation of this radiation quality it was carried through of its first and second HVL (Half Value Layer). Thus, a methodology according to the international Norms has been implemented in the laboratory. The results of the present work provide suitable and useful information about radiation beams features related to the determination techniques of the attenuation properties. Once implemented the procedures for conformity evaluation of the protection devices, it will be possible to carry out specific quality control tests, which will be helpful to manufacturers, customers, as well as authorities in the radiological protection and health areas. (author)

  15. Use of tissue equivalent proportional counters to characterize radiation quality on the space shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Conroy, T.J.; Elegy, D.C.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1992-04-01

    Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are essentially cavity ionization chambers operating at low pressure and with gas gain. A small, battery powered, TEPC spectrometer, which records lineal energy spectra at one minute intervals, has been used on several space shuttle missions. The data it has collected clearly show the South Atlantic anomaly and indicate a mean quality factor somewhat higher than expected. An improved type of instrument has been developed with sufficient memory to record spectra at 10 second intervals, and with increased resolution for low LET events. This type of instrument will be used on most future space shuttle flights and in some international experiments

  16. Probabilistic diffusion tractography of the optic radiations and visual function in preterm infants at term equivalent age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Laura; Ricci, Daniela; Volzone, Anna; Allsop, Joanna M; Srinivasan, Latha; Pai, Aakash; Ribes, Carmen; Ramenghi, Luca A; Mercuri, Eugenio; Mosca, Fabio; Edwards, A David; Cowan, Frances M; Rutherford, Mary A; Counsell, Serena J

    2008-02-01

    Children born prematurely have a high incidence of visual disorders which cannot always be explained by focal retinal or brain lesions. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that visual function in preterm infants is related to the microstructural development of white matter in the optic radiations. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with probabilistic diffusion tractography to delineate the optic radiations at term equivalent age and compared the fractional anisotropy (FA) to a contemporaneous evaluation of visual function. Thirty-seven preterm infants (19 male) born at median (range) 28(+4) (24(+1)-32(+3)) weeks gestational age, were examined at a post-menstrual age of 42 (39(+6)-43) weeks. MRI and DTI were acquired on a 3 Tesla MR system with DTI obtained in 15 non-collinear directions with a b value of 750 s/mm(2). Tracts were generated from a seed mask placed in the white matter lateral to the lateral geniculate nucleus and mean FA values of these tracts were determined. Visual assessment was performed using a battery of nine items assessing different aspects of visual abilities. Ten infants had evidence of cerebral lesions on conventional MRI. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the visual assessment score was independently correlated with FA values, but not gestational age at birth, post-menstrual age at scan or the presence of lesions on conventional MRI. The occurrence of mild retinopathy of prematurity did not affect the FA measures or visual scores. We then performed a secondary analysis using tract-based spatial statistics to determine whether global brain white matter development was related to visual function and found that only FA in the optic radiations was correlated with visual assessment score. Our results suggest that in preterm infants at term equivalent age visual function is directly related to the development of white matter in the optic radiations.

  17. Thermal radiation analysis for small satellites with single-node model using techniques of equivalent linearization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anh, N.D.; Hieu, N.N.; Chung, P.N.; Anh, N.T.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Linearization criteria are presented for a single-node model of satellite thermal. • A nonlinear algebraic system for linearization coefficients is obtained. • The temperature evolutions obtained from different methods are explored. • The temperature mean and amplitudes versus the heat capacity are discussed. • The dual criterion approach yields smaller errors than other approximate methods. - Abstract: In this paper, the method of equivalent linearization is extended to the thermal analysis of satellite using both conventional and dual criteria of linearization. These criteria are applied to a differential nonlinear equation of single-node model of the heat transfer of a small satellite in the Low Earth Orbit. A system of nonlinear algebraic equations for linearization coefficients is obtained in the closed form and then solved by the iteration method. The temperature evolution, average values and amplitudes versus the heat capacity obtained by various approaches including Runge–Kutta algorithm, conventional and dual criteria of equivalent linearization, and Grande's approach are compared together. Numerical results reveal that temperature responses obtained from the method of linearization and Grande's approach are quite close to those obtained from the Runge–Kutta method. The dual criterion yields smaller errors than those of the remaining methods when the nonlinearity of the system increases, namely, when the heat capacity varies in the range [1.0, 3.0] × 10 4  J K −1 .

  18. The Equivalent Uniform Dose as a severity metric for radiation treatment incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunscombe, Peter B.; Iftody, Sandra; Ploquin, Nicolas; Ekaette, Edidiong U.; Lee, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    In allocating resources within a risk management program, ideally we would like to know both the probabilities and consequences of potential incidents. We simulate, on a treatment planning computer, several commonly reported incidents in radiation treatment and explore their consequences for the EUDs of targets and organs at risk

  19. Principle and methods for measurement of snow water equivalent by detection of natural gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrestoel, G O [Institutt for Atomenergi, Kjeller (Norway)

    1979-01-01

    The underlying principles for snow cover determination by use of terrestrial gamma radiation are presented. Several of the methods that have been proposed to exploit the effect are discussed, and some of the more important error sources for the different methods are listed. In conclusion an estimate of the precision that can be obtained by these methods is given.

  20. Principle and methods for measurement of snow water equivalent by detection of natural gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrestol, G O

    1979-01-01

    The underlying principles for snow cover determination by use of terrestrial gamma radiation are presented. Several of the methods that have been proposed to exploit the effect are discussed, and some of the more important error sources for the different methods are listed. In conclusion estimates of the precision that can be obtained by these methods are given.

  1. Development of a drift tissue equivalent proportional counter for radiation protection personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    A new multicellular geometry for proportional counter has been developed. It is made of several drift regions which are some holes drilled in the cathode in front of anodes wires. The present work is made of 3 parts: 1) A theoretical evaluation of the multicellular counter characteristics: the sensitivity increases by a factor 15 vs the Tinelli Merlin-Gerin counter; the chord length distribution study shows the possibility to use a Dirac function for the dosimetry calculations; a tissue equivalent gas mixture based on argon and propane is designed. 2) The production of a monocellular prototype made of a hole and a needle shaped anode. 3) An experimental study of the prototype electrical characteristics and a computation of the electrical field in the counter. The focalization and the electron drift into the hole, the proportional operating mode are shown. Irradiations in front of photon and neutron sources verify these results

  2. An overview of equivalent doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in medical, industrial and nuclear areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.R.; Silva, F.C.A. da; Hunt, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Some epidemiological evidences were recently reviewed by the ICRP and it was suggested that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriments is about 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on 2011, the ICRP has recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens dose equivalent limit of 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not exceeding 50 mSv in a single year. Following the ICRP recommendation, the Brazilian Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) adopted immediately the new limit to the eyes lens. This study aimed to show an overview about the doses in eye lens of occupational radiation workers in situations of planned exposures in the medical, industrial and nuclear areas, emphasizing the greatest radiological risks applications. It was observed that there are some limitations, such as example, to use individual monitor calibrated on Hp(3), to assess the equivalent dose in the eye lens. This limitation obstructs some experimental studies and monitoring of the levels of radiation received in the eye lens of radiation workers. Recent studies have showed that the lenses of eyes monitoring of workers, mainly in the planned exposure, must be follow-up. However, such researches were obtained only in medical exposures, mainly in interventional medicine procedures. Studies with planned exposure on nuclear and industrial areas are really needed and will be very important due to the new recommended by ICRP dose limits. (author)

  3. Radiating nonuniform transmission-line systems and the partial element equivalent circuit method

    CERN Document Server

    Nitsch, Juergen; Wollenberg, Gunter

    2009-01-01

    High frequencies of densely packed modern electronic equipment turn even the smallest piece of wire into a transmission line with signal retardation, dispersion, attenuation, and distortion. In electromagnetic environments with high-power microwave or ultra-wideband sources, transmission lines pick up noise currents generated by external electromagnetic fields. These are superimposed on essential signals, the lines acting not only as receiving antennas but radiating parts of the signal energy into the environment. This book is outstanding in its originality. While many textbooks rephrase

  4. Calibration procedures of area monitors in terms of the Ambient Dose Equivalent H*(10), for gamma, x-ray radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez Davila, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    In the present thesis procedures for calibrating portable survey meters in terms of the new ICRU quantities H*(10) ambient dose equivalent are discussed. Also the remendations of International Comission on Radiation Protection in their report ICRP 60 that inludes the operational magnitudes that the International Comission of Radiation Units proposed for calibrating area monitors

  5. A proliferation-resistant closed nuclear fuel cycle with radiation-equivalent disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Gabaraev, B.A.; Ganev, I.K.; Lopatkin, A.V.; Orlov, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    The growing energy demand in the next century can be met by large-scale nuclear power that can be deployed around fast reactors operating in a closed U-Pu cycle. The main requirements to the future fuel cycle are 1) reduction of the radiation risk from radioactive waste owing to transmutation of the most hazardous long-lived actinides and fission products in reactors and due to thorough treatment of radwaste to remove these elements, with provision of a balance between the activity of waste put to final disposal and that of uranium extracted from earth; 2) no possibility to use closed cycle facilities for Pu extraction from spent fuel for the purpose of weapons production; physical protection of fuel against thefts (nonproliferation). (author)

  6. The equidosemeter ED-02 as a device for dose equivalent measurements in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrosimov, A.I.; Alekseev, A.G.; Antipov, V.A.; Golovachik, V.T.

    1985-01-01

    The equidosemeter ED-02 is to be used for simultaneous measurements of the dose equivalent, absorbed dose, and mean quality factor of mixed radiations. The detector is a tissue equivalent spherical low-pressure proportional counter tube the signal of which is simultaneously recorded in two channels - a current channel and a pulse one. The current channel is linear and its response proportional to the absorbed dose. The pulse channel includes a nonlinear pulse amplitude converter the characteristic of which, taking into account the required dependence of the mean quality factor on linear energy transfer, has been chosen in such a way that in final counting the pulse channel response is proportional to the difference between dose equivalent and absorbed dose. On the basis of calculations of event spectra in the sensitive volume of the detector, the energy dependence of the dosemeter sensitivity is analysed for neutron energies up to 20 MeV. The characteristic of the nonlinear converter has been calculated on the basis of the construction parameters of the detector and optimized with respect to a representative sample of neutron spectra beyond the shields of nuclear plants. The heterogeneity of the detector, i.e. the difference between the atomic composition of wall and filling and the composition of soft biological tissue as well as the effect of the conducting coating of the case cathode, has been taken into consideration. Moreover, the test results of the device in mixed neutron-photon fields of 60 Co, 239 Pu-α-Be and 252 Cf radioisotope sources are presented. The main measuring error of dose characteristics is shown to be less than 20% in the dose range 1 x 10 -3 to 4 x 10 -3 Sv/h. (author)

  7. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J. T.

    2014-10-01

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H E and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  8. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  9. Thermoluminescence and radioluminescence properties of tissue equivalent Cu-doped Li2B4O7 for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Z, E.; Furetta, C.; Marcazzo, J.; Santiago, M.; Guarneros, C.; Pacio, M.; Palomino, R.

    2015-10-01

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) and radioluminescence (Rl) properties of lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) doped with different concentration of copper (0.25, 0.5, 1 wt %) under gamma and beta irradiation has been investigated. The feasibility of using this borate in radiation dosimetry at low doses has been evaluated. Tissue equivalent Li 2 B 4 O 7 was prepared by solid state reaction using mixing stoichiometric compositions of lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) and boric acid (H 3 BO 3 ) and a solution of CuCl 2 as dopant. The glow curve, of the most efficient copper doped borate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu 0.5 wt %), shows a main stable peak centered at 225 degrees C and a second low temperature peak centered at 80 degrees C. The low temperature peak disappears completely after 24 hours of storage in darkness and at room temperature or after an annealing at 120 degrees C for 10 seconds. The main peak of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu remains constant. The Tl response of Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu shows good linearity in the analyzed dose range. The stability and repeatability of Rl signals of the borate have been studied and the Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu (0.5 wt %) shown the higher Rl emission and a stable and repetitive response. Results show that Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu has prospects to be used in gamma and beta radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  10. Radiation quality and effective dose equivalent of alpha particles from radon decay products indoors: uncertainties in risk estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Affan, I.A. (Velindre Hospital, Whitchurch, Cardiff (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    In order to make a better estimate of cancer risk due to radon the radiation quality of alpha particles emitted from the element and its daughters has been re-assessed. In particular, uncertainties in all components involved in the calculations of the effective dose E, have been investigated. This has been done in the light of the recent draft report of the ICRU on quantities and units for use in radiation protection (Allisy et al (1991) ICRU NEWS 2). On the assumption of an indoor radon concentration of 30 Bq.m[sup -3], microdose spectra have been calculated for alpha particles hitting lung cells at different depths. Then the mean quality factor Q-bar in the lung, dose equivalent H[sub T] to the lung and the effective dose have been calculated. A comparison between lung cancer risk from radon and that arising from diagnostic X rays to the chest is made. A suggestion to make the lung weighting factor w[sub T] a function of the fraction of lung cells hit is discussed. (Author).

  11. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ( 2 H + ) in the energy range 10 MeV -1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by < 3 %. The greatest difference, 47 %, occurred at 30 MeV. (authors)

  12. An accelerated line-by-line option for MODTRAN combining on-the-fly generation of line center absorption within 0.1 cm-1 bins and pre-computed line tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Alexander; Conforti, Patrick; Hawes, Fred

    2015-05-01

    A Line-By-Line (LBL) option is being developed for MODTRAN6. The motivation for this development is two-fold. Firstly, when MODTRAN is validated against an independent LBL model, it is difficult to isolate the source of discrepancies. One must verify consistency between pressure, temperature and density profiles, between column density calculations, between continuum and particulate data, between spectral convolution methods, and more. Introducing a LBL option directly within MODTRAN will insure common elements for all calculations other than those used to compute molecular transmittances. The second motivation for the LBL upgrade is that it will enable users to compute high spectral resolution transmittances and radiances for the full range of current MODTRAN applications. In particular, introducing the LBL feature into MODTRAN will enable first-principle calculations of scattered radiances, an option that is often not readily available with LBL models. MODTRAN will compute LBL transmittances within one 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin at a time, marching through the full requested band pass. The LBL algorithm will use the highly accurate, pressure- and temperature-dependent MODTRAN Padé approximant fits of the contribution from line tails to define the absorption from all molecular transitions centered more than 0.05 cm-1 from each 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin. The beauty of this approach is that the on-the-fly computations for each 0.1 cm-1 bin will only require explicit LBL summing of transitions centered within a 0.2 cm-1 spectral region. That is, the contribution from the more distant lines will be pre-computed via the Padé approximants. The status of the LBL effort will be presented. This will include initial thermal and solar radiance calculations, validation calculations, and self-validations of the MODTRAN band model against its own LBL calculations.

  13. A reappraisal of the reported dose equivalents at the boundary of the University of California Radiation Laboratory during the early days of Bevatron operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Smith, Alan R.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2000-01-01

    Accelerator-produced radiation levels at the perimeter of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (the Berkeley Laboratory) reached a maximum in 1959. Neutrons produced by the Bevatron were the dominant component of the radiation field. Radiation levels were estimated from measurements of total neutron fluence and reported in units of dose equivalent (rem). Accurate conversion from total fluence to dose equivalent demands knowledge of both the energy spectrum of accelerator-produced neutrons and the appropriate conversion coefficient functions for different irradiation geometries. At that time (circa 1960), such information was limited, and it was necessary to use judgment in the interpretation of measured data. The Health Physics Group of the Berkeley Laboratory used the best data then available and, as a matter of policy, reported the most conservative (largest) values of dose equivalent supported by their data. Since the early sixties, significant improvements in the information required to compute dose equivalent, particularly in the case of conversion coefficients, have been reported in the scientific literature. This paper reinterprets the older neutron measurements using the best conversion coefficient data available today. It is concluded that the dose equivalents reported in the early sixties would be reduced by at least a factor of two using current methods of analysis

  14. Estimation of the radiation strength, dose equivalent and mean gamma-ray energy form p+ sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U fission products

    CERN Document Server

    Kawakami, H

    2003-01-01

    On 100 isobars from 72 to 171 mass number, the radiation strength, dose equivalent and mean gamma-ray energy from p+ sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U fission products at Tandem accelerator facility were estimated on the basis of data of proton induced fission mass yield by T. Tsukada. In order to control radiation, the decay curves of radiation of each mass after irradiation were estimated and illustrated. These calculation results showed 1) the peak of p+ sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U fission products is 101 and 133 mass number. 2) gamma-ray strength of target ion source immediately after irradiation is 3.12x10 sup 1 sup 1 (Radiation/s) when it repeated 4 cycles of UC sub 2 (2.6 g/cm sup 2) target radiated by 30 MeV and 3 mu A proton for 5 days and then cooled for 2 days. It decreased to 3.85x10 sup 1 sup 0 and 6.7x10 sup 9 (Radiation/s) after one day and two weeks cooling, respectively. 3) Total dose equivalent is 3.8x10 sup 4 (mu S/h) at 1 m distance without shield. 4) There are no problems on control the following isobars, beca...

  15. Construction of computational program of aging in insulating materials for searching reversed sequential test conditions to give damage equivalent to simultaneous exposure of heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuse, Norikazu; Homma, Hiroya; Okamoto, Tatsuki

    2013-01-01

    Two consecutive numerical calculations on degradation of polymeric insulations under thermal and radiation environment are carried out to simulate so-called reversal sequential acceleration test. The aim of the calculation is to search testing conditions which provide material damage equivalent to the case of simultaneous exposure of heat and radiation. At least following four parameters are needed to be considered in the sequential method; dose rate and exposure time in radiation, as well as temperature and aging time in heating. The present paper discusses the handling of these parameters and shows some trial calculation results. (author)

  16. A conversion method of air-kerma from the primary, scatter and leakage radiations to ambient dose equivalent for calculating the mamography x-ray shielding barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, H.

    2005-01-01

    The primary, scatter, and leakage doses(in Gy), which constitute the data base for calculating shielding requirements for x-ray facilities, are often converted to the equivalent dose (in sievert) by using a constant of conversion of 1.145Sv/Gy. This constant is used for diagnostic radiology as well as for mammography spectra, and is derived by considering an exposure of 1 R corresponds to an air kerma of 8.73 m Gy, which renders by tradition an equivalent dose of 10 mSv. However, this conversion does not take into account the energy dependence of the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the equivalent dose as described in ICRU report. Moreover, current radiation protection standards propose the use of the quantity ambient dose equivalent in order to qualify the efficiently of given radiation shielding. Therefore, in this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation ambient dose equivalent from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to ambient dose equivalent for mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium (NMi), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and International Atomic Energy Agency (AIEA) laboratories. The calculation has been performed by the means of two methods which show a maximum deviation less than 10%2 for the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations. The results show that the conversion coefficients vary from 0.242 Sv/ Gy to 0.692 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.436 Sv/Gy for the primary and the scatter radiations, and form 0.156 Sv/Gy to 1.329 Sv/Gy with an average value of 0.98 Sv/Gy for the leakage radiation. Simpkin et al. using an empirical approach propose a conversion value of 0.50 Sv/Gy for the mammography x-ray spectra. This value approximately coincides with the average conversion value of 0.436 Sv/Gy obtained in this work for

  17. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, K.L.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Gavazza, S.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Gomes, R.G.; Silva, M.G.; Thalhofer, J.L.; Silva, A.X.; Santos, R.F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  18. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2010-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons ( 3 H + ) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the US Government 2010. (authors)

  19. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: Conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, K.; Parker, D. E.; Friedberg, W.

    2010-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions ( 3 He 2+ ) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder TM 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV. Published by Oxford Univ. Press on behalf of the U.S. Government 2010. (authors)

  20. Aircraft crew radiation workplaces: Comparison of measured and calculated ambient dose equivalent rate data using the EURADOS in-flight radiation data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, P.; Bartlett, D.; Lindborg, L.; McAulay, I.; Schnuer, K.; Schraube, H.; Spurny, F.

    2006-01-01

    In May 2000, the chairman of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) invited a number of experts with experience of cosmic radiation dosimetry to form a working group (WG 5) on aircraft crew dosimetry. Three observers from the Article 31 Group of Experts as well as one observer from the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) were also appointed. The European Commission funded the meetings. Full meetings were organised in January 2001 and in November 2001. An editorial group, who are the authors of this publication, started late in 2002 to finalise a draft report, which was submitted to the Article 31 Group of Experts in June 2003. The methods and data reported are the product of the work of 26 research institutes from the EU, USA and Canada. Some of the work was supported by contracts with the European Commission, Directorate General XII, Science, Research and Development. A first overview of the EC report was published late in 2004. In this publication we focus on a comparison of measured and calculated ambient dose rate data using the EURADOS In-Flight Data Base. The evaluation of results obtained by different methods and groups, and comparison of measurement results and the results of calculations were performed in terms of the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H*(10). Aspects of measurement uncertainty are reported also. The paper discusses the estimation of annual doses for given flight hours and gives an outline of further research needed in the field of aircraft crew dosimetry, such as the influence of solar particle events. (authors)

  1. Calibration of photographic dosemeters to evaluate the personal equivalent dose, Hp (10), irradiated by different radiation qualities and angles of incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Christiana; Antonio Filho, Joao

    2013-01-01

    To use radiation detectors, should periodically perform tests and calibrations on instruments in order to verify its good functionality. One way to ascertain the quality of the instrument is to conduct a study of the angular dependence of the response of the radiation detectors. The photographic dosimetry has been used widely to quantify the radiation doses and to estimate levels of doses received by workers involved with X-and gamma radiation. Photographic dosimeters are used because provide wide range of exposure and good accuracy. One of the sources of error have been introduced by different irradiation geometries between calibration and measurement in radiation fields used in x-ray and gamma ray sources, therefore, there is a need for an evaluation of the sensitivity of dosimeters with variation of the angle of the incident beam. In this study were tested 190 photographic dosemeters in the Metrology Laboratory of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE) using the phantom H p (10), where the dosimeters are evaluated on the basis of the new operational magnitude for individual monitoring, the equivalent personal dose, H p (10). Angular dependence of these radiation detectors was studied in X radiation fields (in the range of 45 keV energy to 164 keV) and gamma radiation ( 137 Cs-662 keV e 60 Co - 1250 keV)

  2. Assessment of ambient dose equivalent rate performance of an automatic survey meter as an instrument to quantify the presence of radiation in soils

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, E M; Okuno, E

    2002-01-01

    Those who work in radiation protection are faced with various quantities that were created to account for the effects of ionizing radiation in the human body. As far as the experimental point of view is concerned, each available equipment is planned to measure a distinct quantity, for a specific radiation protection application, and it is not always clear which one it is. This paper shows a series of tests, planned and applied to a portable gamma ray spectrometer, in order to assure that the monitoring low dose levels of radiation with it is reliable. The equipment is fully automated and does not allow modifications of the conversion factors from counts to ambient dose equivalent. It is therefore necessary to assure that the values provided by the equipment are correct and refer to the actual situation one expects to find in practice. The system is based on an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, mounted with its electronics in a portable case, suitable for field measurements. It measures ambient dose equivalent r...

  3. Equivalent Lagrangians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojman, S.

    1982-01-01

    We present a review of the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations, emphasizing the ambiguities which appear due to the existence of equivalent Lagrangians for a given classical system. In particular, we analyze the properties of equivalent Lagrangians in the multidimensional case, we study the conditions for the existence of a variational principle for (second as well as first order) equations of motion and their solutions, we consider the inverse problem of the Calculus of Variations for singular systems, we state the ambiguities which emerge in the relationship between symmetries and conserved quantities in the case of equivalent Lagrangians, we discuss the problems which appear in trying to quantize classical systems which have different equivalent Lagrangians, we describe the situation which arises in the study of equivalent Lagrangians in field theory and finally, we present some unsolved problems and discussion topics related to the content of this article. (author)

  4. Equivalent 5-year bNED in select prostate cancer patients managed with surgery or radiation therapy despite exclusion of the seminal vesicles from the CTV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'amico, Anthony V.; Whittington, Richard; Kaplan, Irving; Beard, Clair; Schultz, Delray; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Tomaszewski, John E.; Wein, Alan; Coleman, C. Norman

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) failure free survival was determined for select prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy to the prostate only or radical retropubic prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A logistic regression multivariable analysis evaluating the variables of PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and clinical stage was used to evaluate the endpoint of pathologic seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) in 749 consecutive prostate cancer patients managed with a radical retropubic prostatectomy. In a subgroup of 332 surgically and 197 radiation managed patients who did not have the clinical predictors of SVI, PSA failure free survival (bNED) was determined. Comparisons were made using the log rank test between surgically and radiation managed patients in this subgroup. In this subgroup, radiation managed patients were treated to a median dose of 66 Gy (66-70 Gy) to the prostate only. Results: The pretreatment PSA (> 10 ng/ml), biopsy Gleason score (≥7), and clinical stage (T2b, 2c, or 3) were found to be significant independent predictors (p < 0.001) of SVI. Only 2% of patients without any of these factors had SVI and 17% had extracapsular extension (15% microscopic; 2% macroscopic). In this subgroup the 5-year bNED rates were equivalent [84 vs. 89% (p = 0.67)] for surgically and radiation managed patients, respectively. Conclusions: Conventional dose external beam radiation therapy directed at the prostate alone resulted in 5-year bNED rates equivalent to surgery on retrospective comparison in patients with clinical stage T1,2a, PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml, and biopsy Gleason ≤ 6 prostate cancer

  5. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy

  6. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = radiography (P radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run.

  7. Measurement of extrapolation curves for the secondary pattern of beta radiation Nr. 86 calibrated in rapidity of absorbed dose for tissue equivalent by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1988-10-01

    The following report has as objective to present the obtained results of measuring - with a camera of extrapolation of variable electrodes (CE) - the dose speed absorbed in equivalent fabric given by the group of sources of the secondary pattern of radiation Beta Nr. 86, (PSB), and to compare this results with those presented by the calibration certificates that accompany the PSB extended by the primary laboratory Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), of the R.F.A. as well as the uncertainties associated to the measure process. (Author)

  8. Simulation of equivalent dose due to accidental electron beam loss in Indus-1 and Indus-2 synchrotron radiation sources using FLUKA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahani, P.K.; Dev, Vipin; Singh, Gurnam; Haridas, G.; Thakkar, K.K.; Sarkar, P.K.; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Indus-1 and Indus-2 are two Synchrotron radiation sources at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), India. Stored electron energy in Indus-1 and Indus-2 are 450MeV and 2.5GeV respectively. During operation of storage ring, accidental electron beam loss may occur in addition to normal beam losses. The Bremsstrahlung radiation produced due to the beam losses creates a major radiation hazard in these high energy electron accelerators. FLUKA, the Monte Carlo radiation transport code is used to simulate the accidental beam loss. The simulation was carried out to estimate the equivalent dose likely to be received by a trapped person closer to the storage ring. Depth dose profile in water phantom for 450MeV and 2.5GeV electron beam is generated, from which percentage energy absorbed in 30cm water phantom (analogous to human body) is calculated. The simulation showed the percentage energy deposition in the phantom is about 19% for 450MeV electron and 4.3% for 2.5GeV electron. The dose build up factor in 30cm water phantom for 450MeV and 2.5GeV electron beam are found to be 1.85 and 2.94 respectively. Based on the depth dose profile, dose equivalent index of 0.026Sv and 1.08Sv are likely to be received by the trapped person near the storage ring in Indus-1 and Indus-2 respectively. (author)

  9. Evaluation of personal dose equivalent 'HP(d)' in a external individual monitoring system for X and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, C.; Antonio Filho, J.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The good of individual monitoring for external radiation is the assessment of occupational exposure from X and γ radiations in order to assure that the radiological conditions of the workplace are acceptable, safe and satisfactory. The evaluation of radiations doses for workers must not exceed dose limits specified for workers, according to national regulatory agencies. Nowadays, there are two external monitoring systems in use, both based on ICRU definitions. In the conventional system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of Hx. The personal dosimeter is worn over chest surface and it is calibrated in function of air kerma. In the new system, the workers doses are evaluated in terms of HP(d) and the personal dosimeter is calibrated in function of phantom doses. The aim of this paper is to adapt an external dosimetry laboratory (based on photographic dosimetry) to evaluate the personal dosimeters in terms of HP(d). In this way, a simple methodology, based on linear programming, was utilized. In this adaptation, calibration curves were obtained for radiation qualities (W and N series) described by International Organization for Standardization (ISO 4037-1, 1995). These calibration curves offer a better accuracy on dose determinations and energy below 140 keV, improving the quality of service rendered the society. (author)

  10. Estimation of the radiation strength and dose equivalent from activities produced by p+ sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U fission reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kawakami, H

    2002-01-01

    The decay curves of radiation and dose equivalent of mass from 72 to 171 produced by p+ sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U fission reaction are calculated under the consideration that 1) dose equivalent by decay of each nuclide is estimated by each calculation and 2) only one isomer is considered when there are some isomers in the chain decay. Four isotopes selected to calculate the time-depend intensity in the chain decay. Total radiation is 150 times, which is difference of proton beam current, larger than the value not considered isomer. There is no problem in the following isobar, which decays after beam off, 75, 78, 79, 81, 89, 100, 101, 104, 107, 116, 138, 163, 164 and 168. The nuclides such as 81, 95, 98, 102, 108, 146, 152, 158, 165, 169 and 170 are long life, but have low or weak energy of gamma-ray. Nuclides of gas or high vapor pressure show different values from the calculation results, because total nuclide did not accumulate. This analysis showed the isomer ratio was not identified by experiments. The value is...

  11. Accuracy assessment of a net radiation and temperature index snowmelt model using ground observations of snow water equivalent in an alpine basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotch, N. P.; Painter, T. H.; Bales, R. C.; Dozier, J.

    2003-04-01

    In this study, an accumulated net radiation / accumulated degree-day index snowmelt model was coupled with remotely sensed snow covered area (SCA) data to simulate snow cover depletion and reconstruct maximum snow water equivalent (SWE) in the 19.1-km2 Tokopah Basin of the Sierra Nevada, California. Simple net radiation snowmelt models are attractive for operational snowmelt runoff forecasts as they are computationally inexpensive and have low input requirements relative to physically based energy balance models. The objective of this research was to assess the accuracy of a simple net radiation snowmelt model in a topographically heterogeneous alpine environment. Previous applications of net radiation / temperature index snowmelt models have not been evaluated in alpine terrain with intensive field observations of SWE. Solar radiation data from two meteorological stations were distributed using the topographic radiation model TOPORAD. Relative humidity and temperature data were distributed based on the lapse rate calculated between three meteorological stations within the basin. Fractional SCA data from the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (5 acquisitions) and the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) (2 acquisitions) were used to derive daily SCA using a linear regression between acquisition dates. Grain size data from AVIRIS (4 acquisitions) were used to infer snow surface albedo and interpolated linearly with time to derive daily albedo values. Modeled daily snowmelt rates for each 30-m pixel were scaled by the SCA and integrated over the snowmelt season to obtain estimates of maximum SWE accumulation. Snow surveys consisting of an average of 335 depth measurements and 53 density measurements during April, May and June, 1997 were interpolated using a regression tree / co-krig model, with independent variables of average incoming solar radiation, elevation, slope and maximum upwind slope. The basin was clustered into 7 elevation / average-solar-radiation

  12. Radiation protection clothing in X-ray diagnostics. Comparison of attenuation equivalents in narrow beam and inverse broad-beam geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, Thomas; Schoepf, T.; Ennemoser, O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Standard DIN EN 61 331-1 for attenuation measurements in the narrow and broad beam as well as DIN 6857-1 for the determination of shielding properties in the inverse broad-beam geometry are available for testing the attenuation of protection clothing. The attenuation measurements in the narrow beam don't consider scattered radiation and fluorescence due to the arrangement. This leads to the fact that the protective effect of lead-free materials will be misestimated when compared to lead. Therefore, the differences in attenuation equivalents, determined by both test methods for topical radiation protection aprons, were examined. Materials and Methods: The attenuations in inverse broad-beam geometry according to DIN 6857-1 and in the narrow beam according to DIN EN 61 331-1 were measured using commercially available aprons. They were made of lead, lead-reduced and lead-free materials. For determination of the attenuation equivalents, certificated lead-foils with high purity and a precise thickness of 0.1 to 1.25 mm were used. Results: The measurements in the narrow beam according to DIN EN 61 331-1 showed that nearly all aprons reach the required lead equivalent at mid-range tube voltages of 100 kV. At higher and lower tube voltages, the requirements of DIN EN 61 331-3 were largely not met. In contrast, the testing of the same aprons in inverse broad-beam geometry according to DIN 6857-1 showed that only a few aprons meet the requirements for being classified in the nominal protection class. Conclusion: The measurements suggest that testing method DIN 6857-1 has yet to prevail and that manufacturers are just beginning to develop the appropriate protective materials. (orig.)

  13. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  14. New recommendations for dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    In its report 39, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), has defined four new quantities for the determination of dose equivalents from external sources: the ambient dose equivalent, the directional dose equivalent, the individual dose equivalent, penetrating and the individual dose equivalent, superficial. The rationale behind these concepts and their practical application are discussed. Reference is made to numerical values of these quantities which will be the subject of a coming publication from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP. (Author)

  15. Present status of ambient dose equivalent rate and radioactive substance concentration measurements in working environment. (3) Measuring instruments for ionizing radiation in working environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Shohei

    2006-01-01

    In order to measure the airborne radioactive substance concentration in working environments, some kinds of sampler such as dust sampler and iodine sampler, measuring instruments (alpha and beta spectrometer, and liquid scintillation counter), monitor (dust-, iodine- and gas-monitor), survey meter for measuring gamma ray dose rate are stated. The measurement method of α, β and γ-ray nuclides and ambient dose-equivalent at 10 mm was explained. Some examples of the list of dust sampler, filter, tritium sampler, dust monitor, iodine monitor, gas monitor, and survey meter on the market are shown. There are so many kinds of measuring instruments for ionizing radiation in working environment that the best instrument for measurement should be selected. The environment conditions such as sample form, temperature and humidity have to be considered in order to evaluate the measurement values. (S.Y.)

  16. An efficient method for computing the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M.-D.; Arking, A.

    1981-01-01

    Chou and Arking (1980) have developed a fast but accurate method for computing the IR cooling rate due to water vapor. Using a similar approach, the considered investigation develops a method for computing the heating rates due to the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in the wavelength range from 4 to 8.3 micrometers. The validity of the method is verified by comparison with line-by-line calculations. An outline is provided of an efficient method for transmittance and flux computations based upon actual line parameters. High speed is achieved by employing a one-parameter scaling approximation to convert an inhomogeneous path into an equivalent homogeneous path at suitably chosen reference conditions.

  17. Gyrokinetic equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We compare two different derivations of the gyrokinetic equation: the Hamiltonian approach in Dubin D H E et al (1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3524) and the recursive methodology in Parra F I and Catto P J (2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 065014). We prove that both approaches yield the same result at least to second order in a Larmor radius over macroscopic length expansion. There are subtle differences in the definitions of some of the functions that need to be taken into account to prove the equivalence.

  18. Analysis and comparison of immune reactivity in guinea-pigs immunized with equivalent numbers of normal or radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.V.; McLaren, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Guinea-pigs immunized with equivalent numbers of normal or radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni develop close to complete resistance to reinfection at weeks 12 and 4.5 respectively. We here analyse and compare the immune responses induced by the two populations of cercariae. Both radiation-attenuated and normal parasites of S. mansoni elicited an extensive germinal centre response in guinea-pigs by week 4.5 post-immunization. The anti-parasite antibody titre and cytotoxic activity of serum from 4.5-week-vaccinated, or 4.5-week-infected guinea-pigs were approximately equal, but sera from 12-week-infected individuals had high titres of anti-parasite antibody, which promoted significant larvicidal activity in vitro. In all cases, larvicidal activity was mediated by the IgG 2 fraction of the immune serum. Lymphocyte transformation tests conducted on splenic lymphocytes from 4.5-week vaccinated guinea-pigs revealed maximal stimulation against cercarial, 2-week and 3-week worm antigens, whereas spleen cells from 4.5-week-infected guinea-pigs were maximally stimulated by cercarial and 6-week worm antigens. The splenic lymphocyte responses of 12-week infected animals were dramatic against antigens prepared from all life-stages of the parasite. (author)

  19. Using Neural Networks to Improve the Performance of Radiative Transfer Modeling Used for Geometry Dependent Surface Lambertian-Equivalent Reflectivity Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasnacht, Zachary; Qin, Wenhan; Haffner, David P.; Loyola, Diego; Joiner, Joanna; Krotkov, Nickolay; Vasilkov, Alexander; Spurr, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Surface Lambertian-equivalent reflectivity (LER) is important for trace gas retrievals in the direct calculation of cloud fractions and indirect calculation of the air mass factor. Current trace gas retrievals use climatological surface LER's. Surface properties that impact the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) as well as varying satellite viewing geometry can be important for retrieval of trace gases. Geometry Dependent LER (GLER) captures these effects with its calculation of sun normalized radiances (I/F) and can be used in current LER algorithms (Vasilkov et al. 2016). Pixel by pixel radiative transfer calculations are computationally expensive for large datasets. Modern satellite missions such as the Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) produce very large datasets as they take measurements at much higher spatial and spectral resolutions. Look up table (LUT) interpolation improves the speed of radiative transfer calculations but complexity increases for non-linear functions. Neural networks perform fast calculations and can accurately predict both non-linear and linear functions with little effort.

  20. Annual effective dose equivalents arising from inhalation of 222Rn, 220Rn and their decay products in high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhonghou

    1985-01-01

    The author presents the data of on-the-sport investigations in the high background radiation area in Yangjiang County in 1975 and 1981. Monazite sand is contained in the soil of this area. The average concentrations of 222 Rn in the air indoors and out doors of the high background radiation area are 31.8 and 16.4 Bqm -3 respectively, which are equal to 2.9 and 1.5 times the average concentrations in the control area. The average concentrations of 220 Rn in the air indoors and outdoors of the high background area are 167.5 and 18.4 Bqm -3 , corresponding to 9.6 and 4.8 times those of the control area respectively. The average potential alpha energy concentrations for daughters of 222 Rn indoors and outdoors are 0.1 and 0.097 μJm -3 , which are equal to 2.6 and 2.2 times those of the control are respectively. The average potential alpha energy concentrations for daughters of 220 Rn indoors and outdoors are 0.255 and 0.053 μJm -3 , corresponding to 3.7 and 2.7 times those of the control area respectively. The average annual effective dose equivalents arising from inhalation of 222 Rn, 220 Rn and their decay products in high background radiation area are estimated to be 2.8 mSv per caput, in which 40.5% arise from 220 Rn and its decay products. This result is about 3 times that in the neighboring control area

  1. Extensive and equivalent repair in both radiation-resistant and radiation-sensitive E. coli determined by a DNA-unwinding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnstroem, G.; George, A.M.; Cramp, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    The extent of strand breakage and repair in irradiated E. coli B/r and Bsub(s-l) was studied using a DNA-unwinding technique in denaturing conditions of weak alkali. Although these two strains showed widely different response to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, they both had an equal capacity to repair radiation-induced breaks in DNA. Oxygen enhancement ratios for the killing of B/r and Bsub(s-l) were respectively 4 and 2; but after repair in non-nutrient or nutrient post-irradiation conditions, the oxygen enhancement values for the residual strand breaks were always the same for the two strains. The equal abilities of E.coli B/r and E.coli Bsub(s-l) to remove the strand breaks measured by this weak-alkali technqiue has led to the suggestion that some other type of damage to either DNA or another macromolecule may play a major role in determining whether or not the cells survive to proliferate. (author)

  2. Extensive and equivalent repair in both radiation-resistant and radiation-sensitive E. coli determined by a DNA-unwinding technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnstroem, G [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); George, A M; Cramp, W A

    1978-10-01

    The extent of strand breakage and repair in irradiated E. coli B/r and Bsub(s-l) was studied using a DNA-unwinding technique in denaturing conditions of weak alkali. Although these two strains showed widely different response to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, they both had an equal capacity to repair radiation-induced breaks in DNA. Oxygen enhancement ratios for the killing of B/r and Bsub(s-l) were respectively 4 and 2; but after repair in non-nutrient or nutrient post-irradiation conditions, the oxygen enhancement values for the residual strand breaks were always the same for the two strains. The equal abilities of E.coli B/r and E.coli Bsub(s-l) to remove the strand breaks measured by this weak-alkali technqiue has led to the suggestion that some other type of damage to either DNA or another macromolecule may play a major role in determining whether or not the cells survive to proliferate.

  3. Editorial: New operational dose equivalent quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The ICRU Report 39 entitled ''Determination of Dose Equivalents Resulting from External Radiation Sources'' is briefly discussed. Four new operational dose equivalent quantities have been recommended in ICRU 39. The 'ambient dose equivalent' and the 'directional dose equivalent' are applicable to environmental monitoring and the 'individual dose equivalent, penetrating' and the 'individual dose equivalent, superficial' are applicable to individual monitoring. The quantities should meet the needs of day-to-day operational practice, while being acceptable to those concerned with metrological precision, and at the same time be used to give effective control consistent with current perceptions of the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiations. (U.K.)

  4. Thermoluminescence and radioluminescence properties of tissue equivalent Cu-doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E.; Furetta, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 70543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Marcazzo, J.; Santiago, M. [Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco / UNICEN, Gral. Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Guarneros, C. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Altamira Km 14.5, 896000 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Pacio, M. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Instituto de Ciencias, Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Av. 14 Sur, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Palomino, R., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, 72570 Puebla Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) and radioluminescence (Rl) properties of lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) doped with different concentration of copper (0.25, 0.5, 1 wt %) under gamma and beta irradiation has been investigated. The feasibility of using this borate in radiation dosimetry at low doses has been evaluated. Tissue equivalent Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was prepared by solid state reaction using mixing stoichiometric compositions of lithium carbonate (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) and a solution of CuCl{sub 2} as dopant. The glow curve, of the most efficient copper doped borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu 0.5 wt %), shows a main stable peak centered at 225 degrees C and a second low temperature peak centered at 80 degrees C. The low temperature peak disappears completely after 24 hours of storage in darkness and at room temperature or after an annealing at 120 degrees C for 10 seconds. The main peak of the Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu remains constant. The Tl response of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu shows good linearity in the analyzed dose range. The stability and repeatability of Rl signals of the borate have been studied and the Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu (0.5 wt %) shown the higher Rl emission and a stable and repetitive response. Results show that Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu has prospects to be used in gamma and beta radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  5. Determination of dose equivalent with tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, G.; Schuhmacher, H.; Menzel, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are instruments based on the cavity chamber principle and provide spectral information on the energy loss of single charged particles crossing the cavity. Hence such detectors measure absorbed dose or kerma and are able to provide estimates on radiation quality. During recent years TEPC based instruments have been developed for radiation protection applications in photon and neutron fields. This was mainly based on the expectation that the energy dependence of their dose equivalent response is smaller than that of other instruments in use. Recently, such instruments have been investigated by intercomparison measurements in various neutron and photon fields. Although their principles of measurements are more closely related to the definition of dose equivalent quantities than those of other existing dosemeters, there are distinct differences and limitations with respect to the irradiation geometry and the determination of the quality factor. The application of such instruments for measuring ambient dose equivalent is discussed. (author)

  6. Ecological aspects of the radiation-migration equivalence principle in a closed fuel cycle and its comparative assessment with the ALARA principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poluektov, P.P.; Lopatkin, A.V.; Nikipelov, B.V.; Rachkov, V.I.; Sukhanov, L.P.; Voloshin, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    The errors and uncertainties arising in the determination of radionuclide escape from the RW burial require the use of extremely conservative estimates. In the limit, the nuclide concentrations in the waste may be used as estimates of their concentrations in underground waters. On this basis, it is possible to evaluate the corresponding radio-toxicities (by normalizing to the interference levels) of individual components and radioactive waste as a whole or the effective radio-toxicities (by dividing the radionuclide radio-toxicities into the retardation factors for the nuclide transfer with underground waters). This completely coincides with the procedure of performing the limiting conservative estimate according to the traditional approach with the use of scenarios, escape models, and the corresponding codes. A comparison of radio-toxicities for waste with those for natural uranium consumed for producing a required fuel results in the notion of radiation-migration equivalence for individual waste components and radioactive waste as a whole. Therefore, the radiation-migration equivalence corresponds to the limiting conservative estimate in the traditional approach to the determination of RW disposal safety in comparison with the radiotoxicity of natural uranium. The amounts of radionuclides in fragments (and actinides) and the corresponding weight of heavy metal in the fuel are compared with due regard for the hazard (according to the NRB-99 standards), the nuclide mobility (through the sorption retardation factors), the retention of radioactive waste by the solid matrix, and the contribution from the chains of uranium fission products. It was noted above that the RME principle is aimed at ensuring the radiological safety of the present and future generations and the environment through the minimization of radioactive waste upon reprocessing. This is attended by reaching a reasonably achievable, low level of radiological action in the context of modern science, i

  7. Using generalized equivalent uniform dose atlases to combine and analyze prospective dosimetric and radiation pneumonitis data from 2 non-small cell lung cancer dose escalation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Yorke, Ellen D; Belderbos, José S A; Borst, Gerben R; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Lebesque, Joos V; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate≥20% were plotted. The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The sensitivity of radiative transfer calculations to the changes in the HITRAN database from 1982 to 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last quarter century, improvements in the determination of the spectroscopic characteristics of the infrared-active trace species have enhanced our ability to retrieve quantitative distributions of temperatures, clouds, and abundances for various trace species within the Earth's atmosphere. These improvements have also allowed for refinements in the estimates of climatic effects attributed to changes in the Earth's atmospheric composition. Modeling efforts, however, have frequently experienced significant delays in assimilating improved spectroscopic information. Such is the case for highly parameterized models, where considerable effort is typically required to incorporate any revisions. Thus, a line-by-line radiative transfer model has been used to investigate the magnitude of the effects resulting from modifications to the spectroscopic information. Calculations from this line-by-line model have demonstrated that recent modifications to the HITRAN (High Resolution Transmission) line parameters, the continuum formulation, and the CO 2 line-mixing formulation can significantly affect the interpretation of the high spectral resolution radiance and brightness temperature retrievals. For certain moderate-resolution satellite remote sensing channels, modifications to these spectroscopic parameters and formulations have shown the capacity to induce changes in the calculated radiances equivalent to brightness temperature differences of 1-2 K. Model calculations have further shown that modifications of the spectroscopic characteristics tend to have a modest effect on the determination of spectrally integrated radiances, fluxes, and radiative forcing estimates, with the largest differences being of order 1 W m -2 for the total thermal infrared fluxes, and of order 2-3% of the calculated radiative forcing at the tropopause attributed to the combined doubling of CO 2 , N 2 O, and CH 4 . The results from this investigation are intended to function as a guide to

  9. A research program on radiative transfer model development in support of the ARM program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with ARM spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by-line model then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. A preprint of an extended abstract for the 1994 AMS volume describing a Quality Measurement Experiment using the ARM spectral data is included as an attachment

  10. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. Critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 [1] methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed. The effective dose equivalent determined using ICRP-26 methods is significantly smaller than the dose equivalent determined by traditional methods. No existing personnel dosimeter or health physics instrument can determine effective dose equivalent. At the present time, the conversion of dosimeter response to dose equivalent is based on calculations for maximal or ''cap'' values using homogeneous spherical or cylindrical phantoms. The evaluated dose equivalent is, therefore, a poor approximation of the effective dose equivalent as defined by ICRP Publication 26. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. SU-F-T-124: Radiation Biological Equivalent Presentations OfLEM-1 and MKM Approaches in the Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, W; Jiang, G; Sheng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the correlations of the radiation biological equivalent doses (BED) along depth and lateral distance between LEM-1 and MKM approaches. Methods: In NIRS-MKM (Microdosimetric Kinetic Model) approach, the prescribed BED, referred as C-Eq, doses aims to present the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for different energies of carbon-ions on a fixed 10% survival value of HCG cell with respect to convention X-ray. Instead of a fixed 10% survival, the BED doses of LEM-1 (Local Effect Model) approach, referred as X-Eq, aims to present the RBE over the whole survival curve of chordoma-like cell with alpha/beta ratio of 2.0. The relationship of physical doses as a function of C-Eq and X-Eq doses were investigated along depth and lateral distance for various sizes of cubic targets in water irradiated by carbon-ions. Results: At the center of each cubic target, the trends between physical and C-Eq or X-Eq doses can be described by a linear and 2nd order polynomial functions, respectively. Using fit functions can then calculate a scaling factor between C-Eq and X-Eq doses to have similar physical doses. With equalized C-Eq and X-Eq doses at the depth of target center, over- and under-estimated X-Eq to C-Eq are seen for depths before and after the target center, respectively. Near the distal edge along depth, sharp rising of RBE value is observed for X-Eq, but sharp dropping of RBE value is observed for C-Eq. For lateral locations near and just outside 50% dose level, sharp raising of RBE value is also seen for X-Eq, while only minor increasing with fast dropping for C-Eq. Conclusion: An analytical function to model the differences between the CEq and X-Eq doses along depth and lateral distance need to further investigated to explain varied clinic outcome of specific cancers using two different approaches to calculated BED doses.

  12. Individualized determination of lower margin in pelvic radiation field after low anterior resection for rectal cancer resulted in equivalent local control and radiation volume reduction compared with traditional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Suk Won; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae; Chun, Ho Kyung; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Do Hoon; Noh, Young Ju; Lee, Jung Eun

    2000-01-01

    . There was no significant difference with respect to local control and disease-free survival rates (p=0.42, p=0.68) between two groups of different lower margin determination policies. The new concept in the individualized determination of the lower margin depending on the anastomotic site has led to the equivalent local control and disease-free survival rates, and is expected to contribute to the reduction of unnecessary radiation-related morbidity by reduction of radiation volume, compared with the traditional method of lower margin determination

  13. Radiation Response of Forward Biased Float Zone and Magnetic Czochralski Silicon Detectors of Different Geometry for 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, J; Dusseau, Laurent; Roche, Nicolas Jean-Henri; Saigne, Frederic; Mekki, Julien; Glaser, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at evaluating new options for radiation monitoring sensors in LHC/SLHC experiments, the radiation responses of FZ and MCz custom made silicon detectors of different geometry have been studied up to about 4 x 10(14) n(eq)/cm(2). The radiation response of the devices under investigation is discussed in terms of material type, thickness and active area influence.

  14. Politico-economic equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime and a st......Traditional "economic equivalence'' results, like the Ricardian equivalence proposition, define equivalence classes over exogenous policies. We derive "politico-economic equivalence" conditions that apply in environments where policy is endogenous and chosen sequentially. A policy regime...... their use in the context of several applications, relating to social security reform, tax-smoothing policies and measures to correct externalities....

  15. What is correct: equivalent dose or dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In Croatian language some physical quantities in radiation protection dosimetry have not precise names. Consequently, in practice either terms in English or mathematical formulas are used. The situation is even worse since the Croatian language only a limited number of textbooks, reference books and other papers are available. This paper compares the concept of ''dose equivalent'' as outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations No. 26 and newest, conceptually different concept of ''equivalent dose'' which is introduced in ICRP 60. It was found out that Croatian terminology is both not uniform and unprecise. For the term ''dose equivalent'' was, under influence of Russian and Serbian languages, often used as term ''equivalent dose'' even from the point of view of ICRP 26 recommendations, which was not justified. Unfortunately, even now, in Croatia the legal unit still ''dose equivalent'' defined as in ICRP 26, but the term used for it is ''equivalent dose''. Therefore, in Croatian legislation a modified set of quantities introduced in ICRP 60, should be incorporated as soon as possible

  16. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  17. Calculation methods for determining dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endres, G.W.R.; Tanner, J.E.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A series of calculations of neutron fluence as a function of energy in an anthropomorphic phantom was performed to develop a system for determining effective dose equivalent for external radiation sources. critical organ dose equivalents are calculated and effective dose equivalents are determined using ICRP-26 methods. Quality factors based on both present definitions and ICRP-40 definitions are used in the analysis. The results of these calculations are presented and discussed

  18. Hydration and transparency of the rabbit cornea irradiated with UVB-doses of 0.25 J/cm(2) and 0.5 J/cm(2) compared with equivalent UVB radiation exposure reaching the human cornea from sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejka, Cestmír; Ardan, Taras; Sirc, Jakub; Michálek, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Brůnová, Blanka; Rosina, Jozef

    2011-07-01

    Exposure of the cornea to UV radiation from sunlight evokes intraocular inflammation, photokeratitis. Photokeratitis is caused by UVB radiation. It is accompanied by changes of corneal hydration and light absorption. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of two UVB doses on corneal optics in rabbits and to compare these UVB doses with the equivalent exposure of UVB radiation reaching the human cornea from sunlight. Rabbit corneas were irradiated with a daily UVB dose of 0.25 J/cm(2) or 0.5 J/cm(2) for 4 days. One day after finishing the irradiations the rabbits were sacrificed and corneal light absorption measured using our spectrophotometrical method. Corneal hydration was examined using an ultrasonic Pachymeter every experimental day before the irradiation procedure and the last day before sacrificing the animals. Changes in corneal optics appeared after the repeated exposure of the cornea to a UVB dose of 0.25 J/ cm(2) and massively increased after the repeated exposure of the cornea to a UVB dose of 0.5 J/cm(2). The first significant changes in corneal hydration appeared after a single exposure of the cornea to a UVB dose of 0.25 J/cm(2). Changes in corneal hydration appeared after the exposure of the rabbit cornea to a single UVB dose equivalent to 2.6 hours of solar UVB radiation reaching the human cornea, as measured by UVB sensors embedded in the eyes of mannequin heads facing the sun on a beach at noon in July. Repeated exposure of the rabbit cornea to the same UVB dose evoked profound changes in corneal optics. Although comparison of experimental and outdoor conditions are only approximate, the results in rabbits point to the danger for the human eye from UVB radiation when short stays in sunlight are repeated for several consecutive days without UV protection.

  19. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cess, R. D.; Kratz, D. P.; Caldwell, J.; Kim, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mutually consistent line-by-line, narrow-band and broad-band infrared radiation models are presented for methane, a potentially important anthropogenic trace gas within the atmosphere. Comparisons of the modeled band absorptances with existing laboratory data produce the best agreement when, within the band models, spurious band intensities are used which are consistent with the respective laboratory data sets, but which are not consistent with current knowledge concerning the intensity of the infrared fundamental band of methane. This emphasizes the need for improved laboratory band absorptance measurements. Since, when applied to atmospheric radiation calculations, the line-by-line model does not require the use of scaling approximations, the mutual consistency of the band models provides a means of appraising the accuracy of scaling procedures. It is shown that Curtis-Godson narrow-band and Chan-Tien broad-band scaling provide accurate means of accounting for atmospheric temperature and pressure variations.

  20. Radiation beans characterization and implantation for study of lead equivalent individual protection device used in radiodiagnostic practices; Caracterizacao e implantacao de feixes de radiacao para estudo de dispositivos de protecao individual com equivalencia em chumbo utilizados em praticas de radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Leslie Silva

    2004-07-01

    The protective shielding (IPC) must be used by occupationally exposed professionals, patients and volunteers, in order to optimize the doses who receive due to radiological practices. International and national norms establish the methodology to be adopted for determination of the IPC attenuation. In this work, the IPC had been submitted to X-rays beams with known characteristics, standardized for determination of their attenuation equivalent thickness by comparison to an experimental lead attenuation slope. This comparison technique allowed insurance estimative of the IPC attenuation equivalent thickness in mm of lead. Thus, it was possible to verify the conformity of the attenuation equivalent thickness determined experimentally and the value of the thickness indicated by the manufacturer. To carry out this work, it was necessary the implementation of experimental setups stated in the specifics norms, the study of the X-rays beams original features and the determination of combined additional filters, in order to allow the X-ray equipment used operates in compliance with Norm IEC 61331-1 IEC. The radiation quality selected is characterized by a 100 kV voltage and a 0.25 mm of copper overall filtration. The implementation of this radiation quality it was carried through of its first and second HVL (Half Value Layer). Thus, a methodology according to the international Norms has been implemented in the laboratory. The results of the present work provide suitable and useful information about radiation beams features related to the determination techniques of the attenuation properties. Once implemented the procedures for conformity evaluation of the protection devices, it will be possible to carry out specific quality control tests, which will be helpful to manufacturers, customers, as well as authorities in the radiological protection and health areas. (author)

  1. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (1). Overview of the lens, radiogenic cataract, and equivalent dose limit for the lens newly recommended by the ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Yamauchi, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2014-01-01

    In April 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued the statement on tissue reactions. This stimulated interest in many countries. The Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye was established in the Japanese Health Physics Society, and in April 2013, started discussion about the international developments and recent studies related to the dosimetry of the lens of the eye. This committee now publishes the interim report consisting of parts I-VI. Of these, this Part I overviews the structure of the eye and lens, cataract types and the scientific evidence of its new dose threshold and equivalent dose limit newly recommended by the ICRP. (author)

  2. Radiological equivalent of chemical pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, V.O.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy has caused continued effort toward public safety through radiation health protection measures and nuclear management practices. However, concern has not been focused on the development specifically in the operation of chemical pestrochemical industries as well as other industrial processes brought about by technological advancements. This article presents the comparison of the risk of radiation and chemicals. The methods used for comparing the risks of late effects of radiation and chemicals are considered at three levels. (a) as a frame of reference to give an impression of resolving power of biological tests; (b) as methods to quantify risks; (c) as instruments for an epidemiological survey of human populations. There are marked dissimilarities between chemicals and radiation and efforts to interpret chemical activity may not be achieved. Applicability of the concept of rad equivalence has many restrictions and as pointed out this approach is not an established one. (RTD)

  3. Effect of radiation on reconstitution of skin equivalent (dermal alterations); Effet de l`irradiation sur la reconstruction d`une peau equivalente (alterations dermiques)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentilhomme, E.; Bergier, J.; Richard, M.; Neveux, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Dermal equivalents have been treated by single doses of gamma irradiation of 10, 20, 30 and 50 Gray. Numerations at different times show a dose and time dependant diminution of cellular population. This diminution is histologically observed in dermal part of reconstituted skin, in association with cellular and functional alterations of fibroblast cells. Modifications of epidermal epithelia are also noted in some reconstituted skin. This model would be useful to apprehend the effect of a dermal irradiation lesion on the later epidermization. (author). 4 refs.

  4. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  5. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE IMPULSE IS EQUIVALENT TO LIVER BIOPSY TO EVALUATE LIVER FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C AND NONALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ayres de Alencar Arrais GUERRA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLiver biopsy is recommended as the gold standard method for assessing the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. However, it is invasive, with potential risks and complications. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that provides information of changes in the liver tissue, evaluating tissue elasticity and acoustic radiation force impulse is one of the available techniques.ObjectiveThe main objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of acoustic radiation force impulse comparing to liver biopsy to evaluate fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.MethodsTwenty four patients were included, everyone underwent liver biopsy and acoustic radiation force impulse, and the results were compared with values described in the literature by several authors.ResultsIn the population of patients with chronic hepatitis C, our data were better correlated with data published by Carmen Fierbinteanu-Braticevici et al., with an accuracy of 82.4%, sensitivity of 71.4% and specificity of 90%. For nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, our data were better correlated with data published by Masato Yoneda et al., with an accuracy of 85.7%, sensitivity 80% and specificity of 100%.ConclusionAcoustic radiation force impulse is a method with good accuracy to distinguish initial fibrosis from advanced fibrosis in hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and can replace biopsy in most cases.

  6. Performance of ultralow-dose CT with iterative reconstruction in lung cancer screening: limiting radiation exposure to the equivalent of conventional chest X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Adrian [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Polyvalent and Oncological Radiology, Paris (France); Landau, Julia; Buetikofer, Yanik; Leidolt, Lars; Brela, Barbara; May, Michelle; Heverhagen, Johannes; Christe, Andreas [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the detection rate of pulmonary nodules in ultralow-dose CT acquisitions. In this lung phantom study, 232 nodules (115 solid, 117 ground-glass) of different sizes were randomly distributed in a lung phantom in 60 different arrangements. Every arrangement was acquired once with standard radiation dose (100 kVp, 100 references mAs) and once with ultralow radiation dose (80 kVp, 6 mAs). Iterative reconstruction was used with optimized kernels: I30 for ultralow-dose, I70 for standard dose and I50 for CAD. Six radiologists examined the axial 1-mm stack for solid and ground-glass nodules. During a second and third step, three radiologists used maximum intensity projection (MIPs), finally checking with computer-assisted detection (CAD), while the others first used CAD, finally checking with the MIPs. The detection rate was 95.5 % with standard dose (DLP 126 mGy*cm) and 93.3 % with ultralow-dose (DLP: 9 mGy*cm). The additional use of either MIP reconstructions or CAD software could compensate for this difference. A combination of both MIP reconstructions and CAD software resulted in a maximum detection rate of 97.5 % with ultralow-dose. Lung cancer screening with ultralow-dose CT using the same radiation dose as a conventional chest X-ray is feasible. (orig.)

  7. Equivalent 5 year bNED in select prostate cancer patients managed with surgery or radiation therapy despite exclusion of the seminal vesicles from the clinical target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, A. V.; Whittington, R.; Kaplan, I.; Beard, C.; Schultz, D.; Malkowicz, S.B.; Tomaszewski, J.E.; Wein, A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) failure free survival was determined for select prostate cancer patients treated definitively with external beam radiation therapy to the prostate only or a radical retropubic prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: A logistic regression multivariable analysis evaluating the variables of PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and clinical stage was used to evaluate the endpoint of pathologic seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) in 749 consecutive prostate cancer patients treated with a radical retropubic prostatectomy. In a subgroup of 325 surgically and 197 radiation managed patients who did not have the clinical predictors of SVI, PSA failure free survival (bNED) was determined. Comparisons were made using the log rank test. Radiation managed patients in this subgroup were treated to a median dose of 66 Gray (66 - 70 Gray) in 2 Gray fractions to the prostate only. A 95% normalization was used routinely. Results: The pre-treatment PSA (> 10 ng/ml), biopsy Gleason score (≥ 7), and clinical stage (T 2b,2c,3 versus T 1,2a ) were found to be significant independent predictors (p 1,2a , PSA < 10 ng/ml, and biopsy Gleason ≤ 6 prostate cancer

  8. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohannes, Indra; Vasiliniuc, Stefan [Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Hild, Sebastian [Faculty of Medicine, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91054, Germany and Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Langner, Oliver [QRM - Quality Assurance in Radiology and Medicine GmbH, Möhrendorf 91096 (Germany); Graeff, Christian [Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Bert, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.bert@uk-erlangen.de [Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Department of Biophysics, GSI - Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Methods: Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Results: Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy.

  9. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohannes, Indra; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Hild, Sebastian; Langner, Oliver; Graeff, Christian; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Methods: Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Results: Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy

  10. Technical Note: Radiation properties of tissue- and water-equivalent materials formulated using the stoichiometric analysis method in charged particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Indra; Hild, Sebastian; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Langner, Oliver; Graeff, Christian; Bert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Five tissue- and water-equivalent materials (TEMs) mimicking ICRU real tissues have been formulated using a previously established stoichiometric analysis method (SAM) to be applied in charged particle therapy. The purpose of this study was an experimental verification of the TEMs-SAM against charged particle beam measurements and for different computed tomography (CT) scanners. The potential of the TEMs-SAM to be employed in the dosimetry was also investigated. Experimental verification with three CT scanners was carried out to validate the calculated Hounsfield units (HUs) of the TEMs. Water-equivalent path lengths (WEPLs) of the TEMs for proton (106.8 MeV/u), helium (107.93 MeV/u), and carbon (200.3 MeV/u) ions were measured to be compared with the computed relative stopping powers. HU calibration curves were also generated. Differences between the measured HUs of the TEMs and the calculated HUs of the ICRU real tissues for all CT scanners were smaller than 4 HU except for the skeletal tissues which deviated up to 21 HU. The measured WEPLs verified the calculated WEPLs of the TEMs (maximum deviation was 0.17 mm) and were in good agreement with the calculated WEPLs of the ICRU real tissues (maximum deviation was 0.23 mm). Moreover, the relative stopping powers converted from the measured WEPLs differed less than 0.8% and 1.3% from the calculated values of the SAM and the ICRU, respectively. Regarding the relative nonelastic cross section per unit of volume for 200 MeV protons, the ICRU real tissues were generally well represented by the TEMs except for adipose which differed 3.8%. Further, the HU calibration curves yielded the mean and the standard deviation of the errors not larger than 0.5% and 1.9%, respectively. The results of this investigation implied the potential of the TEMs formulated using the SAM to be employed for both, beam dosimetry and HU calibration in charged particle therapy.

  11. A narrow-band k-distribution model with single mixture gas assumption for radiative flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung Min; Kim, Jae Won; Kwon, Oh Joon

    2018-06-01

    In the present study, the narrow-band k-distribution (NBK) model parameters for mixtures of H2O, CO2, and CO are proposed by utilizing the line-by-line (LBL) calculations with a single mixture gas assumption. For the application of the NBK model to radiative flows, a radiative transfer equation (RTE) solver based on a finite-volume method on unstructured meshes was developed. The NBK model and the RTE solver were verified by solving two benchmark problems including the spectral radiance distribution emitted from one-dimensional slabs and the radiative heat transfer in a truncated conical enclosure. It was shown that the results are accurate and physically reliable by comparing with available data. To examine the applicability of the methods to realistic multi-dimensional problems in non-isothermal and non-homogeneous conditions, radiation in an axisymmetric combustion chamber was analyzed, and then the infrared signature emitted from an aircraft exhaust plume was predicted. For modeling the plume flow involving radiative cooling, a flow-radiation coupled procedure was devised in a loosely coupled manner by adopting a Navier-Stokes flow solver based on unstructured meshes. It was shown that the predicted radiative cooling for the combustion chamber is physically more accurate than other predictions, and is as accurate as that by the LBL calculations. It was found that the infrared signature of aircraft exhaust plume can also be obtained accurately, equivalent to the LBL calculations, by using the present narrow-band approach with a much improved numerical efficiency.

  12. Environmental equivalent dose due to radiation dispersed by the patient body in treatments with tomotherapy; Dosis equivalente ambiental debida a la radiacion dispersada por el cuerpo del paciente en tratamientos con tomoterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza H, A.; Luna S, K. C.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Reyes R, E., E-mail: ange.es.he55@gmail.com [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenieria, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    One of the important parameters of the design and evaluation of the bunker of a linear accelerator for radiotherapy is the dose at the point to be protected behind the barriers of the treatment room. In the case of primary barriers this dose is due to direct radiation and in the case of secondary barriers is the dose due to radiation that leaks from the head and the dose due to radiation scattered by the body of the patient. In Zacatecas the bunker in the oncology ward was designed for a linear accelerator of 18 MV, but an accelerator of the latest technology was installed, which is a linear accelerator of 6 MV for tomotherapy that has a better control of the applied dose. In order to determine the dose due to the scattered radiation that reaches the internal surfaces of the barriers of the room, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) of type 100 were used, which were placed on three occasions, in 9 points inside the bunker for periods of 7 days. During these periods, patients were routinely treated and treated for different tumors using different procedures. At each measurement point, 4 dosimeters were placed. The readings of the TLDs were used to calculate the environmental equivalent dose that was normalized to the applied dose. The highest doses were found on the surface of the accelerator and did not show symmetry, in the primary barriers the same doses were found and in the labyrinth the dose due to scattered radiation is influenced by the Compton dispersion that the photons scattered on the wall of the labyrinth background. (Author)

  13. Tolerance of the High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology ASIC to potentially destructive radiation processes in Earth-orbit-equivalent environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. F.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Wilson, M.; Benmoussa, A.; Campola, M.; Christe, S. D.; Gissot, S.; Jones, L.; Newport, J.; Prydderch, M.; Richards, S.; Seller, P.; Shih, A. Y.; Thomas, S.

    2018-02-01

    The High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology (HEXITEC) ASIC is designed on a 0.35 μm CMOS process to read out CdTe or CZT detectors and hence provide fine-pixellated spectroscopic imaging in the range 2-200 keV. In this paper, we examine the tolerance of HEXITEC to both potentially destructive cumulative and single event radiation effects. Bare ASICs are irradiated with X-rays up to a total ionising dose (TID) of 1 Mrad (SiO2) and bombarded with heavy ions with linear energy transfer (LET) up to 88.3 MeV mg-1 cm-2. HEXITEC is shown to operate reliably below a TID of 150 krad, have immunity to fatal single event latchup (SEL) and have high tolerance to non-fatal SEL up to LETs of at least 88.3 MeV mg-1 cm-2. The results are compared to predictions of TID and SELs for various Earth-orbits and aluminium shielding thicknesses. It is found that HEXITEC's radiation tolerance to both potentially destructive cumulative and single event effects is sufficient to reliably operate in these environments with moderate shielding.

  14. Sci-Sat AM: Radiation Dosimetry and Practical Therapy Solutions - 05: Not all geometries are equivalent for magnetic field Fano cavity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkov, Victor N.; Rogers, David W.O. [Carleton University (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    The coupling of MRI and radiation treatment systems for the application of magnetic resonance guided radiation therapy necessitates a reliable magnetic field capable Monte Carlo (MC) code. In addition to the influence of the magnetic field on dose distributions, the question of proper calibration has arisen due to the several percent variation of ion chamber and solid state detector responses in magnetic fields when compared to the 0 T case (Reynolds et al., Med Phys, 2013). In the absence of a magnetic field, EGSnrc has been shown to pass the Fano cavity test (a rigorous benchmarking tool of MC codes) at the 0.1 % level (Kawrakow, Med.Phys, 2000), and similar results should be required of magnetic field capable MC algorithms. To properly test such developing MC codes, the Fano cavity theorem has been adapted to function in a magnetic field (Bouchard et al., PMB, 2015). In this work, the Fano cavity test is applied in a slab and ion-chamber-like geometries to test the transport options of an implemented magnetic field algorithm in EGSnrc. Results show that the deviation of the MC dose from the expected Fano cavity theory value is highly sensitive to the choice of geometry, and the ion chamber geometry appears to pass the test more easily than larger slab geometries. As magnetic field MC codes begin to be used for dose simulations and correction factor calculations, care must be taken to apply the most rigorous Fano test geometries to ensure reliability of such algorithms.

  15. Epidemiological studies on disturbances of human fetal development in areas with various doses of natural background radiation. I. Relationship between incidences of Down's syndrome or visible malformation and gonad dose equivalent rate of natural background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujeno, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between environmental radiation to the gonads and incidences of Down's syndrome and visible malformation was analyzed using Kendall's rank correlation method. The subjects, studied during a 3-yr period (1979-1981), were inhabitants of 46 prefectures in Japan that had various dose rates of natural background ionizing radiation. Results showed that the natural background very low-dose radiation rate was not a predominant factor responsible for inducing Down's syndrome or other visible malformations

  16. On uncertainties in definition of dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Keiji

    1995-01-01

    The author has entertained always the doubt that in a neutron field, if the measured value of the absorbed dose with a tissue equivalent ionization chamber is 1.02±0.01 mGy, may the dose equivalent be taken as 10.2±0.1 mSv. Should it be 10.2 or 11, but the author considers it is 10 or 20. Even if effort is exerted for the precision measurement of absorbed dose, if the coefficient being multiplied to it is not precise, it is meaningless. [Absorbed dose] x [Radiation quality fctor] = [Dose equivalent] seems peculiar. How accurately can dose equivalent be evaluated ? The descriptions related to uncertainties in the publications of ICRU and ICRP are introduced, which are related to radiation quality factor, the accuracy of measuring dose equivalent and so on. Dose equivalent shows the criterion for the degree of risk, or it is considered only as a controlling quantity. The description in the ICRU report 1973 related to dose equivalent and its unit is cited. It was concluded that dose equivalent can be considered only as the absorbed dose being multiplied by a dimensionless factor. The author presented the questions. (K.I.)

  17. Characterization of revenue equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, B.; Müller, R.; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, R.

    2009-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called revenue equivalence. We give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The characterization holds

  18. Characterization of Revenue Equivalence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heydenreich, Birgit; Müller, Rudolf; Uetz, Marc Jochen; Vohra, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    The property of an allocation rule to be implementable in dominant strategies by a unique payment scheme is called \\emph{revenue equivalence}. In this paper we give a characterization of revenue equivalence based on a graph theoretic interpretation of the incentive compatibility constraints. The

  19. On the operator equivalents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenet, G.; Kibler, M.

    1978-06-01

    A closed polynomial formula for the qth component of the diagonal operator equivalent of order k is derived in terms of angular momentum operators. The interest in various fields of molecular and solid state physics of using such a formula in connection with symmetry adapted operator equivalents is outlined

  20. Didactic revision of the operative magnitudes system ICRU for the evaluation of the equivalent dose in radiation external fields; Revision didactica del sistema de magnitudes operativas ICRU para la evaluacion de la dosis equivalente en campos externos de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work is presented in a didactic way the operative magnitudes system ICRU, showing as these magnitudes carry out an appropriate estimate of the effective equivalent doses H{sub E} and the effective dose. The objective is to present the basic concepts of the dosimetry for radiation external fields with purposes of radiological protection, because the assimilation lack and technological development of this dosimetric magnitudes system has persisted for near 50 years, in terms of practice of the radiological protection in Mexico. Also, this system is an essential part of safety basic standards of the IAEA and ICRP recommendations 26, 60, 74 and 103, as well as of the ICRU 25, 39, 43, 51 and 57. (Author)

  1. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Thrapsanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and ( and ( dosimetric parameters, calculated for  Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and dosimetric parameter, calculated for both  Gy ( and  Gy (. The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions.

  2. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  3. Equivalent Dynamic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Equivalences of two classes of dynamic models for weakly stationary multivariate time series are discussed: dynamic factor models and autoregressive models. It is shown that exploratory dynamic factor models can be rotated, yielding an infinite set of equivalent solutions for any observed series. It also is shown that dynamic factor models with lagged factor loadings are not equivalent to the currently popular state-space models, and that restriction of attention to the latter type of models may yield invalid results. The known equivalent vector autoregressive model types, standard and structural, are given a new interpretation in which they are conceived of as the extremes of an innovating type of hybrid vector autoregressive models. It is shown that consideration of hybrid models solves many problems, in particular with Granger causality testing.

  4. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Transcriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudo, María Marcela; Powers, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Shewry, Peter R.

    Regulatory authorities in Western Europe require transgenic crops to be substantially equivalent to conventionally bred forms if they are to be approved for commercial production. One way to establish substantial equivalence is to compare the transcript profiles of developing grain and other tissues of transgenic and conventionally bred lines, in order to identify any unintended effects of the transformation process. We present detailed protocols for transcriptomic comparisons of developing wheat grain and leaf material, and illustrate their use by reference to our own studies of lines transformed to express additional gluten protein genes controlled by their own endosperm-specific promoters. The results show that the transgenes present in these lines (which included those encoding marker genes) did not have any significant unpredicted effects on the expression of endogenous genes and that the transgenic plants were therefore substantially equivalent to the corresponding parental lines.

  5. The principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    Principle of equivalence was the fundamental guiding principle in the formulation of the general theory of relativity. What are its key elements? What are the empirical observations which establish it? What is its relevance to some new experiments? These questions are discussed in this article. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  6. Radioactive waste equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Schaller, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    The report reviews, for the Member States of the European Community, possible situations in which an equivalence concept for radioactive waste may be used, analyses the various factors involved, and suggests guidelines for the implementation of such a concept. Only safety and technical aspects are covered. Other aspects such as commercial ones are excluded. Situations where the need for an equivalence concept has been identified are processes where impurities are added as a consequence of the treatment and conditioning process, the substitution of wastes from similar waste streams due to the treatment process, and exchange of waste belonging to different waste categories. The analysis of factors involved and possible ways for equivalence evaluation, taking into account in particular the chemical, physical and radiological characteristics of the waste package, and the potential risks of the waste form, shows that no simple all-encompassing equivalence formula may be derived. Consequently, a step-by-step approach is suggested, which avoids complex evaluations in the case of simple exchanges

  7. Equivalent Colorings with "Maple"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2005-01-01

    Many counting problems can be modeled as "colorings" and solved by considering symmetries and Polya's cycle index polynomial. This paper presents a "Maple 7" program link http://users.tamuk.edu/kfdrc00/ that, given Polya's cycle index polynomial, determines all possible associated colorings and their partitioning into equivalence classes. These…

  8. Correspondences. Equivalence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1978-03-01

    We comment on sections paragraph 3 'Correspondences' and paragraph 6 'Equivalence Relations' in chapter II of 'Elements de mathematique' by N. Bourbaki in order to simplify their comprehension. Paragraph 3 exposes the ideas of a graph, correspondence and map or of function, and their composition laws. We draw attention to the following points: 1) Adopting the convention of writting from left to right, the composition law for two correspondences (A,F,B), (U,G,V) of graphs F, G is written in full generality (A,F,B)o(U,G,V) = (A,FoG,V). It is not therefore assumed that the co-domain B of the first correspondence is identical to the domain U of the second (EII.13 D.7), (1970). 2) The axiom of choice consists of creating the Hilbert terms from the only relations admitting a graph. 3) The statement of the existence theorem of a function h such that f = goh, where f and g are two given maps having the same domain (of definition), is completed if h is more precisely an injection. Paragraph 6 considers the generalisation of equality: First, by 'the equivalence relation associated with a map f of a set E identical to (x is a member of the set E and y is a member of the set E and x:f = y:f). Consequently, every relation R(x,y) which is equivalent to this is an equivalence relation in E (symmetrical, transitive, reflexive); then R admits a graph included in E x E, etc. Secondly, by means of the Hilbert term of a relation R submitted to the equivalence. In this last case, if R(x,y) is separately collectivizing in x and y, theta(x) is not the class of objects equivalent to x for R (EII.47.9), (1970). The interest of bringing together these two subjects, apart from this logical order, resides also in the fact that the theorem mentioned in 3) can be expressed by means of the equivalence relations associated with the functions f and g. The solutions of the examples proposed reveal their simplicity [fr

  9. Fast radiative transfer models for retrieval of cloud properties in the back-scattering region: application to DSCOVR-EPIC sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Garcia, Victor; Sasi, Sruthy; Efremenko, Dmitry; Doicu, Adrian; Loyola, Diego

    2017-04-01

    In this work, the requirements for the retrieval of cloud properties in the back-scattering region are described, and their application to the measurements taken by the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is shown. Various radiative transfer models and their linearizations are implemented, and their advantages and issues are analyzed. As radiative transfer calculations in the back-scattering region are computationally time-consuming, several acceleration techniques are also studied. The radiative transfer models analyzed include the exact Discrete Ordinate method with Matrix Exponential (DOME), the Matrix Operator method with Matrix Exponential (MOME), and the approximate asymptotic and equivalent Lambertian cloud models. To reduce the computational cost of the line-by-line (LBL) calculations, the k-distribution method, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a combination of the k-distribution method plus PCA are used. The linearized radiative transfer models for retrieval of cloud properties include the Linearized Discrete Ordinate method with Matrix Exponential (LDOME), the Linearized Matrix Operator method with Matrix Exponential (LMOME) and the Forward-Adjoint Discrete Ordinate method with Matrix Exponential (FADOME). These models were applied to the EPIC oxygen-A band absorption channel at 764 nm. It is shown that the approximate asymptotic and equivalent Lambertian cloud models give inaccurate results, so an offline processor for the retrieval of cloud properties in the back-scattering region requires the use of exact models such as DOME and MOME, which behave similarly. The combination of the k-distribution method plus PCA presents similar accuracy to the LBL calculations, but it is up to 360 times faster, and the relative errors for the computed radiances are less than 1.5% compared to the results when the exact phase function is used. Finally, the linearized models studied show similar behavior

  10. The equivalence theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, H.

    1990-01-01

    The equivalence theorem states that, at an energy E much larger than the vector-boson mass M, the leading order of the amplitude with longitudinally polarized vector bosons on mass shell is given by the amplitude in which these vector bosons are replaced by the corresponding Higgs ghosts. We prove the equivalence theorem and show its validity in every order in perturbation theory. We first derive the renormalized Ward identities by using the diagrammatic method. Only the Feynman-- 't Hooft gauge is discussed. The last step of the proof includes the power-counting method evaluated in the large-Higgs-boson-mass limit, needed to estimate the leading energy behavior of the amplitudes involved. We derive expressions for the amplitudes involving longitudinally polarized vector bosons for all orders in perturbation theory. The fermion mass has not been neglected and everything is evaluated in the region m f ∼M much-lt E much-lt m Higgs

  11. Study of the radiation scattered and produced by concrete shielding of radiotherapy rooms and its effects on equivalent doses in patients' organs; Estudo da radiacao espalhada e produzida pela blindagem de concreto de salas de radioterapia e seus efeitos sobre doses equivalentes nos orgaos dos pacientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, K.L.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Gavazza, S.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Gomes, R.G.; Silva, M.G., E-mail: kelmo.lins@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: sergiogavazza@yahoo.com, E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: raphaelmsm@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com, E-mail: maglosilva15@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Thalhofer, J.L.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: jardellt@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, R.F.G., E-mail: raphaelfgsantos@gmail.com [Centro Universitario Anhanguera, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia

    2015-07-01

    Within a radiotherapy room, in addition to the primary beam, there is also secondary radiation due to the leakage of the accelerator head and the radiation scattering from room objects, patient and even the room's shielding itself, which is projected to protect external individuals disregarding its effects on the patient. This work aims to study the effect of concrete shielding wall over the patient, taking into account its contribution on equivalent doses. The MCNPX code was used to model the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D operating at 18MeV, with MAX phantom representing the patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer following Brazilian Institute of Cancer four-fields radiation application protocol (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). Firstly, the treatment was patterned within a standard radiotherapy room, calculating the equivalent doses on patient's organs individually. In a second step, this treatment was modeled withdrawing the walls, floor and ceiling from the radiotherapy room, and then the equivalent doses calculated again. Comparing these results, it was found that the concrete has an average shielding contribution of around 20% in the equivalent dose on the patient's organs. (author)

  12. Evaluation of 1cm dose equivalent rate using a NaI(Tl) scintilation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hideharu

    1990-01-01

    A method for evaluating 1 cm dose equivalent rates from a pulse height distribution obtained by a 76.2mmφ spherical NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer was described. Weak leakage radiation from nuclear facilities were also measured and dose equivalent conversion factor and effective energy of leakage radiation were evaluated from 1 cm dose equivalent rate and exposure rate. (author)

  13. Equivalence, commensurability, value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Deriving value in Capital Marx uses three commensurability arguments (CA1-3). CA1 establishes equivalence in exchange as exchangeability with the same third commodity. CA2 establishes value as common denominator in commodities: embodied abstract labour. CA3 establishes value substance...... as commonality of labour: physiological labour. Tensions between these logics have permeated Marxist interpretations of value. Some have supported value as embodied labour (CA2, 3), others a monetary theory of value and value as ‘pure’ societal abstraction (ultimately CA1). They all are grounded in Marx....

  14. Water equivalence of polymer gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellakumar, P.; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the water equivalence and radiation transport properties of polymer gel dosimeters over the wide range of photon and electron energies 14 different types of polymer gels were considered. Their water equivalence was evaluated in terms of effective atomic number (Z eff ), electron density (ρ e ), photon mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), photon mass energy absorption coefficient (μ en /ρ) and total stopping power (S/ρ) tot of electrons using the XCOM and the ESTAR database. The study showed that the effective atomic number of polymer gels were very close ( en /ρ for all polymer gels were in close agreement ( tot of electrons in polymer gel dosimeters were within 1% agreement with that of water. From the study we conclude that at lower energy (<80keV) the polymer gel dosimeters cannot be considered water equivalent and study has to be carried out before using the polymer gel for clinical application

  15. Occupational dose equivalent limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinch, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper considers methods of limiting individual radiation risks by recognizing the variation of risk with age at exposure, taking into account both somatic and genetic risks and proposes a simple formula for controlling individual cumulative exposure and hence risk. (Author)

  16. Thermoluminescence dosemeter for personal dose equivalent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.A. da; Rosa, L.A.R. da; Campos, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility was investigated of utilising a Brazilian thermoluminescence individual dosemeter, usually calibrated in terms of photon dose equivalent, for the assessment of the personal dose equivalent, H p (d), at depths of 0.07 and 10 mm. The dosemeter uses four CaSO 4 :Dy thermoluminescent detectors, between different filters, as the sensitive materials. It was calibrated in gamma and X radiation fields in the energy range from 17 to 1250 keV. Linear combinations of the responses of three detectors, in this energy range, allow the evaluation of H p (0.07) and H p (10), for radiation incidence angles varying from 0 to 60 degrees, with an accuracy better than 35%. The method is not applicable to mixed photon-beta fields. (author)

  17. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Rebecca D. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  18. The radiative heating response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maycock, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    The structure and magnitude of radiative heating rates in the atmosphere can change markedly in response to climate forcings; diagnosing the causes of these changes can aid in understanding parts of the large-scale circulation response to climate change. This study separates the relative drivers of projected changes in longwave and shortwave radiative heating rates over the 21st century into contributions from radiatively active gases, such as carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapour, and from changes in atmospheric and surface temperatures. Results are shown using novel radiative diagnostics applied to timeslice experiments from the UM-UKCA chemistry-climate model; these online estimates are compared to offline radiative transfer calculations. Line-by-line calculations showing spectrally-resolved changes in heating rates due to different gases will also be presented.

  19. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  20. Quantification of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative relationships illustrate Einstein's equivalence principle, relating it to Newton's ''fictitious'' forces arising from the use of noninertial frames, and to the form of the relativistic time dilatation in local Lorentz frames. The equivalence principle can be interpreted as the equivalence of general covariance to local Lorentz covariance, in a manner which is characteristic of Riemannian and pseudo-Riemannian geometries

  1. Calculation of committed dose equivalent from intake of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, D.V.

    1978-08-01

    A new computerized method of calculating the committed dose equivalent from the intake of tritiated water at Harwell is described in this report. The computer program has been designed to deal with a variety of intake patterns and urine sampling schemes, as well as to produce committed dose equivalents corresponding to any periods for which individual monitoring for external radiation is undertaken. Details of retrospective doses are added semi-automatically to the Radiation Dose Records and committed dose equivalents are retained on a separate file. (author)

  2. Calibration of photographic dosemeters to evaluate the personal equivalent dose, Hp (10), irradiated by different radiation qualities and angles of incidence; Calibracao de dosimetros fotograficos para avaliar o equivalente de dose pessoal, Hp(10), irradiados por diferentes qualidades de radiacao e angulos de incidencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Christiana; Antonio Filho, Joao, E-mail: chsantoro@gmail.com, E-mail: jaf@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Marcus Aurelio P.; Goncalves Filho, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: masantos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: l.filho@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, Pe (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To use radiation detectors, should periodically perform tests and calibrations on instruments in order to verify its good functionality. One way to ascertain the quality of the instrument is to conduct a study of the angular dependence of the response of the radiation detectors. The photographic dosimetry has been used widely to quantify the radiation doses and to estimate levels of doses received by workers involved with X-and gamma radiation. Photographic dosimeters are used because provide wide range of exposure and good accuracy. One of the sources of error have been introduced by different irradiation geometries between calibration and measurement in radiation fields used in x-ray and gamma ray sources, therefore, there is a need for an evaluation of the sensitivity of dosimeters with variation of the angle of the incident beam. In this study were tested 190 photographic dosemeters in the Metrology Laboratory of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE) using the phantom H{sub p} (10), where the dosimeters are evaluated on the basis of the new operational magnitude for individual monitoring, the equivalent personal dose, H{sub p} (10). Angular dependence of these radiation detectors was studied in X radiation fields (in the range of 45 keV energy to 164 keV) and gamma radiation ({sup 137}Cs-662 keV e {sup 60}Co - 1250 keV)

  3. System equivalent model mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Steven W. B.; van der Seijs, Maarten V.; de Klerk, Dennis

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces SEMM: a method based on Frequency Based Substructuring (FBS) techniques that enables the construction of hybrid dynamic models. With System Equivalent Model Mixing (SEMM) frequency based models, either of numerical or experimental nature, can be mixed to form a hybrid model. This model follows the dynamic behaviour of a predefined weighted master model. A large variety of applications can be thought of, such as the DoF-space expansion of relatively small experimental models using numerical models, or the blending of different models in the frequency spectrum. SEMM is outlined, both mathematically and conceptually, based on a notation commonly used in FBS. A critical physical interpretation of the theory is provided next, along with a comparison to similar techniques; namely DoF expansion techniques. SEMM's concept is further illustrated by means of a numerical example. It will become apparent that the basic method of SEMM has some shortcomings which warrant a few extensions to the method. One of the main applications is tested in a practical case, performed on a validated benchmark structure; it will emphasize the practicality of the method.

  4. Ultrasonic unit for line-by-line ultrasonic scanning of bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldner, R.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic unit for medical diagnostics operates by the sectorial scanning principle, which avoids direct coupling of the transducer head to the surface of the body. For this purpose, several transmitter/receiver units (approx. 100) are arranged on a partial ring of a circular arc and the ultrasonic beams, which can be triggered sequentially in time, are directed at a common intersection behind the ultrasonic window of the unit, i.e., outside the unit. A mechanical system is employed to set and adjust the partial ring carrying the transmitter/receiver units. (DG) [de

  5. The equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smorodinskij, Ya.A.

    1980-01-01

    The prerelativistic history of the equivalence principle (EP) is presented briefly. Its role in history of the general relativity theory (G.R.T.) discovery is elucidated. A modern idea states that the ratio of inert and gravitational masses does not differ from 1 at least up to the 12 sign after comma. Attention is paid to the difference of the gravitational field from electromagnetic one. The difference is as follows, the energy of the gravitational field distributed in space is the source of the field. These fields always interact at superposition. Electromagnetic fields from different sources are put together. On the basis of EP it is established the Sun field interact with the Earth gravitational energy in the same way as with any other one. The latter proves the existence of gravitation of the very gravitational field to a heavy body. A problem on gyroscope movement in the Earth gravitational field is presented as a paradox. The calculation has shown that gyroscope at satellite makes a positive precession, and its axis turns in an angle equal to α during a turn of the satellite round the Earth, but because of the space curvature - into the angle two times larger than α. A resulting turn is equal to 3α. It is shown on the EP basis that the polarization plane in any coordinate system does not turn when the ray of light passes in the gravitational field. Together with the historical value of EP noted is the necessity to take into account the requirements claimed by the EP at description of the physical world

  6. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  7. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  8. On the calibration of photon dosemeters in the equivalent dose units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregadze, Yu.I.; Isaev, B.M.; Maslyaev, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    General aspects of transition from exposure dose of photo radiation to equivalent one are considered. By determination the equivalent dose is a function of point location in an irradiated object, that is why it is necessary to know equivalent dose distribution in the human body for uniform description of the risk degree. The international electrotechnical comission recommends to measure equivalent doses at 7 and 800 mg/cm 2 depths in a tissue-equivalent ball with 30 cm diameter, calling them skin equivalent dose and depth equivalent dose, respectively, and to compare them with the permissible 500 mZ and 50 mZ a year, respectively. Practical transition to using equivalent dose for evaluation of radiation danger of being in photon radiation field of low energy should include measures on regraduating already produced dose meters, graduating the dose meters under production and developing the system of their metrologic supply [ru

  9. Logically automorphically equivalent knowledge bases

    OpenAIRE

    Aladova, Elena; Plotkin, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge bases theory provide an important example of the field where applications of universal algebra and algebraic logic look very natural, and their interaction with practical problems arising in computer science might be very productive. In this paper we study the equivalence problem for knowledge bases. Our interest is to find out how the informational equivalence is related to the logical description of knowledge. Studying various equivalences of knowledge bases allows us to compare d...

  10. Mathematical simulation of biologically equivalent doses for LDR-HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slosarek, K.; Zajusz, A.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the LQ model examples of biologically equivalent doses LDR, HDR and external beams were calculated. The biologically equivalent doses for LDR were calculated by appending to the LQ model the corrector for the time of repair of radiation sublethal damages. For radiation continuously delivered at a low dose rate the influence of sublethal damage repair time changes on biologically equivalent doses were analysed. For fractionated treatment with high dose rate the biologically equivalent doses were calculated by adding to the LQ model the formula of accelerated repopulation. For total biologically equivalent dose calculation for combine LDR-HDR-Tele irradiation examples are presented with the use of different parameters of the time of repair of sublethal damages and accelerated repopulation. The calculations performed show, that the same biologically equivalent doses can be obtained for different parameters of cell kinetics changes during radiation treatment. It also shows, that during biologically equivalent dose calculations for different radiotherapy schedules, ignorance of cell kinetics parameters can lead to relevant errors

  11. Testing statistical hypotheses of equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Wellek, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalence testing has grown significantly in importance over the last two decades, especially as its relevance to a variety of applications has become understood. Yet published work on the general methodology remains scattered in specialists' journals, and for the most part, it focuses on the relatively narrow topic of bioequivalence assessment.With a far broader perspective, Testing Statistical Hypotheses of Equivalence provides the first comprehensive treatment of statistical equivalence testing. The author addresses a spectrum of specific, two-sided equivalence testing problems, from the

  12. Personnel ionizing radiation dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A dosimeter and method for use by personnel working in an area of mixed ionizing radiation fields for measuring and/or determining the effective energy of x- and gamma radiation; beta, x-, and gamma radiation dose equivalent to the surface of the body; beta, x-, and gamma radiation dose equivalent at a depth in the body; the presence of slow neutron, fast neutron dose equivalent; and orientation of the person wearing the dosimeter to the source of radiation is disclosed. Optionally integrated into this device and method are improved means for determining neutron energy spectrum and absorbed dose from fission gamma and neutron radiation resulting from accidental criticality

  13. SAPONIFICATION EQUIVALENT OF DASAMULA TAILA

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  14. Saponification equivalent of dasamula taila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R B

    1994-07-01

    Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are very useful for the technical and analytical work. It gives the mean molecular weight of the glycerides and acids present in Dasamula Taila. Saponification equivalent values of Dasamula taila are reported in different packings.

  15. A study on lead equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Guanxin

    1991-01-01

    A study on the rules in which the lead equivalent of lead glass changes with the energy of X rays or γ ray is described. The reason of this change is discussed and a new testing method of lead equivalent is suggested

  16. Is the dose equivalent index a quantity to be measured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    ICRP introduced the concept of Effective Dose Equivalent H(sub)E and fixed the basic limits of radiation exposure in terms of H(sub)I. As H(sub)E cannot be measured, ICRP stated that with external exposure to penetrating radiation the limitation of the Dose Equivalent Index H(sub)I would afford at least as good a level of protection. However, difficulties arise in measuring H(sub)I and in calibrating instruments in terms of H(sub)I, since the height and location of the dose equivalent maximum in the sphere which is the phantom used in the definition of H(sub)I, depend on the energy and the angular distribution of the incident radiation. That is, H(sub)I is not an additive quantity relative to the partial H(sub)I(sub)i-values of the different energy and angular components. Hence, 1) the distribution of dose equivalent in the sphere must be measured in full for a determination of H(sub)I, and 2) it is not possible to calibrate an instrument which does not exhibit the scattering and absorption properties of the sphere, consistently for arbitrary radiation fields in terms of H(sub)I. Thus the calibration in an unidirectional beam would infer an uncertainty which may amount to a factor of up to 4. This would hardly be tolerable as a base for radiation protection provisions. An alternative is to introduce operational quantities which are additive, e.g. 1) the sum of maxima of the dose equivalent distributions in the sphere produced by different radiation components, and 2) the mean dose equivalent in the sphere. Their relation to H(sub)E for different types of radiation and consequences on secondary limits are discussed. (H.K.)

  17. Airborne gamma-radiation snow water-equivalent and soil-moisture measurements and satellite areal extent of snow-cover measurements. A user's guide. Version 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, T.; Allen, M.

    1988-01-01

    The National Remote Sensing Hydrology Program is managed by the Office of Hydrology and consists of the Airborne Snow Survey Section and the Satellite Hydrology Section. The Airborne Snow Survey Section makes airborne snow water-equivalent and soil-moisture measurements over large areas of the country subject to a severe and chronic snowmelt flooding threat. The User's Guide is intended primarily to provide field hydrologists with some background on the technical and administrative aspects of the National Remote Sensing Hydrology Program. The guide summarizes the techniques and procedures used to make and distribute real-time, operational airborne snow water-equivalent measurements and satellite areal extent of snow-cover measurements made over large areas of the country. The current airborne and satellite databases are summarized, and procedures to access the real-time observations through both AFOS and through a commercial, electronic bulletin board system are given in the appendices

  18. Conditions needed to give meaning to rad-equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latarjet, R.

    1980-01-01

    To legislate on mutagenic chemical pollution the problem to be faced is similar to that tackled about 30 years ago regarding pollution by ionizing radiations. It would be useful to benefit from the work of these 30 years by establishing equivalences, if possible, between chemical mutagens and radiations. Inevitable mutagenic pollutions are considered here, especially those associated with fuel based energy production. As with radiations the legislation must derive from a compromise between the harmful and beneficial effects of the polluting system. When deciding on tolerance doses it is necessary to safeguard the biosphere without inflicting excessive restrictions on industry and on the economy. The present article discusses the conditions needed to give meaning to the notion of rad-equivalence. Some examples of already established equivalences are given, together with the first practical consequences which emerge [fr

  19. Models for infrared atmospheric radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Line and band models for infrared spectral absorption are discussed. Radiative transmittance and integrated absorptance of Lorentz, Doppler, and voigt line profiles were compared for a range of parameters. It was found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voigt) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. Narrow band model relations for absorptance were used to develop exact formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Several continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model were compared with the numerical solutions of the wide band models. By employing the line-by-line and quasi-random band model formulations, computational procedures were developed for evaluating transmittance and upwelling atmospheric radiance. Homogeneous path transmittances were calculated for selected bands of CO, CO2, and N2O and compared with experimental measurements. The upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of the CO fundamental band were also calculated.

  20. Measurement of extrapolation curves for the secondary pattern of beta radiation Nr. 86 calibrated in rapidity of absorbed dose for tissue equivalent by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt; Medicion de curvas de extrapolacion para el patron secundario de radiacion beta Nr. 86 calibrado en rapidez de dosis absorbida para tejido equivalente por el Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T

    1988-10-15

    The following report has as objective to present the obtained results of measuring - with a camera of extrapolation of variable electrodes (CE) - the dose speed absorbed in equivalent fabric given by the group of sources of the secondary pattern of radiation Beta Nr. 86, (PSB), and to compare this results with those presented by the calibration certificates that accompany the PSB extended by the primary laboratory Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), of the R.F.A. as well as the uncertainties associated to the measure process. (Author)

  1. Reassessment of calculation of effective dose equivalent for the CRCN-CO Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, L.B.; Dourado, M.A.; Barbosa, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    To reassess the calculations of the effective dose equivalent to obtain data of dosimetry and the accomplishment of the analysis comparing the data of several techniques that record doses of radiation originating from the cosmogenic and terrestrial contributions that make up the so-called background radiation. the basic information to be obtained is the contribution of the difference between the terrestrial dose equivalents, even the lowest concentration of primordial radionuclides, and that of the dose equivalent, deduced from TLD readings. (author)

  2. Reassessment of calculation of effective dose equivalent for the CRCN-CO Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, L.B.; Dourado, M.A.; Barbosa, R.C., E-mail: research.photonics@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goiás, GO (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    To reassess the calculations of the effective dose equivalent to obtain data of dosimetry and the accomplishment of the analysis comparing the data of several techniques that record doses of radiation originating from the cosmogenic and terrestrial contributions that make up the so-called background radiation. the basic information to be obtained is the contribution of the difference between the terrestrial dose equivalents, even the lowest concentration of primordial radionuclides, and that of the dose equivalent, deduced from TLD readings. (author)

  3. Development of dose equivalent meters based on microdosimetric principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booz, J.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the employment of microdosimetric dose-equivalent meters in radiation protection is described considering the advantages of introducing microdosimetric methods into radiation protection, the technical suitability of such instruments for measuring dose equivalent, and finally technical requirements, constraints and solutions together with some examples of instruments and experimental results. The advantage of microdosimetric methods in radiation protection is illustrated with the evaluation of dose-mean quality factors in radiation fields of unknown composition and with the methods of evaluating neutron- and gamma-dose fractions. - It is shown that there is good correlation between dose-mean lineal energy, anti ysub(anti D), and the ICRP quality factor. - Neutron- and gamma-dose fractions of unknown radiation fields can be evaluated with microdosimetric proportional counters without recurrence to other instruments and methods. The problems of separation are discussed. The technical suitability of microdosimetric instruments for measuring dose equivalent is discussed considering the energy response to neutrons and photons and the sensitivity in terms of dose-equivalent rate. Then, considering technical requirements, constraints, and solutions, the problem of the large dynamic range in LET, the large dynamic range in pulse rate, geometry of sensitive volume and electrodes, evaluation of dose-mean quality factors, calibration methods, and uncertainties are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Mensuration of equivalent dose with personal dosemeters and instruments of radiological protection in the new operative quantities ICRU, for external fields of beta radiation. Part II. I study of the angular response of personal dosemeters TLD-100 in secondary patron fields of beta radiation (90Sr / 90Y)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this work is to carry out one of the possible ones test type for personal dosemeters TLD, under the recomendations of the ICRU 39, ICRU 43 and the draft of the norm ISO 6980,(1992), with the purpose of verifying the capacity of these detectors to carry out the operative unit: H' (0.07;α). Since H' (O. 07;α) this defined one in an expanded field, one of these tests type consist on determining the angular response of these detectors. 20 personal dosemeters TLD-100 was used, (card marks: Harshaw, Model: G-1, with two glasses of TLD-100 absorbed in teflon; the portadosemeters has two windows, a free one and another with a filter of Pb of 171.0 mg cm -2 ); these dosemeters they were previously selected, [to see, S tudy of the Homogeneity of the response of Personal Dosemeters (Cards G-l, TLD-100) in Radiation of Countrysides of 60 Co , J.T. Alvarez R. Technician Report GSR/IT/0001/94].The irradiations to effectued in secondary countryside of radiation beta of 90 Sr/ 90 Y. The study was undertaken by means of an experimental design of blocks random that contemplate the following variables: intensity of the radiation source, (1850 MBq and 74 MBq); position of irradiation, (four positions); incidence of angle of the radiation (0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 grades) and the absorbed dose in air, (0.005, 0.010, 0.020, 0.050 and 0.100 Gy). Then null hypothesis it was to suppose that there was not difference among the stockings of each treatment, to used the statistical of Duncan to carry out tests of stockings at a level of significance of 5%.These tests of stockings throw the following results in those variables of the experimental design: The irradiations carried out so much with the source pattern secondary of 90 Sr/ 90 Y of 1850 MBq and of 74 MBq, they are equivalent reason why they can be used indistinctly. The responses of each one of the glasses of the card are strongly anisotropic for each glass; four positions of irradiation is used: glass 1 (window of

  5. Equivalent biochemical failure-free survival after external beam radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy in patients with a pretreatment prostate specific antigen of > 4-20 ng/ml

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Whittington, Richard; Kaplan, Irving; Beard, Clair; Jiroutek, Michael; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Wein, Alan; Coleman, C. Norman

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical failure-free survival stratified by the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and biopsy Gleason score (bGl) is determined for prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A Cox regression multivariable analysis evaluating the variables of PSA, bGl, and clinical stage was used to evaluate the end point of time to PSA failure in 867 and 757 consecutive prostate cancer patients managed definitively with external beam radiation therapy or radical retropubic prostatectomy, respectively. PSA failure-free survival was determined using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Comparisons were made using the log rank test. Results: The pretreatment PSA, bGl, and clinical stage (T3,4 vs. T1,T2) were found to be independent predictors of time to post-treatment PSA failure for both surgically and radiation managed patients using Cox regression multivariable analysis. Patients with a pretreatment PSA of > 4 ng/ml and ≤ 20 ng/ml could be classified into risk groups for time to post-therapy PSA failure: low = PSA > 4-10 ng/ml and bGl ≤ 4; intermediate = PSA > 4-10 and bGl 5-7; or PSA > 10-20 ng/ml and bGl ≤ 7; high = PSA > 4-20 ng/ml and bGl ≥ 8. Two-year PSA failure-free survival for surgically managed and radiation-managed patients, respectively, were 98% vs. 92% (p = 0.45), 77% vs. 81% (p = 0.86), and 51% vs. 53% (p = 0.48) for patients at low, intermediate, and high risk for post-therapy PSA failure. Conclusions: There was no statistical difference in the 2-year PSA failure-free survival for potentially curable patients managed definitively with surgery or radiation therapy when a retrospective comparison stratifying for the pretreatment PSA and bGl was performed

  6. Symmetries of dynamically equivalent theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitman, D.M.; Tyutin, I.V. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-03-15

    A natural and very important development of constrained system theory is a detail study of the relation between the constraint structure in the Hamiltonian formulation with specific features of the theory in the Lagrangian formulation, especially the relation between the constraint structure with the symmetries of the Lagrangian action. An important preliminary step in this direction is a strict demonstration, and this is the aim of the present article, that the symmetry structures of the Hamiltonian action and of the Lagrangian action are the same. This proved, it is sufficient to consider the symmetry structure of the Hamiltonian action. The latter problem is, in some sense, simpler because the Hamiltonian action is a first-order action. At the same time, the study of the symmetry of the Hamiltonian action naturally involves Hamiltonian constraints as basic objects. One can see that the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian actions are dynamically equivalent. This is why, in the present article, we consider from the very beginning a more general problem: how the symmetry structures of dynamically equivalent actions are related. First, we present some necessary notions and relations concerning infinitesimal symmetries in general, as well as a strict definition of dynamically equivalent actions. Finally, we demonstrate that there exists an isomorphism between classes of equivalent symmetries of dynamically equivalent actions. (author)

  7. Radiation practices and radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The guide presents the principal requirements on accuracy of radiation measurements and on the approval, calibration and operating condition inspections of radiation meters, together with requirements for dosimetric services measuring the individual radiation doses of workers engaged in radiation work (approved dosimetric services). The Guide also sets out the definitions of quantities and units used in radiation measurements. The radiation protection quantities used for assessing the harmful effects of radiation and for expressing the maximum values for radiation exposure (equivalent dose and effective dose) are set out in Guide ST 7.2. This Guide concerns measurements of ionizing radiation involved in radiation practices, the results of which are used for determining the radiation exposure of workers engaged in radiation work and members of the public, and of patients subject to the use of radiation in health services, or upon the basis of which compliance with safety requirements of appliances currently in use and of their premises of use or of the workplaces of workers is ensured. The Guide also concerns measurements of the radon concentration of inhaled air in both workplaces and dwellings. The Guide does not apply to determining the radiation exposure of aircrews, determination of exposure caused by internal radiation, or measurements made to protect the public in the event of, or in preparation for abnormal radiation conditions

  8. Matching of equivalent field regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Rengarajan, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    In aperture problems, integral equations for equivalent currents are often found by enforcing matching of equivalent fields. The enforcement is made in the aperture surface region adjoining the two volumes on each side of the aperture. In the case of an aperture in a planar perfectly conducting...... screen, having the same homogeneous medium on both sides and an impressed current on one aide, an alternative procedure is relevant. We make use of the fact that in the aperture the tangential component of the magnetic field due to the induced currents in the screen is zero. The use of such a procedure...... shows that equivalent currents can be found by a consideration of only one of the two volumes into which the aperture plane divides the space. Furthermore, from a consideration of an automatic matching at the aperture, additional information about tangential as well as normal field components...

  9. Indoor ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, S.O.; Lindvall, T.; Maansson, L-G.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation in indoor air is discussed in the perspective of the effective dose equivalents from other sources of radiation. Estimates of effective doses equivalents from indoor radon and its contribution to lung cancer incidence are reviewed. Swedish experiences with cost effective remedial actions are presented. The authors present optimal strategies for screening measurements and remedial actions in cost-benefit perspective. (author.)

  10. Teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing interest in modified gravity theories based on torsion, as these theories exhibit interesting cosmological implications. In this work inspired by the teleparallel formulation of general relativity, we present its extension to Lovelock gravity known as the most natural extension of general relativity in higher-dimensional space-times. First, we review the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and then we construct the teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity. In order to achieve this goal, we use the vielbein and the connection without imposing the Weitzenböck connection. Then, we extract the teleparallel formulation of the theory by setting the curvature to null.

  11. Is the dose equivalent index a quantity to be measured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    The following modifying factors are briefly considered in relation to the ambiguities and limitations of the Dose Equivalent Index: 1) Variations with time or of the movement of the exposed person 2) Irradiation geometry 3) Effect of radiation energy 4) Instrument performance and calibration, and other operational quantities. (U.K.)

  12. Technical background for shallow (skin) dose equivalent evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; Crawford, O.H.; Hamm, R.N.; Reaves, K.L.; McMahan, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Department of Energy Order 5480.11 describes procedures for radiation protection for occupational workers. The revisions dealing with non-uniform exposure to the skin are the subject of this report. We describe measurements and analysis required to assess shallow (skin) dose equivalent from skin contamination. 6 refs., 4 tabs

  13. Analysis of equivalent antenna based on FDTD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-xing Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An equivalent microstrip antenna used in radio proximity fuse is presented. The design of this antenna is based on multilayer multi-permittivity dielectric substrate which is analyzed by finite difference time domain (FDTD method. Equivalent iterative formula is modified in the condition of cylindrical coordinate system. The mixed substrate which contains two kinds of media (one of them is airtakes the place of original single substrate. The results of equivalent antenna simulation show that the resonant frequency of equivalent antenna is similar to that of the original antenna. The validity of analysis can be validated by means of antenna resonant frequency formula. Two antennas have same radiation pattern and similar gain. This method can be used to reduce the weight of antenna, which is significant to the design of missile-borne antenna.

  14. Comments on field equivalence principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1987-01-01

    It is pointed Out that often-used arguments based on a short-circuit concept in presentations of field equivalence principles are not correct. An alternative presentation based on the uniqueness theorem is given. It does not contradict the results obtained by using the short-circuit concept...

  15. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.; Ma, R.

    2001-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  16. EQUIVALENCE VERSUS NON-EQUIVALENCE IN ECONOMIC TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina, Chifane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at highlighting the fact that “equivalence” represents a concept worth revisiting and detailing upon when tackling the translation process of economic texts both from English into Romanian and from Romanian into English. Far from being exhaustive, our analysis will focus upon the problems arising from the lack of equivalence at the word level. Consequently, relevant examples from the economic field will be provided to account for the following types of non-equivalence at word level: culturespecific concepts; the source language concept is not lexicalised in the target language; the source language word is semantically complex; differences in physical and interpersonal perspective; differences in expressive meaning; differences in form; differences in frequency and purpose of using specific forms and the use of loan words in the source text. Likewise, we shall illustrate a number of translation strategies necessary to deal with the afore-mentioned cases of non-equivalence: translation by a more general word (superordinate; translation by a more neutral/less expressive word; translation by cultural substitution; translation using a loan word or loan word plus explanation; translation by paraphrase using a related word; translation by paraphrase using unrelated words; translation by omission and translation by illustration.

  17. Development of air equivalent gamma dose monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, Mary; Bhattacharya, Sadhana; Karpagam, R.; Prasad, D.N.; Jakati, R.K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes design and development of air equivalent gamma absorbed dose monitor. The monitor has gamma sensitivity of 84 pA/R/h for 60 Co source. The characterization of the monitor has been done to get energy dependence on gamma sensitivity and response to gamma radiation field from 1 R/hr to 5000 R/hr. The gamma sensitivity in the energy range of 0.06 to 1.25MeV relative to 137 Cs nuclide was within 2.5%. The linearity of the monitor response as a function of gamma field from 10 R/h to 3.8 kR/h was within 6%. The monitor has been designed for its application in harsh environment. It has been successfully qualified to meet environmental requirements of shock. (author)

  18. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modelling techniques and a knowledge of the incident radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron doses and dose equivalents were measured in a RANDO phantom at specific locations using thermoluminescence dosemeters, etched track dosemeters, and a 1.27 cm (1/2 in) tissue-equivalent proportional counter. The phantom was exposed to a bare and a D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutron source at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and to calculate the organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared with the calculations. (author)

  19. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  20. The Source Equivalence Acceleration Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everson, Matthew S.; Forget, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new acceleration method, the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method. • SEAM forms an equivalent coarse group problem for any spatial method. • Equivalence is also formed across different spatial methods and angular quadratures. • Testing is conducted using OpenMOC and performance is compared with CMFD. • Results show that SEAM is preferable for very expensive transport calculations. - Abstract: Fine-group whole-core reactor analysis remains one of the long sought goals of the reactor physics community. Such a detailed analysis is typically too computationally expensive to be realized on anything except the largest of supercomputers. Recondensation using the Discrete Generalized Multigroup (DGM) method, though, offers a relatively cheap alternative to solving the fine group transport problem. DGM, however, suffered from inconsistencies when applied to high-order spatial methods. While an exact spatial recondensation method was developed and provided full spatial consistency with the fine group problem, this approach substantially increased memory requirements for realistic problems. The method described in this paper, called the Source Equivalence Acceleration Method (SEAM), forms a coarse-group problem which preserves the fine-group problem even when using higher order spatial methods. SEAM allows recondensation to converge to the fine-group solution with minimal memory requirements and little additional overhead. This method also provides for consistency when using different spatial methods and angular quadratures between the coarse group and fine group problems. SEAM was implemented in OpenMOC, a 2D MOC code developed at MIT, and its performance tested against Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) acceleration on the C5G7 benchmark problem and on a 361 group version of the problem. For extremely expensive transport calculations, SEAM was able to outperform CMFD, resulting in speed-ups of 20–45 relative to the normal power

  1. Equivalent statistics and data interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Recent reform efforts in psychological science have led to a plethora of choices for scientists to analyze their data. A scientist making an inference about their data must now decide whether to report a p value, summarize the data with a standardized effect size and its confidence interval, report a Bayes Factor, or use other model comparison methods. To make good choices among these options, it is necessary for researchers to understand the characteristics of the various statistics used by the different analysis frameworks. Toward that end, this paper makes two contributions. First, it shows that for the case of a two-sample t test with known sample sizes, many different summary statistics are mathematically equivalent in the sense that they are based on the very same information in the data set. When the sample sizes are known, the p value provides as much information about a data set as the confidence interval of Cohen's d or a JZS Bayes factor. Second, this equivalence means that different analysis methods differ only in their interpretation of the empirical data. At first glance, it might seem that mathematical equivalence of the statistics suggests that it does not matter much which statistic is reported, but the opposite is true because the appropriateness of a reported statistic is relative to the inference it promotes. Accordingly, scientists should choose an analysis method appropriate for their scientific investigation. A direct comparison of the different inferential frameworks provides some guidance for scientists to make good choices and improve scientific practice.

  2. Determination of skin dose reduction by lead equivalent gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norriza Mohd Isa; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli

    2006-01-01

    Radiation protective gloves are always used in medical facilities to protect radiation workers from unnecessary radiation exposure. A study on radiation protection gloves which are produced by local company had been performed by the Medical Physics Group, MINT. The gloves were made of lead equivalent material, as the attenuating element. The gloves were evaluated in term of the percentage of skin dose reduction by using a newly developed procedure and facilities in MINT. Attenuation measurements of the gloves had been carried out using direct beams and scattered radiations of different qualities. TLD rings were fitted on finger phantom; and water phantom were used in the measurement. The result were obtained and analysed based on data supplied by manufacturer. (Author)

  3. Equivalent nozzle in thermomechanical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, F.

    1977-01-01

    When analyzing nuclear vessels, it is most important to study the behavior of the nozzle cylinder-cylinder intersection. For the elastic field, this analysis in three dimensions is quite easy using the method of finite elements. The same analysis in the non-linear field becomes difficult for designs in 3-D. It is therefore necessary to resolve a nozzle in two dimensions equivalent to a 3-D nozzle. The purpose of the present work is to find an equivalent nozzle both with a mechanical and thermal load. This has been achieved by the analysis in three dimensions of a nozzle and a nozzle cylinder-sphere intersection, of a different radius. The equivalent nozzle will be a nozzle with a sphere radius in a given ratio to the radius of a cylinder; thus, the maximum equivalent stress is the same in both 2-D and 3-D. The nozzle examined derived from the intersection of a cylindrical vessel of radius R=191.4 mm and thickness T=6.7 mm with a cylindrical nozzle of radius r=24.675 mm and thickness t=1.350 mm, for which the experimental results for an internal pressure load are known. The structure was subdivided into 96 finite, three-dimensional and isoparametric elements with 60 degrees of freedom and 661 total nodes. Both the analysis with a mechanical load as well as the analysis with a thermal load were carried out on this structure according to the Bersafe system. The thermal load consisted of a transient typical of an accident occurring in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, with a peak of the temperature (540 0 C) for the sodium inside the vessel with an insulating argon temperature constant at 525 0 C. The maximum value of the equivalent tension was found in the internal area at the union towards the vessel side. The analysis of the nozzle in 2-D consists in schematizing the structure as a cylinder-sphere intersection, where the sphere has a given relation to the

  4. 21 CFR 26.9 - Equivalence determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Equivalence determination. 26.9 Section 26.9 Food... Specific Sector Provisions for Pharmaceutical Good Manufacturing Practices § 26.9 Equivalence determination... document insufficient evidence of equivalence, lack of opportunity to assess equivalence or a determination...

  5. Information Leakage from Logically Equivalent Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Shlomi; McKenzie, Craig R. M.

    2006-01-01

    Framing effects are said to occur when equivalent frames lead to different choices. However, the equivalence in question has been incompletely conceptualized. In a new normative analysis of framing effects, we complete the conceptualization by introducing the notion of information equivalence. Information equivalence obtains when no…

  6. Wijsman Orlicz Asymptotically Ideal -Statistical Equivalent Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipan Hazarika

    2013-01-01

    in Wijsman sense and present some definitions which are the natural combination of the definition of asymptotic equivalence, statistical equivalent, -statistical equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense. Finally, we introduce the notion of Cesaro Orlicz asymptotically -equivalent sequences in Wijsman sense and establish their relationship with other classes.

  7. Equivalence relations of AF-algebra extensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we consider equivalence relations of *-algebra extensions and describe the relationship between the isomorphism equivalence and the unitary equivalence. We also show that a certain group homomorphism is the obstruction for these equivalence relations to be the same.

  8. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalaksh Shenoy, K.

    2013-01-01

    Three main pillars underpin the IAEA's mission: Safety and Security - The IAEA helps countries to upgrade their infrastructure for nuclear and radiation safety and security, and to prepare for and respond to emergencies. Work is keyed to international conventions, the development of international standards and the application of these standards. The aim is to protect people and the environment from the harmful effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Science and Technology - The IAEA is the world's focal point for mobilizing peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology for critical needs in developing countries. The work contributes to alleviating poverty, combating disease and pollution of the environment and to other goals of sustainable development. Safeguards and Verification - The IAEA is the nuclear inspectorate, with more than four decades of verification experience. Inspectors work to verify that nuclear material and activities are not diverted towards military purposes. Quantities and Units: Dose equivalent is the product of absorbed dose of radiation and quality factor (Q). For absorbed dose in rads, dose equivalent is in rems. If absorbed dose is in gray, the dose equivalent is in sievert. Quality factor is defined without reference to any particular biological end point. Quality factors are recommended by committees such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) or the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), based on experimental RBE values but with some judgment exercised. Effective Dose Equivalent: It is the sum of the weighted dose equivalents for all irradiated tissues, in which the weighting factors represent the different risks of each tissue to mortality from cancer and hereditary effects. Committed dose equivalent: It is the integral over 50 years of dose equivalent following the intake of a radionuclide. Collective effective dose equivalent: It is a quantity for a population and is

  9. Mixed field dose equivalent measuring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; McDonald, J.C.; Endres, G.W.R.; Quam, W.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, separate instruments have been used to monitor dose equivalent from neutrons and gamma rays. It has been demonstrated that it is now possible to measure simultaneously neutron and gamma dose with a single instrument, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). With appropriate algorithms dose equivalent can also be determined from the TEPC. A simple ''pocket rem meter'' for measuring neutron dose equivalent has already been developed. Improved algorithms for determining dose equivalent for mixed fields are presented. (author)

  10. Benefits of the effective dose equivalent concept at a medical center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Classic, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    A primary objective of the recommendations of the International Committee on Radiological Protection Publication 26 is to insure that no source of radiation exposure is unjustified in relation to its benefits. This objective is consistent with goals of the Radiation Safety Committee and Institutional Review Board at medical centers where research may involve radiation exposure of human subjects. The effective dose equivalent concept facilitates evaluation of risk by those who have little or no knowledge of quantities or biological effects of radiation. This paper presents effective dose equivalent data used by radiation workers and those who evaluate human research protocols as these data relate to personal dosimeter reading, entrance skin exposure, and target organ dose. The benefits of using effective dose equivalent to evaluate risk of medical radiation environments and research protocols are also described

  11. Derived equivalences for group rings

    CERN Document Server

    König, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    A self-contained introduction is given to J. Rickard's Morita theory for derived module categories and its recent applications in representation theory of finite groups. In particular, Broué's conjecture is discussed, giving a structural explanation for relations between the p-modular character table of a finite group and that of its "p-local structure". The book is addressed to researchers or graduate students and can serve as material for a seminar. It surveys the current state of the field, and it also provides a "user's guide" to derived equivalences and tilting complexes. Results and proofs are presented in the generality needed for group theoretic applications.

  12. Collision and radiative processes in emission of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2018-05-01

    The peculiarities of the spectroscopic properties of CO2 molecules in air due to vibration-rotation radiative transitions are analyzed. The absorption coefficient due to atmospheric carbon dioxide and other atmospheric components is constructed within the framework of the standard atmosphere model, on the basis of classical molecular spectroscopy and the regular model for the spectroscopy absorption band. The radiative flux from the atmosphere toward the Earth is represented as that of a blackbody, and the radiative temperature for emission at a given frequency is determined with accounting for the local thermodynamic equilibrium, a small gradient of the tropospheric temperature and a high optical thickness of the troposphere for infrared radiation. The absorption band model with an absorption coefficient averaged over the frequency and line-by-line model are used for evaluating the radiative flux from the atmosphere to the Earth which values are nearby for these models and are equal W m‑2 for the contemporary concentration of atmospheric CO2 molecules and W m‑2 at its doubled value. The absorption band model is not suitable to calculate the radiative flux change at doubling of carbon dioxide concentration because averaging over oscillations decreases the range where the atmospheric optical thickness is of the order of one, and just this range determines this change. The line-by-line method gives the change of the global temperature K as a result of doubling the carbon dioxide concentration. The contribution to the global temperature change due to anthropogenic injection of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, i.e. resulted from combustion of fossil fuels, is approximately 0.02 K now.

  13. 10 CFR 835.203 - Combining internal and external equivalent doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combining internal and external equivalent doses. 835.203 Section 835.203 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Standards for Internal and External Exposure § 835.203 Combining internal and external equivalent doses. (a) The total effective dose...

  14. Mensuration of equivalent dose with personal dosemeters and instruments of radiological protection in the new operative magnitudes ICRU, for external fields of beta radiation. Part I. Study of the homogeneity of the response personal dosemeters leaves (cards G-1, TLD-100), in radiation fields of Co60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A sample of 40 composed personal dosemeters by cards model: G-l, (each card is made up of two TLD-100 crystals encapsulated in teflon), Harshaw trademark; those personal dosemeters present a free window and another with a filter of A1 of 171.7 mg cm -2 of mass thickness.The objective of the work is to select of this sample of 40 personal dosemeters a population with the same stocking and standard deviation. The technique used is that of comparison of stockings, (ANOVA; Variance Analysis, when samples of the same one were had size; and/or GLM, Widespread Lineal Models, when the samples were of different size), by means of the use of those Duncan statistics, SNK, Tukey, Gabriel; the results are validated proving the kindness of adjustment of the experimental data to a Normal distribution by means of the Shapiro-Wilks statistics.The experimental design used consists on a test of two vias: a via is the variable card with two levels, (crystal 1 and 2), the other via is the variable irradiation position with four levels, (LS=left superior, SR= right superior, LI= left Inferior, IR = right inferior). The irradiations carried out in blocks of four personal dosemeters in a gamma radiation beam range of Cobalt 60; carrying out three repetitions of the design. With object of proving the homogeneity of the filter of A1 in those personal dosemeters the experimental design was executed for those cards without personal dosemeters.They were also carried out tests of stockings to the readings of bottom and sensibility of the reader equipment, (Harshaw, model marks 2271), certain that doesn t exist differences for sequence of reading, but if in the stockings of the sensibility, (they were 4 different populations). The responses of the dosemeters were corrected subtracting him the reading correspondence of bottom and by sensibility of the reader equipment before subjecting them to the tests of stockings mentioned. Of the results of the tests of stockings for the cards with and

  15. Tissue equivalent detector measurements on Mir space station. Comparison with other data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de la Sante de l`Homme et de Dosimetrie; Siegrist, M. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 31 - Toulouse (France); Duvivier, E.; Almarcha, B. [STEEL Technologies, Mazeres sur Salat (France); Dachev, T.P.; Semkova, J.V. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Central Lab. of Solar Energy and New Energy Sources; Petrov, V.M.; Bengin, V.; Koslova, S.B. [Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The measurement of the dose received by the cosmonauts, due to cosmic radiations, during a space mission is an important parameter to estimate the radiological risk. Tissue equivalent measurements of radiation environment inside the MIR space station were performed continuously since July 1992. Interesting results about radiation measurements show (a) the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) crossing, (c) the increase of radiation near the poles and (d) the effects of solar eruptions. These data are compared with solid state detector (SSD) and other tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) results. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Tissue equivalent detector measurements on Mir space station. Comparison with other data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Duvivier, E.; Almarcha, B.; Dachev, T.P.; Semkova, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement of the dose received by the cosmonauts, due to cosmic radiations, during a space mission is an important parameter to estimate the radiological risk. Tissue equivalent measurements of radiation environment inside the MIR space station were performed continuously since July 1992. Interesting results about radiation measurements show (a) the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) crossing, (c) the increase of radiation near the poles and (d) the effects of solar eruptions. These data are compared with solid state detector (SSD) and other tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) results. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs

  17. DIFFERENCES IN WATER VAPOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER AMONG 1D MODELS CAN SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Yuwei [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Leconte, Jérémy; Forget, François [Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, CNRS, Paris (France); Wolf, Eric T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado in Boulder, CO (United States); Goldblatt, Colin [School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Feldl, Nicole [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, CA (United States); Merlis, Timothy [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at McGill University, Montréal (Canada); Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: junyang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: abbot@uchicago.edu [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4-Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μ m) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μ m. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10–20 W m{sup 2}; differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m{sup 2}, especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m{sup 2} in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  18. DIFFERENCES IN WATER VAPOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER AMONG 1D MODELS CAN SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Yuwei; Leconte, Jérémy; Forget, François; Wolf, Eric T.; Goldblatt, Colin; Feldl, Nicole; Merlis, Timothy; Koll, Daniel D. B.; Ding, Feng; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the inner edge of the habitable zone is critical for determining which exoplanets are potentially habitable and for designing future telescopes to observe them. Here, we explore differences in estimating the inner edge among seven one-dimensional radiative transfer models: two line-by-line codes (SMART and LBLRTM) as well as five band codes (CAM3, CAM4-Wolf, LMDG, SBDART, and AM2) that are currently being used in global climate models. We compare radiative fluxes and spectra in clear-sky conditions around G and M stars, with fixed moist adiabatic profiles for surface temperatures from 250 to 360 K. We find that divergences among the models arise mainly from large uncertainties in water vapor absorption in the window region (10 μ m) and in the region between 0.2 and 1.5 μ m. Differences in outgoing longwave radiation increase with surface temperature and reach 10–20 W m 2 ; differences in shortwave reach up to 60 W m 2 , especially at the surface and in the troposphere, and are larger for an M-dwarf spectrum than a solar spectrum. Differences between the two line-by-line models are significant, although smaller than among the band models. Our results imply that the uncertainty in estimating the insolation threshold of the inner edge (the runaway greenhouse limit) due only to clear-sky radiative transfer is ≈10% of modern Earth’s solar constant (i.e., ≈34 W m 2 in global mean) among band models and ≈3% between the two line-by-line models. These comparisons show that future work is needed that focuses on improving water vapor absorption coefficients in both shortwave and longwave, as well as on increasing the resolution of stellar spectra in broadband models.

  19. Uniformly accelerating charged particles. A threat to the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyle, Stephen N.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a long debate about whether uniformly accelerated charges should radiate electromagnetic energy and how one should describe their worldline through a flat spacetime, i.e., whether the Lorentz-Dirac equation is right. There are related questions in curved spacetimes, e.g., do different varieties of equivalence principle apply to charged particles, and can a static charge in a static spacetime radiate electromagnetic energy? The problems with the LD equation in flat spacetime are spelt out in some detail here, and its extension to curved spacetime is discussed. Different equivalence principles are compared and some vindicated. The key papers are discussed in detail and many of their conclusions are significantly revised by the present solution. (orig.)

  20. Polarized Radiative Transfer of a Cirrus Cloud Consisting of Randomly Oriented Hexagonal Ice Crystals: The 3 x 3 Approximation for Non-Spherical Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamnes, S.; Ou, S. C.; Lin, Z.; Takano, Y.; Tsay, S. C.; Liou, K.N.; Stamnes, K.

    2016-01-01

    The reflection and transmission of polarized light for a cirrus cloud consisting of randomly oriented hexagonal columns were calculated by two very different vector radiative transfer models. The forward peak of the phase function for the ensemble-averaged ice crystals has a value of order 6 x 10(exp 3) so a truncation procedure was used to help produce numerically efficient yet accurate results. One of these models, the Vectorized Line-by-Line Equivalent model (VLBLE), is based on the doubling- adding principle, while the other is based on a vector discrete ordinates method (VDISORT). A comparison shows that the two models provide very close although not entirely identical results, which can be explained by differences in treatment of single scattering and the representation of the scattering phase matrix. The relative differences in the reflected I and Q Stokes parameters are within 0.5 for I and within 1.5 for Q for all viewing angles. In 1971 Hansen showed that for scattering by spherical particles the 3 x 3 approximation is sufficient to produce accurate results for the reflected radiance I and the degree of polarization (DOP), and he conjectured that these results would hold also for non-spherical particles. Simulations were conducted to test Hansen's conjecture for the cirrus cloud particles considered in this study. It was found that the 3 x 3 approximation also gives accurate results for the transmitted light, and for Q and U in addition to I and DOP. For these non-spherical ice particles the 3 x 3 approximation leads to an absolute error 2 x 10(exp -6) for the reflected and transmitted I, Q and U Stokes parameters. Hence, it appears to be an excellent approximation, which significantly reduces the computational complexity and burden required for multiple scattering calculations.

  1. The Equivalence Principle and Anomalous Magnetic Moment Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, C.; Mann, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of testing of the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) using measurements of anomalous magnetic moments of elementary particles. We compute the one loop correction for the $g-2$ anomaly within the class of non metric theories of gravity described by the \\tmu formalism. We find several novel mechanisms for breaking the EEP whose origin is due purely to radiative corrections. We discuss the possibilities of setting new empirical constraints on these effects.

  2. Quantitative comparison of mutagenic hazards: rad-equivalences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The present situation concerning the problem of estimating genetic risks associated with the exposure of living beings, including man, to chemical compounds present in the environment is defined. Since these compounds affect the genetic material of cells by reactions similar to those produced by radiations, attempts have been made to establish rad-equivalences for some of these substances. This idea is discussed through the different publications mentioned [fr

  3. Foreword: Biomonitoring Equivalents special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, M E; Sonawane, B; Becker, R A

    2008-08-01

    The challenge of interpreting results of biomonitoring for environmental chemicals in humans is highlighted in this Foreword to the Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) special issue of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology. There is a pressing need to develop risk-based tools in order to empower scientists and health professionals to interpret and communicate the significance of human biomonitoring data. The BE approach, which integrates dosimetry and risk assessment methods, represents an important advancement on the path toward achieving this objective. The articles in this issue, developed as a result of an expert panel meeting, present guidelines for derivation of BEs, guidelines for communication using BEs and several case studies illustrating application of the BE approach for specific substances.

  4. Tissue equivalence in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutton, D.H.; Harris, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the essential features of neutron tissue equivalence for radiotherapy and gives the results of a computation of relative absorbed dose for 14 MeV neutrons, using various tissue models. It is concluded that for the Bragg-Gray equation for ionometric dosimetry it is not sufficient to define the value of W to high accuracy and that it is essential that, for dosimetric measurements to be applicable to real body tissue to an accuracy of better than several per cent, a correction to the total absorbed dose must be made according to the test and tissue atomic composition, although variations in patient anatomy and other radiotherapy parameters will often limit the benefits of such detailed dosimetry. (U.K.)

  5. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Cecilia Padilla Rodriguez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner is present at a high level. This study sought to apply this theorem to the corporate sector, and to expand it to include other indicators of course effectiveness: satisfaction, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations. A large Mexican organisation participated in this research, with 146 learners, 30 teachers and 3 academic assistants. Three versions of an online course were designed, each emphasising a different type of interaction. Data were collected through surveys, exams, observations, activity logs, think aloud protocols and sales records. All course versions yielded high levels of effectiveness, in terms of satisfaction, learning and return on expectations. Yet, course design did not dictate the types of interactions in which students engaged within the courses. Findings suggest that the interaction equivalency theorem can be reformulated as follows: In corporate settings, an online course can be effective in terms of satisfaction, learning, knowledge transfer, business results and return on expectations, as long as (a at least one of three types of interaction (learner-content, learner-teacher or learner-learner features prominently in the design of the course, and (b course delivery is consistent with the chosen type of interaction. Focusing on only one type of interaction carries a high risk of confusion, disengagement or missed learning opportunities, which can be managed by incorporating other forms of interactions.

  6. Equivalent damage of loads on pavements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Prozzi, JA

    2009-05-26

    Full Text Available This report describes a new methodology for the determination of Equivalent Damage Factors (EDFs) of vehicles with multiple axle and wheel configurations on pavements. The basic premise of this new procedure is that "equivalent pavement response...

  7. Investigation of Equivalent Circuit for PEMFC Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myong, Kwang Jae

    2011-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring in a PEMFC are dominated by the physical conditions and interface properties, and the reactions are expressed in terms of impedance. The performance of a PEMFC can be simply diagnosed by examining the impedance because impedance characteristics can be expressed by an equivalent electrical circuit. In this study, the characteristics of a PEMFC are assessed using the AC impedance and various equivalent circuits such as a simple equivalent circuit, equivalent circuit with a CPE, equivalent circuit with two RCs, and equivalent circuit with two CPEs. It was found in this study that the characteristics of a PEMFC could be assessed using impedance and an equivalent circuit, and the accuracy was highest for an equivalent circuit with two CPEs

  8. 46 CFR 175.540 - Equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Management (ISM) Code (IMO Resolution A.741(18)) for the purpose of determining that an equivalent... Organization (IMO) “Code of Safety for High Speed Craft” as an equivalent to compliance with applicable...

  9. Some spectral equivalences between Schroedinger operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, C; Hibberd, K E; Links, J

    2008-01-01

    Spectral equivalences of the quasi-exactly solvable sectors of two classes of Schroedinger operators are established, using Gaudin-type Bethe ansatz equations. In some instances the results can be extended leading to full isospectrality. In this manner we obtain equivalences between PT-symmetric problems and Hermitian problems. We also find equivalences between some classes of Hermitian operators

  10. The definition of the individual dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, Margarete

    1986-01-01

    A brief note examines the choice of the present definition of the individual dose equivalent, the new operational dosimetry quantity for external exposure. The consequences of the use of the individual dose equivalent and the danger facing the individual dose equivalent, as currently defined, are briefly discussed. (UK)

  11. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  12. Risk equivalent of exposure versus dose of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a risk analysis study of low-dose irradiation and the resulting biological effects on a cell. The author describes fundamental differences between the effects of high-level exposure (HLE) and low-level exposure (LLE). He stresses that the concept of absorbed dose to an organ is not a dose but a level of effect produced by a particular number of particles. He discusses the confusion between a linear-proportional representation of dose limits and a threshold-curvilinear representation, suggesting that a LLE is a composite of both systems

  13. Lead Equivalent Thickness Measurement for Mixed Compositions of Barium Plaster Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norriza Mohd Isa; Muhammad Jamal Muhammad Isa; Nur Shahriza Zainuddin; Mohd Khairusalih Md Zin; Shahrul Azlan Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of lead equivalent thickness for ionizing radiation exposure room wall shall be performed as stated in Malaysian Standard MS 838. A few numbers of sample blocks with different mixture of barium plaster compositions based and varies certain thickness as a shielding material for exposure room wall belong to a local company were tested by using Cs-137, Co-60 and Am-241 with different activities . Radiations passed through the samples were detected with calibrated survey meter. The distance between radiation source and the detector is about 40 cm. Lead uniformity test on the samples was also determined at three labeled points on the samples. Lead equivalent thicknesses for the samples were evaluated based on a calibration graph that was plotted with lead sheets and with the radiation sources. Results shown that lead equivalent thickness for the samples with same actual physical thickness represent different values for different sources. (author)

  14. Measurement Of Lead Equivalent Thickness For Irradiation Room: An Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Azuhar Ripin; Husaini Salleh; Mohd Khairusalih Mohd Zin; Muhammad Jamal Muhd Isa; Mohd Faizal Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH) has established that the irradiation room must have a sufficient thickness of shielding to ensure that requirements for the purpose of radiation protection of patients, employees and the public are met. This paper presents a technique using americium-241 source to test and verify the integrity of the shielding thickness in term of lead equivalent for irradiation room at health clinics own by MOH. Results of measurement of 8 irradiation rooms conducted in 2014 were analyzed for this presentation. Technical comparison of the attenuation of gamma rays from Am-241 source through the walls of the irradiation room and pieces of lead were used to assess the lead equivalent thickness of the walls. Results showed that almost all the irradiation rooms tested meet the requirements of the Ministry of Health and is suitable for the installation of the intended diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Some specific positions such as door knobs and locks, electrical plug sockets were identified with potential to not met the required lead equivalent thickness hence may contribute to higher radiation exposure to workers and the public. (author)

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation of a Ambient Dose Equivalent Standard Ionization Chamber for Gamma Reference Radiation%γ射线参考辐射周围剂量当量标准电离室的蒙特卡罗模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋明哲; 魏可新; 高飞; 侯金兵; 王红玉; 倪宁

    2014-01-01

    Gamma reference radiation produced by isotope sources 137 Cs and 60 Co is very nec-essary for calibration of radiation dosimeter .For the calibration of area monitoring dosime-ter ,reference radiation must provide the conventionally true value of the ambient dose e-quivalent H* (10) .According to the recommendation given in the international standard ISO 4037-4 ,the conventionally true value of H* (10)could be obtained by two methods , one is spectrum method ,the other is H* (10) standard ionization chamber methed .In order to establish a standard chamber w hich could meet the requirements of ISO 4037-4 ,a design for H* (10) standard chamber was established by MCNP4C Monte Carlo simulation pro-gram .The results showed that the energy response of the ionization chamber satisfied the requirement of international standard ISO 4037-4 from 15 keV to 1 500 keV ,the conclusion of this study was good to the establishment of H* (10) secondary standard ionization cham-ber .%由放射源137Cs和60Co产生的γ射线参考辐射在辐射监测仪表的校准中起着重要作用。对于场所辐射监测仪表的校准,参考辐射需提供周围剂量当量H*(10)的约定真值。本研究采用H*(10)标准电离室法测定周围剂量当量H*(10)的约定真值,利用MCNP4C蒙特卡罗模拟程序,提出了基于双金属补偿法的电离室结构设计方案。结果表明,在15~1500keV能量范围内,该电离室能量响应满足国际标准ISO4037-4的要求,该研究结果对H*(10)标准电离室的建立具有重要的指导作用。

  16. Dose distribution around ion track in tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the energy deposition micro-specialty of ions in body-tissue or tissue equivalent material (TEM). Methods: The water vapor was determined as the tissue equivalent material, based on the analysis to the body-tissue, and Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the behavior of proton in the tissue equivalent material. Some features of the energy deposition micro-specialty of ion in tissue equivalent material were obtained through the analysis to the data from calculation. Results: The ion will give the energy by the way of excitation and ionization in material, then the secondary electrons will be generated in the progress of ionization, these electron will finished ions energy deposition progress. When ions deposited their energy, large amount energy will be in the core of tracks, and secondary electrons will devote its' energy around ion track, the ion dose distribution is then formed in TEM. Conclusions: To know biological effects of radiation , the research to dose distribution of ions is of importance(significance). (authors)

  17. The Complexity of Identifying Large Equivalence Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven; Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    1999-01-01

    We prove that at least 3k−4/k(2k−3)(n/2) – O(k)equivalence tests and no more than 2/k (n/2) + O(n) equivalence tests are needed in the worst case to identify the equivalence classes with at least k members in set of n elements. The upper bound is an improvement by a factor 2 compared to known res...

  18. Equivalent Simplification Method of Micro-Grid

    OpenAIRE

    Cai Changchun; Cao Xiangqin

    2013-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the equivalent simplification method for the micro-grid system connection into distributed network. The equivalent simplification method proposed for interaction study between micro-grid and distributed network. Micro-grid network, composite load, gas turbine synchronous generation, wind generation are equivalent simplification and parallel connect into the point of common coupling. A micro-grid system is built and three phase and single phase grounded faults are per...

  19. Equivalences of real submanifolds in complex space.

    OpenAIRE

    ZAITSEV, DMITRI

    2001-01-01

    PUBLISHED We show that for any real-analytic submanifold M in CN there is a proper real-analytic subvariety V contained in M such that for any p ? M \\ V , any real-analytic submanifold M? in CN, and any p? ? M?, the germs of the submanifolds M and M? at p and p? respectively are formally equivalent if and only if they are biholomorphically equivalent. More general results for k-equivalences are also stated and proved.

  20. Relations of equivalence of conditioned radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumer, L.; Szeless, A.; Oszuszky, F.

    1982-01-01

    A compensation for the wastes remaining with the operator of a waste management center, to be given by the agent having caused the waste, may be assured by effecting a financial valuation (equivalence) of wastes. Technically and logically, this equivalence between wastes (or specifically between different waste categories) and financial valuation has been established as reasonable. In this paper, the possibility of establishing such equivalences are developed, and their suitability for waste management concepts is quantitatively expressed

  1. Behavioural equivalence for infinite systems - Partially decidable!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunesen, Kim; Nielsen, Mogens

    1996-01-01

    languages with two generalizations based on traditional approaches capturing non-interleaving behaviour, pomsets representing global causal dependency, and locality representing spatial distribution of events. We first study equivalences on Basic Parallel Processes, BPP, a process calculus equivalent...... of processes between BPP and TCSP, not only are the two equivalences different, but one (locality) is decidable whereas the other (pomsets) is not. The decidability result for locality is proved by a reduction to the reachability problem for Petri nets....

  2. Equivalence in Bilingual Lexicography: Criticism and Suggestions*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Ernst Wiegand

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: A reminder of general problems in the formation of terminology, as illustrated by theGerman Äquivalence (Eng. equivalence and äquivalent (Eng. equivalent, is followed by a critical discussionof the concept of equivalence in contrastive lexicology. It is shown that especially the conceptof partial equivalence is contradictory in its different manifestations. Consequently attemptsare made to give a more precise indication of the concept of equivalence in the metalexicography,with regard to the domain of the nominal lexicon. The problems of especially the metalexicographicconcept of partial equivalence as well as that of divergence are fundamentally expounded.In conclusion the direction is indicated to find more appropriate metalexicographic versions of theconcept of equivalence.

    Keywords: EQUIVALENCE, LEXICOGRAPHIC EQUIVALENT, PARTIAL EQUIVALENCE,CONGRUENCE, DIVERGENCE, CONVERGENCE, POLYDIVERGENCE, SYNTAGM-EQUIVALENCE,ZERO EQUIVALENCE, CORRESPONDENCE

    Abstrakt: Äquivalenz in der zweisprachigen Lexikographie: Kritik und Vorschläge.Nachdem an allgemeine Probleme der Begriffsbildung am Beispiel von dt. Äquivalenzund dt. äquivalent erinnert wurde, wird zunächst auf Äquivalenzbegriffe in der kontrastiven Lexikologiekritisch eingegangen. Es wird gezeigt, dass insbesondere der Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenzin seinen verschiedenen Ausprägungen widersprüchlich ist. Sodann werden Präzisierungenzu den Äquivalenzbegriffen in der Metalexikographie versucht, die sich auf den Bereich der Nennlexikbeziehen. Insbesondere der metalexikographische Begriff der partiellen Äquivalenz sowie derder Divergenz werden grundsätzlich problematisiert. In welche Richtung man gehen kann, umangemessenere metalexikographische Fassungen des Äquivalenzbegriffs zu finden, wird abschließendangedeutet.

    Stichwörter: ÄQUIVALENZ, LEXIKOGRAPHISCHES ÄQUIVALENT, PARTIELLE ÄQUIVALENZ,KONGRUENZ, DIVERGENZ, KONVERGENZ, POLYDIVERGENZ

  3. Introduction to radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, Ch.J.

    1978-08-01

    This document is to introduce personnel who come into contact with any radiological activities to different aspects of radiation hygiene. The basic theory of radiation physics is given and units and dose equivalents are discussed. The biological effects of ionizing radiations are described and risk analysis is introduced. The various sources of radiation to which the population is exposed are outlined. Saftey standards and legislation regarding radiation hygiene are described and the various methods and instruments for measuring radiation are given. Dosimetry and safety precautions and measures are finally discussed. (C.F.)

  4. Low Simulated Radiation Limit for Runaway Greenhouse Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Colin; Robinson, Tyler D.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Crisp, David

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial planet atmospheres must be in long-term radiation balance, with solar radiation absorbed matched by thermal radiation emitted. For hot moist atmospheres, however, there is an upper limit on the thermal emission which is decoupled from the surface temperature. If net absorbed solar radiation exceeds this limit the planet will heat uncontrollably, the so-called \\runaway greenhouse". Here we show that a runaway greenhouse induced steam atmosphere may be a stable state for a planet with the same amount of incident solar radiation as Earth has today, contrary to previous results. We have calculated the clear-sky radiation limits at line-by-line spectral resolution for the first time. The thermal radiation limit is lower than previously reported (282 W/sq m rather than 310W/sq m) and much more solar radiation would be absorbed (294W/sq m rather than 222W/sq m). Avoiding a runaway greenhouse under the present solar constant requires that the atmosphere is subsaturated with water, and that cloud albedo forcing exceeds cloud greenhouse forcing. Greenhouse warming could in theory trigger a runaway greenhouse but palaeoclimate comparisons suggest that foreseeable increases in greenhouse gases will be insufficient to do this.

  5. Determination of dose equivalent and risk in thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, C.L.V.N.

    1988-01-01

    In these report are presented the calculations of dose equivalent and risk, utilizing the dosimetric model described in publication 30 of the International Comission on Radiological Protection. This information was obtained by the workers of the thorium cycle, employed at the Praia and Santo Amaro Facilities, by assessing the quantity and concentration of thorium in the air. The samples and the number of measurements were established through design of experiments techniques, and the results were evaluated with the aid of variance analysis. The estimater of dose equivalent for internal and external radiation exposure and risk associated were compared with the maximum recommended limits. The results indicate the existence of operation areas whose values were above those limits, requiring so an improvement in the procedures and services in order to meet the requirements of the radiological protetion. (author) [pt

  6. Composition variability and equivalence of Shonka TE plastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spokas, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    A number of conducting plastic mixtures had been developed by Francis R. Shonka, and collaborators, in the Physical Sciences Laboratory of Illinois Benedictine College (formerly St. Procopius College). Several of these mixtures have been used widely in radiation research. In particular, a tissue-equivalent (muscle) formulation designated A-150 has been used extensively in the dosimetry, research and measurements of gamma, neutron and pion beams. Certain confusion has arisen concerning the composition of A-150. The definition of A-150 is reviewed and what is known of the composition is summarized. The equivalence of A-150 and ICRU ''muscle'' with respect to photons is discussed as a function of photon energy using the latest data on extra-nuclear photon cross sections. (U.S.)

  7. Measurement of dose equivalent with personal dosemeters and instrumentation of radiological protection in the new operative magnitudes ICRU, for external fields of radiation beta. Part IV. Survey of the angular response of instruments used in radiological protection in secondary patron fields of beta radiation (90Sr/90Y (1850 MBq and 74 MBq), 204TI (18.5 MBq) and 147Pm (518 MBq)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1994-02-01

    Tests type were made (type test) in the following commercial instrumentation commonly used in radiological protection: Geiger-Mueller Counters (FH40 FE), Plastic Scintillators (NE-BP/6/4A), Ionization Chambers (RO-5) and Proportional Counters (HP-100A; gas:P-10). With object of checking the possibility that these they can carry out the new operative unit ICRU, H' (0.07; α). The tests consisted on determining the energy and angular response of the detectors in secondary patron fields of beta radiation, for isotopes of 90 Sr/ 90 Y (1850 MBq and 74 MBq and 147 Pm(518 MBq). The results show the inadequate of these commercial instruments for the realization of the H' operative unit (0.07; α) in beta external fields. Due to flaws in the design, construction and calibration of the instruments for this type of radiation fields (Author)

  8. Equivalent drawbead performance in deep drawing simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, Vincent T.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han

    1999-01-01

    Drawbeads are applied in the deep drawing process to improve the control of the material flow during the forming operation. In simulations of the deep drawing process these drawbeads can be replaced by an equivalent drawbead model. In this paper the usage of an equivalent drawbead model in the

  9. Orientifold Planar Equivalence: The Chiral Condensate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armoni, Adi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino

    2008-01-01

    The recently introduced orientifold planar equivalence is a promising tool for solving non-perturbative problems in QCD. One of the predictions of orientifold planar equivalence is that the chiral condensates of a theory with $N_f$ flavours of Dirac fermions in the symmetric (or antisymmetric...

  10. 7 CFR 1005.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1005.54 Section 1005.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1005.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  11. 7 CFR 1126.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1126.54 Section 1126.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1126.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  12. 7 CFR 1001.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1001.54 Section 1001.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1001.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  13. 7 CFR 1032.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1032.54 Section 1032.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1032.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  14. 7 CFR 1124.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1124.54 Section 1124.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Class Prices § 1124.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  15. 7 CFR 1030.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1030.54 Section 1030.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1030.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. ...

  16. 7 CFR 1033.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1033.54 Section 1033.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1033.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Producer Price Differential ...

  17. 7 CFR 1131.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1131.54 Section 1131.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1131.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  18. 7 CFR 1006.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1006.54 Section 1006.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1006.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  19. 7 CFR 1007.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1007.54 Section 1007.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Handling Class Prices § 1007.54 Equivalent price. See § 1000.54. Uniform Prices ...

  20. 7 CFR 1000.54 - Equivalent price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Equivalent price. 1000.54 Section 1000.54 Agriculture... Prices § 1000.54 Equivalent price. If for any reason a price or pricing constituent required for computing the prices described in § 1000.50 is not available, the market administrator shall use a price or...

  1. Finding small equivalent decision trees is hard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantema, H.; Bodlaender, H.L.

    2000-01-01

    Two decision trees are called decision equivalent if they represent the same function, i.e., they yield the same result for every possible input. We prove that given a decision tree and a number, to decide if there is a decision equivalent decision tree of size at most that number is NPcomplete. As

  2. What is Metaphysical Equivalence? | Miller | Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theories are metaphysically equivalent just if there is no fact of the matter that could render one theory true and the other false. In this paper I argue that if we are judiciously to resolve disputes about whether theories are equivalent or not, we need to develop testable criteria that will give us epistemic access to the obtaining ...

  3. EQUIVALENT MODELS IN COVARIANCE STRUCTURE-ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUIJBEN, TCW

    1991-01-01

    Defining equivalent models as those that reproduce the same set of covariance matrices, necessary and sufficient conditions are stated for the local equivalence of two expanded identified models M1 and M2 when fitting the more restricted model M0. Assuming several regularity conditions, the rank

  4. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  5. Beyond Language Equivalence on Visibly Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    We study (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds for a number of studied...... preorders and equivalences like simulation, completed simulation, ready simulation, 2-nested simulation preorders/equivalences and bisimulation equivalence. Our main results are that all the mentioned equivalences and preorders are EXPTIME-complete on visibly pushdown automata, PSPACE-complete on visibly...... one-counter automata and P-complete on visibly BPA. Our PSPACE lower bound for visibly one-counter automata improves also the previously known DP-hardness results for ordinary one-counter automata and one-counter nets. Finally, we study regularity checking problems for visibly pushdown automata...

  6. Preparation of water-equivalent radioactive solid sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Ione M.; Koskinas, Marina F.; Dias, Mauro S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of water-equivalent solid sources in two geometries, cylindrical and flat without the need of irradiation in a strong gamma radiation source to obtain polymerization is described. These sources should have density similar to water and good uniformity. Therefore, the density and uniformity of the distribution of radioactive material in the resins were measured. The variation of these parameters in the cylindrical geometry was better than 2.0% for the density and 2.3% for the uniformity and for the flat geometry the values obtained were better than 2.0 % and better than 1.3%, respectively. These values are in good agreement with the literature. (author)

  7. Atmospheric radiative transfer modeling: a summary of the AER codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Shephard, M.W. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States)]. E-mail: mshephar@aer.com; Mlawer, E.J. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Delamere, J.S. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Iacono, M.J. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Cady-Pereira, K. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Boukabara, S. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Brown, P.D. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The radiative transfer models developed at AER are being used extensively for a wide range of applications in the atmospheric sciences. This communication is intended to provide a coherent summary of the various radiative transfer models and associated databases publicly available from AER (http://www.rtweb.aer.com). Among the communities using the models are the remote sensing community (e.g. TES, IASI), the numerical weather prediction community (e.g. ECMWF, NCEP GFS, WRF, MM5), and the climate community (e.g. ECHAM5). Included in this communication is a description of the central features and recent updates for the following models: the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM); the line file creation program (LNFL); the longwave and shortwave rapid radiative transfer models, RRTM{sub L}W and RRTM{sub S}W; the Monochromatic Radiative Transfer Model (MonoRTM); the MT{sub C}KD Continuum; and the Kurucz Solar Source Function. LBLRTM and the associated line parameter database (e.g. HITRAN 2000 with 2001 updates) play a central role in the suite of models. The physics adopted for LBLRTM has been extensively analyzed in the context of closure experiments involving the evaluation of the model inputs (e.g. atmospheric state), spectral radiative measurements and the spectral model output. The rapid radiative transfer models are then developed and evaluated using the validated LBLRTM model.

  8. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, Johann Valentin

    2013-05-15

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition than combustion with air. Standard computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are therefore out of their validity range in oxyfuel combustion. This thesis provides a common spectral basis for the validation of new spectral models. A literature review about fundamental gas radiation theory, spectral modeling and experimental methods provides the reader with a basic understanding of the topic. In the first results section, this thesis validates detailed spectral models with high resolution spectral measurements in a gas cell with the aim of recommending one model as the best benchmark model. In the second results section, spectral measurements from a turbulent natural gas flame - as an example for a technical combustion process - are compared to simulated spectra based on measured gas atmospheres. The third results section compares simplified spectral models to the benchmark model recommended in the first results section and gives a ranking of the proposed models based on their accuracy. A concluding section gives recommendations for the selection and further development of simplified spectral radiation models. Gas cell transmissivity spectra in the spectral range of 2.4 - 5.4 {mu}m of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 727 C to 1500 C and at different concentrations were compared in the first results section at a nominal resolution of 32 cm{sup -1} to line-by-line models from different databases, two statistical-narrow-band models and the exponential-wide-band model. The two statistical-narrow-band models EM2C and RADCAL showed good agreement with a maximal band transmissivity deviation of 3 %. The exponential-wide-band model showed a deviation of 6 %. The new line-by-line database HITEMP2010 had the lowest band transmissivity deviation of 2.2% and was therefore recommended as a reference model for the

  9. 78 FR 67360 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... Methods: Designation of Five New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Office of Research and Development; Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of the designation of five new equivalent methods for...) has designated, in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, five new equivalent methods, one for measuring...

  10. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of three new equivalent methods for monitoring ambient air quality. SUMMARY... equivalent methods, one for measuring concentrations of PM 2.5 , one for measuring concentrations of PM 10...

  11. Chapter 1: A little of Radiation Physics and radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 1 presents the subjects: 1) quantities and units of radiation physics which includes: the electron volt (eV); Exposure (X); Absorbed dose (D); Dose equivalent (H); Activity (A); Half-life; Radioactive decay; 2) Radiation protection which includes: irradiation and radioactive contamination; irradiation; contamination; background radiation; dose limits for individual occupationally exposed (IOE) and for the general public.

  12. Changes in ambient dose equivalent rates around roads at Kawamata town after the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinase, Sakae; Sato, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Saito, Kimiaki; Sakamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Changes in ambient dose equivalent rates noted through vehicle-borne surveys have elucidated ecological half-lives of radioactive caesium in the environment. To confirm that the ecological half-lives are appropriate for predicting ambient dose equivalent rates within living areas, it is important to ascertain ambient dose equivalent rates on/around roads. In this study, radiation monitoring on/around roads at Kawamata town, located about 37 km northwest of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, was performed using monitoring vehicles and survey meters. It was found that the ambient dose equivalent rates around roads were higher than those on roads as of October 2012. And withal the ecological half-lives on roads were essentially consistent with those around roads. With dose predictions using ecological half-lives on roads, it is necessary to make corrections to ambient dose equivalent rates through the vehicle-borne surveys against those within living areas. (authors)

  13. Analytical and numerical construction of equivalent cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, K A; Rosenberg, J R; Tucker, G

    2003-08-01

    The mathematical complexity experienced when applying cable theory to arbitrarily branched dendrites has lead to the development of a simple representation of any branched dendrite called the equivalent cable. The equivalent cable is an unbranched model of a dendrite and a one-to-one mapping of potentials and currents on the branched model to those on the unbranched model, and vice versa. The piecewise uniform cable, with a symmetrised tri-diagonal system matrix, is shown to represent the canonical form for an equivalent cable. Through a novel application of the Laplace transform it is demonstrated that an arbitrary branched model of a dendrite can be transformed to the canonical form of an equivalent cable. The characteristic properties of the equivalent cable are extracted from the matrix for the transformed branched model. The one-to-one mapping follows automatically from the construction of the equivalent cable. The equivalent cable is used to provide a new procedure for characterising the location of synaptic contacts on spinal interneurons.

  14. Energy response of detectors to alpha/beta particles and compatibility of the equivalent factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Bingxing; Li Guangxian; Lin Lixiong

    2011-01-01

    By measuring detect efficiency and equivalent factors of alpha/beta radiation with different energies on three types of detectors, this paper compares compatibility of their equivalent factors and discusses applicability of detectors to measuring total alpha/beta radiation. The result shows the relationship between efficiency of alpha/beta radiation and their energies on 3 types of detectors, such as scintillation and proportional and semiconductor counters, are overall identical. Alpha count efficiency display exponential relation with alpha-particle energy. While beta count efficiency display logarithm relation with beta-particle energy, but the curves appears deflection at low energy. Comparison test of energy response also shows that alpha and beta equivalent factors of scintillation and proportional counters have a good compatibility, and alpha equivalent factors of the semiconductor counters are in good agreement with those of the above two types of counters, but beta equivalent factors have obvious difference, or equivalent factors of low energy beta-particle are lower than those of other detectors. So, the semiconductor counter can not be used for measuring total radioactivity or for the measurements for the purpose of food safety. (authors)

  15. Operation and application of tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdung, S.; Roos, H.

    1995-01-01

    The application of TEPCs during the past decades in dosimetry, radiation protection and radiation therapy has revealed their large potential but also the necessity of careful operation. This paper reviews the experience gathered in the past and summarises the experimental procedures to ensure proper TEPC operation. The measurement system is described including detector, electronics and quality assurance. The pulse height analysis and its interpretation in terms of microdosimetric spectra and mean values are presented as well as the variance method. On the basis of these evaluation procedures, the second part of the paper presents some typical examples of TEPC applications: dose spectrometry, time-of-flight techniques and the measurement of dose equivalent quantities. Special attention is paid to possible extensions but also to limitations of the use of TEPCs in the various fields of application. (Author)

  16. Guideline values for skin decontamination measures based on nuclidspecific dose equivalent rate factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfob, H.; Heinemann, G.

    1992-01-01

    Corresponding dose equivalent rate factors for various radionuclides are now available for determining the skin dose caused by skin contamination. These dose equivalent rate factors take into account all contributions from the types of radiation emitted. Any limits for skin decontamination measures are nowhere contained or determined yet. However, radiological protection does in practice require at least guideline values in order to prevent unsuitable or detrimental measures that can be noticed quite often. New calculations of dose equivalent rate factors for the skin now make the recommendation of guideline values possible. (author)

  17. A Study on intelligent measurement of nuclear explosion equivalent in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Desheng; Wu Xiaohong

    1999-01-01

    Measurement of nuclear explosion equivalent in atmosphere is an important subject for nuclear survey. Based on the relations between nuclear explosion equivalent and the minimum illuminance time of light radiation from nuclear explosion. The method of RC differential valley time detection and mean-time taking is presented the method, using a single-chip computer as a intelligent part, can realize intelligent measurement of minimum illuminance time with high reliability and low power consumption. This method provides a practical mean for quick, accurate and reliable measurement of nuclear explosion equivalent in atmosphere

  18. Geometry of the local equivalence of states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, A; Kus, M, E-mail: assawi@cft.edu.pl, E-mail: marek.kus@cft.edu.pl [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland)

    2011-12-09

    We present a description of locally equivalent states in terms of symplectic geometry. Using the moment map between local orbits in the space of states and coadjoint orbits of the local unitary group, we reduce the problem of local unitary equivalence to an easy part consisting of identifying the proper coadjoint orbit and a harder problem of the geometry of fibers of the moment map. We give a detailed analysis of the properties of orbits of 'equally entangled states'. In particular, we show connections between certain symplectic properties of orbits such as their isotropy and coisotropy with effective criteria of local unitary equivalence. (paper)

  19. The lead equivalence of plate glass for diagnostic x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, B.F.; Morris, N.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of plate glass as a radiation protection barrier was determined. For x ray energies between 80 and 140 kVp, the lead equivalence of plate glass is energy independent, but below 80 kVp there is an apparent dependence. A thickness of plate glass of 25 mm for radiation energies between 80 and 140 kVp is equivalent to lead of .3mm thickness. There could be a limited application for the use of plate glass in viewing panels

  20. Quantum equivalence principle without mass superselection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Coronado, H.; Okon, E.

    2013-01-01

    The standard argument for the validity of Einstein's equivalence principle in a non-relativistic quantum context involves the application of a mass superselection rule. The objective of this work is to show that, contrary to widespread opinion, the compatibility between the equivalence principle and quantum mechanics does not depend on the introduction of such a restriction. For this purpose, we develop a formalism based on the extended Galileo group, which allows for a consistent handling of superpositions of different masses, and show that, within such scheme, mass superpositions behave as they should in order to obey the equivalence principle. - Highlights: • We propose a formalism for consistently handling, within a non-relativistic quantum context, superpositions of states with different masses. • The formalism utilizes the extended Galileo group, in which mass is a generator. • The proposed formalism allows for the equivalence principle to be satisfied without the need of imposing a mass superselection rule

  1. On the equivalence of chaos control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaofan

    2003-01-01

    For a given chaotic system, different control systems can be constructed depending on which parameter is tuned or where the external input is added. We prove that two different feedback control systems are qualitatively equivalent if they are feedback linearizable

  2. Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, M

    2000-07-01

    Where do equivalence relations come from? One possible answer is that they arise directly from the reinforcement contingency. That is to say, a reinforcement contingency produces two types of outcome: (a) 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, or n-term units of analysis that are known, respectively, as operant reinforcement, simple discrimination, conditional discrimination, second-order conditional discrimination, and so on; and (b) equivalence relations that consist of ordered pairs of all positive elements that participate in the contingency. This conception of the origin of equivalence relations leads to a number of new and verifiable ways of conceptualizing equivalence relations and, more generally, the stimulus control of operant behavior. The theory is also capable of experimental disproof.

  3. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  4. ON THE EQUIVALENCE OF THE ABEL EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article uses the reflecting function of Mironenko to study some complicated differential equations which are equivalent to the Abel equation. The results are applied to discuss the behavior of solutions of these complicated differential equations.

  5. interpratation: of equivalences and cultural untranslatability

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jgmweri

    translatability in cultural diversity in terms equivalences such as –Vocabulary or lexical ..... A KSL interpreter who does not understand this English idiom may literally interpret it .... Nida, E.A. (1958) Analysis of meaning and dictionary making.

  6. Equivalence Principle, Higgs Boson and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Francaviglia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss here possible tests for Palatini f(R-theories together with their implications for different formulations of the Equivalence Principle. We shall show that Palatini f(R-theories obey the Weak Equivalence Principle and violate the Strong Equivalence Principle. The violations of the Strong Equivalence Principle vanish in vacuum (and purely electromagnetic solutions as well as on short time scales with respect to the age of the universe. However, we suggest that a framework based on Palatini f(R-theories is more general than standard General Relativity (GR and it sheds light on the interpretation of data and results in a way which is more model independent than standard GR itself.

  7. The gauge principle vs. the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, S.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Within the context of field theory, it is argued that the role of the equivalence principle may be replaced by the principle of gauge invariance to provide a logical framework for theories of gravitation

  8. Investigation of radiological properties and water equivalency of PRESAGE dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Adamovics, John; Bosi, Stephen; Kim, Jung-Ha; Baldock, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: PRESAGE is a dosimeter made of polyurethane, which is suitable for 3D dosimetry in modern radiation treatment techniques. Since an ideal dosimeter is radiologically water equivalent, the authors investigated water equivalency and the radiological properties of three different PRESAGE formulations that differ primarily in their elemental compositions. Two of the formulations are new and have lower halogen content than the original formulation. Methods: The radiological water equivalence was assessed by comparing the densities, interaction probabilities, and radiation dosimetry properties of the three different PRESAGE formulations to the corresponding values for water. The relative depth doses were calculated using Monte Carlo methods for 50, 100, 200, and 350 kVp and 6 MV x-ray beams. Results: The mass densities of the three PRESAGE formulations varied from 5.3% higher than that of water to as much as 10% higher than that of water for the original formulation. The probability of photoelectric absorption in the three different PRESAGE formulations varied from 2.2 times greater than that of water for the new formulations to 3.5 times greater than that of water for the original formulation. The mass attenuation coefficient for the three formulations is 12%-50% higher than the value for water. These differences occur over an energy range (10-100 keV) in which the photoelectric effect is the dominant interaction. The collision mass stopping powers of the relatively lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations also exhibit marginally better water equivalency than the original higher halogen-containing PRESAGE formulation. Furthermore, the depth dose curves for the lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations are slightly closer to that of water for a 6 MV beam. In the kilovoltage energy range, the depth dose curves for the lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations are in better agreement with water than the original PRESAGE formulation. Conclusions: Based

  9. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  10. S-equivalents lagrangians in generalized mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, L.J.; Silva, Edna G. da.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of s-equivalent lagrangians is considered in the realm of generalized mechanics. Some results corresponding to the ordinary (non-generalized) mechanics are extended to the generalized case. A theorem for the reduction of the higher order lagrangian description to the usual order is found to be useful for the analysis of generalized mechanical systems and leads to a new class of equivalence between lagrangian functions. Some new perspectives are pointed out. (Author) [pt

  11. A design of ambient dose equivalent dosimeter and its dosimetric performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shian; Ou Xiangming; Li Kaibao

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To design an ambient dose equivalent dosimeter with digital display for radiation protection, which is based on the definition of the new operational radiation quantity for environmental monitoring-ambient dose equivalent recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report 39. Methods: Considering the energy response of the instrument, the inner wall of ionizing chamber is coated with gum graphite added with a bit of metal powder. Results: Using this chamber, measurement of H * (10) for photon radiation with unknown spectrum distribution is possible in the energy range from 47 keV to 230 keV with an uncertainty of better than 5%. The configuration, technology and dosimetric performance of the chamber and automatic functions of the reader are presented. Conclusion: The ambient dose equivalent dosimeter can be used as not only a working reference dosimeter, but also a field dosimeter for radiation protection because the readings are expressed directly in ambient dose equivalent and averaged automatically in the period of measurement. Also, its power is supplied by battery for the portable purpose and the readings are displayed on the screen with light-background for dim field

  12. Determination of equivalent copper thickness of patient equivalent phantoms in terms of attenuation, used in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, J.Th.M.; Suliman, I.I.; Zoetelief, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the radiation protection research programme of the European Union, as part of the DIMOND concerted action, constancy check protocols for fluoroscopic systems have been developed. For practical reasons copper filters are preferred to patients and tissue equivalent, water or PMMA, phantoms. The objectives are to derive patient entrance surface dose rates and the dose rate at the image intensifier input. The protocol states that copper sheets of either 1 mm or 1.5 mm thick may be used. The present study investigates the equivalent thickness of copper filters compared to PMMA phantoms in terms of attenuation for both geometries and different tube voltage and filter combinations. The geometry to determine the patient entrance surface dose is with the copper filter close to the image intensifier. The ionisation chamber is placed on the side of the copper sheet nearest to the X-ray tube. The inverse square law is used to correct for differences in position. Measurements are performed with different settings and with and without the use of an anti-scatter grid. The geometry to determine the air kerma rate at the image intensifier is with the copper filter attached to the X-ray tube diaphragm. The ionisation chamber is placed on the surface of the image intensifier housing. Again measurements are performed with different settings and with and without anti-scatter grid. If necessary, the inverse square law correction is applied. Two different radiation beam sizes are used, i.e., a small beam with a diameter of 0.10 m at a distance of 1.00 m from the focus and a large beam with a diameter of 0.23 m at a distance of 1.00 m from the focus. The applied tube voltages and PMMA phantom thickness combinations are 60 kV, 13 cm; 80 kV, 14 cm; 100 kV, 16 cm; 120 kV, 17 cm; 150 kV, 18 cm; 150 kV, 20 cm and 150 kV, 30 cm. The spectra for the different tube voltages are generated with the IPEM Report 78 software at an anode angle of 16 degree, 0% ripple and 2.5 mm added

  13. Foundations of ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisenko, O.N.; Pereslegin, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    Foundations of dosimetry in application to radiotherapy are presented. General characteristics of ionizing radiations and main characteristics of ionizing radiation sources, mostly used in radiotherapy, are given. Values and units for measuring ionizing radiation (activity of a radioactive substance, absorbed dose, exposure dose, integral dose and dose equivalent are considered. Different methods and instruments for ionizing radiation dosimetry are discussed. The attention is paid to the foundations of clinical dosimetry (representation of anatomo-topographic information, choice of radiation conditions, realization of radiation methods, corrections for a configuration and inhomogeneity of a patient's body, account of biological factors of radiation effects, instruments of dose field formation, control of irradiation procedure chosen)

  14. Radiation from an equilibrium CO2-N2 plasma in the [250-850 nm] spectral region: II. Spectral modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M Lino da; Vacher, D; Andre, P; Faure, G; Dudeck, M

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of this work, described in a previous paper, the thermodynamic conditions in an atmospheric pressure inductively coupled CO 2 -N 2 plasma have been determined, and the radiation emission spectrum has been measured and calibrated in the [250-850 nm] spectral region. In the second part of this work, a synthetic radiation spectrum is obtained taking into account (a) the geometry of the plasma torch and (b) the local thermodynamic conditions of the plasma. This synthetic spectrum has then been compared against the measured spectrum. The good agreement between the two spectra allows validating the spectral database of the line-by-line code SPARTAN for the simulation of the radiative emission of CO 2 -N 2 plasmas from the near-UV to the near-IR spectral region.

  15. The principle of equivalence reconsidered: assessing the relevance of the principle of equivalence in prison medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotterand, Fabrice; Wangmo, Tenzin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we critically examine the principle of equivalence of care in prison medicine. First, we provide an overview of how the principle of equivalence is utilized in various national and international guidelines on health care provision to prisoners. Second, we outline some of the problems associated with its applications, and argue that the principle of equivalence should go beyond equivalence to access and include equivalence of outcomes. However, because of the particular context of the prison environment, third, we contend that the concept of "health" in equivalence of health outcomes needs conceptual clarity; otherwise, it fails to provide a threshold for healthy states among inmates. We accomplish this by examining common understandings of the concepts of health and disease. We conclude our article by showing why the conceptualization of diseases as clinical problems provides a helpful approach in the delivery of health care in prison.

  16. A survey to establish ambient and personal dose equivalent standards in the X- and γ-ray field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Yuichiro

    2007-01-01

    National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) develops and supplies standards of ionizing radiations as national primary references. Fundamental matters to establish ambient and personal dose equivalent standards of X- and γ-radiation are reviewed in this report. First, units of radiation dose in measurements of X- and γ-radiation are surveyed. Next, the present status of the preparation of X-radiation standard is explained, and finally the relationship between the physical dose and the radiation-protection dose is described. (J.P.N.)

  17. Equivalence of Szegedy's and coined quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2017-09-01

    Szegedy's quantum walk is a quantization of a classical random walk or Markov chain, where the walk occurs on the edges of the bipartite double cover of the original graph. To search, one can simply quantize a Markov chain with absorbing vertices. Recently, Santos proposed two alternative search algorithms that instead utilize the sign-flip oracle in Grover's algorithm rather than absorbing vertices. In this paper, we show that these two algorithms are exactly equivalent to two algorithms involving coined quantum walks, which are walks on the vertices of the original graph with an internal degree of freedom. The first scheme is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with one walk step per query of Grover's oracle, and the second is equivalent to a coined quantum walk with two walk steps per query of Grover's oracle. These equivalences lie outside the previously known equivalence of Szegedy's quantum walk with absorbing vertices and the coined quantum walk with the negative identity operator as the coin for marked vertices, whose precise relationships we also investigate.

  18. Solar cell radiation handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  19. Protective aprons in imaging departments: manufacturer stated lead equivalence values require validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnerty, M.; Brennan, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of protective aprons worn by X-ray personnel to shield against secondary radiation is changing. Lead is being replaced by either lead-free or composite (lead with other high atomic numbered elements) materials. These newer aprons are categorised by manufacturers in terms of lead equivalent values, but it is unclear how these stated values compare with actual lead equivalent values. In this work, the actual lead equivalence of 41 protective aprons from four manufacturers, all specified as having 0.25 mm lead equivalence, were investigated with transmission experiments at 70 and 100 kVp. All aprons were in current use. The aprons were screened for defects, and age, weight and design was recorded along with details of associated quality assurance (QA). Out of the 41 protective aprons examined for actual lead equivalence, 73% were outside tolerance levels, with actual levels in some aprons demonstrating less than half of the nominal values. The lack of compatibility between actual and nominal lead equivalent values was demonstrated by aprons from three of the four manufacturers investigated. The area of the defects found on screening of the protective aprons were within recommendations. The results highlight the need for acceptancy and ongoing checks of protective aprons to ensure that radiation exposure of imaging personnel is kept to a minimum. (orig.)

  20. Quantum mechanics and the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P C W

    2004-01-01

    A quantum particle moving in a gravitational field may penetrate the classically forbidden region of the gravitational potential. This raises the question of whether the time of flight of a quantum particle in a gravitational field might deviate systematically from that of a classical particle due to tunnelling delay, representing a violation of the weak equivalence principle. I investigate this using a model quantum clock to measure the time of flight of a quantum particle in a uniform gravitational field, and show that a violation of the equivalence principle does not occur when the measurement is made far from the turning point of the classical trajectory. The results are then confirmed using the so-called dwell time definition of quantum tunnelling. I conclude with some remarks about the strong equivalence principle in quantum mechanics

  1. Using frequency equivalency in stability calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzdev, I.A.; Temirbulatov, R.A.; Tereshko, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A methodology for calculating oscillatory instability that involves using frequency equivalency is employed in carrying out the following proceedures: dividing an electric power system into subgroups; determining the adjustments to the automatic excitation control in each subsystem; simplifying the mathematical definition of the separate subsystems by using frequency equivalency; gradually re-tuning the automatic excitation control in the separate subsystems to account for neighboring subsystems by using their equivalent frequency characteristics. The methodology is to be used with a computer program to determine the gain in the stabilization channels of the automatic excitation control unit in which static stability of the entire aggregate of normal and post-breakdown conditions acceptable damping of transient processes are provided. The possibility of reducing the equation series to apply to chosen regions of the existing range of frequencies is demonstrated. The use of the methodology is illustrated in a sample study on stability in a Siberian unified power system.

  2. The equivalence problem for LL- and LR-regular grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Gecsec, F.

    It will be shown that the equivalence problem for LL-regular grammars is decidable. Apart from extending the known result for LL(k) grammar equivalence to LLregular grammar equivalence, we obtain an alternative proof of the decidability of LL(k) equivalence. The equivalence prob]em for LL-regular

  3. Fiscal adjustments in Europe and Ricardian equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. DE BONIS

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the ‘Ricardian’ equivalence hypothesis, consumption is dependent on permanent disposable income and current deficits are equivalent to future tax payments. This hypothesis is tested on 14 European countries in the 1990s. The relationships between private sector savings and general government deficit, and the GDP growth rate and the unemployment rate are determined. The results show the change in consumers' behaviour with respect to government deficit, and that expectations of an increase in future wealth are no longer associated with a decrease in deficit.

  4. Equivalent circuit analysis of terahertz metamaterial filters

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xueqian

    2011-01-01

    An equivalent circuit model for the analysis and design of terahertz (THz) metamaterial filters is presented. The proposed model, derived based on LMC equivalent circuits, takes into account the detailed geometrical parameters and the presence of a dielectric substrate with the existing analytic expressions for self-inductance, mutual inductance, and capacitance. The model is in good agreement with the experimental measurements and full-wave simulations. Exploiting the circuit model has made it possible to predict accurately the resonance frequency of the proposed structures and thus, quick and accurate process of designing THz device from artificial metamaterials is offered. ©2011 Chinese Optics Letters.

  5. Topological equivalence of nonlinear autonomous dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Huynh Phan; Tran Van Nhung

    1995-12-01

    We show in this paper that the autonomous nonlinear dynamical system Σ(A,B,F): x' = Ax+Bu+F(x) is topologically equivalent to the linear dynamical system Σ(A,B,O): x' = Ax+Bu if the projection of A on the complement in R n of the controllable vectorial subspace is hyperbolic and if lipschitz constant of F is sufficiently small ( * ) and F(x) = 0 when parallel x parallel is sufficiently large ( ** ). In particular, if Σ(A,B,O) is controllable, it is topologically equivalent to Σ(A,B,F) when it is only that F satisfy ( ** ). (author). 18 refs

  6. A neutron dose equivalent meter at CAEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Shihai; Lu Yan; Wang Heyi; Yuan Yonggang; Chen Xu

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of neutron dose equivalent has been a widespread need in industry and research. In this paper, aimed at improving the accuracy of neutron dose equivalent meter: a neutron dose counter is simulated with MCNP5, and the energy response curve is optimized. The results show that the energy response factor is from 0.2 to 1.8 for neutrons in the energy range of 2.53×10 -8 MeV to 10 MeV Compared with other related meters, it turns that the design of this meter is right. (authors)

  7. Measurements of the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Badita, E.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the results of measurements related to the personal dose equivalent in the rooms adjacent to NILPRP 7 MeV linear accelerator, by means of the secondary standard chamber T34035 Hp(10). The chamber was calibrated by PTB at S- 137 Cs (E av = 661.6 keV, T 1/2 11050 days) and has N H = 3.17x10 6 Sv/C calibration factor for the personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), at a depth of 10 mm in climatic reference conditions. The measurements were made for the two operation mode of the 7 MeV linac: electrons and bremsstrahlung

  8. A phantom for assessing the personal dose equivalent, HP(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, C.; Filho, J.A

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of a phantom designed to evaluate the personal dose equivalent, H P (10), and appropriate for photographic dosimetry are presented. It is called HP(10) phantom due to cavities constructed to insert dosimetric films at a depth of 10 mm. The H P (10) phantom is irradiated with ionizing radiation energy, E, from 45 to 1250 keV, with doses ranging from 0.2 to 50 mSv. It is positioned in the direction α = 0 °, and the radiation field focusing perpendicular to its front surface. So, are established calibration curves of dosimeters in the position conventionally true and quantities H P (10). It made a comparison between the responses obtained with the H P (10) phantom and responses obtained when using the calibration procedure recommended by ISO dosimeters. The ISO recommends getting the air kerma, Ka, for photons at test point of the radiation field by an ionization chamber. And through conversion coefficients, h pK (10; E, α), becomes the air kerma for H P (10). The ISO 4037-3 recommendation has been studied by researchers to ensure that the low energy spectral differences occur in radiation fields which are generated by various X-ray equipment, and induce changes in the percentages of conversion coefficients on the order of 10% to 90% . On the basis of the recommendations ISO, this article develops phantom able to assess the dose to the influence of scattering and absorption of radiation, its implications with respect to dosimetry, providing improvement in the assessment of doses. (author)

  9. Determination of the radiation dose to the body due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Eckerl, H.

    1985-01-01

    Section 63 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance defines the basic requirement, determination of radiation dose to the body. The determination of dose equivalents for the body is the basic step in practical monitoring of dose equivalents or dose limits with regard to individuals or population groups, both for constant or varying conditions of exposure. The main field of monitoring activities is the protection of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Conversion factors between body doses and radiation quantities are explained. (DG) [de

  10. Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent of Indoor 222Rn Daughters in Inchass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, E.M.; Taha, T.M.; Gomaa, M.A.; El-Hussein, A.M.; Ahmad, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The dominant component of natural radiation dose for the general population comes from the radon gas 222 Rn and its short-lived decay products, Ra A ( 214 Po), Ra B ( 214 Pb), Ra C ( 214 Bi), Ra C( 214 Po) in the breathing air. The objective of the present work is to assess the affective dose equivalent of the inhalation exposure of indoor 222 Rn for occupational workers. Average indon concentrations (Bqm -3 ) were monitored in several departments in Nuclear Research Center by radon monitor. We have calculated the lung dose equivalent and the effective dose equivalent for the Egyptian workers due to inhalation exposure of an equilibrium equivalent concentrations of radon daughters which varies from 0.27 to 2.5 mSvy -1 and 0.016 to 0.152mSvy -1 respectively. The annual effective doses obtained are within the accepted range of ICRP recommendations

  11. Our khowledge of radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure pathways of natural source radiation on man are shown. Radiation earth sources give on an average more, than 5/6 of the year effective equivalent dose absorbed by population mainly due to the internal radiation. Radon and its decay products which are contained in many building materials and in water and natural gas as well, require particular attention. Necessity to carry out radiation control of building materias, as well as, other measures dealing with reduction of radon concentration in houses is underlined

  12. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  13. 77 FR 32632 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... accordance with 40 CFR Part 53, three new equivalent methods: One for measuring concentrations of nitrogen... INFORMATION: In accordance with regulations at 40 CFR Part 53, the EPA evaluates various methods for...

  14. Confluence Modulo Equivalence in Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Kirkeby, Maja Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Previous results on confluence for Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, are generalized to take into account user-defined state equivalence relations. This allows a much larger class of programs to enjoy the advantages of confluence, which include various optimization techniques and simplified...

  15. Free Fall and the Equivalence Principle Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Free fall is commonly discussed as an example of the equivalence principle, in the context of a homogeneous gravitational field, which is a reasonable approximation for small test masses falling moderate distances. Newton's law of gravity provides a generalisation to larger distances, and also brings in an inhomogeneity in the gravitational field.…

  16. Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimation of Toxicity Equivalent Concentration (TEQ) of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils from Idu Ekpeye playground and University of Port ... Effective soil remediation and detoxification method like Dispersion by chemical reaction technology should be deployed to clean-up sites to avoid soil toxicity ...

  17. Chemical equivalence assessment of three brands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assay for content of active ingredients is a critical test of drug quality; failure to meet up the standard for content of active ingredients will result to sub therapeutic quantities. Three brands (A, B and C) of carbamazepine were assayed to determine their chemical equivalence as well as their anticonvulsant activities. This was ...

  18. On Behavioral Equivalence of Rational Representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, Harry L.; Willems, JC; Hara, S; Ohta, Y; Fujioka, H

    2010-01-01

    This article deals with the equivalence of representations of behaviors of linear differential systems In general. the behavior of a given linear differential system has many different representations. In this paper we restrict ourselves to kernel representations and image representations Two kernel

  19. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis , including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning paradigm. After cuttlefish reached the learning criteria, a series of discrimination tasks were conducted. In the visual equivalence experiment, several transformed versions of the training images, such as images reduced in size, images reduced in contrast, sketches of the images, the contours of the images, and silhouettes of the images, were used. In the amodal completion experiment, partially occluded views of the original images were used. The results showed that cuttlefish were able to treat the training images of reduced size and sketches as the visual equivalence. Cuttlefish were also capable of recognizing partially occluded versions of the training image. Furthermore, individual differences in performance suggest that some cuttlefish may be able to recognize objects when visual information was partly removed. These findings support the hypothesis that the visual perception of cuttlefish involves both visual equivalence and amodal completion. The results from this research also provide insights into the visual processing mechanisms used by cephalopods.

  20. Possibility and necessity measures and integral equivalence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, T.; Mesiar, Radko; Li, J.; Stupňanová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 1 (2017), s. 62-72 ISSN 0888-613X Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Integral equivalence * Necessity measure * Possibility measure * Survival function * Universal integral Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0477092.pdf

  1. Fuel Cell Equivalent Electric Circuit Parameter Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    In this work a simple model for a fuel cell is investigated for diagnostic purpose. The fuel cell is characterized, with respect to the electrical impedance of the fuel cell at non-faulty conditions and under variations in load current. Based on this the equivalent electrical circuit parameters can...

  2. Weak equivalence classes of complex vector bundles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van

    LXXVII, č. 1 (2008), s. 23-30 ISSN 0862-9544 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : chern classes * complex Grassmannians weak equivalence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  3. Violation of Equivalence Principle and Solar Neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gago, A.M.; Nunokawa, H.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.

    2001-01-01

    We have updated the analysis for the solution to the solar neutrino problem by the long-wavelength neutrino oscillations induced by a tiny breakdown of the weak equivalence principle of general relativity, and obtained a very good fit to all the solar neutrino data

  4. Bilingual Dictionaries and Communicative Equivalence for a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This implies that a bilingual dictionary becomes a poly functional instrument, presenting more information than just translation equivalents. ... With the emphasis on the user perspective, metalexicographical criteria are used to investigate problems regarding the access structure and the addressing procedures in Afrikaans ...

  5. Equivalent operator preconditioning for elliptic problems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Axelsson, Owe; Karátson, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2009), s. 297-380 ISSN 1017-1398 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Elliptic problem * Conjugate gradient method * preconditioning * equivalent operators * compact operators Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.716, year: 2009 http://en.scientificcommons.org/42514649

  6. Superstring field theory equivalence: Ramond sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroyter, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We prove that the finite gauge transformation of the Ramond sector of the modified cubic superstring field theory is ill-defined due to collisions of picture changing operators. Despite this problem we study to what extent could a bijective classical correspondence between this theory and the (presumably consistent) non-polynomial theory exist. We find that the classical equivalence between these two theories can almost be extended to the Ramond sector: We construct mappings between the string fields (NS and Ramond, including Chan-Paton factors and the various GSO sectors) of the two theories that send solutions to solutions in a way that respects the linearized gauge symmetries in both sides and keeps the action of the solutions invariant. The perturbative spectrum around equivalent solutions is also isomorphic. The problem with the cubic theory implies that the correspondence of the linearized gauge symmetries cannot be extended to a correspondence of the finite gauge symmetries. Hence, our equivalence is only formal, since it relates a consistent theory to an inconsistent one. Nonetheless, we believe that the fact that the equivalence formally works suggests that a consistent modification of the cubic theory exists. We construct a theory that can be considered as a first step towards a consistent RNS cubic theory.

  7. Equivalence Scales for the Former West Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlier, E.

    1997-01-01

    Equivalence scales provide answers to questions like how much a household with four children needs to spend compared to a household with two children or how much a childless couple needs to spend compared to a single person household to attain the same welfare level. These are important questions

  8. Confluence Modulo Equivalence in Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Kirkeby, Maja Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Previous results on confluence for Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, are generalized to take into account user-defined state equivalence relations. This allows a much larger class of programs to enjoy the ad- vantages of confluence, which include various optimization techniques and simplified...

  9. Equivalence of rational representations of behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottimukkala, Sasanka; Fiaz, Shaik; Trentelman, H.L.

    This article deals with the equivalence of representations of behaviors of linear differential systems. In general, the behavior of a given linear differential system has many different representations. In this paper we restrict ourselves to kernel and image representations. Two kernel

  10. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Dezhong; He Bin

    2003-01-01

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping

  11. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  12. XRD, lead equivalent and UV-VIS properties study of Ce and Pr lead silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alias, Nor Hayati; Abdullah, Wan Shafie Wan; Isa, Norriza Mohd; Isa, Muhammad Jamal Md; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Abdullah, Nuhaslinda Ee; Muhammad, Azali

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Cerium (Ce) and Praseodymium (Pr) containing lead silicate glasses were produced with 2 different molar ratios low (0.2 wt%) and high (0.4wt%). These types of glasses can satisfy the characteristics required for radiation shielding glasses and minimize the lead composition in glass. The radiation shielding properties of the synthesized glasses is explained in the form of lead equivalent study. The XRD diffraction and UV-VIS analysis were performed to observe the structural changes of the synthesis glasses at 1.5 Gy gamma radiation exposures

  13. The Scaled SLW model of gas radiation in non-uniform media based on Planck-weighted moments of gas absorption cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovjov, Vladimir P.; Andre, Frederic; Lemonnier, Denis; Webb, Brent W.

    2018-02-01

    The Scaled SLW model for prediction of radiation transfer in non-uniform gaseous media is presented. The paper considers a new approach for construction of a Scaled SLW model. In order to maintain the SLW method as a simple and computationally efficient engineering method special attention is paid to explicit non-iterative methods of calculation of the scaling coefficient. The moments of gas absorption cross-section weighted by the Planck blackbody emissive power (in particular, the first moment - Planck mean, and first inverse moment - Rosseland mean) are used as the total characteristics of the absorption spectrum to be preserved by scaling. Generalized SLW modelling using these moments including both discrete gray gases and the continuous formulation is presented. Application of line-by-line look-up table for corresponding ALBDF and inverse ALBDF distribution functions (such that no solution of implicit equations is needed) ensures that the method is flexible and efficient. Predictions for radiative transfer using the Scaled SLW model are compared to line-by-line benchmark solutions, and predictions using the Rank Correlated SLW model and SLW Reference Approach. Conclusions and recommendations regarding application of the Scaled SLW model are made.

  14. Design Of Load-klystron Equivalent For Jlc

    CERN Document Server

    Grishanov, B I

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a design of a resistive load - an equivalent of a klystron for the Japan Linear Collider JLC is described. The load should operate in a pulse mode at high voltage and high averege power. Different design variants were considered. The choice in favour of ceramic bulk resistor with longitudinal conductivity was done. A caloric and hydraulic calculation was executed. A mesurements of ceramics thermal conductivity of the bulk resistor and of a single radiator produced warmth remooval were done. Unfortunataly the last events on JLC forbad us to realys the project "in metall". But authours houp that this design experience could be usefull for another accelerating centers. The load can find an application as a absorbing resistor in high voltage schemes.

  15. Effects of UV irradiation on a living skin equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D; Gay, R J [Organogenesis Incorporated, Camton, MA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Living Skin Equivalent is an organotypic coculture composed of human dermal fibroblasts interspersed in a collagen-containing matrix and overlaid with human keratinocytes forming a stratified epidermis. The LSE has a dry, air-exposed epidermal surface suitable for the application of oils, creams and emulsions. The protective effects of an 8% homosylate standard and of five UV-A sunscreens, topically applied to the LSE, were determined and compared with their reported protection factors in human skin. Morphological changes and the release of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-1-''alpha, tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] and prostaglandin E2) implicated in UV-induced erythema were also demonstrated in the LSE exposed to UV-A or UV-B. The data suggest that the LSE can be used for studying the effects of UV radiation on skin and may have utility for assessing the efficacy of certain sunscreens against UV-B and UV-A. (Author).

  16. Effects of UV irradiation on a living skin equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.; Gay, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Living Skin Equivalent is an organotypic coculture composed of human dermal fibroblasts interspersed in a collagen-containing matrix and overlaid with human keratinocytes forming a stratified epidermis. The LSE has a dry, air-exposed epidermal surface suitable for the application of oils, creams and emulsions. The protective effects of an 8% homosylate standard and of five UV-A sunscreens, topically applied to the LSE, were determined and compared with their reported protection factors in human skin. Morphological changes and the release of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-1-''alpha, tumor necrosis factor-α and prostaglandin E2) implicated in UV-induced erythema were also demonstrated in the LSE exposed to UV-A or UV-B. The data suggest that the LSE can be used for studying the effects of UV radiation on skin and may have utility for assessing the efficacy of certain sunscreens against UV-B and UV-A. (Author)

  17. Radiation shielding curtain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, N.T.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation shield is described in the form of a stranded curtain made up of bead-chains whose material and geometry are selected to produce a cross-sectional density that is the equivalent of 0.25 mm or more of lead and which curtain may be mounted on various radiological devices to shield against scattered radiation while offering a minimum of obstruction to the radiologist

  18. On the equivalence of GPD representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Dieter; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenological representations of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) implementing the non-trivial field theoretical requirements are employed in the present day strategies for extracting of hadron structure information encoded in GPDs from the observables of hard exclusive reactions. Showing out the equivalence of various GPD representations can help to get more insight into GPD properties and allow to build up flexible GPD models capable of satisfactory description of the whole set of available experimental data. Below we review the mathematical aspects of establishing equivalence between the the double partial wave expansion of GPDs in the conformal partial waves and in the t-channel SO(3) partial waves and the double distribution representation of GPDs

  19. Developing equivalent circuits for radial distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Ricardo; Coelho, Agnelo; Rodrigues, Anselmo [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering], Emails: prada@ele.puc-rio.br, agnelo@ele.puc-rio.br, nebulok_99@yahoo.com; Silva, Maria da Guia da [Federal University of Maranhao, Sao Luiz, MA (Brazil). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method for evaluating External Equivalent in Electric Distribution Networks (EDN).The proposed method has as its main objectives the reduction of the computational costs in distribution network reconfiguration, investigation of the optimal allocation of banks of capacitors, investigation of the allocation of distributed generation, etc. In these sorts of problems a large number of alternative projects must be assessed in order to identify the optimal solution. The optimal solution comes up with the voltage level in the load points within specified limits. Consequently, the EDN must retain the external network load points but without major increasing in the dimension of the equivalent circuit. The proposed method has been tested and validated in a substation of the Electricity Utility of Maranhao - CEMAR, in Brazil. (author)

  20. Thevenin Equivalent Method for Dynamic Contingency Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jakob Glarbo; Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Østergaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A method that exploits Thevenin equivalent representation for obtaining post-contingency steady-state nodal voltages is integrated with a method of detecting post-contingency aperiodic small-signal instability. The task of integrating stability assessment with contingency assessment is challenged...... by the cases of unstable post-contingency conditions. For unstable postcontingency conditions there exists no credible steady-state which can be used for basis of a stability assessment. This paper demonstrates how Thevenin Equivalent methods can be applied in algebraic representation of such bifurcation...... points which may be used in assessment of post-contingency aperiodic small-signal stability. The assessment method is introduced with a numeric example....

  1. The Logic of Equivalence in Academic Discourse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    of discourse to distinguish between the scientific field, where interrelationships among academic disciplines are taken as an object of research, and the widespread uses of ‘interdisciplinary’ and ‘interdisciplinarity’ in academic discourse more generally, typically for legitimation purposes. The assumption......-discourses meet. It is suggested that the logics of signification, and the tension between difference and equivalence, may be important tools for theorizing this borderland. It is argued that whereas the logic of equivalence and the production of empty signifiers appears to be of marginal interest...... to the scientific field, the logic of difference as a more complex articulation of elements, seems to be more in line with the ideals of academic discourse....

  2. On equivalent resistance of electrical circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    While the standard (introductory physics) way of computing the equivalent resistance of nontrivial electrical circuits is based on Kirchhoff's rules, there is a mathematically and conceptually simpler approach, called the method of nodal potentials, whose basic variables are the values of the electric potential at the circuit's nodes. In this paper, we review the method of nodal potentials and illustrate it using the Wheatstone bridge as an example. We then derive a closed-form expression for the equivalent resistance of a generic circuit, which we apply to a few sample circuits. The result unveils a curious interplay between electrical circuits, matrix algebra, and graph theory and its applications to computer science. The paper is written at a level accessible by undergraduate students who are familiar with matrix arithmetic. Additional proofs and technical details are provided in appendices.

  3. Symmetry adaptation, operator equivalents and magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.; Chatterjee, R.

    1977-12-01

    Basic quantities for symmetry adaptation are discussed in connection with molecular and solid state physics. This gives rise to a formalism whose the central elements are operator equivalents adapted to a point group. Such symmetry adapted operator equivalents are defined in terms of Schwinger operators so that they cover the off-diagonal and diagonal cases. Special emphasis is put on the applications of the formalism to magnetic resonance. More specifically, it is shown how to apply the formalism to the construction, the study of the transformation properties, and the determination of the eigenstates of a generalized spin hamiltonian. Numerous examples are given as well as key tables relative to the chain SO(3) for making easy the application of the formalism to electron paramagnetic resonance [fr

  4. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Ji Feng, E-mail: wjfcom2000@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Graduate School of China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China); Key Laboratory of Laser Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Chang, Yan; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Key Laboratory of Laser Science and Technology, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Sun, Li Qun [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%).

  5. Radiation hazard control report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Hisanaga, Saemi; Miki, Ryota; Kawai, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yutaka; Sone, Koji; Okada, Hirokazu

    1990-01-01

    The report describes the radiation hazard control activities performed at the Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University, Japan, during the one-year period from April 1989 to March 1990. Personal radiation hazard control is outlined first focusing on results of physical examination and data of personal exposure dose equivalent. Radiation control in laboratory is then described. Dose equivalent at various places is discussed on the basis of monthly total dose equivalent measured on film badges, measurements made by TLD, and observations made through a continuous radiations monitoring system. The concentration of radiations in air and water is discussed focusing on their measured concentrations in air at the air outlets of tracer/accelerator facilities, and radioactivity in waste water sampled in the reactor facilities and tracer/accelerator facilities. Another discussion is made on the surface contamination density over the floors, draft systems, sink surface, etc. Concerning outdoor radiation hazard control, furthermore, TLD measurements of environmental gamma-rays, data on total gamma-ray radioactivity in environmental samples, and analysis of gamma-ray emitting nuclides in environmental samples are described and discussed. (N.K.)

  6. A Logical Characterisation of Static Equivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Pedersen, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    -order logic for frames with quantification over environment knowledge which, under certain general conditions, characterizes static equivalence and is amenable to construction of characteristic formulae. The logic can be used to reason about environment knowledge and can be adapted to a particular application...... by defining a suitable signature and associated equational theory. The logic can furthermore be extended with modalities to yield a modal logic for e.g. the Applied Pi calculus....

  7. Global equivalent magnetization of the oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Lesur, V.; Thebault, E.

    2015-11-01

    As a by-product of the construction of a new World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map over oceanic areas, we use an original approach based on the global forward modeling of seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies and their comparison to the available marine magnetic data to derive the first map of the equivalent magnetization over the World's ocean. This map reveals consistent patterns related to the age of the oceanic lithosphere, the spreading rate at which it was formed, and the presence of mantle thermal anomalies which affects seafloor spreading and the resulting lithosphere. As for the age, the equivalent magnetization decreases significantly during the first 10-15 Myr after its formation, probably due to the alteration of crustal magnetic minerals under pervasive hydrothermal alteration, then increases regularly between 20 and 70 Ma, reflecting variations in the field strength or source effects such as the acquisition of a secondary magnetization. As for the spreading rate, the equivalent magnetization is twice as strong in areas formed at fast rate than in those formed at slow rate, with a threshold at ∼40 km/Myr, in agreement with an independent global analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25. This result, combined with those from the study of the anomalous skewness of marine magnetic anomalies, allows building a unified model for the magnetic structure of normal oceanic lithosphere as a function of spreading rate. Finally, specific areas affected by thermal mantle anomalies at the time of their formation exhibit peculiar equivalent magnetization signatures, such as the cold Australian-Antarctic Discordance, marked by a lower magnetization, and several hotspots, marked by a high magnetization.

  8. Visual Equivalence and Amodal Completion in Cuttlefish

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, I-Rong; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Modern cephalopods are notably the most intelligent invertebrates and this is accompanied by keen vision. Despite extensive studies investigating the visual systems of cephalopods, little is known about their visual perception and object recognition. In the present study, we investigated the visual processing of the cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis, including visual equivalence and amodal completion. Cuttlefish were trained to discriminate images of shrimp and fish using the operant conditioning pa...

  9. Canonizing certain Borel equivalences for Silver forcing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doucha, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 13 (2012), s. 2973-2979 ISSN 0166-8641. [Prague Symposium on General Topology and its Relations to Modern Analysis and Algebra /11./. Prague, 07.08.2011-12.08.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Borel equivalence relations * silver ideal * canonical Ramsey theorem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.562, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166864112002180#

  10. Quantum mechanics from an equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    The authors show that requiring diffeomorphic equivalence for one-dimensional stationary states implies that the reduced action S 0 satisfies the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the Planck constant playing the role of a covariantizing parameter. The construction shows the existence of a fundamental initial condition which is strictly related to the Moebius symmetry of the Legendre transform and to its involutive character. The universal nature of the initial condition implies the Schroedinger equation in any dimension

  11. Equivalency of two-dimensional algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Gildemar Carneiro dos; Pomponet Filho, Balbino Jose S.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Let us consider a vector z = xi + yj over the field of real numbers, whose basis (i,j) satisfy a given algebra. Any property of this algebra will be reflected in any function of z, so we can state that the knowledge of the properties of an algebra leads to more general conclusions than the knowledge of the properties of a function. However structural properties of an algebra do not change when this algebra suffers a linear transformation, though the structural constants defining this algebra do change. We say that two algebras are equivalent to each other whenever they are related by a linear transformation. In this case, we have found that some relations between the structural constants are sufficient to recognize whether or not an algebra is equivalent to another. In spite that the basis transform linearly, the structural constants change like a third order tensor, but some combinations of these tensors result in a linear transformation, allowing to write the entries of the transformation matrix as function of the structural constants. Eventually, a systematic way to find the transformation matrix between these equivalent algebras is obtained. In this sense, we have performed the thorough classification of associative commutative two-dimensional algebras, and find that even non-division algebra may be helpful in solving non-linear dynamic systems. The Mandelbrot set was used to have a pictorial view of each algebra, since equivalent algebras result in the same pattern. Presently we have succeeded in classifying some non-associative two-dimensional algebras, a task more difficult than for associative one. (author)

  12. Cryogenic test of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worden, P.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The weak equivalence principle is the hypothesis that the ratio of internal and passive gravitational mass is the same for all bodies. A greatly improved test of this principle is possible in an orbiting satellite. The most promising experiments for an orbital test are adaptations of the Galilean free-fall experiment and the Eotvos balance. Sensitivity to gravity gradient noise, both from the earth and from the spacecraft, defines a limit to the sensitivity in each case. This limit is generally much worse for an Eotvos balance than for a properly designed free-fall experiment. The difference is related to the difficulty of making a balance sufficiently isoinertial. Cryogenic technology is desirable to take full advantage of the potential sensitivity, but tides in the liquid helium refrigerant may produce a gravity gradient that seriously degrades the ultimate sensitivity. The Eotvos balance appears to have a limiting sensitivity to relative difference of rate of fall of about 2 x 10 -14 in orbit. The free-fall experiment is limited by helium tide to about 10 -15 ; if the tide can be controlled or eliminated the limit may approach 10 -18 . Other limitations to equivalence principle experiments are discussed. An experimental test of some of the concepts involved in the orbital free-fall experiment is continuing. The experiment consists in comparing the motions of test masses levitated in a superconducting magnetic bearing, and is itself a sensitive test of the equivalence principle. At present the levitation magnets, position monitors and control coils have been tested and major noise sources identified. A measurement of the equivalence principle is postponed pending development of a system for digitizing data. The experiment and preliminary results are described

  13. Equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian BRST quantizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, G.V.; Grigoryan, R.P.; Tyutin, I.V.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches to the quantization of gauge theories using BRST symmetry are widely used nowadays: the Lagrangian quantization, developed in (BV-quantization) and Hamiltonian quantization, formulated in (BFV-quantization). For all known examples of field theory (Yang-Mills theory, gravitation etc.) both schemes give equivalent results. However the equivalence of these approaches in general wasn't proved. The main obstacle in comparing of these formulations consists in the fact, that in Hamiltonian approach the number of ghost fields is equal to the number of all first-class constraints, while in the Lagrangian approach the number of ghosts is equal to the number of independent gauge symmetries, which is equal to the number of primary first-class constraints only. This paper is devoted to the proof of the equivalence of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian quantizations for the systems with first-class constraints only. This is achieved by a choice of special gauge in the Hamiltonian approach. It's shown, that after integration over redundant variables on the functional integral we come to effective action which is constructed according to rules for construction of the effective action in Lagrangian quantization scheme

  14. Energy conservation and the principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugan, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    If the equivalence principle is violated, then observers performing local experiments can detect effects due to their position in an external gravitational environment (preferred-location effects) or can detect effects due to their velocity through some preferred frame (preferred frame effects). We show that the principle of energy conservation implies a quantitative connection between such effects and structure-dependence of the gravitational acceleration of test bodies (violation of the Weak Equivalence Principle). We analyze this connection within a general theoretical framework that encompasses both non-gravitational local experiments and test bodies as well as gravitational experiments and test bodies, and we use it to discuss specific experimental tests of the equivalence principle, including non-gravitational tests such as gravitational redshift experiments, Eoetvoes experiments, the Hughes-Drever experiment, and the Turner-Hill experiment, and gravitational tests such as the lunar-laser-ranging ''Eoetvoes'' experiment, and measurements of anisotropies and variations in the gravitational constant. This framework is illustrated by analyses within two theoretical formalisms for studying gravitational theories: the PPN formalism, which deals with the motion of gravitating bodies within metric theories of gravity, and the THepsilonμ formalism that deals with the motion of charged particles within all metric theories and a broad class of non-metric theories of gravity

  15. Rotating model for the equivalence principle paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, D.C.

    1975-01-01

    An idealized system is described in which two inertial frames rotate relative to one another. When a (scalar) dipole is locally at rest in one frame, a paradox arises as to whether or not it will radiate. Fluxes of energy and angular momentum and the time development of the system are discussed. Resolution of the paradox involves several unusual features, including (i) radiation by an unmoving charge, an effect discussed by Chitre, Price, and Sandberg, (ii) different power seen by relatively accelerated inertial observers, and (iii) radiation reaction due to gravitational backscattering of radiation, in agreement with the work of C. and B. DeWitt. These results are obtained, for the most part, without the complications of curved space--time

  16. Gauge equivalence of the Gross Pitaevskii equation and the equivalent Heisenberg spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, R.; Kumar, V. Ramesh

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we construct an equivalent spin chain for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with quadratic potential and exponentially varying scattering lengths using gauge equivalence. We have then generated the soliton solutions for the spin components S3 and S-. We find that the spin solitons for S3 and S- can be compressed for exponentially growing eigenvalues while they broaden out for decaying eigenvalues.

  17. Equivalent models of wind farms by using aggregated wind turbines and equivalent winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L.M.; Garcia, C.A.; Saenz, J.R.; Jurado, F.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the increasing wind farms penetration on power systems, the wind farms begin to influence power system, and therefore the modeling of wind farms has become an interesting research topic. In this paper, new equivalent models of wind farms equipped with wind turbines based on squirrel-cage induction generators and doubly-fed induction generators are proposed to represent the collective behavior on large power systems simulations, instead of using a complete model of wind farms where all the wind turbines are modeled. The models proposed here are based on aggregating wind turbines into an equivalent wind turbine which receives an equivalent wind of the ones incident on the aggregated wind turbines. The equivalent wind turbine presents re-scaled power capacity and the same complete model as the individual wind turbines, which supposes the main feature of the present equivalent models. Two equivalent winds are evaluated in this work: (1) the average wind from the ones incident on the aggregated wind turbines with similar winds, and (2) an equivalent incoming wind derived from the power curve and the wind incident on each wind turbine. The effectiveness of the equivalent models to represent the collective response of the wind farm at the point of common coupling to grid is demonstrated by comparison with the wind farm response obtained from the detailed model during power system dynamic simulations, such as wind fluctuations and a grid disturbance. The present models can be used for grid integration studies of large power system with an important reduction of the model order and the computation time

  18. Radiation protection glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, Ibrahim; Abdul-Rahim, Maha

    1989-12-01

    This glossary contains the arabic equivalent of all the terms included in the IAEA Safety Series No.76 (which is a selected basic terms used in IAEA publications), thus this glossary contains English, French, Spanish, Russian, and Arabic. It is intended to facilitate the work of arabic speaking scientists involved in the field of radiation protection

  19. Basic ionizing radiation symbol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of the standard symbol for ionizing radiation and of the conditions under which it should not be used. The Arabic equivalent of some English technical terms in this subject is given in one page. 1 ref., 1 fig

  20. Radiation unit and quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed: Radioactivity, Exposure, Absorbed Dose, Equivalent Dose, Dose Limits: Dose Limits for Radiation Workers, Dose Limits for Member of the public, Dose Limit for Apprentice and Students, Dose Limits in Special Circumstances, Dose Limits for Pregnant Workers

  1. Nighttime Infrared radiative cooling and opacity inferred by REMS Ground Temperature Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Torres, Javier; Paz Zorzano, María; Pla-García, Jorge; Rafkin, Scot; Lepinette, Alain; Sebastián, Eduardo; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    Due to the low density of the Martian atmosphere, the temperature of the surface is controlled primarily by solar heating, and infrared cooling to the atmosphere and space, rather than heat exchange with the atmosphere. In the absence of solar radiation the infrared (IR) cooling, and then the nighttime surface temperatures, are directly controlled by soil termal inertia and atmospheric optical thickness (τ) at infrared wavelengths. Under non-wind conditions, and assuming no processes involving latent heat changes in the surface, for a particular site where the rover stands the main parameter controlling the IR cooling will be τ. The minimal ground temperature values at a fixed position may thus be used to detect local variations in the total dust/aerosols/cloud tickness. The Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS) and Air Temperature Sensor (ATS) in the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover provides hourly ground and air temperature measurements respectively. During the first 100 sols of operation of the rover, within the area of low thermal inertia, the minimal nightime ground temperatures reached values between 180 K and 190 K. For this season the expected frost point temperature is 200 K. Variations of up to 10 K have been observed associated with dust loading at Gale at the onset of the dust season. We will use these measurements together with line-by-line radiative transfer simulations using the Full Transfer By Optimized LINe-by-line (FUTBOLIN) code [Martín-Torres and Mlynczak, 2005] to estimate the IR atmospheric opacity and then dust/cloud coverage over the rover during the course of the MSL mission. Monitoring the dust loading and IR nightime cooling evolution during the dust season will allow for a better understanding of the influence of the atmosphere on the ground temperature and provide ground truth to models and orbiter measurements. References Martín-Torres, F. J. and M. G. Mlynczak

  2. Water-equivalent plastic scintillation detectors for radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddar, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Plastic scintillation dosimetry is a promising new method of measuring absorbed dose for high energy radiotherapy beams. The theory behind this concept will be presented along with the many advantages that it offers over conventional dosimetry. A variety of plastic scintillation detector systems have been recently developed for photon and electron dosimetry. These new water-equivalent detectors use small to miniature plastic scintillators. Their attractive feature lies in their use for field mapping in water, particularly for small fields, high dose gradient regions, and near inhomogeneous interfaces, or for in-vivo insertions. The physical characteristics and the dosimetric properties of these scintillators will be presented, discussed, and compared to the commonly used detectors in radiation dosimetry. The system first used successfully for multi-purpose radiotherapy field mapping, as well as other systems, will be described. The technical challenges of the design of these detectors including the optical coupling to small fibers will be discussed. One of the limitations, at the present time, is the radiation-induced light produced in the optical fibers that are used to transmit the signal to the photodetectors. The mechanisms of these spurious effects will be identified and discussed with emphasis on signal-to-noise improvements

  3. A passive and active microwave-vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Min, Qilong

    2015-01-01

    A passive and active microwave vector radiative transfer (PAM-VRT) package has been developed. This fast and accurate forward microwave model, with flexible and versatile input and output components, self-consistently and realistically simulates measurements/radiation of passive and active microwave sensors. The core PAM-VRT, microwave radiative transfer model, consists of five modules: gas absorption (two line-by-line databases and four fast models); hydrometeor property of water droplets and ice (spherical and nonspherical) particles; surface emissivity (from Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM)); vector radiative transfer of successive order of scattering (VSOS); and passive and active microwave simulation. The PAM-VRT package has been validated against other existing models, demonstrating good accuracy. The PAM-VRT not only can be used to simulate or assimilate measurements of existing microwave sensors, but also can be used to simulate observation results at some new microwave sensors. - Highlights: • A novel microwave vector radiative transfer model is developed. • It can simulate passive and active microwave radiative transfer simultaneously. • It can be applied to simulate measurements for different types of viewing geometry. • The accuracy of this model has been validated against other existing models

  4. The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure: A predictive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiangmeng; Wei, Kai; He, Rujie; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A predictive model of the equivalent thermal conductivity was established. • Both the heat conduction and radiation were considered. • The predictive results were in good agreement with experiment and FEM. • Some methods for improving the thermal protection performance were proposed. - Abstract: The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure was predicted using a novel model. The predictive results were in good agreement with experimental and Finite Element Method results. The thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure was attributed to both core conduction and radiation. The core conduction caused thermal conductivity only relied on the relative density of the structure. And the radiation caused thermal conductivity increased linearly with the thickness of the core. It was found that the equivalent thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure showed a highly dependent relationship on temperature. At low temperatures, the structure exhibited a nearly thermal insulated behavior. With the temperature increasing, the thermal conductivity of the structure increased owing to radiation. Therefore, some attempts, such as reducing the emissivity of the core or designing multilayered structure, are believe to be of benefit for improving the thermal protection performance of the structure at high temperatures.

  5. Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, Hp(d)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantuzzi, E.

    2001-01-01

    The institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA - Bologna has organised a one day-workshop on the subject: Individual monitoring of external exposure in terms of personal dose equivalent, H p (d). The aim of the workshop was the discussion of the new implications and modifications to be expected in the routine individual monitoring of external radiation, due to the issue of the Decree 241/00 (G.U. 31/8/2000) in charge since 01/01/2001. The decree set up in Italian law the standards contained in the European Directive EURATOM 96/29-Basic Standards for the Protection of Health of Workers and the General Public against Dangers arising from Ionizing Radiation. Among others, the definition of the operational quantities for external radiation for personal and environmental monitoring, H p (d) e H * (d) respectively as defined by ICRU (International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurements), requires to update the methods of measurements and calibration of the personal dosemeters and environmental monitors. This report collects the papers presented at the workshop dealing with the Personal Dose Equivalent, H p (d), the conversion coefficients, H p (d)/K a e H p (d)/ , obtained through Monte Carlo calculations published by ICRU and ICRP (International Commission for Radiation Protection), the new calibration procedures and the practical implication in the routine of individual monitoring in terms of H p (d). Eventually, in the last chapter, the answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) are briefly reported [it

  6. The use of the effective dose equivalent, Hsub(E), as a risk parameter in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Sandison, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    This note employs the concept of the effective dose equivalent, Hsub(E) to overcome the problems of comparing the non-uniform radiation doses encountered in CT examinations with the whole-body dose-equivalent limits imposed for non-medical exposures for members of the public (5 mSv/year), or with the risks from familiar everyday activities such as smoking cigarettes or driving cars. (U.K.)

  7. Generating carbyne equivalents with photoredox catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaofeng; Herraiz, Ana G.; Del Hoyo, Ana M.; Suero, Marcos G.

    2018-02-01

    Carbon has the unique ability to bind four atoms and form stable tetravalent structures that are prevalent in nature. The lack of one or two valences leads to a set of species—carbocations, carbanions, radicals and carbenes—that is fundamental to our understanding of chemical reactivity. In contrast, the carbyne—a monovalent carbon with three non-bonded electrons—is a relatively unexplored reactive intermediate; the design of reactions involving a carbyne is limited by challenges associated with controlling its extreme reactivity and the lack of efficient sources. Given the innate ability of carbynes to form three new covalent bonds sequentially, we anticipated that a catalytic method of generating carbynes or related stabilized species would allow what we term an ‘assembly point’ disconnection approach for the construction of chiral centres. Here we describe a catalytic strategy that generates diazomethyl radicals as direct equivalents of carbyne species using visible-light photoredox catalysis. The ability of these carbyne equivalents to induce site-selective carbon-hydrogen bond cleavage in aromatic rings enables a useful diazomethylation reaction, which underpins sequencing control for the late-stage assembly-point functionalization of medically relevant agents. Our strategy provides an efficient route to libraries of potentially bioactive molecules through the installation of tailored chiral centres at carbon-hydrogen bonds, while complementing current translational late-stage functionalization processes. Furthermore, we exploit the dual radical and carbene character of the generated carbyne equivalent in the direct transformation of abundant chemical feedstocks into valuable chiral molecules.

  8. Equivalent conserved currents and generalized Noether's theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized Noether theorem is presented, relating symmetries and equivalence classes of local) conservation laws in classical field theories; this is contrasted with the standard theorem. The concept of a ''Noether'' field theory is introduced, being a theory for which the generalized theorem applies; not only does this include the cases of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian field theories, these structures are ''derived'' from the Noether property in a natural way. The generalized theorem applies to currents and symmetries that contain derivatives of the fields up to an arbitrarily high order

  9. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  10. European Equivalencies in Legal Interpreting and Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsellis, Ann; Hertog, Erik; Martinsen, Bodil

    2002-01-01

    Within Europe there is increasing freedom of movement between countries and increasing inward migration. As a result, equivalent standards of legl interpreting and translation are required to allow reliable communication for judicial cooperation between member states, for criminal and civil matters...... which cross national borders and for the needs of multilingual populations. The European Convention of Human Rights (article 6, paragrph 3) is one of the main planks of relevant legislation. This international, two year project has been funded by the EU Grotius programme to set out what is required...

  11. Testing efficiency transfer codes for equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidmar, T.; Celik, N.; Cornejo Diaz, N.; Dlabac, A.; Ewa, I.O.B.; Carrazana Gonzalez, J.A.; Hult, M.; Jovanovic, S.; Lepy, M.-C.; Mihaljevic, N.; Sima, O.; Tzika, F.; Jurado Vargas, M.; Vasilopoulou, T.; Vidmar, G.

    2010-01-01

    Four general Monte Carlo codes (GEANT3, PENELOPE, MCNP and EGS4) and five dedicated packages for efficiency determination in gamma-ray spectrometry (ANGLE, DETEFF, GESPECOR, ETNA and EFFTRAN) were checked for equivalence by applying them to the calculation of efficiency transfer (ET) factors for a set of well-defined sample parameters, detector parameters and energies typically encountered in environmental radioactivity measurements. The differences between the results of the different codes never exceeded a few percent and were lower than 2% in the majority of cases.

  12. The equivalence principle in a quantum world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. Emil J.; Donoghue, John F.; El-Menoufi, Basem Kamal

    2015-01-01

    the energy is small, we now have the tools to address this conflict explicitly. Despite the violation of some classical concepts, the EP continues to provide the core of the quantum gravity framework through the symmetry - general coordinate invariance - that is used to organize the effective field theory......We show how modern methods can be applied to quantum gravity at low energy. We test how quantum corrections challenge the classical framework behind the equivalence principle (EP), for instance through introduction of nonlocality from quantum physics, embodied in the uncertainty principle. When...

  13. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  14. Money and bonds: an equivalence theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Narayana R. Kocherlakota

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers four models in which immortal agents face idiosyncratic shocks and trade only a single risk-free asset over time. The four models specify this single asset to be private bonds, public bonds, public money, or private money respectively. I prove that, given an equilibrium in one of these economies, it is possible to pick the exogenous elements in the other three economies so that there is an outcome-equivalent equilibrium in each of them. (The term ?exogenous variables? ref...

  15. Gravitational leptogenesis, C, CP and strong equivalence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M. [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-12

    The origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry is one of the most important outstanding problems at the interface of particle physics and cosmology. Gravitational leptogenesis (baryogenesis) provides a possible mechanism through explicit couplings of spacetime curvature to appropriate lepton (or baryon) currents. In this paper, the idea that these strong equivalence principle violating interactions could be generated automatically through quantum loop effects in curved spacetime is explored, focusing on the realisation of the discrete symmetries C, CP and CPT which must be broken to induce matter-antimatter asymmetry. The related issue of quantum corrections to the dispersion relation for neutrino propagation in curved spacetime is considered within a fully covariant framework.

  16. A single-aliquot OSL protocol using bracketing regenerative doses to accurately determine equivalent doses in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folz, Elise; Mercier, Norbert

    1999-01-01

    In most cases, sediments show inherent heterogeneity in their luminescence behaviours and bleaching histories, and identical aliquots are not available: single-aliquot determination of the equivalent dose (ED) is then the approach of choice and the advantages of using regenerative protocols are outlined. Experiments on five laboratory bleached and dosed quartz samples, following the protocol described by Murray and Roberts (1998. Measurement of the equivalent dose in quartz using a regenerative-dose single aliquot protocol. Radiation Measurements 27, 171-184), showed the hazards of using a single regeneration dose: a 10% variation in the regenerative dose yielded some equivalent dose estimates that differed from the expected value by more than 5%. A protocol is proposed that allows the use of different regenerative doses to bracket the estimated equivalent dose. The measured ED is found to be in excellent agreement with the known value when the main regeneration dose is within 10% of the true equivalent dose

  17. A single-aliquot OSL protocol using bracketing regenerative doses to accurately determine equivalent doses in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Folz, E

    1999-01-01

    In most cases, sediments show inherent heterogeneity in their luminescence behaviours and bleaching histories, and identical aliquots are not available: single-aliquot determination of the equivalent dose (ED) is then the approach of choice and the advantages of using regenerative protocols are outlined. Experiments on five laboratory bleached and dosed quartz samples, following the protocol described by Murray and Roberts (1998. Measurement of the equivalent dose in quartz using a regenerative-dose single aliquot protocol. Radiation Measurements 27, 171-184), showed the hazards of using a single regeneration dose: a 10% variation in the regenerative dose yielded some equivalent dose estimates that differed from the expected value by more than 5%. A protocol is proposed that allows the use of different regenerative doses to bracket the estimated equivalent dose. The measured ED is found to be in excellent agreement with the known value when the main regeneration dose is within 10% of the true equivalent dose.

  18. The simulated measurements of area and personal neutron-gamma dose equivalent in the building of HWRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao; Wen Youqin; Su Jingling; Liu Shuying; Liu Nairong

    1988-01-01

    The measuring methods and results for area and personal n-γ dose equivalent in the building of HWRR of Institute of Atomic Energy were reported. The reactor operated 4440 hours during 1985, the average themal power was 11 MW. The average area n-γ dose equivalents of the basement, experimental hall, corridors and laboratories in the building were 12.2, 11.6, 0.45 and 0.23 cSv/a, respectively. The fraction of the neutron dose equivalent in any working area was less than 21%. The average personal n-γ dose equivalent to radiation workers in the building was about 0.49 cSv/a, the γ dose equivalent was a major component. The measuring methods were compared

  19. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam

  20. Integrable topological billiards and equivalent dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedyushkina, V. V.; Fomenko, A. T.

    2017-08-01

    We consider several topological integrable billiards and prove that they are Liouville equivalent to many systems of rigid body dynamics. The proof uses the Fomenko-Zieschang theory of invariants of integrable systems. We study billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics and their generalizations, generalized billiards, where the motion occurs on a locally planar surface obtained by gluing several planar domains isometrically along their boundaries, which are arcs of confocal quadrics. We describe two new classes of integrable billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics, namely, non-compact billiards and generalized billiards obtained by gluing planar billiards along non-convex parts of their boundaries. We completely classify non-compact billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics and study their topology using the Fomenko invariants that describe the bifurcations of singular leaves of the additional integral. We study the topology of isoenergy surfaces for some non-convex generalized billiards. It turns out that they possess exotic Liouville foliations: the integral trajectories of the billiard that lie on some singular leaves admit no continuous extension. Such billiards appear to be leafwise equivalent to billiards bounded by arcs of confocal quadrics in the Minkowski metric.

  1. Twisted conformal field theories and Morita equivalence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marotta, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Compl. universitario M. Sant' Angelo, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Naddeo, Adele [CNISM, Unita di Ricerca di Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Salvador Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Compl. universitario M. Sant' Angelo, Via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)], E-mail: adelenaddeo@yahoo.it

    2009-04-01

    The Morita equivalence for field theories on noncommutative two-tori is analysed in detail for rational values of the noncommutativity parameter {theta} (in appropriate units): an isomorphism is established between an Abelian noncommutative field theory (NCFT) and a non-Abelian theory of twisted fields on ordinary space. We focus on a particular conformal field theory (CFT), the one obtained by means of the m-reduction procedure [V. Marotta, J. Phys. A 26 (1993) 3481; V. Marotta, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 13 (1998) 853; V. Marotta, Nucl. Phys. B 527 (1998) 717; V. Marotta, A. Sciarrino, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 13 (1998) 2863], and show that it is the Morita equivalent of a NCFT. Finally, the whole m-reduction procedure is shown to be the image in the ordinary space of the Morita duality. An application to the physics of a quantum Hall fluid at Jain fillings {nu}=m/(2pm+1) is explicitly discussed in order to further elucidate such a correspondence and to clarify its role in the physics of strongly correlated systems. A new picture emerges, which is very different from the existing relationships between noncommutativity and many body systems [A.P. Polychronakos, arXiv: 0706.1095].

  2. Planck Constant Determination from Power Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Equating mechanical to electrical power links the kilogram, the meter, and the second to the practical realizations of the ohm and the volt derived from the quantum Hall and the Josephson effects, yielding an SI determination of the Planck constant. The NIST watt balance uses this power equivalence principle, and in 1998 measured the Planck constant with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 8.7 x 10-8, the most accurate determination to date. The next generation of the NIST watt balance is now being assembled. Modification to the experimental facilities have been made to reduce the uncertainty components from vibrations and electromagnetic interference. A vacuum chamber has been installed to reduce the uncertainty components associated with performing the experiment in air. Most of the apparatus is in place and diagnostic testing of the balance should begin this year. Once a combined relative standard uncertainty of one part in 10-8 has been reached, the power equivalence principle can be used to monitor the possible drift in the artifact mass standard, the kilogram, and provide an accurate alternative definition of mass in terms of fundamental constants. *Electricity Division, Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. Contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, not subject to copyright in the U.S.

  3. Validation of the community radiative transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shouguo; Yang Ping; Weng Fuzhong; Liu Quanhua; Han Yong; Delst, Paul van; Li Jun; Baum, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    To validate the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) developed by the U.S. Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA), the discrete ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT) model and the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) are combined in order to provide a reference benchmark. Compared with the benchmark, the CRTM appears quite accurate for both clear sky and ice cloud radiance simulations with RMS errors below 0.2 K, except for clouds with small ice particles. In a computer CPU run time comparison, the CRTM is faster than DISORT by approximately two orders of magnitude. Using the operational MODIS cloud products and the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) atmospheric profiles as an input, the CRTM is employed to simulate the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances. The CRTM simulations are shown to be in reasonably close agreement with the AIRS measurements (the discrepancies are within 2 K in terms of brightness temperature difference). Furthermore, the impact of uncertainties in the input cloud properties and atmospheric profiles on the CRTM simulations has been assessed. The CRTM-based brightness temperatures (BTs) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), for both thin (τ 30) clouds, are highly sensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and cloud top pressure. However, for an optically thick cloud, the CRTM-based BTs are not sensitive to the uncertainties of cloud optical thickness, effective particle size, and atmospheric humidity profiles. On the contrary, the uncertainties of the CRTM-based TOA BTs resulting from effective particle size and optical thickness are not negligible in an optically thin cloud.

  4. Equivalent sphere approximations for skin, eye, and blood-forming organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxson, W.L.; Townsend, L.W.; Bier, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the manned spaceflight program, protecting astronauts from space radiation has been the subject of intense study. For interplanetary crews, two main sources of radiation hazards are solar particle events (SPEs) and galactic cosmic rays. For nearly three decades, crew doses and related shielding requirements have been assessed using the assumption that body organ exposures are well approximated by exposures at the center of tissue-equivalent spheres. For the skin and for blood-forming organs (BFOs), these spheres have radii of 0 and 5 cm, respectively. Recent studies indicate that significant overestimation of organ doses occurs if these models are used instead of realistic human geometry models. The use of the latter, however, requires much longer computational times. In this work, the authors propose preliminary revisions to these equivalent sphere approximations that yield more realistic dose estimates

  5. Using the BERT concept to promote public understanding of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Cameron, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation phobia can be greatly decreased if the simple BERT (Background Equivalent Radiation Time) concept is used to explain the dose to all diagnostic radiology patients. It converts the radiation dose to an equivalent period of natural background radiation. It is understandable, it does not mention risk, and it educates the patient that human-made radiation is the same as the background radiation which gives them most of their annual dose. Medical physicists should provide each clinical x-ray unit with a table that gives the BERT value for various procedures and patient sizes and educate the radiologists and radiographers how to use the BERT approach for relieving radiation anxiety. (author)

  6. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Edvan V. de; Oliveira, Alex C.H. de; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials

  7. Americium-241 use of measurement lead equivalent thickness for medical x-ray room: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Husaini Saleh; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Mohd Firdaus Abd Rahman; Zainal Jamaluddin

    2010-01-01

    Lead equivalent thickness measurement of a shielding material in diagnostic radiology is very important to ensure that requirements for the purpose of radiation protection of patients, employees and the public are met. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH) has established that the irradiation room must have sufficient shielding thickness, for example for general radiography it must be at least equal to 2.0 mm of Pb, for panoramic dental radiography at least equal to 1.5 mm of Pb and for mammography should be a minimum of 1.0 mm of Pb. This paper presents a technique using americium-241 source to test and verify the integrity of the shielding thickness in term of lead equivalent for X-ray room at health centres. Results of measurement of 30 irradiation rooms conducted from 2009 to mid 2010 were analyzed for this presentation. Technical comparison of the attenuation of gamma rays from Am-241 source through the walls of the irradiation room and pieces of lead were used to assess the lead equivalent thickness of the walls. Results showed that 96.7 % of the irradiation rooms tested meet the requirements of the Ministry of Health and is suitable for the installation of the intended diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Some specific positions such as door knobs and locks, electrical plug sockets were identified with potential to not met the required lead equivalent thickness hence may contribute to higher radiation exposure to workers and the public. (author)

  8. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies.

  9. Radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  10. Hazards of cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet-Bidaud, J.M.; Dzitko, H.

    2000-06-01

    The main limitations on long-distance space transport is neither the energy source nor the propulsion system but appears to be the protection of cosmonauts from radiation. Cosmic radiation is made up of protons (87%), alpha particles (12%) and heavy nuclei (1%), all these particles travel through interstellar space and come from the explosion of stars at the end of their life. The earth is protected from cosmic radiation by 3 natural shields: i) the magnetic field generated by the solar wind, ii) the earth magnetic field (magnetosphere), and iii) the earth atmosphere, this elusive layer of air is equivalent to a 10 meter-high volume of water. Magnetosphere and atmosphere reduce the radiation dose by a factor 4000. According to a European directive (1996) air crews must be considered as radiation workers. (A.C.)

  11. A study of the responses of neutron dose equivalent survey meters with computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, D.E.; Beer, G.P. de

    1983-01-01

    The ANISN and DOT discrete-ordinates radiation transport codes for one and two dimensions have been proved as effective and simple techniques to study the response of dose equivalent neutron detectors. Comparisons between results of an experimental calibration of the Harwell 95/0075 survey meter and calculated results rendered satisfactory agreement, considering the different techniques and sources of error involved. Possible improvements in the methods and designs and causes of error are discussed. (author)

  12. Borel equivalence relations structure and classification

    CERN Document Server

    Kanovei, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, the theory of Borel equivalence relations and related topics have been very active areas of research in set theory and have important interactions with other fields of mathematics, like ergodic theory and topological dynamics, group theory, combinatorics, functional analysis, and model theory. The book presents, for the first time in mathematical literature, all major aspects of this theory and its applications. This book should be of interest to a wide spectrum of mathematicians working in set theory as well as the other areas mentioned. It provides a systematic exposition of results that so far have been only available in journals or are even unpublished. The book presents unified and in some cases significantly streamlined proofs of several difficult results, especially dichotomy theorems. It has rather minimal overlap with other books published in this subject.

  13. Characterization of Destrins with Different Dextrose Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dextrins are widely used for their functional properties and prepared by partial hydrolysis of starch using acid, enzymes, or combinations of both. The physiochemical properties of dextrins are dependent on their molecular distribution and oligosaccharide profiles. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, rapid viscoanalysis (RVA, high-performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC and gel permeation chromatography (GPC were used to characterize dextrins prepared by common neutral and thermostable α-amylase hydrolysis. The dextrin granules displayed irregular surfaces and were badly damaged by the enzyme treatment. They displayed A-type X-ray diffraction patterns with a decrease of intensity of the characteristic diffraction peaks. The RVA profiles showed that the viscosity of dextrin decreased with the increase of its Dextrose Equivalent (DE value. According to HPLC analysis, the molecular weight, degree of polymerization and the composition of oligosaccharides in dextrins were different.

  14. Multiplicities of states od equivalent fermion shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savukinas, A.Yu.; Glembotskij, I.I.

    1980-01-01

    Classification of states of three or four equivalent fermions has been studied, i.e. possible terms and their multiplicities have been determined. For this purpose either the group theory or evident expressions for the fractional-parentage coefficients have been used. In the first approach the formulas obtained by other authors for the multiplicities of terms through the characters of the transformation matrices of bond moments have been used. This approach happens to be more general as compared with the second one, as expressions for the fractional-parentage coefficients in many cases are not known. The multiplicities of separate terms have been determined. It has been shown that the number of terms of any multiplicity becomes constant when l or j is increased [ru

  15. Sample size allocation in multiregional equivalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jason J Z; Yu, Ziji; Li, Yulan

    2018-06-17

    With the increasing globalization of drug development, the multiregional clinical trial (MRCT) has gained extensive use. The data from MRCTs could be accepted by regulatory authorities across regions and countries as the primary sources of evidence to support global marketing drug approval simultaneously. The MRCT can speed up patient enrollment and drug approval, and it makes the effective therapies available to patients all over the world simultaneously. However, there are many challenges both operationally and scientifically in conducting a drug development globally. One of many important questions to answer for the design of a multiregional study is how to partition sample size into each individual region. In this paper, two systematic approaches are proposed for the sample size allocation in a multiregional equivalence trial. A numerical evaluation and a biosimilar trial are used to illustrate the characteristics of the proposed approaches. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Equivalence principle and the baryon acoustic peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Simonović, Marko; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-08-01

    We study the dominant effect of a long wavelength density perturbation δ (λL) on short distance physics. In the nonrelativistic limit, the result is a uniform acceleration, fixed by the equivalence principle, and typically has no effect on statistical averages due to translational invariance. This same reasoning has been formalized to obtain a "consistency condition" on the cosmological correlation functions. In the presence of a feature, such as the acoustic peak at ℓBAO, this naive expectation breaks down for λLexplicitly applied to the one-loop calculation of the power spectrum. Finally, the success of baryon acoustic oscillation reconstruction schemes is argued to be another empirical evidence for the validity of the results.

  17. A new concept of equivalent homogenization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Pogoskekyan, Leonid; Kim, Young Il; Ju, Hyung Kook; Chang, Moon Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    A new concept of equivalent homogenization is proposed. The concept employs new set of homogenized parameters: homogenized cross sections (XS) and interface matrix (IM), which relates partial currents at the cell interfaces. The idea of interface matrix generalizes the idea of discontinuity factors (DFs), proposed and developed by K. Koebke and K. Smith. The offered concept covers both those of K. Koebke and K. Smith; both of them can be simulated within framework of new concept. Also, the offered concept covers Siemens KWU approach for baffle/reflector simulation, where the equivalent homogenized reflector XS are derived from the conservation of response matrix at the interface in 1D simi-infinite slab geometry. The IM and XS of new concept satisfy the same assumption about response matrix conservation in 1D semi-infinite slab geometry. It is expected that the new concept provides more accurate approximation of heterogeneous cell, especially in case of the steep flux gradients at the cell interfaces. The attractive shapes of new concept are: improved accuracy, simplicity of incorporation in the existing codes, equal numerical expenses in comparison to the K. Smith`s approach. The new concept is useful for: (a) explicit reflector/baffle simulation; (b) control blades simulation; (c) mixed UO{sub 2}/MOX core simulation. The offered model has been incorporated in the finite difference code and in the nodal code PANDOX. The numerical results show good accuracy of core calculations and insensitivity of homogenized parameters with respect to in-core conditions. 9 figs., 7 refs. (Author).

  18. Equivalence principle implications of modified gravity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Lam; Nicolis, Alberto; Stubbs, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    Theories that attempt to explain the observed cosmic acceleration by modifying general relativity all introduce a new scalar degree of freedom that is active on large scales, but is screened on small scales to match experiments. We demonstrate that if such screening occurs via the chameleon mechanism, such as in f(R) theory, it is possible to have order unity violation of the equivalence principle, despite the absence of explicit violation in the microscopic action. Namely, extended objects such as galaxies or constituents thereof do not all fall at the same rate. The chameleon mechanism can screen the scalar charge for large objects but not for small ones (large/small is defined by the depth of the gravitational potential and is controlled by the scalar coupling). This leads to order one fluctuations in the ratio of the inertial mass to gravitational mass. We provide derivations in both Einstein and Jordan frames. In Jordan frame, it is no longer true that all objects move on geodesics; only unscreened ones, such as test particles, do. In contrast, if the scalar screening occurs via strong coupling, such as in the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld model, equivalence principle violation occurs at a much reduced level. We propose several observational tests of the chameleon mechanism: 1. small galaxies should accelerate faster than large galaxies, even in environments where dynamical friction is negligible; 2. voids defined by small galaxies would appear larger compared to standard expectations; 3. stars and diffuse gas in small galaxies should have different velocities, even if they are on the same orbits; 4. lensing and dynamical mass estimates should agree for large galaxies but disagree for small ones. We discuss possible pitfalls in some of these tests. The cleanest is the third one where the mass estimate from HI rotational velocity could exceed that from stars by 30% or more. To avoid blanket screening of all objects, the most promising place to look is in

  19. Proposing a simple radiation scale for the public: Radiation index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Soon [Center for Ionizing Radiation, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kunwoo [Dept. of Natural Radiation Safety, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    A new radiation scale is proposed. With empathy toward the vast majority of people who are not well versed in radiation and related matters, and thus suffering from misunderstanding that breeds unnecessary fear of radiation, the aim of proposing a new radiation scale, radiation index (RAIN), is to put the general public at ease with the concept of radiation. RAIN is defined in dimensionless numbers that relate any specific radiation dose to a properly defined reference level. As RAIN is expressed in plain numbers without an attached scientific unit, the public will feel comfortable with its friendly look, which in turn should help them understand radiation dose levels easily and allay their anxieties about radiation. The expanded awareness and proper understanding of radiation will empower the public to feel that they are not hopeless victims of radiation. The correspondence between RAIN and the specific accumulated dose is established. The equivalence will allow RAIN to serve as a common language of communication for the general public with which they can converse with radiation experts to discuss matters related to radiation safety, radiation diagnosis and therapy, nuclear accidents, and other related matters. Such fruitful dialogues will ultimately enhance public acceptance of radiation and associated technologies.

  20. Proposing a simple radiation scale for the public: Radiation index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Hyun; Park, Tae Soon; Cho, Kunwoo

    2017-01-01

    A new radiation scale is proposed. With empathy toward the vast majority of people who are not well versed in radiation and related matters, and thus suffering from misunderstanding that breeds unnecessary fear of radiation, the aim of proposing a new radiation scale, radiation index (RAIN), is to put the general public at ease with the concept of radiation. RAIN is defined in dimensionless numbers that relate any specific radiation dose to a properly defined reference level. As RAIN is expressed in plain numbers without an attached scientific unit, the public will feel comfortable with its friendly look, which in turn should help them understand radiation dose levels easily and allay their anxieties about radiation. The expanded awareness and proper understanding of radiation will empower the public to feel that they are not hopeless victims of radiation. The correspondence between RAIN and the specific accumulated dose is established. The equivalence will allow RAIN to serve as a common language of communication for the general public with which they can converse with radiation experts to discuss matters related to radiation safety, radiation diagnosis and therapy, nuclear accidents, and other related matters. Such fruitful dialogues will ultimately enhance public acceptance of radiation and associated technologies

  1. Radiation protection in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ashkar, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Full text: People are exposed to ionizing radiation in many different forms: cosmic rays that penetrate earth atmosphere or radiation from soil and mineral resources are natural forms of ionizing radiation. Other forms are produced artificially using radioactive materials for various beneficial applications in medicine, industry and other fields. The greatest concerns about ionizing radiation are tied to its potential health effects and a system of radiation protection has been developed to protect people from harmful radiation. The promotion of radiation protection is one of the International Atomic Energy Agency main activities. Radiation protection concerns the protection of workers, members of public, and patients undergoing diagnosis and therapy against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The report covers the responsibility of radiation protection officer in Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) in Inshas - Egypt, also presents the protection against ionizing radiation from external sources, including types of radiation, sources of radiation (natural - artificial), and measuring units of dose equivalent rate. Also covers the biological effects of ionizing radiation, personal monitoring and radiation survey instruments and safe transport of radioactive materials. The report describes the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2), the survey instruments used, also presents the results obtained and gave a relations between different categories of data. (author)

  2. New device for the radiation protection of the eye lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csobaly, S.; Zarand, P.

    1980-01-01

    Lenses of 50 mm diameter and 2 mm width were ground from lead glass, equivalent to 2 mm of lead. In the case of X-radiations of different intensity and different filtering the finished glasses are equivalent to 0.73-0.78 mm of lead and they decrease the radiation exposition of the eye lens 15-fold. (L.E.)

  3. 49 CFR 391.33 - Equivalent of road test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equivalent of road test. 391.33 Section 391.33... AND LONGER COMBINATION VEHICLE (LCV) DRIVER INSTRUCTORS Tests § 391.33 Equivalent of road test. (a) In place of, and as equivalent to, the road test required by § 391.31, a person who seeks to drive a...

  4. A bicategorical approach to Morita equivalence for Von Neumann algebras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Brouwer (Rachel)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe relate Morita equivalence for von Neumann algebras to the ``Connes fusion'' tensor product between correspondences. In the purely algebraic setting, it is well known that rings are Morita equivalent if and only if they are equivalent objects in a bicategory whose 1-cells are

  5. Problems of Equivalence in Shona- English Bilingual Dictionaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    Page 1 ... translation equivalents in Shona-English dictionaries where lexicographers will be dealing with divergent languages and cultures, traditional practices of lexicography and the absence of reliable ... ideal in translation is to achieve structural and semantic equivalence. Absolute equivalence between any two ...

  6. The equivalence principle in classical mechanics and quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss our understanding of the equivalence principle in both classical mechanics and quantum mechanics. We show that not only does the equivalence principle hold for the trajectories of quantum particles in a background gravitational field, but also that it is only because of this that the equivalence principle is even to be expected to hold for classical particles at all.

  7. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattison, P.; Quinn, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  8. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meier, M.; Trompier, F.; Ambrožová, Iva; Kubančák, Ján; Matthia, D.; Ploc, Ondřej; Santen, N.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, MAY (2016), A24 ISSN 2115-7251 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : aviation * radiation exposure of aircrew * comparison of radiation detectors * galactic cosmic radiation * ambient dose equivalent Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.446, year: 2016

  9. Application of maximum radiation exposure values and monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The guide presents the principles to be applied in calculating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, instructions on application of the maximum values for radiation exposure, and instruction on monitoring of radiation exposure. In addition, the measurable quantities to be used in monitoring the radiation exposure are presented. (2 refs.)

  10. Calculation of equivalent dose index for electrons from 5,0 to 22,0 MeV by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The index of equivalent dose in depth and in a sphere surface of a soft tissue equivalent material were determined by Monte Carlo method for electron irradiations from 5,0 to 22.00 MeV. The effect of different irradiation geometries which simulate the incidence of onedirectional opposite rotational and isotropic beams was studied. It is also shown that the detector of wall thickness with 0.5g/cm 2 and isotropic response com be used to measure index of equivalent dose for fast electrons. The alternative concept of average equivalent dose for radiation protection is discussed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. The one-dimensional normalised generalised equivalence theory (NGET) for generating equivalent diffusion theory group constants for PWR reflector regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.Z.

    1991-01-01

    An equivalent diffusion theory PWR reflector model is presented, which has as its basis Smith's generalisation of Koebke's Equivalent Theory. This method is an adaptation, in one-dimensional slab geometry, of the Generalised Equivalence Theory (GET). Since the method involves the renormalisation of the GET discontinuity factors at nodal interfaces, it is called the Normalised Generalised Equivalence Theory (NGET) method. The advantages of the NGET method for modelling the ex-core nodes of a PWR are summarized. 23 refs

  12. Bone marrow equivalent prompt dose from two common fallout scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.D.; Jones, T.D.; Young, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    A cell-kinetics model for radiation-induced myelopoiesis has been derived for mice, rats, dogs, sheep, swine, and burros. The model was extended to humans after extensive comparisons with molecular and cellular data from biological experiments and an assortment of predictive/validation tests on animal mortality, cell survival, and cellular repopulation following irradiations. One advantage of the model is that any complex pattern of protracted irradiation can be equated to its equivalent prompt dose. Severity of biological response depends upon target-organ dose, dose rate, and dose fractionation. Epidemiological and animal data are best suited for exposures given in brief periods of time. To use those data to assess risk from protracted human exposures, it is obligatory to model molecular repair and compensatory proliferation in terms of prompt dose. Although the model is somewhat complex both mathematically and biologically, this note describes simple numerical approximations for two common exposure scenarios. Both approximations are easily evaluated on a simple pocket calculator by a health physicist or emergency management officer. 12 refs., 5 figs

  13. Observation of The Top of The Atmosphere Outgoing Longwave Radiation Using The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, G.; Llewellyn-Jones, D.

    In the summer of 2002 the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite is due to be launched. On board the MSG satellite is the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) sensor. This is a new radiometer that will be able to observe and measure the outgoing longwave radiation from the top of the atmosphere for the whole ob- served Earth disc, due to its unique position in geostationary orbit. Every 15 minutes the GERB sensor will make a full Earth disc observation, centred on the Greenwich meridian. Thus, the GERB sensor will provide unprecedented coupled temporal and spatial resolution of the outgoing longwave radiation (4.0 to 30.0 microns), by first measuring the broadband radiation (0.32 to 30.0 microns) and then subtracting the measured reflected shortwave solar radiation (0.32 to 4.0 microns), from the earth- atmosphere system. The GERB sensor is able to make measurements to within an accuracy of 1 W/sq. m. A forward model is being developed at Leicester to simulate the data from the GERB sensor for representative geophysical scenes and to investigate key parameters and processes that will affect the top of the atmosphere signal. At the heart of this model is a line-by-line radiative transfer model, the Oxford Reference Forward Model (RFM) that is to be used with model atmospheres generated from ECMWF analysis data. When MSG is launched, cloud data from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI), also on board, is to be used in conjunction with GERB data.

  14. Radiation and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfermann, H.H.; Solbach, C.

    1992-11-01

    The brochure explains the major types of radiation, the radiation sources, effects, uses, and risks, as well as the regulatory system adopted by the government in order to keep the risks as low as possible. (orig./DG) [de

  15. A bicategorical approach to Morita equivalence for von Neumann algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    We relate Morita equivalence for von Neumann algebras to the ''Connes fusion'' tensor product between correspondences. In the purely algebraic setting, it is well known that rings are Morita equivalent if they are equivalent objects in a bicategory whose 1-cells are bimodules. We present a similar result for von Neumann algebras. We show that von Neumann algebras form a bicategory, having Connes's correspondences as 1-morphisms, and (bounded) intertwiners as 2-morphisms. Further, we prove that two von Neumann algebras are Morita equivalent iff they are equivalent objects in the bicategory. The proofs make extensive use of the Tomita-Takesaki modular theory

  16. A Thermal Infrared Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Yan, Michael M.-H.; Cote, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This technical memorandum documents the longwave radiation parameterization developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for a wide variety of weather and climate applications. Based on the 1996-version of the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory HITRAN data, the parameterization includes the absorption due to major gaseous absorption (water vapor, CO2, O3) and most of the minor trace gases (N2O, CH4, CFCs), as well as clouds and aerosols. The thermal infrared spectrum is divided into nine bands. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and speed, various approaches of computing the transmission function are applied to different spectral bands and gases. The gaseous transmission function is computed either using the k-distribution method or the table look-up method. To include the effect of scattering due to clouds and aerosols, the optical thickness is scaled by the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. The parameterization can accurately compute fluxes to within 1% of the high spectral-resolution line-by-line calculations. The cooling rate can be accurately computed in the region extending from the surface to the 0.01-hPa level.

  17. Measurement of ambient dose equivalent H*(10) and directional dose equivalent H'(0.07) with pocket sized survey meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatschenko, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In many parts of the world, predominantly in Europe, small sized survey meters based on Geiger-Mueller or proportional counters are widely used for dose rate and dose equivalent rate measurements, while in other regions, especially in the U.S., ionisation chambers are preferred for this task. This paper tries to shed some light on the likely reasons for these two diverging instrumental inclinations. Their respective strengths and weaknesses is analyzed in respect to energy response, dose rate measuring range, size, weight and susceptibility to environmental influences. Furthermore the response and limitations regarding the measurement of pulsed radiation (medical X-ray and CT-devices, accelerators, non-destructive testing) is discussed. A newly developed pocket size instrument based on a pan-cake Geiger-Mueller tube is used as an example to explain the capability and flexibility of modern survey meters. The RadEye B20 is a compact multi-purpose dose rate meter and contamination meter for alpha, beta, gamma and X-ray radiation. By virtue of carefully designed multi-layer gamma energy filters, H*(10) (deep dose) or H'(0,07) (shallow dose) measurements from 17 - 1300 keV can be performed. The instrument can even be worn in a belt holster, so that the impact to the mobility of the user is minimized. For emergency response purposes alpha and beta contamination can be discriminated using another optional filter; a simple sample changer adapter can extend the scope of application. Immediate and reproducible counter measurements, e.g. of smear tests can be performed locally. (author)

  18. Theoretical aspects of the equivalence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damour, Thibault

    2012-01-01

    We review several theoretical aspects of the equivalence principle (EP). We emphasize the unsatisfactory fact that the EP maintains the absolute character of the coupling constants of physics, while general relativity and its generalizations (Kaluza–Klein, …, string theory) suggest that all absolute structures should be replaced by dynamical entities. We discuss the EP-violation phenomenology of dilaton-like models, which is likely to be dominated by the linear superposition of two effects: a signal proportional to the nuclear Coulomb energy, related to the variation of the fine-structure constant, and a signal proportional to the surface nuclear binding energy, related to the variation of the light quark masses. We recall various theoretical arguments (including a recently proposed anthropic argument) suggesting that the EP be violated at a small, but not unmeasurably small level. This motivates the need for improved tests of the EP. These tests are probing new territories in physics that are related to deep, and mysterious, issues in fundamental physics. (paper)

  19. Biomonitoring Equivalents for interpretation of urinary fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, L L; Hays, S M; Vezina, A; Deveau, M; St-Amand, A; Nong, A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to fluoride is widespread due to its natural occurrence in the environment and addition to drinking water and dental products for the prevention of dental caries. The potential health risks of excess fluoride exposure include aesthetically unacceptable dental fluorosis (tooth mottling) and increased skeletal fragility. Numerous organizations have conducted risk assessments and set guidance values to represent maximum recommended exposure levels as well as recommended adequate intake levels based on potential public health benefits of fluoride exposure. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are estimates of the average biomarker concentrations corresponding to such exposure guidance values. The literature on daily urinary fluoride excretion rates as a function of daily fluoride exposure was reviewed and BE values corresponding to the available US and Canadian exposure guidance values were derived for fluoride in urine. The derived BE values range from 1.1 to 2.1mg/L (1.2-2.5μg/g creatinine). Concentrations of fluoride in single urinary spot samples from individuals, even under exposure conditions consistent with the exposure guidance values, may vary from the predicted average concentrations by several-fold due to within- and across-individual variation in urinary flow and creatinine excretion rates and due to the rapid elimination kinetics of fluoride. Thus, the BE values are most appropriately applied to screen population central tendency estimates for biomarker concentrations rather than interpretation of individual spot sample concentrations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. VERSE - Virtual Equivalent Real-time Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yang; Martin, Bryan J.; Villaume, Nathaniel

    2005-01-01

    Distributed real-time simulations provide important timing validation and hardware in the- loop results for the spacecraft flight software development cycle. Occasionally, the need for higher fidelity modeling and more comprehensive debugging capabilities - combined with a limited amount of computational resources - calls for a non real-time simulation environment that mimics the real-time environment. By creating a non real-time environment that accommodates simulations and flight software designed for a multi-CPU real-time system, we can save development time, cut mission costs, and reduce the likelihood of errors. This paper presents such a solution: Virtual Equivalent Real-time Simulation Environment (VERSE). VERSE turns the real-time operating system RTAI (Real-time Application Interface) into an event driven simulator that runs in virtual real time. Designed to keep the original RTAI architecture as intact as possible, and therefore inheriting RTAI's many capabilities, VERSE was implemented with remarkably little change to the RTAI source code. This small footprint together with use of the same API allows users to easily run the same application in both real-time and virtual time environments. VERSE has been used to build a workstation testbed for NASA's Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) instrument flight software. With its flexible simulation controls and inexpensive setup and replication costs, VERSE will become an invaluable tool in future mission development.

  1. Challenging a culture of racial equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Miri

    2014-03-01

    We live at a time when our understandings and conceptualizations of 'racism' are often highly imprecise, broad, and used to describe a wide range of racialized phenomena. In this article, I raise some important questions about how the term racism is used and understood in contemporary British society by drawing on some recent cases of alleged racism in football and politics, many of which have been played out via new media technologies. A broader understanding of racism, through the use of the term 'racialization', has been helpful in articulating a more nuanced and complex understanding of racial incidents, especially of people's (often ambivalent) beliefs and behaviours. However, the growing emphasis upon 'racialization' has led to a conceptualization of racism which increasingly involves multiple perpetrators, victims, and practices without enough consideration of how and why particular interactions and practices constitute racism as such. The trend toward a growing culture of racial equivalence is worrying, as it denudes the idea of racism of its historical basis, severity and power. These frequent and commonplace assertions of racism in the public sphere paradoxically end up trivializing and homogenizing quite different forms of racialized interactions. I conclude that we need to retain the term 'racism', but we need to differentiate more clearly between 'racism' (as an historical and structured system of domination) from the broader notion of 'racialization'. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  2. Testing the equivalence principle on a trampoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Phillips, James D.

    2001-07-01

    We are developing a Galilean test of the equivalence principle in which two pairs of test mass assemblies (TMA) are in free fall in a comoving vacuum chamber for about 0.9 s. The TMA are tossed upward, and the process repeats at 1.2 s intervals. Each TMA carries a solid quartz retroreflector and a payload mass of about one-third of the total TMA mass. The relative vertical motion of the TMA of each pair is monitored by a laser gauge working in an optical cavity formed by the retroreflectors. Single-toss precision of the relative acceleration of a single pair of TMA is 3.5×10-12 g. The project goal of Δg/g = 10-13 can be reached in a single night's run, but repetition with altered configurations will be required to ensure the correction of systematic error to the nominal accuracy level. Because the measurements can be made quickly, we plan to study several pairs of materials.

  3. Testing the equivalence principle on cosmological scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvin, Camille; Fleury, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    The equivalence principle, that is one of the main pillars of general relativity, is very well tested in the Solar system; however, its validity is more uncertain on cosmological scales, or when dark matter is concerned. This article shows that relativistic effects in the large-scale structure can be used to directly test whether dark matter satisfies Euler's equation, i.e. whether its free fall is characterised by geodesic motion, just like baryons and light. After having proposed a general parametrisation for deviations from Euler's equation, we perform Fisher-matrix forecasts for future surveys like DESI and the SKA, and show that such deviations can be constrained with a precision of order 10%. Deviations from Euler's equation cannot be tested directly with standard methods like redshift-space distortions and gravitational lensing, since these observables are not sensitive to the time component of the metric. Our analysis shows therefore that relativistic effects bring new and complementary constraints to alternative theories of gravity.

  4. A Bayesian equivalency test for two independent binomial proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yohei; Shimokawa, Asanao; Yamada, Hiroshi; Miyaoka, Etsuo

    2016-01-01

    In clinical trials, it is often necessary to perform an equivalence study. The equivalence study requires actively denoting equivalence between two different drugs or treatments. Since it is not possible to assert equivalence that is not rejected by a superiority test, statistical methods known as equivalency tests have been suggested. These methods for equivalency tests are based on the frequency framework; however, there are few such methods in the Bayesian framework. Hence, this article proposes a new index that suggests the equivalency of binomial proportions, which is constructed based on the Bayesian framework. In this study, we provide two methods for calculating the index and compare the probabilities that have been calculated by these two calculation methods. Moreover, we apply this index to the results of actual clinical trials to demonstrate the utility of the index.

  5. Dose determination algorithms for a nearly tissue equivalent multi-element thermoluminescent dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovitch, M.; Chamberlain, J.; Velbeck, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop dosimetric systems that will enable reliable interpretation of dosimeter readings in terms of the absorbed dose or dose-equivalent, a new multi-element TL dosimeter assembly for Beta and Gamma dose monitoring has been designed. The radiation-sensitive volumes are four LiF-TLD elements, each covered by its own unique filter. For media-matching, care has been taken to employ nearly tissue equivalent filters of thicknesses of 1000 mg/cm 2 and 300 mg/cm 2 for deep dose and dose to the lens-of-the-eye measurements respectively. Only one metal filter (Cu) is employed to provide low energy photon discrimination. A Thin TL element (0.09 mm thick) is located behind an open window designed to improve the energy under-response to low energy beta rays and to provide closer estimate of the shallow dose equivalent. The deep and shallow dose equivalents are derived from the correlation of the response of the various TL elements to the above quantities through computations based on previously defined relationships obtained from experimental results. The theoretical formalization for the dose calculation algorithms is described in detail, and provides a useful methodology which can be applied to different tissue-equivalent dosimeter assemblies. Experimental data has been obtained by performing irradiation according to the specifications established by DOELAP, using 27 types of pure and mixed radiation fields including Cs-137 gamma rays, low energy photons down to 20 keV, Sr/Y-90, Uranium, and Tl-204 beta particles

  6. Radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Sung Jin; Kim, Seung Guk; No, Gyeong Seok; Park, Myeong Hwan; Ann, Bong Seon

    1998-03-01

    This book explains technical terms about radiation measurement, which are radiation, radiation quantity and unit such as prefix of international unit, unit for defence purposes of radiation, coefficient of radiation and interaction, kinds and principles of radiation detector, ionization chamber, G-M counter, G-M tube, proportional counter, scintillation detector, semiconductor radiation detector, thermoluminescence dosimeter, PLD, others detector, radiation monitor, neutron detector, calibration of radiation detector, statistics of counting value, activation analysis and electronics circuit of radiation detector.

  7. Semi-empirical equivalent field method for dose determination in midline block fields for cobalt - 60 beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagoe, S.N.A.; Nani, E.K.; Yarney, J.; Edusa, C.; Quayson-Sackey, K.; Nyamadi, K.M.; Sasu, E.

    2012-01-01

    For teletherapy treatment time calculations, midline block fields are resolved into two fields, but neglecting scattering from other fields, the effective equivalent square field size of the midline block is assumed to the resultant field. Such approach is underestimation, and may be detrimental in achieving the recommended uncertainty of ± 5 % for patient's radiation dose delivery. By comparison, the deviations of effective equivalent square field sizes by calculations and experiments were within 13.2 % for cobalt 60 beams of GWGP80 cobalt 60 teletherapy. Therefore, a modified method incorporating the scatter contributions was adopted to estimate the effective equivalent square field size for midline block field. The measured outputs of radiation beams with the block were compared with outputs of square fields without the blocks (only the block tray) at depths of 5 and 10 cm for the teletherapy machine employing isocentric technique, and the accuracy was within ± 3 % for the cobalt 60 beams. (au)

  8. A Multimode Equivalent Network Approach for the Analysis of a 'Realistic' Finite Array of Open Ended Waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neto, A.; Bolt, R.; Gerini, G.; Schmitt, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this contribution we present a theoretical model for the analysis of finite arrays of open-ended waveguides mounted on finite mounting platforms or having radome coverages. This model is based on a Multimode Equivalent Network (MEN) [1] representation of the radiating waveguides complete with

  9. Evaluation of equivalent doses in 18F PET/CT using the Monte Carlo method with MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, Walmir; Santos, William Souza; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2017-01-01

    The present work used the Monte Carlo method (MMC), specifically the Monte Carlo NParticle - MCNPX, to simulate the interaction of radiation involving photons and particles, such as positrons and electrons, with virtual adult anthropomorphic simulators on PET / CT scans and to determine absorbed and equivalent doses in adult male and female patients

  10. Significance and principles of the calculation of the effective dose equivalent for radiological protection of personnel and patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Williams, G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the effective dose equivalent, Hsub(E), concept for radiological protection assessments of occupationally exposed persons is justifiable by the practicability thus achieved with regard to the limiting principles. Nevertheless, it would be proper logic to further use as the basic limiting quantity the real physical dose equivalent of homogeneous whole-body exposure, and for inhomogeneous whole-body irradiation the Hsub(E) value, calculated by means of the concept of the effective dose equivalent. For then the required concepts, models and calculations would not be connected with a basic radiation protection quantity. Application of the effective dose equivalent for radiation protection assessments for patients is misleading and is not practical with regard to assessing an individual or collective radiation risk of patients. The quantity of expected harm would be better suited to this purpose. There is no need to express the radiation risk by a dose quantity, which means careless handling of good information. (orig./WU) [de

  11. Biomonitoring Equivalents for bisphenol A (BPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Kannan; Gagné, Michelle; Nong, Andy; Aylward, Lesa L; Hays, Sean M

    2010-10-01

    Recent efforts worldwide have resulted in a growing database of measured concentrations of chemicals in blood and urine samples taken from the general population. However, few tools exist to assist in the interpretation of the measured values in a health risk context. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are defined as the concentration or range of concentrations of a chemical or its metabolite in a biological medium (blood, urine, or other medium) that is consistent with an existing health-based exposure guideline. BE values are derived by integrating available data on pharmacokinetics with existing chemical risk assessments. This study reviews available health-based exposure guidance values for bisphenol A (BPA) from Health Canada, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). BE values were derived based on data on BPA urinary excretion in humans. The BE value corresponding to the oral provisional tolerable daily intake (pTDI) of 25 microg/kg-d from Health Canada is 1mg/L (1.3mg/g creatinine); value corresponding to the US EPA reference dose (RfD) and EFSA tolerable daily intake (TDI) estimates (both of which are equal to 50 microg/kg-d) is 2mg/L (2.6 mg/g creatinine). These values are estimates of the 24-h average urinary BPA concentrations that are consistent with steady-state exposure at the respective exposure guidance values. These BE values may be used as screening tools for evaluation of central tendency measures of population biomonitoring data for BPA in a risk assessment context and can assist in prioritization of the potential need for additional risk assessment efforts for BPA relative to other chemicals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation scars on mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.; Breining, H.; Knappschafts-Krankenhaus Essen

    1985-01-01

    Six patients with radiation scars are described. In each case the diagnosis was confirmed histologically in five cases corresponding mammograms were available. The histological appearances of radiation scars are described and the radiological features are presented. These lesions can be diagnosed mammographically in vivo. Macroscopically differentiation from a scirrhous carcinoma is not possible and therefore a radiation scar must always be excised; this also leads to definitive cure. On mammographic screening the incidence is 0.5 to 0.9 per thousand. The significance of radiation scars depends on the fact that they are pre-cancerous and therefore are equivalent to the early diagnosis of a carcinoma with the possibility of a complete cure. (orig.) [de

  13. Radiation protection information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the measurements and discussion presented in this report, the following conclusions may be drawn: The population doses from naturally occuring radiation is on average lower in Denmark and much lower in Iceland than in the other Nordic countries. In Sweden, Finland and Norway the largest contributors to the population doses from naturally occuring radiation are radon daughters in indoor air. For Denmark and Iceland, radon daughters contribute about the same to the total effective dose equivalent as the external gamma radiation. Some groups of people in the Nordic countries are highly exposed to radon daughters. In some cases, the received doses are very high (higher than the dose limit for radiation workers). From the conclusions above, the radon daughter problem should be given priority, at least in Sweden, Finland and Norway, especially regarding the search for population groups receiving the highest doses

  14. General Dynamic Equivalent Modeling of Microgrid Based on Physical Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchun Cai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microgrid is a new power system concept consisting of small-scale distributed energy resources; storage devices and loads. It is necessary to employ a simplified model of microgrid in the simulation of a distribution network integrating large-scale microgrids. Based on the detailed model of the components, an equivalent model of microgrid is proposed in this paper. The equivalent model comprises two parts: namely, equivalent machine component and equivalent static component. Equivalent machine component describes the dynamics of synchronous generator, asynchronous wind turbine and induction motor, equivalent static component describes the dynamics of photovoltaic, storage and static load. The trajectory sensitivities of the equivalent model parameters with respect to the output variables are analyzed. The key parameters that play important roles in the dynamics of the output variables of the equivalent model are identified and included in further parameter estimation. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO is improved for the parameter estimation of the equivalent model. Simulations are performed in different microgrid operation conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of the equivalent model of microgrid.

  15. Dose-equivalent response CR-39 track detector for personnel neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, K.; Ito, M.; Yoneda, H.; Miyake, H.; Yamamoto, J.; Tsuruta, T.

    1991-01-01

    A dose-equivalent response detector based on CR-39 has been designed to be applied for personnel neutron dosimetry. The intrinsic detection efficiency of bare CR-39 was first evaluated from irradiation experiments with monoenergetic neutrons and theoretical calculations. In the second step, the radiator effect was investigated for the purpose of sensitization to fast neutrons. A two-layer radiator consisting of deuterized dotriacontane (C 32 D 66 ) and polyethylene (CH 2 ) was designed. Finally, we made the CR-39 detector sensitive to thermal neutrons by doping with orthocarbone (B 10 H 12 C 2 ), and also estimated the contribution of albedo neutrons. It was found that the new detector - boron-doped CR-39 with the two-layer radiator - would have a flat response with an error of about 70% in a wide energy region, ranging from thermal to 15 MeV. (orig.)

  16. Modular remote radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Fabio; Farias, Marcos S.; Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2013-01-01

    The Modular Remote Radiation Monitor (MRRM) is a novel radiation monitor suitable for monitoring environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is a portable compact-size low-power microprocessor-based electronic device which provides its monitoring data to other electronic systems, physically distant from it, by means of an electronic communication channel, which can be wired or wireless according to the requirements of each application. Besides its low-power highly-integrated circuit design, the Modular Remote Radiation Monitor is presented in a modular architecture, which promotes full compliance to the technical requirements of different applications while minimizing cost, size and power consumption. Its communication capability also supports the implementation of a network of multiple radiation monitors connected to a supervisory system, capable of remotely controlling each monitor independently as well as visualizing the radiation levels from all monitors. A prototype of the MRRM, functionally equivalent to the MRA-7027 radiation monitor, was implemented and connected to a wired MODBUS network of MRA-7027 monitors, responsible for monitoring ionizing radiation inside Argonauta reactor room at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear. Based on the highly positive experimental results obtained, further design is currently underway in order to produce a consumer version of the MRRM. (author)

  17. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poje Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent and/or neutron dose rate to which medical personnel could be exposed. Also, the neutron dose dependence on collimator aperture was analyzed. The obtained neutron dose rates outside the accelerator rooms were several times smaller than the neutron dose rates inside the accelerator rooms. Nevertheless, the measured neutron dose equivalent was not negligible from the aspect of the personal dosimetry with almost 2 mSv a year per person in the areas occupied by staff (conservative estimation. In rooms with 15 MV accelerators, the neutron exposure to the personnel was significantly lower than in the rooms having 18 MV accelerators installed. It was even more pronounced in the room reconstructed after the 60Co decommissioning. This study confirms that shielding from the neutron radiation should be considered when building vaults for high energy linear accelerators, especially when the space constraints exist.

  18. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  19. Theoretical investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry and optical radiation in hypersonic flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Ellis E.

    1990-01-01

    Future space vehicles returning from distant missions or high earth orbits may enter the upper regions of the atmosphere and use aerodynamic drag to reduce their velocity before they skip out of the atmosphere and enter low earth orbit. The Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) is designed to explore the special problems encountered in such entries. A computer code was developed to calculate the radiative transport along line-or-sight in the general 3-D flow field about an arbitrary entry vehicle, if the temperatures and species concentrations along the line-of-sight are known. The radiative heating calculation at the stagnation point of the AFE vehicle along the entry trajectory was performed, including a detailed line-by-line accounting of the radiative transport in the vacuum ultraviolet (below 200 nm) by the atomic N and O lines. A method was developed for making measurements of the haze particles in the Titan atmosphere above 200 km altitude. Several other tasks of a continuing nature, to improve the technical ability to calculate the nonequilibrium gas dynamic flow field and radiative heating of entry vehicles, were completed or advanced.

  20. A two dimensional modeling study of the sensitivity of ozone to radiative flux uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, K.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1988-08-01

    Radiative processes strongly effect equilibrium trace gas concentrations both directly, through photolysis reactions, and indirectly through temperature and transport processes. We have used the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport model to investigate the net sensitivity of equilibrium ozone concentrations to several changes in radiative forcing. Doubling CO 2 from 300 ppmv to 600 ppmv resulted in a temperature decrease of 5 K to 8 K in the middle stratosphere along with an 8% to 16% increase in ozone in the same region. Replacing our usual shortwave scattering algorithms with a simplified Rayleigh algorithm led to a 1% to 2% increase in ozone in the lower stratosphere. Finally, modifying our normal CO 2 cooling rates by corrections derived from line-by-line calculations resulted in several regions of heating and cooling. We observed temperature changes on the order of 1 K to 1.5 K with corresponding changes of 0.5% to 1.5% in O 3 . Our results for doubled CO 2 compare favorably with those by other authors. Results for our two perturbation scenarios stress the need for accurately modeling radiative processes while confirming the general validity of current models. 15 refs., 5 figs

  1. Multi-Group Reductions of LTE Air Plasma Radiative Transfer in Cylindrical Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, James; Magin, Thierry Edouard Bertran; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2013-01-01

    Air plasma radiation in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) within cylindrical geometries is studied with an application towards modeling the radiative transfer inside arc-constrictors, a central component of constricted-arc arc jets. A detailed database of spectral absorption coefficients for LTE air is formulated using the NEQAIR code developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The database stores calculated absorption coefficients for 1,051,755 wavelengths between 0.04 µm and 200 µm over a wide temperature (500K to 15 000K) and pressure (0.1 atm to 10.0 atm) range. The multi-group method for spectral reduction is studied by generating a range of reductions including pure binning and banding reductions from the detailed absorption coefficient database. The accuracy of each reduction is compared to line-by-line calculations for cylindrical temperature profiles resembling typical profiles found in arc-constrictors. It is found that a reduction of only 1000 groups is sufficient to accurately model the LTE air radiation over a large temperature and pressure range. In addition to the reduction comparison, the cylindrical-slab formulation is compared with the finite-volume method for the numerical integration of the radiative flux inside cylinders with varying length. It is determined that cylindrical-slabs can be used to accurately model most arc-constrictors due to their high length to radius ratios.

  2. Soot and Spectral Radiation Modeling for a High-Pressure Turbulent Spray Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreryo-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Simulations are performed of a transient high-pressure turbulent n-dodecane spray flame under engine-relevant conditions. An unsteady RANS formulation is used, with detailed chemistry, a semi-empirical two-equation soot model, and a particle-based transported composition probability density function (PDF) method to account for unresolved turbulent fluctuations in composition and temperature. Results from the PDF model are compared with those from a locally well-stirred reactor (WSR) model to quantify the effects of turbulence-chemistry-soot interactions. Computed liquid and vapor penetration versus time, ignition delay, and flame lift-off height are in good agreement with experiment, and relatively small differences are seen between the WSR and PDF models for these global quantities. Computed soot levels and spatial soot distributions from the WSR and PDF models show large differences, with PDF results being in better agreement with experimental measurements. An uncoupled photon Monte Carlo method with line-by-line spectral resolution is used to compute the spectral intensity distribution of the radiation leaving the flame. This provides new insight into the relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation, and the importance of turbulent fluctuations on radiative heat transfer.

  3. Intercomparison of radiative forcing calculations of stratospheric water vapour and contrails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myhre, Gunnar [Dept. of Geosciences, Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo (Norway); Kvalevaag, Maria [Dept. of Geosciences, Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Raedel, Gaby; Cook, Jolene; Shine, Keith P. [Dept. of Meteorology, Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Clark, Hannah [CNRM/GAME Meteo France, Toulouse (France); Lab. d' Aerologie, Univ. de Toulouse (France); Karcher, Fernand [CNRM/GAME Meteo France, Toulouse (France); Markowicz, Krzysztof; Kardas, Aleksandra; Wolkenberg, Paulina [Inst. of Geophysics, Univ. of Warsaw (Poland); Balkanski, Yves [LSCE/IPSL, Lab. CEA-CNRS-UVSQ (France); Ponater, Michael [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR), Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Forster, Piers; Rap, Alexandru [School of Earth and Environment, Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Leon, Ruben Rodriguez de [Manchester Metropolitan Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Seven groups have participated in an intercomparison study of calculations of radiative forcing (RF) due to stratospheric water vapour (SWV) and contrails. a combination of detailed radiative transfer schemes and codes for global-scale calculations have been used, as well as a combination of idealized simulations and more realistic global-scale changes in stratospheric water vapour and contrails. Detailed line-by-line codes agree within about 15% for longwave (LW) and shortwave (SW) RF, except in one case where the difference is 30%. Since the LW and SW RF due to contrails and SWV changes are of opposite sign, the differences between the models seen in the individual LW and SW components can be either compensated or strengthened in the net RF. and thus in relative terms uncertainties are much larger for the net RF. Some of the models used for global-scale simulations of changes in SWV and contrails differ substantially in RF from the more detailed radiative transfer schemes. For the global-scale calculations we use a method of weighting the results to calculate a best estimate based on their performance compared to the more detailed radiative transfer schemes in the idealized simulations. (orig.)

  4. Preliminary study of dose equivalent evaluation for residents in radioactivity contaminated rebar buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.; Liao, C.C.; Wang, M.T.; Chen, F. D.

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been found that several resident and office buildings in Taiwan were constructed with 60 Co-contaminated reinforcing steel bar (rebar). Both governmental officials and the residents of such buildings have been concerned about this finding. In order to respond to the situation, the government has adopted a number of remedial measures, including full-scale radiation survey, dose evaluation and physical examinations of residents. This article presents three methods for evaluating the dose equivalents of the residents living in the contaminated rebar buildings by means of γ-ray survey, necklace-type thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and the human lymphocyte chromosome aberration analyses. The results reveal that the dose evaluation by γ-ray survey is rather conservative. Generally for the residents whose annual dose equivalents are greater than 5 mSv (0.5 rem) by γ-ray survey, the dose equivalents from necklace-type TLDs are only within the range of 20 to 50% of the evaluated values mentioned above. For chromosome analyses, at least 500 lymphocyte cells were scored and analyzed for each resident. Most of the chromosome analysis data show that the dose equivalents received by residents are lower than the detection limit of the method (100 mSv) and quite different from the estimated dose obtained from either γ-ray survey or necklace-type TLD measurements

  5. Best available technology equivalent controls for B Plant Process Condensate: Tank farm process technology section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This report evaluates whether proposed controls for the B Plant Process Condensate effluent stream are equivalent to Best Available Technology (BAT) economically achievable. Methods to determine whether the proposed controls for the BCP were equivalent to BAT originated from the Guidance Document for the Hanford Site. The BAT performance standards, which originate from the Clean Water Act, are to be applied to all contaminated liquid effluent discharges currently going to the soil column at the Hanford Site. The B Plant BAT evaluation addressed pollutants that had not been regulated traditionally under Federal or State water-pollution control programs. As a result, only comparisons could be made to existing radiation and water quality standards, and a BAT determination based on the effluent guidelines method (as outlined in the BAT Guidance Document) was not possible. Due to the variability and inconsistency of factors with comparable streams, such as the effluent stream at the Savannah River Plant, a BAT determination by the technology transfer method and treatability studies method was not possible. By using the generic treatment systems method, a one-or two-stage treatment system for dissolved solids removal was concluded to be equivalent to BAT. By performing two economic achievability tests, a one-stage treatment system consisting of mixed bed ion exchange columns was considered to be cost effective and equivalent to BAT. 13 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Constraints on equivalent elastic source models from near-source data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stump, B.

    1993-01-01

    A phenomenological based seismic source model is important in quantifying the important physical processes that affect the observed seismic radiation in the linear-elastic regime. Representations such as these were used to assess yield effects on seismic waves under a Threshold Test Ban Treaty and to help transport seismic coupling experience at one test site to another. These same characterizations in a non-proliferation environment find applications in understanding the generation of the different types of body and surface waves from nuclear explosions, single chemical explosions, arrays of chemical explosions used in mining, rock bursts and earthquakes. Seismologists typically begin with an equivalent elastic representation of the source which when convolved with the propagation path effects produces a seismogram. The Representation Theorem replaces the true source with an equivalent set of body forces, boundary conditions or initial conditions. An extension of this representation shows the equivalence of the body forces, boundary conditions and initial conditions and replaces the source with a set of force moments, the first degree moment tensor for a point source representation. The difficulty with this formulation, which can completely describe the observed waveforms when the propagation path effects are known, is in the physical interpretation of the actual physical processes acting in the source volume. Observational data from within the source region, where processes are often nonlinear, linked to numerical models of the important physical processes in this region are critical to a unique physical understanding of the equivalent elastic source function

  7. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  8. Dynamic equivalence relation on the fuzzy measure algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Ghasemkhani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the present paper is to extend classical results from the measure theory and dynamical systems to the fuzzy subset setting. In this paper, the notion of  dynamic equivalence relation is introduced and then it is proved that this relation is an equivalence relation. Also, a new metric on the collection of all equivalence classes is introduced and it is proved that this metric is complete.

  9. Dose equivalent distributions in the AAEC total body nitrogen facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Bailey, G.M.; McGregor, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The incident neutron dose equivalent in the AAEC total body nitrogen facility is measured by a calibrated remmeter. Dose equivalent rates and distributions are calculated by Monte Carlo techniques which take account of the secondary neutron flux from the collimator. Experiment and calculation are found to be in satisfactory agreement. The effective dose equivalent per exposure is determined by weighting organ doses, and the potential detriment per exposure is calculated from ICRP risk factors

  10. Mensuration of equivalent dose with personal dosemeters and instruments of radiological protection in the new operative quantities ICRU, for external fields of beta radiation. Part II. I study of the angular response of personal dosemeters TLD-100 in secondary patron fields of beta radiation ({sup 90}Sr / {sup 90}Y); Medicion de dosis equivalente con dosimetros personales e instrumentos de proteccion radiologica en las nuevas magnitudes operativas ICRU, para campos de radiacion beta externos. Parte II. Estudio de la respuesta angular de dosimetros personales TLD-100 en campos patrones secundarios de radiacion beta ({sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1994-01-15

    The objective of this work is to carry out one of the possible ones test type for personal dosemeters TLD, under the recomendations of the ICRU 39, ICRU 43 and the draft of the norm ISO 6980,(1992), with the purpose of verifying the capacity of these detectors to carry out the operative unit: H' (0.07;{alpha}). Since H' (O. 07;{alpha}) this defined one in an expanded field, one of these tests type consist on determining the angular response of these detectors. 20 personal dosemeters TLD-100 was used, (card marks: Harshaw, Model: G-1, with two glasses of TLD-100 absorbed in teflon; the portadosemeters has two windows, a free one and another with a filter of Pb of 171.0 mg cm{sup -2}); these dosemeters they were previously selected, [to see, {sup S}tudy of the Homogeneity of the response of Personal Dosemeters (Cards G-l, TLD-100) in Radiation of Countrysides of {sup 60}Co{sup ,} J.T. Alvarez R. Technician Report GSR/IT/0001/94].The irradiations to effectued in secondary countryside of radiation beta of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y. The study was undertaken by means of an experimental design of blocks random that contemplate the following variables: intensity of the radiation source, (1850 MBq and 74 MBq); position of irradiation, (four positions); incidence of angle of the radiation (0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 grades) and the absorbed dose in air, (0.005, 0.010, 0.020, 0.050 and 0.100 Gy). Then null hypothesis it was to suppose that there was not difference among the stockings of each treatment, to used the statistical of Duncan to carry out tests of stockings at a level of significance of 5%.These tests of stockings throw the following results in those variables of the experimental design: The irradiations carried out so much with the source pattern secondary of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y of 1850 MBq and of 74 MBq, they are equivalent reason why they can be used indistinctly. The responses of each one of the glasses of the card are strongly anisotropic for each glass

  11. Method for measuring and evaluation dose equivalent rate from fast neutrons in mixed gamma-neutron fields around particles accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruceru, I.; Sandu, M.; Cruceru, M.

    1994-01-01

    A method for measuring and evaluation of doses and dose equivalent rate in mixed gamma- neutron fields is discussed in this paper. The method is basedon a double detector system consist of an ionization chamber with components made from a plastic scintillator, coupled to on photomultiplier. Generally the radiation fields around accelerators are complex, often consisting of many different ionizing radiations extending over a broad range of energies. This method solve two major difficulties: determination of response functions of radiation detectors; interpretation of measurement and determination of accuracy. The discrimination gamma-fast neutrons is assured directly without a pulse shape discrimination circuit. The method is applied to mixed fields in which particle energies are situated in the energy range under 20 MeV and an izotropic emision (Φ=10 4 -10 11 n.s -1 ). The dose equivalent rates explored is 0.01mSV--0.1SV

  12. The cost of collective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.J.; Fleishman, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    The successful application of the ALARA principle is dependent on a monetary evaluation of collective dose, so that the costs of control may be directly compared with the costs of detriment. The paper initially reviews the traditional, quantitative methods of valuing human life from which a monetary value of the man-sievert can be derived by subsequent application of risk factors. The political, ethical and economic implications of employing such techniques in radiological protection are noted. An alternative approach to the problem is then outlined, based on estimating the marginal value of a change in risk. At low levels of individual risk this includes only the tangible, economic consequences of detriment from output losses and medical costs. However, as risk levels rise, social costs related to the anxiety associated with radiation-induced health effects are also incorporated and the valuation increases disproportionally. While such valuations are in principle measurable, in the absence of empirical data a risk/detriment cost relationship is proposed, leading to a variable monetary value of the man-sievert which is a function of the per caput dose of a given population sub-group. Application of this methodology will help to ensure that radiological protection resources are spent in areas where they are most required. (author)

  13. Equivalence principle violations and couplings of a light dilaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damour, Thibault; Donoghue, John F.

    2010-01-01

    We consider possible violations of the equivalence principle through the exchange of a light 'dilaton-like' scalar field. Using recent work on the quark-mass dependence of nuclear binding, we find that the dilaton-quark-mass coupling induces significant equivalence-principle-violating effects varying like the inverse cubic root of the atomic number - A -1/3 . We provide a general parametrization of the scalar couplings, but argue that two parameters are likely to dominate the equivalence-principle phenomenology. We indicate the implications of this framework for comparing the sensitivities of current and planned experimental tests of the equivalence principle.

  14. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  15. Strong equivalence, Lorentz and CPT violation, anti-hydrogen spectroscopy and gamma-ray burst polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, Graham M.

    2005-01-01

    The strong equivalence principle, local Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry are fundamental ingredients of the quantum field theories used to describe elementary particle physics. Nevertheless, each may be violated by simple modifications to the dynamics while apparently preserving the essential fundamental structure of quantum field theory itself. In this paper, we analyse the construction of strong equivalence, Lorentz and CPT violating Lagrangians for QED and review and propose some experimental tests in the fields of astrophysical polarimetry and precision atomic spectroscopy. In particular, modifications of the Maxwell action predict a birefringent rotation of the direction of linearly polarised radiation from synchrotron emission which may be studied using radio galaxies or, potentially, gamma-ray bursts. In the Dirac sector, changes in atomic energy levels are predicted which may be probed in precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen atoms, notably in the Doppler-free, two-photon 1s-2s and 2s-nd (n∼10) transitions

  16. Estimation of equivalent dose on the ends of hemodynamic physicians during neurological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squair, Peterson L.; Souza, Luiz C. de; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C. de

    2005-01-01

    The estimation of doses in the hands of physicists during hemodynamic procedures is important to verify the application of radiation protection related to the optimization and limit of dose, principles required by the Portaria 453/98 of Ministry of Health/ANVISA, Brazil. It was checked the levels of exposure of the hands of doctors during the use of the equipment in hemodynamic neurological procedures through dosimetric rings with thermoluminescent dosemeters detectors of LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), calibrated in personal Dose equivalent HP (0.07). The average equivalent dose in the end obtained was 41.12. μSv per scan with an expanded uncertainty of 20% for k = 2. This value is relative to the hemodynamic Neurology procedure using radiological protection procedures accessible to minimize the dose

  17. Breakdown of the equivalence between gravitational mass and energy for a composite quantum body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebed, Andrei G

    2014-01-01

    The simplest quantum composite body, a hydrogen atom, is considered in the presence of a weak external gravitational field. We define an operator for the passive gravitational mass of the atom in the post-Newtonian approximation of the general relativity and show that it does not commute with its energy operator. Nevertheless, the equivalence between the expectation values of the mass and energy is shown to survive at a macroscopic level for stationary quantum states. Breakdown of the equivalence between passive gravitational mass and energy at a microscopic level for stationary quantum states can be experimentally detected by studying unusual electromagnetic radiation, emitted by the atoms, supported by and moving in the Earth's gravitational field with constant velocity, using spacecraft or satellite

  18. Biological radiation effects and radioprotection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, H.

    1991-03-01

    In this report, after recalling the mode of action of ionizing radiations, the notions of dose, dose equivalents and the values of natural irradiation, the author describes the biological radiation effects. Then he presents the ICRP recommendations and their applications to the french radioprotection system

  19. Nature of radiation damage in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Efforts to determine the equivalence between different sources of radiation damage in ceramics are reviewed. The ways in which ceramics differ from metals are examined and proposed mechanisms for creation and stabilization of defects in insulators are outlined. Work on radiation damage in crystalline oxides is summarized and suggestions for further research are offered

  20. Collective effective dose equivalent, population doses and risk estimates from occupational exposures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo; Mase, Naomichi.

    1993-01-01

    Collective dose equivalent and population dose from occupational exposures in Japan, 1988 were estimated on the basis of a nationwide survey. The survey was conducted on annual collective dose equivalents by sex, age group and type of radiation work for about 0.21 million workers except for the workers in nuclear power stations. The data on the workers in nuclear power stations were obtained from the official report of the Japan Nuclear Safety Commission. The total number of workers including nuclear power stations was estimated to be about 0.26 million. Radiation works were subdivided as follows: medical works including dental; non-atomic energy industry; research and education; atomic energy industry and nuclear power station. For the determination of effective dose equivalent and population dose, organ or tissue doses were measured with a phantom experiment. The resultant doses were compared with the doses previously calculated using a chord length technique and with data from ICRP publications. The annual collective effective dose equivalent were estimated to be about 21.94 person·Sv for medical workers, 7.73 person·Sv for industrial workers, 0.75 person·Sv for research and educational workers, 2.48 person·Sv for atomic energy industry and 84.4 person ·Sv for workers in nuclear power station. The population doses were calculated to be about 1.07 Sv for genetically significant dose, 0.89 Sv for leukemia significant dose and 0.42 Sv for malignant significant dose. The population risks were estimated using these population doses. (author)

  1. On the radiation dosimetry in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doke, Tadayoshi

    2005-01-01

    The radiation dosimetry in space is considerably different from that on the earth surface, because, on the earth surface, the quality factor for radiation is roughly given for its energy but, in space, it is defined as a continuous function of LET. Thus, the contribution to the dose equivalent from heavy charged particles included in galactic cosmic rays is more than 50%, because of their high LET values. To evaluate such dose equivalent within an uncertainty of 30%, we must determine the true LET distribution. This paper describes the essence of such a new radiation dosimetry in space. (author)

  2. Development of solid water-equivalent radioactive certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finke, E.; Greupner, H.; Groche, K.; Rittwag, R.; Geske, G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the development of solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials. These certified reference materials were prepared for the beta fission nuclides 90 Sr/ 90 Y, 137 Cs, 147 Pm and 204 Tl. Comparative measurements of liquid and solid water-equivalent beta volume radioactive certified reference materials are discussed. (author)

  3. Equivalence of quantum states under local unitary transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei Shaoming; Jing Naihuan

    2005-01-01

    In terms of the analysis of fixed point subgroup and tensor decomposability of certain matrices, we study the equivalence of quantum bipartite mixed states under local unitary transformations. For non-degenerate case an operational criterion for the equivalence of two such mixed bipartite states under local unitary transformations is presented

  4. 40 CFR 133.105 - Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment. 133.105 Section 133.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS SECONDARY TREATMENT REGULATION § 133.105 Treatment equivalent to secondary treatment...

  5. Microcystin-LR equivalent concentrations in fish tissue during a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of a decomposing cyanobacteria bloom on water quality and the accumulation of microcystin-LR equivalent toxin in fish at Loskop Dam were studied in May 2012. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] was used to confirm the presence of microcystin-LR equivalent in the water and to determine the ...

  6. Decompositional equivalence: A fundamental symmetry underlying quantum theory

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Decompositional equivalence is the principle that there is no preferred decomposition of the universe into subsystems. It is shown here, by using simple thought experiments, that quantum theory follows from decompositional equivalence together with Landauer's principle. This demonstration raises within physics a question previously left to psychology: how do human - or any - observers agree about what constitutes a "system of interest"?

  7. Preparation of A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saion, E.B.; Shaari, A.H.; Watt, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic is widely used as a wall material for tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCS) used in experimental microdosimetry. The objective of this note is to give a technical account of how A-150 TE plastic film can be fabricated in the laboratory from commercially available A-150 TE plastic. (author)

  8. Equivalence of several Chern-Simons matter models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.; Itoi, C.

    1994-01-01

    Chern-Simons (CS) coupling characterizes not only statistics, but also spin and scaling dimension of matter fields. We demonstrate spin transmutation in relativistic CS matter theory, and moreover show equivalence of several models. We study the CS vector model in some detail, which provides a consistent check to the assertion of the equivalence

  9. 29 CFR 4.170 - Furnishing fringe benefits or equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Furnishing fringe benefits or equivalents. 4.170 Section 4... Standards Compliance with Compensation Standards § 4.170 Furnishing fringe benefits or equivalents. (a) General. Fringe benefits required under the Act shall be furnished, separate from and in addition to the...

  10. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalized...

  11. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continuous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalize...

  12. Graphene-based THz modulator analyzed by equivalent circuit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Binggang; Chen, Jing; Xie, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    A terahertz (THz) modulator based on graphene is proposed and analysed by use of equivalent transmission line of a homogeneous mediumand the local anisotropic model of the graphene conductivity. The result calculated by the equivalent circuit is consistent with that obtained byFresnel transfer...

  13. The lexicographical handling of grammatical equivalence: the case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lexicographers compiling translating dictionaries are not exclusively concerned with semantic equivalence when selecting translating equivalents for lemmata, but often include also grammatical information in illustrative examples when the lexical item to be translated does not have an exact grammatical counterpart in the ...

  14. 30 CFR 90.206 - Approved sampling devices; equivalent concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approved sampling devices; equivalent... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.206 Approved sampling devices; equivalent...

  15. Teaching Brain-Behavior Relations Economically with Stimulus Equivalence Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Covey, Daniel P.; Critchfield, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Instructional interventions based on stimulus equivalence provide learners with the opportunity to acquire skills that are not directly taught, thereby improving the efficiency of instructional efforts. The present report describes a study in which equivalence-based instruction was used to teach college students facts regarding brain anatomy and…

  16. Foundations of gravitation theory: the principle of equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugan, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    A new framework is presented within which to discuss the principle of equivalence and its experimental tests. The framework incorporates a special structure imposed on the equivalence principle by the principle of energy conservation. This structure includes relations among the conceptual components of the equivalence principle as well as quantitative relations among the outcomes of its experimental tests. One of the most striking new results obtained through use of this framework is a connection between the breakdown of local Lorentz invariance and the breakdown of the principle that all bodies fall with the same acceleration in a gravitational field. An extensive discussion of experimental tests of the equivalence principle and their significance is also presented. Within the above framework, theory-independent analyses of a broad range of equivalence principle tests are possible. Gravitational redshift experiments. Doppler-shift experiments, the Turner-Hill and Hughes-Drever experiments, and a number of solar-system tests of gravitation theories are analyzed. Application of the techniques of theoretical nuclear physics to the quantitative interpretation of equivalence principle tests using laboratory materials of different composition yields a number of important results. It is found that current Eotvos experiments significantly demonstrate the compatibility of the weak interactions with the equivalence principle. It is also shown that the Hughes-Drever experiment is the most precise test of local Lorentz invariance yet performed. The work leads to a strong, tightly knit empirical basis for the principle of equivalence, the central pillar of the foundations of gravitation theory

  17. Sensitivity of a two-dimensional chemistry-transport model to changes in parameterizations of radiative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, K.E.; Ellingson, R.G.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1988-08-01

    Radiative processes strongly effect equilibrium trace gas concentrations both directly, through photolysis reactions, and indirectly through temperature and transport processes. As part of our continuing radiative submodel development and validation, we have used the LLNL 2-D chemical-radiative-transport (CRT) model to investigate the net sensitivity of equilibrium ozone concentrations to several changes in radiative forcing. Doubling CO 2 from 300 ppmv to 600 ppmv resulted in a temperature decrease of 5 K to 8 K in the middle stratosphere along with an 8% to 16% increase in ozone in the same region. Replacing our usual shortwave scattering algorithms with a simplified Rayleigh algorithm led to a 1% to 2% increase in ozone in the lower stratosphere. Finally, modifying our normal CO 2 cooling rates by corrections derived from line-by-line calculations resulted in several regions of heating and cooling. We observed temperature changes on the order of 1 K to 1.5 K with corresponding changes of 0.5% to 1.5% in O 3 . Our results for doubled CO 2 compare favorably with those by other authors. Results for our two perturbation scenarios stress the need for accurately modeling radiative processes while confirming the general validity of current 2-D CRT models. 15 refs., 5 figs

  18. Evaluation of the transmitted exposure through lead equivalent aprons used in a radiology department, including the contribution from backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulou, Emmanuel G.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Larson, Sandra C.; Darner, Katie L.; Satti, Jahangir; Chan, H.-P.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the radiation transmission through lead equivalent aprons that are used in a radiology department. A large area beam (poor geometry) was employed for the transmission measurements, and backscatter was simulated by placing 7 '' of Lucite behind each apron. Separate ionization chambers were used to measure the incident and transmitted x-ray beams. Transmission measurements were made at 70 kVp and 100 kVp through aprons and protective shields from eight different vendors that were marked 0.25 mm and 0.5 mm lead equivalent. Transmissions through 0.254 mm and 0.508 mm of pure lead were also measured and were compared with the transmissions through the lead equivalent materials. In addition, the area densities of the aprons were measured to compare radiation transmission with respect to the weights of the aprons. At 70 kVp, the transmission through 0.254 mm of pure lead was 5.4% and the transmissions through the 0.25 mm lead equivalent materials were 4.3% to 10.2% with a mean value of 7.1% and a standard deviation (s.d.) of 1.4%. At 100 kVp, the values were 15% for 0.254 mm pure lead and 12.3% to 20.7% (mean 16.8%, s.d. 2.1%) for the 0.25 mm lead equivalent materials. The transmission through the 0.508 mm pure lead sample was 0.9% at 70 kVp, and the corresponding transmissions through the 0.5 mm lead equivalent materials were 0.6% to 1.6% (mean 1.0%, s.d. 0.2%). At 100 kVp, the transmission through the 0.508 mm lead sample was 5% and those through the 0.5 mm lead equivalent materials were 3.5% to 6.7% (mean 4.9%, s.d. 0.7%). The radiation transmissions at 70 kVp, through two 'lead-free' 0.5 mm lead equivalent aprons, were 1.7% and 1.9% and at 100 kVp the transmissions were 6.1% and 6.8%, respectively. This study indicates that there is a need to establish methods for acceptance testing of aprons and a need to establish acceptance limits for the x-ray transmission of aprons at specific kVp values. There is also a need for the

  19. Calculation simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for dispersion nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wei; Zhao Yunmei; Gong Xin; Ding Shurong; Huo Yongzhong

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion nuclear fuel was regarded as a kind of special particle composites. Assuming that the fuel particles are periodically distributed in the dispersion nuclear fuel meat, the finite element model to calculate its equivalent irradiation swelling was developed with the method of computational micro-mechanics. Considering irradiation swelling in the fuel particles and the irradiation hardening effect in the metal matrix, the stress update algorithms were established respectively for the fuel particles and metal matrix. The corresponding user subroutines were programmed, and the finite element simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for the fuel meat was performed in Abaqus. The effects of the particle size and volume fraction on the equivalent irradiation swelling were investigated, and the fitting formula of equivalent irradiation swelling was obtained. The results indicate that the main factors to influence equivalent irradiation swelling of the fuel meat are the irradiation swelling and volume fraction of fuel particles. (authors)

  20. Seismic equivalents of volcanic jet scaling laws and multipoles in acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Matthew M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Fee, David; Aldridge, David F.

    2018-04-01

    We establish analogies between equivalent source theory in seismology (moment-tensor and single-force sources) and acoustics (monopoles, dipoles and quadrupoles) in the context of volcanic eruption signals. Although infrasound (acoustic waves volcanic eruptions may be more complex than a simple monopole, dipole or quadrupole assumption, these elementary acoustic sources are a logical place to begin exploring relations with seismic sources. By considering the radiated power of a harmonic force source at the surface of an elastic half-space, we show that a volcanic jet or plume modelled as a seismic force has similar scaling with respect to eruption parameters (e.g. exit velocity and vent area) as an acoustic dipole. We support this by demonstrating, from first principles, a fundamental relationship that ties together explosion, torque and force sources in seismology and highlights the underlying dipole nature of seismic forces. This forges a connection between the multipole expansion of equivalent sources in acoustics and the use of forces and moments as equivalent sources in seismology. We further show that volcanic infrasound monopole and quadrupole sources exhibit scalings similar to seismicity radiated by volume injection and moment sources, respectively. We describe a scaling theory for seismic tremor during volcanic eruptions that agrees with observations showing a linear relation between radiated power of tremor and eruption rate. Volcanic tremor over the first 17 hr of the 2016 eruption at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, obeyed the linear relation. Subsequent tremor during the main phase of the eruption did not obey the linear relation and demonstrates that volcanic eruption tremor can exhibit other scalings even during the same eruption.