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Sample records for linde uranium refinery

  1. Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

    2002-02-27

    During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

  2. Post-Remediation Radiological Dose Assessment, Linde Site, Tonawanda, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, Sunita [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Durham, Lisa A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    A post-remediation radiological dose assessment was conducted for the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Linde Site by using the measured residual concentrations of the radionuclides of concern following the completion of the soils remedial action. The site’s FUSRAP-related contaminants of concern (COCs) are radionuclides associated with uranium processing activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) in support of the Nation’s early atomic energy and weapons program and include radium-226 (Ra-226), thorium-230 (Th-230), and total uranium (Utotal). Remedial actions to address Linde Site soils and structures were conducted in accordance with the Record of Decision for the Linde Site, Tonawanda, New York (ROD) (USACE 2000a). In the ROD, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) determined that the cleanup standards found in Title 40, Part 192 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 192), the standards for cleanup of uranium mill sites designated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) standards for decommissioning of licensed uranium and thorium mills, found in 10 CFR Part 40, Appendix A, Criterion 6(6), are Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) for cleanup of MED-related contamination at the Linde Site. The major elements of this remedy will involve excavation of the soils with COCs above soil cleanup levels and placement of clean materials to meet the other criteria of 40 CFR Part 192.

  3. Refinery scheduling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Marcus V.; Fraga, Eder T. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Shah, Nilay [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    This work addresses the refinery scheduling problem using mathematical programming techniques. The solution adopted was to decompose the entire refinery model into a crude oil scheduling and a product scheduling problem. The envelope for the crude oil scheduling problem is composed of a terminal, a pipeline and the crude area of a refinery, including the crude distillation units. The solution method adopted includes a decomposition technique based on the topology of the system. The envelope for the product scheduling comprises all tanks, process units and products found in a refinery. Once crude scheduling decisions are Also available the product scheduling is solved using a rolling horizon algorithm. All models were tested with real data from PETROBRAS' REFAP refinery, located in Canoas, Southern Brazil. (author)

  4. Quando se convocam os lindes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Vallejos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784x.2008nesp1p28 Presento aquí notas acerca de problemas epistemológicos vinculados con los lindes o las fronteras. Al llamar literaria a la epistemología no reclamo ese estatuto o condición para ella; más bien aspiro a llamar la atención sobre la participación de lo epistémico en lo literario y qué realidad epistémica adquiere visibilidad allí. Dar expresión a esta aspiración es un modo de heredar una manera de entender y habitar el mundo intelectual: un mundo sin límites preestablecidos, un mundo donde no haya noticias de las fronteras para traer.

  5. Quando se convocam os lindes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Vallejos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Presento aquí notas acerca de problemas epistemológicos vinculados con los lindes o las fronteras. Al llamar literaria a la epistemología no reclamo ese estatuto o condición para ella; más bien aspiro a llamar la atención sobre la participación de lo epistémico en lo literario y qué realidad epistémica adquiere visibilidad allí. Dar expresión a esta aspiración es un modo de heredar una manera de entender y habitar el mundo intelectual: un mundo sin límites preestablecidos, un mundo donde no haya noticias de las fronteras para traer.

  6. Contemporary art encompasses all the rest / Maria Lind ; intervjueerinud Eero Epner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lind, Maria, 1966-

    2011-01-01

    Rootsi kuraator ja kunstikriitik Maria Lind retrospektiivnäituse formaadist, kaasaegsest kunstimaailmast, riigi kunstiinstitutsioonidest ja eragaleriidest, oma raamatust "Maria Lind. Selected Writings" (2010), kunstikriitikast ja -kirjutistest, kureerimise tähtsuse tõusust, nüüdiskunstist

  7. Contemporary art encompasses all the rest / Maria Lind ; intervjueerinud Eero Epner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lind, Maria, 1966-

    2011-01-01

    Rootsi kuraator ja kunstikriitik Maria Lind retrospektiivnäituse formaadist, kaasaegsest kunstimaailmast, riigi kunstiinstitutsioonidest ja eragaleriidest, oma raamatust "Maria Lind. Selected Writings" (2010), kunstikriitikast ja -kirjutistest, kureerimise tähtsuse tõusust, nüüdiskunstist

  8. Max Linde, MD, a Luebeck ophthalmologist and patron of Edvard Munch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C

    1999-01-01

    Ophthalmologist Maximilian Linde (1862-1940) had a passion for contemporary art and owned one of the most important private collections in Europe. He first met little known Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch in 1903, recognized special talent, and welcomed him into his family. With Linde's encouragement, patronage, and friendship, Munich became one of the most important artists of his time. Many of Munch's works were commissioned by Linde and many featured Linde and his family as subjects.

  9. Maximizing petrochemicals from refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, B.; Foley, T.; Frey, S. [UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2007-07-01

    New fuel quality requirements and high growth rates for petrochemicals are providing both challenges and opportunities for refineries. A key challenge in refineries today is to improve of the value of the products from the FCC unit. In particular, light FCC naphtha and LCO are prime candidates for improved utilization. Processing options have been developed focusing on new opportunities for these traditional fuel components. The Total Petrochemicals/UOP Olefin Cracking Process cracks C4-C8 olefins to produce propylene and ethylene. This process can be integrated into FCC units running at all severity levels to produce valuable light olefins while reducing the olefin content of the light FCC naphtha. Integration of the Olefin Cracking Process with an FCC unit can be accomplished to allow a range of operating modes which can accommodate changing demand for propylene, cracked naphtha and alkylate. Other processes developed by UOP allow for upgrading LCO into a range of products including petrochemical grade xylenes, benzene, high cetane diesel and low sulfur high octane gasoline. Various processing options are available which allow the products from LCO conversion to be adjusted based on the needs and opportunities of an individual refinery, as well as the external petrochemical demand cycles. This presentation will examine recent refining and petrochemical trends and highlight new process technologies that can be used to generate additional revenue from petrochemical production while addressing evolving clean fuel demands. (orig.)

  10. Alan Guth and Andrei Linde win international cosmology award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Leading theoretical cosmologists Alan Guth, Weisskopf Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Andrei Linde, Professor of Physics at Stanford University, who played prominent roles in developing and refining the theory of cosmic inflation, have been selected by an international panel of experts to receive the 2004 Cosmology Prize of the Peter Gruber Foundation" (1 page).

  11. ENERGY MANAGEMENT IN REFINERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Japan energy saving activities of refineries in 1970s and 1980s were reviewed. The activities led by task teams were strongly supported by the corporate management. The teams consisted of well-trained and experienced persons from technical, maintenance, operation and manufacturing planning, and focused on cost cut, preventing energy losses, uncovering a lot of energy losses and preventing losses with no or small investment. For instance, loss measurement, less stripping steam, less reflux ratios, less treat gas, lower pressure and lower temperature, etc. In 1990s, environmental discussions suggested to introduce ultra low sulfur fuels and less CO2 emission fuels. In addition to the above, oil prices hike and supply shortage drive these activities. Energy saving should be evaluated by the overall optimization (saving and value generation). Energy utilization can be managed.

  12. Innovative Regulatory and Technical Approaches for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers' Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, J. T.; Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J.; Boyle, J. D.; Rogers, B. C.

    2002-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) created the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974 to identify, investigate, and cleanup or control radiological contamination at sites used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the 1940s through the 1960s. The USDOE had identified 46 sites in the program and finished remediation at 24 of the smaller ones before the end of 1997. With the passage of the Energy and Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1998 the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was designated by Congress with responsibility to manage and execute the FUSRAP. The Linde Site located in Tonawanda, New York was operated by the MED from 1942-1946 to extract uranium from several high-grade ores. This natural uranium was subsequently enriched in U-235 elsewhere in the United States and ultimately used to produce energy or weapons. Though in the process of reviewing alternative disposal options by 1995, the USDOE had operated FUSRAP with a strategy requiring virtually all materials remediated be disposed of at only one Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facility. The change in management of the FUSRAP in 1997 allowed the disposal policy of low levels of radioactively contaminated materials found at the remaining sites to be reexamined. This paper presents some of the innovative regulatory and technical approaches employed at the Linde Site that are resulting in project cost savings while meeting applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements as well as fulfilling commitments made to the local community.

  13. On Ms.Linde in A Doll’s House

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁玮珊

    2012-01-01

      A Doll’s House is a three-act play written by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. Itis seen as a very important work on feminism in which Nora, the heroine, is generally considered as the pioneer of modern feminism for her brave act of leaving her husband. However, this kind of perspective is actually biased for Ms.Linde, with her job, firmness in her own values, positive impact on others as well as her infinite maternal love deserves more than Nora to be the forebear of modern feminism.

  14. The f(R gravity function of the Linde quintessence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Ketov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the f(R gravity function in the dual gravity description of the quintessence model with a quadratic (Linde scalar potential and a positive cosmological constant. We find that in the large curvature regime relevant to chaotic inflation in Early Universe, the dual f(R gravity is well approximated by the (matter loop-corrected Starobinsky inflationary model. In the small curvature regime relevant to dark energy in the Present Universe, the f(R gravity function reduces to the Einstein–Hilbert one with a positive cosmological constant.

  15. Analysis on Competitiveness of China's Refineries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yuguo

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviewed the refining and marketing business of both domestic and international oil companies, and tried to figure out the gap of domestic refining enterprises in terms of the refinery scale,processing unit configuration, stream factor and competitive edge as compared to overseas refineries. The paper also concluded that the net margin of domestic refineries is about $1.0/bbl lower than that of the overseas refineries, and proposed some ideas to sharpen the competitive edge of Chinese refining industry.

  16. Bernhard Linde. Noor-Eesti vooriülem. Bernhard Linde. Leader of the Young Estonian Pack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaanus Kulli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Bernhard Linde (1886–1954 was a recognized and prolific Estonian theatre critic of the first quarter of the 20th century, who mediated and propagated western as well as eastern European theatrical innovations. In addition, he was active as a literary and art critic, publisher, and proponent of libraries, to a modest extent he was a prose writer and poet. Unquestionably, however, Bernhard Linde’s most prominent role was as one of the founding members of the literary movement Young Estonia. He was the group’s first general manager; later on, he was the secretary of the Estonian Writers’ Association Young Estonia, and the chairman of the board of the Young Estonia Publishing House. Linde’s formal education culminated in graduation from Tartu University as a Slavic philologist; he was the only member of the Young Estonia group to demonstrate serious and sustained interest toward Slavic cultures and peoples. Linde was a contradictory figure, evoking a range of responses from his contemporaries: on the one hand, there was the unbelievably broad range of his participation in cultural life, his organizing skills and business instincts in directing publishing houses; on the other hand, a superficiality in his writings, his often rash and subjective style as a critic, and his financial intrigues. If one adds in Linde’s stubbornness, egocentrism, and intense spirit of protest, which often led to lawsuits, the outcome is the portrait of an extremely complicated, fascinating, and passionate man—both in his creative work and his personal life Linde guaranteed a place for himself in literary history through a small catch of texts: a few foundational essays (for example, on August Kitzberg, a translation of Balzac’s Le père Goriot, the essay collection Omad ja võõrad (Own and Foreign and a travel book focusing on the literature and theatre of eastern Europe (Loova Kesk-Euroopa Poole (Toward A Creative Central Europe. The prominent public

  17. Maximizing production rates of the Linde Hampson machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, B.-Z.

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to the ideal case of unlimited size recuperator, any real Linde-Hampson machine of finite size recuperator can be optimized to reach the extreme rates of performance. The group of cryocoolers sharing the same size recuperator is optimized in a closed form by determining the corresponding flow rate which maximizes its rate of cold production. For a similar group of liquefiers an optimal flow rate is derived to maximize the rate of production of liquid cryogen. The group of cryocoolers sharing a constant and given flow rate is optimized by shortening the recuperator for reaching a maximum compactness measured by the cooling power per unit size of the recuperator. The optimum conditions are developed for nitrogen and argon. The relevance of this analysis is discussed in the context of practice of fast cooldown Joule-Thomson cryocooling.

  18. Generalized Poisson-Lindely Distribution in Promotion Time Cure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Baghestani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 Long-term survival analysis has been improved in the last decade and most of the models concentrate on the promotion time cure model that proposed by Chen (1999. These models are based on the distribution of latent variable N, number of initiated node cells. In this paper we proposed a Generalized Poisson-Lindely distribution that is another option instead of Negative Binomial distribution when there is overdispersion. The results indicated a better fitness compared to others, because of its more flexibility. Parameter estimation has been done by Bayesian approach, in a real data set and a simulation study has shown the advantages of proposed model. Normal 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

  19. Występowanie szarej pleśni tulipanow – Botrytis tulipae (Lib. Lind na plantacjach produkcyjnych [Botrytis tulipae (Lib. Lind in tulip plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cz. Zamorski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of disease caused by Botrytis tulipae (Lib. Lind was studied in selected tulip plantations. Primary and secondary infection, as well as infections of daughter bulbs were observed. The number of affected plants differed according (to the variety, season, and rainfall.

  20. Aspects of petrochemistry in a fuels refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, J.; Mielicke, C.J.; Maier, T. [MIRO - Mineraloelraffinerie Oberrhein GmbH und Co. KG, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Classical links between refinery and petrochemical downstream operations are light naphtha, C2-C4-Olefins and various aromatic compounds. Additionally long chain paraffines from dewaxing or even heavy residues can be interesting starting materials for petrochemistry. Some aspects of these links between refining and petrochemistry as well as their impact on refinery operation and product pools are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  2. 75 FR 4822 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for Linde Ceramics, Tonawanda...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ...: Facility: Linde Ceramics. Location: Tonawanda, New York. Job Titles and/or Job Duties: All employees who... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for Linde Ceramics... gives notice as required by 42 CFR 83.12(e) of a decision to evaluate a petition to designate a class of...

  3. Fracture toughness master curve characterization of Linde 1092 weld metal for Beaver valley 1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bong Sang; Yang, Won Jon; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the test results obtained from the Korean contribution to the integrity assessment of low toughness Beaver Valley reactor vessel by characterizing the fracture toughness of Linde 1092 (No. 305414) weld metal. 10 PCVN specimens and 10 1T-CT specimens were tested in accordance with the ASTM E 1921-97 standard, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T{sub o}, for ferritic steels in the transition range'. This results can also be useful for assessment of Linde 80 low toughness welds of Kori-1.

  4. Mazeikiai refinery woes deepen on all fronts

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Leedu rahandusminister teatas, et riigieelarvet mõjutavad probleemid Mazeikiai tehasega, mis on Leedu suurim maksumaksja. Lisa: Russian oil company to build refinery. Surgutneftegaz teatas plaanist ehitada naftatöötlustehas Peterburi lähedale

  5. Mazeikiai refinery woes deepen on all fronts

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Leedu rahandusminister teatas, et riigieelarvet mõjutavad probleemid Mazeikiai tehasega, mis on Leedu suurim maksumaksja. Lisa: Russian oil company to build refinery. Surgutneftegaz teatas plaanist ehitada naftatöötlustehas Peterburi lähedale

  6. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  7. Current situation of oil refinery in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershkova, Elena; Petkova, Petinka; Grinkevich, Anastasia

    2016-09-01

    This article deals with the classification approach for oil refineries in international practices. Criteria of refinery estimation group, including its financial status estimation, have been investigated. The analysis object is “Lukoil Neftochim Bourgas” AD (LNCHB) activity. This company is a leading enterprise in Bulgaria. The analysis of LNCHB operating: energy intensity index; index of operating costs and return on investment index have been performed.

  8. Presidendi otsevalimine võib saada tegelikkuseks / Väino Linde

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Linde, Väino

    2003-01-01

    Ilmunud ka Sakala (2003/Sep/18) lk. 2 ; Koit (2003/Sep/20) lk. 3 ; Vooremaa (2003/Sep/20) lk. 2 ; Pärnu Postimees (2003/Sep/20) lk. 15. Riigikogu põhiseaduskomisjoni liige Väino Linde presidendi otsevalimise seaduse eelnõust

  9. Presidendi otsevalimine võib saada tegelikkuseks / Väino Linde

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Linde, Väino

    2003-01-01

    Ilmunud ka Sakala (2003/Sep/18) lk. 2 ; Koit (2003/Sep/20) lk. 3 ; Vooremaa (2003/Sep/20) lk. 2 ; Pärnu Postimees (2003/Sep/20) lk. 15. Riigikogu põhiseaduskomisjoni liige Väino Linde presidendi otsevalimise seaduse eelnõust

  10. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  11. Status and tasks of oil refinery industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, I.M. [Korea Petroleum Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The oil refinery industry is currently undergoing more difficulties than other industries. Since crude oil is all imported, whose import amount is the biggest as single item, and usance financing that once extended up to one hundred eighty (180) days is not easy to get under the current exchange and financial crisis, there are many hardships in import of crude oil. With this, domestic petroleum products demand shows sudden decline trend while competition gets more intensified due to remarkable regulation relief and liberalization measures in oil refinery industry such as the liberalization of domestic oil prices, etc. It is estimated that it entered the low growth stage as high-growth age of double-digit ends due to several complicated factors and rapid changes of economic environment. Under these crisis situations, domestic oil refinery industry drives super retrenchment management and restructuring for survival, but they are bombarded with piled up tasks while faced with liberalization and outward opening of imminent oil refinery business and domestic petroleum market. Domestic oil refinery industry should provide petroleum energy, which is blood of national economy and industries steadily without interruption overcoming wisely the worst management crisis with collective wisdom based on the accumulated management know-how and experience for the past first generation, and I also firmly believe that they can do that. 21 tabs.

  12. Sinopec Builds World-class Refinery in Qingdao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sinopec launched a subsidiary company in midNovember, Sinopec Qingdao Refinery and Chemical Company, to construct and operate a US$ 1.2 billion refinery in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province. The refinery,which was first initiated 12 years ago, is an important move for Sinopec to complete its refinery deployment along the coast line to cash in on rapid market growth and better handle imports of crude oil.

  13. A planning model for petroleum refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to develop a nonlinear planning model for refinery production. The model described here represents a general petroleum refinery and its framework allows the implementation of nonlinear process models as well as blending relations. This model assumes the existence of several processing units, producing a variety of intermediate streams, with different properties, that can be blended to constitute the desired kinds of products. Two real-world applications are developed, one for the planning of diesel production in the RPBC refinery in Cubatão (SP and the other for the general production planning in the REVAP refinery in S. José dos Campos (SP. In both cases, different market scenarios were analyzed using the planning optimization and the results were compared with the current situation, in which there is no extensive use of planning decision support tools. Results revealed that there is a very large potential of profitability embedded in the planning activity, reaching several millions of dollars per year.

  14. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  15. Integrated pollution control for oil refinery complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiperstok, A. [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil); Sharratt, P.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology

    1993-12-31

    Improving environmental performance of oil refineries is a complex task. Emission limits, operating constraints, available technologies, operating techniques, and local environment sensitivity must all be considered. This work describes efforts to build an interactive software to deal with this problem. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Typical Industrial Cluster - Chemistry/refinery/petrochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bungener, Stéphane Laurent

    2016-01-01

    A refinery and petrochemical site are described in the document. Data for the steam consumption and production of the cluster's process units are also described. The cluster can be broken down into two individual sites made up of process units and process utility requirements.

  17. SUPERTARGET: Applications software for oil refinery retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.; Patela, E.

    1987-01-01

    Pinch Technology has recently delivered radically new procedures for process retrofit. Software appropriate to these techniques is implemented in SUPERTARGET. It is now possible to predict, ahead of design, targets for energy savings, capital investment, and payback. The procedures account for how poorly the existing design is being used. This paper shows the techniques performed in an actual oil refinery retrofit using SUPERTARGET.

  18. [Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill) biomass refinery engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Wang, Ning; Li, Tan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Sumac (Rhus chinensis Mill) is an abundant and widely distributed Chinese native plant. Sumac fruit contains low content of vegetable oil, as an atypical oil plants hardly being processed through traditional vegetable oil production technologies. Based on our own studies on the characteristics of sumac fruit and branches, we established a novel model of sumac biomass refinery, and constructed the sumac biomass refinery technology system and eco-industrial chain integration. Steam explosion was the key technology, and several components fractionation technologies were integrated in the sumac biomass refinery system. The fractionated components were converted into different products depending on their functional features. Eight products including sumac fruit oil, biodiesel, protein feed, flavonoids, unbleached facial tissue, phenolic resin, biomass briquette and biogas were produced in the refinery. The extracted sumac fruit oil by steam explosion pretreatment was applied for the new food resource of Ministry of Health, and the permit was approved. This research provides a new model for the development of atypical wild plant resources.

  19. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil From Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Michael [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Marker, Terry [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Ortiz-Toral, Pedro [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Linck, Martin [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Felix, Larry [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Wangerow, Jim [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Swanson, Dan [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); McLeod, Celeste [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Del Paggio, Alan [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Urade, Vikrant [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Rao, Madhusudhan [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Narasimhan, Laxmi [CRI Catalyst, Houston, TX (United States); Gephart, John [Johnson Timber, Hayward, WI (United States); Starr, Jack [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Hahn, John [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Stover, Daniel [Cargill, Wayzata, MN (United States); Parrish, Martin [Valero, San Antonio, TX (United States); Maxey, Carl [Valero, San Antonio, TX (United States); Shonnard, David [MTU, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Handler, Robert [MTU, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Fan, Jiquig [MTU, Friedrichshafen (Germany)

    2015-08-31

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be converted to bio-oils containing less than 10% oxygen by a hydropyrolysis process. Hydropyrolysis is the first step in Gas Technology Institute’s (GTI) integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion IH2®. These intermediate bio-oils can then be converted to drop-in hydrocarbon fuels using existing refinery hydrotreating equipment to make hydrocarbon blending components, which are fully compatible with existing fuels. Alternatively, cellulosic or woody biomass can directly be converted into drop-in hydrocarbon fuels containing less than 0.4% oxygen using the IH2 process located adjacent to a refinery or ethanol production facility. Many US oil refineries are actually located near biomass resources and are a logical location for a biomass to transportation fuel conversion process. The goal of this project was to work directly with an oil refinery partner, to determine the most attractive route and location for conversion of biorenewables to drop in fuels in their refinery and ethanol production network. Valero Energy Company, through its subsidiaries, has 12 US oil refineries and 11 ethanol production facilities, making them an ideal partner for this analysis. Valero is also part of a 50- 50 joint venture with Darling Ingredients called Diamond Green Diesel. Diamond Green Diesel’s production capacity is approximately 11,000 barrels per day of renewable diesel. The plant is located adjacent to Valero’s St Charles, Louisiana Refinery and converts recycled animal fats, used cooking oil, and waste corn oil into renewable diesel. This is the largest renewable diesel plant in the U.S. and has successfully operated for over 2 years For this project, 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oil from wood and 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oils from corn stover were produced. The hydropyrolysis oil produced had 4-10% oxygen. Metallurgical testing of hydropyrolysis liquids was completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories (Oak Ridge) and showed the

  20. Production planning and scheduling in refinery industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jan

    1999-07-01

    In this thesis we consider production planning and scheduling in refinery industry, in particular we study the planning and scheduling at the Nynaes AB refinery and at the Scanraff AB refinery. The purpose is to contribute to the development and the use of optimization models to support efficient decision making. We identify various decision problems concerning the aggregated production planning, the shipment planning, the scheduling of operation modes, and the utilization of pipes and tanks; and we discuss the potential to successfully apply optimization models on these problems. We formulate a mixed integer linear programming model for the scheduling of operation modes at Nynaes. The model concerns decisions about which mode of operation to use at a particular point in time in order to minimize costs of changing modes and costs of keeping inventories, given demands for products. We derive several types of valid inequalities for this mathematical problem and show how these inequalities can improve the lower bound obtained from the linear programming relaxation of the problem. We also show how the valid inequalities can be used to improve the performance of a branch and bound solution approach. Further, a tabu search heuristic is developed for the scheduling problem. The solution methods are tested on data provided by the Nynaes refinery, and the performance of the methods are discussed. We present several extensions of the proposed model, and illustrate how the model can be used to support both operational and strategic decision making at the refinery. 66 refs, 6 figs, 32 tabs. Also published as: Dissertation from the International Graduate School of Management and Industrial Engineering, No 25, Licenciate Thesis.

  1. Production planning and scheduling in refinery industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jan

    1999-06-01

    In this thesis we consider production planning and scheduling in refinery industry, in particular we study the planning and scheduling at the Nynaes AB refinery and at the Scanraff AB refinery. The purpose is to contribute to the development and the use of optimization models to support efficient decision making. We identify various decision problems concerning the aggregated production planning, the shipment planning, the scheduling of operation modes, and the utilization of pipes and tanks; and we discuss the potential to successfully apply optimization models on these problems. We formulate a mixed integer linear programming model for the scheduling of operation modes at Nynaes. The model concerns decisions about which mode of operation to use at a particular point in time in order to minimize costs of changing modes and costs of keeping inventories, given demands for products. We derive several types of valid inequalities for this mathematical problem and show how these inequalities can improve the lower bound obtained from the linear programming relaxation of the problem. We also show how the valid inequalities can be used to improve the performance of a branch and bound solution approach. Further, a tabu search heuristic is developed for the scheduling problem. The solution methods are tested on data provided by the Nynaes refinery, and the performance of the methods are discussed. We present several extensions of the proposed model, and illustrate how the model can be used to support both operational and strategic decision making at the refinery. 66 refs, 6 figs, 32 tabs. Also published as: Dissertation from the International Graduate School of Management and Industrial Engineering, No 25, Licenciate Thesis

  2. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  3. THE EFFECT OF REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL EFFLUENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    estuary and the largest oil producing state in Nigeria. Consequently ... health hazards associated with exploration and ... and refinery effluents and the health of aquatic ..... 2.85±0.04 p>0.05 10. Salinity (mg/l) 47.43,40.00. 45.32,45.19. 47.43,45.23 ... exposure to manganese during welding. Tech. D.Welding Allied Process.

  4. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  5. All Hydrogen Refinery with Zero Residue Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Weifan; Sun Lili; Ju Linqing

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the block process flow scheme for the 8.0 Mt/a refining project at Hainan Refining and Chemical Company, Ltd., highlighting a green route for processing sour heavy oils, and the enlarged scale of production with Chinese content. The refinery is targeted at hydrotreating of process streams, integration and intensified design of process units, clean gasoline and diesel production, centralized recovery and utilization of light ends and optimization of sulphur recovery systems.

  6. Comment on "Quantum Creation of an Open Universe" by Andrei Linde

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen William; Turok, Neil

    1998-01-01

    We comment on Linde's claim that one should change the sign in the action for a Euclidean instanton in quantum cosmology, resulting in the formula $P \\sim e^{-|S|}$ for the probability of various classical universes. There are serious problems with doing so. First, the action for perturbations about the classical solution has the wrong sign and such perturbations are therefore unsuppressed. Second, with this sign for the action the nucleation of primordial black holes during inflation is unsuppressed, with a disastrous resulting cosmology. We regard these as compelling arguments for adhering to the usual sign given by the Wick rotation.

  7. Ranking environmental liabilities at a petroleum refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupo, M. [K. W. Brown Environmental Services, College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A new computer model is available to allow the management of a petroleum refinery to prioritize environmental action and construct a holistic approach to remediation. A large refinery may have numerous solid waste management units regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as well as process units that emit hazardous chemicals into the environment. These sources can impact several environmental media, potentially including the air, the soil, the groundwater, the unsaturated zone water, and surface water. The number of chemicals of concern may be large. The new model is able to rank the sources by considering the impact of each chemical in each medium from each source in terms of concentration, release rate, and a weighted index based on toxicity. In addition to environmental impact, the sources can be ranked in three other ways: (1) by cost to remediate, (2) by environmental risk reduction caused by the remediation in terms of the decreases in release rate, concentration, and weighted index, and (3) by cost-benefit, which is the environmental risk reduction for each source divided by the cost of the remedy. Ranking each unit in the refinery allows management to use its limited environmental resources in a pro-active strategic manner that produces long-term results, rather than in reactive, narrowly focused, costly, regulatory-driven campaigns that produce only short-term results.

  8. MALODOR POLLUTION FROM REFINERY SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEM AND TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUZhong-sheng; GUOBing-bing; WANGYu-ting; LIUNian-zeng

    2003-01-01

    Main malodor pollutants from oil separator of Refinery A are hydrocarbons and a small quantity of sulfides.Main malodor pollutants from surface aeration tank of Refinery B are sulfides,especially CH3SH.And main malodor pollutants from bubbling aeration tank of Refinery C are also sulfides,of which H2S concentration is the highest,Catalytic combustion technology is applied to treat malodorous gas from oil separator of Refinery A,in which the total hydrocarbon removal was over 97%.The purified gas meets the national standard.Activated carbon adsorption is used to treat malodorous gas from surface aeration tank of Refinery B,and main pollutant CH3SH removal reached up to 98%-100%.As for malodorous gas from bubbling aeration tank of Refinery C,biopacking tower is used and the removals of hydrogen sulfide,organic sulfides and benzene series reached up to 80%-98%.

  9. Oil Refinery Supply Chain Modelling Using Pipe Transportation Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Dyntar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an application of Pipe Transportation Simulator (PTS in oil refinery supply chain modelling. We develop the simulator in Witness simulation software environment using MS Excel for input data loading and outputs upgrading. PTS is particularly suitable for “what-if” analysis in the crude oil, fuels or gas supply chains where the products are transported among warehouses and refineries through the pipe lines. To discuss the basic functionality of proposed simulator we employ PTS to simulate a real oil refinery supply chain consisting of 16 warehouses and 3 refineries placed in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The refineries and warehouses are connected together with 21 pipe lines. PTS is used to verify a plan of fuels movements among warehouses and refineries as well as a plan of repairs of certain pipe lines in the selected time period of the length of 30 days.

  10. Sinopec to Construct New Refinery in East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ China Petrochemical Corp (Sinopec), Asia's largest refiner, is beckoning Saudi Arabian Oil Company, or Saudi Aramco, to take a stake in its proposed US$13 billion refinery in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province, in an attempt to bring in crude imports from Saudi Arabia to feed the refinery. A feasibility study on the refinery has been submitted for approval to the State Development and Reform Commission.

  11. Uranium industry in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Current state of uranium industry in Canada has been considered. It is shown that in Canada, which is the major supplier of uranium, new methods of prospecting, mining and processing of uranium are developed and the old ones are improved. Owing to automation and mechanization a higher labour productivity in uranium ore mining is achieved. The uranium industry of Canada can satisfy the future demands in uranium but introduction of any new improvement will depend completely on the rate of nuclear power development.

  12. 75 FR 37730 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... Petroleum Refineries AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY... air pollutants from heat exchange systems at petroleum refineries. These requirements were published as amendments to the national emission standards for petroleum refineries. In this notice, we are...

  13. Soil Characterization at the Linde FUSRAP Site and the Impact on Soil Volume Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2002-02-27

    The former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York is currently undergoing active remediation of Manhattan Engineering District's radiological contamination. This remediation is authorized under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The focus of this paper will be to describe the impact of soil characterization efforts as they relate to soil volume estimates and project cost estimates. An additional objective is to stimulate discussion about other characterization and modeling technologies, and to provide a ''Lessons Learned'' scenario to assist in future volume estimating at other FUSRAP sites. Initial soil characterization efforts at the Linde FUSRAP site in areas known to be contaminated or suspected to be contaminated were presented in the Remedial Investigation Report for the Tonawanda Site, dated February 1993. Results of those initial characterization efforts were the basis for soil volume estimates that were used to estimate and negotiate the current remediation contract. During the course of remediation, previously unidentified areas of contamination were discovered, and additional characterization was initiated. Additional test pit and geoprobe samples were obtained at over 500 locations, bringing the total to over 800 sample locations at the 135-acre site. New data continues to be collected on a routine basis during ongoing remedial actions.

  14. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  15. The Experimental Research on Refrigerant Mixtures of a Linde-Hampson Refrigeration System%混合工质Linde-Hampson制冷系统的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱军韬; 张华

    2012-01-01

    搭建了混合工质Linde-Hampson制冷系统,将4种工质R245fa/R600a/R508b/R14按照不同比例混合后进行实验研究.通过优化制冷剂组分得到不同配比下的最低运行温度,分析了最优配比下环境温度对系统运行性能的影响.结果表明:将4种工质按照不同配比进行混合,系统的最低运行温度范围在-45℃~-85℃之间.在环境温度35℃时,混合工质按比例R245 fa∶R600a∶R508b∶R 14=0.45∶0.3∶0.18∶0.07充注时,系统运行温度可达到-85℃,在此条件下,将环境温度从35℃降低到5℃,系统运行温度则从-85.5℃降低到-89.3℃.%The performance of quaternionic refrigerant mixtures, R345fa/R600a/R508b/R14, in Linde-Hampson refrigeration cycle was experimentally investigated. To get the lowest operation temperature, the components of refrigerant mixtures were optimized. The influence of ambient temperature on system operational performance was analyzed. It is shown that the lowest system operation temperature could reach from -4S'C to -85°C when mixing the four refrigerant components at different species ratio,. If the proportion of the refrigerant mixtures charged is R245fa:R600a:R508b:R14=0.45:0.3:0.18:0.07, the operating temperature of the system can reach -85℃ when the ambient temperature is 35°C. With the same refrigerant mixtures, the system temperature can reach -89.3℃ if the ambient temperature decreases from 35℃to5℃.

  16. Evaluation of treatment efficiency of processes for petroleum refinery`s wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, Kean Chin [National Univ. of Singapore, Kent Ridge (Singapore). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-12-31

    Processes used in the treatment of a petroleum refinery wastewater included initial API oil separator to be followed by dissolved air flotation and extended aeration system. The use of extended aeration biological system proved to be an improvement but not a solution yet in such kind of treatment. 2 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  18. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  19. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  20. Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

  1. Efficiency in Brazilian Refineries Under Different DEA Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Aparecida Cavalheiro Francisco

    2012-11-01

    following as outputs: refinery production volume and generated effluents, desirable and undesirable, respectively, besides the uncontrollable variable, the refinery age. With the comparison result between the models, we observed the clear importance of the environmental variable for a more realistic analysis of the production process.

  2. Morphology Characterization of Uranium Particles From Laser Ablated Uranium Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In the study, metallic uranium and uranium dioxide material were ablated by laser beam in order to simulate the process of forming the uranium particles in pyrochemical process. The morphology characteristic of uranium particles and the surface of

  3. 77 FR 56421 - Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries; Standards of Performance for Petroleum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... for Petroleum Refineries; Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction... CFR Parts 9 and 60 RIN 2060-AN72 Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries; Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After...

  4. Uranium industry annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  5. Uranium Provinces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Three uranium provinces are recognized in China, the Southeast China uranium province, the Northeast China-lnner Mongolia uranium province and the Northwest China (Xinjiang) uranium province. The latter two promise good potential for uranium resources and are major exploration target areas in recent years. There are two major types of uranium deposits: the Phanerozoic hydrothermal type (vein type) and the Meso-Cenozoic sandstone type in different proportions in the three uranium provinces. The most important reason or prerequisite for the formation of these uranium provinces is that Precambrian uranium-enriched old basement or its broken parts (median massifs) exists or once existed in these regions, and underwent strong tectonomagmatic activation during Phanerozoic time. Uranium was mobilized from the old basement and migrated upwards to the upper structural level together with the acidic magma originating from anatexis and the primary fluids, which were then mixed with meteoric water and resulted in the formation of Phanerozoic hydrothermal uranium deposits under extensional tectonic environments. Erosion of uraniferous rocks and pre-existing uranium deposits during the Meso-Cenozoic brought about the removal of uranium into young sedimentary basins. When those basins were uplifted and slightly deformed by later tectonic activity, roll-type uranium deposits were formed as a result of redox in permeable sandstone strata.

  6. Uranium industry annual 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

  8. Treatment of Tehran refinery wastewater using rotating biological contactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, Masoud; Mirsajadi, Hassan; Ganjidoust, Hossien [Tarbeyat Modarres Univ., Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Environmental Engineering Dept.

    1993-12-31

    Tehran Refinery is a large plant which produces several petroleum products. The wastewaters are generated from several different refinery processes and units. Because of the wastewaters uniqueness they need to be treated in each specific plant. Currently, an activated sludge system is the main biological wastewater treatment process in Tehran refinery plant. A study was initiated in order to find a more suitable and reliable process which can produce a better treated effluent which might, in case the process be successful, be reused for irrigation lands. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

    1984-08-09

    The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

  10. Uranium Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — An integral part of Y‑12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium...

  11. Uranium industry annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  12. Assessment of the effect of effluent discharge from coffee refineries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    coffee refineries on river water quality based on physicochemical parameters and benthos assemblages as ... Water pollution is an acute problem in all water bodies, and major river ...... Mananga River, Cebu, Philippines. Philipp. Sci. Lett.

  13. environmental impact of illegal refineries on the vegetation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. O. M. Adesope

    impact of illegal oil refineries in the Niger Delta, Nigeria, the floristic ... ecosystem of Rivers State, five species of Mangroves and two species of grasses .... polluted air, contaminated environment, degraded forests, biodiversity loss and high.

  14. PetroChina to Expand Dushanzi Refinery on Large Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ A large-scale expansion project for PetroChina Dushanzi Petrochemical Company has been given the green light, a move which will make it one of the largest refineries and petrochemical complexes in the country.

  15. Chinese Government Approves Nanhai Oil Refinery Project of CNOOC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Nanhai Oil Refinery Project independently funded by CNOOC was approved by the related governmental departments in late July. The offshore oil giant builds the 12 million ton-per-year oil refinery in Guangdong Province in the next three years to tap the lucrative South China oil market.The investment in the project will total at least 16 billion yuan (US$1.93 billion).

  16. Challenges Facing Chinese Refineries and Demand Forecast for 2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Yongsheng

    2003-01-01

    @@ After several decades of development the processing capac ity of Chinese refineries has reached 276 million tons per year,ranking the fourth in the world. The refining industry has made great contribution to the growth of national economy in China. With changing times, especially after China's accession to the WTO, significant changes have occurred in economy, politics and petroleum market both at home and abroad. The survival and growth of Chinese refineries has faced new challenges.

  17. Uranium and free trade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-08-01

    This report was prepared by a working group of the Committee on International Trade in Uranium of the Uranium Institute. The report describes the general benefits of free trade and their relevance in the uranium market, and compares government restrictions on Western world uranium trade with those in other commodity markets. It is not directly concerned with restrictions designed to discourage nuclear weapons proliferation. The Uranium Institute and its members fully support the objective of nuclear non-proliferation. The report takes as given the current non-proliferation regime and focuses on economic and commercial restrictions imposed by governments on international trade in uranium, recognising that governments will always have a special interest in uranium trade owing to its potential weapons use. (author).

  18. Evolution of clinical research: A history before and beyond james lind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Bhatt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of clinical research traverses a long and fascinating journey. From the first recorded trial of legumes in biblical times to the first randomized controlled of trial of streptomycin in 1946, the history of clinical trial covers a wide variety of challenges - scientific, ethical and regulatory. The famous 1747 scurvy trial conducted by James Lind contained most elements of a controlled trial. The UK Medical Research Council′s (MRC trial of patulin for common cold in 1943 was the first double blind controlled trial. This paved the way for the first randomized control trial of streptomycin in pulmonary tuberculosis carried out in 1946 by MRC of the UK. This landmark trial was a model of meticulousness in design and implementation, with systematic enrolment criteria and data collection compared with the ad hoc nature of other contemporary research. Over the years, as the discipline of controlled trials grew in sophistication and influence, the streptomycin trial continues to be referred to as ground breaking. The ethical advances in human protection include several milestones - Nuremberg Code, Declaration of Helsinki, Belmont Report, and 1996, International Conference on Harmonization Good Clinical Practice guidance. In parallel to ethical guidelines, clinical trials started to become embodied in regulation as government authorities began recognizing a need for controlling medical therapies in the early 20th century. As the scientific advances continue to occur, there will be new ethical and regulatory challenges requiring dynamic updates in ethical and legal framework of clinical trials.

  19. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed....

  20. Palm-based biofuel refinery (PBR) to substitute petroleum refinery: An energy and emergy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Chun Sheng; Lee, Keat Teong [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Seberang Perai Selatan, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    As the most active palm industry cluster in the world, Malaysia produces enormous amount of biomass from the industry. This work studies the possibility of creating a renewable and sustainable source of energy by fully utilizing an area of land to provide liquid biofuel for the country. Palm-based biofuel refinery (PBR) proposed in this study has the ultimate goal to displace petroleum fuels and fulfill domestic energy demand. It fully utilizes indigenous palm biomass to fulfill 35.5% of energy demand in the country by using land area of only 8% of current palm cultivation. The operation concept of PBR is similar to petroleum refinery in which a single source feedstock (crude petroleum) can be processed to multiple products. In PBR, products from an oil palm plantation will be converted to various biofuel end products. Renewable biofuel such as biodiesel and bioethanol can be produced from crude palm oil and lignocellulosic residues. Energy and emergy assessment were made in this work to evaluate the sustainability and efficiency of PBR. Biofuel produced from PBR has a high energy equivalent of 31.56 MJ/kg as 1 ha of land can produce 182,142 MJ annually. Although there are still obstacles to be overcome, it is important for Malaysia to develop its own energy supply from indigenous resources as an initiative not only for security but also lower carbon emission. (author)

  1. Uranium hexafluoride public risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

  2. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  3. Uranium conversion; Conversion de l`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the activities of the Comurhex company, created in 1971 and which became a 100% Cogema`s daughter company in 1992. The Comurhex company is in charge of the conversion of natural uranium into gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The two steps of the conversion operation are performed in the Malvesi and Pierrelatte (France) industrial sites and represent 31% (14000 t/year) of the uranium conversion capacity of western countries. The refining and UF{sub 4} production (Malvesi) and the UF{sub 6} fabrication (Pierrelatte) processes are described. Comurhex is also one of the few companies in the world which produces UF{sub 6} from the uranium of spent fuels. (J.S.)

  4. Planning and scheduling for petroleum refineries using mathematical programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joly M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is the development and solution of nonlinear and mixed-integer (MIP optimization models for real-world planning and scheduling problems in petroleum refineries. Firstly, we present a nonlinear planning model that represents a general refinery topology and allows implementation of nonlinear process models as well as blending relations. The optimization model is able to define new operating points, thus increasing the production of the more valuable products and simultaneously satisfying all specification constraints. The second part addresses scheduling problems in oil refineries, which are formulated as MIP optimization models and rely on both continuous and discrete time representations. Three practical applications closely related to the current refinery scenario are presented. The first one addresses the problem of crude oil inventory management of a refinery that receives several types of crude oil delivered exclusively by a single oil pipeline. Subsequently, two optimization models intended to define the optimal production policy, inventory control and distribution are proposed and solved for the fuel oil and asphalt plant. Finally, the planning model of Moro et al. (1998 is extended in order to sequence decisions at the scheduling level in the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG area for maximization of the production of petrochemical-grade propane and product delivery.

  5. Diversity of birds at Panipat refinery, Haryana (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadse, Sharda; Kotangale, J P; Chaudhari, P R; Wate, S R

    2009-11-01

    Avifaunal study was carried out in Panipat refinery area before and after commissioning. A total of 63 birds were observed during the study, of which 39 and 49 birds were present during 1992 and 2001 respectively. Of these, 25 birds were common during both the study period. Blue rock pigeon was most dominant during 1992 whereas house sparrow was dominant during 2001. Species diversity index was found to be 5.26 and 6.64 in respective years. Jaccard's and Sorenson similarity indices were 0.40 and 0.57 respectively. Majority of birds were insectivorous in habits followed by granivorous birds in 1992 and piscivorous birds in 2001. The study reveals that less diversity was observed in 1992 when Panipat refinery was commissioned, but more birds especially aquatic ones were observed after the commissioning of the refinery. This has been attributed to increase in birds habitats due to developments of wetlands in and outside refinery, development of green belt around refinery and increase in green cover of area due to boosting of agroforestry and social forestry.

  6. 77 FR 29362 - Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Conocophillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, PA; Notice of... former workers of ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, Pennsylvania (subject firm)....

  7. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion repla...

  8. Chemical thermodynamics of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenthe, I.; Fuger, J.; Lemire, R.J.; Muller, A.B.; Nguyen-Trung Cregu, C.; Wanner, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview on the chemical thermodynamics of those elements that are of particular importance in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems is provided. This is the first volume in a series of critical reviews to be published on this subject. The book provides an extensive compilation of chemical thermodynamic data for uranium. A description of procedures for activity corrections and uncertainty estimates is given. A critical discussion of data needed for nuclear waste management assessments, including areas where significant gaps of knowledge exist is presented. A detailed inventory of chemical thermodynamic data for inorganic compounds and complexes of uranium is listed. Data and their uncertainty limits are recommended for 74 aqueous complexes and 199 solid and 31 gaseous compounds containing uranium, and on 52 aqueous and 17 solid auxiliary species containing no uranium. The data are internally consistent and compatible with the CODATA Key Values. The book contains a detailed discussion of procedures used for activity factor corrections in aqueous solution, as well as including methods for making uncertainty estimates. The recommended data have been prepared for use in environmental geochemistry. Containing contributions written by experts the chapters cover various subject areas such a s: oxide and hydroxide compounds and complexes, the uranium nitrides, the solid uranium nitrates and the arsenic-containing uranium compounds, uranates, procedures for consistent estimation of entropies, gaseous and solid uranium halides, gaseous uranium oxides, solid phosphorous-containing uranium compounds, alkali metal uranates, uncertainties, standards and conventions, aqueous complexes, uranium minerals dealing with solubility products and ionic strength corrections. The book is intended for nuclear research establishments and consulting firms dealing with uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal, as well as academic and research institutes.

  9. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

    1957-11-12

    An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

  10. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  11. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  12. Operational planning of refineries; Planejamento operacional de refinarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinay, Maria Cristina Fogliatti de [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bueno, Catia [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The activities integration that compose the petroleum logistic chain makes more complex its planning which is normally done in a joined level, using operation research models in order to find optimized solutions. When this integrated planning is repassed to the companies and its constitutes parts (mainly refinery) uncertainness are generated about the solution that will be adopted in case of new restrictions appear. Then, the purpose of this work is propose a procedure that is capable to adequate and specifies optimized solutions presented by corporative model to refinery operations, using 'What-if' and deterministic simulation technique with optimization. To achieve this objective will be analysed typical activities in refineries and basic principles to their operational planning. (author)

  13. A new heavy residue upgrading process to retrofit existing refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedian, Maryam; Zarkesh, Jamshid [NIOC-Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (Russian Federation); Khadzhiev, S.; Kadiev, H. [Russian Academy of science (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    Light crude oil reserves have declined and new fields being explored tend to be heavy oil, requiring processes to convert heavy residue to light products. The aim of this paper is to present the use of heavy residue hydroconversion (HRH) to upgrade heavy residues in existing refineries. A case study was carried out on a refinery with 250,000 barrel per day capacity, two cases were examined: the base case and the HRH case. Results showed that HRH provides higher IRR and NPV than the base case for the same investment. The heavy residue hydroconversion process was proved to be a feasible and reliable alternative which could eliminate residue while creating added value in existing refineries.

  14. 40 CFR 80.596 - How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel... Requirements § 80.596 How is a refinery motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline calculated? (a) For purposes of this subpart, a refinery's motor vehicle diesel fuel volume baseline is calculated using...

  15. Optimization Model for Refinery Hydrogen Networks Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique E. Tarifa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this work, a model of optimization was presented that minimizes the consumption of the hydrogen of a refinery. In this second part, the model will be augmented to take into account the length of the pipelines, the addition of purification units and the installation of new compressors, all features of industrial real networks. The model developed was implemented in the LINGO software environment. For data input and results output, an Excel spreadsheet was developed that interfaces with LINGO. The model is currently being used in YPFLuján de Cuyo refinery (Mendoza, Argentina

  16. Development of a distribution management system in refinery industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Developing an information system for managing the product distribution in a refinery demands sophisticated design solutions. First, organization models are created to describe the structural relationships among employees and the ways in which they will use the information system. Second, function models are created to hierarchically describe how sales, transports, deliveries and vehicles are managed. Thirdly, an information model is built to represent the data entities and their dynamic interactions. Based on the system design, a distribution management system is developed and implemented in a refinery, which has considerably increased the distribution management efficiency and effectiveness.

  17. Optimization of existing heat-integrated refinery distillation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadalla, M.; Jobson, M.; Smith, R.

    2003-01-01

    Existing refinery distillation systems are highly energy-intensive, and have complex column configurations that interact strongly with the associated heat exchanger network. An optimization approach is developed for existing refinery distillation processes. The optimization framework includes shortcut models developed for the simulation of the existing distillation column, and a retrofit shortcut model for the heat exchanger network. The existing distillation process is optimized by changing key operating parameters, while simultaneously accounting for hydraulic limitations and the design and the performance of the existing heat exchanger network. A case study shows that a reduction in energy consumption and operating costs of over 25% can be achieved. (Author)

  18. Toxicity reduction in the treatment of refinery waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckenfelder, W.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Aquatic Toxicity in refinery and petrochemical wastewaters may result from chemicals present in the feedstock, chemicals added or generated in the process, or chemicals generated during the wastewater treatment process, usually referred to as soluble microbial products (SMP). In most cases, the chemicals originally present or generated are biodegradable and can be removed in the biological treatment process. In some cases, a physical-chemical source treatment may be required. SMP generated through the wastewater treatment process are non-biodegradable and are best handled by the application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) integrated into the activated sludge process. This paper describes toxicity reduction in refinery effluents.

  19. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  20. Uranium: abundance or shortage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steyn, J. [Energy Resources International, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-09-01

    With large uranium stockpiles, particularly in the form of HEU, continuing to be the dominant factor in the world uranium market, buyers should be able to enter into attractive long-term commitments for the future. Nevertheless, producers are now able to see forward with some degree of certainty and are expected to meet their planned levels of production and demand. (author).

  1. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  2. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  3. Nature, raison et nation dans le modernisme shï'ite de l'Inde britannique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Boivin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Comme dans le reste du monde musulman, la domination coloniale sur le sous-continent indien a provoqué des interrogations. La recherche des causes de cette domination a fait émerger un aggiomamento et si la réflexion de penseurs comme Sayyid Ahmad Khân (1817-1898 a été largement analysée, on connaît moins le rôle joué par les penseurs shî'ites comme Sayyid Amîr’Alî (1849-1928, un shî'ite ithnâ 'asharî, ou Sultân Muhammad Shâh Aghâ Khân (1877-1957, shî'ite ismâ'îlî. Pour ces auteurs, qui répondent souvent à des polémistes chrétiens, le message coranique se répartit en deux catégories fondamentales : les versets « éternels », relatifs aux fondements de la foi (unicité de Dieu, et les versets « temporaires », ceux qui ont été édictés pour répondre à des questions ponctuelles qui se posaient à l'époque du Prophète. Ce faisant, ils élaborent une conception libérale et séculariste de l'islam qui fait émerger un rationalisme islamique. Sur le plan politique, s'ils participèrent activement aux premières associations de défense des intérêts des Musulmans, ils ne parvinrent pas à penser la nation musulmane de l'Inde, bien que Sultân Muhammad Shâh Âghâ Khân ait accueilli avec enthousiasme la création du Pakistan.

  4. Using relative risk analysis to set priorities for pollution prevention at a petroleum refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.E.; Klee, H.; Sparks, D.M. [Amoco Corporation, Warrenville, IL (United States). Environmental Technical Services; Podar, M.K. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This paper traces the background to the study site, Amoco`s Yorktown refinery, which currently manufactures gasoline, heating oil, liquefied petroleum gases (LPG), sulphur and coke, and the project to assess all the refinery emissions and evaluate options for reducing the releases. The assembling of the inventory of refinery releases, and the evaluation of the risks posed by the refinery emissions to air, surface water, drinking water and groundwater are described. The measuring of public perception of the refinery, the development and assessment of options to reduce the releases, ranking methods and results, and implementation of the selected option are discussed. (UK)

  5. Feasibility study of a dedicated nuclear desalination system: Low-pressure Inherent heat sink Nuclear Desalination plant (LIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Sik Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we suggest the conceptual design of a water-cooled reactor system for a low-pressure inherent heat sink nuclear desalination plant (LIND that applies the safety-related design concepts of high temperature gas-cooled reactors to a water-cooled reactor for inherent and passive safety features. Through a scoping analysis, we found that the current LIND design satisfied several essential thermal–hydraulic and neutronic design requirements. In a thermal–hydraulic analysis using an analytical method based on the Wooton–Epstein correlation, we checked the possibility of safely removing decay heat through the steel containment even if all the active safety systems failed. In a neutronic analysis using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, we estimated a cycle length of approximately 6 years under 200 MWth and 4.5% enrichment. The very long cycle length and simple safety features minimize the burdens from the operation, maintenance, and spent-fuel management, with a positive impact on the economic feasibility. Finally, because a nuclear reactor should not be directly coupled to a desalination system to prevent the leakage of radioactive material into the desalinated water, three types of intermediate systems were studied: a steam producing system, a hot water system, and an organic Rankine cycle system.

  6. Feasibility study of a dedicate nuclear desalination system: Low-pressure inherent heat sink nuclear desalination plant (LIND)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Sik; No, Hee Cheon; Jo, Yu Gwan; Wivisono, Andhika Feri; Park, Byung Ha; Choi, Jin Young; Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Cho, Nam Zin [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, we suggest the conceptual design of a water-cooled reactor system for a low-pressure inherent heat sink nuclear desalination plant (LIND) that applies the safety-related design concepts of high temperature gas-cooled reactors to a water-cooled reactor for inherent and passive safety features. Through a scoping analysis, we found that the current LIND design satisfied several essential thermal-hydraulic and neutronic design requirements. In a thermal-hydraulic analysis using an analytical method based on the Wooton-Epstein correlation, we checked the possibility of safely removing decay heat through the steel containment even if all the active safety systems failed. In a neutronic analysis using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, we estimated a cycle length of approximately 6 years under 200 MW{sub th} and 4.5% enrichment. The very long cycle length and simple safety features minimize the burdens from the operation, maintenance, and spent-fuel management, with a positive impact on the economic feasibility. Finally, because a nuclear reactor should not be directly coupled to a desalination system to prevent the leakage of radioactive material into the desalinated water, three types of intermediate systems were studied: a steam producing system, a hot water system, and an organic Rankine cycle system.

  7. Optimization Model for Refinery Hydrogen Networks Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique E. Tarifa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum refineries have many process units that consume hydrogen.These process units are distributed in different places everywhere in the refinery.In order to feed them, it is necessary to have sources capable of supplying, in amount and quality, the hydrogen that every consuming unit needs.It is also needed to have a distribution network that it is correctly designed and which operation is adjusted in an optimal manner to the changing conditions of the refinery.This involves the minimization of the cost of installation and operation of the hydrogen network.The installation cost is dominated by the amount of pipelines, compressors and purifying units; while the cost of operation is dominated by the amount of fresh hydrogen that the plant consumes.In this work a mathematical model is developed for a hydrogen network,which is adapted to the different information levels available in the different stages of design of that system.The model is currently in use in the YPFLuján de Cuyo refinery (Mendoza, Argentina. In this first part, the basic model is presented; whereas in a second part, the model is enlarged to accommodate the incorporation of purifying units and new compressors

  8. a factorial study of corporate performance of nigerian refineries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    2016-01-01

    Jan 1, 2016 ... of Kendall's coefficient of concordance, which ranks varia of Kendall's ... There are oodles of factors that contribute to this kind ..... Choice of Outsourcing. 49. Refinery .... The Nigerian consumers are in need of ... Government should hold fast to the vision and mission ... Toxicology and Food Technology, Vol.

  9. Construction of Refinery Planned in China's Coastal Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ CNOOC plans to build a 12-million-ton-per-year oil refinery in Southeast China's Guangdong Province in the next three years to tap the lucrative oil market in the southern part of the nation. Investment in the project, which was approved by the central government in mid-July, will total at least 16 billion yuan (US$1.93 billion).

  10. 76 FR 52556 - Election To Expense Certain Refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... is more than 20 percent of the total cost of the property. (ii) Sale-leaseback. If any new portion of... the total amount allocated, determined on the basis of each cooperative owner's ownership interest in... directly from shale or tar sands. (iv) The total cost basis of the qualified refinery property at issue for...

  11. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide

  12. The arctic species Heterostigma separ Ärnbäck-Christie-Linde, 1924 (Ascidiacea: Pyuridae) in the strait og Gibraltar (southern Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naranjo, S.A.; Garcia-Gomez, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The arctic species Heterostigma separ Arnbäck-Christie-Linde, 1924, a component of the interstitial fauna in coastal soft bottoms from Nova Zembla, was found in gravels of Algeciras Bay (Gibraltar Strait, Southern Spain). This new record constitutes the southernmost limit of the geographical range o

  13. The arctic species Heterostigma separ Ärnbäck-Christie-Linde, 1924 (Ascidiacea: Pyuridae) in the strait og Gibraltar (southern Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naranjo, S.A.; Garcia-Gomez, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The arctic species Heterostigma separ Arnbäck-Christie-Linde, 1924, a component of the interstitial fauna in coastal soft bottoms from Nova Zembla, was found in gravels of Algeciras Bay (Gibraltar Strait, Southern Spain). This new record constitutes the southernmost limit of the geographical range o

  14. [Lind tulemäe kohal : valik XX sajandi teise poole türgi luulet] / Helen Geršman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Geršman, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Tutvustus: Lind tulemäe kohal : valik XX sajandi teise poole türgi luulet / türgi keelest tõlkinud Ly Seppel ja Andres Ehin ; koostanud Ly Seppel ; järelsõna: Andres Ehin. Tallinn : Kultuurileht, 2010. (Loomingu Raamatukogu, 1406-0515 ; 2010, 11)

  15. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  16. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  17. Linde problem in Yang-Mills theory compactified on $\\mathbb{R}^2 \\times \\mathbb{T}^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; Noronha, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the perturbative expansion in $SU(3)$ Yang-Mills theory compactified on $\\mathbb{R}^2\\times \\mathbb{T}^2$ where the compact space is a torus $\\mathbb{T}^2= S^1_{\\beta}\\times S^1_{L}$, with $S^1_{\\beta}$ being a thermal circle with period $\\beta=1/T$ ($T$ is the temperature) while $S^1_L$ is a circle with length $L=1/\\Lambda$ where $\\Lambda$ is an energy scale. A Linde-type analysis indicates that perturbative calculations for the pressure in this theory break down already at order $\\mathcal{O}(g^2)$ due to the presence of a non-perturbative scale $\\sim g \\sqrt{T\\Lambda}$. We conjecture that a similar result should hold if the torus is replaced by any compact surface of genus one.

  18. Application of PIMS Software in Monthly Planning of Refinery Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the application of the PIMS software in formulating monthly refining production plan. Application of the PIMS software can help to solve a series of problems related with monthly plan of refining production such as optimized selection of crude and feedstocks, optimized selection of production scale and processing scheme, identification of bottlenecks and their mitigation,optimized selection of turnaround time and optimized selection of operating regime, which have increased the economic benefits of refining enterprises. With the further development and improvement of models the PIMS software will play an increasingly important role in formulating monthly plans of refining operations and production management at refineries. This article also explores the problems existing in refinery monthly planning, and has made recommendations on developing and improving models and reporting system, enhancement of basic data acquisition, model maintenance personnel and staff training.

  19. Refinery production planning and scheduling: the refining core business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Joly

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent production planning and scheduling are of paramount importance to ensure refinery profitability, logistic reliability and safety at the local and corporate levels. In Brazil, such activities play a particularly critical role, since the Brazilian downstream model is moving towards a demand-driven model rather than a supply-driven one. Moreover, new and specialized non-linear constraints are continuously being incorporated into these large-scale problems: increases in oil prices implying the need for processing poor quality crudes, increasing demand and new demand patterns for petroleum products, new stringent environmental regulations related to clean fuels and start-up of new production technologies embedded into more complex refining schemes. This paper aims at clarifying the central role of refinery planning and scheduling activities in the Petrobras refining business. Major past and present results are outlined and corporate long-term strategies to deal with present and future challenges are presented.

  20. Global Warming Potential Of A Waste Refinery Using Enzymatic Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Astrup, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    and fossil resources. This is especially important with respect to the residual waste (i.e. the remains after source-separation and separate collection) which is typically incinerated or landfilled. In this paper the energy and Global Warming performance of a pilot-scale waste refinery for the enzymatic...... plants and utilization of the liquid fraction for biogas production turned out to be the best options with respect to energy and Global Warming performance....

  1. Global Warming Potential Of A Waste Refinery Using Enzymatic Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Astrup, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    and fossil resources. This is especially important with respect to the residual waste (i.e. the remains after source-separation and separate collection) which is typically incinerated or landfilled. In this paper the energy and Global Warming performance of a pilot-scale waste refinery for the enzymatic...... plants and utilization of the liquid fraction for biogas production turned out to be the best options with respect to energy and Global Warming performance....

  2. POSSIBILITIES OF CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION BY MICROALGAE IN REFINERY

    OpenAIRE

    Šingliar, Michal; Mikulec, Jozef; Kušnir, Patrik; Polakovičova, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the most critical challenges today for businesses and governments worldwide. Thousands of emitting power plants and industries worldwide face this costly challenge – reduce the CO2 emissions or pay penalties. One possibility for carbon dioxide sequestration is its fixation in microalgae. Microalgae can sequester CO2 from flue gases emitted from fossil fuel-fired refinery plants and units, thereby reducing emissions of a major greenhouse ga...

  3. Legitimacy in Green: Pollution vs. Profit in Canadian Oil Refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Magness

    2007-06-01

    light of changing societal expectations have created an external environment that encourages the development of new technologies that promote cost efficiencies and good environmental performance simultaneously.  Russo and Fouts (1997 argued that industries subject to rapid technological advance are well suited to respond to these changes in the external environment. The findings of this paper suggest that the petroleum refinery sector of the oil and gas industry may be meeting the challenge of the environmental movement.

  4. Modeling and Multi-objective Optimization of Refinery Hydrogen Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦云强; 苏宏业; 廖祖维; 侯卫锋

    2011-01-01

    The demand of hydrogen in oil refinery is increasing as market forces and environmental legislation, so hydrogen network management is becoming increasingly important in refineries. Most studies focused on single-objective optimization problem for the hydrogen network, but few account for the multi-objective optimization problem. This paper presents a novel approach for modeling and multi-objective optimization for hydrogen network in refineries. An improved multi-objective optimization model is proposed based on the concept of superstructure. The optimization includes minimization of operating cost and minimization of investment cost of equipment. The proposed methodology for the multi-objective optimization of hydrogen network takes into account flow rate constraints, pressure constraints, purity constraints, impurity constraints, payback period, etc. The method considers all the feasible connections and subjects this to mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP). A deterministic optimization method is applied to solve this multi-objective optimization problem. Finally, a real case study is intro-duced to illustrate the applicability of the approach.

  5. Advanced purification of petroleum refinery wastewater by catalytic vacuum distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Ma, Hongzhu; Wang, Bo; Mao, Wei; Chen, Yashao

    2010-06-15

    In our work, a new process, catalytic vacuum distillation (CVD) was utilized for purification of petroleum refinery wastewater that was characteristic of high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and salinity. Moreover, various common promoters, like FeCl(3), kaolin, H(2)SO(4) and NaOH were investigated to improve the purification efficiency of CVD. Here, the purification efficiency was estimated by COD testing, electrolytic conductivity, UV-vis spectrum, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and pH value. The results showed that NaOH promoted CVD displayed higher efficiency in purification of refinery wastewater than other systems, where the pellucid effluents with low salinity and high COD removal efficiency (99%) were obtained after treatment, and the corresponding pH values of effluents varied from 7 to 9. Furthermore, environment estimation was also tested and the results showed that the effluent had no influence on plant growth. Thus, based on satisfied removal efficiency of COD and salinity achieved simultaneously, NaOH promoted CVD process is an effective approach to purify petroleum refinery wastewater. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy Consumption and Analysis on Energy Saving Measures at SINOPEC's Large Refineries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Jian; Hou Kaifeng; Yan Chun; Li Zhiqiang

    2007-01-01

    This article sums up the energy consumption of process units and the overall energy consumption of 10 Mt/a class refineries constructed or revamped in recent years.The energy saving measures adopted in design of these refineries are analyzed and discussed.Finally,this article also makes comments and puts forward recommendations on the objectives for energy conservation at refineries jn the future.

  7. Development of a life cycle cost estimating framework for oil refineries

    OpenAIRE

    Okafor, Okechukwu Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study is concerned with the understanding of some vital features of various life cycle costing methodologies and tools. Integrating these features with the refinery technical processes would assist in the development of a life cycle costing framework for oil refineries. The aim of this research is to develop a comprehensive life cycle cost estimating framework for the evaluation of not only the total cost and system effectiveness of new refineries but also the revamping, and maintenance ...

  8. Oil Refineries Emissions Impact on Urban Localities Using AERMOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira M.W. Abdelrasoul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The absolute necessity of compulsory fuel utilities, no matter small or big has resulted into substantial high hazards pollutants. Petroleum refineries are major industrial installations that are necessary for providing the best suited fuel for various necessary utilities, but are responsible of the emission of several hazardous pollutants into the atmosphere. Hydrocarbons are among the most perilous air pollutants that are emitted from almost all refining processes in petroleum refineries. Approach: Every day leaks and gaseous discharge from relief valves and liquid discharge, which are often directed to knock-out drums, are flared to minimize the impact of hydrocarbons emissions. But these flares are not that efficient and result into partial discharge of pollutants that have severe impact on the industrial area and urban localities in the vicinity of industrial refining complex. Results: In the present study, a thorough investigation has been completed to estimate the total emissions of sulfur dioxide SO2 and non methane hydrocarbons NMHC (VOCs and to assess their impact on the air quality in industrial and suburban areas. The latest version AMS/EPA Regulatory Model (AERMOD specially designed to support the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA’s was used to predict the ground level concentrations of SO2, VOCs from AL-Ahmadi and Al-Shuiba Refineries of total refining capacity of 646 thousand barrels/day. Conclusion/Recommendations: These concentrations are compared with EPA standards to indicate the ambient air quality. The dispersion model was corroborated with extensive one year hourly record of the surface and upper air meteorological data for year 2006 and emission rates of the specified pollutants, with detailed refinery stacks parameters, such as stack height, diameter, exit flue gas velocity and temperature to determine the fraction of total study area in the vicinity of refineries that had substantially high

  9. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. Understanding uranium behaviour at the Askola uranium mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokelainen, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Markovaara-Koivisto, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, TKK (Finland); Read, D. [Enterpris, The Old Library, Lower Shott, Great Bookham, Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindberg, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hellmuth, K.H. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the behaviour of uranium is essential when assessing the safety of a spent nuclear fuel repository. The geochemical behaviour of uranium, including its reactive transport chemistry, is also a matter of concern when assessing the environmental impact of uranium mining. Subsurface uranium mobility is believed to be primarily controlled by dissolution and (co)-precipitation of uranium mineral solids and adsorption to mineral surfaces. This paper describes a modelling exercise based on characterisation of samples taken from drilled cores at the uranium mineralization at Askola, Southern Finland. In the modelling exercise, current conditions are assumed to be oxidizing and saturated with groundwater. PHREEQC was used for modelling in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory database, chosen for its extensive coverage of uranium species and mineral phases. It is postulated that weathering processes near the surface have led to uranium dissolution from the primary ore, leaching out from the matrix and migrating along water-conducting fractures with subsequent re-diffusion into the rock matrix. Electron microscopy studies show that precipitated uranium occupies intra-granular fractures in feldspars and quartz. In addition, secondary uranium was found to be distributed within goethite nodules as well as around the margins of iron-containing minerals in the form of silicate and phosphate precipitates. Equilibrium modelling calculations predict that uranium would be precipitated as uranyl silicates, most likely soddyite and uranophane, in the prevailing chemical conditions beneath Lakeakallio hill. (orig.)

  11. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U3O8 yellowcake into UF6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.

  12. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  13. The neurotoxicology of uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinocourt, Céline; Legrand, Marie; Dublineau, Isabelle; Lestaevel, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The brain is a target of environmental toxic pollutants that impair cerebral functions. Uranium is present in the environment as a result of natural deposits and release by human applications. The first part of this review describes the passage of uranium into the brain, and its effects on neurological functions and cognitive abilities. Very few human studies have looked at its cognitive effects. Experimental studies show that after exposure, uranium can reach the brain and lead to neurobehavioral impairments, including increased locomotor activity, perturbation of the sleep-wake cycle, decreased memory, and increased anxiety. The mechanisms underlying these neurobehavioral disturbances are not clearly understood. It is evident that there must be more than one toxic mechanism and that it might include different targets in the brain. In the second part, we therefore review the principal mechanisms that have been investigated in experimental models: imbalance of the anti/pro-oxidant system and neurochemical and neurophysiological pathways. Uranium effects are clearly specific according to brain area, dose, and time. Nonetheless, this review demonstrates the paucity of data about its effects on developmental processes and the need for more attention to the consequences of exposure during development.

  14. Toxicological characteristics of refinery streams used to manufacture lubricating oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, M L; Ladov, E N; Holdsworth, C E; Weaver, N K

    1984-01-01

    In the past, reports on the tumorigenic potential of lubricating oils in experimental animals have poorly defined the materials under study. In this paper the results of mouse skin painting studies with 46 clearly defined samples of refinery streams associated with lubricating oil processing show that modern conventional solvent refining of distillates removes tumorigenic potential while conventional acid refining may not. Furthermore, dewaxing, hydrofinishing, and clay treatments do not appear to mitigate the tumorigenicity of the lubricant distillates. Lubricant processing has changed over the years and assessments of the carcinogenicity of present-day lubricating materials must be based on knowledge of modern processing.

  15. High temperature degradation in power plants and refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furtado Heloisa Cunha

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants and refineries around the world share many of the same problems, namely aging equipment, high costs of replacement, and the need to produce more efficiently while being increasingly concerned with issues of safety and reliability. For equipment operating at high temperature, there are many different mechanisms of degradation, some of which interact, and the rate of accumulation of damage is not simple to predict. The paper discusses the mechanisms of degradation at high temperature and methods of assessment of such damage and of the remaining safe life for operation.

  16. The roles of aromatics and catalytic reforming in the 2000+ refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genis, O.; Simpson, S.G. [UOP Limited, Guildford (United Kingdom); Penner, D.W.; Gautam, R.; Glover, B.K. [UOPLLC, Des Plaines, IL (United Kingdom)

    2000-10-01

    Upcoming European environmental legislation will restrict the concentration of benzene and other aromatics in gasoline. Because catalytic reforming units are the major source of benzene and aromatics in gasoline as well as refinery hydrogen, the new fuel regulations have the potential to significantly affect refinery operation. The manner in which the new benzene and aromatics limits are met will be critical to refinery profitability and may change the availability of refinery-derived aromatics for petrochemical applications. This paper analyzes the refining and petrochemical market factors and technology options that will influence the way refiners and petrochemical producers respond to the new fuels legislation. Shortages of benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) in Europe for petrochemical production will provide refiners with an outlet for excess gasoline benzene and aromatics and allow them to improve refinery profitability. Instead of turning down catalytic reforming units to meet gasoline aromatics limits, refiners can increase BTX production by using the proper feedstock and reforming catalysts, thereby improving refinery margins by helping to satisfy the petrochemical market demand for aromatics. Catalytic reforming will continue to be an important process unit in the 2000+ refinery not only for gasoline production but also for further linking of refinery and petrochemical operations. (orig.)

  17. 76 FR 64943 - Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; ACM Smelter and Refinery Site, Located...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... AGENCY Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; ACM Smelter and Refinery Site, Located in... administrative settlement for recovery of past and projected future response costs concerning the ACM Smelter and...-5027. Comments should reference the ACM Smelter and Refinery NPL Site, the EPA Docket No....

  18. The Implementation and Maintenance of a Behavioral Safety Process in a Petroleum Refinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Wanda V.; McSween, Terry E.; Medina, Rixio E.; Rost, Kristen; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2010-01-01

    A values-centered and team-based behavioral safety process was implemented in a petroleum oil refinery. Employee teams defined the refinery's safety values and related practices, which were used to guide the process design and implementation. The process included (a) a safety assessment; (b) the clarification of safety-related values and related…

  19. 77 FR 47429 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... in Foreign Trade Sub-zones AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... concerning the Petroleum Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones. This request for comment is being made... Refineries in Foreign Trade Sub-zones. OMB Number: 1651-0063. Form Number: None. Abstract: The Foreign...

  20. 76 FR 42052 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... Petroleum Refineries AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule; partial withdrawal... Petroleum Refineries. EPA is now providing final notice of the partial withdrawal. DATES: As of August 17... signed a final rule amending the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum...

  1. The Implementation and Maintenance of a Behavioral Safety Process in a Petroleum Refinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Wanda V.; McSween, Terry E.; Medina, Rixio E.; Rost, Kristen; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2010-01-01

    A values-centered and team-based behavioral safety process was implemented in a petroleum oil refinery. Employee teams defined the refinery's safety values and related practices, which were used to guide the process design and implementation. The process included (a) a safety assessment; (b) the clarification of safety-related values and related…

  2. Sounding pollution and the refinery environmental risks; A poluicao sonora e os riscos ambientais das refinarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This chapter gives a general overview on the effects of the sound pollution, the principal pollutants emitted by the oil refineries, control actions for the sound waves emissions, the minimization actions, the risk concepts and evaluation, the risk perception and the accidents in refineries.

  3. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  4. Uranium from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, D.; Folkendt, M.

    1982-09-21

    A novel process for recovering uranium from seawater is proposed and some of the critical technical parameters are evaluated. The process, in summary, consists of two different options for contacting adsorbant pellets with seawater without pumping the seawater. It is expected that this will reduce the mass handling requirements, compared to pumped seawater systems, by a factor of approximately 10/sup 5/, which should also result in a large reduction in initial capital investment. Activated carbon, possibly in combination with a small amount of dissolved titanium hydroxide, is expected to be the preferred adsorbant material instead of the commonly assumed titanium hydroxide alone. The activated carbon, after exposure to seawater, can be stripped of uranium with an appropriate eluant (probably an acid) or can be burned for its heating value (possible in a power plant) leaving the uranium further enriched in its ash. The uranium, representing about 1% of the ash, is then a rich ore and would be recovered in a conventional manner. Experimental results have indicated that activated carbon, acting alone, is not adequately effective in adsorbing the uranium from seawater. We measured partition coefficients (concentration ratios) of approximately 10/sup 3/ in seawater instead of the reported values of 10/sup 5/. However, preliminary tests carried out in fresh water show considerable promise for an extraction system that uses a combination of dissolved titanium hydroxide (in minute amounts) which forms an insoluble compound with the uranyl ion, and the insoluble compound then being sorbed out on activated carbon. Such a system showed partition coefficients in excess of 10/sup 5/ in fresh water. However, the system was not tested in seawater.

  5. Conservation and reuse of water in Brazilian petroleum refineries; Conservacao e reuso de agua em refinarias de petroleo no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pombo, Felipe Ramalho; Magrini, Alessandra; Szklo, Alexandre Salem [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PPE/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Planejamento Energetico], Emails: frpombo@ppe.ufrj.br, ale@ppe.ufrj.br, szklo@ppe.ufrj.br

    2010-07-01

    This paper views to present the main technologies for effluent treatment of petroleum refineries having as target the reuse. An analysis of international and Brazilian experiences of water reuse in petroleum refineries is performed viewing to support the proposition of recommendations for Brazilian refineries.

  6. Trends in oil discharged with aqueous effluents from oil refineries in Western Europe, 1993 survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dando, D.A.J.; Martin, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the information gathered by CONCAWE in a survey of Western European oil refineries` effluent water quantity, oil content and treatment processes in 1993. It compares the 1993 data with the results of previous surveys and shows that the trend in the reduction of oil discharges continued, even though the reported refinery throughputs increased by more than 30% since the low point of 1984. The ratio of oil discharged to the amount of oil processed has continued to fall. Furthermore, when allowance is made for changes in the refineries which reported, it is apparent that there was a modest reduction of total effluent discharged in 1993, reinforcing the long-term trend. These two results indicate that overall management of water use in refineries and the efficiency of effluent purification continue to improve. The report indicates that around 85% of the refineries surveyed now include biological treatment in their waste water treatment facilities.

  7. Environmental performance of an innovative waste refinery based on enzymatic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    ) from the waste. The waste refinery was compared to alternative treatments such as incineration, bioreactor landfill and mechanical-biological treatment followed by utilization of the RDF (refuse-derived fuel) for energy. The performance of the waste refinery turned out to be comparable...... for virgin material and saving fossil resources. In this paper a life-cycle assessment of a pilot-scale waste refinery for the enzymatic treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) is presented. The refinery produced a liquid (liquefied organic materials and paper) and a solid fraction (non-degradable materials...... with incineration for most environmental categories. Landfilling turned out to be the worst option with respect to most categories (especially energy-related such as GW). The refinery treatment has large margins of improvement with respect to the environmental performance. These are mainly associated...

  8. Uranium Potential and Regional Metallogeny in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jindai; LI Ziying

    2008-01-01

    This paper is briefly involved in distributions of China's uranium metallogenic types,provinces, regions and belts. Eight target regions have been pointed out to be worthy of prospectingfor uranium resources. The regional uranium metallogeny is discussed and great uranium potentialpointed out from many aspects. Generally speaking, there are favorable conditions for uraniummineralization and good perspective to explore for uranium resources.

  9. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  10. 31 CFR 540.309 - Natural uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Natural uranium. 540.309 Section 540... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.309 Natural uranium. The term natural uranium means uranium found...

  11. Genotoxicity of refinery waste assessed by some DNA damage tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit Kumar; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Masood

    2015-04-01

    Refinery waste effluent is well known to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and heavy metals as potentially genotoxic substances. The aim of the present study was to assess the genotoxic potential of Mathura refinery wastewater (MRWW) by various in vitro tests including the single cell gel electrophoresis, plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Treatment of human lymphocytes to different MRWW concentrations (0.15×, 0.3×, 0.5× and 0.78×) caused the formation of comets of which the mean tail lengths increased proportionately and differed significantly from those of unexposed controls. The toxic effect of MRWW on DNA was also studied by plasmid nicking assay and S1 nuclease assay. Strand breaks formation in the MRWW treated pBR322 plasmid confirmed its genotoxic effect. Moreover, a dose dependent increase in cleavage of calf thymus DNA in S1 nuclease assay was also suggestive of the DNA damaging potential of MRWW. A higher level of ROS generation in the test water sample was recorded which might be contributing to its genotoxicity. Interaction between the constituents of MRWW and calf thymus DNA was also ascertained by UV-visible spectroscopy.

  12. Biodegradation of oil refinery wastes under OPA and CERCLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamblin, W.W.; Banipal, B.S.; Myers, J.M. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Land treatment of oil refinery wastes has been used as a disposal method for decades. More recently, numerous laboratory studies have been performed attempting to quantify degradation rates of more toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This paper discusses the results of the fullscale aerobic biodegradation operations using land treatment at the Macmillan Ring-Free Oil refining facility. The tiered feasibility approach of evaluating biodegradation as a treatment method to achieve site-specific cleanup criteria, including pilot biodegradation operations, is discussed in an earlier paper. Analytical results of biodegradation indicate that degradation rates observed in the laboratory can be met and exceeded under field conditions and that site-specific cleanup criteria can be attained within a proposed project time. Also prevented are degradation rates and half-lives for PAHs for which cleanup criteria have been established. PAH degradation rates and half-life values are determined and compared with the laboratory degradation rates and half-life values which used similar oil refinery wastes by other in investigators (API 1987).

  13. Improving secondary clarifier performance at the Oakville Oil Refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.M.; Bagley, D.M. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-06-15

    The purpose of this study was threefold: to investigate the relationship between settleability and the physical properties of activated sludge, to correlate settleability and key operational parameters such as chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration at the aeration basin inlet and to determine potential operational improvements to the Oakville Oil Refinery Wastewater Treatment Plant. Nine separate sets of stirred sludge-settling tests were conducted over a six-month period to measure settleability. The stirred sludge volume index (SSVI), the zone settling constants, and the Zheng-Bagley compression constants were determined. State point analyses were conducted to determine the maximum solids flux of the clarifiers. The concentrations of Al, Mn, Mg, Fe, Ca, Na, and K were determined to identify potential correlations to settling characteristics. Extracellular polymeric substances were extracted from the sludge and analyzed for the same reason. The performance of the clarifiers was highly variable during the period examined. As the refinery process flows and effluent streams changed, influent COD increased, from an average of 180mg/L to 600mg/L. Concurrently the settleability of the sludge decreased from excellent (SSVI = 68mL/g) to very poor (150mL/g), perhaps as the result of under aeration. State point analyses indicated that the clarifiers are under-sized for process upsets of this magnitude. (author)

  14. Photocatalysis as a tertiary treatment for petroleum refinery wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Santos

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis has been used as tertiary treatment for petroleum refinery wastewaters to comply with the regulatory discharge limits and to oxidize persistent compounds that had not been oxidized in the biological treatment. The wastewater is generated by the refinery and directly discharged into the Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro. Although BOD removal is high, a residual and persistent COD, besides a somewhat high phenol content remains. Three photocatalysts were tested - TiO2 (Aldrich, ZnO (Aldrich, and TiO2 (P25, Degussa - the third being the most active. The optimized conditions obtained with an experimental design were 3.0 g L-1 TiO2 and pH 6.3. The use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 showed no beneficial effect. Removal of 93% of phenols, 63% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and more than 50% of oil and grease (OG were achieved in the photocatalytic process, improving the quality of the treated wastewater.

  15. A Novel Transporting System Model for Oil Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman M. Tahar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Oil refineries are widely used to store various liquids and gases. Petroleum products are in high demand. Oil companies have abundant resources of petroleum products in pipelines and storage tanks. Approach: Included are storage tanks at retail gasoline station, home heating oil tanks, lubricant storage at automotive service facilities, propane tanks in all sorts of application, and oil company terminals across the world. The aim of this study is to present a model by which a decision maker should be able to choose the optimal number of tanks, tank size and truck arrival rate to maximize average total profit per week for an oil terminal operation. Results: In this study, oil terminal modeled by using a discrete event simulation program Arena for AL-Dura refinery, Baghdad, Iraq. Multifactor variance analysis is used to determine different levels of the three factors and their interactions significantly affect the terminal profit including the optimal number of tanks, size of tanks and trucks of the arrival rate to maximize total revenue on average per week. Conclusion/Recommendations: The result showed minimum cost of oil at the terminal and tanker truck fill rates and price and income structure, also predict with 90% confidence levels, a number of factors, which gives highest average total income per week.

  16. Phenol removal from refinery wastewater by mutant recombinant horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Sedigheh; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Khajeh, Khosro

    2014-01-01

    Application of mutated recombinant horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for phenol removal from refinery effluents is reported. Recombinant HRP produced in Escherichia coli suffers from the disadvantage of lacking glycosylation, which affects its catalytic efficiency and stability toward inactivating parameters such as increased temperature and enhanced amounts of hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, the previously reported variant (in which Asn268 was substituted with Asp, N268D) with improved stability characteristics and catalytic efficiency was used to remove phenol from a petroleum refinery effluent. The presence and removal of phenol was studied by high-performance liquid chromatography; the precipitated oxidized phenol was also observed and removed from the sample by centrifugation. Results showed that the N268D variant can remove 61%, 67%, and 81% of phenol from effluent in 1, 2, and 16 H, respectively. By exploiting the N268D mutant, removal of 50% phenol could be achieved in 42 Min, which was more than 22 times less than the treatment time required by native recombinant enzyme.

  17. Critical parameters for optimal biomass refineries: the case of biohydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukios, Emmanuel; Koullas, Dimitrios; Koukios, Irene Daouti; Avgerinos, Emmanouil [National Technical University of Athens, Bioresource Technology Unit, School of Chemical Engineering, Athens (Greece)

    2010-04-15

    The object of this paper is to identify and assess the elements taken from agro-industries and fossil hydrocarbon refineries, especially with respect to biomass logistics, fractionation kinetics, and process energetics. Such critical information will be of immediate use by policy and decision makers, especially in the early phase of planning and designing the first generation of biorefineries. Concerning feedstock logistics, biorefineries have a lot to learn from food and wood supply chains. This learning could lead to the deployment of complex, decentralised, stage-wise biorefining systems, consisting of local agro-refineries, regional biorefineries, where the primary plant fractions are processed and upgraded to useful intermediates, and central bioconversion units for the generation of market-grade biofuels, such as biohydrogen and other high value-added vectors. The kinetic aspects of biorefineries are related to the physico-chemical nature of the macromolecules. Finally, to solve the problem of the non-optimal energy transformations a tailored-up bioenergy plan is proposed for each biorefinery. The example of a wheat bran-based biorefinery, aiming at the production of biohydrogen will be used to illustrate the way ahead. (orig.)

  18. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  19. Uranium Critical Point Location Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Significant uncertainty of our present knowledge for uranium critical point parameters is under consideration. Present paper is devoted to comparative analysis of possible resolutions for the problem of uranium critical point location, as well as to discussion of plausible scheme of decisive experiment, which could resolve existing uncertainty. New calculations of gas-liquid coexistence in uranium by modern thermodynamic code are included in the analysis.

  20. Radiochemistry of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gindler, J.E.

    1962-03-01

    This volume which deals with the radiochemistry of uranium is one of a series of monographs on radiochemistry of the elements. There is included a review of the nuclear and chemical features of particular interest to the radiochemist, a discussion of problems of dissolution of a sample and counting technique, and finally, a collection of radiochemical procedures for the element as found in the literature.

  1. METHOD FOR RECOVERING URANIUM FROM OILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, L.H.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for recovering uranium from hydrocarbon oils, wherein the uranium is principally present as UF/sub 4/. According to the invention, substantially complete removal of the uranium from the hydrocarbon oil may be effected by intimately mixing one part of acetone to about 2 to 12 parts of the hydrocarbon oil containing uranium and separating the resulting cake of uranium from the resulting mixture. The uranium in the cake may be readily recovered by burning to the oxide.

  2. URANIUM MARKET TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei MĂRGULESCU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent UN Climate Talks in Paris have put forward the goal of limiting the global temperature rise to two degrees Celsius by the end of the century. This is providing a strong political base for expanding the nuclear power capacity because of the critical role that nuclear power plants play in the production of electricity without emissions of greenhouse gases. In all, more than a dozen countries get over 25% of their energy from nuclear power, with 437 nuclear reactors operating around the world. On top of that, there are another 71 reactors under construction, 165 planned, and 315 proposed. Global uranium demand is expected to rise 40% by 2025 and 81% by 2035. Mined supply of uranium will struggle to keep pace amid rising demand and falling secondary supplies. A cumulative supply deficit is expected to emerge by 2021 while 2016 marks a huge inflection point for the industry, beeing the first year that demand will actually exceed supplies, creating a 60,000-tonne shortfall by 2018. Over the next 10 years, we're going to see uranium prices more than double while the bull run will begin in earnest in 2016.

  3. SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, R.W.

    1959-09-01

    A description is given for the separation of thorium from uranium by forming an aqueous acidic solution containing ionic species of thorium, uranyl uranium, and hydroxylamine, flowing the solution through a column containing the phenol-formaldehyde type cation exchange resin to selectively adsorb substantially all the thorium values and a portion of the uranium values, flowing a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid through the column to desorb the uranium values, and then flowing a dilute aqueous acidic solution containing an ion, such as bisulfate, which has a complexing effect upon thortum through the column to desorb substantially all of the thorium.

  4. Combined analysis of job and task benzene air exposures among workers at four US refinery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Amanda; Shin, Jennifer Mi; Unice, Ken M; Gaffney, Shannon H; Kreider, Marisa L; Gelatt, Richard H; Panko, Julie M

    2017-03-01

    Workplace air samples analyzed for benzene at four US refineries from 1976 to 2007 were pooled into a single dataset to characterize similarities and differences between job titles, tasks and refineries, and to provide a robust dataset for exposure reconstruction. Approximately 12,000 non-task (>180 min) personal samples associated with 50 job titles and 4000 task (job titles and task codes across all four refineries, and (5) our analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the distribution of benzene air concentrations for select jobs/tasks across all four refineries. The jobs and tasks most frequently sampled included those with highest potential contact with refinery product streams containing benzene, which reflected the targeted sampling approach utilized by the facility industrial hygienists. Task and non-task data were analyzed to identify and account for significant differences within job-area, task-job, and task-area categories. This analysis demonstrated that in general, areas with benzene containing process streams were associated with greater benzene air concentrations compared to areas with process streams containing little to no benzene. For several job titles and tasks analyzed, there was a statistically significant decrease in benzene air concentration after 1990. This study provides a job and task-focused analysis of occupational exposure to benzene during refinery operations, and it should be useful for reconstructing refinery workers' exposures to benzene over the past 30 years.

  5. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  6. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  7. The terrestrial uranium isotope cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Morten B; Elliott, Tim; Freymuth, Heye; Sims, Kenneth W W; Niu, Yaoling; Kelley, Katherine A

    2015-01-15

    Changing conditions on the Earth's surface can have a remarkable influence on the composition of its overwhelmingly more massive interior. The global distribution of uranium is a notable example. In early Earth history, the continental crust was enriched in uranium. Yet after the initial rise in atmospheric oxygen, about 2.4 billion years ago, the aqueous mobility of oxidized uranium resulted in its significant transport to the oceans and, ultimately, by means of subduction, back to the mantle. Here we explore the isotopic characteristics of this global uranium cycle. We show that the subducted flux of uranium is isotopically distinct, with high (238)U/(235)U ratios, as a result of alteration processes at the bottom of an oxic ocean. We also find that mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs) have (238)U/(235)U ratios higher than does the bulk Earth, confirming the widespread pollution of the upper mantle with this recycled uranium. Although many ocean island basalts (OIBs) are argued to contain a recycled component, their uranium isotopic compositions do not differ from those of the bulk Earth. Because subducted uranium was probably isotopically unfractionated before full oceanic oxidation, about 600 million years ago, this observation reflects the greater antiquity of OIB sources. Elemental and isotope systematics of uranium in OIBs are strikingly consistent with previous OIB lead model ages, indicating that these mantle reservoirs formed between 2.4 and 1.8 billion years ago. In contrast, the uranium isotopic composition of MORB requires the convective stirring of recycled uranium throughout the upper mantle within the past 600 million years.

  8. Petroleum Refinery Hydrogen Production Unit: Exergy and Production Cost Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio de Oliveira Júnior

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Some specific processes are required to obtain pure hydrogen and the most usual one is natural gas reforming, where natural gas reacts with superheated steam producing H2, CO, CO2 and H2O. This paper presents the exergy and production costs evaluation of a complete hydrogen production unit of a petroleum refinery. The hydrogen production unit analysed in this paper has to supply 550,000 Nm3 of hydrogen per day to purify diesel oil. Based on a synthesis plant of the hydrogen production unit, the exergy efficiency of each component and of the overall plant are calculated. The hydrogen production cost is determined by means of a thermoeconomic analysis in which the equality cost partition method is employed, including capital and operational costs, in order to determine the production cost of hydrogen and other products of the plant.

  9. Refinery energy profile. Data collection: Task 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, R.W.; Olivent, W.P.; Brandt, D.L.; Golden, T.G.; Hanson, O.L.

    1978-04-01

    Under Task 2, the raw data to be used in developing the various energy balances which will make up the refinery energy profile were gathered and recorded on a unit by unit basis. Temperature, pressure, flow, and composition data for each stream flowing to or from a significant energy producer or consumer were gathered to the maximum extent possible using available instrumentation and additional instrumentation moved on site. The procedures used, the problems encountered, the unit time requirements, comments on the instrumentation used, and representative samples of the data collected are included in the report. Many methods and techniques were employed in gathering the data but no techniques are being recommended in this Task 2 Report. Recommendations will be made in the final report after the data have been evaluated and all profiles prepared.

  10. Removal of mercury from an alumina refinery aqueous stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, Mark; Tardio, James; Bhargava, Suresh; Dobbs, Charles

    2007-06-01

    Digestion condensate is formed as a by-product of the alumina refinery digestion process. The solution exhibits a high pH and is chemically reducing, containing many volatile species such as water, volatile organics, ammonia, and mercury. Because digestion condensate is chemically unique, an innovative approach was required to investigate mercury removal. The mercury capacity and adsorption kinetics were investigated using a number of materials including gold, silver and sulphur impregnated silica and a silver impregnated carbon. The results were compared to commercial sorbents, including extruded and powdered virgin activated carbons and a sulphur impregnated mineral. Nano-gold supported on silica (88% removal under batch conditions and 95% removal under flow conditions) and powdered activated carbon (91% under batch conditions and 98% removal under flow conditions) were the most effective materials investigated. The silver and sulphur impregnated materials were unstable in digestion condensate under the test conditions used.

  11. Utilization of Eucalyptus Oil Refineries Waste for Cement Particle Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Setiadji

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of eucalyptus oil refinery waste in the manufacture of building material component of cement particle board is expected to reduce the price of housing units. This research used laboratory experimental methods, eucalyptus oil waste in the form of branches an twigs from eucalyptus tree. The variation of the testing were mixtures composition of the particle : cement, additives as accelerators, cold press load during manufacture of cement particle board. Cold press duration of cement board was 24 hours. The size of particle boards were (40 x 40 cm2 and 13 mm thick. The samples were tested for its density, water content, water absorption, flexural strength, thickness swelling, adhesion strength, and the nails pull out strength.

  12. 21世纪的炼油技术和炼油厂(2)%PETROLEUM REFINING TECHNIQUES AND REFINERIES IN 21ST CENTURY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚国欣; 刘伯华

    2001-01-01

    Some quality indexes of gasoline and diesel in developedconturies,quality requirements of clean fuels and problems in production,upgrading of traditional techniques for petroleum refining as well as the new techniques to be commercialized in the 21st century were introduced.Prospects for refineries in the 21st century were introduced together with process diagrams of the super-clean gasoline refinery,super-clean diesel refinery,no sludge refinery and conventional natural gas refinery.

  13. Uranium in soils and water; Uran in Boden und Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dienemann, Claudia; Utermann, Jens

    2012-07-15

    The report of the Umweltbundesamt (Federal Environmental Agency) on uranium in soils and water covers the following chapters: (1) Introduction. (2) Deposits and properties: Use of uranium; toxic effects on human beings, uranium in ground water and drinking water, uranium in surface waters, uranium in soils, uranium in the air. (3) Legal regulations. (4) Uranium deposits, uranium mining, polluted area recultivation. (5) Diffuse uranium entry in soils and water: uranium insertion due to fertilizers, uranium insertion due to atmospheric precipitation, uranium insertion from the air. (6) Diffuse uranium release from soils and transfer in to the food chain. (7) Conclusions and recommendations.

  14. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  15. Final Techno-Economic Analysis of 550 MWe Supercritical PC Power Plant CO2 Capture with Linde-BASF Advanced PCC Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, Devin [Linde LLC, Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Stoffregen, Torsten [Linde AG Linde Engineering Division, Dresden (Germany); Rigby, Sean [BASF Corporation, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-01-09

    This topical report presents the techno-economic evaluation of a 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing Illinois No. 6 coal as fuel, integrated with 1) a previously presented (for a subcritical PC plant) Linde-BASF post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant incorporating BASF’s OASE® blue aqueous amine-based solvent (LB1) [Ref. 6] and 2) a new Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the same BASF OASE® blue solvent that features an advanced stripper interstage heater design (SIH) to optimize heat recovery in the PCC process. The process simulation and modeling for this report is performed using Aspen Plus V8.8. Technical information from the PCC plant is determined using BASF’s proprietary thermodynamic and process simulation models. The simulations developed and resulting cost estimates are first validated by reproducing the results of DOE/NETL Case 12 representing a 550 MWe supercritical PC-fired power plant with PCC incorporating a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent as used in the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference [Ref. 2]. The results of the techno-economic assessment are shown comparing two specific options utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent technology (LB1 and SIH) to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for PCC, the incremental fuel requirement, and the net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the PC power plant integrated with the PCC plant. A comparison of the capital costs for each PCC plant configuration corresponding to a net 550 MWe power generation is also presented. Lastly, a cost of electricity (COE) and cost of CO2 captured assessment is shown illustrating the substantial cost reductions achieved with the Linde-BASF PCC plant utilizing the advanced SIH configuration in combination with BASF’s OASE® blue solvent technology as compared to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The key factors contributing to the reduction of COE and the cost of CO2 captured

  16. The use of mass flow meters in the PER+ refinery; PER+ verlegt grenzen van massaflowmeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, A. [ed.

    1998-02-01

    An adjusted Coriolis mass flowmeter for 365C and 100 bar is applied in the new Shell refinery PER+ in Rotterdam, Netherlands. The flowmeter can handle the flow of liquid asphalt of which the composition and density can vary strongly

  17. Inefficiency of Malaysian palm oil refineries and the impact of different factors on its inefficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahverdi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze changes in the inefficiency of Malaysian palm oil refineries using DEA window analysis method over the period 1996 to 2009. We investigated the effects of different factors on inefficiency of Malaysian palm oil refineries. Based on empirical results, the effect of all factors such as vertical integration, types of ownership, foreign investment, location, experience, and liberalization on inefficiency of refineries was significant. Experience, liberalization, and joint venture between private and public sectors showed an increase in efficiency, while joint venture between local and foreign investment and vertical integration increased refineries’ inefficiency. However, palm oil refineries which were located in the states of Sabah and Sarawak were less technically inefficient than those located in peninsular Malaysia.

  18. Implication of coastal refineries to the ecology of the Gulf of Kachchh

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Anand, N

    In order to meet the projected demand of petroleum products it is essential to establish additional refining capacities to process imported crude. Two grass root refineries with a combined capacity to process 24 MMTPA are proposed on the southern...

  19. Manhattan Project Technical Series: The Chemistry of Uranium (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1947-03-10

    This constitutes Chapters 11 through 16, inclusive, of the Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Uranium Oxides, Sulfides, Selenides, and Tellurides; The Non-Volatile Fluorides of Uranium; Uranium Hexafluoride; Uranium-Chlorine Compounds; Bromides, Iodides, and Pseudo-Halides of Uranium; and Oxyhalides of Uranium.

  20. Preliminary Discussion on the Construction and Development of Modern Refinery in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Rongxing; Sun Lili; Li Zhiqiang

    2004-01-01

    Sustainable development of refinery is an important problem that refining industry faces in the 21st Century. The situation and challenges in front of refining industry are analyzed and illustrated by examples in this paper. It is also recognized that large-scale, clean, light-oriented and integrated refinery is the mode of development in future, and also an important measure for the sustainable development of petroleum resource.

  1. Mild Biomass Liquefaction Process for Economic Production of Stabilized Refinery-Ready Bio-oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, Santosh [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); Meng, Jiajia [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); McCabe, Kevin [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States); Larson, Eric [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Environmental Inst.; Mastro, Kelly [Southern Research, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-04-25

    Southern Research (SR) in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bioenergy Technology Office (BETO), investigated a biomass liquefaction process for economic production of stabilized refinery-ready bio-oil. The project was awarded by DOE under a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA-0000686) for Bio-oil Stabilization and Commoditization that intended to evaluate the feasibility of using bio-oil as a potential feedstock in an existing petroleum refinery. SR investigated Topic Area 1 of the FOA at Technology Readiness Level 2-3 to develop thermochemical liquefaction technologies for producing a bio-oil feedstock from high-impact biomass that can be utilized within a petroleum refinery. Bio-oil obtained from fast pyrolysis of biomass is a green intermediate that can be further upgraded into a biofuel for blending in a petroleum refinery using a hydro-deoxygenation (HDO) route. Co-processing pyrolysis bio-oil in a petroleum refinery is an attractive approach to leverage the refinery’s existing capital. However, the petroleum industry is reluctant to accept pyrolysis bio-oil because of a lack of a standard definition for an acceptable bio-oil feedstock in existing refinery processes. Also per BETO’s multiyear program plan, fast pyrolysis-based bio-fuel is presently not cost competitive with petroleum-based transportation fuels. SR aims to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective low-severity thermal liquefaction and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process to convert woody biomass to stabilized bio-oils that can be directly blended with hydrotreater input streams in a petroleum refinery for production of gasoline and/or diesel range hydrocarbons. The specific project objectives are to demonstrate the processes at laboratory scale, characterize the bio-oil product and develop a plan in partnership with a refinery company to move the technology towards commercialization.

  2. Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John W. Berthold

    2006-02-22

    The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

  3. Affordability analysis of lead emission controls for a smelter-refinery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, T.M.

    1989-10-01

    This document evaluates the affordability and economic impact of additional control measures deemed necessary for a smelter-refinery to meet the lead emission standard. The emphasis in the analysis is on the impact of control costs on the smelter-refinery's profitability. The analysis was performed using control-cost data from two different lead-smelter studies in conjunction with other existing industry data.

  4. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N{sup 15} gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work.

  5. 31 CFR 540.316 - Uranium enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium enrichment. 540.316 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.316 Uranium enrichment. The term uranium enrichment means the process...

  6. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  7. Opportunities and challenges at the interface between petrochemistry and refinery. The BASF perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankertz, H.J. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the BASF perspective according to opportunities and challenges at the interface between petrochemistry and refinery. This contribution is divided into the following chapters: (a) Overview BASF-Group; (b) Overview BASF Petrochemicals; (c) The refinery-chemistry interface; (d) Main focus refineries; (e) Interface challenges and opportunities; (f) What can BASF do for refineries. BASF employs the Verbund concept, a system that combines production with energy needs in an intelligent way. The idea is to reduce of primary energy carriers both in terms of raw materials and for power and steam generation. The authors describes the petrochemicals of BASF AG (Ludwigshafen, Federal Republic of Germany), the raw material development, evolution of thermal steamcracking and crackerproducts. Major feedstock source of the European petrochemical industry are streams out of refineries which can't be used for transportation fuels. The gap between propylene demand and production out of steam crackers has to be closed by propylene out for FCC's. Demand for aromatics (xylenes and benzene, and to a lesser extent toluene) needs to be filled in by aromatics out of refineries. Market drivers for the refining industry are lowering crude costs, growing clean products, increasing capacity and enhancing E and P integration. BASF has various business with the oil und refining industry and provides solutions for oil field chemicals, process chemicals and performance additives. The author explains which kind of products and services BASF provides for refiners.

  8. OXYGEN ISOTOPE FRACTION ATION IN URANIUM OXIDES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑永飞

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic oxygen isotope factors for uranium oxides have been calculated by means of the modified increment method.The sequence of 18O-enrichment in the uranium oxides with respect to the common rock-forming minerals is predicted as follows:spineluranium blacks≤coffiniteuranium oxides and water and between the uranium oxides and the other minerals have been obtained for 0-1200℃.The theoretical results are applicable to the isotopic geothermometry of uranium ores when pairing with other gangue minerals in hydrothermal uranium deposits.

  9. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FROM URANIUM/MOLYBDENUM ALLOY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R; Ann Visser, A; James Laurinat, J

    2007-10-15

    The Savannah River Site will recycle a nuclear fuel comprised of 90% uranium-10% molybdenum by weight. The process flowsheet calls for dissolution of the material in nitric acid to a uranium concentration of 15-20 g/L without the formation of precipitates. The dissolution will be followed by separation of uranium from molybdenum using solvent extraction with 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin. Testing with the fuel validated dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature. Batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed for the extraction, strip and wash stages with particular focus on the distribution of molybdenum.

  10. A study of uranium uptake in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, A.; Singh, Surinder; Virk, H.S. (Guru Nanak Dev Univ., Amritsar (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1988-01-01

    A fission track technique has been used to study the uptake of uranium in Tomato Plant. Lexan plastic has been employed as the external detector for recording induced fission tracks due to uranium. The uranium uptake rate is found to increase as the growth proceeds. The uranium concentration is also determined in Phlox, Calendula and Dog Flower, grown under normal conditions. The uranium content is found to vary in different parts of the plants. (author).

  11. SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, N.N.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for separating uranium from thorium wherein the ratio of thorium to uranium is between 100 to 10,000. According to the invention the thoriumuranium mixture is dissolved in nitric acid, and the solution is prepared so as to obtain the desired concentration within a critical range of from 4 to 8 N with regard to the total nitrate due to thorium nitrate, with or without nitric acid or any nitrate salting out agent. The solution is then contacted with an ether, such as diethyl ether, whereby uranium is extracted into ihe organic phase while thorium remains in the aqueous phase.

  12. Pyrophoric behaviour of uranium hydride and uranium powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guyadec, F., E-mail: fabienne.leguyadec@cea.f [CEA Marcoule DEN/DTEC/SDTC, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze, BP 17171 (France); Genin, X.; Bayle, J.P. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DTEC/SDTC, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze, BP 17171 (France); Dugne, O. [DEN/DTEC/SGCS, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze, BP 17171 (France); Duhart-Barone, A.; Ablitzer, C. [CEA Cadarache DEN/DEC/SPUA, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2010-01-31

    Thermal stability and spontaneous ignition conditions of uranium hydride and uranium metal fine powders have been studied and observed in an original and dedicated experimental device placed inside a glove box under flowing pure argon. Pure uranium hydride powder with low amount of oxide (<0.5 wt.%) was obtained by heat treatment at low temperature in flowing Ar/5%H{sub 2}. Pure uranium powder was obtained by dehydration in flowing pure argon. Those fine powders showed spontaneous ignition at room temperature in air. An in situ CCD-camera displayed ignition associated with powder temperature measurement. Characterization of powders before and after ignition was performed by XRD measurements and SEM observations. Oxidation mechanisms are proposed.

  13. Thermodynamics analysis of refinery sludge gasification in adiabatic updraft gasifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Reem; Sinnathambi, Chandra M; Eldmerdash, Usama; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the thermodynamic evaluation for biomass gasification process using updraft gasifier. Therefore, to minimize errors, the gasification of dry refinery sludge (DRS) is carried out in adiabatic system at atmospheric pressure under ambient air conditions. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the physical and chemical energy and exergy of product gas at different equivalent ratios (ER). It will also be used to determine whether the cold gas, exergy, and energy efficiencies of gases may be maximized by using secondary air injected to gasification zone under various ratios (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5) at optimum ER of 0.195. From the results obtained, it is indicated that the chemical energy and exergy of producer gas are magnified by 5 and 10 times higher than their corresponding physical values, respectively. The cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies of DRS gasification are in the ranges of 22.9-55.5%, 43.7-72.4%, and 42.5-50.4%, respectively. Initially, all 3 efficiencies increase until they reach a maximum at the optimum ER of 0.195; thereafter, they decline with further increase in ER values. The injection of secondary air to gasification zone is also found to increase the cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies. A ratio of secondary air to primary air of 0.5 is found to be the optimum ratio for all 3 efficiencies to reach the maximum values.

  14. Thermodynamics Analysis of Refinery Sludge Gasification in Adiabatic Updraft Gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited information is available about the thermodynamic evaluation for biomass gasification process using updraft gasifier. Therefore, to minimize errors, the gasification of dry refinery sludge (DRS is carried out in adiabatic system at atmospheric pressure under ambient air conditions. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the physical and chemical energy and exergy of product gas at different equivalent ratios (ER. It will also be used to determine whether the cold gas, exergy, and energy efficiencies of gases may be maximized by using secondary air injected to gasification zone under various ratios (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 at optimum ER of 0.195. From the results obtained, it is indicated that the chemical energy and exergy of producer gas are magnified by 5 and 10 times higher than their corresponding physical values, respectively. The cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies of DRS gasification are in the ranges of 22.9–55.5%, 43.7–72.4%, and 42.5–50.4%, respectively. Initially, all 3 efficiencies increase until they reach a maximum at the optimum ER of 0.195; thereafter, they decline with further increase in ER values. The injection of secondary air to gasification zone is also found to increase the cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies. A ratio of secondary air to primary air of 0.5 is found to be the optimum ratio for all 3 efficiencies to reach the maximum values.

  15. Regeneration and reuse waste from an edible oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukerroui, Abdelhamid; Belhocine, Lydia; Ferroudj, Sonia

    2017-08-21

    A spent bleaching earth (SBE) from an edible oil refinery has been regenerated by thermal processing in oven, followed by washing with a cold solution of hydrochloric acid (1M). Optimal regeneration conditions have been controlled by decolorization tests of degummed and neutralized soybean oil. Optimal values of treatment (temperature 350°C, carbonization time 01 h, and HCl concentration 1M) gave a very efficient material. After bleaching oil by regenerated spent bleaching earth (RSBE), the chlorophyll-a and β-carotenes contained in crude edible oil and observed respectively at 430, 454, and 483 nm, value of λ max, are very much decreased. The results obtained after decolorization of edible oil by RSBE material indicate, that, during the process, the bleaching oil did not undergo any changes in the free fatty acid content. The peroxide value (PV) was reduced from 4.2 to 1.8 meq O2/kg, and the color has been improved (Lovibond color yellow/red: from 50/0.5 to 2.7/0.3, respectively). The RSBE material obtained was characterized by several techniques (FTIR, SEM). The results show that the heat treatment did not affect the mineral structure of RSBE, and the regenerated material recovered its porous structure.

  16. Recent approach to recycling business in Naoshima smelter and refinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, K.; Shimizu, T.; Usami, N.; Kaneda, A. [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    This paper described a recent retrofit conducted at the Naoshima Smelter and Refinery in Japan. Melting pretreatment and fly ash pretreatment plants for recycling industrial waste were installed as a result of recent recycling legislation in Japan. At the melting plant, mixed waste is sorted and incinerated under high temperatures. Melted slag and metal is then granulated by water, crushed, screened, and forwarded to a smelter to recover copper and other precious metals. Offgases are completely combusted in a secondary combustion chamber. Steam created by the waste boiler is used to generate electricity. The fly ash washing treatment plant was constructed to pretreat shredder residue and fly ash. The fly ash from the incinerating and melting plant is transported to a slurry tank where it is mixed with water in order to remove chlorine, sodium, and potassium. Leached fly ash is then filtered into a cake, which can then be treated in the smelter. Pretreated materials are also treated in a Mitsubishi continuous copper smelting and converting process line, which was installed to process waste residues that contained chlorine and tended to vary in size and shape. It was concluded that the installation of the process line has resulted in increased efficiency and reduced environmental impacts. 3 tabs., 8 figs.

  17. Purification and detoxification of petroleum refinery wastewater by electrocoagulation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousmi, N; Sahmi, A; Li, H Z; Poncin, S; Djebbar, R; Bensadok, K

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of synthetic oily wastewater having the characteristics of a typical petroleum refinery wastewater (PRW) by electrocoagulation (EC) using iron and aluminum electrodes was conducted in an electrolytic reactor equipped with fluid recirculation. During the treatment, the emulsion stability was followed by the measurement of Zeta potential and particle sizes. Effects of some operating conditions such as electrodes material, current density and electrolysis time on removal efficiencies of turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were investigated in detail. The PRW purification by the EC process was found to be the most effective using aluminum as the anode and cathode, current density of 60 A/m(2) and 30 min of electrolysis time. Under these conditions, the process efficiencies were 83.52% and 99.94%, respectively, for COD and turbidity removals which correspond to final values of 96 mg O2/L and 0.5 NTU. A moderate energy consumption (0.341 kWh) was needed to treat 1 m(3) of PRW. Besides, the ecotoxicity test proved that toxic substances presented in the PRW, and those inhibiting the germination growth of whet, were eliminated by the EC technique.

  18. Thermodynamics Analysis of Refinery Sludge Gasification in Adiabatic Updraft Gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Reem; Sinnathambi, Chandra M.; Eldmerdash, Usama; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the thermodynamic evaluation for biomass gasification process using updraft gasifier. Therefore, to minimize errors, the gasification of dry refinery sludge (DRS) is carried out in adiabatic system at atmospheric pressure under ambient air conditions. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the physical and chemical energy and exergy of product gas at different equivalent ratios (ER). It will also be used to determine whether the cold gas, exergy, and energy efficiencies of gases may be maximized by using secondary air injected to gasification zone under various ratios (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5) at optimum ER of 0.195. From the results obtained, it is indicated that the chemical energy and exergy of producer gas are magnified by 5 and 10 times higher than their corresponding physical values, respectively. The cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies of DRS gasification are in the ranges of 22.9–55.5%, 43.7–72.4%, and 42.5–50.4%, respectively. Initially, all 3 efficiencies increase until they reach a maximum at the optimum ER of 0.195; thereafter, they decline with further increase in ER values. The injection of secondary air to gasification zone is also found to increase the cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies. A ratio of secondary air to primary air of 0.5 is found to be the optimum ratio for all 3 efficiencies to reach the maximum values. PMID:24672368

  19. Uranium hexafluoride bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of reports written about the transportation, handling, safety, and processing of uranium hexafluoride. An on-line literature search was executed using the DOE Energy files and the Nuclear Science Abstracts file to identify pertinent reports. The DOE Energy files contain unclassified information that is processed at the Office of Scientific and Technical Information of the US Department of Energy. The reports selected from these files were published between 1974 and 1983. Nuclear Science Abstracts contains unclassified international nuclear science and technology literature published from 1948 to 1976. In addition, scientific and technical reports published by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration, as well as those published by other agencies, universities, and industrial and research organizations, are included in the Nuclear Science Abstracts file. An alphabetical listing of the acronyms used to denote the corporate sponsors follows the bibliography.

  20. Towards effective waste management. Knowledge centre Waste Refinery Activity Report 2007-2009; Mot effektivare avfallshantering. Kunskapscentrum Waste Refinery Verksamhetsrapport 2007-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    This report aims to provide a comprehensive picture of the areas that have been discussed and developed during the knowledge centre Waste Refinery first three years. Details and depth analyzes of each area are contained in project reports, which can be downloaded free of charge through our website www.wasterefinery.se

  1. Oil refinery hazardous effluents minimization by membrane filtration: An on-site pilot plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno; Crespo, João G; Santos, Maria António; Velizarov, Svetlozar

    2016-10-01

    Experiments for treating two different types of hazardous oil refinery effluents were performed in order to avoid/minimize their adverse impacts on the environment. First, refinery wastewater was subjected to ultrafiltration using a ceramic membrane, treatment, which did not provide an adequate reduction of the polar oil and grease content below the maximal contaminant level allowed. Therefore the option of reducing the polar oil and grease contamination at its main emission source point in the refinery - the spent caustic originating from the refinery kerosene caustic washing unit - using an alkaline-resistant nanofiltration polymeric membrane treatment was tested. It was found that at a constant operating pressure and temperature, 99.9% of the oil and grease and 97.7% of the COD content were rejected at this emission point. Moreover, no noticeable membrane fouling or permeate flux decrease were registered until a spent caustic volume concentration factor of 3. These results allow for a reuse of the purified permeate in the refinery operations, instead of a fresh caustic solution, which besides the improved safety and environmentally related benefits, can result in significant savings of 1.5 M€ per year at the current prices for the biggest Portuguese oil refinery. The capital investment needed for nanofiltration treatment of the spent caustic is estimated to be less than 10% of that associated with the conventional wet air oxidation treatment of the spent caustic that is greater than 9 M€. The payback period was estimated to be 1.1 years. The operating costs for the two treatment options are similar, but the reuse of the nanofiltration spent caustic concentrate for refinery pH control applications can further reduce the operating expenditures. Overall, the pilot plant results obtained and the process economics evaluation data indicate a safer, environmentally friendly and highly competitive solution offered by the proposed nanofiltration treatment, thus

  2. Assessing the Methane Emissions from Natural Gas-Fired Power Plants and Oil Refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Tegan N; Shepson, Paul B; Gore, Chloe A; Stirm, Brian H; Kaeser, Robert; Wulle, Bernard; Lyon, David; Rudek, Joseph

    2017-03-21

    Presently, there is high uncertainty in estimates of methane (CH4) emissions from natural gas-fired power plants (NGPP) and oil refineries, two major end users of natural gas. Therefore, we measured CH4 and CO2 emissions at three NGPPs and three refineries using an aircraft-based mass balance technique. Average CH4 emission rates (NGPPs: 140 ± 70 kg/h; refineries: 580 ± 220 kg/h, 95% CL) were larger than facility-reported estimates by factors of 21-120 (NGPPs) and 11-90 (refineries). At NGPPs, the percentage of unburned CH4 emitted from stacks (0.01-0.14%) was much lower than respective facility-scale losses (0.10-0.42%), and CH4 emissions from both NGPPs and refineries were more strongly correlated with enhanced H2O concentrations (R(2)avg = 0.65) than with CO2 (R(2)avg = 0.21), suggesting noncombustion-related equipment as potential CH4 sources. Additionally, calculated throughput-based emission factors (EF) derived from the NGPP measurements made in this study were, on average, a factor of 4.4 (stacks) and 42 (facility-scale) larger than industry-used EFs. Subsequently, throughput-based EFs for both the NGPPs and refineries were used to estimate total U.S. emissions from these facility-types. Results indicate that NGPPs and oil refineries may be large sources of CH4 emissions and could contribute significantly (0.61 ± 0.18 Tg CH4/yr, 95% CL) to U.S. emissions.

  3. Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emission intensity of petroleum products at U.S. refineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgowainy, Amgad; Han, Jeongwoo; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael; Forman, Grant S; DiVita, Vincent B

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of (1) a formula correlating the variation in overall refinery energy efficiency with crude quality, refinery complexity, and product slate; and (2) a methodology for calculating energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensities and processing fuel shares of major U.S. refinery products. Overall refinery energy efficiency is the ratio of the energy present in all product streams divided by the energy in all input streams. Using linear programming (LP) modeling of the various refinery processing units, we analyzed 43 refineries that process 70% of total crude input to U.S. refineries and cover the largest four Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) regions (I, II, III, V). Based on the allocation of process energy among products at the process unit level, the weighted-average product-specific energy efficiencies (and ranges) are estimated to be 88.6% (86.2%-91.2%) for gasoline, 90.9% (84.8%-94.5%) for diesel, 95.3% (93.0%-97.5%) for jet fuel, 94.5% (91.6%-96.2%) for residual fuel oil (RFO), and 90.8% (88.0%-94.3%) for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The corresponding weighted-average, production GHG emission intensities (and ranges) (in grams of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2e) per megajoule (MJ)) are estimated to be 7.8 (6.2-9.8) for gasoline, 4.9 (2.7-9.9) for diesel, 2.3 (0.9-4.4) for jet fuel, 3.4 (1.5-6.9) for RFO, and 6.6 (4.3-9.2) for LPG. The findings of this study are key components of the life-cycle assessment of GHG emissions associated with various petroleum fuels; such assessment is the centerpiece of legislation developed and promulgated by government agencies in the United States and abroad to reduce GHG emissions and abate global warming.

  4. Carcinogenesis of Depleted Uranium Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-01

    P. W. Morrow, B. J. Panner and R. B. Baggs (eds.): Nephrotoxicity of Uranyl Fluoride and Reversibility of Renal Injury in the Rat. NUREG /CR-4951...Accidental Exposure to Uranium Hexafluoride. NUREG /CR-5566, PNL-7328, Prepared for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC, 1990. Foulkes, E. C...Hydrolysis Products of Uranium Hexafluoride, NUREG /CR-2268, RH, Prepared for Division of Health Siting and Waste Management, Washington, DC, 1982. 20 Nothdurft

  5. Uranium mining operations in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, J.-M.; Arnaiz, J.; Criado, M.; Lopez, A.

    1995-12-31

    The Empresa Nacional del Uranio, SA (ENUSA) was founded in 1972 to undertake and develop the industrial and procurement activities of the nuclear fuel cycle in Spain. Within the organisation of ENUSA, the Uranium Division is directly responsible for the uranium mining and production operations that have been carried out since 1973 in the area of Ciudad Rodrigo in the province of Salamanca. These activities are based on open pit mining, heap leaching and a hydrometallurgical plant (Elefante) for extracting uranium concentrates from the ore. This plant was shut down in 1993 and a new plant was started up on the same site (Quercus) with a dynamic leaching process. The nominal capacity of the new plant is 950 t U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year. Because of the historically low uranium prices which have recently prevailed, the plant is currently running at a strategic production rate of 300 t U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year. From 1981 to 1990, in the area of La Haba (Badajoz province), ENUSA also operated a uranium production site, based on open pit mining, and an experimental extraction plant (Lobo-G). ENUSA is currently decommissioning these installations. This paper describes innovations and improvements that ENUSA has recently introduced in the field of uranium concentrates production with a view to cutting production costs, and to improving the decommissioning and site restoration processes in those sites where production is being shut down or resources have been worked out. (author).

  6. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Environment Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dvorakova, Marcela [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC{sub 50} value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC{sub 50} = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: > The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. > Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. > Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. > The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  7. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested.

  8. Feasibility of flare gas reformation to practical energy in Farashband gas refinery: no gas flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reaza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    A suggested method for controlling the level of hazardous materials in the atmosphere is prevention of combustion in flare. In this work, three methods are proposed to recover flare gas instead of conventional gas-burning in flare at the Farashband gas refinery. These methods aim to minimize environmental and economical disadvantages of burning flare gas. The proposed methods are: (1) gas to liquid (GTL) production, (2) electricity generation with a gas turbine and, (3) compression and injection into the refinery pipelines. To find the most suitable method, the refinery units that send gas to the flare as well as the required equipment for the three aforementioned methods are simulated. These simulations determine the amount of flare gas, the number of GTL barrels, the power generated by the gas turbine and the required compression horsepower. The results of simulation show that 563 barrels/day of valuable GTL products is produced by the first method. The second method provides 25 MW electricity and the third method provides a compressed natural gas with 129 bar pressure for injection to the refinery pipelines. In addition, the economics of flare gas recovery methods are studied and compared. The results show that for the 4.176MMSCFD of gas flared from the Farashband gas refinery, the electricity production gives the highest rate of return (ROR), the lowest payback period, the highest annual profit and mild capital investment. Therefore, the electricity production is the superior method economically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of the odour and chemical composition of alumina refinery air emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, P S; Ioppolo-Armanios, M

    2004-01-01

    Alcoa World Alumina Australia has undertaken comprehensive air emissions monitoring aimed at characterising and quantifying the complete range of emissions to the atmosphere from Bayer refining of alumina at its Western Australian refineries. To the best of our knowledge, this project represents the most complete air emissions inventory of a Bayer refinery conducted in the worldwide alumina industry. It adds considerably to knowledge of air emission factors available for use in emissions estimation required under national pollutant release and transfer registers (NPRTs), such as the Toxic Releases Inventory, USA, and the National Pollutant Inventory, Australia. It also allows the preliminary identification of the key chemical components responsible for characteristic alumina refinery odours and the contribution of these components to the quality, or hedonic tone, of the odours. The strength and acceptability of refinery odours to employees and neighbours appears to be dependent upon where and in what proportion the odorous gases have been emitted from the refineries. This paper presents the results of the programme and develops a basis for classifying the odour properties of the key emission sources in the alumina-refining process.

  10. Reducing refinery CO2 emissions through amine solvent upgrade and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Thiago V.; Valenzuela, Michelle [The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Regional initiatives are underway to reduce and limit the emissions of greenhouse gases. With CO2 emissions making up over 80% of the greenhouse gases, cap-and-trade programs will focus on those industries that consume the most energy. Refineries are among the top energy consumers and are seeking opportunities to reduce usage. With tightening margins, energy management programs will not only help refineries meet CO{sub 2} emission regulations, but can also provide a competitive advantage. With the trend towards heavier and higher sulfur containing crudes, refineries are increasing processing capabilities, which can include capital-intensive projects and additional energy consumption. Energy conservation plans should include optimization of these processes. One area to consider includes the acid gas removal systems in refineries. Through the selection and use of optimal solvents and implementation of energy efficiency techniques, which require minimal capital investment and expenditures, refineries can reduce energy usage, overall CO{sub 2} emissions, and total cost in acid gas systems. This paper will discuss these approaches and share case studies detailing the implementation and results. (author)

  11. Predicting refinery effluent toxicity on the basis of hydrocarbon composition determined by GCxGC analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whale, G. [and others

    2013-04-15

    A high resolution analytical method for determining hydrocarbon blocks in petroleum products by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) was used for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons extracted from refinery effluents. From 105 CONCAWE refineries in Europe 111 refinery effluents were collected in the period June 2008 to March 2009 (CONCAWE, 2010). The effluents were analysed for metals, standard effluent parameters (including Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), oil in water (OiW), GCxGC speciated hydrocarbons, BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes) and volatile organic compounds. This report describes the subsequent analysis of the GCxGC data, as described in hydrocarbon blocks, and uses the PETROTOX model, to predict the environmental toxicity (i.e. ecotoxicity) of the discharged effluents. A further analysis was undertaken to address the potential environmental impact of these predicted effects initially using default dilution factors and then,when necessary site specific factors. The report describes all the methods used to arrive at the predictions, and shows that for the majority of refinery effluents direct toxicity effects in the effluents are not anticipated. Furthermore, when applying either the EU Risk Assessment Technical Guidance Document (TGD) default dilution factors or site specific dilution factors, none of the refineries are predicted to exerting either acute or chronic toxicity to organisms in the receiving aquatic environment, based on their hydrocarbon composition present in the effluent samples.

  12. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  13. Trends in oil discharged with aqueous effluents from oil refineries in Europe. 2005 and 2008 survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldoni-Andrey, P.; Girling, A.; Garcia Biosca, E.; Struijk, K.; De Borman, F.; Smith, R.; Kitow, I.; Negroni, J.; Neal, G.; Den Haan, K.

    2011-03-15

    This report summarises data gathered by CONCAWE in surveys of effluent water quantity, oil content and treatment processes for refinery locations situated in the EU-27 countries and those in Norway and Switzerland for the years 2005 and 2008. Data obtained in previous surveys are included for comparison. The number of refinery locations reporting in 2008 has increased to 125. The results of the surveys show that the trend for lower volumes of effluent discharge relative to refinery capacity and throughput has continued. Changes in the total amounts of discharged oil, ammonia, total nitrogen (TN), phenols, BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand), COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) and TOC (Total Organic Carbon) are related to the increase in the number of refineries reporting in these years. The associated slight increases in the ratios of oil, TN, phenol, BOD and COD discharged relative to refining capacity and/or throughput may reflect the inclusion of additional refineries in countries that joined the EU in that period and whose performance may not have been at the same level as those previously surveyed. The results show that 89% of the refineries surveyed in 2005 had at least one stage of biological treatment in their wastewater treatment facilities. For 2008, this number rose to 94% for the reporting refineries. A different system of refinery complexity classification has been adopted for the 2005 and 2008 surveys. The Nelson Complexity Index (NCI) is an industry standard measure that takes account of each piece of refinery equipment on a refinery site. The 2005 and 2008 NCI scores show that the trend towards more complex refineries that was evident in the data set for the years 1969 to 2000 continues.

  14. Characterization of oily sludge from a Tehran oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Nima; Gitipour, Saeid; Abdoli, Mohammad Ali

    2010-10-01

    In this study, oily sludge samples generated from a Tehran oil refinery (Pond I) were evaluated for their contamination levels and to propose an adequate remediation technique for the wastes. A simple, random, sampling method was used to collect the samples. The samples were analyzed to measure Total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metal concentrations in the sludge. Statistical analysis showed that seven samples were adequate to assess the sludge with respect to TPH analyses. The mean concentration of TPHs in the samples was 265,600 mg kg⁻¹. A composite sample prepared from a mix of the seven samples was used to determine the sludge's additional characteristics. Composite sample analysis showed that there were no detectable amounts of PAHs in the sludge. In addition, mean concentrations of the selected heavy metals Ni, Pb, Cd and Zn were 2700, 850, 100, 6100 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. To assess the sludge contamination level, the results from the analysis above were compared with soil clean-up levels. Due to a lack of national standards for soil clean-up levels in Iran, sludge pollutant concentrations were compared with standards set in developed countries. According to these standards, the sludge was highly polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons. The results indicated that incineration, biological treatment and solidification/stabilization treatments would be the most appropriate methods for treatment of the sludges. In the case of solidification/stabilization, due to the high organic content of the sludge, it is recommended to use organophilic clays prior to treatment of the wastes.

  15. Biorefineries: Relocating Biomass Refineries to the Rural Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Papendiek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The field for application of biomass is rising. The demand for food and feeding stuff rises while at the same time energy, chemicals and other materials also need to be produced from biomass because of decreasing fossil resources. However, the biorefinery ideas and concepts can help to use the limited renewable raw materials more efficiently than today. With biorefineries, valuable products, such as platform chemicals, can be produced from agricultural feedstock, which can subsequently be further processed into a variety of substances by the chemical industry. Due to the role they play as producers of biomass, rural areas will grow in importance in the decades to come. Parts of the biorefinery process can be relocated to the rural areas to bring a high added value to these regions. By refining biomass at the place of production, new economic opportunities may arise for agriculturists, and the industry gets high-grade pre-products. Additionally, an on-farm refining can increase the quality of the products because of the instant processing. To reduce competition with the food production and to find new possibilities of utilisation for these habitats, the focus for new agricultural biomass should be on grasslands. But also croplands can provide more renewable raw materials without endangering a sustainable agriculture, e.g. by implementing legumes in the crop rotation. To decide if a region can provide adequate amounts of raw material for a biorefinery, new raw material assessment procedures have to be developed. In doing so, involvement of farmers is inevitable to generate a reliable study of the biomass refinery potentials.

  16. The end of cheap uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10±2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58±4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54±5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41±5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

  17. 40 CFR 421.320 - Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary uranium subcategory. 421.320 Section 421.320 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Uranium Subcategory § 421.320 Applicability: Description of the secondary uranium... uranium (including depleted uranium) by secondary uranium facilities....

  18. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  19. Emergency Response Program Designing Based On Case Study ERP Regulations In Ilam Gas Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tahmasbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Emergency response plan designing is one of the most important prevention approaches in crisis management. This study aims to design emergency response plan based on case study ERP regulations in Ilam gas refinery. On the basis of risk assessment and identification techniques such as HAZOP and FMEA in Ilam gas refinery the risks have been prioritized and then according to this prioritization the design of possible scenarios which have the highest rate of occurrence and the highest level of damage has been separated. Possible scenarios were simulated with PHAST software. Then emergency response program has been designed for the special mode or similar cases. According to the internal emergency response plan for Ilam gas refinery and predictable conditions of the process special instructions should be considered at the time of the incident to suffer the least damage on people and environment in the shortest time possible.

  20. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Lijiao

    2013-05-01

    High-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) were used to perform treatability studies on many different refinery wastewater samples all having appreciably different characteristics, which resulted in large differences in current generation. A de-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1±0.2A/m2 (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal. These results were similar to those obtained using domestic wastewater. Two other de-oiled refinery wastewater samples also showed good performance, with a de-oiled oily sewer sample producing less current. A stabilization lagoon sample and a stripped sour wastewater sample failed to produce appreciable current. Electricity production, organics removal, and startup time were improved when the anode was first acclimated to domestic wastewater. These results show mini-MECs are an effective method for evaluating treatability of different wastewaters. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Biological remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons from a refinery's soil : comparison of different technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazare Couto, M.; Vasconcelos, T.S.D. [CIMAR/CIIMAR, Porto (Portugal)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation discussed bioremediation methods used at a refinery in Portugal with a high distillation capacity. The aim of the project was to develop a method for restoring contaminated sites using rhizoremediation and bio-augmentation. Hydrocarbon molecules were tightly sorbed to the soil particles at the refinery. Plants used in the bioremediation project included Scirpus maritimus and Juncus maritimus, as well as Cortoaderia selloana taken from an estuary near the refinery. Tests were conducted both with, and without the use of microorganisms. Commercial bio-augmentation products were used. Plant growth was evaluated for a period of 64 days. It was concluded that the technology is cheaper than many traditional methods of treating hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. tabs., figs.

  2. 77 FR 44685 - ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Shrack, Young, and Associates, Inc., and Project Control Associates, Trainer, PA; Notice of... of ConocoPhillips Company, Trainer Refinery, Trainer, Pennsylvania (subject firm). The subject...

  3. Mechanism of removal of undesirable residual amylase, insoluble starch, and select colorants from refinery streams by powdered activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a need in the world-wide sugar industry to find a practical and economical solution to remove or inactivate residual alpha-amylase that are high temperature stable from factory or refinery streams. A survey of refineries that used amylase and had activated carbon systems for decolorization,...

  4. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  5. The economics of uranium 1991. 3. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The new Roskill report on the economics of uranium, 1991, gives essential facts and figures on five main topics; background, supply and demand; prices and uranium and nuclear activities by country and company. (author).

  6. Uranium Determination by Delayed Neutron Counting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Uranium is a very important resource in nuclear industry, especially in the exploiture of nuclear energy. Determination of uranium using delayed neutron counting (DNC) is simple, non-destructive, and

  7. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  8. Uranium 2007 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2008-01-01

    Based on official information received from 40 countries, Uranium 2007 provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1st January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. It finds that with rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of underinvestment.

  9. Variations in the uranium isotopic compositions of uranium ores from different types of uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Geagea, Majdi Lahd; Chipley, Don

    2014-12-01

    Variations in 238U/235U and 234U/238U ratios were measured in uranium minerals from a spectrum of uranium deposit types, as well as diagenetic phosphates in uranium-rich basins and peraluminous rhyolites and associated autunite mineralisation from Macusani Meseta, Peru. Mean δ238U values of uranium minerals relative to NBL CRM 112-A are 0.02‰ for metasomatic deposits, 0.16‰ for intrusive, 0.18‰ for calcrete, 0.18‰ for volcanic, 0.29‰ for quartz-pebble conglomerate, 0.29‰ for sandstone-hosted, 0.44‰ for unconformity-type, and 0.56‰ for vein, with a total range in δ238U values from -0.30‰ to 1.52‰. Uranium mineralisation associated with igneous systems, including low-temperature calcretes that are sourced from U-rich minerals in igneous systems, have low δ238U values of ca. 0.1‰, near those of their igneous sources, whereas uranium minerals in basin-hosted deposits have higher and more variable values. High-grade unconformity-related deposits have δ238U values around 0.2‰, whereas lower grade unconformity-type deposits in the Athabasca, Kombolgie and Otish basins have higher δ238U values. The δ234U values for most samples are around 0‰, in secular equilibrium, but some samples have δ234U values much lower or higher than 0‰ associated with addition or removal of 234U during the past 2.5 Ma. These δ238U and δ234U values suggest that there are at least two different mechanisms responsible for 238U/235U and 234U/238U variations. The 234U/238U disequilibria ratios indicate recent fluid interaction with the uranium minerals and preferential migration of 234U. Fractionation between 235U and 238U is a result of nuclear-field effects with enrichment of 238U in the reduced insoluble species (mostly UO2) and 235U in oxidised mobile species as uranyl ion, UO22+, and its complexes. Therefore, isotopic fractionation effects should be reflected in 238U/235U ratios in uranium ore minerals formed either by reduction of uranium to UO2 or chemical

  10. Cleaner shipping. Trade off between air pollution, costs and refinery CO2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wilde, H.P.J.; Kroon, P. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-05-15

    Still subject to final approval in October 2008, the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) agreed on a maximum sulphur content of 0.5% for shipping fuels in 2020. This target will induce major changes in the global refinery industry. We have estimated the impact on the Dutch refinery industry, which annually produces about 8 million tons of heavy fuel oil for sea shipping, with refinery residues as main component. It is technically possible to convert all residues, although this process will cause an additional energy use of about one million tons of crude oil and a related CO2 emission of about 4 million tons. The investment costs for these major changes in the Dutch refinery industry are estimated at about 1.5 tot 2 billion euros. The recent IMO agreement enables a gradual introduction of cleaner shipping fuels, which will reduce market disruptions and peak prices. Nevertheless, Rotterdam may not necessarily be able to develop a similar position in import, export and bunkering of future low sulphur fuels, compared to its present strong position in the market of heavy marine bunkers. Extrapolation of our national study to the global scale suggests that the deep conversion of 350 million tons of heavy fuel oil for shipping would require refinery investments in the order of 70-100 billion euros. The associated CO2 emissions would amount up to 175 Mton. The net additional CO2 emission, however, would be smaller since lighter shipping fuels result in less CO2 emissions at sea. On balance, we expect that the improvements in fuel economy, driven by the expensive low-carbon shipping fuels, will decrease CO2 emissions more than the increase in CO2 emissions from additional desulphurization in the refineries. Nevertheless CO2 emissions from sea shipping will continue to increase since marine transport is rapidly growing.

  11. The End of Cheap Uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

  12. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  13. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1946-09-30

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  14. What Are the Top 10 Research Questions in the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease? A Priority Setting Partnership with the James Lind Alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ailsa L; Lomer, Miranda; Verjee, Azmina; Kemp, Karen; Faiz, Omar; Daly, Ann; Solomon, Julie; McLaughlin, John

    2017-02-01

    Many uncertainties remain regarding optimal therapies and strategies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Setting research priorities addressing therapies requires a partnership between health care professionals, patients and organisations supporting patients. We aimed to use the structure of the James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership, which has been used in other disease areas, to identify and prioritise unanswered questions about treatments for inflammatory bowel disease. The James Lind Priority Setting Partnership uses methods agreed and adopted in other disease areas to work with patients and clinicians: to identify uncertainties about treatments; to agree by consensus a prioritised list of uncertainties for research; then to translate these uncertainties into research questions which are amenable to hypothesis testing; and finally to take results to research commissioning bodies to be considered for funding. A total of 1636 uncertainties were collected in the initial survey from 531 respondents, which included 22% health care professionals and 78% patients and carers. Using the rigorously applied processes of the priority setting partnership, this list was distilled down to the top 10 research priorities for inflammatory bowel disease. The top priorities were: identifying treatment strategies to optimise efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness; and stratifying patients with regard to their disease course and treatment response. Diet and symptom control [pain, incontinence and fatigue] were also topics which were prioritised. A partnership involving multidisciplinary clinicians, patients and organisations supporting patients has identified the top 10 research priorities in the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. © European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation 2016.

  15. Uranium 2003 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2004-01-01

    Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a detailed statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020.

  16. Statistical data of the uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on US uranium reserves, potential resources, exploration, mining, drilling, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1980. The compendium reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Office. Statistics are based primarily on information provided by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. Data on commercial U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ sales and purchases are included. Data on non-US uranium production and resources are presented in the appendix. (DMC)

  17. U.S. refinery efficiency: impacts analysis and implications for fuel carbon policy implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Grant S; Divita, Vincent B; Han, Jeongwoo; Cai, Hao; Elgowainy, Amgad; Wang, Michael

    2014-07-01

    In the next two decades, the U.S. refining industry will face significant changes resulting from a rapidly evolving domestic petroleum energy landscape. The rapid influx of domestically sourced tight light oil and relative demand shifts for gasoline and diesel will impose challenges on the ability of the U.S. refining industry to satisfy both demand and quality requirements. This study uses results from Linear Programming (LP) modeling data to examine the potential impacts of these changes on refinery, process unit, and product-specific efficiencies, focusing on current baseline efficiency values across 43 existing large U.S. refineries that are operating today. These results suggest that refinery and product-specific efficiency values are sensitive to crude quality, seasonal and regional factors, and refinery configuration and complexity, which are determined by final fuel specification requirements. Additional processing of domestically sourced tight light oil could marginally increase refinery efficiency, but these benefits could be offset by crude rebalancing. The dynamic relationship between efficiency and key parameters such as crude API gravity, sulfur content, heavy products, residual upgrading, and complexity are key to understanding possible future changes in refinery efficiency. Relative to gasoline, the efficiency of diesel production is highly variable, and is influenced by the number and severity of units required to produce diesel. To respond to future demand requirements, refiners will need to reduce the gasoline/diesel (G/D) production ratio, which will likely result in greater volumes of diesel being produced through less efficient pathways resulting in reduced efficiency, particularly on the marginal barrel of diesel. This decline in diesel efficiency could be offset by blending of Gas to Liquids (GTL) diesel, which could allow refiners to uplift intermediate fuel streams into more efficient diesel production pathways, thereby allowing for the

  18. FUZZY MODELING APPLICATION OF FLUID CATALYTIC CRACKING UNIT (FCCU OF A PETROLEUM REFINERY (TÜPRAŞ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithat ZEYDAN

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fuzzy modeling of FCCU in the refinery system as the most important part of Petrochemical Industry was carried out. FCCU is the most important unit in the refinery system as it is a higly nonlinear system with MIMO (Multi input-multi output, internal feedback, strongly coupling, time-varying, distributed parameter, significantly uncertain behaviours in nature. Mathematical Models is not enough to identify this system. On the occasion of this, FCCU has a characteristic specifications as a subject of Fuzzy Logic.

  19. The uranium in the environment; L'uranium dans l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The uranium is a natural element omnipresent in the environment, with a complex chemistry more and more understood. Many studies are always today devoted to this element to better improve the uranium behavior in the environment. To illustrate this knowledge and for the public information the CEA published this paper. It gathers in four chapters: historical aspects and properties of the uranium, the uranium in the environment and the impacts, the metrology of the uranium and its migration. (A.L.B.)

  20. 77 FR 14837 - Bioassay at Uranium Mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... COMMISSION Bioassay at Uranium Mills AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-8051, ``Bioassay at Uranium Mills.'' This guide describes a bioassay program acceptable to the NRC staff for uranium mills and applicable portions...

  1. 77 FR 12880 - Uranium From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... COMMISSION Uranium From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... investigation on uranium from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to... Publication 4307 (February 2012), entitled Uranium from Russia: Investigation No. 731-TA-539-C (Third...

  2. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  3. Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

    1999-08-05

    Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

  4. Electroformation of uranium hemispherical shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, S.L.; Redey, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Vissers, D.R.

    1989-11-01

    This effort was directed at developing an electrochemical process for forming uniform and dendrite-free deposits of uranium from molten salts. This process is to be used for the electroformation of free-standing hemispherical shells of uranium for nuclear applications. Electrodeposition of uranium onto a substrate was accomplished with a fused chloride mixture containing 42 wt% UCl{sub 3} and a fused chloride-fluoride mixture containing 4 wt % UF{sub 4}. Under pulsed potential control at 504{degree}C, the chloride-fluoride mixture yielded the widest range of plating conditions for which dendrites could be avoided. Bipolar current pulse plating with both electrolytes gave good results, and successful application of this technique to a large tubular cathode has been demonstrated. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  5. A Typical Case Study: Solid Waste Management in Petroleum Refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadea S. Alshammari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The current environmental concerns have forced developed and developing countries to reduce air, water and land pollution for sustainable growth. Solid refinery waste is cocktail of hydrocarbons, water, heavy metal and fine solids and is substantial in quantity. The principal processes of waste management focus mainly on waste source reduction, reusing, recycling, composting, incineration with or without energy recovery, fuel production and land filling. Waste management models have a common approach of assignment of generating sources to landfills, transfer stations sitting, site selection for landfills, etc. but recently new integrated models have been developed and applied. Waste management system in an industrial complexes uses multi-objective mixed integer programming approach for the running of existing facilities in dynamic net work flow models with nonlinear costs of management. The latest multi-objective mixed integer programming techniques are applied to resolve the potential conflict between environmental and economic goals and to evaluate sustainable strategies for waste management. In this approach, material recycling in an economic sense exhibits huge indirect benefits, although the emphasis of environmental quality as a major objective in decision-making drives the optimal solution toward pro-recycling programs. The use of grey and fuzzy system theories as uncertainty analysis tools as an enhancement of this modeling analysis proves to be highly profitable. A multi-objective optimization model based on the goal programming approach has been developed and tested in this study for passable management of solid waste generated by a typical petroleum refining industry in the state of Kuwait. The analytic hierarchy process, a decision-making approach, including qualitative and quantitative aspects of a problem, has been integrated in the model to prioritize the conflicting goals existing in the waste management problems of the petroleum

  6. Trends in desulfurization capabilities, processing technologies, and the availability of crude oils: U. S. refineries; Caribbean ''exporting'' refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, E. L.; Marsik, F. V.

    1977-12-01

    A review of all U.S. refineries and their downstream equipment has led to the conclusion that slightly more than 40 percent of the existing capacity can handle some sour crude of one type or another. For various reasons, this cannot be an exactly defined number, nor does it coincide with the percent of hydroprocessing equipment in relation to crude capacity. A few refineries have hydrotreating facilities and yet only have sweet crude capability. A few refiners may only have capability to handle sour crudes in the lower sulfur ranges, say 0.5 to 1.0 percent, due to emissions problems or other limitations. These are limitations which can be overcome by investments. Still others would face problems in their product output pattern due to low gravity of some sour crudes. Catalytic hydroprocessing (hydrocracking, hydrorefining, and hydrotreating) removes sulfur from refinery streams so that the total amount of sulfur in the products and residues is less than that in the crude oil feedstock. For this reason, changes in hydroprocessing capacity are used to express the changing capabilities of refiners to process sour crudes. On the other hand, thermal processes (vacuum distillation, visbreaking, and coking), segregate most of the sulfur contained in the refinery feedstocks into residual fractions, allowing the production of low sulfur containing products, but the total amount of sulfur in the products and in the residual fractions is essentially the same as that in the crude oil feedstocks. In this regard, thermal processes are limited in their ability to produce low-sulfur products.

  7. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-01-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the US may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  8. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  9. Release behavior of uranium in uranium mill tailings under environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Tongjiang; Sun, Hongjuan; Yue, Huanjuan

    2017-05-01

    Uranium contamination is observed in sedimentary geochemical environments, but the geochemical and mineralogical processes that control uranium release from sediment are not fully appreciated. Identification of how sediments and water influence the release and migration of uranium is critical to improve the prevention of uranium contamination in soil and groundwater. To understand the process of uranium release and migration from uranium mill tailings under water chemistry conditions, uranium mill tailing samples from northwest China were investigated with batch leaching experiments. Results showed that water played an important role in uranium release from the tailing minerals. The uranium release was clearly influenced by contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH under water chemistry conditions. Longer contact time, higher liquid content, and extreme pH were all not conducive to the stabilization of uranium and accelerated the uranium release from the tailing mineral to the solution. The values of pH were found to significantly influence the extent and mechanisms of uranium release from minerals to water. Uranium release was monitored by a number of interactive processes, including dissolution of uranium-bearing minerals, uranium desorption from mineral surfaces, and formation of aqueous uranium complexes. Considering the impact of contact time, liquid-solid ratio, particle size, and pH on uranium release from uranium mill tailings, reducing the water content, decreasing the porosity of tailing dumps and controlling the pH of tailings were the key factors for prevention and management of environmental pollution in areas near uranium mines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear, uranium, reserves, sustainability, independence; Nucleaire, Uranium, reserves, durabilite, independance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acket, C

    2007-06-15

    In order to evaluate the energy independence concerning the nuclear energy, the author takes the state of the art about the uranium. He details the fuel needs, the reserves on the base of the today available techniques, the reserves on the base of the future techniques and concludes positively on the energy independence for the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  11. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-guang, E-mail: wangxg@upc.edu.cn [School of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nuclear Technology Application (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Liu, Dan [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Zhang, Feng [School of Geosciences, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2015-03-15

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  12. Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

  13. Uranium 2011 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24th edition of the “Red Book”, a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countri...

  14. Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2014-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

  15. Uranium 2005 Resources, Production and Demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris. Nuclear Energy Agency

    2006-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  16. Pyrolysis oil upgrading for Co-processing in standard refinery units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Miguel Mercader, Ferran

    2010-01-01

    This thesis considers the route that comprises the upgrading of pyrolysis oil (produced from lingo-cellulosic biomass) and its further co-processing in standard refineries to produce transportation fuels. In the present concept, pyrolysis oil is produced where biomass is available and then transport

  17. MIGREYD Modular IGCC concepts for in-Refinery Energy and Hydrogen supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romey, I.; Obladen, M.; Schulz, A. [Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Inst. Technology of Energy Supply and Energery Conversion Systems (TEE), Essen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    There is an increasing tendency for refineries to produce a greater proportion of light, high-hydrogen-content chemicals, which also results in greater quantities of heavy residues which require disposal. Gasification of these residues offers a number of options for utilisation of the resulting products. Importantly, gasification offers the opportunity for cost-effective production of hydrogen, which may not only be used in the refinery processes, but also in future fuel cell applications, either for stationary or transport options. The MIGREYD project opens an important bridge for the transition from the use of conventional fossil fuels to a future hydrogen based energy system. Through this project, an advanced, highly efficient in-refinery energy and hydrogen supply system will be developed that is flexible in terms of fuels (biomass, oil refinery residues, low-grade fossil fuels) and products (hydrogen, cogeneration of power and process heat, and other chemicals). The improved efficiency of the process stages and the synergistic benefits of poly-generation will realise savings of primary fossil energy resources, sustainable pollution control and a significant decrease of the total plant's CO{sub 2} emissions. (orig.)

  18. Biological treatment of refinery spent caustics under halo-alkaline conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Abbas, B.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Muyzer, G.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present research demonstrates the biological treatment of refinery sulfidic spent caustics in a continuously fed system under halo-alkaline conditions (i.e. pH 9.5; Na(+)= 0.8M). Experiments were performed in identical gas-lift bioreactors operated under aerobic conditions (80-90% saturation) at

  19. REMOTE SENSING DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL PLANTS AND REFINERIES FOLLOWING HURRICANES KATRINA AND RITA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The massive destruction brought by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita also impacted the many chemical plants and refineries in the region. The achievement of this rapid analysis capability highlights the advancement of this technology for air quality assessment and monitoring. Case st...

  20. Use of activated carbons to remove undesirable residual amylase from factory and refinery streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over residual (carry-over) activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were develope...

  1. Development of optimum conditions for modification of Kpautagi clay for application in petroleum refinery wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. ONU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kautagi clay is a kaolin type deposit that is abundantly available in Niger State, Nigeria with potential for application in pollution control such as wastewater treatment. This study investigates the optimum conditions for modification of Kpautagi clay for application in refinery wastewater treatment. Sulphuric acid was used in the modification of the clay and the modification variables considered were acid concentration, activation time and temperature. To develop the optimum conditions for the modification variables, the sulphuric acid modified Kpautagi clay was applied in the treatment of refinery wastewater in column mode at a fixed flow rate and mass of adsorbent. The results obtained indicate that the optimum conditions for modification of Kpautagi clay for application in the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater are: acid concentration of 4M; activation time of 120min and activation temperature of 100°C. Therefore, the optimum conditions developed in this study for modification of Kpautagi clay could be applied for improved performance in the treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater.

  2. Profitability diagnosis of refinery and improvement proposal; Seiyusho no shueki shindan to kaizen teian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, H.

    2000-07-01

    Based on consulting service RPS-J under joint operation of Nikki, UOP LLC of U.S.A. and Nikki Universal, approaching ways applied for profitability improvement and improvement proposal for refineries and analyzing techniques used for resolution of process bottlenecks were described. In RPS-J, themes of (1) energy saving, (2) quality upgrading, (3) improvement of disintegrating ratio, (4) reduction of give-away, (5) improvement of equipment operation ratio, (6) reduction of maintenance cost, (7) effective utilization of catalysts, are considered for profitability improvement fields. Procedures from idea excavation for profitability improvement to realization of profitability improvement are carried out in the order of, (1) Grasping of the present state, (2) Excavation of improving items and selection, (3) Quantitative evaluation of draft profitability improvement plan and focusing, (4) Profitability improvement by operation improvement, (5) Profitability improvement by minor improvement, (6) Profitability improvement in middle- and long-term vision, (7) Final focusing by feasibility study. Afterwards, examination to economically solve bottlenecks of critical facilities, examination on bottlenecks of distillation tower and refining tower and utility analysis are carried out. RPS-J was already applied to 4 refineries including Muroran Refinery and Negishi Refinery of Nisseki Mitsubishi, and profitability improvement themes were found to improve profitability of 50 to 150 cents per barrel. (NEDO)

  3. Monitoring coastal pollution associated with the largest oil refinery complex of Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croquer, Aldo; Bone, David; Bastidas, Carolina; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pollution levels in water and sediments of Península de Paraguaná and related these levels with benthic macrofauna along a coastal area where the largest Venezuelan oil refineries have operated over the past 60 years. For this, the concentration of heavy metals, of hydrocarbon compounds and the community structure of the macrobenthos were examined at 20 sites distributed along 40 km of coastline for six consecutive years, which included windy and calm seasons. The spatial variability of organic and inorganic compounds showed considerably high coastal pollution along the study area, across both years and seasons. The southern sites, closest to the refineries, had consistently higher concentrations of heavy metals and organic compounds in water and sediments when compared to those in the north. The benthic community was dominated by polychaetes at all sites, seasons and years, and their abundance and distribution were significantly correlated with physical and chemical characteristics of the sediments. Sites close to the oil refineries were consistently dominated by families known to tolerate xenobiotics, such as Capitellidae and Spionidae. The results from this study highlight the importance of continuing long-term environmental monitoring programs to assess the impact of effluent discharge and spill events from the oil refineries that operate in the western coast of Paraguaná, Venezuela.

  4. Pyrolysis oil upgrading for Co-processing in standard refinery units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Miguel Mercader, F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis considers the route that comprises the upgrading of pyrolysis oil (produced from lingo-cellulosic biomass) and its further co-processing in standard refineries to produce transportation fuels. In the present concept, pyrolysis oil is produced where biomass is available and then

  5. Lymphohematopoietic Cancer Mortality and Morbidity of Workers in a Refinery/Petrochemical Complex in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hee Koh

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion: The results showed a potential relationship between leukemia and lymphohematopoietic cancers and exposure to benzene in refinery/petrochemical complex workers. This study yielded limited results due to a short observational period; therefore, a follow-up study must be performed to elucidate the relationship between petrochemical exposure and cancer rates.

  6. Environmental and economic sustainability of integrated production in bio-refineries: The thistle case in Sardinia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazan, Devrim; Yazan, Devrim Murat; Mandras, Giovanni; Garau, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims at evaluating the environmental and economic sustainability of bio-refineries that produce multiple products through their supply chains (SCs). A physical enterprise input-output (EIO) model is used to quantify the material/energy/waste flows and integrated to the monetary EIO model

  7. Production of advanced biofuels: Co-processing of upgraded pyrolysis oil in standard refinery units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, de F.; Groeneveld, M.J.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Way, N.W.J.; Schaverien, C.J.; Hogendoorn, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the possible process options for the production of advanced biofuels is the co-processing of upgraded pyrolysis oil in standard refineries. The applicability of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) was studied as a pyrolysis oil upgrading step to allow FCC co-processing. Different HDO reaction end temper

  8. Material resources, energy, and nutrient recovery from waste: are waste refineries the solution for the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    of a Danish waste refinery solution against state-of-the-art waste technology alternatives (incineration, mechanical-biological treatment (MBT), and landfilling). In total, 252 scenarios were evaluated, including effects from source-segregation, waste composition, and energy conversion pathway efficiencies...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or imported...: ER26FE07.012 Where: Bavg = Average benzene concentration for the applicable averaging period (volume...

  10. Recent grassland losses are concentrated around U.S. ethanol refineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christopher K.; Larson, Ben; Lark, Tyler J.; Gibbs, Holly K.

    2017-04-01

    Although the United States has pursued rapid development of corn ethanol as a matter of national biofuel policy, relatively little is known about this policy’s widespread impacts on agricultural land conversion surrounding ethanol refineries. This knowledge gap impedes policy makers’ ability to identify and mitigate potentially negative environmental impacts of ethanol production. We assessed changes to the landscape during initial implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard v2 (RFS2) from 2008 to 2012 and found nearly 4.2 million acres of arable non-cropland converted to crops within 100 miles of refinery locations, including 3.6 million acres of converted grassland. Aggregated across all ethanol refineries, the rate of grassland conversion to cropland increased linearly with proximity to a refinery location. Despite this widespread conversion of the landscape, recent cropland expansion could have made only modest contributions to mandated increases in conventional biofuel capacity required by RFS2. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a shortcoming in the existing ‘aggregate compliance’ method for enforcing land protections in the RFS2 and suggest an alternative monitoring mechanism would be needed to appropriately capture the scale of observed land use changes.

  11. Materials And Carbon Flow In A Waste Refinery Process Using Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Woods, M.; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    that the waste refinery has great potential for resource recovery: about 100% of the Cbiogenic and up to 90% of N and P can potentially be recovered in the bioslurry and returned to land after anaerobic digestion. Recovery of ferrous and non-ferrous material is estimated double compared to recovering the same...

  12. Utilization of the BR-SIPP systems (Integrated Refinery Scheduling System) at the PETROBRAS Capuava refinery; Utilizacao do sistema BR-SIPP - Sistema Integrado de Programacao de Producao PETROBRAS na refinaria de Capuava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, Marcel [PETROBRAS, Maua, SP (Brazil). Refinaria de Capuava (RECAP). Gerencia de Otimizacao]. E-mail: joly@petrobras.com.br; Hassimotto, Marcelo Kenji [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Solucoes de Negocios de Logistica e Planejamento]. E-mail: kenji@petrobras.com.br; Magalhaes, Marcus Vinicius de Oliveira [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Otimizacao]. E-mail: vinicius@petrobras.com.br

    2007-04-15

    The BR-SIPP is a production scheduling decision support tool for refineries. It is integrated into the Corporate Inventory, Movements and Quality Data Base and is based on events simulation technology for the elaboration and analysis of scheduling scenarios. Its utilization at the Capuava Refinery allows the production programming team to analyze and anticipate difficulties and opportunities, thereby being able to make viable a potential integration of management and people directly involved with the refinery scheduling information, such as planning, logistics and commercial areas. (author)

  13. Synthesis of uranium fluorides from uranium dioxide with ammonium bifluoride and ammonolysis of uranium fluorides to uranium nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeamans, Charles Burnett

    This work presents the chemical conversion of uranium oxides to uranium fluorides, and their subsequent conversion to uranium nitrides. Uranium dioxide reacts with ammonium bifluoride at 20°C to form compound in the ammonium-uranium fluoride chemical system. This reaction occurs between solid uranium dioxide at the surface of the particles and ammonium fluoride vapor. A shrinking-sphere model demonstrated surface reaction kinetics, not mass transport by diffusion through the product layer, limit the reaction rate when the starting material consists of 100 mum uranium dioxide particles. Powder x-ray diffraction showed the reaction to be complete within 8 hours, with (NH4) 4UF8 the reaction product. High-resolution electron microcopy revealed the product is largely amorphous on a micrometer-scale, but contains well-formed crystal domains on the order of 10x10 nm. X-ray diffraction showed the reaction progresses though beta-NH4UF5, delta-(NH 4)2UF6, and gamma-(NH4)2UF6 intermediate phases before finally forming (NH4)4UF 8. Modeling the system as a series of first-order reaction suggested a fourth intermediate, possibly UF4, is likely to occur. The reaction of (NH4)4UF8 with ammonia gas at 800°C forms alpha-U2N3/UN2 solid solution products with a composition of UN1.83. The x-ray powder diffraction pattern of this product is the fcc pattern commonly referenced as that of UN2 and the lattice parameter was 0.53050 nm. Surface area increased by a factor of ten during ammonolysis, consistent with the action of a hydriding agent. The alpha-U2N 3/UN2 solid solution system formed contained 1 wt% UO 2 as an impurity. Upon subsequent heating to 1150°C for 4.5 hours under argon, the nitride sample formed UN with a UO2 impurity of 9 wt%. Based on the HRTEM images, oxidation in the UN product appears to be limited to within 20 nm of particle surfaces and grain boundaries.

  14. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  15. Contribution of Tula Refinery flaring emissions to the Mexico megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, Victor; Molina, Luisa; Sosa, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    Flaring is an important source of greenhouse gases, particulate matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in both upstream and downstream operations in the oil and gas industry. In 2010 Mexico was the eleventh emitting country with 2.5 billion cubic meters of gas flared (World Bank, 2012). Black carbon (a component of soot) emissions from flaring facilities are of particular interest because soot is considered a short-lived climate forcer (SLCF) (UNEP, 2011). In 2011 there were 23 megacities of at least 10 million inhabitants. It is expected that this number increase to 37 by 2025, which will include one more in Northern America (NA) and two more in Latin America (UN, 2012). International collaborative projects like MILAGRO in NA and MEGAPOLI/CityZen in Europe, have been conducted to assess the impact of megacities air pollution at several scales. The former focused on the air pollution plume of Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA), the largest megacity in NA. This work studies the contribution of flaring emissions from Tula Refinery to regional air quality. This is accomplished in two steps. First, the flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order to estimate emission rates of combustion by-products of interest for air quality. Mass flow rates of acetylene, ethylene, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, soot and sulfur dioxide are obtained. The emission rates of NO2 and SO2 are compared with measurements obtained at Tula as part of MILAGRO field campaign. The rates of soot, VOCs and CO emissions are compared with estimates obtained by Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (IMP). The second stage takes the flaring emission rates of the aforementioned species as inputs to WRF-Chem in order to simulate the chemical transport of the plume from 22 March to 27 March of 2006. The air quality model presented reliable performance of the resolved meteorology, with respect to the Mean Absolute Error (MAE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE

  16. Becoming a refinery leader by changing operations to match new product quality regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, Maryro P. [KBC Advanced Technologies, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Global environmental concerns have forced the automotive and oil industries to increase efficiency and reduce emissions, which has led to the tightening of fuels specifications around the world. The implementation of ultra-low sulphur transport fuels has become a worldwide trend with growing momentum. Compliance with these standards requires the refiner to make decisions in advance of the implementation date. Therefore, in order to make changes on time, refiners are currently assessing options and changes required to comply with regulations by 2016. Similar regulations have been implemented in Europe already and KBC has the methodology and experience to assess the existing refinery configuration, unit capability and facility infrastructure to provide the basis for decision making. This paper focus on KBC's methodology which looks at the molecular management needed to produce the low levels of sulfur and toxic required in today's refined products. A key element to the study is the use of Petro-SIM for development of a representative detailed non-linear model, of the refinery which has been used to test ideas and configurations and help confirm the Refinery LP development activities. Using a Petro-SIM representation, KBC is able to make an assessment of the impact of imposing Tier 3 gasoline (sulphur to < 10 ppm) on the refinery, examining critical blending constraints, unused stream qualities and quantities and likely type and scale of capital investment that would be required while optimising unit operations and maximising margins. This paper illustrates KBC's current thinking based on studies done to date to review clean fuels and Tier 3 specifications options for specific refinery configurations. (author)

  17. Management of environmental liability and remediation of the La Pampilla Oil Refinery, Lima, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.S. [Hazco Environmental Services, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The La Pampilla Oil Refinery has a capacity of 102,000 barrels per day, and supplies over 50 per cent of Peru's petroleum products. The area surrounding the refinery was severely polluted due to continuous leaks and spills. Remediation of the area began in 2001. The remediation project was divided into 5 sub-projects: (1) free product recovery in refinery area; (2) free recovery in beach area; (3) secure industrial and hazardous landfill; (4) bioremediation of treatable soil contamination; and (5) characterization, handling and shipping of hazardous historical waste. Recovery wells, collection tanks, and air compressors were located at various sites on the refinery grounds. A pneumatic skimmer was used to recover an estimated 33,000 bbls of free product in the refinery area over a period of 3.5 years. Product thickness on the groundwater table is remaining stable. Over 2000 bbls of free product were recovered in the beach area through the combined use of pump recovery and skimmer pumps. Two landfill cells were sited on the property with over 140,000 tonnes of hydrocarbons. Details of liner construction and installation were provided, as well as details of the earthquake design adjustments needed to ensure the safety of the landfills. Soils in the area are being bioremediated by digging 29 pits using segregated materials and a combination of aeration and organic amendments with air biopiles. Excavated volumes to date are 498,000 m{sup 3}. It was concluded that soils contaminated with tetraethyl lead, asbestos, and heavy metals are now being classified and disposed of. The total volume of disposed solid wastes has exceeded 12,000 cubic metres. tabs., figs.

  18. Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K. [Inst. for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

    1997-05-10

    The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

  19. Reactive transport modeling at uranium in situ recovery sites: uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Tutu, Hlanganani; Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical changes that can occur down gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites are important for various stakeholders to understand when evaluating potential effects on surrounding groundwater quality. If down gradient solid-phase material consists of sandstone with iron hydroxide coatings (no pyrite or organic carbon), sorption of uranium on iron hydroxides can control uranium mobility. Using one-dimensional reactive transport models with PHREEQC, two different geochemical databases, and various geochemical parameters, the uncertainties in uranium sorption on iron hydroxides are evaluated, because these oxidized zones create a greater risk for future uranium transport than fully reduced zones where uranium generally precipitates.

  20. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  1. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  2. Depleted uranium: Metabolic disruptor?; Uranium appauvri: perturbateur metabolique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, Maamar; Dublineau, Isabelle; Lestaevel, Philippe [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN, Direction de la radioprotection de l' homme, Laboratoire de radiotoxicologie experimentale, Service de radiobiologie et d' epidemiologie, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    The presence of uranium in the environment can lead to long-term contamination of the food chain and of water intended for human consumption and thus raises many questions about the scientific and societal consequences of this exposure on population health. Although the biological effects of chronic low-level exposure are poorly understood, results of various recent studies show that contamination by depleted uranium (DU) induces subtle but significant biological effects at the molecular level in organs including the brain, liver, kidneys and testicles. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that DU induces effects on several metabolic pathways, including those metabolizing vitamin D, cholesterol, steroid hormones, acetylcholine and xenobiotics. This evidence strongly suggests that DU might well interfere with many metabolic pathways. It might thus contribute, together with other man-made substances in the environment, to increased health risks in some regions. (authors)

  3. Reports on investigations of uranium anomalies. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodknight, C.S.; Burger, J.A. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    During the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program, conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC), radiometric and geochemical surveys and geologic investigations detected anomalies indicative of possible uranium enrichment. Data from the Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey (ARMS) and the Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), both of which were conducted on a national scale, yielded numerous anomalies that may signal areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Results from geologic evaluations of individual 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles for the NURE program also yielded anomalies, which could not be adequately checked during scheduled field work. Included in this volume are individual reports of field investigations for the following six areas which were shown on the basis of ARMS, HSSR, and (or) geologic data to be anomalous: (1) Hylas zone and northern Richmond basin, Virginia; (2) Sischu Creek area, Alaska; (3) Goodman-Dunbar area, Wisconsin; (4) McCaslin syncline, Wisconsin; (5) Mt. Withington Cauldron, Socorro County, New Mexico; (6) Lake Tecopa, Inyo County, California. Field checks were conducted in each case to verify an indicated anomalous condition and to determine the nature of materials causing the anomaly. The ultimate objective of work is to determine whether favorable conditions exist for the occurrence of uranium deposits in areas that either had not been previously evaluated or were evaluated before data from recent surveys were available. Most field checks were of short duration (2 to 5 days). The work was done by various investigators using different procedures, which accounts for variations in format in their reports. All papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  4. Uranium triflate complexes; Complexes triflates de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthet, J.C.; Ephritikhine, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, Lab. de Chimie de Coordination, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Nierlich, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, Lab. de Cristallochimie, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2002-02-01

    Uranium triflate complexes. We review here the different preparations of uranium triflates that we have developed in the course of these last years in our laboratory. Protonation of [U]-R and [U]-NR{sub 2} (R=alkyl) bonds with pyridinium triflate constitutes a general and efficient route towards triflate complexes. This method is very suitable for the preparation of organometallic compounds such as U(Cp){sub 3}(OTf), U(Cp){sub 2}(OTf){sub 2}(py), U(Cp{sup *}){sub 2}(OTf){sub 2}, and U(Cot)(OTf){sub 2}(py), which have been crystallographically characterised. The homoleptic species U(OTf){sub n} (n=3,4) are easily prepared by heating a mixture of uranium turnings or UH{sub 3} in triflic acid. By adjusting the temperature to 120 or 180 deg C, either U(OTf){sub 3} or U(OTf){sub 4} is isolated. Treatment of UO{sub 3} with pure or aqueous solution of triflic acid leads to the non-solvated uranyl triflate UO{sub 2}(OTf){sub 2}, which is more conveniently obtained by heating a suspension of UO{sub 3} in triflic anhydride. This reactant is an excellent dehydrating agent and enables the preparation of UO{sub 2}(OTf){sub 2} and Ce(OTf){sub 4} from the hydrated starting materials. (authors)

  5. Cellular localization of uranium in the renal proximal tubules during acute renal uranium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kitahara, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kyoko; Blyth, Benjamin J; Suya, Noriyoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Terada, Yasuko; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2015-12-01

    Renal toxicity is a hallmark of uranium exposure, with uranium accumulating specifically in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules causing tubular damage. As the distribution, concentration and dynamics of accumulated uranium at the cellular level is not well understood, here, we report on high-resolution quantitative in situ measurements by high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis in renal sections from a rat model of uranium-induced acute renal toxicity. One day after subcutaneous administration of uranium acetate to male Wistar rats at a dose of 0.5 mg uranium kg(-1) body weight, uranium concentration in the S3 segment of the proximal tubules was 64.9 ± 18.2 µg g(-1) , sevenfold higher than the mean renal uranium concentration (9.7 ± 2.4 µg g(-1) ). Uranium distributed into the epithelium of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and highly concentrated uranium (50-fold above mean renal concentration) in micro-regions was found near the nuclei. These uranium levels were maintained up to 8 days post-administration, despite more rapid reductions in mean renal concentration. Two weeks after uranium administration, damaged areas were filled with regenerating tubules and morphological signs of tissue recovery, but areas of high uranium concentration (100-fold above mean renal concentration) were still found in the epithelium of regenerating tubules. These data indicate that site-specific accumulation of uranium in micro-regions of the S3 segment of the proximal tubules and retention of uranium in concentrated areas during recovery are characteristics of uranium behavior in the kidney.

  6. Maximum permissible concentrations of uranium in air

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    The retention of uranium by bone and kidney has been re-evaluated taking account of recently published data for a man who had been occupationally exposed to natural uranium aerosols and for adults who had ingested uranium at the normal dietary levels. For life-time occupational exposure to uranium aerosols the new retention functions yield a greater retention in bone and a smaller retention in kidney than the earlier ones, which were based on acute intakes of uranium by terminal patients. Hence bone replaces kidney as the critical organ. The (MPC) sub a for uranium 238 on radiological considerations using the current (1959) ICRP lung model for the new retention functions is slightly smaller than for earlier functions but the (MPC) sub a determined by chemical toxicity remains the most restrictive.

  7. Uranium in cassiterites of tin deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagruzina, I.A.; Pinskij, Eh.M.; Savinova, I.B.

    1986-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidation of physico-chemical features of uranium and tin behaviour in ore deposition zones uranium determinations (1000 determ) in cassiterite grains from 55 tin-ore deposits of different formation types of several separate regions are carried out by means of fission radiography. It is shown that uranium content in cassiterites is a genetic sign. Peculiarities of uranium concentration and migration in tin deposits permit to use them as prognostic radiogeochemical criteria. Radiogeochemical prognostic-search signs confirm the antagonism between uranium and tin deposits of cassiterite-silicate and cassiterite-sulfide formations and paragenetic of certain types of uranium hydrothermal deposits with tin deposits of cassiterite-quartz formation.

  8. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanism is a major contributor to the formation of important uranium deposits both close to centers of eruption and more distal as a result of deposition of ash with leachable uranium. Hydrothermal fluids that are driven by magmatic heat proximal to some volcanic centers directly form some deposits. These fluids leach uranium from U-bearing silicic volcanic rocks and concentrate it at sites of deposition within veins, stockworks, breccias, volcaniclastic rocks, and lacustrine caldera sediments. The volcanogenic uranium deposit model presented here summarizes attributes of those deposits and follows the focus of the International Atomic Energy Agency caldera-hosted uranium deposit model. Although inferred by some to have a volcanic component to their origin, iron oxide-copper-gold deposits with economically recoverable uranium contents are not considered in this model.

  9. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  10. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  11. Current status of vegetation of six PETROBRAS refineries; Status dos fragmentos de vegetacao em seis refinarias da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basbaum, Marcos Andre; Bonafini, Fabio Loureiro; Porciano, Patricia Pereira [SEEBLA, Servicos de Engenharia Emilio Baumgart Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Torggler, Bianca Felippe; Fernandes, Renato [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Engenharia; Vieira, Elisa Diniz Reis [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Most of refineries from PETROBRAS have significant vegetation areas within their limits. The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary assessment study of the vegetation fragments on six refineries, including the quantification of permanent preservation areas (Brazilian environmental law requirement). Besides that, the authors propose potential recovery areas and some reforestation techniques. The methodology was based on Rapid Ecological Assessment, that consists on the selection of target areas by image analysis (satellite or aerial photos) and expedite fieldwork - three days on each refinery. The main features of vegetation, like phytophysiognomy and successional stage were obtained, and registered on a specific form developed to be used at fieldwork. The results achieved show that 44,7% of the areas from these six refineries were occupied by vegetation. The most representative categories of vegetation were Atlantic forest fragments and mangroves, as well as to permanent preservation areas. (author)

  12. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2 Accumulation in Soil and Plant's Leaves around an Oil Refinery: A Case Study from Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Al-Jahdali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulative levels of SO2 in soil and plant's leaves around an oil refinery were monitored. Four different sites around the refinery area were chosen; west, south east, north east and the northern side. The refinery southern side was not accessible. In addition to the soil samples, leaves samples of the dominant plants species Myoporum pictum were randomly collected from all sites. Highly significant levels of sulfate were found in soil and plant leaves samples at all sites compared to the control. The highest level of sulfate in soil (9,000 ± 1200 µg g-1 and plant's leaves (65,774 ± 320 µg g-1 were found in the southern east side. This high content of sulfate indicates high levels of air contamination with SO2 around the refinery which negatively effects the environment and public health at this populated area.

  13. Development of a research method to measure insoluble and soluble starch in sugarcane factory and refinery products

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid, quantitative research method using microwave-assisted probe ultrasonication was developed to facilitate the determination of total insoluble, and soluble starch in various sugar factory and refinery products. Several variables that affect starch solubilization were evaluated: 1) conductiv...

  14. Current status of vegetation of six PETROBRAS refineries; Status dos fragmentos de vegetacao em seis refinarias da PETROBRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basbaum, Marcos Andre; Bonafini, Fabio Loureiro; Porciano, Patricia Pereira [SEEBLA, Servicos de Engenharia Emilio Baumgart Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Torggler, Bianca Felippe; Fernandes, Renato [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Engenharia; Vieira, Elisa Diniz Reis [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Most of refineries from PETROBRAS have significant vegetation areas within their limits. The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary assessment study of the vegetation fragments on six refineries, including the quantification of permanent preservation areas (Brazilian environmental law requirement). Besides that, the authors propose potential recovery areas and some reforestation techniques. The methodology was based on Rapid Ecological Assessment, that consists on the selection of target areas by image analysis (satellite or aerial photos) and expedite fieldwork - three days on each refinery. The main features of vegetation, like phytophysiognomy and successional stage were obtained, and registered on a specific form developed to be used at fieldwork. The results achieved show that 44,7% of the areas from these six refineries were occupied by vegetation. The most representative categories of vegetation were Atlantic forest fragments and mangroves, as well as to permanent preservation areas. (author)

  15. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  16. Rate phenomena in uranium extraction by amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, C. F.; McDowell, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetics studies and other rate measurements are reviewed in the amine extraction of uranium and of some other related and associated metal ions. Equilibration is relatively fast in the uranium sulfate systems most important to uranium hydrometallurgy. Significantly slow equilibration has been encountered in some other systems. Most of the recorded rate information, both qualitative and quantitative, has come from exploratory and process-development work, while some kinetics studies have been directed specifically toward elucidation of extraction mechanisms. 71 references.

  17. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  18. Design of Uranium Solution Critical Experimental Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI; Da-yong; GUO; Zhi-jia; YAO; Cheng-zhi; SHI; Chen-lei

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, Department of reactor engineering design completes the design and mechanical analysis of Uranium solution critical experimental device. According to user’s requirements and nuclear safety regulations, design and analysis mainly involves two sets of core structure, uranium solution loop, water loop and experimental bench, etc. The core which includes a core vessel, reactor core support, safety rods, control rods, and so on, is used for containing uranium solution and fuel element and fulfilling the

  19. ELECTROLYTIC CLADDING OF ZIRCONIUM ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, J.J.

    1959-09-22

    A method is presented for coating uranium with zircoalum by rendering the uranium surface smooth and oxidefree, immersing it in a molten electrolytic bath in NaCI, K/sub 2/ZrF/sub 6/, KF, and ZrO/sub 2/, and before the article reaches temperature equilibrium with the bath, applying an electrolyzing current of 60 amperes per square dectmeter at approximately 3 volts to form a layer of zirconium metal on the uranium.

  20. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium; Recuperacao de uranio em escorias de uranio metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CNEN/IPEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Combustiveis Nucleares], e-mail: ffornar@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U{sub 3} Si{sub 2}) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF{sub 6}) with enrichment 20% in weight of {sup 235}U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  1. Uranium market issues and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julian, L.C. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The market for uranium has become increasingly international in scope. This trend is expected to continue, with additional sources of competitive supply entering the market. The decrease in constant-dollar uranium prices over the past 11-12 years has realigned competitive supply sources. Implementation of the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement in 1989 is a significant event in its implications for future trade patterns. Namibian independence from South Africa would open additional markets for Rossing production. Decisions by the government of Australia concerning the three mine policy and the floor price for contracts are crucial in the development of supply in that country. Uranium from China and the USSR may become increasingly available and acceptable to some worldwide buyers. Over the long run, the competitive status of the US with respect to certain foreign producers will probably depend more on the success of US producers in minimizing costs or using unconventional mining techniques, such as in-situ leach where feasible, than on legislative measures. Investment in promising areas outside of the US is a potential avenue to be explored for profitable ventures. Price formation is dependent on a number of interacting supply-and-demand factors. Future price movement will be the major factor determining which production centers will be competitive.

  2. Removal of ammonium ions by laboratory-synthesized zeolite linde type A adsorption from water samples affected by mining activities in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakye-Awuah, Bright; Labik, Linus Kweku; Nkrumah, Isaac; Williams, Craig

    2014-03-01

    Ammonium ion adsorption by laboratory-synthesized zeolite (linde type A; LTA) was investigated in batch kinetics experiments. Synthesized zeolite LTA was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size analysis. Water samples were taken from the Nyam and Tano rivers in Ghana, and 0.8 g of zeolite was added to 100 ml portions of each sample. Portions of the samples were withdrawn every 30 min for 150 min and the concentration of ammonia in each sample was determined. The removal efficiency of zeolite LTA was evaluated by retrieving the zeolite from the water samples and adding to a fresh sample to repeat the process. Equilibrium data were fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Maximum adsorption capacities were 72.99 mg g(-1) for samples from the River Nyam and 72.87 mg g(-1) for samples from the River Tano. The equilibrium kinetic data were analysed using adsorption kinetic models: pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. Linear regression was used to estimate the adsorption and kinetic parameters. The results showed that the adsorption followed pseudo-second order kinetics and suggest that zeolite LTA is a good adsorbent for the removal of nitrogen ammonia from water.

  3. Diagnosis of extraction of mineral water for the city of Águas de Lindóia, São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledda Gobbo Freitas Bueno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The changes in natural resources – high consumption, waste and pollution – particularly the water used by the population and the need for healthier habits, the has increased the demand for mineral water, in the society. As a result of increased consumption of mineral water, its extraction increases – more groundwater wells are drilled – and the generation of packaging is becoming bigger and bigger. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of extraction of mineral water in the city of Águas de Lindóia, SP, was raised and analyzed through questionnaires with the city population and water bottlers, as well as data collected from the municipal government in order to identify what this market represents in the local population, and the consequences of the larger production to the environment. The local population consumes mineral water bottled in the city, especially because of their health concern. There is also a large consumption of treated water, what demonstrates trust in the quality and the treatment thereof. The market for bottler industries has shown limited, but companies have a good vision for the future. As for issues related to the environment, companies have carried out with their obligations to the environmental agencies and already have some concern about the subject, such as the reuse of excess water.

  4. Mutation in Torenia fournieri Lind. UFO homolog confers loss of TfLFY interaction and results in a petal to sepal transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsutomo; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Aida, Ryutaro; Shikata, Masahito; Abe, Tomoko; Ohtsubo, Norihiro

    2012-09-01

    We identified a Torenia fournieri Lind. mutant (no. 252) that exhibited a sepaloid phenotype in which the second whorls were changed to sepal-like organs. This mutant had no stamens, and the floral organs consisted of sepals and carpels. Although the expression of a torenia class B MADS-box gene, GLOBOSA (TfGLO), was abolished in the 252 mutant, no mutation of TfGLO was found. Among torenia homologs such as APETALA1 (AP1), LEAFY (LFY), and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), which regulate expression of class B genes in Arabidopsis, only accumulation of the TfUFO transcript was diminished in the 252 mutant. Furthermore, a missense mutation was found in the coding region of the mutant TfUFO. Intact TfUFO complemented the mutant phenotype whereas mutated TfUFO did not; in addition, the transgenic phenotype of TfUFO-knockdown torenias coincided with the mutant phenotype. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that the mutated TfUFO lost its ability to interact with TfLFY protein. In situ hybridization analysis indicated that the transcripts of TfUFO and TfLFY were partially accumulated in the same region. These results clearly demonstrate that the defect in TfUFO caused the sepaloid phenotype in the 252 mutant due to the loss of interaction with TfLFY. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  6. The Leyden uranium prospect, Jefferson County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Garland B.

    1950-01-01

    The Leyden uranium prospect is in sec. 28, T, 2 S., R. 70 W, Jefferson County, Cplo, Examination of the property was made in February 1950. Uranium was first reported in this locality in 1875 by Captain E. L. Berthoud, who noted uranium minerals associated with the main coal bed. The Old Leyden coal mine workings have long been abandoned and caved, but specimens of the uranium-bearing rock can be seen on the old dump 700 feet to the south. The mineralized coal bed is 10 to 12 feet thick and occurs near the base of the Laramie formation of Upper Cretaceous age. Uranium minerals are present in the form of yellow incrustations and inclusions in fractured and partly silicified coal. Petrographic studies indicate that the silica and uranium minerals were deposited after deposition and carbonization of the coal. Secondary uranium minerals also were found by C. R. Butler along the outcrop of the sandstones in the Laramie formation. No uranium minerals were found in place by the writer, but four samples from the dump contained 0.001, 0,005, 0.17 and 0.69 percent uranium.

  7. Mitigating uranium in groundwater: prospects and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noubactep, C; Meinrath, G; Dietrich, P; Merkel, B

    2003-09-15

    Removal of uranium(VI) by zerovalent iron has been suggested as a feasible pathway to control uranium contaminations in seepage waters. Available information in the literature however presents discrepant evidence on the process responsible for the mitigation effect. On basis of an EH-pH diagram of uranium and iron, it is outlined that these discrepancies may be explained by the aqueous chemistry of uranium and iron. Additional effects contributing to the complexity of the system are given. Solubilization experiments using scrap iron together with water works sludge, MnO2, and pyrite indicate that U(VI) is immobilized by iron corrosion products after about 50 days.

  8. In Vivo Nanodetoxication for Acute Uranium Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guzmán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accidental exposure to uranium is a matter of concern, as U(VI is nephrotoxic in both human and animal models, and its toxicity is associated to chemical toxicity instead of radioactivity. We synthesized different PAMAM G4 and G5 derivatives in order to prove their interaction with uranium and their effect on the viability of red blood cells in vitro. Furthermore, we prove the effectiveness of the selected dendrimers in an animal model of acute uranium intoxication. The dendrimer PAMAM G4-Lys-Fmoc-Cbz demonstrated the ability to chelate the uranyl ion in vivo, improving the biochemical and histopathologic features caused by acute intoxication with uranium.

  9. Colorimetric detection of uranium in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVol, Timothy A [Clemson, SC; Hixon, Amy E [Piedmont, SC; DiPrete, David P [Evans, GA

    2012-03-13

    Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

  10. Statistical data of the uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry is a compendium of information relating to US uranium reserves and potential resources and to exploration, mining, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1981. The statistics are based primarily on data provided voluntarily by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. The compendium has been published annually since 1968 and reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Area Office (GJAO) of the US Department of Energy. The production, reserves, and drilling information is reported in a manner which avoids disclosure of proprietary information.

  11. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  12. Genotoxic evaluation of an industrial effluent from an oil refinery using plant and animal bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Postalli Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are genotoxic chemicals commonly found in effluents from oil refineries. Bioassays using plants and cells cultures can be employed for assessing environmental safety and potential genotoxicity. In this study, the genotoxic potential of an oil refinery effluent was analyzed by means of micronucleus (MN testing of Alium cepa, which revealed no effect after 24 h of treatment. On the other hand, primary lesions in the DNA of rat (Rattus norvegicus hepatoma cells (HTC were observed through comet assaying after only 2 h of exposure. On considering the capacity to detect DNA damage of a different nature and of these cells to metabolize xenobiotics, we suggest the association of the two bioassays with these cell types, plant (Allium cepa and mammal (HTC cells, for more accurately assessing genotoxicity in environmental samples.

  13. Materials And Carbon Flow In A Waste Refinery Process Using Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Woods, M.; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of resources from mixed Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is a crucial aspect of waste management practices. In this paper the materials and carbon flows of an innovative waste refinery process using enzymes are presented. Through enzymatic treatment the process produces two main streams from...... the initial mixed MSW: a bioslurry (liquefied paper and organics) and a solid fraction (non-degradable materials). The discussion is based on the performance of the process in separating recyclables and recovery Cbiogenic as well as nutrients from the input MSW. The results of MFA and SFA illustrate...... that the waste refinery has great potential for resource recovery: about 100% of the Cbiogenic and up to 90% of N and P can potentially be recovered in the bioslurry and returned to land after anaerobic digestion. Recovery of ferrous and non-ferrous material is estimated double compared to recovering the same...

  14. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-04-23

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  15. Toward zero waste to landfill: an effective method for recycling zeolite waste from refinery industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homchuen, K.; Anuwattana, R.; Limphitakphong, N.; Chavalparit, O.

    2017-07-01

    One-third of landfill waste of refinery plant in Thailand was spent chloride zeolite, which wastes a huge of land, cost and time for handling. Toward zero waste to landfill, this study was aimed at determining an effective method for recycling zeolite waste by comparing the chemical process with the electrochemical process. To investigate the optimum conditions of both processes, concentration of chemical solution and reaction time were carried out for the former, while the latter varied in term of current density, initial pH of water, and reaction time. The results stated that regenerating zeolite waste from refinery industry in Thailand should be done through the chemical process with alkaline solution because it provided the best chloride adsorption efficiency with cost the least. A successful recycling will be beneficial not only in reducing the amount of landfill waste but also in reducing material and disposal costs and consumption of natural resources as well.

  16. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  17. Treatment of oil refinery wastewater using crude Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikehata, K.; Buchanan, I. D.; Smith, D. W. [University of Alberta, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-11-01

    Enzymatic treatment of oil refinery wastewater was investigated using crude peroxidase derived from the fungus Coprinus cinereus (CIP), and hydrogen peroxide. Further objectives were to investigate the effects of residual organic compounds in the crude enzyme, and compare the performance of CIP to those of purified horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) in the treatment of a strong refinery wastewater. Phenols in the wastewater were converted to coloured polymeric products and then removed by coagulation with alum. As a result of the enzymatic treatment and alum coagulation of the wastewater containing 6.4 mM total phenol, the chemical oxygen demand and the 5-d biochemical oxygen demand were reduced by 52 per cent and 58 per cent, respectively. Reduction of the oxygen demands notwithstanding, the dissolved organic materials in the crude CIP were not affected by either of these processes and tended to remain in the treated wastewater. 31 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  18. Striving for an Energy and Resources Saving Refinery with Harmonious Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Lili

    2007-01-01

    The operating circumstances of refinery industry in China in 2005 were referred to in this paper,along with the processes for development of petrochemical industry aimed at regionalization,concentrated disposition of enterprises and construction of industrial bases.The pressure faced currently by the oil refining industry in terms of resources avalibility and environmental regulations was analyzed.The key elements associated with the refining industry restructuring to economize on all kinds of resources were discussed and presented.It is stated that the key for building an energy and materials saving oil refining industry should rely on the adoption of advanced process and engineering technology,adjustment of refinery configuration,improving the energy and resources utilization efficiency,deep processing of crude oils,optimizing all kinds of resources,reducing effluents by saving water,as well as boosting the integration of oil refining with chemical production,concentrated disposition and realization of large scale of process units.

  19. Mathematical Model for Predicting Corrosion Rates in Furnace Internal Wall Tubes of The Refinery Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edori, E. S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for predicting the corrosion rates in the furnace internal wall tubes of the refinery boiler was resolved, using the first order differential equation derived from the material balance equation of the system. The mathematical model was able to predict the metal loss recorded by ultrasonic thickness scanning technique (UTS, and the results shows an agreement. The results from both the model and UTS shows that in the various tubes of the furnace, internal wall of the refinery boiler were between the same range. The percentage deviation which was calculated to ascertain the acceptability of the model result as compared to that from UTS proved that the model is effective. The inhibitor model result show that corrosion will drastically reduce in the presence of corrosion inhibitors under proper chemical treatment and management. The model developed can be used to monitor furnace internal wall corrosion even when the system is in operation by extrapolating the result to further years.

  20. Life-cycle assessment of a waste refinery process for enzymatic treatment of municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Astrup, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Decrease of fossil fuel dependence and resource saving has become increasingly important in recent years. From this perspective, higher recycling rates for valuable materials (e.g. metals) as well as energy recovery from waste streams could play a significant role substituting for virgin material...... production and saving fossil resources. This is especially important with respect to residual waste (i.e. the remains after source-separation and separate collection) which in Denmark is typically incinerated. In this paper, a life-cycle assessment and energy balance of a pilot-scale waste refinery...... for the enzymatic treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) is presented. The refinery produced a liquid (liquefied organic materials and paper) and a solid fraction (non-degradable materials) from the initial waste. A number of scenarios for the energy utilization of the two outputs were assessed. Co...

  1. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of dilution of the recovered uranium with depleted uranium and low-enriched uranium to obtain fuel for VVER reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. Yu; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of the recovered uranium enrichment in a cascade of gas centrifuges with three feed flows (depleted uranium, low-enriched uranium, recovered uranium) with simultaneous dilution of U-232,234,236 isotopes was shown. A series of numerical experiments were performed for different content of U-235 in low-enriched uranium. It has been demonstrated that the selected combination of diluents can simultaneously reduce the cost of separative work and the consumption of natural uranium, not only with respect to the previously used multi-flow cascade schemes, but also in comparison to the standard cascade for uranium enrichment.

  3. Management of waste generation in the oil refining industry. The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lage Refinery experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, J.I.; Machado, J.B.; Linhares, C.A.; Mazarino, P.R. [PETROBRAS, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). REVAP. Refinaria Henrique Lage

    1993-12-31

    The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lages Refinery - located in Sao Paulo State (Southeast Brazil), has been developing for many years a systematic program for solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generation reduction. The waste minimization management program success has been built due to the structure behavioural modifications due to the new environment protection and quality politics; the training and equipment investments, and operational procedures changes. (author). 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Optimal Renewable Energy Integration into Refinery with CO2 Emissions Consideration: An Economic Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnifro, M.; Taqvi, S. T.; Ahmad, M. S.; Bensaida, K.; Elkamel, A.

    2017-08-01

    With increasing global energy demand and declining energy return on energy invested (EROEI) of crude oil, global energy consumption by the O&G industry has increased drastically over the past few years. In addition, this energy increase has led to an increase GHG emissions, resulting in adverse environmental effects. On the other hand, electricity generation through renewable resources have become relatively cost competitive to fossil based energy sources in a much ‘cleaner’ way. In this study, renewable energy is integrated optimally into a refinery considering costs and CO2 emissions. Using Aspen HYSYS, a refinery in the Middle East was simulated to estimate the energy demand by different processing units. An LP problem was formulated based on existing solar energy systems and wind potential in the region. The multi-objective function, minimizing cost as well as CO2 emissions, was solved using GAMS to determine optimal energy distribution from each energy source to units within the refinery. Additionally, an economic feasibility study was carried out to determine the viability of renewable energy technology project implementation to overcome energy requirement of the refinery. Electricity generation through all renewable energy sources considered (i.e. solar PV, solar CSP and wind) were found feasible based on their low levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). The payback period for a Solar CSP project, with an annual capacity of about 411 GWh and a lifetime of 30 years, was found to be 10 years. In contrast, the payback period for Solar PV and Wind were calculated to be 7 and 6 years, respectively. This opens up possibilities for integrating renewables into the refining sector as well as optimizing multiple energy carrier systems within the crude oil industry

  5. Analysis of Accidents in Nine Iranian Gas Refineries: 2007–2011

    OpenAIRE

    AR Shakibmanesh; Bolouri, A.; R Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Occupational accidents are one of the major health hazards in industries and associated with high mortality, morbidity, spiritual damage and economic losses in the world.Objective: To determine the incidence of occupational accidents in 9 Iranian gas refineries between March 2007 and February 2011.Methods: Data on all occupational accidents occurred between March 2007 and February 2011, as well as other possible associated variables including time of accident, whether the accident...

  6. Decreasing emission factor of pollutants in an oil refinery by renovating the furnace design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zabihi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The significant consumption of gas in the World results in the emission of greenhouse gases into atmosphere. Abadan refinery has always been the biggest and oldest oil refinery in the Middle East and has a variety of refined products. After six months of collecting data about pollutant concentration emitted from a stack of old furnaces of units 75 and new unit 200, the emission factor of the pollutant was calculated. The result showed that the emission factor of some hazardous pollutants emitted from old unit 75 was tremendously higher than that of unit 200. This study suggests the installation of a forced fan to provide the excess air and a feed temperature controlling system to control fuel gas consumption. These would make the fuel combustion complete and decrease its consumption. Meanwhile, further results showed that the renovation of unit 75 could lead to a significant annual reduction of some pollutants such as CO, H2S, and CxHx to 66 ton, 3 ton, and 800 kg, respectively; this would increase the emission rate of pollutant SO2 up to 150 ton annually. Finally, the new data of pollution coming from unit 75 were compared to pollution standard at American refineries. Results showed that the emission factor of most pollutants were below the American standard limits. However, the emission factor of sulfur dioxide emitted from upgraded furnace of unit 75 surpassed the American standard values. Fuel gas needs to be free of hydrogen sulfide in order to decrease SO2 emission in unit 75. It is predicted that the renovation of other 11 old furnaces belonging to Abadan refinery will result in significant decrease of pollutants CO, CxHx and H2S up to 320, 94 and 76 ton annually.

  7. A Spatial Risk Analysis of Oil Refineries within the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Daniels, V. (2003, November 24). Review of Literature: Responses to "Empirical and Hermeneutic Approaches to Phenomenological Research in Psychology ...a Comparison. Retrieved May 31, 2011 , from Gestalt -L: http://www.g-gej.org/5-2/reviewlit.html Cox, J. A. (2008). Limitations of "Risk = Threat x...May, 2011, from Stanford Encyclopedia of Psychology : http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/game- theory/#Neu47 96 Rusco, F. (2008). Refinery Outages

  8. PetroChina and Sinopec Raises Oil Ex-refinery Prices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sinopec and PetroChina have raised ex-refinery prices for gasoline and diesel to boost sagging margins as it faces soaring crude prices. The Chinese refiners increased 90-octane gasoline price by 100 yuan (US$12) a ton to about 3,580 yuan (US$432) a ton, and that of diesel by 40 yuan (US$4.80) a ton to 3,602 yuan (US$435),effective September 17.

  9. PetroChina and Kuwait to Construct Joint Venture Refinery in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ PetroChina, China's largest oil producer and Asia's most profitable company, and Kuwait may build a planned joint venture oil refinery in South China's Pearl River Delta area, according to Guangdong Province's Executive Vice Governor Zhong Yangsheng, who told reporters at the Boao Forum for Asia in Hainan Province in late April.However, he declined to provide further details. The Pearl River Delta region accounts for about a third of the nation's exports.

  10. Microbial community succession in alkaline, saline bauxite residue: a cross-refinery study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, T.; Malcolm, L. I.; Tyson, G. W.; Warren, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Bauxite residue, a byproduct of the Bayer process for alumina refining, is an alkaline, saline tailings material that is generally considered to be inhospitable to microbial life. In situ remediation strategies promote soil formation in bauxite residue by enhancing leaching of saline, alkaline pore water, and through incorporation of amendments to boost organic matter content, decrease pH, and improve physical structure. The amelioration of chemical and physical conditions in bauxite residue is assumed to support diversification of microbial communities from narrow, poorly functioning microbial communities towards diverse, well-functioning communities. This study aimed to characterise microbial communities in fresh and remediated bauxite residues from refineries worldwide, to identify (a) whether initial microbial communities differed between refineries; (b) major environmental controls on microbial community composition; and (c) whether remediation successfully shifts the composition of microbial communities in bauxite residue towards those found in reference (desired endpoint) soils. Samples were collected from 16 refineries and characterised using 16S amplicon sequencing to examine microbial community composition and structure, in conjunction with physicochemical analyses. Initial microbial community composition was similar across refineries but partitioned into two major groups. Microbial community composition changes slowly over time and indicates that alkalinity and salinity inhibit diversification. Microbially-based strategies for in situ remediation should consider the initial microbial community composition and whether the pre-treatment of chemical properties would optimise subsequent bioremediation outcomes. During in situ remediation, microbial communities become more diverse and develop wider functional capacity, indicating progression towards communities more commonly observed in natural grassland and forest soils.

  11. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses

  12. Optimization of operating conditions of distillation columns: an energy saving option in refinery industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Fazlali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While energy prices continue to climb, it conservation remains the prime concern for process industries. The daily growth of energy consumption throughout the world and the real necessity of providing it, shows that optimization of energy generation and consumption units is an economical and sometimes vital case. Hence, the optimization of a petroleum refinery is aimed towards great production and an increase in quality. In this research, the atmospheric distillation unit of the Iran-Arak-Shazand petroleum refinery was subject to optimization efforts. It was performed by the means of using a simulator with the aim to earn more overhead products. In the next step the optimization results from the simulators were carried out in the real world, at the above mentioned unit. Results demonstrate that the changes in the real operating conditions increase the overhead products with desirable quality. Finally, a net economical balance between the increments of the overhead products and the energy consumption shows an energy saving in this refinery.

  13. Exergy and exergoeconomic analysis of a petroleum refinery utilities plant using the condensing to power method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes da Silva, Julio Augusto; Pellegrini, Luiz Felipe; Oliveira Junior, Silvio [Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mails: jams@usp.br, luiz.pellegrini@usp.br, soj@usp.br; Plaza, Claudio; Rucker, Claudio [Petrobras - Petroleo Brasileiro S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mails: claudioplaza@petrobras.com.br, rucker@petrobras.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a brief description of the main processes present in a modern high capacity refinery is done. The methodology used to evaluate, through exergy analysis, the performance of the refinery's utilities plant since it is responsible for a very considerable amount of the total exergy destruction in a refinery is presented. The utilities plant products: steam, electricity, shaft power and high pressure water had their exergy unit cost determined using exergoeconomic approach. A simple and effective method called condensing to power was used to define the product of the condensers in exergy basis. Using this method it is possible to define the product of the condenser without the use of negentropy concept nor the aggregation of condensers to the steam turbines. By using this new approach, the costs obtained for the plant's products are exactly the same costs obtained when the condenser is aggregated to the steam turbine but with the advantage that the information about the stream between condenser and the steam turbine is not lost and the condenser can be evaluated singly. The analysis shows that the equipment where attention and resources should be focused are the boilers followed by the gas turbine, that together, are responsible for 80% of total exergy destruction in the utilities plant. The total exergy efficiency found for the utilities plant studied is 35% while more than 280 MW of exergy is destroyed in the utilities processes. (author)

  14. WATER PINCH TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION TO MINIMIZE SULPHUROUS WASTEWATER IN AN OIL REFINERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Orlando Lobelles Sardiñas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oil refining industries there is a high water consumption, which influences the high production costs and impacts the environment due to the discharge of their wastes. It is known that there are no technological conditions for the reuse of industrial water at the oil refineries, based on hydroskimming processes. The objective of this study is to implement the process integration methodology, Water Pinch, to a sour water stripper unit, as a unitary process of an oil refinery, to minimize the amount of sulphurous waste water and reduce contamination of the bay that receives these wastes. The technology is applied to evaluate the volume of sulphurous wastewater generated in the Cienfuegos oil refinery. This technology allows identifying opportunities for recovery and reuse of water, based on concentration ranges of contaminants. To achieve this purpose, a sour water stripper tower was assessed with the help of Water Pinch software, which provided an optimized distribution network, as a proposed technological improvement. This facilitated to recover and reuse 667 757, 28 m3 of water per year, and 1 035 023, 78 CUC were saved, at the same time the amount of polluting effluents decreased in approximately 2 % of non-reusable treated water.

  15. Analysis on Refinery System as a Complex Task-resource Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Suyu; RONG Gang

    2013-01-01

    Refinery system,a typical example of process systems,is presented as complex network in this paper.The topology of this system is described by task-resource network and modeled as directed and weighted graph,in which nodes represent various tasks and edges denote the resources exchanged among tasks.Using the properties of node degree distribution,strength distribution and other weighted quantities,we demonstrate the heterogeneity of the network and point out the relation between structural characters of vertices and the functionality of corresponding tasks.The above phenomena indicate that the design requirements and principles of production process contribute to the heterogeneous features of the network.Besides,betweenness centrality of nodes can be used as an importance indicator to provide additional information for decision making.The correlations between structure and weighted properties are investigated to further address the influence brought by production schemes in system connectivity patterns.Cascading failures model is employed to analyze the robustness of the network when targeted attack happens.Two capacity assignment strategies are compared in order to improve the robustness of the network at certain cost.The refinery system displays more reliable behavior when the protecting strategy considers heterogeneous properties.This phenomenon further implies the structure-activity relationship of the refinery system and provides insightful suggestions for process system design.The results also indicate that robustness analysis is a promising application of methodologies from complex networks to process system engineering.

  16. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  17. Bioremediation of oil refinery sludge by landfarming in semiarid conditions: influence on soil microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, J A; Hernandez, T; Garcia, C

    2005-06-01

    Bioremediation of a refinery sludge containing hydrocarbons in a semi-arid climate using landfarming techniques is described. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of this technique to reduce the total hydrocarbon content added to the soil with the refinery sludge in semiarid climate (low rain and high temperature). In addition, we have evaluated the effect of this technique on the microbial activity of the soil involved. For this, biological parameters (carbon fractions, microbial biomass carbon, basal respiration and ATP) and biochemical parameters(different enzymatic activities) were determined. The results showed that 80% of the hydrocarbons were eliminated in eleven months, half of this reduction taking place during the first three months. The labile carbon fractions, MBC, basal respiration and ATP of the soils submitted to landfarming showed higher values than the control soil during the first months of the process, although these values fell down by the end of the experimental period as the hydrocarbons were degraded by mineralisation. All the enzymatic activities studied: oxidoreductases such as dehydrogenase activity, and hydrolases of C(beta-glucosidase activity) and N Cycle (urease and protease) showed higher values in the soils amended with the refinery sludge than in the control. As in the case of the previous parameters, these value fell down as the bioremediation of the hydrocarbons progressed, many of them reaching levels similar to those of the control soil after eleven months.

  18. Bioremediation of refinery wastewater using immobilised Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp and their transconjugants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi T. Ajao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available When oil spill occurs, it poses serious toxic hazards to all forms of life. Mixed culture of Burkholderia cepacia and Corynebacterium sp isolated from refinery sludge using selective enrichment technique was used for bioremediation of refinery wastewater in a laboratoryscale bioreactor. Physicochemical parameters of both raw and treated water were as determined and compared with Federal Environ - mental Protection Agency (FEPA-limit, Abuja, Nigeria to asses the efficiency of the bioremediation process. Each of the bacterium was screened for the presence of plasmid DNA and for the involvement or otherwise of plasmid in the bioremediation of wastewater. The immobilised cells showed percentage decrease in chemical oxygen demand (97%, biochemical oxygen demand (94%, phenol (98%, total petroleum hydrocarbon (79%, oil and grease (90% of the refinery waste water after 20 days of treatment while their transconjugants showed the multiplicative effect by achieving the same percentage after 10 days of treatment. Therefore, the findings revealed that bioaugmentation of wastewater using transmissible catabolic plasmid will enhance efficiency of the bioremediation by spreading the plasmid among indigenous microbial community either through horizontal gene transfer or transformation.

  19. Plant biotests in the bioindication of the rainfall pollution in an oil refinery region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukowska-Wieszczek, D.; Zimny, H.

    1980-01-01

    Rainfall was collected during spring and summer at four points localized in the vicinity of the largest oil refinery in Europe. The rain water was analyzed chemically by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Sulfur was estimated by nephelometric methods, chlorine was measured argentometrically and pH, electrometrically. Beans, beetroot and cucumber were grown in the rainwater. Rainwater collected near the industrial and oil refinery regions had a pH value ranging from 2.4 to 4.4. Chemical analysis showed that the water was high in minerals and pollution by heavy metal ions as well as having increased acidity due to sulfates, nitrates and nitrites. The germination capacity of seeds treated with rain water from the refinery region was significantly decreased in comparison to those germinating on distilled water. Impairment of seed germination capacity was higher for seeds germinating on water from the summer than from the spring rainfalls. Seedling growth, while vigorous at first, soon showed signs of shortening and thickening of the hypocotyl and maceration of root-cap. Beetroot showed the most significant changes. 5 references, 4 tables.

  20. In vitro analysis of the phytotoxic and genotoxic potential of Aligarh wastewater and Mathura refinery wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmad Fazili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Present report deals with the phytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Mathura refinery wastewater and Aligarh wastewater of Northern India. The IC50 value in Allium cepa root growth inhibition test was recorded to be 0.14X and 0.10X for Mathura refinery and Aligarh industrial wastewaters, respectively. Significant decline in the survival of various Escherichia coli K12 DNA repair defective mutants was observed when the tester strains were exposed to the aforementioned samples. The order of sensitivity was invariably as: AB1157 (wild type < AB2494 (lexA mutant < AB2463 (recA mutant < AB2480 (uvrA recA double mutant. These results suggested a significant amount of DNA damage within the bacterial cells exposed to test wastewaters. A. cepa genotoxicity test also demonstrated a considerable amount of chromosomal damage of A. cepa brought about by the test samples. The aberration index (A.I. for Aligarh wastewater and refinery wastewater was recorded to be 11.2% and 14.7%, respectively, whereas the aquaguard mineral water serving as negative control displayed the A.I. value to be 2.6%. Interestingly, genotoxicity of both industrial wastewaters was reduced to a remarkable extent in presence of mannitol, the hydroxyl radical scavenger. Present study clearly indicated a distinct pattern of the chromosomal aberrations showing predominantly stickiness and stray chromosomes in case of AWW while clumping and stickiness in case of RWW, thereby affirming the genotoxicity of both test waters.

  1. Corrosion monitoring in the oil refinery LUKoil-Neftochim-Burgas AD, Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanov, V.; Papazov, B. [Laboratory Corrosion Protection, LUKoil-Neftochim Burgas AD, Strandsha str. 20 A, 8001-Burgas (Bulgaria)

    2004-07-01

    A great variety of corrosion processes are observed on the territory of the Oil Refinery LUKoil-Neftochim Burgas AD, Bulgaria. They are a result of aggressive action of wide range of chemical active reagents and environments, industrial atmosphere with sea climate influence and underground water with varied composition. Substantial corrosion monitoring is used in oil distillation plant, petrochemical and other refinery units. A part of the most important cases of successfully solved corrosion problems are included in this paper - corrosion in Ethyl-benzene unit alcilators, corrosion protection of equipment and floors in concentrated sulfuric acid in the Sulfuric Acid Alkylation plant, corrosion protection of electro-filters in the Chemical Cleaning of Service Water System, chemical resistant floor in PAN and AN plant, outside varnish protection of tanks, vessels, pumps, steelworks etc. There are many proper solutions suggested, including wide range of coatings and new resistant materials offered by well-known companies - Hempel, Chesterton, Permatex DuPont, Paint International and many others which work in close collaboration with our laboratory. Those problems are typical of all oil refineries and petrochemical plants and are possible to be applied successfully. (authors)

  2. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dip Majumder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059, a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm chemical oxygen demand (COD could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  3. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-09-22

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm² in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm² in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10⁻²% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  4. Bioactive Compounds of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD from Several Palm Oil Refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teti Estiasih

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the characteristics of Palm Fatty Acids Distillates (PFADs from several palm oil refineries. It was aimed to know the potency of PFAD as bioactive compounds source, including vitamin E (mainly tocotrienols, phytosterols, squalene and possibly co-enzyme Q10 and polycosanol. Sampling was conducted at 6 palm oil refineries. The results showed that PFAD was dominated by free fatty acids of 85-95% with low oxidation level indicated by peroxide value of 1-10 meq/kg and anisidin value of 6-31. Bioactive compounds found were vitamin E 60-200 ppm, phytosterols 400-7500 ppm and squalene 400-2800 ppm, meanwhile polycosanol and co-enzyme Q10 were not found. Vitamin E was dominated by tocotrienols and γ tocotrienol was the major vitamin E, followed by α and δ tocotrienols. Phytosterols in PFADs from several palm oil refineries had variety in quantity and composition. Generally it was dominated by &beta sitosterol, followed by stigmasterol and campesterol

  5. Who lives near coke plants and oil refineries An exploration of the environmental inequity hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, J.D.; Beaulieu, N.D.; Sussman, D.; Sadowitz, M.; Li, Y.C. (Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, Boston, MA (United States))

    1999-04-01

    Facility-specific information on pollution was obtained for 36 coke plants and 46 oil refineries in the US and matched with information on populations surrounding these 82 facilities. These data were analyzed to determine whether environmental inequities were present, whether they were more economic or racial in nature, and whether the racial composition of nearby communities has changed significantly since plants began operations. The Census tracts near coke plants have a disproportionate share of poor and nonwhite residents. Multivariate analyses suggest that existing inequities are primarily economic in nature. The findings for oil refineries are not strongly supportive of the environmental inequity hypothesis. Rank ordering of facilities by race, poverty, and pollution produces limited (although not consistent) evidence that the more risky facilities tend to be operating in communities with above-median proportions of nonwhite residents (near coke plants) and Hispanic residents (near oil refineries). Over time, the radical makeup of many communities near facilities has changed significantly, particularly in the case of coke plants sited in the early 1900s. Further risk-oriented studies of multiple manufacturing facilities in various industrial sectors of the economy are recommended.

  6. Pilot scale thin film plate reactors for the photocatalytic treatment of sugar refinery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, S; Kamalraj, G; Arunkumar, P; Devipriya, S P

    2016-09-01

    Pilot scale thin film plate reactors (TFPR) were fabricated to study the solar photocatalytic treatment of wastewater obtained from the secondary treatment plant of a sugar refinery. Silver-impregnated titanium dioxide (TiO2) was prepared by a facile chemical reduction method, characterized, and immobilized onto the surface of ceramic tiles used in the pilot scale reactors. On 8 h of solar irradiation, percentage reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the wastewater by Ag/TiO2, pure TiO2, and control (without catalyst) TFPR was about 95, 86, and 22 % respectively. The effects of operational parameters such as, flow rate, pH, and addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were optimized as they influence the rate of COD reduction. Under 3 h of solar irradiation, 99 % COD reduction was observed at an optimum flow rate of 15 L h(-1), initial pH of 2, and addition of 5 mM of H2O2. The results show that Ag/TiO2 TFPR could be effectively used for the tertiary treatment of sugar refinery effluent using sunlight as the energy source. The treated water could be reused for industrial purposes, thus reducing the water footprint of the industry. Graphical Abstract Sugar refinery effluent treatment by solar photocatalytic TFPR.

  7. Consequence modeling of fire on Methane storage tanks in a gas refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Shahedi ali abadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: using fossil fuels, some hazards such as explosion and fire are probable. This study was aimed to consequence modeling of fire on Methane storage tanks in a gas refinery using analyzing the risk, and modeling and evaluating the related consequences. Method: Hazard analysis by PHA was used to choosing the worst-case scenario. Then, causes of the scenario were determined by FTA. After that, consequence modeling by the PHAST software was applied for the consequence analysis. Results: Based on some criteria, the fire of methane gas tank (V-100 was selected as the worst-case scenario at the refinery. The qualitative fault tree showed three factors including mechanical, process, and human failures contribute in gas leakage. The leakage size and weather conditions were effective on the distance of radiation. Using consequence modeling, thermal radiation was considered as the major outcome of the incident. Finally, for outcome evaluating, probit equations were used to quantify losses and the percentage of fatalities due to the methane gas leakage and fire occurrence. The maximum number of fatalities caused by fire was obtained 23 persons. Conclusions: In conclusion, the methane gas vessel in the refinery can be considered as the main center of hazard, therefore the implementation of the safety rules, eliminating mechanical failures, personal protection and education, and Effective measures to prevent and fighting of fire are proposed for decreasing the probable losses and fatalities.

  8. 炼油污水处理场恶臭污染及其治理研究%MALODOR POLLUTION FROM REFINERY SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEM AND TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘忠生; 郭兵兵; 王玉亭; 刘念曾

    2003-01-01

    Main malodor pollutants from oil separator of Refinery A are hydrocarbons and a small quantity of sulfides. Main malodor pollutants from surface aeration tank of Refinery B are sulfides, especially CH3SH. And main malodor pollutants from bubbling aeration tank of Refinery C are also sulfides, of which H2S concentration is the highest. Catalytic combustion technology is applied to treat malodorous gas from oil separator of Refinery A, in which the total hydrocarbon removal was over 97%. The purified gas meets the national standard. Activated carbon adsorption is used to treat malodorous gas from surface aeration tank of Refinery B, and main pollutant CH3SH removal reached up to 98%~100%. As for malodorous gas from bubbling aeration tank of Refinery C, bio-packing tower is used and the removals of hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides and benzene series reached up to 80%~98%.

  9. Distribution of uranium, thorium, and isotopic composition of uranium in soil samples of south Serbia: Evidence of depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Sarata Kumar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and thermal ionization mass spectrom - etry were used to measure concentration of uranium and thorium as well as isotopic composition of uranium respectively in soil samples collected around south Serbia. An analytical method was established for a routine sample preparation procedure for uranium and thorium. Uranium was chemically separated and purified from soil samples by anion exchange resin and UTEVA extraction chromatography and its isotopic composition was measured using a thermal ionization mass spectrometry. There was a little deviation of U/Th ratio from the average values in some soil samples. Presence of 236U as well as depleted uranium was observed in 235U/238U ratio measurement in the same soil sample.

  10. Characterization of uranium and uranium-zirconium deposits produced in electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T.C.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the metallurgical characterization of deposits produced in molten salt electrorefining of uranium and uranium - 10.% zirconium alloy. The techniques of characterization are described with emphasis on considerations given to the radioactive and pyrophoric nature of the samples. The morphologies observed and their implications for deposit performance are also presented - samples from pure uranium deposits were comprised of chains of uranium crystals with a characteristic rhomboidal shape, while morphologies of samples from deposits containing zirconium showed more polycrystalline features. Zirconium was found to be present as a second, zirconium metal phase at or very near the uranium-zirconium dendrite surfaces. Higher collection efficiencies and total deposit weights were observed for the uranium-zirconium deposits; this performance increase is likely a result of better mechanical properties exhibited by the uranium-zirconium dendrite morphology. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Speciation and Precipitation of Uranium Complexes in Hydrothermal Solutions Related to Granite—type Uranium Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈培荣; 章邦桐; 等

    1992-01-01

    Uranium-bearing hydrothermal solutions during the stage of ore deposition are weakly alkaline and of the Ca2+ -Na+/HCO3- -F- type.UO2(CO3)22- and UO2F4-, are dominant in the hydrothermal solutions with respect to their activity.Wall-rock hydrothermal alterations ,temperature and pressure drop and the reducing capability of rock assemblage (Δeh) led to a decrease in Eh of the hydrothermal solutions and an increase in Eh at which uranium began precipitating.Therefore,the mechanism of uranium precipitation is essentially the reduction of uranium complexes.The granite-type uranium deposits are the most important type of uranium resources in China.Discussions will be made in this paper concerning the hydrothermal speciation and precipitation mech-anisms of uranium complexes in the light of fluid inclusion and geological data from some major de-posits of this type in South China.

  12. Uranium Management - Preservation of a National Asset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J. D.; Stroud, J. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Uranium Management Group (UMG) was established at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Operations in 1999 as a mechanism to expedite the de-inventory of surplus uranium from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site. This successful initial venture has broadened into providing uranium material de-inventory and consolidation support to the Hanford site as well as retrieving uranium materials that the Department had previously provided to universities under the loan/lease program. As of December 31, 2001, {approx} 4,300 metric tons of uranium (MTU) have been consolidated into a more cost effective interim storage location at the Portsmouth site near Piketon, OH. The UMG continues to uphold its corporate support mission by promoting the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative (NMSI) and the twenty-five (25) action items of the Integrated Nuclear Materials Management Plan (1). Before additional consolidation efforts may commence to remove excess inventory from Environmental Management closure sites and universities, a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) must be completed. Two (2) noteworthy efforts currently being pursued involve the investigation of re-use opportunities for surplus uranium materials and the recovery of usable uranium from the shutdown Portsmouth cascade. In summary, the UMG is available as a DOE complex-wide technical resource to promote the responsible management of surplus uranium.

  13. Uranium reconnaissance survey in southern Sudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civetta, L.; De Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Orsi, G.; Perrone, V.; Zupetta, A.; Giunta, G.; Ippolito, F.

    1981-09-01

    The southern provinces of Sudan (Equatoria, Bahr el Ghazal and el Buheyrat) have been investigated by geological and geochemical methods for uranium and thorium. Results of radiometric measurements permitted the identification of a target area for follow-up work, favourable to host a roll-type uranium deposit.

  14. Uranium exploration and mining in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wutzler, B.

    Uranium minerals were discovered in Australia in the years 1850 to 1900 already, but most of them were not recognised as such. It was not until 1894 that the first significant uranium find was made in Carcoar, west of Sydney. At that time, the uranium output of the world, which only amounted to a few hundred cwts, was for the most part obtained from mining areas close to the border between Saxony and Bohemia. In South Australia, uranium ore was mined experimentally for the production of radium at Radium Hill from 1906 onwards and at Mt. Painter from 1910 onwards. It was not until World War II, however, that uranium gained importance as a valuable raw material that could also be used for military purposes. The second phase of uranium mining in Australia commenced in 1944. Within ten years Australia's presumed uranium potential was confirmed by extensive exploration. The development of uranium mining in Australia is described in the present paper.

  15. New french uranium mineral species; Nouvelles especes uraniferes francaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; {beta} uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the {alpha} uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [French] Dans ce travail, les auteurs etudient les nouveaux mineraux uraniferes francais: parsonsite et renardite, phosphates hydrates de plomb et d'uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrate d'uranium et de plomb uranopilite: sulfate d'uranium hydrate; bayleyite: carbonate d'uranium et de magnesium hydrate; {beta} uranolite: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate. Pour tous ces mineraux, les auteurs donnent les caracteres cristallographiques, optiques, et les analyses chimiques quantitatives. Par contre, les especes suivantes, tres rares dans les gites francais, n'ont pas permis d'effectuer d'analyses quantitatives. Ce sont: l'ianthinite: oxyde uraneux hydrate; l'{alpha} uranotile: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate; le bassetite: phosphate d'uranium et de fer hydrate; la hosphuranylite: phosphate duranium hydrate; la becquerelite: oxyde d'uranium hydrate; la curite: oxyde d'uranium

  16. Smart microgrids in refineries, Mexico case; Microrredes inteligentes en refinerias, caso Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Garcia, Javier Alejandro; Linan Garcia, Roberto; Picasso Blanquel, Cuitlahuac; Silva Farias, Jose Luis [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we present the technological trends on smart microgrids for refineries, case Mexico. Distributed generation on refineries is a model of microgrid with great challenges to solve, considering renewable energy. Also it discusses the scenario in bidirectional connection from refineries to the utility supergrid Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE by its acronym in Spanish) and how to reach the development of a smart microgrid. We look different scenarios in power systems refineries, and the feasibility to achieve and develop the technology concepts in smart grid, such as: demand response in real time, exchange of energy between microgrid with supergrid-CFE and viceversa, energy efficiency, microgrid automation, selfhealing/real time autorecovery fault in power systems, storage energy and its application on power systems blackout in refineries. Finally we discussed the concepts that represent the greatest challenges to be solved on the smart microgrids and consider obtaining alternatives solution in medium or long term. [Spanish] En este documento se presentan las tendencias tecnologicas en micro redes inteligentes para refinerias, en el caso de Mexico. La generacion distribuida en refinerias es un modelo de micro red con grandes desafios por resolver, considerando la energia renovable. Se analiza tambien el escenario en conexion bidireccional de refinerias a la super red de la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), la empresa electrica mexicana, y como lograr el desarrollo de una micro red inteligente. Se consideran diferentes escenarios en refinerias de sistemas de potencia, y la factibilidad de alcanzar y desarrollar los conceptos de tecnologia en una red inteligente, tales como: respuesta de demanda en tiempo real, intercambio de energia entre la micro red con la super red de la CFE y viceversa, eficiencia de energia, automatizacion de micro redes, autorrecuperacion de fallas en autoarreglo/tiempo real. En sistemas de potencia, almacenamiento de

  17. Diffusive gradient in thin FILMS (DGT) compared with soil solution and labile uranium fraction for predicting uranium bioavailability to ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquène, L; Vandenhove, H; Tack, F; Van Hees, M; Wannijn, J

    2010-02-01

    The usefulness of uranium concentration in soil solution or recovered by selective extraction as unequivocal bioavailability indices for uranium uptake by plants is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to test if the uranium concentration measured by the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique is a relevant substitute for plant uranium availability in comparison to uranium concentration in the soil solution or uranium recovered by ammonium acetate. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Melvina) is grown in greenhouse on a range of uranium spiked soils. The DGT-recovered uranium concentration (C(DGT)) was correlated with uranium concentration in the soil solution or with uranium recovered by ammonium acetate extraction. Plant uptake was better predicted by the summed soil solution concentrations of UO(2)(2+), uranyl carbonate complexes and UO(2)PO(4)(-). The DGT technique did not provide significant advantages over conventional methods to predict uranium uptake by plants.

  18. Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Bao-Guo; Gu, Ji-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results demonstrate how these reactors can possess and realize extraordinary excellent characteristics, no prompt critical, long-term safe and stable operation with negative feedback, closed uranium-plutonium cycle chain within the vessel, normal operation only with depleted-uranium, and depleted-uranium high burnup in reality, to realize with fission nuclear energy sufficiently satisfying humanity long-term energy resource needs, as well as thoroughly solve the challenges of nuclear criticality safety, uranium resource insuffic...

  19. Mica surfaces stabilize pentavalent uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilton, Eugene S; Haiduc, Anca; Cahill, Christopher L; Felmy, Andrew R

    2005-05-02

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that reduction of aqueous U6+ at ferrous mica surfaces at 25 degrees C preserves U5+ as the dominant sorbed species over a broad range of solution compositions. Polymerization of sorbed U5+ with sorbed U6+ and U4+ is identified as a possible mechanism for how mineral surfaces circumvent the rapid disproportionation of aqueous U5+. The general nature of this mechanism suggests that U5+ could play an important, but previously unidentified, role in the low-temperature chemistry of uranium in reducing, heterogeneous aqueous systems.

  20. L'Inde de 1919 à 1941 : nationalismes, « communalisme », prosélytisme et fondamentalisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Gaborieau

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Durant l'entre-deux-guerres, se produisit la rupture définitive, sur le plan politique, entre hindous et musulmans, avec la revendication dès 1930 par le poète philosophe Iqbâl (1876-1938 d'un État séparé pour les musulmans, dont le nom (Pakistan fut forgé dès 1935. Une rupture idéologique avait précédé ce divorce politique. La droite hindoue avait forgé dès 1923 la notion d' « hindouité » (hin-dutva fondée sur un rejet de l'héritage de l'Inde médiévale musulmane, notamment moghole. Les musulmans ripostèrent avec Mawdûdî (1903-1979 qui, dans son premier livre de 1927, fit l'apologie du jihâd guerrier, cherchant à réhabiliter l'islam médiéval dans sa pureté et son agressivité. Ces écrits portaient en germe la jamâ'at-i Islâmî, organisation militante qui vit formellement le jour en 1941. La détérioration des relations entre les communautés religieuses alla de pair avec cette double rupture : cette confrontation est appelé « communalisme » en anglo-indien. Des organisations missionnaires prosélytes furent créées de part et d'autre, dont la Tablîghî Jamâ'at pour les musulmans en 1927.

  1. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C. W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

  2. Removal and Recovery of Uranium using Microorganisms Isolated from North American Uranium Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Tsuruta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Some attempts were made to remove and recover uranium that may be present in nuclear fuel effluents and mine tailings using microorganisms isolated from North American uranium deposits. To establish which microorganisms accumulate the most uranium, hundreds strains of microorganisms were screened. Of these strains of microorganisms tested, extremely high uranium accumulating ability was found in some bacteria isolated from North American uranium deposits. These bacterial strains, such as Arthrobacter and Bacillus sp., can accumulate about 2500 µmol uranium per gram dry wt. of microbial cells within one hour. These microbial cells can remove uranium from the uranium refining waste water with high efficiency. These microbial cells can also accumulate thorium as well as uranium with high efficiency. The microbial cells immobilized with polyacrylamide gel have excellent handling characteristics and can be used repeatedly in the adsorption-desorption cycles. These new microorganisms isolated from uranium deposits can be used as an adsorbing agent for the removal of the nuclear fuel elements, which may be present in nuclear fuel effluents, mine tailings and other waste sources.

  3. 31 CFR 540.315 - Uranium-235 (U235).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium-235 (U235). 540.315 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.315 Uranium-235 (U235). The term uranium-235 or U235 means the...

  4. Uranium Detection - Technique Validation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colletti, Lisa Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Garduno, Katherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Lujan, Elmer J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Mechler-Hickson, Alexandra Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); May, Iain [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division

    2016-04-14

    As a LANL activity for DOE/NNSA in support of SHINE Medical Technologies™ ‘Accelerator Technology’ we have been investigating the application of UV-vis spectroscopy for uranium analysis in solution. While the technique has been developed specifically for sulfate solutions, the proposed SHINE target solutions, it can be adapted to a range of different solution matrixes. The FY15 work scope incorporated technical development that would improve accuracy, specificity, linearity & range, precision & ruggedness, and comparative analysis. Significant progress was achieved throughout FY 15 addressing these technical challenges, as is summarized in this report. In addition, comparative analysis of unknown samples using the Davies-Gray titration technique highlighted the importance of controlling temperature during analysis (impacting both technique accuracy and linearity/range). To fully understand the impact of temperature, additional experimentation and data analyses were performed during FY16. The results from this FY15/FY16 work were presented in a detailed presentation, LA-UR-16-21310, and an update of this presentation is included with this short report summarizing the key findings. The technique is based on analysis of the most intense U(VI) absorbance band in the visible region of the uranium spectra in 1 M H2SO4, at λmax = 419.5 nm.

  5. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  6. CARBON ACCOUNTING INITIATIVES: CASE STUDY OF A PETROLEUM REFINERY IN MALAYSIA TO PREPARE FOR FUTURE CARBON MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMANDA H.L. CHEE

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum refining process produces a large amount of atmospheric pollutants including greenhouse gases which are attributed to global warming. The international community inevitably addressed the global warming issue by introducing a market-based mechanism known as Emission Trading Systems (ETS under the Kyoto Protocol which imposes binding limits to developed nations using three flexibility mechanisms, including the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM. This case study was carried out in a petroleum refinery in Malaysia to explore the possibility for the refinery to participate in CDM. Information was collected through observatory field survey at the refinery and documentation review. Results show that the current monitoring tool using indirect calculation of fuel consumption provides a comprehensive coverage of emission sources but the reporting frequency should be increased for data accuracy. An accounting system was then created to predict the emissions gap of the refinery with reference to the baseline-year set by the Kyoto Protocol. It was concluded that the refinery showed promising potential to participate in CDM to benefit from technology transfer by selling their ‘credits’ to Annex I countries despite the uncertainty on the impact of the carbon market in a Non-Annex I country.

  7. 77 FR 33782 - License Amendment To Construct and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment To Construct and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium... referenced. The Ludeman facility In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Project License Amendment Request is... construct and operate a new in situ leach uranium recovery (ISL) facility at its Ludeman facility...

  8. Interaction of uranium with Pleurotus sp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozaki, Naofumi; Ozaki, Takuro; Samadfam, Mohammad [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Uptake of uranium by higher fungi, such as mushroom is little elucidated. We have studied the interaction of uranium with Pleurotus sp. (a mushroom) in pure culture over a wide range of U concentration (50-3000 mg/L). The Pleurotus sp. was cultured in two different media. One was rice bran medium, and the other was agar (yeast extract, peptone and dextrose) medium. The uptake of uranium in Pleurotus sp. was examined by alpha ray autoradiography (A,A), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning microcopy (SEM) equipped with EDS. In the agar medium, the higher uranium concentration gave lower growth of mycelia, and no fruiting body was observed. In the rice bran medium, the fruiting body was grown at U concentrations up to 1000 mg/L. The AA and XRF analysis showed that uranium taken up in the fruiting body was below the detection limit. The SEM-EDS analysis indicated that U was distributed in the limited region and was not transported to the mycelia far from U containing medium. It is concluded that uranium affects the growth of Pleurotus sp., and little uranium is taken up by Pleurotus sp. during the growth of both mycelia and fruiting body. (author)

  9. The concentrations of uranium in marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuba, Mitsue; Ishii, Toshiaki; Nakahara, Motokazu; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Watabe, Teruhisa; Hirano, Shigeki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki (Japan). Laboratory for Radioecology

    2000-07-01

    Determination of uranium in sixty-one species of marine organisms was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to obtain concentration factors and to estimate the internal radiation dose. The concentrations of uranium in soft tissues of marine animals were ranged from 0.077 to 5040 ng/g wet wt. Especially, the branchial heart of cephalopod molluscs showed the specific accumulation of uranium. The concentration factor of the branchial heart of Octopus vulgaris, which indicated the highest value, was calculated to be about 1.6 x 10{sup 3}, comparing with that (3.1 ng/ml) in coastal seawaters of Japan. The concentrations of uranium in hard tissues of marine invertebrates such as clam and sea urchin were similar to those in soft tissues. In contrast, hard tissues like bone, scale, fin, etc. of fishes showed much higher concentrations of uranium than soft tissues like muscle. The concentrations of uranium of twenty-two species of algae were ranged from 2 to 310 ng/g wet wt. Particularly, the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida showed the highest value of the uranium content in the algae and its concentration factor was calculated to be 10{sup 2}. (author)

  10. Lung cancer mortality (1950-1999 among Eldorado uranium workers: a comparison of models of carcinogenesis and empirical excess risk models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Eidemüller

    Full Text Available Lung cancer mortality after exposure to radon decay products (RDP among 16,236 male Eldorado uranium workers was analyzed. Male workers from the Beaverlodge and Port Radium uranium mines and the Port Hope radium and uranium refinery and processing facility who were first employed between 1932 and 1980 were followed up from 1950 to 1999. A total of 618 lung cancer deaths were observed. The analysis compared the results of the biologically-based two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE model to the empirical excess risk model. The spontaneous clonal expansion rate of pre-malignant cells was reduced at older ages under the assumptions of the TSCE model. Exposure to RDP was associated with increase in the clonal expansion rate during exposure but not afterwards. The increase was stronger for lower exposure rates. A radiation-induced bystander effect could be a possible explanation for such an exposure response. Results on excess risks were compared to a linear dose-response parametric excess risk model with attained age, time since exposure and dose rate as effect modifiers. In all models the excess relative risk decreased with increasing attained age, increasing time since exposure and increasing exposure rate. Large model uncertainties were found in particular for small exposure rates.

  11. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  12. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  13. Toxicity of uranium on renal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiebault, C.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, UMR9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Kidney and bone are the main retention organs affected by uranium toxicity. Although the clinical effects of uranium poisoning are well known, only few studies dealt with cellular mechanisms of toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cyto- and genotoxicity of uranium (U) on renal cells. The cell death was also studied in this conditions of exposure. The effects of U were evaluated in acute and chronic exposure. The acute effects were evaluated after 24 h exposure to strong U concentrations (200-700{mu}M). The chronic exposure was observed on renal cells incubated with low U concentrations (0.1-100 {mu}M) until 70 days then with high uranium concentrations (400-500 {mu}M) during 24 h. U induces apoptosis cell death mainly by the intrinsic pathway. The high U concentrations (600-700 {mu}M) lead to necrosis. U induces DNA damages (single, double strand breaks, as well as alkali labile sites) from 300{mu}M. The cytotoxicity and intracellular accumulation of uranium were less important in cells previously exposed to low uranium concentrations when compared to non-exposed cells. In the same time, DNA damage observed after acute exposure of uranium decreased with the increase of chronic uranium concentrations. These results suggest that renal cells became resistant to uranium, probably due to a cellular transformation process. In conclusion, high U concentrations (300-700{mu}M) induce apoptosis cell death and DNA damages. Cells previously exposed to low U concentrations present also DNA damages and a cellular transformation. (authors)

  14. Removal of uranium from uranium plant wastewater using zero-valent iron in an ultrasonic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Libo; Peng, Jinhui; Ma, Aiyuan; Xia, Hong Ying; Guo, Wen Qian; Yu, Xia [Yunnan Provincial Key Laboratory of Intensification Metallurgy, Kunming (China); Hu, Jinming; Yang, Lifeng [Nuclear Group Two Seven Two Uranium Industry Limited Liability Company, Hengyang (China)

    2016-06-15

    Uranium removal from uranium plant wastewater using zero-valent iron in an ultrasonic field was investigated. Batch experiments designed by the response surface methodology (RSM) were conducted to study the effects of pH, ultrasonic reaction time, and dosage of zero-valent iron on uranium removal efficiency. From the experimental data obtained in this work, it was found that the ultrasonic method employing zero-valent iron powder effectively removes uranium from uranium plant wastewater with a uranium concentration of 2,772.23 μg/L. The pH ranges widely from 3 to 7 in the ultrasonic field, and the prediction model obtained by the RSM has good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Trends in oil discharged with aqueous effluents from oil refineries in Europe. 2010 survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldoni-Andrey, P.; Girling, A.; Bakker, A.; Muller, A.; Struijk, K.; Fotiadou, I.; Andres Huertas, A.; Negroni, J.; Neal, G.; Den Haan, K.

    2012-10-15

    This report summarises data gathered by CONCAWE in a 2010 survey of effluent water quantity, oil content and treatment processes for refinery installations situated in the EU-27 countries and those in Croatia Norway and Switzerland. Data obtained in previous surveys are included for comparison. Operators of 100 installations completed questionnaires, of which two of these only reported data for water intake and discharge. The number of 100 reporting locations is lower than the 125 locations that reported in 2008. There are several reasons for this. Since the last data gathering exercise several refinery installations have been closed or moth-balled, turning these into fuels depots without any production. Another four sites that are still operating today informed CONCAWE that these would not be in a position to complete the questionnaire for 2010. Finally, the ownership of some installations changed since 2008, leading to CONCAWE being unable to identify an appropriate contact person for timely completion of the questionnaire. The data provided through the completion of the questionnaire have been extracted into an MS-ACCESS Database. This enabled sorting, extraction, analyses and presentation of the information in a range of formats. The information presented in this report relates to a selected range of parameters that have been covered by previous surveys carried out since 1969. Two further reports will cover the results of the complete survey in more detail; one concerning final discharge quality parameters and the other focussing on water use and consumption. The results reported herein show that the volume of process water that was being discharged from EU-27+3 (Norway, Croatia and Switzerland) - located refineries decreased between 2008 and 2010 while the overall volume of aqueous discharges remained about the same or slightly increased over the same period. When expressed relative to refinery capacities and throughputs there is a slight increase in 2010 in

  16. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION WITH RESPECT TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, S.; Beederman, M.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranium values from a nitric acid aqueous solution containing uranyl values, zirconium values and tetravalent plutonium values. The process comprises contacting said solution with a substantially water-immiscible liquid organic solvent containing alkyl phosphate, separating an organic extract phase containing the uranium, zirconium, and tetravalent plutonium values from an aqueous raffinate, contacting said organic extract phase with an aqueous solution 2M to 7M in nitric acid and also containing an oxalate ion-containing substance, and separating a uranium- containing organic raffinate from aqueous zirconium- and plutonium-containing extract phase.

  17. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  18. A new opportunity for Australian uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    This study analyses the outlook for the world uranium industry and includes projections of uranium demand, supply and prices over the next decade and a comparison with other forecasts. The potential increases in Australian output are quantified, under both continuation of the three mine policy and an open mine policy, as well as the potential impact on the world uranium market, using the well known ORANI model of the Australian economy. It is estimated that Australian output could almost double by 2004 if the three mine policy were abolished. 53 refs., 20 tabs., 6 figs.

  19. Statistical data of the uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-01-01

    This report is a compendium of information relating to US uranium reserves and potential resources and to exploration, mining, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1982. The statistics are based primarily on data provided voluntarily by the uranium exploration, mining and milling companies. The compendium has been published annually since 1968 and reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Area Office of the US Department of Energy. Statistical data obtained from surveys conducted by the Energy Information Administration are included in Section IX. The production, reserves, and drilling data are reported in a manner which avoids disclosure of proprietary information.

  20. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the filtration leaching for uranium recovery from uranium ore

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The physical and chemical processes taking place in filtration leaching of uranium from uranium ore sample by sulphuric acid solution have been studied by modern physico-chemical methods (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, optical emission spectroscope, ICP OES). Column leaching test was carried out for ore samples obtained from a uranium in-situ leaching (ISL) mining site using deluted sulphuricacid to study the evolution of various elements conc...

  1. Separation and Molecular Identification of Resistant Bacteria to Lead from Behbahan Bidboland Gas Refinery Wastewater (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Mehrbakhsh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are one of the pollution sources in environment. The pollution due to these metals is the problem that could have negative impact on water. Human is faced with these poisons effects due to occupational reasons. The lead is regarded as heavy metal whose industrial applications cause environmental pollution in high rate.The aim of this project was Separation and Molecular Identification of Resistant Bacteria to Lead from Behbahan Bidboland Gas Refinery Wastewater (Iran. For this aim, 6 samples of water and refinery output wastewater is provided after sampling, pH, COD, BOD rates and lead metal primary concentration was determined in wastewaters, after this phase the concentration and separation of resistant bacteria was done to separate them from lead. In this phase the minimum inhibitory concentration was defined from heavy metal growth (MIC. To determine the bacteria identity first the evaluation method of bacteria morphologic and gram staining and then biochemical tests and finally colony-–PCR molecular method was used and then separated bacteria 16S rRNA gen was identified. The obtained results from this research showed that among the separated bacteria from Behbahan Bidboland gas refinery wastewater, the Providencia genous had the most resistant toward Pb. The MIC rate for this bacteria was calculated at 1140 mg/l. the result of this study showed that separated bacteria in this wastewater seemed to have high resistant toward heavy metals due to long encountering to pollution sources and hence they could be proper factor for bioremediation process of heavy metals

  2. Biostimulation of indigenous microbial community for bioremediation of petroleum refinery sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayeeta Sarkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient deficiency severely impairs the catabolic activity of indigenous microorganisms in hydrocarbon rich environments (HREs and limits the rate of intrinsic bioremediation. The present study aimed to characterize the microbial community in refinery waste and evaluate the scope for biostimulation based in situ bioremediation. Samples recovered from the wastewater lagoon of Guwahati refinery revealed a hydrocarbon enriched high total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH, oxygen-, moisture-limited, reducing environment. Intrinsic biodegradation ability of the indigenous microorganisms was enhanced significantly (>80% reduction in TPH by 90 days with nitrate amendment. Preferred utilization of both higher- (>C30 and middle- chain (C20-30 length hydrocarbons were evident from GC-MS analysis. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and community level physiological profiling (CLPP analyses indicated distinct shift in community’s composition and metabolic abilities following nitrogen (N amendment. High throughput deep sequencing of 16S rRNA gene showed that the native community was mainly composed of hydrocarbon degrading, syntrophic, methanogenic, nitrate/iron/sulfur reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria and archaebacteria, affiliated to γ- and δ-Proteobacteria and Euryarchaeota respectively. Genes for aerobic and anaerobic alkane metabolism (alkB and bssA, methanogenesis (mcrA, denitrification (nirS and narG and N2 fixation (nifH were detected. Concomitant to hydrocarbon degradation, lowering of dissolve O2 and increase in oxidation-reduction potential (ORP marked with an enrichment of N2 fixing, nitrate reducing aerobic/facultative anaerobic members e.g., Azovibrio, Pseudoxanthomonas and Commamonadaceae members was evident in N amended microcosm. This study highlighted that indigenous community of refinery sludge was intrinsically diverse, yet appreciable rate of in situ bioremediation could be achieved by supplying adequate N sources.

  3. Uranium: myths and realities the depleted uranium; Uranio: Mitos y realidades. El caso del uranio emprobrecido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, G.

    2001-07-01

    Uranium is an element whose name causes worry. The uranium properties are very unknown for people. However the element plays an important roll in the Earth as responsible of numerous natural phenomena, which are vital for life evolution. An example of the low knowledge about uranium has been the Balkan syndrome. A relation between cancers and the use of depleted uranium in ammunition in the Balkan War has been pretended to be established. From the beginning, this hypothesis could have been discarded as it has been confirmed and stated in recent reports of UNEP Commissions who have studied this matter. (Author)

  4. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the filtration leaching for uranium recovery from uranium ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolat Uralbekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The physical and chemical processes taking place in filtration leaching of uranium from uranium ore sample by sulphuric acid solution have been studied by modern physico-chemical methods (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, optical emission spectroscope, ICP OES. Column leaching test was carried out for ore samples obtained from a uranium in-situ leaching (ISL mining site using deluted sulphuricacid to study the evolution of various elements concentration in the pregnant leach solution. It has been shown that the uranium in pregnant solutions appears by dissolution of calcium and magnesium carbonates and uranium minerals as well. It was found the decreasing of filtration coefficient from 0.099 m day-1 to 0.082 m day-1, due to the presence of mechanical and chemical mudding. Partial extraction of uranium (85% from the ore has been explained by the slow diffusion of sulfuric acid to the uranium minerals locates in the cracks of silicate minerals. It was concluded that the studied uranium ore sample according to adverse geotechnical parameters is not suitable for uranium extraction by filtration leaching.

  5. Refinery effluent analysis methodologies for relevant parameters from EU-regulatory regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwood, D.; Ward, T. [Beta Technology Ltd, Heavens Walk, Doncaster, South Yorkshire DN4 5HZ (United Kingdom); Prescott, N.; Rippin, I. [Environment Agency, National Laboratory Service, PO Box 544 Rotherham S60 1BY (United Kingdom); Comber, M.; Den Haan, K.

    2013-08-15

    This report provides guidance to CONCAWE members on the analytical methods that might be used to monitor oil refinery effluents for those refinery-specific parameters covered by relevant European legislation and a comparison of the methods that are used today, as reported in the last Effluent Survey. A method assessment programme is presented whereby the performance of methods of analysis (used to monitor oil refinery effluents) can be compared and prioritised in order of their analytical performance capabilities. Methods for a specific parameter, which is clearly and unambiguously defined, are compared with each other and then prioritised in terms of their overall quality. The quality of these methods is based on an assessment of a combination of characteristic features, namely, precision, bias or recovery, limit of detection (where appropriate), indicative costs, and ease of use. Ranking scores for each feature are assigned to various ranges of each feature, and then added together to give an overall ranking value. The method exhibiting the lowest overall ranking value is deemed the most appropriate method for analysing that parameter. Within this report, several recommendations are made in terms of comparing results of analyses or their associated uses. Where data are to be compared for a particular parameter, then, all CONCAWE members involved in this comparison should agree common objectives, in advance. These include defining a common definition for the: (1) Parameter being analysed and compared; (2) Limit of detection, and how this concentration value should be calculated; (3) Limit of quantification, and how this concentration value should be calculated and how it is to be applied for selective reporting purposes; and (4) Uncertainty of measurement and how it should be calculated. It is further recommended that these involved members should agree on the range of values and ranking scores chosen to reflect the performance characteristic features used in the

  6. Study on Immobilized Algal Cells for Treatment and Recycle of Refinery Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Baocheng; Liu Deqi; Dong Lihua; Li Gang

    2005-01-01

    Compared to the algal oxidation pond, treatment of wastewater using the immobilized algal cell technology has excellent effect, which not only can effectively avoid the disadvantage of oxidation pond,but can also remarkably improve the efficiency of treating system and the effluent quality. When the treating system operates under an optimal control conditions, such as a 55% loading rate, an illumination intensity of 2500-3500 lux and a hydraulic residence time of 4 hours, the COD and ammonia nitrogen removal can reach 90%. Water after deep treatment can comply with the requirement of the refinery for the quality of recycled water.

  7. Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Seismic Scenario in the Acambay Graben and Possible Affectations in the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama Membrillo, S.; Aguirre, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we presented synthetic acceleration records in the Miguel Hidalgo refinery, Hidalgo due to a seismic scenario originated in the graben Acambay, such as occurred in 1912 (70 km distance to it). This earthquake had a magnitude of 6.9 and caused extensive damage, according to reports caused 164 deaths and numerous houses collapsing. To simulate the event of M = 6.9 we used the empirical Greeńs function method proposed by Irikura (1986). Due to the low seismic activity we have not any small earthquake record or an "element earthquake" so that we generated a synthetic seismogram of M = 4.1 to be used as empirical Greeńs function. The seismogram was constructed in two parts. For low frequencies we constructed from cross-correlations of seismic noise, while for high frequencies we made a stochastic simulation. Subsequently, we applied a "matched filter" to join the two frequency bands of synthetic earthquake. For the construction of seismic scenario the method of Irikura (1986) was used. We consider a square fault of 47.75 km long, a radial rupture propagation, rupture velocity of 3.06 m/s, and with the following focal mechanism: strike of 280°, dip of 66 ° and rake of -138 °. With these parameters we obtained the synthetic seismograms. Since there was not any observed earthquake to validate the model, the 1912 event was simulated and then from relationships of intensity (obtained Wald et al.,2005; Sandoval et al., 2013; and Arias, 1969), we estimated the Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) for the refinery. We compare our result with isoseismal map obtained by Suter et al. (1996) for the earthquake of 1912. In agreement with Suter, our results shown a MMI V-VI for the Miguel Hidalgo refinery. With this qualitative validation we search the seismic scenario with the higher accelerations and from this synthetic seismogram, we obtained parameters that are of interest in engineering to estimate the possible affectations to the Miguel Hidalgo refinery, such as

  9. Investigation of some solvents for asphalten-wax-paraffin depositions formed on the oil refinery equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. В. Тертишна

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Тhe methods of asphalten - wax- paraffin depositions removal from the oil refinery equipment were studied. The effectiveness of solvents were estimated by mass losses of samples wrapped up in filter paper after exposition in different reagents, such as once-run petrol, benzene, toluene, hexane and some mixtures of these substances. The best results were obtained in the hexane - benzene mixture with volume ratio 1:1. The maximal level of dissolution was achieved at 30-35 °С

  10. Troubleshooting vacuum systems steam turbine surface condensers and refinery vacuum towers

    CERN Document Server

    Lieberman, Norman P

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum systems are in wide spread use in the petrochemical plants, petroleum refineries and power generation plants. The existing texts on this subject are theoretical in nature and only deal with how the equipment functions when in good mechanical conditions, from the viewpoint of the equipment vendor.  In this much-anticipated volume, one of the most well-respected and prolific process engineers in the world takes on troubleshooting vacuum systems, and especially steam ejectors, an extremely complex and difficult subject that greatly effects the profitability of the majority of the world'

  11. Synergies between bio- and oil refineries for the production of fuels from biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, George W; Corma, Avelino

    2007-01-01

    As petroleum prices continue to increase, it is likely that biofuels will play an ever-increasing role in our energy future. The processing of biomass-derived feedstocks (including cellulosic, starch- and sugar-derived biomass, and vegetable fats) by catalytic cracking and hydrotreating is a promising alternative for the future to produce biofuels, and the existing infrastructure of petroleum refineries is well-suited for the production of biofuels, allowing us to rapidly transition to a more sustainable economy without large capital investments for new reaction equipment. This Review discusses the chemistry, catalysts, and challenges involved in the production of biofuels.

  12. Determination of the priority indexes for the oil refinery wastewater treatment process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, M. G.; Myshlyavtsev, A. V.; Kriga, A. S.; Shaporenko, A. P.; Markelov, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The wastewater biological treatment intensity and effectiveness are influenced by many factors: temperature, pH, presence and concentration of toxic substances, the biomass concentration et al. Regulation of them allows controlling the biological treatment process. Using the Bayesian theorem the link between changes was determined and the wastewater indexes normative limits exceeding influence for activated sludge characteristics alteration probability was evaluated. The estimation of total, or aposterioric, priority index presence probability, which characterizes the wastewater treatment level, is an important way to use the Bayesian theorem in activated sludge swelling prediction at the oil refinery biological treatment unit.

  13. Test plan: the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, D.J.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.

    1997-03-31

    The remediation strategies that will be applied at the Czechowice Oil Refinery waste lagoon in Czechowice, Poland are designed, managed, and implemented under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). WSRC will be assisted in the demonstration by The Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas (IETU). This collaboration between IETU and DOE will provide the basis for international technology transfer of new and innovative remediation technologies that can be applied in Poland and the Eastern European Region as well.

  14. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofryk, K; Du, S; Stanek, C R; Lashley, J C; Liu, X-Y; Schulze, R K; Smith, J L; Safarik, D J; Byler, D D; McClellan, K J; Uberuaga, B P; Scott, B L; Andersson, D A

    2014-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide has been studied for over half a century, as uranium dioxide is the fuel used in a majority of operating nuclear reactors and thermal conductivity controls the conversion of heat produced by fission events to electricity. Because uranium dioxide is a cubic compound and thermal conductivity is a second-rank tensor, it has always been assumed to be isotropic. We report thermal conductivity measurements on oriented uranium dioxide single crystals that show anisotropy from 4 K to above 300 K. Our results indicate that phonon-spin scattering is important for understanding the general thermal conductivity behaviour, and also explains the anisotropy by coupling to the applied temperature gradient and breaking cubic symmetry.

  15. Nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Dardenne, Yves M.

    2017-01-03

    Apparatus, systems, and methods for nuclear radiation cleanup and uranium prospecting include the steps of identifying an area; collecting samples; sample preparation; identification, assay, and analysis; and relating the samples to the area.

  16. Biosorption of uranium by human black hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Amardeep Singh; Melo, Jose Savio

    2015-04-01

    Naturally available low cost materials have gained importance as effective alternative to conventional sorbents for the removal of metal ions from water. The present study describes the use of black hair waste as a sorbent for the removal of uranium ions from an aqueous medium. Alkali treatment of the biomass resulted in a significant increase in its uptake capacity. The optimum pH and contact time for uranium removal were 4.5 and 2 h respectively. It was observed that the experimental data fits well in Ho's pseudo-second order kinetic model. Binding of uranium to the biomass was confirmed using FT-IR spectroscopy. Thus, the present study could demonstrate the utility of human black hair to remove uranium from aqueous medium.

  17. Esofagomanometria e phmetria de 24 horas para avaliar a fundoplicatura de lind laparoscópica na doença do refluxo gastroesofágico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Roberto Miguel

    Full Text Available As técnicas laparoscópicas e toracoscópicas proporcionaram uma nova dimensão para a correção dos distúrbios funcionais do esôfago. O sucesso terapêutico, entretanto, depende da confirmação da doença esofágica como causa dos sintomas, da compreensão da causa básica da disfunção e da identificação do paciente cirúrgico. O presente trabalho é um estudo retrospectivo em pacientes operados pela técnica de Lind para doença do refluxo gastroesofágico (DRGE. Tem por objetivo estabelecer o valor do uso sistemático da esofagomanometria e da pHmetria de 24 horas na seleção de pacientes e na avaliação funcional pré e pós-operatória. Quarenta e um pacientes (68,3% tinham hipotonia do esfíncter inferior do esôfago. A pressão foi em média de 9,2 mmHg no pré-operatório e de 15,2mmHg no pós-operatório, com um aumento de 6,0 mmHg. Este aumento foi de 8,8mmHg nos hipotônicos e 4,3 mmHg nos normotônicos. Houve algum grau de hipomotilidade do corpo do esôfago em 14 pacientes (23,3%, sendo que, deste grupo, quatro (28,5% obtiveram melhora pós-operatória. Refluxo ácido patológico foi constatado em 51 casos (85,0% pela pHmetria. A média do score de DeMeester pré-operatório foi de 31,4, baixando depois para 3,2. A esofagomanometria e a pHmetria de 24 horas são métodos eficazes em revelar o nível de modificação funcional estabelecido pela cirurgia anti-refluxo e ajudam objetivamente na seleção.

  18. Uranium and the use of depleted uranium in weaponry; L'uranium et les armes a l'uranium appauvri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, R

    2000-07-01

    In this brief report the author shows that the use of shells involving a load of depleted uranium might lead to lasting hazards to civil population and environment. These hazards come from the part of the shell that has been dispersed as contaminating radioactive dusts. The author describes some features of radioactivity and highlights the role of Uranium-238 as a provider of energy to the planet. (A.C.)

  19. Uranium extraction by complexation with siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde Castro, Cristina

    One of the major concerns of energy production is the environmental impact associated with the extraction of natural resources. Nuclear energy fuel is obtained from uranium, an abundant and naturally occurring element in the environment, but the currently used techniques for uranium extraction leave either a significant fingerprint (open pit mines) or a chemical residue that alters the pH of the environment (acid or alkali leaching). It is therefore clear that a new and greener approach to uranium extraction is needed. Bioleaching is one potential alternative. In bioleaching, complexants naturally produced from fungi or bacteria may be used to extract the uranium. In the following research, the siderophore enterobactin, which is naturally produced by bacteria to extract and solubilize iron from the environment, is evaluated to determine its potential for complexing with uranium. To determine whether enterobactin could be used for uranium extraction, its acid dissociation and its binding strength with the metal of interest must be determined. Due to the complexity of working with radioactive materials, lanthanides were used as analogs for uranium. In addition, polyprotic acids were used as structural and chemical analogs for the siderophore during method development. To evaluate the acid dissociation of enterobactin and the subsequent binding constants with lanthanides, three different analytical techniques were studied including: potentiometric titration, UltraViolet Visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). After evaluation of three techniques, a combination of ITC and potentiometric titrations was deemed to be the most viable way for studying the siderophore of interest. The results obtained from these studies corroborate the ideal pH range for enterobactin complexation to the lanthanide of interest and pave the way for determining the strength of complexation relative to other naturally occurring metals. Ultimately, this

  20. Release of uranium from candidate wasteforms

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, N.; Harrison, M.; Brogden, M,; Hanson, B

    2012-01-01

    Large volumes of depleted natural and low-enriched uranium exist in the UK waste inventory. This work reports on initial investigations of the leaching performance of candidate glass and cement encapsulation matrices containing UO3 powder as well as that of uranium oxide powders. The surface areas of UO3 powder and the monolith samples of UO3 conditioned in the glass and cement matrices were very different making leaching comparisons difficult. The results showed that for both types of monoli...

  1. A new procedure for Uranium fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costas Costas, E.; Baselga Cervara, B.; Tarin garcia, F.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays only few procedures are employed for uranium fractionation, all of them at physico-chemical level. Ideally, we would develop a procedure based in a von Neumann machines (a rapid self-replicating machine capable of perform the uranium fractionation). Microorganism behave as von Newmann machines and al l known enzymatic processes are able to isotopic fractionation, often enriching the living organism in the lighter isotope. (Author)

  2. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  3. Pentavalent uranium trans-dihalides and -pseudohalides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kikkawa, James M; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2012-05-21

    Pentavalent uranium complexes of the formula U(V)X(2)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) (X = F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), N(3)(-), NCS(-)) are accessible from the oxidation of U(III)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) through two sequential, one-electron oxidation reactions (halides) and substitution through salt metathesis (pseudohalides). Uranium(v) mixed-halides are also synthesized by successive one-electron oxidation reactions.

  4. Treatment of effluents from uranium oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, A C Q; Gonçalves, J S; Morais, C A

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle comprises a series of industrial processes which involve the production of electricity from uranium in nuclear power reactors. In Brazil the conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) into uranium dioxide (UO2) takes place in Resende (RJ) at the Nuclear Fuel Factory (FCN). The process generates liquid effluents with significant concentrations of uranium, which might be treated before being discharged into the environment. This study investigates the recovery of uranium from three distinct liquid effluents: one with a high carbonate content and the other with an elevated fluoride concentration. This paper also presents a study on carbonate removal from an effluent that consists of a water-methanol solution generated during the filtration of the yellow cake (ammonium uranyl tricarbonate). The results showed that: (1) the uranium from the carbonated solution can be recovered through the ion exchange technique using the strong base anionic resin IRA 910-U, as the carbonate has been removed as CO2 after heating; (2) the most suitable technique to recover uranium from the fluoride solution is its precipitation as (NH4)2UO4F2 (ammonium fluorouranate peroxide), (3) the solution free of carbonate can be added to the fluoride solution and the uranium from the final solution can be recovered by precipitation as ammonium fluorouranate peroxide as well; (4) the carbonate from the water-methanol solution can be recovered as calcium carbonate through the addition of calcium chloride, or it can be recovered as ammonium sulphate through the addition of sulphuric acid. The ammonium sulphate product can be used as a fertilizer.

  5. Environmental Radioactive Impact Associated to Uranium Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando P. Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One century of uranium mining in Europe and North-America created a legacy of ore mining and milling sites needing rehabilitation for environmental and human safety. In the last decades developments of uranium mining displaced the core of this activity to Australia, Canada and African countries. In the coming years, uranium mining is expected to grow further, in those countries and elsewhere, due to the possible increase of nuclear power production and thus the amount of radioactive and toxic tailing materials will grow. Approach: International radiation protection guidelines and legislation have known recent developments and set the radiation dose limit applied to members of the public at 1 mSv y-1. Taking into account past and present uranium waste management and environmental remediation measures adopted already in some countries, we assessed the implications of enforcing this new dose limit in uranium milling and mining areas. Results: The radioactive impact of uranium mining and milling was illustrated through case studies. Environmental radioactivity monitoring and surveillance carried out in areas impacted by uranium mining and milling industry showed generally that dose limit for members of the public was exceeded. The compliance with this dose limit is nowadays the main goal for environmental remediation programs of legacy sites implemented in European Union countries. Taking into account the new radiation protection regulations, a change is required in mining practices from traditionally reactionary (problem solving to proactive (integrated management and life-cycle approach. Conclusion: A new paradigm in uranium mining should be implemented worldwide to ensure reduced environmental radioactivity impact current and future reduced radiation risk exposure of population.

  6. Microbial transformation of uranium in wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Cline, J.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from the disposal of uranium processing wastes is a major national concern. Although much is known about the physico- chemical aspects of U, we have little information on the effects of aerobic and anaerobic microbial activities on the mobilization or immobilization of U and other toxic metals in mixed wastes. In order to understand the mechanisms of microbial transformations of uranium, we examined a contaminated pond sediment and a sludge sample from the uranium processing facility at Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, TN. The uranium concentration in the sediment and sludge samples was 923 and 3080 ug/g dry wt, respectively. In addition to U, the sediment and sludge samples contained high levels of toxic metals such as Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Ni, and Zn. The association of uranium with the various mineral fractions of the sediment and sludge was determined by selective chemical extraction techniques. Uranium was associated to varying degrees with the exchangeable carbonate, iron oxide, organic, and inert fractions in both samples. Initial results in samples amended with carbon and nitrogen indicate immobilization of U due to enhanced indigenous microbial activity under anaerobic conditions. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Auxiliary units for refining of high nitrogen content oils: Premium II refinery case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Paolo Contim; Pinotti, Rafael [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    PETROBRAS is constantly investing on its refining park in order to increase the production of clean and stable fuels and to be capable to process heavier oils with high contaminants content. Sulfur and nitrogen are the main heteroatoms present in petroleum. They are responsible for some undesirable fuels properties like corrosivity and instability, and also emit pollutants when burnt. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking processes are designed to remove these contaminants and adjust other fuel properties, generating, as byproduct, sour gases and sour water streams rich in H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}, which are usually sent to Sour Water Treatment Units and Sulfur Recovery Units. The regeneration of the amine used for the light streams treatment, as fuel gas and LPG, also generates sour gas streams that must be also sent to Sulfur Recovery Units. As the ammonia content in the sour streams increases, some design parameters must be adjusted to avoid increasing the Refinery emissions. Sulfur Recovery Units must provide proper NH3 destruction. Sour Water Treatment must have a proper segregation between H{sub 2}S and ammonia streams, whenever desirable. Amine Regeneration Systems must have an efficient procedure to avoid the ammonia concentration in the amine solution. This paper presents some solutions usually applied to the Petroleum Industry and analyses some aspects related to Premium II Refinery Project and how its design will help the Brazilian refining park to meet future environmental regulation and market demands. (author)

  8. Discrete event simulation for petroleum transfers involving harbors, refineries and pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcella S.R.; Lueders, Ricardo; Delgado, Myriam R.B.S. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays a great effort has been spent by companies to improve their logistics in terms of programming of events that affect production and distribution of products. In this case, simulation can be a valuable tool for evaluating different behaviors. The objective of this work is to build a discrete event simulation model for scheduling of operational activities in complexes containing one harbor and two refineries interconnected by a pipeline infrastructure. The model was developed in Arena package, based on three sub-models that control pier allocation, loading of tanks, and transfers to refineries through pipelines. Preliminary results obtained for a given control policy, show that profit can be calculated by taking into account many parameters such as oil costs on ships, pier using, over-stay of ships and interface costs. Such problem has already been considered in the literature but using different strategies. All these factors should be considered in a real-world operation where decision making tools are necessary to obtain high returns. (author)

  9. MBBR evaluation for oil refinery wastewater treatment, with post-ozonation and BAC, for wastewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E E; Cerqueira, A C F P; Dezotti, M

    2011-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) in the treatment of an oil refinery wastewater. Also, it investigated the possibility of reuse of the MBBR effluent, after ozonation in series with a biological activated carbon (BAC) column. The best performance of the MBBR was achieved with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours, employing a bed to bioreactor volume ratio (V(B)/V(R)) of 0.6. COD and N-NH₄(+) MBBR effluent concentrations ranged from 40 to 75 mg L⁻¹ (removal efficiency of 69-89%) and 2 to 6 mg L⁻¹ (removal efficiency of 45-86%), respectively. Ozonation carried out for 15 min with an ozone concentration of 5 mg L⁻¹ was able to improve the treated wastewater biodegradability. The treatment performance of the BAC columns was practically the same for ozonated and non ozonated MBBR effluents. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content of the columns of the activated carbon columns (CAG) was in the range of 2.1-3.8 mg L⁻¹, and the corresponding DOC removal efficiencies were comprised between 52 and 75%. The effluent obtained at the end of the proposed treatment presented a quality, which meet the requirements for water reuse in the oil refinery.

  10. Optimization of water network in petroleum refinery; Otimizacao de redes de agua em refinarias de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Debora C.; Souza, Selene M.A. Guelli Ulson de; Souza, Antonio A. Ulson de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The petroleum refineries have shown high water's consuming that creates high costs and damages the hydric resources. However, the industrial sector, especially the petroleum industry, has been looking for alternatives that minimizing the impact caused by to use these natural resources. Currently, methodologies of controlling the pollution on the source have been appearing how a strong tendency and the reuse and/or recycle of wastewater can be emphasized. The optimization by mathematical programming, together with engineering know-how, is one of the great tendency in process integration technology developed. The present work presents one optimization mathematical model that objectifies to reduce the water's consuming and/or operational costs. The model is based in chemical species and mass conservation equation. This work presents the solution of one case found in literature that broach one petroleum refinery's network of water. This network is composed of six operations and three regenerative processes, and there are four keys contaminants. The water's consuming was minimized first and next the minimum cost in the minimum consume was broached. The results found were enough satisfactory and presented reductions up to 76% in the water consume and approximately 65% in the operational costs. (author)

  11. Suitability of Scirpus maritimus for petroleum hydrocarbons remediation in a refinery environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, M Nazaré P F S; Basto, M Clara P; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2012-01-01

    In the ambit of a project searching for appropriate biological approaches for recovering a refinery soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC), we compared results obtained in the absence and in the presence of the salt marsh plant Scirpus maritimus or Juncus maritimus or an association of these two plants, which were tested in the refinery environment. Synergistic effects caused by addition of a non-ionic surfactant and/or a bioaugmentation product were also investigated. Major challenges of this study were: field conditions and weathered contamination. Transplants of the plants were carried out in individual containers filled with a weathered contaminated soil, which was recontaminated with turbine oil with two purposes: for increasing PHC level and allowing a comparison of the potential of plants for remediation of ancient and recent contamination. Analysis of total PHC led to the conclusion that, after 24-month exposure, neither J. maritimus nor the association caused any improvement in remediation. In contrast, S. maritimus revealed potential for PHC remediation, favoring degradation of both recent and older contamination (which was refractory to natural attenuation). About 15% of remediation improvement was found in the soil layer with higher root density (5-10 cm). A more marked improvement in that layer (28%) was observed when non-ionic surfactant amendment and bioaugmentation were used jointly. The fact that S. maritimus has demonstrated capability for PHC remediation, leads to admit that it has potential to be also used for recovering sediments that have suffered accidental oil spills.

  12. Optimization of Anaerobic Treatment of Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Gasim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of petroleum refinery wastewater using anaerobic treatment has many advantages over other biological method particularly when used to treat complex wastewater. In this study, accumulated data of Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB reactor treating petroleum refinery wastewater under six different volumetric organic loads (0.58, 1.21, 0.89, 2.34, 1.47 and 4.14 kg COD/m3.d, respectively were used for developing mathematical model that could simulate the process pattern. The data consist of 160 entries and were gathered over approximately 180 days from two UASB reactors that were continuously operating in parallel. Artificial neural network software was used to model the reactor behavior during different loads applied. Two transfer functions were compared and different number of neurons was tested to find the optimum model that predicts the reactor pattern. The tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig at hidden layer and a linear transfer function (purelin at output layer with 12 neurons were selected as the optimum best model.

  13. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

    2012-05-15

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

  14. Pretreatment of super viscous oil wastewater and its application in refinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Chunmao; Yan Guangxu; Guo Shaohui; Yang Yong

    2008-01-01

    Wastewater from super viscous oil processing cannot be effectively treated by conventional wastewater treatment plants in refineries because of its high concentration of various organic pollutants.In order to resolve this problem,a number of investigations were conducted in our work to understand the physicochemical properties,sedimentation,demulsification and pretreatment of such super viscous oil refinery wastewater.The results showed that the key issues for pretreatment of this wastewater were:(1)Optimized process parameters were used in the sedimentation and demulsification processes for oil removal to effectively recover oil and remove scum from wastewater;(2)A suitable flocculation process was selected to minimize oil,suspended solids(SS)and chemical oxygen demand(CODcr).A pretreatment process including three continuous steps:oil removal by sedimentation,oil removal by demulsification,and flotation separation,was proposed and applied in Liaohe Petrochemical Company,PetroChina and the oil content in effluents was Iess than 200 mg/L and CODcr less than 2,500 mg/L,which completely met the requirement for influent of the conventional wastewater treatment plant,and the recovered super viscous oil reached 5,873 tons in the initial year in Liaohe Petrochemical Company,PetroChina.

  15. Application of biological marker technology to bioremediation of refinery by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moldowan, J.M.; Dahl, J.; McCaffrey, M.A.; Smith, W.J.; Fetzer, J.C. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The progress of bioremediation of waste petroleum sludge at Chevron`s Perth Amboy, New Jersey, refinery landfarm was evaluated using a ranking scale based on refractory biological marker hydrocarbons that are indigenous to, and ubiquitous in, crude oils. Of the four samples analyzed from different locations in the landfarm, two were virtually identical and showed an absence of the n-alkanes expected to be found in the sludge (light biodegradation ranking). Another showed additional partial degradation of acyclic isoprenoids, e.g., pristane and phytane (moderate ranking). The fourth sample showed complete n-paraffin and isoprenoid loss, partial alteration of hopanes, and losses of C{sub 27} steranes, C{sub 27} diasteranes, C{sub 27} monoaromatic steroids, and C{sub 26} triaromatic steroids relative to the higher steroid homologs in each of these series (heavy ranking). These results suggest a concomitant preferential loss of steroid hydrocarbons that have the cholestane side chain and a possible new steroid biodegradation mechanism that is essentially blind to the structure of the steroid nucleus. The latter sample also showed levels of most polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), suggesting a building up of these compounds as others were removed. However, some of the smaller PAH (acenaphylene, fluorene, fluoranthene) appear to have decreased. These results suggest that a protocol based on such a biodegradation ranking scale could be used to monitor the progress of bioremediation of oil based refinery wastes. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Research of combined adsorption-coagulation process in treating petroleum refinery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Shui, Yiyu; Ren, Hongyang; He, Min

    2017-02-01

    The petroleum refinery industry generates a significant amount of wastewater that contains a high level of organic matter, which calls for effective and costly treatments. In this research, the effectiveness of the petroleum refinery effluent (PRE) treatment with physicochemical process of combined adsorption and coagulation was evaluated. The effects of initial pH, hydraulic condition , and combined sequence of treatment process, different treating reagent types and dosages on the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were investigated. Additionally, the elimination efficiency of pollutant wastewater was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometer was adopted to describe the structure of the wastewater. Wooden activated carbon was chosen as adsorbent at the dosage of 10 g/L as a primary treatment, and 1500 mg/L polymeric magnesium ferric sulfate was used in coagulation. Results showed that adsorption and subsequent coagulation displayed the best performance when initial pH was 9 at shear rates (G) of G1 = 65 s(-1) and G2 = 20 s(-1), which reached maximal removal rate of COD and total organic carbon GC-MS testing result revealed that adsorption was effective in phenols and iso-alkanes removal, whereas coagulation was good at removing esters and n-alkanes.

  17. ENHANCEMENT OF PHENOL REMOVAL EFFICIENCY IN DORA REFINERY WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah F. Sharif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Because the sanctions imposed on Iraq by the United Nations, programmed maintenance and wearing parts replacement has not been performed according to schedules in DORA Refinery Wastewater Unit, which resulted in higher phenol content and BOD5 in effluents disposed to river. The investigations showed that two main reasons were behind this problem: Firstly, increased emissions of hydrocarbons in the complexity of refinery equipment and Secondly, the decreased efficiency of the aerators in the biological. During the last few months, phenol average concentration in the effluent, after biological treatment was found to be between 0.06-0.13 mg/L, while COD was exceeding 110 mg/L after treatment in the same period. Considerable enhancement, has been indicated recently, after the following performances: First: Recycling wastewater from some heat exchangers, and the segregation of low and high strength of wastewaters, Second: Minimizing emissions of hydrocarbons from fluid catalytic cracking and steam cracking, Third: Replacement of driving motors of the aerators in the biological treatment unit. After replacement of these units, a significant decrease in phenol concentration was obtained in purified water (0.03-0.05 mg/L and COD of 60 mg/L before the tertiary treatment. It is concluded that a better quality of effluents has been obtained after a series of emissions control and wastewater treatment unit equipment maintenance performances.

  18. Preliminary characterization of biosurfactants produced by microorganisms isolated from refinery wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçin, Emine; Ergene, Aysun

    2010-02-01

    Some bacterial strains isolated from refinery wastewaters were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa RWI, Pseudomonas putida RWII, Pseudomonas fluorescens RWIII and Burkholderia cepacia RWIV, and the biosurfactants produced by these strains were coded as BS-I, BS-II, BS-III and BS-IV, respectively. The bacterial strains were characterized by the following biochemical methods: Gram stain, oxidase activity, indol, lactose and growth at 42 degrees C. Biosurfactant production was evaluated by: emulsification activity, surface tension measurement and critical micelle concentration. Chemical characterization of the biosurfactants was done by: FTIR and analysis of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content. The biosurfactants showed good emulsification activity against different hydrocarbon sources. The initial surface tension of culture broth was determined as 67.3 mN/m, and production of BS-I, BS-II, BS-III and BS-IV lowered this value to 35.9, 49.2, 51.6 and 45.7 mN/m, respectively. The critical micelle concentration of the biosurfactants was found to be in the range 10-50 mg/L. From the results of this study it was observed that the refinery wastewaters are a suitable source for isolation of biosurfactant-producing bacteria, but are not a substrate for biosurfactant production.

  19. Stabilization of Bio-Oil Fractions for Insertion into Petroleum Refineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Robert C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Smith, Ryan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Wright, Mark [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Elliott, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Resasco, Daniel [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Crossley, Steven [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-28

    This project is part of a collaboration effort between Iowa State University (ISU), University of Oklahoma (OK) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The purpose of this project is to stabilize bio-oil fractions and improve their suitability for insertion into petroleum refineries. Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of biomass is a complex mixture of unstable organic compounds. These organic compounds react under standard room conditions resulting in increases in bio-oil viscosity and water content – both detrimental for bio-oil storage and transportation. This study employed fractionation and upgrading systems to improve the stability of bio-oil. The fractionation system consists of a series of condensers, and electrostatic precipitators designed to separate bio-oil into five fractions: soluble carbohydrates (SF1&2), clean phenolic oligomers (CPO) and middle fraction (SF3&4), light oxygenates (SF5). A two-stage upgrading process was designed to process bio-oil stage fractions into stable products that can be inserted into a refinery. In the upgrading system, heavy and middle bio-oil fractions were upgraded into stable oil via cracking and subsequent hydrodeoxygenation. The light oxygenate fraction was steam reformed to provide a portion of requisite hydrogen for hydroprocessing. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking employed hydrogen from natural gas, fuel gas and light oxygenates reforming. The finished products from this study consist of gasoline- and diesel-blend stock fuels.

  20. Evaluation and control of worker exposure to fungi in a beet sugar refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, P A; Todd, W F; Hart, M E; Mickelsen, R L; O'Brien, D M

    1993-12-01

    A study of worker exposure to airborne fungi was undertaken in a sugar beet refinery to evaluate the level of exposure and to determine if controls could be implemented that would lower these exposures. A previous study at this refinery identified one worker who reacted on challenge testing to the moldy but not the fresh sugar beet pulp, had specific Immunoglobulin G to Aspergillus niger, and specific Immunoglobulin E to Aspergillus. Also, two employees were diagnosed with occupational asthma. In the study reported here, two field surveys were conducted, the first during the sugar production campaign (January) and the second during postproduction cleanup and maintenance (June). Approximately 65 personal and area air samples were collected on polycarbonate filters and the culturable fungal spores were identified and enumerated. This study showed high exposure of pellet loaders and pellet silo workers to various species of Aspergillus. Other fungal species that might pose a health hazard were detected. Exposures to fungi during the postproduction cleanup and maintenance phase were much higher than those measured during the production campaign. Engineering controls that would reduce employee exposure are discussed.

  1. Hydroprocessing and premium II refinery: a new refining philosophy for an era of clean fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgaudio, Caio Veiga Penna; Pinotti, Rafael [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses a brief history of Brazilian's emission and fuel specifications, since the appearance of PROCONVE until the late stages of the program for vehicles powered by gasoline and diesel. The development of the Brazilian refining is analyzed taking into account the emission and specification evolutions, and it can be perceived that the system's complexity increases while new constraints are imposed by the regulator. This aspect is even more apparent when the detailed scheme of the Premium II refinery and its main unit, the catalytic hydrocracker (HCC, which has not yet been part of PETROBRAS' refining park and will appear in three of the four new refineries of the company) is described. The new projects represent the culmination of the intensive use of energy and raw material for obtaining the products with the new specifications. There is a price for this development, both in investments and increased operating costs due to greater complexity of the system. To adapt to the era of clean fuels, refiners will present a series of challenges that will lead them to seek for more efficient processes and operational excellence (and ongoing efforts to reduce their emissions) in order to ensure positive refining margins. (author)

  2. Dry uranium tetrafluoride process preparation using the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Neto, J.B.; Urano de Carvalho, E.F.; Oliveira, F.B.V. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: jbsneto@ipen.br; elitaucf@ipen.br; fabio@ipen.br; Riella, H.G. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: riella@enq.ufsc.br

    2007-07-01

    It is a well known fact that the use of uranium tetrafluoride allows flexibility in the production of uranium silicide and uranium oxide fuel. To its obtention there are two conventional routes, the one which reduces uranium from the UF{sub 6} hydrolysis solution with stannous chloride, and the hydrofluorination of a solid uranium dioxide. In this work we are introducing a third and a dry way route, mainly utilized to the recovery of uranium from the liquid effluents generated in the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process, at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Working in the liquid phase, this route comprises the recuperation of ammonium fluoride by NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2} precipitation. Working with the solid residues, the crystallized bifluoride is added to the solid UO{sub 2}, which comes from the U miniplates recovery, also to its conversion in a solid state reaction, to obtain UF{sub 4}. That returns to the process of metallic uranium production unity to the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} obtention. This fuel is considered in IPEN-CNEN/SP as the high density fuel phase for IEA-R1m reactor, which will replace the former low density U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al fuel. (author)

  3. The Behavior of Uranium in the Environment: Bacterial Reduction of an Aqueous Uranium Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    studies used Shewanella putrefaciens because of its ability to grow rapidly in aerobic conditions and reduce metals in anaerobic conditions. Under...anaerobic conditions, Shewanella putrefaciens use aqueous uranium as the electron acceptor in lieu of oxygen. The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) removes uranium

  4. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity; Biocinetique et toxicite de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A

    2000-07-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation.

  5. Ultrasensitive techniques for measurement of uranium in biological samples and the nephrotoxicity of uranium: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.; Weber, J.R. (eds.)

    1988-04-01

    Edited transcripts are provided of two public meetings sponsored by the Division of Radiation Programs and Earth Sciences of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Occupational Radiation Protection Branch. The first meeting, held on December 3, 1985, included nine presentations covering ultrasensitive techniques for measurement of uranium in biological specimens. Topics included laser-spectrometric techniques for uranium bioassay, correlation of urinary uranium samples with air sampling results in industrial settings, delayed neutron counting, laser-kinetic phosphometry, isotope dilution mass spectrometry, resonance ionization spectroscopy, fission track analysis, laser-induced fluorescence, and costs of sampling and processing. The nine presentations of the second meeting dealt with the nephrotoxicity of uranium. Among the topics presented were the physiology of the kidney, the effects of heavy metals on the kidney, animal studies in uranium nephrotoxicity, comparisons of kidney histology in nine humans, renal effects in uranium mill workers, renal damage from different uranium isotopes, and Canadian studies on uranium toxicity. Discussions following the presentations are included in the edited transcripts. 30 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Dissolution of sludges containing uranium dioxide and metallic uranium in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flament, T.A.

    1998-08-25

    The dissolution in nitric acid of sludges containing uranium oxide and uranium has been modeled. That study has shown that it was necessary to continuously feed the dissolver to have an appropriate control of the reaction. If a unique procedure is deemed preferable, NH03 6M has been used.

  7. Uranium deposits of the world. Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlkamp, Franz J.

    2016-07-01

    Uranium Deposits of the World, in three volumes, comprises an unprecedented compilation of data and descriptions of the uranium regions in Asia, USA, Latin America and Europe structured by countries. With this third, the Europe volume, Uranium Deposits of the World presents the most extensive data collection of the set. It covers about 140 uranium regions in more than 20 European countries with nearly 1000 mentioned uranium deposits. Each country and region receives an analytical overview followed by the geologically- and economically-relevant synopsis of the individual regions and fields. The presentations are structured in three major sections: (a) location and magnitude of uranium regions, districts, and deposits, (b) principal features of regions and districts, and (c) detailed characteristics of selected ore fields and deposits. This includes sections on geology, alteration, mineralization, shape and dimensions of deposits, isotopes data, ore control and recognition criteria, and metallogenesis. Beside the main European uranium regions, for example in the Czech Republic, Eastern Germany, France, the Iberian Peninsula or Ukraine, also small regions an districts to the point of singular occurrences of interest are considered. This by far the most comprehensive presentation of European uranium geology and mining would not be possible without the author's access to extensive information covering the countries of the former Eastern Bloc states, which was partly not previously available. Abundantly illustrated with information-laden maps and charts throughout, this reference work is an indispensable tool for geologists, mining companies, government agencies, and others with an interest in European key natural resources. A great help for the reader's orientation are the substantial bibliography of uranium-related publications and the indices, latter containing about 3900 entries in the geographical part alone. The three volumes of Uranium Deposits of the

  8. ZDC Effective Cross Section for Uranium-Uranium Collisions in Run 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drees, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-09

    An accurate calibration of the luminosity measurement of the 2012 Uranium-Uranium RHIC run at 96 GeV per beam is of the greatest importance in order to measure the total uranium-uranium cross section with a reasonably small error bar. During the run, which lasted from April 20th to May 15th 2012, three vernier scans per experiment were performed. Beam intensities of up to 3.4 1010 Uranium ions in one ring were successfully accelerated to flattop at γ = 103.48 corresponding to 96 GeV/beam. The desired model β value was 0.7 m in the two low beta Interaction Points IP6 and IP8. With these beam parameters interaction rates of up to 15 kHz were achieved. This note presents the data associated with the vernier scans, and discusses the results and systematic effects.

  9. ZDC Effective Cross Section for Run 12 Uranium-Uranium Collisions in RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Drees, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the luminosity measurement of the 2012 Uranium-Uranium RHIC run at 96 GeV per beam is of the greatest importance in order to measure the total uranium-uranium cross section with a reasonably small error bar. During the run, which lasted from April 20th to May 15th 2012, three vernier scans per experiment were performed. Beam intensities of up to 3.4 10$^{10}$ Uranium ions in one ring were successfully accelerated to flattop at $\\gamma = 103.48$ corresponding to 96 GeV/beam. The desired model $\\beta^*$ value was 0.7 m in the two low beta Interaction Points IP6 and IP8. With these beam parameters interaction rates of up to 15 kHz were achieved. This note presents the data associated with the vernier scans, and discusses the results and systematic effects.

  10. Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C.; Appert, Q.D.

    1995-09-01

    Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I{sub 2}) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF{sub 4}, spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area.

  11. Analysis of snow-cap pollution for air quality assessment in the vicinity of an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krastinyte, Viktorija; Baltrenaite, Edita; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas

    2013-01-01

    Snow-cap can be used as a simple and effective indicator of industrial air pollution. In this study snow-cap samples were collected from 11 sites located in the vicinity of an oil refinery in Mazeikiai, a region in the north-west of Lithuania, in the winter of 2011. Analysis of snowmelt water and snow-dust was used to determine anthropogenic pollutants such as: sulphates and chlorides, nitrites, nitrates, ammonium nitrogen, total carbon, total nitrogen; heavy metals: lead (Pb), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd). Concentrations of heavy metals in snow-dust were detected thousands of times higher than those in the snowmelt water. In this study, analysis of heavy metal concentration was conducted considering different distances and the wind direction within the impact zone of the oil refinery. The sequence of heavy metals according to their mean concentrations in the snow-dust samples was the following: Pb > Cr > Cu > Cd. Heavy metals highly correlated among each other. The load of snow-dust was evaluated to determine the pollution level in the study area. The highest daily load of snow-dust was 45.81 +/- 12.35 mg/m2 in the north-western direction from the oil refinery. According to classification of the daily load of snow-dust a lower than medium-risk level of pollution was determined in the vicinity of the oil refinery.

  12. 40 CFR 80.524 - What sulfur content standard applies to motor vehicle diesel fuel downstream of the refinery or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to motor vehicle diesel fuel downstream of the refinery or importer? 80.524 Section 80.524 Protection... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel Standards and Requirements § 80.524 What sulfur content...

  13. Phytoremediation of heavy metals (Cd, Pb and V in gas refinery wastewater using common reed (Phragmitis australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Hamidian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Industrial wastewaters are of the major sources of heavy metal pollution in the environment. In the Middle East, gas and oil industry is the major source of heavy metal pollution and releases significant amounts of metals into the terrestrial and aquatic environment. In this research the capability of the common reed (Phragmitis australis in absorbing heavy metals Cd, Pb and V from the wastewater of a gas refinery plant in Iran was investigated. The plant samples were collected from the vicinity of the Bidboland gas refinery plant in Iran and were used for the treatment of wastewaters collected from the outflow of the refinery plant. The metal concentrations were measured in the roots of the plant species before treatment and after 2, 6 and 10 days of treatment procedure. The heavy metal concentrations were measured after acid digestion and using an ICP-OES instrument. After 10 days of treatment, the concentrations of the metals in plant tissues increased by 2.5, 6.9 and 2.7 times for Cd, Pb and V, respectively. The best treatment time was suggested to be 6 days. The common reed was observed to have a very good capability in removing heavy metals from the gas refinery wastewater.

  14. Pathways of inhalation exposure to manganese in children living near a ferromanganese refinery: A structural equation modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is both essential element and neurotoxicant. Exposure to Mn can occur from various sources and routes. Structural equation modeling was used to examine routes of exposure to Mn among children residing near a ferromanganese refinery in Marietta, Ohio. An inhalation ...

  15. Development of a factory/refinery method to measure total, soluble, and insoluble starch in sugar products

    Science.gov (United States)

    An easy, rapid, and inexpensive method was developed to measure total, soluble, and insoluble starch in products at the factory and refinery, using microwave-assisted neutralization chemistry. The method was optimized using the previously developed USDA Starch Research method as a reference. Optimal...

  16. Unit for Production of MTBE and Butene-1 from Refinery C4 Successfully Put on Stream at Guangzhou Petrochemical Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The unit for manufacture of MTBE with co-production of butene-1 was successfully put on stream at Guangzhou Pet-rochemical Complex (GPC). It is told that this is the first domestic unit that utilizes the refinery C4 fraction to make MTBE and butene-1.

  17. How the physical forms of starch affect filterability at a carbonatation refinery. Part II: simulated carbonatation filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although starch is known to detrimentally impact carbonatation filtration at sugarcane refineries, the physical form(s) of starch responsible is unknown. Thus, a study was undertaken to elucidate the effects of the physical starch forms, i.e., soluble, swollen, and insoluble, and their concentration...

  18. Optimization of two-step bioleaching of spent petroleum refinery catalyst by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srichandan, Haragobinda; Pathak, Ashish; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Seoung-Won

    2014-01-01

    A central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) was employed for maximizing bioleaching yields of metals (Al, Mo, Ni, and V) from as-received spent refinery catalyst using Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Three independent variables, namely initial pH, sulfur concentration, and pulp density were investigated. The pH was found to be the most influential parameter with leaching yields of metals varying inversely with pH. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the quadratic model indicated that the predicted values were in good agreement with experimental data. Under optimized conditions of 1.0% pulp density, 1.5% sulfur and pH 1.5, about 93% Ni, 44% Al, 34% Mo, and 94% V was leached from the spent refinery catalyst. Among all the metals, V had the highest maximum rate of leaching (Vmax) according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The results of the study suggested that two-step bioleaching is efficient in leaching of metals from spent refinery catalyst. Moreover, the process can be conducted with as received spent refinery catalyst, thus making the process cost effective for large-scale applications.

  19. Allocating the CO{sub 2} emissions of an oil refinery with Aumann-Shapley prices. Comment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehrani Nejad Moghaddam, Alireza [Department of Economic Studies, Institut Francais du Petrole (I.F.P.), 92852, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    2010-01-15

    The allocation of CO{sub 2} emissions of petroleum refineries to their oil products is a necessary step in the retrospective Well-to-Tank (WTT) analysis. These allocated emissions are used to evaluate the environmental impacts of automotive fuels' production within the refinery. Oil refining is a complex joint production system and there exists no simple and unique answer to this allocation question. Recently, Pierru proposed adapting the Aumann-Shapley cost sharing method to deal with this issue. Our paper aims at describing the conceptual and technical difficulties of this adaptation to the WTT context. Moreover, we show that this approach, as proposed by Pierru, is not applicable to any real-type refinery model. Different suggestions are provided to improve its applicability (when it is possible) in real situations. A simple numerical example as well as a real-type refinery case study is provided for illustrations. Finally, we discuss an alternative allocation approach which we believe more adapted to the WTT context. (author)

  20. Pathways of inhalation exposure to manganese in children living near a ferromanganese refinery: A structural equation modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganese (Mn) is both essential element and neurotoxicant. Exposure to Mn can occur from various sources and routes. Structural equation modeling was used to examine routes of exposure to Mn among children residing near a ferromanganese refinery in Marietta, Ohio. An inhalation ...

  1. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  2. Atomistic properties of γ uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Benjamin; Deo, Chaitanya; Baskes, Michael; Okuniewski, Maria

    2012-02-22

    The properties of the body-centered cubic γ phase of uranium (U) are calculated using atomistic simulations. First, a modified embedded-atom method interatomic potential is developed for the high temperature body-centered cubic (γ) phase of U. This phase is stable only at high temperatures and is thus relatively inaccessible to first principles calculations and room temperature experiments. Using this potential, equilibrium volume and elastic constants are calculated at 0 K and found to be in close agreement with previous first principles calculations. Further, the melting point, heat capacity, enthalpy of fusion, thermal expansion and volume change upon melting are calculated and found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment. The low temperature mechanical instability of γ U is correctly predicted and investigated as a function of pressure. The mechanical instability is suppressed at pressures greater than 17.2 GPa. The vacancy formation energy is analyzed as a function of pressure and shows a linear trend, allowing for the calculation of the extrapolated zero pressure vacancy formation energy. Finally, the self-defect formation energy is analyzed as a function of temperature. This is the first atomistic calculation of γ U properties above 0 K with interatomic potentials.

  3. Anne Bysted, Carsten Selch Jensen, Kurt Villads Jensen, John H. Lind, Jerusalem in the North: Denmark and the Baltic Crusades, 1100–1522 (Outremer: Studies in the Crusades and the Latin East, vol. 1), Brepols, Turnhout 2012, 393 pp.+ 57 figures and 5 maps

    OpenAIRE

    Czaja, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Anne Bysted, Carsten Selch Jensen, Kurt Villads Jensen, John H. Lind, Jerusalem in the North: Denmark and the Baltic Crusades, 1100–1522 (Outremer: Studies in the Crusades and the Latin East, vol. 1), Brepols, Turnhout 2012, 393 pp. + 57 figures and 5 maps, ISBN: 978-2-503-52325-5.

  4. The measurement test of uranium in a uranium-contaminated waste by passive gamma-rays measurement method

    CERN Document Server

    Sukegawa, Y; Ohki, K; Suzuki, S; Yoshida, M

    2002-01-01

    This report is completed about the measurement test and the proofreading of passive gamma - rays measurement method for Non - destructive assay of uranium in a uranium-contaminated waste. The following are the results of the test. 1) The estimation of the amount of uranium by ionization survey meter is difficult for low intensity of gamma-rays emitted from uranium under about 50g. 2) The estimation of the amount of uranium in the waste by NaI detector is possible in case of only uranium, but the estimation from mixed spectrums with transmission source (60-cobalt) is difficult to confirm target peaks. 3) If daughter nuclides of uranium and thorium chain of uranium ore exist, measurement by NaI detector is affected by gamma-rays from the daughter nuclides seriously-As a result, the estimation of the amount of uranium is difficult. 4) The measurement of uranium in a uranium-contaminated waste by germanium detector is possible to estimate of uranium and other nuclides. 5) As to estimation of the amount of uranium...

  5. A spectroscopic study of uranium(VI) interaction with magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Aamrani, S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gimenez, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: francisco.javier.gimenez@upc.edu; Rovira, M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, Manresa (Spain); Seco, F. [CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, Manresa (Spain); Grive, M. [ENVIROS Spain SL, Passeig de Rubi 29-31, Valldoreix (Spain); Bruno, J. [ENVIROS Spain SL, Passeig de Rubi 29-31, Valldoreix (Spain); Duro, L. [ENVIROS Spain SL, Passeig de Rubi 29-31, Valldoreix (Spain); Pablo, J. de [Chemical Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIB-UPC H4, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1, Manresa (Spain)

    2007-08-31

    The uranium sorbed onto commercial magnetite has been characterized by using two different spectroscopic techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Magnetite samples have been put in contact with uranium(VI) solutions in conditions in which a high uranium uptake is expected. After several days, the magnetite surface has been analysed by XPS and EXAFS. The XPS results obtained are not conclusive regarding the uranium oxidation state in the magnetite surface. On the other hand, the results obtained with the EXAFS technique show that the uranium-magnetite sample spectrum has characteristics from both the UO{sub 2} and schoepite spectra, e.g. a relatively high coordination number of equatorial oxygens and two axial oxygens, respectively. These results would indicate that the uranium sorbed onto magnetite would be a mixture of uranium(IV) and uranium(VI)

  6. Uranium Extraction from Syrian Phosphate: A case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.STAS, I. OTHMAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uranium and trace elements were studied in few hundred samples from phosphatic formations in Syria. Uranium and trace elements were enriched in phosphorites facies compared to carbonate and siliceous facies. Uranium content of Syrian phosphorite by fission track method shows that uranium is related to the apatite mineral and organic matter. The concentration of uranium in phosphatic elements depends on the quality of these elements (grains, biogenic-elements. Further, uranium is relatively mobile during biomicritisation, coating and weathering. Investigation of uranium extraction from phosphoric acid produced at Homs plant (G.F.S by using phosphate concentrate from Khneifiss and Charquieh mines, have been carried out in a micro pilot and pilot plant scales. The result shows that the yield of uranium extraction from H3 PO4 is more than 95%.

  7. Current state of the uranium extraction at the NMMC

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Currently of the uranium mined in NMMC is obtained by means of underground leaching in the Kyzyl-Kum open pits. This method allows to reduce the cost of uranium mining and ensure the environmentally clean production.

  8. Study on Micro-extraction Column of Uranium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Some samples of uranium are very complicated therefore they can not be determined directly by analysis instrument, so pretreatment is necessary. The micro-extraction column of uranium is a kind of

  9. Separation and Purification of Fissiogenic Ruthenium From Irradiated Uranium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Ruthenium is an important fission product. Its isotopic composition may reflect the burnup or the initial uranium enrichment of nuclear fuel. So the separation and purification method of fission products of Ruthenium from irradiated uranium was studied and established.

  10. REMOVAL OF URANIUM FROM DRINKING WATER BY CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA currently does not regulate uranium in drinking water but will be revising the radionuclide regulations during 1989 and will propose a maximum contaminant level for uranium. The paper presents treatment technology information on the effectiveness of conventional method...

  11. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  12. Urine proteomic profiling of uranium nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malard, V.; Gaillard, J.C.; Sage, N. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBTN, Laboratoire de Biochimie des Systemes Perturbes (LBSP), Bagnols-sur-Ceze, F-30207 (France); Berenguer, F. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBTN, Laboratoire d' Etude des Proteines Cibles (LEPC), Bagnols-sur-Ceze, F-30207 (France); Quemeneur, E. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBTN, Bagnols-sur-Ceze, F-30207 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Uranium is used in many chemical forms in civilian and military industries and is a known nephro-toxicant. A key issue in monitoring occupational exposure is to be able to evaluate the potential damage to the body, particularly the kidney. In this study we used innovative proteomic techniques to analyse urinary protein modulation associated with acute uranium exposure in rats. Given that the rat urinary proteome has rarely been studied, we first identified 102 different proteins in normal urine, expanding the current proteome data set for this central animal in toxicology. Rats were exposed intravenously to uranyl nitrate at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg and samples were collected 24 h later. Using two complementary proteomic methods, a classic 2-DE approach and semi-quantitative SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS, 14 modulated proteins (7 with increased levels and 7 with decreased levels) were identified in urine after uranium exposure. Modulation of three of them was confirmed by western blot. Some of the modulated proteins corresponded to proteins already described in case of nephrotoxicity, and indicated a loss of glomerular permeability (albumin, alpha-1-anti-proteinase, sero-transferrin). Others revealed tubular damage, such as EGF and vitamin D-binding protein. A third category included proteins never described in urine as being associated with metal stress, such as ceruloplasmin. Urinary proteomics is thus a valuable tool to profile uranium toxicity non-invasively and could be very useful in follow-up in case of accidental exposure to uranium. (authors)

  13. Electrolytic extraction of uranium from Egyptian phosphorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madkour, L.H. [Dept. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tanta Univ. (Egypt)

    1995-02-01

    Nile Valley phosphate deposits (East Luxor locality), considered in Egypt as a rather rich source of uranium, is subjected to mineralogical, chemical, spectral and infrared spectrometric analyses. A process is proposed for the hydrometallurgical treatment of the phosphate rock for the recovery of uranium and the production of phosphatic fertilizers, without polluting the environment with radioactive materials. A uraniferous iron phosphate concentrate (2.5% U) which is produced as a by-product, is separately processed in an alkaline leaching step using a high concentration of both Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and NaHCO{sub 3} under oxidizing conditions. The product, sodium uranyl tricarbonate complex Na{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} liquor, is converted into the conventional uranium concentrate of sodium diuranate Na{sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7} through sodic decomposition treatment. Uranium metal is cathodically deposited from a number of solutions containing the ore metal concentrate liquor, and a complexing agent at controlled pH. The effects of various factors on the deposition of uranium are discussed. The results of spectrophotometric and chemical analyses revealed that the purity of the deposited metal is > 99%. (orig.)

  14. Investigation of uranium (VI) adsorption by polypyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, S; Nasiri, M; Mesbahi, A; Khani, M H

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the adsorption of uranium (VI) ions on the polypyrrole adsorbent. Polypyrrole was synthesized by a chemical method using polyethylene glycol, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the surfactant and iron (III) chloride as an oxidant in the aqueous solution. The effect of various surfactants on the synthesized polymers and their performance as the uranium adsorbent were investigated. Adsorbent properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The effect of different parameters such as pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentrations, adsorbent dose, and the temperature was investigated in the batch system for uranium adsorption process. It has been illustrated that the adsorption equilibrium time is 7min. The results showed that the Freundlich model had the best agreement and the maximum adsorption capacity of polypyrrole for uranium (VI) was determined 87.72mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. In addition, the mentioned adsorption process was fast and the kinetic data were fitted to the Pseudo first and second order models. The adsorption kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) showed that the uranium adsorption process by polypyrrole was endothermic and spontaneous. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. 10 CFR 760.1 - Uranium leases on lands controlled by DOE. (Domestic Uranium Program Circular No. 760.1, formerly...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uranium leases on lands controlled by DOE. (Domestic Uranium Program Circular No. 760.1, formerly (AEC) Domestic Uranium Program Circular 8, 10 CFR 60.8). 760.1 Section 760.1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOMESTIC URANIUM PROGRAM § 760.1 Uranium leases on...

  16. Studies of Uranium Recovery from Tunisian Wet Process Phosphoric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The growing worldwide energy demand associated with several inter related complex environmental as well as economical issues are driving the increase of the share of uranium in energy mix. Subsequently, over the last few years, the interest for uranium extraction and recovery from unconventional resources has gained considerable importance. Phosphate rock has been the most suitable alternative source for the uranium recovery because of its uranium content. Solvent extraction has been found to...

  17. Mitigating Uranium in Ground Water: Prospects and Limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Noubactep, C.; Meinrath, G.; P. Dietrich; Merkel, B.

    2003-01-01

    Removal of uranium(VI) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) has been suggested as a feasible pathway to control uranium contaminations in seepage waters. Available information in literature however presents discrepant evidence on the process responsible for the mitigation effect. On basis of an EH-pH diagram of uranium and iron it is outlined that these discrepancies may be explained by the aqueous chemistry of uranium and iron. Additional effects contributing to the complexity of the sys...

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of uranium and thorium powders and uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Elizabeth J. [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barefield, James E., E-mail: jbarefield@lanl.gov [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Berg, John M. [Manufacturing Engineering and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Clegg, Samuel M.; Havrilla, George J.; Montoya, Velma M.; Le, Loan A.; Lopez, Leon N. [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze depleted uranium and thorium oxide powders and uranium ore as a potential rapid in situ analysis technique in nuclear production facilities, environmental sampling, and in-field forensic applications. Material such as pressed pellets and metals, has been extensively studied using LIBS due to the high density of the material and more stable laser-induced plasma formation. Powders, on the other hand, are difficult to analyze using LIBS since ejection and removal of the powder occur in the laser interaction region. The capability of analyzing powders is important in allowing for rapid analysis of suspicious materials, environmental samples, or trace contamination on surfaces since it most closely represents field samples (soil, small particles, debris etc.). The rapid, in situ analysis of samples, including nuclear materials, also reduces costs in sample collection, transportation, sample preparation, and analysis time. Here we demonstrate the detection of actinides in oxide powders and within a uranium ore sample as both pressed pellets and powders on carbon adhesive discs for spectral comparison. The acquired LIBS spectra for both forms of the samples differ in overall intensity but yield a similar distribution of atomic emission spectral lines. - Highlights: • LIBS analysis of mixed actinide samples: depleted uranium oxide and thorium oxide • LIBS analysis of actinide samples in powder form on carbon adhesive discs • Detection of uranium in a complex matrix (uranium ore) as a precursor to analyzing uranium in environmental samples.

  19. Effect of uranium (VI) on two sulphate-reducing bacteria cultures from a uranium mine site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, DQF, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB-Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, DQF, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-05-15

    This work was conducted to assess the impact of uranium (VI) on sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) communities obtained from environmental samples collected on the Portuguese uranium mining area of Urgeirica. Culture U was obtained from a sediment, while culture W was obtained from sludge from the wetland of that mine. Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) was used to monitor community changes under uranium stress conditions. TGGE profiles of dsrB gene fragment demonstrated that the initial cultures were composed of SRB species affiliated with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Desulfomicrobium spp. (sample U), and by species related to D. desulfuricans (sample W). A drastic change in SRB communities was observed as a result of uranium (VI) exposure. Surprisingly, SRB were not detected in the uranium removal communities. Such findings emphasize the need of monitoring the dominant populations during bio-removal studies. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene fragment revealed that the uranium removal consortia are composed by strains affiliated to Clostridium genus, Caulobacteraceae and Rhodocyclaceae families. Therefore, these communities can be attractive candidates for environmental biotechnological applications associated to uranium removal.

  20. Selective Removal of Uranium from the Washing Solution of Uranium-Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Choi, J. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study examined selective removal methods of uranium from the waste solution by ion exchange resins or solvent extraction methods to reduce amount of the 2{sup nd} waste. Alamine-336, known as an excellent extraction reagent of uranium from the leaching solution of uranium ore, did not remove uranium from the acidic washing solution of soil. Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on ampholyte resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a washing with 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution at 60 .deg. C. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. A great amount of uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil had been generated from the decommissioning of a uranium conversion plant. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods to decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions.

  1. Influence of uranium on bacterial communities: a comparison of natural uranium-rich soils with controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Mondani

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of uranium on the indigenous bacterial community structure in natural soils with high uranium content. Radioactive soil samples exhibiting 0.26% - 25.5% U in mass were analyzed and compared with nearby control soils containing trace uranium. EXAFS and XRD analyses of soils revealed the presence of U(VI and uranium-phosphate mineral phases, identified as sabugalite and meta-autunite. A comparative analysis of bacterial community fingerprints using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE revealed the presence of a complex population in both control and uranium-rich samples. However, bacterial communities inhabiting uraniferous soils exhibited specific fingerprints that were remarkably stable over time, in contrast to populations from nearby control samples. Representatives of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and seven others phyla were detected in DGGE bands specific to uraniferous samples. In particular, sequences related to iron-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Geothrix were identified concomitantly with iron-oxidizing species such as Gallionella and Sideroxydans. All together, our results demonstrate that uranium exerts a permanent high pressure on soil bacterial communities and suggest the existence of a uranium redox cycle mediated by bacteria in the soil.

  2. Continued Multicolumns Bioleaching for Low Grade Uranium Ore at a Certain Uranium Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongxin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioleaching has lots of advantages compared with traditional heap leaching. In industry, bioleaching of uranium is still facing many problems such as site space, high cost of production, and limited industrial facilities. In this paper, a continued column bioleaching system has been established for leaching a certain uranium ore which contains high fluoride. The analysis of chemical composition of ore shows that the grade of uranium is 0.208%, which is lower than that of other deposits. However, the fluoride content (1.8% of weight is greater than that of other deposits. This can be toxic for bacteria growth in bioleaching progress. In our continued multicolumns bioleaching experiment, the uranium recovery (89.5% of 4th column is greater than those of other columns in 120 days, as well as the acid consumption (33.6 g/kg. These results indicate that continued multicolumns bioleaching technology is suitable for leaching this type of ore. The uranium concentration of PLS can be effectively improved, where uranium recovery can be enhanced by the iron exchange system. Furthermore, this continued multicolumns bioleaching system can effectively utilize the remaining acid of PLS, which can reduce the sulfuric acid consumption. The cost of production of uranium can be reduced and this benefits the environment too.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  4. 78 FR 75579 - Low Enriched Uranium From France

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... COMMISSION Low Enriched Uranium From France Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on low enriched uranium from France would be likely to lead to continuation or...), entitled Low Enriched Uranium from France: Investigation No. 731-TA-909 (Second Review). By order of...

  5. 31 CFR 540.308 - Low Enriched Uranium (LEU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). 540.308... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.308 Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). The term low...

  6. 31 CFR 540.306 - Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). 540...) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.306 Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The term...

  7. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  8. 31 CFR 540.318 - Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6). 540.318... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.318 Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6). The term...

  9. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for

  10. Assessment and planning of the electrical systems in Mexican refineries by 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Flores, Luis Ivan; Rodriguez Martinez, Jose Hugo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Dario Taboada; Guillermo; Pano Jimenez, Javier [PEMEX, (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays the refining sector in Mexico needs to increase the quantity and quality of produced fuels by installing new process plants for gasoline and ultra-low sulphur diesel. These plants require the provision of electricity and steam, among other services to function properly, which can be supplied by the power plants currently installed in each refinery through an expansion of their generation capacity. These power plants need to increase its production of electricity and steam at levels above their installed capacity, which involves the addition of new power generating equipment (gas or steam turbo-generators) as well as the raise of the electrical loads. Currently, the Mexican Petroleum Company (PEMEX) is planning to restructure their electrical and steam systems in order to optimally supply the required services for the production of high quality fuels. In this paper the present status of the original electrical power systems of the refineries is assessed and the electrical integration of new process plants in the typical schemes is analyzed. Also this paper shows the conceptual schemes proposed to restructure the electrical power system for two refineries and the strategic planning focused on implement the modifications required for the integration of new process plants that will demand about 20 MW for each refinery by 2014. The results of the analysis allowed to identify the current conditions of the electrical power systems in the oil refining industry or National Refining Industry (NRI), and thereby to offer technical solutions that could be useful to engineers facing similar projects. [Spanish] Hoy en dia, el sector de refinacion en Mexico necesita aumentar la cantidad y calidad de los combustibles producidos, mediante la instalacion de nuevas plantas de proceso para la gasolina y el diesel ultra bajo en azufre. Estas plantas requieren el suministro de electricidad y vapor de agua, entre otros servicios, para que funcione correctamente, los cuales pueden

  11. Application of organic polymeric fiocculants in centrifugal dewatering of oil refinery sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the applicability of the organic polymeric floeculants(OPF) in the treatment of oil refinery sludge, experimentswere conducted to show that OPF have better performance of flocculation than inorganic flocculants. Both the anionic and cationic OPF havesatisfactory flocculation efficiency in oil sludge treatment, but the latter are more cost-efficient. Among the over 20 types of flocculants tested,2OPF(CPAM-2 and HPAM-2) were selected as the treatment agents, based on their good treatment performances, oil-resistance and economicfeasibility. It was demonstrated in the industrial-scale centrifugal dewatering experiments that the application of either CPAM-2 or HPAM-2could achieve high treatment efficiency of the oil sludge dewatering and reduce the COD of centrifugal liquid to less than 1000 mg/L.

  12. Study on Application of Novel Flocculating Agent in Treating Refinery Wastewater with High Concentration of Pollutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Baoji; Qin Bing

    2009-01-01

    After conducting a lot of screening experiments the appropriate flocculating formulations for treating high-con-centration wastewater discharged fi'om a certain refinery were selected. The oil removal rate and COD removal achieved by these flocculating formulations were better than that achieved by the conventional compound formulation consisting of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and polyactylamide (PAA). Addition of an oil/water separating agent to the formulation could improve its oil removal performance to facilitate the oil/water separation of the oil-in-water emulsion in the high-concentra-tion wastewater along with improved adaptability of the formulation to the wastewater containing high concentration of pollutants. This flocculating agent has promising prospects for commercial application.

  13. Treatment of Slightly Polluted Wastewater in an Oil Refinery Using a Biological Aerated Filter Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wenyu; ZHONG Li; CHEN Jianjun

    2007-01-01

    The slightly polluted wastewater from oil refinery contains some COD, oil pollutants and suspended solids (SS). A small-scale fixed film biological aerated filter (BAF) process was used to treat the wastewater. The influences of hydraulic retention time (HRT), air/water volume flow ratio and backwashing cycle on treatment efficiencies were investigated. The wastewater was treated by the BAF process under optimal conditions: the HRT of backwashing cycle of every 4-7 days. The results showed that the average removal efficiency of COD, oil pollutants and SS was 84.5%, 94.0% and 83.4%, respectively. And the average effluent concentration of COD, oil pollutants and SS was 12.5, 0.27, 14.5the BAF process is a suitable and highly efficient method to treat the wastewater.

  14. Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

  15. Reuse and recycling of secondary effluents in refineries employing advanced multi-barrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahnsteiner, J; Mittal, R

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the reclamation and reuse of municipal secondary effluents, as well as the reclamation and recycling of refinery secondary effluents, are technically and economically evaluated. It is shown that both practices are feasible and sustainable, and that the reclamation costs depend largely on specific circumstances such as legal requirements, price policy, reuse application, raw water composition, etc. The reclaimed water is reused, or respectively recycled, as boiler make-up. Therefore both reclamation plants employ advanced multi-barrier systems including ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis. The employed processes have shown excellent performance with regard to the removal of critical parameters such as silica. For example, this parameter was reduced from 13 mg/l in the raw water to 7 μg/l in the boiler make-up.

  16. Production and characterization of rhamnolipid using palm oil agricultural refinery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzuan, Mohd Nazren; Banat, Ibrahim M; Winterburn, James

    2017-02-01

    In this research we assess the feasibility of using palm oil agricultural refinery waste as a carbon source for the production of rhamnolipid biosurfactant through fermentation. The production and characterization of rhamnolipid produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 grown on palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) under batch fermentation were investigated. Results show that P. aeruginosa PAO1 can grow and produce 0.43gL(-1) of rhamnolipid using PFAD as the sole carbon source. Identification of the biosurfactant product using mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of monorhamnolipid and dirhamnolipid. The rhamnolipid produced from PFAD were able to reduce surface tension to 29mNm(-1) with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) 420mgL(-1) and emulsify kerosene and sunflower oil, with an emulsion index up to 30%. Results demonstrate that PFAD could be used as a low-cost substrate for rhamnolipid production, utilizing and transforming it into a value added biosurfactant product.

  17. Integration of RTO and MPC in the Hydrogen Network of a Petrol Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar de Prada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problems associated with the implementation of Real Time Optimization/Model Predictive Control (RTO/MPC systems, taking as reference the hydrogen distribution network of an oil refinery involving eighteen plants. This paper addresses the main problems related to the operation of the network, combining data reconciliation and a RTO system, designed for the optimal generation and redistribution of hydrogen, with a predictive controller for the on-line implementation of the optimal policies. This paper describes the architecture of the implementation, showing how RTO and MPC can be integrated, as well as the benefits obtained in terms of improved information about the process, increased hydrocarbon load to the treatment plants and reduction of the hydrogen required for performing the operations.

  18. Feed Alternatives Evaluation in an Oil Refinery Using a Process Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelys Armengol Gálvez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By processing a medium crude, a refinery can only operate 80 days a year due to the declining of itswells supply. In order to ensure a better improvement of its resources some feed alternatives areproposed. That depends of the availability in others country regions of raw material that demandsdilutions because of their heavier and viscosity. Taking advantage of geographic location and demands,asphalt can be obtained and also a wide cut with use in oilfields to reduce viscosity. That is why couldbe attractive to evaluate the possibilities of using the simulation model previously obtained withprofessional simulator HYSYS (version 2.2, complementing the information in order to validate resultsin a test with one of the alternatives proposed (heavy diluted crude with solvents of habitual crudeconfirming the convenience of the chosen option, associated with profitable gains.

  19. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO

  20. Monitoring of Emissions From a Refinery Tank Farm Using a Combination of Optical Remote Sensing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, A.; Tisopulos, L.; Pikelnaya, O.; Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Marianne, E.; Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Finlayson, A.; Hashmonay, R.

    2016-12-01

    Despite great advances in reducing air pollution, the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) still faces challenges to attain federal health standards for air quality. Refineries are large sources of ozone precursors and, hence contribute to the air quality problems of the region. Additionally, petrochemical facilities are also sources of other hazardous air pollutants (HAP) that adversely affect human health, for example aromatic hydrocarbons. In order to assure safe operation, decrease air pollution and minimize population exposure to HAP the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) has a number of regulations for petrochemical facilities. However, significant uncertainties still exist in emission estimates and traditional monitoring techniques often do not allow for real-time emission monitoring. In the fall of 2015 the SCAQMD, Fluxsense Inc., the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and Atmosfir Optics Ltd. conducted a measurement study to characterize and quantify gaseous emissions from the tank farm of one of the largest oil refineries in the SCAB. Fluxsense used a vehicle equipped with Solar Occultation Flux (SOF), Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), and Extractive Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy instruments. Concurrently, NPL operated their Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system. Both research groups quantified emissions from the entire tank farm and identified fugitive emission sources within the farm. At the same time, Atmosfir operated an Open Path FTIR (OP-FTIR) spectrometer along the fenceline of the tank farm. During this presentation we will discuss the results of the emission measurements from the tank farm of the petrochemical facility. Emission rates resulting from measurements by different ORS methods will be compared and discussed in detail.

  1. Isolation and screening of native polyhydroxyalkanoate producing bacteria from oil contaminated soils of Abadan refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein MOtamedi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Environmental contaminations due to petrochemical plastic usage have forced researchers to search new biological methods for biodegradable polymer production. The aim of this study was to find native PHA producing bacteria from Abadan oil refinery in order to be used in biodegradable polymer production studies.   Materials and method s : For this purpose soil samples were harvested from oil sludge contaminated soil of Abadan refinery. After primary enrichment, screening of PHA producing bacteria was done by PHA- Detection agar and was confirmed by Sudan black and Nile Blue A staining methods. These isolates were identified based on phenotypic methods and sequencing of 16s rRNA. Polymer extraction was performed and optimized using different concentrations of HClO and SDS.   Results : As a result of this study 26 different bacterial isolates were obtained from which 17 isolates were PHA producer with different potentiality. Based on the polymer accumulation 4 isolates were selected for further studies. The efficiency of PHA production in these isolates was 75.53±5.08, 82±19.05, 81.06±6.92 and 79.86±11.84%. Based on sequence analysis in NCBI database, these isolates were identified as Bacillus cereus.   Discussion and conclusion : With respect to the results of this study it can be suggested that oil contaminated soils due to high C/N and C/P ratios and also different carbohydrate contents are suitable candidates for PHA producer bacteria isolation. So the native strains in such habitats with high carbon content can be optimized for industrial polymer production.

  2. Evaluation the Amount of Emission and Sulfur Dioxide Emission Factor from Tehran Oil Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavoshi B.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bachgrounds and Objectives: Oil, gas and petrochemical are known as important sources of air pollutants and emission of green house gases. About 99 percent of sulfur dioxide in the air is produced from human resources. Although several samples have been taken from industries and refineries' output by environmental experts and private companies, but accurate assessment is not available based on pollutant emissions on product levels (emission coefficients and on the total amount of the annual emission which, can be used as basic modeling of air pollution and planning.Materials and Methods: This study was cross sectional and the output of the chimney measured with Testo 350 XL system. Performance standard was determined based on ASTM D6522 EPACTMO30-41. The amounts of sulfur dioxide were measured from Tehran oil refinery's outlet from the beginning of the march 2007 till the year 2008 for 20 months. Sampling was carried out on averaged range (9 am to 14 pm.Results: The results showed that Northern Distillation unit produced pollutants' concentration more than 3 times in the southern Distillation unit. An emission of pollutants from Northern unit was, 2.8 times higher than the Southern unit. The northern emission factor was 5.6 times higher than the value obtained from southern unit. The Concentration, emissions and coefficient of sulfur dioxide in North catalyst convert unit were more than 2 times in comparison with the same South unit. These three factors in northern concentration breakers unit were 3, 2.6 and 2.6 times higher than the Southern concentration breakers unit‚ respectively.Discussion: Emission rate in all northern units is 2 to 3 times more than similar southern units. The production volumes in northern units are higher than the southern units and the southern units designed properly to remove more pollutants .The use of new technologies in production processes and application of the latest scientific resources can play a major role

  3. Identification of genes and pathways related to phenol degradation in metagenomic libraries from petroleum refinery wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C Silva

    Full Text Available Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system.

  4. Potential tsunami impact on a refinery in North-Eastern Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, A. M.; Franchello, G.; Krausmann, E.

    2009-04-01

    Industrial facilities located in coastal areas subject to tsunami hazards may be at risk of tsunami impact and damage. Furthermore, if hazardous materials are present these can be accidentally released impacting nearby residents and dispersing into the environment. We have analysed the potential impact of two tsunami scenarios originating in the Tyrrhenian Sea and their consequences at an industrial facility located on the coast in North-Eastern Sicily. The results of the tsunami simulations indicate that in both scenarios there would be between 30-45 storage tanks at the industrial facility (potentially exposing up to 1.4 million m3 of chemicals) subject to flooding, with tanks closer to the beach suffering up to 1.6 m inundation. Flow velocities in most areas are less than 1 m/s. This indicates that any damage would occur due to hydrostatic uplift forces due to buoyancy particularly in the western part of the facility where inundation levels are higher and storage tanks are less protected. Damage to the facility due to impact of floating debris may be a problem at the eastern most tip of the refinery where the distance between the waterline and the refinery fence line is less than 20 m. Foundation soils and foundation systems could also be at risk from shear- and liquefaction-induced scour in this section of the plant. The likelihood for hazardous materials releases from inundated storage tanks is low but could occur due to breakage of connected pipelines and flanges due to floating off of storage tanks and other connected appurtenances. Flooding of electrical equipment such as control panels, pumps and motors, not raised above the inundation level could suffer water intrusion.

  5. Opportunities and challenges at the interface between petrochemicals and refinery. The OMV view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtscheidl, J. [OMV Refining and Marketing GmbH, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    OMV's refineries have been integrated into petrochemicals since the first steam cracker came on line in 1970. The refineries in Schwechat, Burghausen and Romania, especially Arpechim, have significant petrochemical capacities. In 1998 PCD was merged with Borealis, a leading producer of high grade polymers. OMV's initial 25% stake in Borealis increased to 36 in 2007. The last years have seen major investments in Schwechat and Burghausen: Schwechat's cracker was expanded by approximately 150 KTA to a nominal 500 KTA of ethylene. And in Burghausen the revamp of the cracker has been combined with a metathesis unit in order to feed a new 330 KTA polypropylene plant. The polymer market is still growing. However, the bulk of investments to increase capacity are located in the Middle East and in the Asia-Pacific region, predominately in China. As more and more products from these regions find their way to Europe, the European petrochemicals industry faces fierce competition. The response is restructuring: the creation of Arkema (Total), the takeover of BP's petrochemical assets by INEOS, the disposal of Shell-BASF subsidiary Basell to Haldia Petrochemical and Accent Industries, and the transfer of Statoil's interest in Borealis to IPIC and OMV. And most recently, Basell's acquisition of Lyondell. Compared with competitors in the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region, producers in Europe are burdened with serious disadvantages: fairly old, small units and high costs of labor, energy and raw materials. There is no single solution. OMV, however, will continue to follow the strategies that have been successful so far: - Ever closer integration of refining and petrochemicals; - Capturing market opportunities for profitable growth; -Remaining market orientated. (orig.)

  6. Identification of genes and pathways related to phenol degradation in metagenomic libraries from petroleum refinery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cynthia C; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; De Paula, Sérgio O; Silva, Lívia C F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Vicentini, Renato; Sousa, Maíra P; Torres, Ana Paula R; Santiago, Vânia M J; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2013-01-01

    Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system.

  7. Oil refinery wastewater treatment using coupled electrocoagulation and fixed film biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Laura S.; Rodriguez, Oscar M.; Reyna, Silvia; Sánchez-Salas, José Luis; Lozada, J. Daniel; Quiroz, Marco A.; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    Oil refinery wastewater was treated using a coupled treatment process including electrocoagulation (EC) and a fixed film aerobic bioreactor. Different variables were tested to identify the best conditions using this procedure. After EC, the effluent was treated in an aerobic biofilter. EC was capable to remove over 88% of the overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the wastewater under the best working conditions (6.5 V, 0.1 M NaCl, 4 electrodes without initial pH adjustment) with total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal slightly higher than 80%. Aluminum release from the electrodes to the wastewater was found an important factor for the EC efficiency and closely related with several operational factors. Application of EC allowed to increase the biodegradability of the sample from 0.015, rated as non-biodegradable, up to 0.5 widely considered as biodegradable. The effluent was further treated using an aerobic biofilter inoculated with a bacterial consortium including gram positive and gram negative strains and tested for COD and TPH removal from the EC treated effluent during 30 days. Cell count showed the typical bacteria growth starting at day three and increasing up to a maximum after eight days. After day eight, cell growth showed a plateau which agreed with the highest decrease on contaminant concentration. Final TPHs concentration was found about 600 mgL-1 after 30 days whereas COD concentration after biological treatment was as low as 933 mgL-1. The coupled EC-aerobic biofilter was capable to remove up to 98% of the total TPH amount and over 95% of the COD load in the oil refinery wastewater.

  8. Bioconversion of biodiesel refinery waste in the bioemulsifier by Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans CLA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Monteiro Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microbial bioemulsifiers was surface active compounds, are more effective in stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions. The yeasts have been isolated to produce bioemulsifiers from vegetable oils and industrial wastes. Results Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans CLA2 is bioemulsifier-producing yeast strain isolated from effluents of the dairy industry, with ability to emulsify different hydrophobic substrates. Bioemulsifier production (mg/L and the emulsifying activity (E24 of this strain were optimized by response surface methodology using mineral minimal medium containing refinery waste as the carbon source, which consisted of diatomaceous earth impregnated with esters from filters used in biodiesel purification. The highest bioemulsifier production occurred in mineral minimal medium containing 75 g/L biodiesel residue and 5 g/L ammonium sulfate. The highest emulsifying activity was obtained in medium containing 58 g/L biodiesel refinery residue and 4.6 g/L ammonium sulfate, and under these conditions, the model estimated an emulsifying activity of 85%. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis suggested a bioemulsifier molecule consisting of monosaccharides, predominantly xylose and mannose, and a long chain aliphatic groups composed of octadecanoic acid and hexadecanoic acid at concentrations of 48.01% and 43.16%, respectively. The carbohydrate composition as determined by GC-MS of their alditol acetate derivatives showed a larger ratio of xylose (49.27%, mannose (39.91%, and glucose (10.81%. 1 H NMR spectra confirmed by COSY suggested high molecular weight, polymeric pattern, presence of monosaccharide’s and long chain aliphatic groups in the bioemulsifier molecule. Conclusions The biodiesel residue is an economical substrate, therefore seems to be very promising for the low-cost production of active emulsifiers in the emulsification of aromatics, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and kerosene.

  9. Application of Response Surface Methodology to Enhance Phenol Removal from Refinery Wastewater by Microwave Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif A. Younis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenol contaminated petroleum refinery wastewater presents a great threat on water resources safety. This study investigates the effect of microwave irradiation on removal of different concentrations of phenol in an attempt for petroleum refinery wastewater treatment. The obtained results show that the MW output power and irradiation time have a significant positive effect on the removal efficiency of phenol. The kinetic reaction is significantly affected by initial MW output power and initial phenol concentrations. Response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize and study the interaction effects of process parameters: MW output power, irradiation time, salinity, pH, and H2O2 concentration using central composite design (CCD. From the CCD design matrix, a quadratic model was considered as an ultimate model (R2 = 0.75 and its adequacy was justified through analysis of variance (ANOVA. The overall reaction rates were significantly enhanced in the combined MW/H2O2 system as proved by RSM. The optimum values for the design parameters of the MW/H2O2 process were evaluated giving predicted phenol removal percentage of 72.90% through RSM by differential approximation and were confirmed by experimental phenol removal of 75.70% in a batch experiment at optimum conditions of 439 W MW power, irradiation time of 24.22 min, salinity of 574 mg/L, pH 5.10, and initial H2O2 concentration of 10% (v/v.

  10. Bio-Refineries Bioprocess Technologies for Waste-Water Treatment, Energy and Product Valorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Cowan, A.

    2010-04-01

    Increasing pressure is being exerted on communities and nations to source energy from forms other than fossil fuels. Also, potable water is becoming a scarce resource in many parts of the world, and there remains a large divide in the demand and utilization of plant products derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and non-GMOs. The most extensive user and manager of terrestrial ecosystems is agriculture which is also the de facto steward of natural resources. As stated by Miller (2008) no other industry or institution comes close to the comparative advantage held for this vital responsibility while simultaneously providing food, fiber, and other biology-based products, including energy. Since modern commercial agriculture is transitioning from the production of bulk commodities to the provision of standardized products and specific-attribute raw materials for differentiated markets, we can argue that processes such as mass cultivation of microalgae and the concept of bio-refineries be seen as part of a `new' agronomy. EBRU is currently exploring the integration of bioprocess technologies using microalgae as biocatalysts to achieve waste-water treatment, water polishing and endocrine disruptor (EDC) removal, sustainable energy production, and exploitation of the resultant biomass in agriculture as foliar fertilizer and seed coatings, and for commercial extraction of bulk commodities such as bio-oils and lecithin. This presentation will address efforts to establish a fully operational solar-driven microalgae bio-refinery for use not only in waste remediation but to transform waste and biomass to energy, fuels, and other useful materials (valorisation), with particular focus on environmental quality and sustainability goals.

  11. Manufacture Of Pozzolanic Cement From RFCC Spent Catalyst In Khartoum Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam E Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pozzolana is defined as Siliceous and aluminous material which reacts with calcium hydroxide in presence of water at room temperature to form strong slow-hardening cement. Pozzolana has the advantage of reduction of leachibility of calcium hydroxide liberated during the setting and hydration of cement. In Khartoum Refinery five to ten tons per week of spent catalyst are produced in fine powder this quantity is sent to dumping sites or landfills. In this study pilot experiments were successfully carried out at different ratios to produce cement. The RFCC spent catalyst samples were subjected to chemical analysis to determine the content of Al2O3 SiO3TiO3 CaO and V2O5 ..etc. These were found to be 49.5 41.1 0.32 1.4 and 0.09 percent respectively other compounds are Na2O MgO P2O5SO3 K2O MnOFe2O3Co3O4 and NiO2 with. It is found that the percentages of SiO2 Al2O3 and Fe2O3 amount up to 91.5 that is above the ASTM standard C6182003 which stipulated that the minimum of such compound is 70 . Physical properties of RFCC spent catalyst were also carried out including crystallinity and Pozzolanicity index. The cement produced was tested for compressive strength consistency and setting time .It is concluded that RFCC spent catalyst in Khartoum Refinery is a Pozzolanic material and up to 30 replacement from Portland cement blended cement complies with the Sudanese and European Standards No SSMO 39982011and EN-197-11992 respectively. The study shows that the compressive strength of blended Pozzolanic cements decreases with increasing Pozzolana content. From the foregoing it is recommended to use RFCC spent catalyst with Portland cement as blended cement to produce mortars for construction and concrete.

  12. Thermal properties of nonstoichiometry uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazauri, R.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Tenishev, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, was developed a method of oxidation pure uranium dioxide to a predetermined deviation from the stoichiometry. Oxidation was carried out using the thermogravimetric method on NETZSCH STA 409 CD with a solid electrolyte galvanic cell for controlling the oxygen potential of the environment. 4 samples uranium oxide were obtained with a different ratio of oxygen-to-metal: O / U = 2.002, O / U = 2.005, O / U = 2.015, O / U = 2.033. For the obtained samples were determined basic thermal characteristics of the heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity. The error of heat capacity determination is equal to 5%. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the samples decreased with increasing deviation from stoichiometry. For the sample with O / M = 2.033, difference of both values with those of stoichiometric uranium dioxide is close to 50%.

  13. Fission Enhanced diffusion of uranium in zirconia

    CERN Document Server

    Bérerd, N; Moncoffre, N; Sainsot, P; Faust, H; Catalette, H

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison between thermal and Fission Enhanced Diffusion (FED) of uranium into zirconia, representative of the inner face of cladding tubes. The experiments under irradiation are performed at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble using the Lohengrin spectrometer. A thin $^{235}UO\\_2$ layer in direct contact with an oxidized zirconium foil is irradiated in the ILL high flux reactor. The fission product flux is about 10$^{11}$ ions cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and the target temperature is measured by an IR pyrometer. A model is proposed to deduce an apparent uranium diffusion coefficient in zirconia from the energy distribution broadening of two selected fission products. It is found to be equal to 10$^{-15}$ cm$^2$ s$^{-1}$ at 480$\\circ$C and compared to uranium thermal diffusion data in ZrO$\\_2$ in the same pressure and temperature conditions. The FED results are analysed in comparison with literature data.

  14. Depleted Uranium Penetrators : Hazards and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Rao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The depleted uranium (DU alloy is a state-of-the-art material for kinetic energy penetrators due to its superior ballistic performance. Several countries use DU penetrators in their main battle tanks. There is no gamma radiation hazard to the crew members from stowage of DO rounds. Open air firing can result in environmental contamination and associated hazards due to airborne particles containing essentially U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ and UO/sub 2/. Inhalation of polluted air only through respirators or nose masks and refraining form ingestion of water or food materials from contaminated environment are safety measures for avoiding exposure to uranium and its toxicity. Infusion of sodium bicarbonate helps in urinary excretion of uranium that may have entered the body.

  15. Monitoring genotoxic exposure in uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sram, R.J.; Vesela, D.; Vesely, D. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    Recent data from deep uranium mines in Czechoslovakia indicated that miners are exposed to other mutagenic factors in addition to radon daughter products. Mycotoxins were identified as a possible source of mutagens in these mines. Mycotoxins were examined in 38 samples from mines and in throat swabs taken from 116 miners and 78 controls. The following mycotoxins were identified from mines samples: aflatoxins B{sub 1} and G1, citrinin, citreoviridin, mycophenolic acid, and sterigmatocystin. Some mold strains isolated from mines and throat swabs were investigated for mutagenic activity by the SOS chromotest and Salmonella assay with strains TA100 and TA98. Mutagenicity was observed, especially with metabolic activation in citro. These data suggest that mycotoxins produced by molds in uranium mines are a new genotoxic factor im uranium miners. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Statistical data of the uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    The ''Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry'' is a compilation of historical facts and figures through 1976. These statistics are based primarily on information provided voluntarily by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. This publication is compiled and revised annually by the Grand Junction Office. The production and ore reserve information has been compiled in a manner which avoids disclosure of proprietary information. Due to increased interest in higher-cost and lower-grade resources, four new categories of information are provided: (1) an estimate of the $50 per pound or less reserves and potential resources (p. 21-22, 26, 43), (2) preproduction and postproduction uranium mineral inventories (p. 34-39), (3) size-depth-thickness and size-grade matrices (p. 64-70), and (4) average U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ prices for delivery commitments (p. 97-98).

  17. Contribution of Uranium-Bearing Evaporites to Plume Persistence Issues at a Former Uranium Mill Site Riverton, Wyoming, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Raymond [Navarro Research and Engineering; Dam, William [U.S. Department of Energy, Legacy Management; Campbell, Sam [Navarro Research and Engineering; Campbell, James [U.S. Geological Survey; Morris, Sarah [Navarro Research and Engineering; Tigar, Aaron [Navarrao Research and Engineering

    2016-08-01

    • Evaporites occur in an unsaturated silt layer, which is underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer. • These evaporites are rich in chloride across the site. • Uranium concentrations are higher in the evaporites that overlie the uranium contaminant plume. • Flooding can solubilize the evaporites in the silt layer and release chloride, sulfate (not shown), and uranium into the underlyingsand and gravel aquifer. • The uranium-rich evaporites can delay natural flushing, creating plume persistence near the Little Wind River.

  18. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to

  19. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to

  20. The Nopal 1 Uranium Deposit: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas, G.; Allard, T.; Galoisy, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Nopal 1 natural analogue is located in the Pena Blanca uranium district, about 50 kms north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit is hosted in tertiary ignimbritic ash-flow tuffs, dated at 44 Ma (Nopal and Colorados formations), and overlying the Pozos conglomerate formation and a sequence of Cretaceous carbonate rocks. The deposit is exposed at the ground surface and consists of a near vertical zone extending over about 100 m with a diameter of 40 m. An interesting characteristic is that the primary mineralization has been exposed above the water table, as a result of the uplift of the Sierra Pena Blanca, and subsequently oxidized with a remobilization of hexavalent uranium. The primary mineralization has been explained by various genetic models. It is associated to an extensive hydrothermal alteration of the volcanic tuffs, locally associated to pyrite and preserved by an intense silicification. Several kaolinite parageneses occur in fissure fillings and feldspar pseudomorphs, within the mineralized breccia pipe and the barren surrounding rhyolitic tuffs. Smectites are mainly developed in the underlying weakly welded tuffs. Several radiation-induced defect centers have been found in these kaolinites providing a unique picture of the dynamics of uranium mobilization (see Allard et al., this session). Another evidence of this mobilization is given by the spectroscopy of uranium-bearing opals, which show characteristic fluorescence spectra of uranyl groups sorbed at the surface of silica. By comparison with the other uranium deposits of the Sierra Pena Blanca and the nearby Sierra de Gomez, the Nopal 1 deposit is original, as it is one of the few deposits hving retained a reduced uranium mineralization.