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Sample records for lignin peroxidase activity

  1. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuta Miki; Rebecca Pogni; Sandra Acebes; Fatima Lucas; Elena Fernandez-Fueyo; Maria Camilla Baratto; Maria I. Fernandez; Vivian De Los Rios; Francisco J. Ruiz-duenas; Adalgisa Sinicropi; Riccardo Basosi; Kenneth E. Hammel; Victor Guallar; Angel T. Martinez

    2013-01-01

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2...

  2. Induction of Laccase, Lignin Peroxidase and Manganese Peroxidase Activities in White-Rot Fungi Using Copper Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vrsanska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic enzymes, such as laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase, are biotechnologically-important enzymes. The ability of five white-rot fungal strains Daedaleopsis confragosa, Fomes fomentarius, Trametes gibbosa, Trametes suaveolens and Trametes versicolor to produce these enzymes has been studied. Three different copper(II complexes have been prepared ((Him[Cu(im4(H2O2](btc·3H2O, where im = imidazole, H3btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, [Cu3(pmdien3(btc](ClO43·6H2O and [Cu3(mdpta3(btc](ClO43·4H2O, where pmdien = N,N,N′,N′′,N′′-pentamethyl-diethylenetriamine and mdpta = N,N-bis-(3-aminopropylmethyl- amine, and their potential application for laccase and peroxidases induction have been tested. The enzyme-inducing activities of the complexes were compared with that of copper sulfate, and it has been found that all of the complexes are suitable for the induction of laccase and peroxidase activities in white-rot fungi; however, the newly-synthesized complex M1 showed the greatest potential for the induction. With respect to the different copper inducers, this parameter seems to be important for enzyme activity, which depends also on the fungal strains.

  3. Structure of Thermobifida fusca DyP-type peroxidase and activity towards Kraft lignin and lignin model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanpour, Rahman; Rea, Dean; Jamshidi, Shirin; Fülöp, Vilmos; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2016-03-15

    A Dyp-type peroxidase enzyme from thermophilic cellulose degrader Thermobifida fusca (TfuDyP) was investigated for catalytic ability towards lignin oxidation. TfuDyP was characterised kinetically against a range of phenolic substrates, and a compound I reaction intermediate was observed via pre-steady state kinetic analysis at λmax 404 nm. TfuDyP showed reactivity towards Kraft lignin, and was found to oxidise a β-aryl ether lignin model compound, forming an oxidised dimer. A crystal structure of TfuDyP was determined, to 1.8 Å resolution, which was found to contain a diatomic oxygen ligand bound to the heme centre, positioned close to active site residues Asp-203 and Arg-315. The structure contains two channels providing access to the heme cofactor for organic substrates and hydrogen peroxide. Site-directed mutant D203A showed no activity towards phenolic substrates, but reduced activity towards ABTS, while mutant R315Q showed no activity towards phenolic substrates, nor ABTS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. EVALUATION OF ENDOGLUCANASE, EXOGLUCANASE, LACCASE, AND LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ACTIVITIES ON TEN WHITE-ROT FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Montoya B

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a way of tracking the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in ten species of white rot fungi: Lentinula edodes, Schizophyllum commune, Trametes trogii, Coriolus versicolor, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa, Pleurotus ostreatus and Auricularia delicata. These species were first screened on solid culture media containing carboxymethyl cellulose, crystalline cellulose, ABTS (2,2´-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate and azure B, which showed the production of endoglucanase, exoglucanase, laccase and lignin peroxidase (LiP enzymes. Cellulolytic activities were detected after five days of incubation with congo red indicator, forming a clear-white halo in areas where cellulose was degraded. For ligninases, the tracking consisted of the monitoring in the formation of green halos due to ABTS oxidation for laccase, and decolorization halos on azure B for LiP during 14 days of incubation. From this qualitative screening, four strains were selected (G. lucidum, L. edodes, C. versicolor and T. trogii as the best producers of cellulolytic and ligninolytic enzymes. These four species were inoculated on a substrate of sawdust oak, yielding 51,8% of lignin degraded by L. edodes and 22% of cellulose degraded by C. versicolor.

  5. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew T; Doyle, Wendy A; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-09-22

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of g(x) = 2.0035(5), g(y) = 2.0027(5), and g(z) = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179(*)] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171(*), for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site.

  6. Calcium carbonate mediates higher lignin peroxidase activity in the culture supernatant of Streptomyces Viridosporus T7A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. B. MACEDO

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Lignin peroxidase (LiP production has been extensively studied due to the potential use of this enzyme in environmental pollution control. Important aspects of the production of the enzyme by S. viridosporus T7A which have been studied include the improvement of yield and enzyme stabilization. In experiments performed in agitated flasks containing culture media composed of yeast extract as the source of nitrogen, mineral salts and different carbon sources, the use of glucose resulted in the highest values for LiP activity (350 U/L, specific LiP activity (450 U/g and productivity (7 U/L/h. As the profile obtained with glucose-containing medium suggested enzyme instability, the effect of calcium carbonate was evaluated. The addition of CaCO3 in two different concentrations, 0.5% and 5.0%, resulted in higher values of maximum LiP activity, 600 and 900 U/L, respectively. The presence of this salt also anticipated enzyme activity peaks and allowed the detection of higher enzyme activities in the extracellular medium for longer periods of time. These results indicate a positive effect of calcium carbonate on LiP production, which is extremely relevant for industrial processes.

  7. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  8. Production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum using solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objectives of this study were to optimize the culture conditions for the production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum, economic utilization of waste corn cobs as inducers substrate by pollution free fermentation technology and to optimize the solid state fermentation (SSF) process for lignin peroxidase ...

  9. Lignin-degrading enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ru; Sarkanen, Simo; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the activities of four kinds of enzyme have been purported to furnish the mechanistic foundations for macromolecular lignin depolymerization in decaying plant cell walls. The pertinent fungal enzymes comprise lignin peroxidase (with a relatively high redox potential), manganese peroxidase, an alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase. The peroxidases and laccase, but not the etherase, are expressed extracellularly by white-rot fungi. A number of these microorganisms exhibit a marked preference toward lignin in their degradation of lignocellulose. Interestingly, some white-rot fungi secrete both kinds of peroxidase but no laccase, while others that are equally effective express extracellular laccase activity but no peroxidases. Actually, none of these enzymes has been reported to possess significant depolymerase activity toward macromolecular lignin substrates that are derived with little chemical modification from the native biopolymer. Here, the assays commonly employed for monitoring the traditional fungal peroxidases, alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase are described in their respective contexts. A soluble native polymeric substrate that can be isolated directly from a conventional milled-wood lignin preparation is characterized in relation to its utility in next-generation lignin-depolymerase assays.

  10. Purification and characterization of lignin peroxidases from Penicillium decumbens P6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S.; Yuan, H.L.; Wang, H.X.; Chen, W.X. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China). College of Biological Science

    2005-06-01

    Peroxidases are essential enzymes in biodegradation of lignin and lignite which have been investigated intensively in the white-rot fungi. This is the first report of purification and characterization of lignin peroxidase from Penicillium sp. P6 as lignite degradation fungus. The results indicated that the lignin peroxidase of Penicillium decumbens P6 had physical and chemical properties and a N-terminal amino acid sequence different from the lignin peroxidases of white-rot fungi. The lignin peroxidase was isolated from a liquid culture of P. decumbens P6. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 46.3 KDa in SDS-PAGE and exhibited greater activity, temperature stability and wider pH range than those previously reported. The isolation procedure involved (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, and non-denaturing, discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of this enzyme using veratryl alcohol as substrate were 0.565 mmol L{sup -1} and 0.088 mmol (mg protein){sup -1} min{sup -1} respectively. The optimum pH of P6 lignin peroxidase was 4.0, and 70.6% of the relative activity was remained at pH 9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 45{sup o}C.

  11. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Mn(II) regulation of lignin peroxidases and manganese-dependent peroxidases from lignin-degrading white rot fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnarme, P.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two families of peroxidases-lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (MnP)-are formed by the lignin-degrading white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium and other white rot fungi. Isoenzymes of these enzyme families carry out reactions important to the biodegradation of lignin. This research investigated the regulation of LiP and MnP production by Mn(II). In liquid culture, LiP titers varied as an inverse function of and MnP titers varied as a direct function of the Mn(II) concentration. The extracellular isoenzyme profiles differed radically at low and high Mn(II) levels, whereas other fermentation parameters, including extracellular protein concentrations, the glucose consumption rate, and the accumulation of cell dry weight, did not change significantly with the Mn(II) concentration. In the absence of Mn(II), extracellular LiP isoenzymes predominated, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), MnP isoenzymes were dominant. The release of 14 CO 2 from 14 C-labeled dehydrogenative polymerizate lignin was likewise affected by Mn(II). The rate of 14 CO 2 release increased at low Mn(II) and decreased at high Mn(II) concentrations. This regulatory effect of Mn(II) occurred with five strains of P. chrysosporium, two other species of Phanerochaete, three species of Phlebia, Lentinula edodes, and Phellinus pini

  13. Lignin peroxidase isoenzyme: a novel approach to biodegrade the toxic synthetic polymer waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Nazia; Jamal, Asif; Ali, Muhammad Ishtiaq

    2018-01-05

    Fungal metabolites are playing an immense role in developing various sustainable waste treatment processes. The present study aimed at production and characterization of fungal lignin peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.14) with a potential to degrade Polyvinyl Chloride. Optimization studies revealed that the maximum enzyme production occurred at a temperature 25°C, pH 5 in the 4th week of the incubation period with fungal strain. Enzyme assay was performed to find out the dominating enzyme in the culture broth. The molecular weight of the enzyme was found to be 46 kDa. Partially purified lignin peroxidase from Phanerocheate chrysosporium was used for the degradation of PVC films. A significant reduction in the weight of PVC film was observed (31%) in shake flask experiment. FTIR spectra of the enzyme-treated plastic film revealed structural changes in the chemical composition, indicating a specific peak at 2943 cm -1 that corresponded to alkenyl C-H stretch. Moreover, deterioration on the surface of PVC films was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy tracked through activity assay for the lignin peroxidase. Extracellular lignin peroxidases from P. chrysosporium play a significant role in the degradation of complex polymeric compounds like PVC.

  14. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Ligninolytic enzymes of the fungus Irpex lacteus (Polyporus tulipiferae): isolation and characterization of lignin peroxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rothschild, N.; Novotný, Čeněk; Šašek, Václav; Dosoretz, C. G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 31, - (2002), s. 627-633 ISSN 0141-0229 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lignin * peroxidase * heme peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.773, year: 2002

  16. Optimization of lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and Lac production from Ganoderma lucidum under solid state fermentation of pineapple leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Hariharan; Padma Nambisan

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to isolate ligninase-producing white-rot fungi for use in the extraction of fibre from pineapple leaf agriwaste. Fifteen fungal strains were isolated from dead tree trunks and leaf litter. Ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), and laccase (Lac)), were produced by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using pineapple leaves as the substrate. Of the isolated strains, the one showing maximum production of ligninolytic enzymes was identified...

  17. Degradation of textile dyes using immobilized lignin peroxidase-like metalloporphines under mild experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucca Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic dyes represent a broad and heterogeneous class of durable pollutants, that are released in large amounts by the textile industry. The ability of two immobilized metalloporphines (structurally emulating the ligninolytic peroxidases to bleach six chosen dyes (alizarin red S, phenosafranine, xylenol orange, methylene blue, methyl green, and methyl orange was compared to enzymatic catalysts. To achieve a green and sustainable process, very mild conditions were chosen. Results IPS/MnTSPP was the most promising biomimetic catalyst as it was able to effectively and quickly bleach all tested dyes. Biomimetic catalysis was fully characterized: maximum activity was centered at neutral pH, in the absence of any organic solvent, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The immobilized metalloporphine kept a large part of its activity during multi-cycle use; however, well-known redox mediators were not able to increase its catalytic activity. IPS/MnTSPP was also more promising for use in industrial applications than its enzymatic counterparts (lignin peroxidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase. Conclusions On the whole, the conditions were very mild (standard pressure, room temperature and neutral pH, using no organic solvents, and the most environmental-friendly oxidant and a significant bleaching and partial mineralization of the dyes was achieved in approximately 1 h. Therefore, the process was consistent with large-scale applications. The biomimetic catalyst also had more promising features than the enzymatic catalysts.

  18. Methylene blue as a lignin surrogate in manganese peroxidase reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goby, Jeffrey D; Penner, Michael H; Lajoie, Curtis A; Kelly, Christine J

    2017-11-15

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) is associated with lignin degradation and is thus relevant to lignocellulosic-utilization technologies. Technological applications require reaction mixture optimization. A surrogate substrate can facilitate this if its susceptibility to degradation is easily monitored and mirrors that of lignin. The dye methylene blue (MB) was evaluated in these respects as a surrogate substrate by testing its reactivity in reaction mixtures containing relevant redox mediators (dicarboxylic acids, fatty acids). Relative rates of MB degradation were compared to available literature reports of lignin degradation under similar conditions, and suggest that MB can be a useful lignin surrogate in MnP systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer: A TRANSIENT-STATE KINETICS, DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS, EPR, AND NMR STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-09-18

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn(2+), and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. A Biocatalytic One-Pot Approach for the Preparation of Lignin Oligomers Using an Oxidase/Peroxidase Cascade Enzyme System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, Mohamed H. M.; Deuss, Peter J.; Loncar, Nikola; Trajkovic, Milos; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic lignin was prepared biocatalytically in a one-pot, two-step reaction using an oxidase/peroxidase cascade enzyme system. Using eugenol in combination with eugenol oxidase and a peroxidase, lignin-like material was produced. The cascade reaction takes advantage of the ability of the oxidase

  1. A novel and efficient oxidative functionalization of lignin by layer-by-layer immobilised Horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzini, Raffaella; Saladino, Raffaele; Guazzaroni, Melissa; Crestini, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was chemically immobilised onto alumina particles and coated by polyelectrolytes layers, using the layer-by-layer technique. The reactivity of the immobilised enzyme was studied in the oxidative functionalisation of softwood milled wood and residual kraft lignins and found higher than the free enzyme. In order to investigate the chemical modifications in the lignin structure, quantitative (31)P NMR was used. The immobilised HRP showed a higher reactivity with respect to the native enzyme yielding extensive depolymerisation of lignin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzymatic extract containing lignin peroxidase immobilized on carbon nanotubes: Potential biocatalyst in dye decolourization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sabrina Feliciano; da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Correa Junior, Ary

    2018-05-01

    The majority of the textile dyes are harmful to the environment and potentially carcinogenic. Among strategies for their exclusion, the treatment of dye contaminated wastewater with fungal extract, containing lignin peroxidase (LiP), may be useful. Two fungi isolates, Pleurotus ostreatus (PLO9) and Ganoderma lucidum (GRM117), produced the enzymatic extract by fermentation in the lignocellulosic residue, Jatropha curcas seed cake. The extracts from PLO9 and GRM117 were immobilized on carbon nanotubes and showed an increase of 18 and 27-fold of LiP specific activity compared to the free enzyme. Also, LiP from both fungi extracts showed higher Vmax and lower Km values. Only the immobilized extracts could be efficiently reused in the dye decolourization, contrary, the carbon nanotubes became saturated and they should be discarded over time. This device may offer a final biocatalyst with higher catalytic efficiency and capability to be reused in the dye decolourization process.

  3. Calculated ionisation potentials to determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Hartmans, S.; Swarts, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was

  4. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich

  5. Modifying sulfomethylated alkali lignin by horseradish peroxidase to improve the dispersibility and conductivity of polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongjie; Huang, Wenjing; Qiu, Xueqing; Lou, Hongming; Qian, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Pine and wheat straw alkali lignin (PAL and WAL) were sulfomethylated to improve water solubility, polymerized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to improve the molecular weight (Mw) and applied to dope and disperse polyaniline (PANI). The structural effect of lignin from different origins on the reactivities of sulfomethylation and HRP polymerization was investigated. The results show that WAL with less methoxyl groups and lower Mw have higher reactivity in sulfomethylation (SWAL). More phenolic hydroxyl groups and lower Mw benefit the HRP polymerization of sulfomethylated PAL (SPAL). Due to the natural three-dimensional aromatic structure and introduced sulfonic groups, SPAL and SWAL could effectively dope and disperse PANI in water by π-π stacking and electrostatic interaction. HRP modified SPAL (HRP-SPAL) with much higher sulfonation degree and larger Mw significantly increased the conductivity and dispersibility of lignin/PANI composites.

  6. Enzymatic extract containing lignin peroxidase immobilized on carbon nanotubes: Potential biocatalyst in dye decolourization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Feliciano Oliveira

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the textile dyes are harmful to the environment and potentially carcinogenic. Among strategies for their exclusion, the treatment of dye contaminated wastewater with fungal extract, containing lignin peroxidase (LiP, may be useful. Two fungi isolates, Pleurotus ostreatus (PLO9 and Ganoderma lucidum (GRM117, produced the enzymatic extract by fermentation in the lignocellulosic residue, Jatropha curcas seed cake. The extracts from PLO9 and GRM117 were immobilized on carbon nanotubes and showed an increase of 18 and 27-fold of LiP specific activity compared to the free enzyme. Also, LiP from both fungi extracts showed higher Vmax and lower Km values. Only the immobilized extracts could be efficiently reused in the dye decolourization, contrary, the carbon nanotubes became saturated and they should be discarded over time. This device may offer a final biocatalyst with higher catalytic efficiency and capability to be reused in the dye decolourization process. Keywords: Lignocellulosic residue, Solid state fermentation, Immobilization, Fungi

  7. Calculated ionisation potentials to determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Have, ten, R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Hartmans, S.; Swarts, H.J.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was calculated and compared to their experimental conversion by LiP, defining a relative IP threshold of approximately 9.0 eV. Based on this threshold value only the O-acetyl esters and glucosides of isoeugeno...

  8. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    OpenAIRE

    Have, ten, R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich medium. This procedure resulted in a successful LiP production of 600 U/L. Peptone in the culture medium was shown to interfere with the standard LiP assay in which the formation of veratraldehyde (V...

  9. Design and Preparation of Nano-Lignin Peroxidase (NanoLiP by Protein Block Copolymerization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Tay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the preparation of nanoprotein particles having lignin peroxidase (LiP using a photosensitive microemulsion polymerization technique. The protein-based nano block polymer was synthesized by cross-linking of ligninase enzyme with ruthenium-based aminoacid monomers. This type polymerization process brought stability in different reaction conditions, reusability and functionality to the protein-based nano block polymer system when compared the traditional methods. After characterization of the prepared LiP copolymer nanoparticles, enzymatic activity studies of the nanoenzymes were carried out using tetramethylbenzidine (TMB as the substrate. The parameters such as pH, temperature and initial enzyme concentration that affect the activity, were investigated by using prepared nanoLip particles and compared to free LiP. The reusability of the nano-LiP particles was also investigated and the obtained results showed that the nano-LiP particles exhibited admirable potential as a reusable catalyst.

  10. A dye-decolorizing peroxidase from Bacillus subtilis exhibiting substrate-dependent optimum temperature for dyes and β-ether lignin dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoungseon; Gong, Gyeongtaek; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-01-01

    In the biorefinery using lignocellulosic biomass as feedstock, pretreatment to breakdown or loosen lignin is important step and various approaches have been conducted. For biological pretreatment, we screened Bacillus subtilis KCTC2023 as a potential lignin-degrading bacterium based on veratryl alcohol (VA) oxidation test and the putative heme-containing dye-decolorizing peroxidase was found in the genome of B. subtilis KCTC2023. The peroxidase from B. subtilis KCTC2023 (BsDyP) was capable of oxidizing various substrates and atypically exhibits substrate-dependent optimum temperature: 30°C for dyes (Reactive Blue19 and Reactive Black5) and 50°C for high redox potential substrates (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid [ABTS], VA, and veratryl glycerol-β-guaiacyl ether [VGE]) over +1.0 V vs. normal hydrogen electrode. At 50°C, optimum temperature for high redox potential substrates, BsDyP not only showed the highest VA oxidation activity (0.13 Umg−1) among the previously reported bacterial peroxidases but also successfully achieved VGE decomposition by cleaving Cα-Cβ bond in the absence of any oxidative mediator with a specific activity of 0.086 Umg−1 and a conversion rate of 53.5%. Based on our results, BsDyP was identified as the first bacterial peroxidase capable of oxidizing high redox potential lignin-related model compounds, especially VGE, revealing a previously unknown versatility of lignin degrading biocatalyst in nature. PMID:25650125

  11. Peroxidase activity as a marker for estrogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.; Liel, Y.; Glick, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the possibility that peroxidase activity might be a marker for estrogen activity in established estrogen-dependent tissues: dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumours and human breast cancer. In DMBA-induced tumours undergoing regression after ovariectomy or tamoxifen treatment, tumour size decreased by 50%, estradiol receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PgR) decreased by 25 and 20%, respectively, but peroxidase activity paradoxically increased six- to sevenfold. In DMBA tumours stimulated by estradiol treatment or by the cessation of tamoxifen administration in intact rats, tumour size increased threefold. ER and PgR increased two- and threefold, respectively, while peroxidase activity decreased 50%. These data indicate an inverse relation between tumour growth, ER and PgR on the one hand, and peroxidase activity on the other. In the human breast cancers there was a singificant negative relation between the presence of ER and peroxidase activity. By using a calibrated Sephadex G-100 column it was shown that uterine peroxidase differs in molecular weight from the peroxidase of rat mammary tumours and that of human breast cancer. (author)

  12. Calculated ionisation potentials determine the oxidation of vanillin precursors by lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, R; Rietjens, I M; Hartmans, S; Swarts, H J; Field, J A

    1998-07-03

    In view of the biocatalytic production of vanillin, this research focused on the lignin peroxidase (LiP) catalysed oxidation of naturally occurring phenolic derivatives: O-methyl ethers, O-acetyl esters, and O-glucosyl ethers. The ionisation potential (IP) of a series of model compounds was calculated and compared to their experimental conversion by LiP, defining a relative IP threshold of approximately 9.0 eV. Based on this threshold value only the O-acetyl esters and glucosides of isoeugenol and coniferyl alcohol would be potential LiP substrates. Both O-acetyl esters were tested and were shown to be converted to O-acetyl vanillin in molar yields of 51.8 and 2.3%, respectively.

  13. Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

    2012-12-13

    The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of

  14. H2O2 recycling during oxidation of the arylglycerol beta-aryl ether lignin structure by lignin peroxidase and glyoxal oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, K E; Mozuch, M D; Jensen, K A; Kersten, P J

    1994-11-15

    Oxidative C alpha-C beta cleavage of the arylglycerol beta-aryl ether lignin model 1-(3,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)-2-phenoxypropane-1,3-diol (I) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase in the presence of limiting H2O2 was enhanced 4-5-fold by glyoxal oxidase from the same fungus. Further investigation showed that each C alpha-C beta cleavage reaction released 0.8-0.9 equiv of glycolaldehyde, a glyoxal oxidase substrate. The identification of glycolaldehyde was based on 13C NMR spectrometry of reaction product obtained from beta-, gamma-, and beta,gamma-13C-substituted I, and quantitation was based on an enzymatic NADH-linked assay. The oxidation of glycolaldehyde by glyoxal oxidase yielded 0.9 oxalate and 2.8 H2O2 per reaction, as shown by quantitation of oxalate as 2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline after derivatization with 1,2-diaminobenzene and by quantitation of H2O2 in coupled spectrophotometric assays with veratryl alcohol and lignin peroxidase. These results suggest that the C alpha-C beta cleavage of I by lignin peroxidase in the presence of glyoxal oxidase should regenerate as many as 3 H2O2. Calculations based on the observed enhancement of LiP-catalyzed C alpha-C beta cleavage by glyoxal oxidase showed that approximately 2 H2O2 were actually regenerated per cleavage of I when both enzymes were present. The cleavage of arylglycerol beta-aryl ether structures by ligninolytic enzymes thus recycles H2O2 to support subsequent cleavage reactions.

  15. Peroxidase-like activity of magnetoferritin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melníková, V.; Pospíšková, K.; Mitróová, Z.; Kopčanský, P.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 181, 3-4 (2014), s. 295-301 ISSN 0026-3672 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetoferritin * magnetic nanoparticles * peroxidase-like activity * hydrogen peroxide * oxidative stress Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.741, year: 2014

  16. A cell wall-bound anionic peroxidase, PtrPO21, is involved in lignin polymerization in Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chien-Yuan; Li, Quanzi; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Shi, Rui; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Wang, Jack P.; Liu, Jie; Loziuk, Philip; Edmunds, Charles W.; Miller, Zachary D.; Peszlen, Ilona; Muddiman, David C.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2016-03-11

    Class III peroxidases are members of a large plant-specific sequence-heterogeneous protein family. Several sequence-conserved homologs have been associated with lignin polymerization in Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Nicotiana tabacum, Zinnia elegans, Picea abies, and Pinus sylvestris. In Populus trichocarpa, a model species for studies of wood formation, the peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis have not yet been identified. To do this, we retrieved sequences of all PtrPOs from Peroxibase and conducted RNA-seq to identify candidates. Transcripts from 42 PtrPOs were detected in stem differentiating xylem (SDX) and four of them are the most xylem-abundant (PtrPO12, PtrPO21, PtrPO42, and PtrPO64). PtrPO21 shows xylem-specific expression similar to that of genes encoding the monolignol biosynthetic enzymes. Using protein cleavage-isotope dilution mass spectrometry, PtrPO21 is detected only in the cell wall fraction and not in the soluble fraction. Downregulated transgenics of PtrPO21 have a lignin reduction of ~20% with subunit composition (S/G ratio) similar to wild type. The transgenics show a growth reduction and reddish color of stem wood. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of the stems of the downregulated PtrPO21-line 8 can be reduced to ~60% of wild type. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis of PtrPO21 downregulated transgenics identified a significant overexpression of PtPrx35, suggesting a compensatory effect within the peroxidase family. No significant changes in the expression of the 49 P. trichocarpa laccases (PtrLACs) were observed.

  17. Effect of Vitamin C on Glutathione Peroxidase Activities in Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione peroxidase is one of the most important antioxidant enzymes in humans. We studied the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C ingestion during normal pregnancy in women attending antenatal clinic in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. Glutathione peroxidase ...

  18. Activity of Mn-Oxidizing Peroxidases of Ganoderma lucidum Depending on Cultivation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Ćilerdžić

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trunks and stumps of various deciduous species act as natural habitats for Ganoderma lucidum. The chemical composition of their cell wall affects the development of fungal ligninolytic enzyme system as well as its ability to degrade lignin from the plant cell wall. Additionally, numerous compounds structurally similar to lignin can be degraded by the G. lucidum enzyme system which could take important roles in various biotechnological processes. The laccases, which are the dominant enzymes synthesized by G. lucidum, have been studied more extensively than the Mn-oxidizing peroxidases. Therefore, this study aimed to create the dynamics profile of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases activities in four G. lucidum strains, classifying and determining their properties depending on the cultivation type and plant residue as a carbon source in the medium, as well as to establish whether intraspecific variety exists. The findings suggest that submerged cultivation appeared to be a more appropriate cultivation type for enzyme activities compared with solid-state cultivation, and oak sawdust was a better carbon source than wheat straw. Under the optimum conditions, on day 14, G. lucidum BEOFB 431 was characterized by the highest levels of both Mn-dependent and Mn-independent peroxidase activities (4795.5 and 5170.5 U/L, respectively. Strain, cultivation type, and carbon source were factors that affected the profiles of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases isoenzymes.

  19. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié , Sté phane C.; Kahawong, Patarawan; Duan, Xiaonan; Bowser, Daniel; Edward, Joseph B.; Walker, Larry P.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs

  20. Immobilized Lignin Peroxidase-Like Metalloporphyrins as Reusable Catalysts in Oxidative Bleaching of Industrial Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zucca

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic and bioinspired metalloporphyrins are a class of redox-active catalysts able to emulate several enzymes such as cytochromes P450, ligninolytic peroxidases, and peroxygenases. Their ability to perform oxidation and degradation of recalcitrant compounds, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, phenolic and non-phenolic aromatic compounds, sulfides, and nitroso-compounds, has been deeply investigated. Such a broad substrate specificity has suggested their use also in the bleaching of textile plant wastewaters. In fact, industrial dyes belong to very different chemical classes, being their effective and inexpensive oxidation an important challenge from both economic and environmental perspective. Accordingly, we review here the most widespread synthetic metalloporphyrins, and the most promising formulations for large-scale applications. In particular, we focus on the most convenient approaches for immobilization to conceive economical affordable processes. Then, the molecular routes of catalysis and the reported substrate specificity on the treatment of the most diffused textile dyes are encompassed, including the use of redox mediators and the comparison with the most common biological and enzymatic alternative, in order to depict an updated picture of a very promising field for large-scale applications.

  1. Oxidizability of unsaturated fatty acids and of a non-phenolic lignin structure in the manganese peroxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander N. Kapich; Tatyana V. Korneichik; Annele Hatakka; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2010-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids have been proposed to mediate the oxidation of recalcitrant, non-phenolic lignin structures by fungal manganese peroxidases (MnP), but their precise role remains unknown. We investigated the oxidizability of three fatty acids with varying degrees of polyunsaturation (linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids) by measuring conjugated dienes...

  2. The Ve-mediated resistance response of the tomato to Verticillium dahliae involves H2O2, peroxidase and lignins and drives PAL gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merino Fuencisla

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verticillium dahliae is a fungal pathogen that infects a wide range of hosts. The only known genes for resistance to Verticillium in the Solanaceae are found in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Ve locus, formed by two linked genes, Ve1 and Ve2. To characterize the resistance response mediated by the tomato Ve gene, we inoculated two nearly isogenic tomato lines, LA3030 (ve/ve and LA3038 (Ve/Ve, with V. dahliae. Results We found induction of H2O2 production in roots of inoculated plants, followed by an increase in peroxidase activity only in roots of inoculated resistant plants. Phenylalanine-ammonia lyase (PAL activity was also increased in resistant roots 2 hours after inoculation, while induction of PAL activity in susceptible roots was not seen until 48 hours after inoculation. Phenylpropanoid metabolism was also affected, with increases in ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, vanillin and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde contents in resistant roots after inoculation. Six tomato PAL cDNA sequences (PAL1 - PAL6 were found in the SolGenes tomato EST database. RT-PCR analysis showed that these genes were expressed in all organs of the plant, albeit at different levels. Real-time RT-PCR indicated distinct patterns of expression of the different PAL genes in V. dahliae-inoculated roots. Phylogenetic analysis of 48 partial PAL cDNAs corresponding to 19 plant species grouped angiosperm PAL sequences into four clusters, suggesting functional differences among the six tomato genes, with PAL2 and PAL6 presumably involved in lignification, and the remaining PAL genes implicated in other biological processes. An increase in the synthesis of lignins was found 16 and 28 days after inoculation in both lines; this increase was greater and faster to develop in the resistant line. In both resistant and susceptible inoculated plants, an increase in the ratio of guaiacyl/syringyl units was detected 16 days after inoculation, resulting from the lowered amount

  3. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic browning arises by peroxidase in fruits. However, essential oils are recognized as natural antioxidant agents. So in this study, the effect of thyme, coriander and rosemary essential oils were evaluated on the reduction of peroxidase activity in apples (Malus domestica Mill. cv Golden delicious), (M. domestica Mill.

  4. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... activities of edible coatings enriched with natural plant extracts such as rosemary ..... its oxidation by ascorbate peroxidase activity (Talano et al., 2008). ... delicious and quince improved the antioxidant protection of the fruits ...

  5. Oxidative cleavage of a phenolic diarylpropane lignin model dimer by manganese peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Valli, K.; Gold, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the presence of Mn II and H 2 O 2 , homogeneous manganese peroxidase oxidized 1-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-dihydroxypropane (I) to yield 1-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-oxo-3-hydroxypropane (II), 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (III), 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-dihydroxybenzene (IV), 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-oxo-2-hydroxyethane (V), 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,2-dihydroxyethane (VI), syringaldehyde (VIII), and 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropanal (IX). Chemically prepared manganese(III) malonate catalyzed the same reactions. Oxidation of I in H 2 18 O under argon resulted in >80% incorporation of 18 O into the phenylglycol VI, the hydroquinone IV, and the quinone III. Oxidation of I in H 2 18 O under aerobic conditions resulted in 40% incorporation of 18 O into VI but no 18 O incorporation into V. Finally, oxidation of I under 18 O 2 resulted in 89% and 28% incorporation of 18 O into V and VI, respectively. These results are explained by mechanisms involving the one-electron oxidation of the substrate I by enzyme-generated Mn III to produce a phenoxy radical intermediate I'. Subsequent C α -C β bond cleavage of the radical intermediate yields syringaldehyde (VIII) and a C 6 -C 2 benzylic radical. Syringaldehyde is oxidized by Mn III in several steps to a cyclohexadiene cation intermediate I double-prime, which is attacked by water to yield the benzoquinone III. The C 6 -C 2 radical is scavenged by O 2 to form a peroxy radical that decomposes to V and VI. In these reactions, Mn III generated by manganese peroxidase catalyzes both formation of the substrate phenoxy radical and oxidation of carbon-centered radical intermediates, to yield reactive cations

  6. The reactivity of phenolic and non-phenolic residual kraft lignin model compounds with Mn(II)-peroxidase from Lentinula edodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestini, C; D'Annibale, A; Sermanni, G G; Saladino, R

    2000-02-01

    Three phenolic model compounds representing bonding patterns of residual kraft lignin were incubated with manganese peroxidase from Lentinula edodes. Extensive degradation of all the phenolic models, mainly occurring via side-chain benzylic oxidation, was observed. Among the tested model compounds the diphenylmethane alpha-5 phenolic model was found to be the most reactive, yielding several products showing oxidation and fragmentation at the bridging position. The non-phenolic 5-5' biphenyl and 5-5' diphenylmethane models were found unreactive.

  7. Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, R; Ortiz, A; Hernández, R; López, V; Gómez, M M; Mena, P

    1996-09-01

    Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity, together with malondialdehyde levels, were determined as indicators of peroxidation in 83 patients from whom liver biopsies had been taken for diagnostic purposes. On histological study, the patients were classified into groups as minimal changes (including normal liver), steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, light to moderately active chronic hepatitis, and severe chronic active hepatitis. The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes showed no significant changes in any liver disease group. In the hepatic study, an increased activity was observed in steatosis with respect to the minimal changes group, this increased activity induced by the toxic agent in the initial stages of the alcoholic hepatic disease declining as the hepatic damage progressed. There was a negative correlation between the levels of hepatic malondialdehyde and hepatic glutathione peroxidase in subjects with minimal changes. This suggested the existence of an oxidative equilibrium in this group. This equilibrium is broken in the liver disease groups as was manifest in a positive correlation between malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase activity.

  8. Activities of some enzymes of lignin formation in reaction wood of Thuja orientalis, Metasequoia glyptostroboides and Robinia pseudoacacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuki, H; Higuchi, T

    1981-07-01

    The activities of the following five enzymes which are involved in the formation of lignin have been compared in reaction wood and in opposite wood: phenylalanine ammonia lyase (EC 4.3.1.5), caffeate 3-O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.-), p-hydroxycinnamate: CoA ligase (EC 6.2.1.12), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.-) and peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7). The activities of the four first-named enzymes in the compression wood of Thuja orientalis L. and Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng were 2.8±1.4-fold and 2.6±1.5-fold higher than those in opposite wood, respectively, whereas peroxidase had the same level of activity in either type of wood. On the other hand, no differences were observed in the activities of the five enzymes between tension and opposite woods of Robinia pseudoacacia L. These findings are well in accord with the chemical structure of lignin in the compression and tension woods of the three species studied: high content of lignin rich in condensed units in compression wood, and little difference in lignin between tension and opposite woods.

  9. Peroxidase activity in root hairs of cress (lepidium sativum L.) Cytochemical localization and radioactive labelling of wall bound peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaar, K.

    1979-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of peroxidase activity in young, growing root hairs of cress (Lepidium sativum L.) after assay with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine is reported. Prominent peroxidase activity has been found in the dictyosomes and the associated vesicles, in ribosomes on ER-cisternae, as well as in the cell wall. On the basis of both ultrastructural and cytochemical evidence it is proposed that peroxidase in root hairs is synthesized on the ER- and within dictyosome cisternae packaged and transported in secretory vesicles and extruded into the cell wall particularily at the tip region of a root hair. The kinetic of Golgi apparatus mediated peroxidasesecretion was monitored by measuring the 55 Fe protoheme content of primary cell walls. Peroxidase secretion seems to be enhanced during stress incubation in destilled water. Secretory activity in root hairs is 20 times higher than in cells of the root body. (author)

  10. Peroxidase activity in Spondias dulcis = Atividade da peroxidase em Spondias dulcis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Cardozo-Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the best conditions to obtain crude extracts showingPeroxidase activity from Spondia dulcis (caja-mango were evaluated. Fresh fruits (25 g were blended in different sodium phosphate buffer (0.05 to 0.2 M with a pH varying from 3.0 to 9.0. The muddy material was centrifuged for 20 minutes. In order to improve POD activity, the crude extract was submitted to precipitation with ammonium sulfate at 90% saturation. This precipitated was re-suspended in sodium phosphate buffer 0.2 M pH 6.5 and then, optimum pH for activity assay (pH varying from 5.0 to 9.0 and thermal stability (exposure to different temperatures varying from 30 to 75ºC for periods between 0 to 15 minutes were determined. The best conditions for activity assay were in phosphate buffer 0.2 M at pH7.0. The results obtained for thermal inactivation study suggest that the heating at 75ºCfor 15 minutes inactivated 95% of initial POD activity.Foram avaliadas, neste trabalho, algumas condições para a obtenção de extratos brutos com atividade peroxidase de Spondias dulcis (cajá-manga. Frutas frescas (25 g foram trituradas com tampão fosfato de sódio (0,05 a 0,2 M em pHs diferentes (3,0 a 9,0. O material obtido foi centrifugado por 20 min. O extrato bruto foi submetido à precipitação com sulfato de amônio até 90% de saturação. Este precipitado foi ressuspenso em tampão fosfato de sódio 0,2 M pH 6,5 e, assim, o pH ótimo para o ensaio de atividade (pH que varia de 5,0 a 9,0 e a estabilidade térmica (exposição a temperaturas de 30, 60, 65, 70 e 75ºC por um período de 0 a 15 min. deste foram determinados. As melhores condições encontradas para o ensaio de atividade foram em tampão fosfato 0,2 M pH 7,0. Os resultados para a inativação térmica sugerem que o aquecimento a 75ºC por 15 mininativa 95% da atividade de POD inicial.

  11. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié, Stéphane C.

    2012-02-15

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs affect the formation of the BNCs, and ultimately control the activity of the bound enzymes. Smaller MNPs form small clusters with a low affinity for the HRP. While the turnover for the bound fraction is drastically increased, there is no difference in the H 2O 2 inhibitory concentration. Larger MNPs with a higher magnetization aggregate in larger clusters and have a higher affinity for the enzyme and a lower substrate inhibition. All of the BNCs are more active than the free enzyme or the MNPs (BNCs > HRP ≤laquo; MNPs). Since the BNCs show surprising resilience in various reaction conditions, they may pave the way towards new hybrid biocatalysts with increased activities and unique catalytic properties for magnetosensitive enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Insights into lignin degradation and its potential industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Solbiati, Jose O; Cann, Isaac K O

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulose is an abundant biomass that provides an alternative source for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The depolymerization of the carbohydrate polymers in lignocellulosic biomass is hindered by lignin, which is recalcitrant to chemical and biological degradation due to its complex chemical structure and linkage heterogeneity. The role of fungi in delignification due to the production of extracellular oxidative enzymes has been studied more extensively than that of bacteria. The two major groups of enzymes that are involved in lignin degradation are heme peroxidases and laccases. Lignin-degrading peroxidases include lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), versatile peroxidase (VP), and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP). LiP, MnP, and VP are class II extracellular fungal peroxidases that belong to the plant and microbial peroxidases superfamily. LiPs are strong oxidants with high-redox potential that oxidize the major non-phenolic structures of lignin. MnP is an Mn-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of various phenolic substrates but is not capable of oxidizing the more recalcitrant non-phenolic lignin. VP enzymes combine the catalytic activities of both MnP and LiP and are able to oxidize Mn(2+) like MnP, and non-phenolic compounds like LiP. DyPs occur in both fungi and bacteria and are members of a new superfamily of heme peroxidases called DyPs. DyP enzymes oxidize high-redox potential anthraquinone dyes and were recently reported to oxidize lignin model compounds. The second major group of lignin-degrading enzymes, laccases, are found in plants, fungi, and bacteria and belong to the multicopper oxidase superfamily. They catalyze a one-electron oxidation with the concomitant four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Fungal laccases can oxidize phenolic lignin model compounds and have higher redox potential than bacterial laccases. In the presence of redox mediators, fungal laccases can oxidize non

  13. Role of paramagnetic polyconjugated clusters in lignin antioxidant activity (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizhbite, T; Ponomarenko, J; Andersone, A; Dobele, G; Lauberts, M; Krasilnikova, J; Telysheva, G; Mironova-Ulmane, N

    2012-01-01

    Using physico-chemical methods (EPR, SEC, Py-GC/MS and UV/VIS spectroscopy) and wet chemical analysis, the characteristics of 6 hardwood lignins in terms of functionality, molecular weight and composition of lignin substructures were determined and considered together with the results of DPPH., ABTS. + and O 2 . − antioxidant assays with the aim to understand the relationships governing antioxidant properties of lignin. The strong positive linear correlation between lignin antioxidant capacity in the three assays used and the extent of conjugation of paramagnetic polyconjugated clusters in lignin macromolecules was found. The biological activity of the most active alkaline lignins was assessed by in vitro experiment with human blood.

  14. DYNAMICS OF LEAF PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY DURING ONTOGENY OF HEMP PLANTS, IN RELATION TO SEXUAL PHENOTYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Truta

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available During vegetation of female and male hemp plants (Cannabis sativa L., five quantitative determinations of peroxidase activities were made (40 days, 55 days, 70 days, 85 days, 105 days. Peroxidase activity presented some differences in hemp plants, between females and males, during their vegetation cycle. In female plants, before anthesis were registered peaks of peroxidase activities. The blossoming of male plants was coincident with the increase of catalitic action of peroxidase. Generally, the male plants displayed greater levels of peroxidasic activity.

  15. Mineralisation of 14C-labelled synthetic lignin and ligninolytic enzyme activities of litter-decomposing basidiomycetous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, K T; Hofrichter, M; Hatakka, A

    2000-12-01

    Within a screening program, 27 soil litter-decomposing basidiomycetes were tested for ligninolytic enzyme activities using agar-media containing 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate), a humic acid or Mn2+ ions as indicator substrates. Most active species were found within the family Strophariaceae (Agrocybe praecox, Stropharia coronilla, S. rugosoannulata) and used for mineralisation experiments with a 14C-ring-labelled synthetic lignin (14C-DHP). The fungi mineralised around 25% of the lignin to 14CO2 within 12 weeks of incubation in a straw environment; about 20% of the lignin was converted to water-soluble fragments. Mn-peroxidase was found to be the predominant ligninolytic enzyme of all three fungi in liquid culture and its production was strongly enhanced in the presence of Mn2+ ions. The results of this study demonstrate that certain ubiquitous litter-decomposing basidiomycetes possess ligninolytic activities similar to the wood-decaying white-rot fungi, the most efficient lignin degraders in nature.

  16. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallego, Nidia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States); Karra, Reddy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  17. Characterization of purified and Xerogel immobilized Novel Lignin Peroxidase produced from Trametes versicolor IBL-04 using solid state medium of Corncobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgher Muhammad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-effective production of industrially important enzymes is a key for their successful exploitation on industrial scale. Keeping in view the extensive industrial applications of lignin peroxidase (LiP, this study was performed to purify and characterize the LiP from an indigenous strain of Trametes versicolor IBL-04. Xerogel matrix enzyme immobilization technique was applied to improve the kinetic and thermo-stability characteristics of LiP to fulfil the requirements of the modern enzyme consumer sector of biotechnology. Results A novel LiP was isolated from an indigenous T. versicolor IBL-04 strain. T. versicolor IBL-04 was cultured in solid state fermentation (SSF medium of corn cobs and maximum LiP activity of 592 ± 6 U/mL was recorded after five days of incubation under optimum culture conditions. The crude LiP was 3.3-fold purified with specific activity of 553 U/mg after passing through the DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex-G-100 chromatography columns. The purified LiP exhibited a relatively low molecular weight (30 kDa homogenous single band on native and SDS-PAGE. The LiP was immobilized by entrapping in xerogel matrix of trimethoxysilane (TMOS and proplytetramethoxysilane (PTMS and maximum immobilization efficiency of 88.6% was achieved. The free and immobilized LiPs were characterized and the results showed that the free and immobilized LiPs had optimum pH 6 and 5 while optimum temperatures were 60°C and 80°C, respectively. Immobilization was found to enhance the activity and thermo-stability potential of LiP significantly and immobilized LiP remained stable over broad pH and temperature range as compare to free enzyme. Kinetic constants Km and Vmax were 70 and 56 μM and 588 and 417 U/mg for the free and immobilized LiPs, respectively. Activity of this novel extra thermo-stable LiP was stimulated to variable extents by Cu2+, Mn2+ and Fe2+ whereas, Cystein, EDTA and Ag+ showed inhibitory effects

  18. The effects of xylitol and sorbitol on lysozyme- and peroxidase-related enzymatic and candidacidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum-Soo; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young; Kho, Hong-Seop

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether xylitol and sorbitol affect enzymatic and candidacidal activities of lysozyme, the peroxidase system, and the glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol were added to hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine lactoperoxidase, glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase, and whole saliva in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces. The enzymatic activities of lysozyme, peroxidase, and glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase were determined by the turbidimetric method, the NbsSCN assay, and production of oxidized o-dianisidine, respectively. Candidacidal activities were determined by comparing colony forming units using Candida albicans ATCC strains 10231, 11006, and 18804. While xylitol and sorbitol did not affect the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme both in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces, they did inhibit the enzymatic activity of salivary lysozyme significantly in solution, but not on the surfaces. Xylitol and sorbitol enhanced the enzymatic activities of both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase significantly in a dose-dependent manner in solution, but not on the surfaces. Sorbitol, but not xylitol, inhibited the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase significantly. Both xylitol and sorbitol did not affect candidacidal activities of hen egg-white lysozyme, the bovine lactoperoxidase system, or the glucose oxidase-mediated bovine lactoperoxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol inhibited salivary lysozyme activity, but enhanced both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase activities significantly in solution. Xylitol and sorbitol did not augment lysozyme- and peroxidase-related candidacidal activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperature dependence of the activity of polyphenol peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases in modern and buried soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Blagodatskaya, E. V.; Blagodatsky, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Under conditions of the global climate warming, the changes in the reserves of soil humus depend on the temperature sensitivities of polyphenol peroxidases (PPPOs) and polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). They play an important role in lignin decomposition, mineralization, and humus formation. The temperature dependence of the potential enzyme activity in modern and buried soils has been studied during incubation at 10 or 20°C. The experimental results indicate that it depends on the availability of the substrate and the presence of oxygen. The activity of PPOs during incubation in the absence of oxygen for two months decreases by 2-2.5 times, which is balanced by an increase in the activity of PPPOs by 2-3 times. The increase in the incubation temperature to 20°C and the addition of glucose accelerates this transition due to the more abrupt decrease in the activity of PPOs. The preincubation of the soil with glucose doubles the activity of PPPOs but has no significant effect on the activity of PPOs. The different effects of temperature on two groups of the studied oxidases and the possibility of substituting enzymes by those of another type under changing aeration conditions should be taken into consideration in predicting the effect of the climate warming on the mineralization of the soil organic matter. The absence of statistically significant differences in the enzymatic activity between the buried and modern soil horizons indicates the retention by the buried soil of some of its properties (soil memory) and the rapid restoration of high enzymatic activity during the preincubation.

  20. Optimized Production of Lignin Peroxidase, Manganese Peroxidase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    submerged culture fermentations were investigated for maximum enzymes ... 0.18, 4.44 and 593 U/ml, respectively compared to 0.0011, 0.0054 and 2.3 U/ml .... (2004) studied some Tanzanian white rot ... were done in 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and ... rotary shaker at 125 rpm. ..... bioreactor cultures (Hess et al., 2002). From.

  1. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-01-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been made! In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of 35 S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection

  2. Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases: peroxidase hydroperoxide specificity and cyclooxygenase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiayan; Seibold, Steve A; Rieke, Caroline J; Song, Inseok; Cukier, Robert I; Smith, William L

    2007-06-22

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) activity of prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases (PGHSs) converts arachidonic acid and O2 to prostaglandin G2 (PGG2). PGHS peroxidase (POX) activity reduces PGG2 to PGH2. The first step in POX catalysis is formation of an oxyferryl heme radical cation (Compound I), which undergoes intramolecular electron transfer forming Intermediate II having an oxyferryl heme and a Tyr-385 radical required for COX catalysis. PGHS POX catalyzes heterolytic cleavage of primary and secondary hydroperoxides much more readily than H2O2, but the basis for this specificity has been unresolved. Several large amino acids form a hydrophobic "dome" over part of the heme, but when these residues were mutated to alanines there was little effect on Compound I formation from H2O2 or 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a surrogate substrate for PGG2. Ab initio calculations of heterolytic bond dissociation energies of the peroxyl groups of small peroxides indicated that they are almost the same. Molecular Dynamics simulations suggest that PGG2 binds the POX site through a peroxyl-iron bond, a hydrogen bond with His-207 and van der Waals interactions involving methylene groups adjoining the carbon bearing the peroxyl group and the protoporphyrin IX. We speculate that these latter interactions, which are not possible with H2O2, are major contributors to PGHS POX specificity. The distal Gln-203 four residues removed from His-207 have been thought to be essential for Compound I formation. However, Q203V PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 mutants catalyzed heterolytic cleavage of peroxides and exhibited native COX activity. PGHSs are homodimers with each monomer having a POX site and COX site. Cross-talk occurs between the COX sites of adjoining monomers. However, no cross-talk between the POX and COX sites of monomers was detected in a PGHS-2 heterodimer comprised of a Q203R monomer having an inactive POX site and a G533A monomer with an inactive COX site.

  3. Cu–hemin metal-organic frameworks with peroxidase-like activity as peroxidase mimics for colorimetric sensing of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fenfen; He, Juan; Zeng, Mulang; Hao, Juan; Guo, Qiaohui; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li, E-mail: lwanggroup@aliyun.com [Jiangxi Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Small Organic Molecule, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a facile strategy to synthesize Cu–hemin metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with peroxidase-like activity was reported. The prepared Cu–hemin MOFs were characterized by various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV–visible absorbance spectra, and so on. The results showed that the prepared Cu–hemin MOFs looked like a ball-flower with an average diameter of 10 μm and provided a large specific surface area. The Cu–hemin MOFs possessing peroxidase-like activity could be used to catalyze the peroxidase substrate of 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which was employed to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} quantitatively with the linear range from 1.0 μM to 1.0 mM and the detection limit was 0.42 μM. Furthermore, with the additional help of glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective method to detect glucose was developed by using the Cu–hemin MOFs as catalyst and the linear range was from 10.0 μM to 3.0 mM and the detection limit was 6.9 μM. This work informs researchers of the advantages of MOFs for preparing biomimetic catalysts and extends the functionality of MOFs for biosensor application.Graphical Abstract.

  4. Strand displacement activated peroxidase activity of hemin for fluorescent DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanbo; Xu, Nan; Gui, Zhen; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2015-10-07

    To efficiently regulate the catalytic activity of the peroxidase mimic hemin, this work designs a double-stranded DNA probe containing an intermolecular dimer of hemin, whose peroxidase activity can be activated by a DNA strand displacement reaction. The double-stranded probe is prepared by annealing two strands of hemin labelled DNA oligonucleotides. Using the fluorescent oxidation product of tyramine by H2O2 as a tracing molecule, the low peroxidase activity of the hemin dimer ensures a low fluorescence background. The strand displacement reaction of the target DNA dissociates the hemin dimer and thus significantly increases the catalytic activity of hemin to produce a large amount of dityramine for fluorescence signal readout. Based on the strand displacement regulated peroxidase activity, a simple and sensitive homogeneous fluorescent DNA sensing method is proposed. The detection can conveniently be carried out in a 96-well plate within 20 min with a detection limit of 0.18 nM. This method shows high specificity, which can effectively distinguish single-base mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA. The DNA strand displacement regulated catalytic activity of hemin has promising application in the determination of various DNA analytes.

  5. Biodegradation of lignin by Shiitake Lentinus edodes (berk. ) sing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, T.; Watanabe, H.; Ishikawa, H.

    1981-01-01

    Each strain of L. edodes destroyed all of the structural components of wood (Fagus crenata) at almost the same rate during the loss of approximately 30% of the total weight of wood. The activities of the extracellular enzymes, i.e. peroxidase, laccase, and polyphenol oxidase, in the wood powder and lignin-containing cultures increased during the early period of mycelial growth, and then declined rapidly, while the activity of Beta-glucosidase increased gradually throughout the growth period. Functional group analysis, nitrobenzene oxidation, and spectroscopic characterization showed that dioxane lignin from F. crenata degraded by L. edodes or in crude enzyme solution isolated from wood-containing culture had a higher content of carboxyl groups than the sound dioxane lignin, whereas the content of methoxyl group was lower in the degraded dioxane lignin than in sound dioxane lignin. The building units of dioxane lignin, which yield aromatic aldehydes on nitrobenzene oxidation, were attacked preferentially by L. edodes under the above conditions.

  6. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidase During Phenol Derivatives Oxidation. Possible Molecular Cloaking of the Active Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Kulys

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been applied to the study of the molecular structure of phenol derivatives and oligomers produced during peroxidasecatalyzed oxidation. The interaction of substrates and oligomers with Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase was analyzed by docking methods. The most possible interaction site of oligomers is an active center of the peroxidase. The complexation energy increases with increasing oligomer length. However, the complexed oligomers do not form a precise (for the reaction hydrogen bonding network in the active center of the enzyme. It seems likely that strong but non productive docking of the oligomers determines peroxidase inhibition during the reaction.

  7. Alkaline and Organosolv Lignins from Furfural Residue: Structural Features and Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Fei Cao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Furfural residue (FR, composed mainly of cellulose and lignin, is an industrial waste produced during furfural manufacture. In this study, dioxane, alkali, ethanol, alkali-ethanol, and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP were used to extract lignins from FR. The structural features of these lignins obtained were characterized by sugar analysis, GPC, UV, FT-IR, and HSQC spectra. As compared to dioxane lignin (DL, other lignins showed lower molecular weights (Mw owing to the partial cleavage of the linkages between lignin units. Results from HSQC spectra revealed that β-O-4' and β-5' were still the major linkages of the FR lignin. Moreover, p-coumaric and ferulic acids were released and co-precipitated in the lignin preparations extracted with alkali and AHP, whereas part of the esters in DL were preserved during the dioxane extraction. Antioxidant activity investigation indicated that the antioxidant property of the alkali and alkali-ethanol lignins was higher than that of the commercial antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene.

  8. The Effect of Citrus Aurantium, Foeniculum Vulgare and Rosmarinus Officinalis Essential Oils on Peroxidase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Mohajerani (PhD); Afsaneh Aghae i ( MSc )

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Peroxidases catalyze protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. The activity of these enzymes in nerve cells is involved in causing disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. This study investigated the effect of Citrus aurantium, Foeniculum vulgare and Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils on activity of peroxidase enzyme. Methods: All three medicinal plants were dried at room temperature. Their essential oil was extracted by steam distillation ...

  9. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Reszka, Krzysztof J.; Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hy...

  10. Effect of mechanical activation on structure changes and reactivity in further chemical modification of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yanjuan; Hu, Huayu; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei; Chen, Dong; Huang, Kai; Huang, Aimin; Qin, Xingzhen; Feng, Zhenfei

    2016-10-01

    Lignin was treated by mechanical activation (MA) in a customized stirring ball mill, and the structure and reactivity in further esterification were studied. The chemical structure and morphology of MA-treated lignin and the esterified products were analyzed by chemical analysis combined with UV/vis spectrometer, FTIR,NMR, SEM and particle size analyzer. The results showed that MA contributed to the increase of aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups but the decrease of methoxyl groups. Moreover, MA led to the decrease of particle size and the increase of specific surface area and roughness of surface in lignin. The reactivity of lignin was enhanced significantly for the increase of hydroxyl content and the improvement of mass transfer in chemical reaction caused by the changes of molecular structure and morphological structure. The process of MA is green and simple, and is an effective method for enhancing the reactivity of lignin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure-activity relationships and molecular docking of thirteen synthesized flavonoids as horseradish peroxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Reguia; Djeridane, Amar; Benarous, Khedidja; Gaydou, Emile M; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    For the first time, the structure-activity relationships of thirteen synthesized flavonoids have been investigated by evaluating their ability to modulate horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalytic activity. Indeed, a modified spectrophotometrically method was carried out and optimized using 4-methylcatechol (4-MC) as peroxidase co-substrate. The results show that these flavonoids exhibit a great capacity to inhibit peroxidase with Ki values ranged from 0.14±0.01 to 65±0.04mM. Molecular docking has been achieved using Auto Dock Vina program to discuss the nature of interactions and the mechanism of inhibition. According to the docking results, all the flavonoids have shown great binding affinity to peroxidase. These molecular modeling studies suggested that pyran-4-one cycle acts as an inhibition key for peroxidase. Therefore, potent peroxidase inhibitors are flavonoids with these structural requirements: the presence of the hydroxyl (OH) group in 7, 5 and 4' positions and the absence of the methoxy (O-CH 3 ) group. Apigenin contributed better in HRP inhibitory activity. The present study has shown that the studied flavonoids could be promising HRP inhibitors, which can help in developing new molecules to control thyroid diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lignin depolymerization by fungal secretomes and a microbial sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvachúa, Davinia; Katahira, Rui; Cleveland, Nicholas S.; Khanna, Payal; Resch, Michael G.; Black, Brenna A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Prieto, Alicia; Martínez, María J.; Martínez, Angel T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Gladden, John M.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-08-25

    In Nature, powerful oxidative enzymes secreted by white rot fungi and some bacteria catalyze lignin depolymerization and some microbes are able to catabolize the resulting aromatic compounds as carbon and energy sources. Taken together, these two processes offer a potential route for microbial valorization of lignin. However, many challenges remain in realizing this concept, including that oxidative enzymes responsible for lignin depolymerization also catalyze polymerization of low molecular weight (LMW) lignin. Here, multiple basidiomycete secretomes were screened for ligninolytic enzyme activities in the presence of a residual lignin solid stream from a corn stover biorefinery, dubbed DMR-EH (Deacetylation, Mechanical Refining, and Enzymatic Hydrolysis) lignin. Two selected fungal secretomes, with high levels of laccases and peroxidases, were utilized for DMR-EH lignin depolymerization assays. The secretome from Pleurotus eryngii, which exhibited the highest laccase activity, reduced the lignin average molecular weight by 63% and 75% at pH 7 compared to the Mw of the control treated at the same conditions and the initial DMR-EH lignin, respectively, and was applied in further depolymerization assays as a function of time. As repolymerization was observed after 3 days of incubation, an aromatic-catabolic microbe (Pseudomonas putida KT2440) was incubated with the fungal secretome and DMR-EH lignin. These experiments demonstrated that the presence of the bacterium enhances lignin depolymerization, likely due to bacterial catabolism of LMW lignin, which may partially prevent repolymerization. In addition, proteomics was also applied to the P. eryngii secretome to identify the enzymes present in the fungal cocktail utilized for the depolymerization assays, which highlighted a significant number of glucose/ methanol/choline (GMC) oxidoreductases and laccases. Overall, this study demonstrates that ligninolytic enzymes can be used to partially depolymerize a solid, high

  13. The Ustilago maydis effector Pep1 suppresses plant immunity by inhibition of host peroxidase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hemetsberger

    Full Text Available The corn smut Ustilago maydis establishes a biotrophic interaction with its host plant maize. This interaction requires efficient suppression of plant immune responses, which is attributed to secreted effector proteins. Previously we identified Pep1 (Protein essential during penetration-1 as a secreted effector with an essential role for U. maydis virulence. pep1 deletion mutants induce strong defense responses leading to an early block in pathogenic development of the fungus. Using cytological and functional assays we show that Pep1 functions as an inhibitor of plant peroxidases. At sites of Δpep1 mutant penetrations, H₂O₂ strongly accumulated in the cell walls, coinciding with a transcriptional induction of the secreted maize peroxidase POX12. Pep1 protein effectively inhibited the peroxidase driven oxidative burst and thereby suppresses the early immune responses of maize. Moreover, Pep1 directly inhibits peroxidases in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Using fluorescence complementation assays, we observed a direct interaction of Pep1 and the maize peroxidase POX12 in vivo. Functional relevance of this interaction was demonstrated by partial complementation of the Δpep1 mutant defect by virus induced gene silencing of maize POX12. We conclude that Pep1 acts as a potent suppressor of early plant defenses by inhibition of peroxidase activity. Thus, it represents a novel strategy for establishing a biotrophic interaction.

  14. Role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon prepared by potassium carbonate activation of lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubouchi, Naoto, E-mail: tsubon@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Nishio, Megumi; Mochizuki, Yuuki

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon prepared from a lignin/urea/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixture provides a high specific surface area and a large pore volume. • Part of the urea nitrogen present in the mixture is retained as heterocyclic nitrogen in the solid phase after activation/carbonization. • Pore development is thought to proceed through interactions between K-species and C–N forms. - Abstract: The present work focuses on the role of nitrogen in the development of pores in activated carbon produced from lignin by K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} activation, employing a fixed bed reactor under a high-purity He stream at temperatures of 500–900 °C. The specific surface area and pore volume obtained by activation of lignin alone are 230 m{sup 2}/g and 0.13 cm{sup 3}/g at 800 °C, and 540 m{sup 2}/g and 0.31 cm{sup 3}/g at 900 °C, respectively. Activation of a mixture of lignin and urea provides a significant increase in the surface area and volume, respectively reaching 3300–3400 m{sup 2}/g and 2.0–2.3 cm{sup 3}/g after holding at 800–900 °C for 1 h. Heating a lignin/urea/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixture leads to a significant decrease in the yield of released N-containing gases compared to the results for urea alone and a lignin/urea mixture, and most of the nitrogen in the urea is retained in the solid phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses clearly show that part of the remaining nitrogen is present in heterocyclic structures (for example, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen), and the rest is contained as KOCN at ≤600 °C and as KCN at ≥700 °C, such that the latter two compounds can be almost completely removed by water washing. The fate of nitrogen during heating of lignin/urea/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon are discussed on the basis of the results mentioned above.

  15. Peroxidase activity in Raphanus sativus and its relationship with soil heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alipour, H.; Zare Myvan, H.; Sharifi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Today heavy metals are important environmental pollutants which generated from human activities and are one of the most important environmental stresses that cause molecular damages to plants through reactive oxygen species formation such as H2O2. Heavy metals are absorbed and accumulated by plants thus are absorbed by human bodies through the food chain. Raphanus sativus is a herbaceous plant within the Brassicaceae family that has different varieties and is used as a food plant in different parts of Iran. Peroxidase is one of the most important enzyme in oxidoreductase super family that can metabolize H2O2. In this research we studied some growth parameters, peroxidase activity and their relationships with heavy metal content and other soil factors in three different populations of radish collected from Sari, Semnan and south of Tehran. After harvesting the plants shoots and roots Peroxidase activity was assayed spectrophotometrically at 470 nm. Our results showed total heavy metal content of shomal 3 station soil and radish plants was higher than other stations, so plants collected from this station had lowest root and shoot lengths, fresh weights, dry weights, protein content and leaf collrophyll content. The peroxidase activity in both leaves and roots of these plants was higher than plants of other stations Therefore our results showed that with increasing heavy metal concentrations in soils peroxidase activity increased.

  16. Peroxidase-Mimicking Nanozyme with Enhanced Activity and High Stability Based on Metal-Support Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhihao; Yang, Xiangdong; Yang, Yanbing; Tan, Yaning; He, Yue; Liu, Meng; Liu, Xinwen; Yuan, Quan

    2018-01-09

    Peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes offer unique advantages in terms of high stability and low cost over natural peroxidase for applications in bioanalysis, biomedicine, and the treatment of pollution. However, the design of high-efficiency peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes remains a great challenge. In this study, we adopted a structural-design approach through hybridization of cube-CeO 2 and Pt nanoparticles to create a new peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with high efficiency and excellent stability. Relative to pure cube-CeO 2 and Pt nanoparticles, the as-hybridized Pt/cube-CeO 2 nanocomposites display much improved activities because of the strong metal-support interaction. Meanwhile, the nanocomposites also maintain high catalytic activity after long-term storage and multiple recycling. Based on their excellent properties, Pt/cube-CeO 2 nanocomposites were used to construct high-performance colorimetric biosensors for the sensitive detection of metabolites, including H 2 O 2 and glucose. Our findings highlight opportunities for the development of high-efficiency peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes with potential applications such as diagnostics, biomedicine, and the treatment of pollution. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Ligninolytic peroxidase genes in the oyster mushroom genome: heterologous expression, molecular structure, catalytic and stability properties, and lignin-degrading ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena Fernández-Fueyo; Francisco J Ruiz-Dueñas; María Jesús Martinez; Antonio Romero; Kenneth E Hammel; Francisco Javier Medrano; Angel T. Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Background: The genome of Pleurotus ostreatus, an important edible mushroom and a model ligninolytic organism of interest in lignocellulose biorefineries due to its ability to delignify agricultural wastes, was sequenced with the purpose of identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for lignin degradation. ...

  18. Peroxidase activity of the rat blood at prolonged intake of 137Cs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Grynevych

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigated peroxidase activity of blood white nonlinear rats-males by daily oral administration of 15 kBq 137Cs by chemiluminescence. Discovered oscillatory nature of the changes chemiluminescent indicators peroxi-dase oxidation of blood, the maximum deviation of the control are registered during the 4th and 60th days, and the minimum at the 1st, 7th and 135th days. Recovering kinetic parameters CL does not occur within 135 days of ob-servation (the 90th day of the completion of the introduction of radioactive cesium.

  19. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  20. Glutathione peroxidase activity in the selenium-treated alga Scenedesmus quadricauda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Hlavová, Monika; Zachleder, Vilém; Rucki, M.; Čížková, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, 1-2 (2011), s. 87-94 ISSN 0166-445X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Cell cycle * Enzyme activity * Glutathione peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.761, year: 2011

  1. Aqueous synthesis of porous platinum nanotubes at room temperature and their intrinsic peroxidase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kai; Lv, Zhicheng; Chen, Kun; Huang, Liang; Wang, Jing; Shao, Feng; Wang, Yanjun; Han, Heyou

    2013-07-11

    Platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) exhibiting high porosity were constructed by sacrificing the exterior of tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) and disintegrating the inner part spontaneously in aqueous solution at room temperature, in which the Kirkendall effect may play an important role. The present PtNTs exhibited intrinsic peroxidase-like activity in the presence of H2O2.

  2. Identification of the primary mechanism for fungal lignin degradation. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Many lignin-degrading fungi appear to lack lignin peroxidase (LiP), an enzyme generally thought important for fungal ligninolysis. The authors are working with one of these fungi, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, an aggressive white-rotter that selectively removes lignin from wood. During this project period, they have obtained the following principal results: new polymeric lignin model compounds were developed to assist in the elucidation of fungal ligninolytic mechanisms; experiments with one of the polymeric lignin models showed that C. subvermispora cultures which express no detectable LiP activity are nevertheless able to degrade nonphenolic lignin structures, this result is significant because LiPs were previously considered essential for fungal attack on these recalcitrant structures, which constitute about 90% of lignin; manganese peroxidases (MnPs), which C. subvermispora does produce, catalyze the peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids to give fatty acid hydroperoxides, fatty acid hydroperoxides are also used by MnP as oxidants (in place of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) that support the MnP catalytic cycle, these results indicate that MnP turnover in the presence of unsaturated lipids generates reactive lipid oxyradicals that could act as oxidant of other molecules; MnP-mediated lipid peroxidation results in the co-oxidative cleavage of nonphenolic lignin structures, the MnP/lipid peroxidation system may therefore provide C. subvermispora and other LiP-negative fungi with a mechanism to degrade the principal structures of lignin.

  3. Cysteine peroxidase activity in rat blood plasma | Razygraev ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rat plasma found to be able to accelerate greatly the H2O2-dependent oxidation of cysteine. The activity was a characteristic of a protein fraction precipitated at 30—44% ammonium sulfate saturation, and the specific activity in protein fraction was significantly higher than in plasma. Cysteine:H2O2 oxidoreductase ...

  4. Hydrogenolysis and Activation of Soda Lignin Using [BMIM]Cl as a Catalyst and Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To improve the reactivity of the soda lignin, an acid ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-mthylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl was used as the catalyst and solvent to degrade the soda lignin through hydrogenolysis. Structural elucidation of the lignin samples was conducted by using a combination of analytical methods including chemical analysis, ultraviolet spectrophotometry (UV spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectra, two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-HSQC NMR techniques, and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The antioxidant activities of the lignin samples were evaluated using the diammonium 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS+ radical scavenging and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging methods. The degradation mechanism was proposed based on the characterization results. The optimal reaction condition was as follows: the concentration of [BMIM]Cl in the solution was 10 wt %, the hydrogen initial pressure was 3 MPa, and the solution was heated for 4 h at 90 °C. After the reaction, the total hydroxyl content of the soda lignin increased by 81.3%, while the phenolic hydroxyl content increased by 23.1%. At the same time, the weight-average molar mass of the soda lignin sample decreased from 8220 to 6450 g/mol with an improved antioxidant activity. In addition, approximately 56.7% of the β-O-4 linkages were degraded in the lreaction. The main effect of the acid ionic liquid [BMIM]C1 was related to the cleavage of β-O-4 linkages. This study has shown the potential of using the catalyzed soda lignin as a natural polymer antioxidant.

  5. Antioxidant Activity of the Lignins Derived from Fluidized-Bed Fast Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail S. Qazi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A challenge in recent years has been the rational use of forest and agriculture residues for the production of bio-fuel, biochemical, and other bioproducts. In this study, potentially useful compounds from pyrolytic lignins were identified by HPLC-MS/MS and untargeted metabolomics. The metabolites identified were 2-(4-allyl-2-methoxyphenoxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1-propanol, benzyl benzoate, fisetinidol, phenyllactic acid, 2-phenylpropionic acid, 6,3′-dimethoxyflavone, and vanillin. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity (DPPH, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, and total phenolics content (TPC per gram of pyrolytic lignin ranged from 14 to 503 mg ascorbic acid equivalents, 35 to 277 mg trolox equivalents, and 0.42 to 50 mg gallic acid equivalents, respectively. A very significant correlation was observed between the DPPH and TPC (r = 0.8663, p ≤ 0.0001, TEAC and TPC (r = 0.8044, p ≤ 0.0001, and DPPH and TEAC (r = 0.8851, p ≤ 0.0001. The polyphenolic compounds in the pyrolytic lignins which are responsible for radical scavenging activity and antioxidant properties can be readily profiled with HPLC-MS/MS combined with untargeted metabolomics. The results also suggest that DPPH, TEAC, and TPC assays are suitable methods for the measurement of antioxidant activity in a variety of pyrolytic lignins. These data show that the pyrolytic lignins can be considered as promising sources of natural antioxidants and value-added chemicals.

  6. Peroxidase-like catalytic activities of ionic metalloporphyrins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the various PS-MTPPS was seen to be Co>Mn>Fe, with CoTPPS showing efficiency ... obtained, by simple ion exchange method in aqueous conditions to get ... The relative activities of the PS-MTPPS resins were then evaluated by comparing.

  7. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit (γ-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis

  8. Effects of ageing on peroxidase activity and localization in radish (Raphanus sativus L. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Scialabba

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase activity was assayed in crude extracts of integument, cotyledons and embryo axis of radish seeds, deteriorated under accelerated ageing conditions. Over five days of ageing, in which germination decreased from 100 to 52%, the enzyme activity in integument was higher than that in other seed parts, increasing in the first days of ageing and then decreasing sharply in extremely aged seeds. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed four peroxidase isoenzymes with MM of 98, 52.5, 32.8 and 29.5 kDa in the embryo axis of unaged seeds, and only the 32.8 and 29.5 kDa MM isoforms in the integument and cotyledons. In these parts of the seed, only the 29.5 kDa MM isoenzyme increased in activity in early days of ageing and decreased thereafter. In the embryo axis, the 29.5 kDa MM isoenzyme activity increased slowly in the first day of ageing, while the 98 and 52.5 kDa MM isoenzyme activities disappeared. A cytochemical localization of peroxidase activity in the various tissues showed that main differences between unaged and extremely aged seeds occurred in the embryo axis.

  9. Photosynthetic pigments and peroxidase activity of Lepidium sativum L. during assisted Hg phytoextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinska, Beata; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2017-05-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate metabolic answer of Lepidium sativum L. on Hg, compost, and citric acid during assisted phytoextraction. The chlorophyll a and b contents, total carotenoids, and activity of peroxidase were determined in plants exposed to Hg and soil amendments. Hg accumulation in plant shoots was also investigated. The pot experiments were provided in soil artificially contaminated by Hg and/or supplemented with compost and citric acid. Hg concentration in plant shoots and soil substrates was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) method after acid mineralization. The plant photosynthetic pigments and peroxidase activity were measured by standard spectrophotometric methods. The study shows that L. sativum L. accumulated Hg in its aerial tissues. An increase in Hg accumulation was noticed when soil was supplemented with compost and citric acid. Increasing Hg concentration in plant shoots was correlated with enhanced activation of peroxidase activity and changes in total carotenoid concentration. Combined use of compost and citric acid also decreased the chlorophyll a and b contents in plant leaves. Presented study reveals that L. sativum L. is capable of tolerating Hg and its use during phytoextraction assisted by combined use of compost and citric acid lead to decreasing soil contamination by Hg.

  10. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities.

  11. Effect of cadmium on growth, protein content and peroxidase activity in pea plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bavi, K.; Kholdebarin, B.

    2011-01-01

    n this study the effects of different cadmium chloride concentrations (5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mu M) on some physiological and biochemical processes including seed germination, root and shoot fresh and dry weight, protein content and peroxidase activity in peas (Cicer arietinum cv. pars) were investigated. Cadmium did not have any significant effect on the rate of pea seed germination. However, it affected the subsequent growth rate in these plants. Higher cadmium concentrations specially at 50 and 100 mu M reduced plant growth significantly. Leaf chlorosis, wilting and leaf abscission were observed in plants treated with cadmium. Protein content in pea roots reduced significantly in the presence of high cadmium concentrations. Low concentrations of CdCl/sub 2/ resulted in higher peroxidase activity both in roots and shoots of pea plants. (author)

  12. Structural elucidation and antioxidant activity of lignin isolated from rice straw and alkali‑oxygen black liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Lihui; Wu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Huifang; Jin, Yongcan

    2018-05-17

    Alkali‑oxygen cooking of lignocellulose offers lignin many structural properties and bioactivities for biorefinery. In this work, milled wood lignin (MWL) and alkali‑oxygen lignin (AOL) were isolated from rice straw and alkali‑oxygen black liquor, respectively. The lignin structure was characterized by spectroscopy and wet chemistry. Antioxidant activity of lignins was assessed by DPPH·and ABTS scavenging ability assay. Results showed the oxidization and condensation of lignin occurred during alkali‑oxygen cooking. The p-hydroxyphenyl was more easily removed from rice straw than guaiacyl and syringyl units. The ester or ether linkages derived from hydroxycynnamic acids, and the main interunit linkages, i.e. β-O-4' bonds, were mostly cleaved. Lignin-xylan complex had high reactivity under alkali‑oxygen condition. Tricin, incorporated into lignin, was detected in MWL but was absent in AOL. Nitrobenzene oxidation showed MWL can well represent the protolignin of rice straw, and the products yield decreased dramatically after alkali‑oxygen cooking. AOL had higher radical scavenging ability than MWL indicating alkali‑oxygen cooking was an effective pathway for the enhancement of antioxidant activity of lignin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fe(III)-TAML activator: a potent peroxidase mimic for chemiluminescent determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovenko, Marina M; Demiyanova, Alexandra S; Kopylov, Kirill E; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2014-07-01

    Efforts to replace native peroxidase with its low molecular weight alternatives have stimulated a search for peroxidase mimetics. Herein we describe the oxidation of luminol with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by commercially available Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a, which was shown to be a more active catalyst than hemin. At Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a use in chemiluminescent assay for H2O2 determination the detection limit value (3σ) of 5×10(-8)M was similar to the detection limit obtained with horseradish peroxidase (1×10(-7)M) and significantly lower than that obtained in the presence of hemin (6×10(-7)M). The linear ranges (R(2)=0.98) of the assay were 6×10(-8)-1×10(-6)M and 6×10(-7)-1×10(-6)M H2O2 for Fe(III)-TAML 1a and hemin, respectively. The CV values for Fe(III)-TAML 1a-based assay measured within the working range varied from 1.0% to 3.7% (n=4), whereas in the case of hemin -5.0% to 9.7% (n=4). Moreover, the sensitivity of Fe(III)-TAML 1a-based method was 56 and 5 times higher than that of hemin- and HRP-based methods, respectively. The obtained results open good perspectives to apply Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a in CL analytical methods instead of hemin, a traditionally used peroxidase mimetic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. V2O5 nanowires with an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    André, R.; Natálio, F.; Humanes, M.; Leppin, J.; Heinze, K.; Wever, R.; Schröder, H.C.; Müller, W.E.G.; Tremel, W.

    2011-01-01

    V2O5 nanowires exhibit an intrinsic catalytic activity towards classical peroxidase substrates such as 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3,3,5,5,-tetramethylbenzdine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2. These V2O5 nanowires show an optimum reactivity at a pH of 4.0 and the

  15. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-02

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation.

  16. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of lignin fractions extracted from Acacia nilotica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barapatre, Anand; Meena, Avtar Singh; Mekala, Sowmya; Das, Amitava; Jha, Harit

    2016-05-01

    Lignin is one of the most important phytomacromolecule with diverse therapeutic properties such as anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and immune-stimulatory. The present study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant, free radical scavenging and anti-proliferative/cytotoxic activities of eleven different lignin fractions, extracted from the wood of Acacia nilotica by pressurized solvent extraction (PSE) and successive solvent extraction (SSE) methods. Results indicate that the PSE fractions have high polyphenolic content and reducing power. However, the antioxidant efficiency examined by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assay was higher in SSE fractions. All lignin fractions revealed a significant ability to scavenge nitric oxide, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. The extracted lignin fractions display high ferric ion reducing capacity and also possess excellent antioxidant potential in the hydrophobic (linoleic acid) system. Fractions extracted by polar solvent has the highest iron (Fe(2+)) chelating activity as compared to other factions, indicating their effect on the redox cycling of iron. Four lignin fractions depicted higher cytotoxic potential (IC50: 2-15 μg/mL) towards breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) but were ineffective (IC50: ≥ 100 μg/mL) against normal primary human hepatic stellate cells (HHSteCs). These findings suggest that the lignin extracts of A. nilotica wood has a remarkable potential to prevent disease caused by the overproduction of radicals and also seem to be a promising candidate as natural antioxidant and anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Peroxidase Activity in Poplar Inoculated with Compatible and Incompetent Isolates of Paxillus involutus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDUL GAFUR

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase activity of the hybrid poplar Populus×canescens (Ait. Sm. (= P. tremula L. × P. alba L. inoculated with compatible and incompetent isolates of Paxillus involutus (Batsch Fr. was investigated. Screening of the ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates was initiated with exploration of mycelial growth characteristics and mycorrhizal ability in vitro with poplar. Both traits varied within the fungus although they did not seem to be genetically correlated. While isolates SCO1, NAU, and 031 grew faster than others, only isolates MAJ, SCO1, and 031 were able to form ectomycorrhiza with poplar. Isolates MAJ (compatible and NAU (incompetent were subsequently selected for further experiments. Activity of peroxidase, one of the defense-related enzymes, was examined in pure culture and short root components of compatible and incompetent interactions between poplar and P. involutus. Peroxidase activities increased significantly in poplar inoculated with incompetent isolate of the fungus compared to control, while induction of the same enzyme was not detected in compatible associations.

  18. Characterization of structure and activity of garlic peroxidase (POX(1B)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ichi, Sarra; Miodek, Anna; Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Henry, Céline; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa

    2011-01-01

    Structural characterization and study of the activity of new POX(1B) protein from garlic which has a high peroxidase activity and can be used as a biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide and phenolic compounds were performed and compared with the findings for other heme peroxidases. The structure-function relationship was investigated by analysis of the spectroscopic properties and correlated to the structure determined by a new generation of high-performance hybrid mass spectrometers. The reactivity of the enzyme was analyzed by studies of the redox activity toward various ligands and the reactivity with various substrates. We demonstrated that, in the case of garlic peroxidase, the heme group is pentacoordinated, and has an histidine as a proximal ligand. POX(1B) exhibited a high affinity for hydrogen peroxide as well as various reducing cosubstrates. In addition, high enzyme specificity was demonstrated. The k(cat) and K(M) values were 411 and 400 mM(-1) s(-1) for 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and 2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), respectively. Furthermore, the reduction of nitro compounds in the presence of POX(1B) was demonstrated by iron(II) nitrosoalkane complex assay. In addition, POX(1B) showed a great potential for application for drug metabolism since its ability to react with 1-nitrohexane in the presence of sodium dithionite was demonstrated by the appearance of a characteristic Soret band at 411 nm. The high catalytic efficiency obtained in the case of the new garlic peroxidase (POX(1B)) is suitable for the monitoring of different analytes and biocatalysis.

  19. Treatment of colored effluents with lignin-degrading enzymes: An emerging role of marine-derived fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; DeSouza-Ticlo, D.; Verma, A.K.

    laccase, manganese-peroxidase and lignin peroxidases are useful in the treatment of colored industrial effluents and other xenobiotics. Free mycelia, mycelial pellets, immobilized fungi or their lignin-degrading enzymes fromterrestrial fungi have been...

  20. Preoxidation and Activation of the Lignin Char: Carbonization and Oxidation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloua Sebbahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive process of pretreatment and oxidation of lignin char was developed to optimize the production of activated carbon. The lignin char was obtained by carbonization of lignin under nitrogen at 600°C for 2 hours. The optimum time and temperature used to oxidize the char without destruction were, respectively, 6 hours and 245°C. The oxygen improves the reactivity of the sample in CO2 and evolved the sample of a thermoplastic behaviour to a thermosetting behaviour. The oxygenation in air of the lignin char does not change the mode of deformation acquired by the material during the carbonization. The preoxidized coal reacts more than the nonoxidized coal during the CO2 activation, whereas the reduction in volume in the first case is smaller than in the second. The preoxidized and then activated carbon shows the formation and the development of microporosity at the expense of macroporosity. This microstructure is one of the main characteristics of activated carbon, which can be used as adsorbent for different pollutants.

  1. Effect of caffeine on peroxidase activity and gamma-ray-induced oxic and anoxic damage in Hordeum vulgare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, R.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of caffeine during and after gamma radiation of barley seeds was studied using seedling injury and peroxidase activity as parameters. The radiation-induced stimulation of peroxidase activity is evident in eight-day only seedlings but not in embryos (i.e. immediately after irradiation). Caffeine present during irradiation of seeds soaked in oxygenated water diminishes seedling injury and also reduces the peroxidase activity to the level observed in eight-day old seedlings of unirradiated seeds. Caffeine, however, produces just the opposite effect (i.e. enhances the seedling injury and peroxidase activity of eight-day old seedlings) when applied during irradiation of seeds soaked in oxygen-free water. There is no evidence that caffeine effects enzyme activity under in vitro conditions. (author)

  2. Effect of biological and chemical preparations on peroxidase activity in leaves of tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Kolomiets

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In terms of treating tomato variety Chaika with chemical preparations with active substances if aluminum phosphate, 570 g/l + phosphorous acid 80 g/,l and mankotseb in concentration of 640 g/kg, the maximum increase in peroxidase activity in leaves of plants was observed in12 hours. In terms of use of biological preparations based on living cells Bacillus subtilis and Azotobacter chroococcum its activity was maximum in 24 hours and ranged from 77.7 to 112.7 un.mg-1•s-1

  3. Activity and isoenzyme spectrum of peroxidases and dehydrins of some plant species, growing on the shores of lake Baikal, under abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Zhivet’ev

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Termostability and optimal pH of weak-associated with plant cell wall and soluble peroxidases was shown to change in relation to natural conditions and season of year. Also the activity of peroxidase was variable during vegetation period. Dehydrine expression was followed by spike of peroxidase activity (and, a priori, an increase of hydrogen peroxide concentration.

  4. A Novel Colorimetric Immunoassay Utilizing the Peroxidase Mimicking Activity of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Gyu Park

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple colorimetric immunoassay system, based on the peroxidase mimicking activity of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, has been developed to detect clinically important antigenic molecules. MNPs with ca. 10 nm in diameter were synthesized and conjugated with specific antibodies against target molecules, such as rotaviruses and breast cancer cells. Conjugation of the MNPs with antibodies (MNP-Abs enabled specific recognition of the corresponding target antigenic molecules through the generation of color signals arising from the colorimetric reaction between the selected peroxidase substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB and H2O2. Based on the MNP-promoted colorimetric reaction, the target molecules were detected and quantified by measuring absorbance intensities corresponding to the oxidized form of TMB. Owing to the higher stabilities and economic feasibilities of MNPs as compared to horseradish peroxidase (HRP, the new colorimetric system employing MNP-Abs has the potential of serving as a potent immunoassay that should substitute for conventional HRP-based immunoassays. The strategy employed to develop the new methodology has the potential of being extended to the construction of simple diagnostic systems for a variety of biomolecules related to human cancers and infectious diseases, particularly in the realm of point-of-care applications.

  5. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  6. Green tea and its major polyphenol EGCG increase the activity of oral peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narotzki, Baruch; Levy, Yishai; Aizenbud, Dror; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2013-01-01

    Oral peroxidases (OPO) consist mainly of salivary peroxidase and myeloperoxidase and are involved in oral defense mechanisms. Salivary peroxidase is synthesized and secreted by salivary glands, whereas myeloperoxidase is found in polymorphonuclear leukocytes, which migrate into the oral cavity at gingival crevices. Green tea is the world's second most popular drink after water. Polyphenols are the most biologically active group of tea components. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the interaction between green tea & EGCG (Epigallocatechin 3-gallate), its main polyphenol and OPO. In previous studies we have shown that elderly trained people who drink green tea for 3 months, have a higher level of OPO activity compared to non-drinkers. Thus, we decided to extend our project in order to understand the above observations by studying the interaction of green tea and OPO both in vitro and in vivo. Addition of green tea and black tea infusions (50 μl/ml) and EGCG (50 μM) to saliva, resulted in a sharp rise of OPO activity +280% (p = 0.009), 54% (p = 0.04) and 42% (p = 0.009), respectively. The elevation of OPO activity due to addition of green tea and EGCG was in a dose dependent manner: r = 0.91 (p = 0.001) and r = 0.637 (p = 0.019), respectively. Also, following green tea infusion mouth rinsing, a rise of OPO activity was observed: +268% (p = 0.159). These results may be of great clinical importance, as tea consumer's oral epithelium may have better protection against the deleterious effects of hydroxyl radicals, produced by not removed hydrogen peroxides in the presence of metal ions. Higher OPO activity upon green tea drinking may provide an extra protection against oxidative stress in the oral cavity.

  7. Effect of phenol on germination capacity and polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadić Vojin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and antioxidant enzymes, peroxidase (POX and catalase (CAT during lettuce seed germination at different concentrations of phenol. Out of eleven varieties of lettuce, four were chosen according to their germination tolerance to phenol as follows: plants exhibiting high (Ljubljanska ledenka - LJL and Nansen - N and low toleranace (Little Gem - LG and Majska kraljica - MK. A decrease in germination efficiency after exposure to LD50 of phenol was determined for these four varieties. The effects of phenol treatment on POX, CAT and PPO activities were determined after 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 days of growth at LD50 concentrations. A trend of increased peroxidase activity was observed in seeds grown on LD50 of phenol compared to control seeds. A significant increase in CAT activity was observed at the beginning of treatment for MK, LG and N in seeds grown on phenol as well as in control seeds. A trend of increased PPO activity was observed in all control seeds. We also investigated the affinity of PPO for two different substrates that were used for the determination of enzyme activity. Our results show that LJL and N are the varieties most tolerant to growth on phenol. Here we report on the activities of their antioxidant enzymes and PPO during seed germination. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173017

  8. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10 4  s -1 subunit -1 at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  9. Changes in Peroxidase Activity in the Peel of Unshiub Mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc. Fruit with Different Storage Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Lepeduš

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Unshiu mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc. is the major Citrus crop in Croatia. Limiting factors for longer consumption of Unshiu mandarin are low storage performance and the appearance of chilling injuries during storage. Previous studies indicated that oxidative stress might be involved in cold-induced peel damage of harvested Citrus fruit. The aim of the present study was to investigate peroxidase distribution, isoenzyme pattern and activity in the peel of Unshiu mandarin fruit. Special goal of our study was to investigate the changes of peroxidase activity in respect to two different hot water dipping (HWD treatments (3 min at 48 and 52 °C and two different storage temperatures (1 and 3 °C combined. Peroxidase activity was detected at the border of oil glands, in the peel surface and in the conducting elements positioned in the inner part of the peel. Electrophoretic analysis revealed the presence of two peroxidase isoenzymes. There were no differences in the electrophoretic pattern after the HWD treatments and cold storage. Lowering of both total and specific peroxidase activity was measured in HWD-treated samples in comparison with the control ones. However, it appeared that significant decrease in total peroxidase activity was influenced by the storage temperatures, while the increase in total soluble protein content was influenced by the HWD pretreatment.

  10. Inhibition mechanism of lanthanum ion on the activity of horseradish peroxidase in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaofen; Wang, Lihong; Lu, Aihua; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-02-01

    In order to understand the inhibition mechanism of lanthanum ion (La 3+) on the activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the effects of La 3+ on the activity, electron transfer and conformation of HRP in vitro were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF/MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It was found that La 3+ can combine with the amide groups of the polypeptide chain in HRP molecule, forming the complex of La 3+ and HRP (La-HRP). The formation of the La-HRP complex causes the destruction of the native structure of HRP molecule, leading to the decrease in the non-planarity of the porphyrin ring in the heme group of HRP molecule, and then in the exposure extent of active center, Fe(III) of the porphyrin ring of HRP molecule. Thus, the direct electrochemical and catalytic activities of HRP are decreased. It is a possible inhibition mechanism of La 3+ on the activity of peroxidase.

  11. [Antimutagenic activity of plant extracts from Armoracia rusticana, Ficus carica and Zea mays and peroxidase in eukaryotic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agabeĭli, R A; Kasimova, T E; Alekperov, U K

    2004-01-01

    Antimutagene activity and high efficiency of antimutagene action of plant extracts from horseradish roots (Armoracia rusticana), fig brunches (Ficus carica) and mays seedlings (Zea mays) and their ability to decrease the frequency of spontaneous and induced by gamma-rays chromosome aberrations in meristematic cells of Vicia faba and marrow cells of mice have been shown. Comparative assessment of genoprotective properties of peroxidase and the studied extracts has revealed higher efficiency of antimutagene action of peroxidase.

  12. Peroxidase-like activity of nanocrystalline cobalt selenide and its application for uric acid detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang QQ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quan-Quan Zhuang,1 Zhi-Hang Lin,1 Yan-Cheng Jiang,1 Hao-Hua Deng,2 Shao-Bin He,1,3 Li-Ting Su,4 Xiao-Qiong Shi,2 Wei Chen2 1Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Quanzhou First Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, 3Department of Pharmacy, Quanzhou Infectious Disease Hospital, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Quanzhou Medical College, Quanzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Dendrite-like cobalt selenide nanostructures were synthesized from cobalt and selenium powder precursors by a solvothermal method in anhydrous ethylenediamine. The as-prepared nanocrystalline cobalt selenide was found to possess peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the reaction of peroxidase substrates in the presence of H2O2. A spectrophotometric method for uric acid (UA determination was developed based on the nanocrystalline cobalt selenide-catalyzed coupling reaction between N-ethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl-3-methylaniline sodium salt and 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP in the presence of H2O2. Under optimum conditions, the absorbance was proportional to the concentration of UA over the range of 2.0–40 µM with a detection limit of 0.5 µM. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by determination of UA in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Keywords: enzyme mimics, cobalt selenide, peroxidase-like activity, uric acid, human serum

  13. Online Detection of Peroxidase Using 3D Printing, Active Magnetic Mixing, and Spectra Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for online detection of peroxidase (POD using 3D printing, active magnetic mixing, fluidic control, and optical detection was developed and demonstrated in this study. The proposed POD detection system consisted of a 3D printing and active magnetic mixing based fluidic chip for online catalytic reaction, an optical detector with a fluidic flow cell for quantitative determination of the final catalysate, and a single-chip microcontroller based controller for automatic control of two rotating magnetic fields and four precise peristaltic pumps. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP was used as research model and a linear relationship between the absorbance at the characteristic wavelength of 450 nm and the concentration of HRP of 1/4–1/128 μg mL−1 was obtained as A  =  0.257ln⁡(C + 1.425 (R2  = 0.976. For the HRP spiked pork tests, the recoveries of HRP ranged from 93.5% to 110.4%, indicating that this proposed system was capable of detecting HRP in real samples. It has the potential to be extended for online detection of the activity of other enzymes and integration with ELISA method for biological and chemical analysis.

  14. Protecting peroxidase activity of multilayer enzyme-polyion films using outer catalase layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiyun; Rusling, James F; Hu, Naifei

    2007-12-27

    Films constructed layer-by-layer on electrodes with architecture {protein/hyaluronic acid (HA)}n containing myoglobin (Mb) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were protected against protein damage by H2O2 by using outer catalase layers. Peroxidase activity for substrate oxidation requires activation by H2O2, but {protein/HA}n films without outer catalase layers are damaged slowly and irreversibly by H2O2. The rate and extent of damage were decreased dramatically by adding outer catalase layers to decompose H2O2. Comparative studies suggest that protection results from catalase decomposing a fraction of the H2O2 as it enters the film, rather than by an in-film diffusion barrier. The outer catalase layers controlled the rate of H2O2 entry into inner regions of the film, and they biased the system to favor electrocatalytic peroxide reduction over enzyme damage. Catalase-protected {protein/HA}n films had an increased linear concentration range for H2O2 detection. This approach offers an effective way to protect biosensors from damage by H2O2.

  15. Hemin-Graphene Derivatives with Increased Peroxidase Activities Restrain Protein Tyrosine Nitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huan; Yang, Zhen; Li, Hailing; Gao, Zhonghong

    2017-12-14

    Protein tyrosine nitration is implicated in the occurrence and progression of pathological conditions involving free radical reactions. It is well recognized that hemin can catalyze protein tyrosine nitration in the presence of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide. Generally, the catalytic efficiency is positively correlated to its peroxidase activity. In this study, however, it is found that the efficiency of hemin in catalyzing protein tyrosine nitration is largely suppressed after functionalization with graphene derivatives, even though its peroxidase-like activity is more than quadrupled. Further studies show that the oxidation of tyrosine is still observed for these composites; dityrosine formation, however, is greatly inhibited. Furthermore, these composites also exhibit strong effects on the oxidation of nitrite into nitrate. Therefore, we propose a mechanism in which hemin-graphene derivatives facilitate the oxidation of tyrosine and nitrite to produce tyrosyl radicals and nitrogen dioxide radicals in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, but graphene interlayers serve as barriers that hinder radical-radical coupling reactions; consequently, protein tyrosine nitration is restrained. This property of hemin-graphene derivatives, by which they catalyze substrate oxidation but suppress radical-radical coupling reactions, shows their great potential in selective oxidation procedures for byproduct removal. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  17. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  18. Modulation in radiation-induced changes in peroxidase activity with gibberellic acid in seedling's growth in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.R.; Qureshi, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the effects of gamma irradiation (10 to 110 Kr) with gibberellic acid (GA/sub 3/) for peroxidase activity, in relation to early days of seedling's growth in Kabulic chickpea cultivar, Noor-91, were evaluated. Stimulation in peroxidase activity over control was recorded at all the irradiation treatments from 3rd to 8th day of seedling's development. Increase in peroxidase activity at 10 and 20 Kr was due to the increase in metabolic activity, while higher doses of gamma radiation account for the damaging action and production of peroxy radicals. However, stimulation in fresh weight was observed only at 10 Kr of gamma irradiation. Postmutagenic application of Ga/sub 3/ protect the seedlings from radiation injury, by increasing the peroxides activity, and increased the fresh weight of chickpea seedlings. (author)

  19. Colorimetric Glucose Assay Based on Magnetic Particles Having Pseudo-peroxidase Activity and Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkova, Pavla; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter; Styriak, Igor; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are currently used as a suitable alternative for peroxidase in the construction of novel biosensors, analytic and diagnostic methods. Their better chemical and thermal stabilities predestine them as appropriate pseudo-enzymatic catalysts. In this point of view, our research was focused on preparation of simply and fast method for immobilization of glucose oxidase onto surface of MPs with peroxidase-like activity. Spectrophotometric method (wavelength 450 nm) optimized for glucose determination using modified MPs has been successfully developed. Concentration curve for optimization of method was assayed, and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) calculated, maximum reaction rate (V max), limit of detection, and correlation coefficient were determined to be 0.13 mmol/l (2.34 mg/dl), 1.79 pkat, 3.74 µmol/l (0.067 mg/dl), and 0.996, respectively. Interferences of other sugars such as sucrose, sorbitol, deoxyribose, maltose, and fructose were determined as well as effect of substances presenting in plasma (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, trolox, and urea). Results in comparison with positive and negative controls showed no interferences of the other sugars and no influence of plasma substances to measuring of glucose. The constructed method showed corresponding results with linear dependence and a correlation coefficient of 0.997. Possibility of repeated use of modified MPs was successfully proved.

  20. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (pal) and peroxidase activity in brown rust infected tissues of pakistani wheat cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, A.; Tahir, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Besides other factors resistance and susceptibility is the outcome of biochemical processes such as activities of defense-related enzymes. So in this study, Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and Peroxidase activity of resistant (Inqilab-91) and susceptible (Kirin-95) wheat cultivars were determined through spectrophotometer to address the biochemical aspect related to the disease after 8 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours of leaf rust inoculation. The results have shown that these enzymes were present in both the resistant and susceptible cultivars but the activity was more pronounced in the resistant one. The effect of PAL and peroxidase activity was also investigated among inoculated and uninoculated plants within the same cultivar. The activity of both PAL and peroxidase were more significant in inoculated ones. The results have shown that the after 72 hours of inoculation Inqilab-91 had more PAL activity i.e., 5.47 IU/ml/min than in Kirin-95 i.e., 2.08 IU/ml/min at 270 nm. While peroxidase activity in Inqilab-91 was 6.41 IU/ml/min and in Kirin-95, 3.66 IU/ml/min after 72 hours of inoculation, observed under 470 nm wavelength. Increase in one's activity increases the other enzyme's activity. The activity was more prominent after 72 hours of infection as pathogen had successfully established itself in the host plant tissue. The activities of these enzymes act as plants active defense mechanism against the attack of pathogen. (author)

  1. Proximity does not contribute to activity enhancement in the glucose oxidase-horseradish peroxidase cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Tsitkov, Stanislav; Hess, Henry

    2016-12-01

    A proximity effect has been invoked to explain the enhanced activity of enzyme cascades on DNA scaffolds. Using the cascade reaction carried out by glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase as a model system, here we study the kinetics of the cascade reaction when the enzymes are free in solution, when they are conjugated to each other and when a competing enzyme is present. No proximity effect is found, which is in agreement with models predicting that the rapidly diffusing hydrogen peroxide intermediate is well mixed. We suggest that the reason for the activity enhancement of enzymes localized by DNA scaffolds is that the pH near the surface of the negatively charged DNA nanostructures is lower than that in the bulk solution, creating a more optimal pH environment for the anchored enzymes. Our findings challenge the notion of a proximity effect and provide new insights into the role of DNA scaffolds.

  2. Adsorption of methyl orange using activated carbon prepared from lignin by ZnCl2 treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, K.; Hamdi, N.; Kriaa, A.; Srasra, E.

    2012-08-01

    Lignocellulosic materials are good and cheap precursors for the production of activated carbon. In this study, activated carbons were prepared from the lignin at different temperatures (200 to 500°C) by ZnCl2. The effects influencing the surface area of the resulting activated carbon are activation temperature, activation time and impregnation ratio. The optimum condition, are found an impregnation ratio of 2, an activation temperature of 450°C, and an activation time of 2 h. The results showed that the surface area and micropores volume of activated carbon at the experimental conditions are achieved to 587 and 0.23 cm3 g-1, respectively. The adsorption behavior of methyl orange dye from aqueous solution onto activated lignin was investigated as a function of equilibrium time, pH and concentration. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms. A maximum adsorption capacity of 300 mg g-1 of methyl orange by activated carbon was achieved.

  3. Humanlike substitutions to Ω-loop D of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c only modestly affect dynamics and peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Haotian; Bowler, Bruce E

    2018-06-01

    Structural studies of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c (L.J. McClelland, T.-C. Mou, M.E. Jeakins-Cooley, S.R. Sprang, B.E. Bowler, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 111 (2014) 6648-6653) show that modest movement of Ω-loop D (residues 70-85, average RMSD versus the native structure: 0.81 Å) permits loss of Met80-heme ligation creating an available coordination site to catalyze the peroxidase activity mediated by cytochrome c early in apoptosis. However, Ala81 and Gly83 move significantly (RMSDs of 2.18 and 1.26 Å, respectively). Ala81 and Gly83 evolve to Ile and Val, respectively, in human cytochrome c and peroxidase activity decreases 25-fold relative to the yeast protein at pH 7. To test the hypothesis that these residues evolved to restrict the peroxidase activity of cytochrome c, A81I and G83V variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c were prepared. For both variants, the apparent pK a of the alkaline transition increases by 0.2 to 0.3 relative to the wild type (WT) protein and the rate of opening the heme crevice is slowed. The cooperativity of acid unfolding is decreased for the G83V variant. At pH 7 and 8, the catalytic rate constant, k cat , for the peroxidase activity of both variants decreases relative to WT, consistent with the effects on alkaline isomerization. Below pH 7, the loss in the cooperativity of acid unfolding causes k cat for peroxidase activity to increase for the G83V variant relative to WT. Neither variant decreases k cat to the level of the human protein, indicating that other residues also contribute to the low peroxidase activity of human cytochrome c. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association between Polymorphisms in Glutathione Peroxidase and Selenoprotein P Genes, Glutathione Peroxidase Activity, HRT Use and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Méplan, Catherine; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is one of the most common cancers in women. Evidence suggests that genetic variation in antioxidant enzymes could influence BC risk, but to date the relationship between selenoproteins and BC risk remains unclear. In this report, a study population including 975 Danish cases...... and 975 controls matched for age and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use was genotyped for five functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SEPP1, GPX1, GPX4 and the antioxidant enzyme SOD2 genes. The influence of genetic polymorphisms on breast cancer risk was assessed using conditional...... logistic regression. Additionally pre-diagnosis erythrocyte GPx (eGPx) activity was measured in a sub-group of the population. A 60% reduction in risk of developing overall BC and ductal BC was observed in women who were homozygous Thr carriers for SEPP1 rs3877899. Additionally, Leu carriers for GPX1 Pro...

  5. Improved activity of immobilized horseradish peroxidase on gold nanoparticles in the presence of bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Yuyang; Li, Jun; Huang, Zhenzhen; He, Ke; Zhuang, Jiaqi; Yang, Wensheng

    2013-01-01

    The using of macromolecular additives is known to be a simple and effective way to improve the activity of immobilized enzymes on solid support, yet the mechanism has not been well understood. Taking horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an example, only 30 % of its catalytic activity was kept after being immobilized on the surface of 25-nm Au nanoparticles, mainly attributed to the conformational change of the heme-containing active site. The catalytic activity of HRP was significantly improved to 80 % when a certain amount of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was added at the initial stage of the immobilization. Systematic spectral investigation indicated that the addition of BSA inhibited the tertiary structure change around the active site, which was a prerequisite for improved activity of the immobilized HRP. Steady-state kinetic analyses revealed that the introduction of BSA could effectively improve the turnover rate of substrate to product in spite of slight reduced affinity to substrates, which also contributed to the improved catalytic activity

  6. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H 2 O 2 -oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum

  7. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  8. Sex determines the influence of smoking and gene polymorphism on glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Tine Halsen; Sigsgaard, Torben; Andersen, Helle Raun

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) is one of the major oxidative enzymes. Our aim was to characterize factors influencing its activity and to determine whether or not the activity is associated with asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Serum selenium concentration was measured, GPX1 polymorphisms...... %) had doctor-diagnosed asthma. RESULTS: The average serum selenium concentration was too low for optimal enzyme activity (mean (SE), 83.4 (0.76) ng/mL). GPX1 activity in men was lower than in women, 52.6 (0.66) and 56.4 (0.59) U/g protein, respectively (p... associated with serum selenium concentration (p = 0.005) and negatively associated with both active smoking (p = 0.009) and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (p = 0.02). In women, activity was associated with genotypes with 59.2 (1.4), 56.0 (1.4) and 54.2 (1.4) U/g protein in the homozygote wild...

  9. Effects of topical vitamin E on corneal superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities and polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration after photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, Ayse; Bilgihan, Kamil; Yis, Ozgür; Sezer, Cem; Akyol, Gülen; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2003-04-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) induces free radical formation and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell infiltration in the cornea. Vitamin E is a free radical scavenger and protects the cells from reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effects of topical vitamin E on corneal PMN cell infiltration and corneal antioxidant enzyme activities after PRK. We studied four groups, each consisting of seven eyes. Group 1 were control eyes. In group 2 the corneal epithelium was removed by a blunt spatula (epithelial scrape). In group 3, corneal photoablation (59 micro m, 5 dioptres) was performed after epithelial removal (traditional PRK). In group 4 we tested the effects of topical Vitamin E after traditional PRK. Corneal tissues were removed and studied with enzymatic analysis (measurement of corneal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities) and histologically. Stromal PMN leucocyte counts were significantly higher after mechanical epithelial removal and traditional PRK (p < 0.05). Corneal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities decreased significantly after mechanical epithelial removal and traditional PRK (p < 0.05). In group 4, treated with vitamin E, corneal superoxide dismutase activity did not differ significantly from that in the medically non-treated groups, nor did corneal PMN cell infiltration after traditional PRK. The reduction of corneal glutathione peroxidase activity after PRK was reduced significantly after topical vitamin E treatment. Topical vitamin E treatment may be useful for reducing the harmful effects of reactive oxygen radical after epithelial scraping and PRK in that it increases corneal glutathione peroxidase activity.

  10. Nanodiamond-Gold Nanocomposites with the Peroxidase-Like Oxidative Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Dukhee; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Lee, Sang-Yup; Kang, Eunah

    2016-12-21

    Novel nanodiamond-gold nanocomposites (NDAus) are prepared, and their oxidative catalytic activity is examined. Gold nanoparticles are deposited on carboxylated nanodiamonds (NDs) by in situ chemical reduction of gold precursor ions to produce NDAus, which exhibit catalytic activity for the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide similarly to a peroxidase. This remarkable catalytic activity is exhibited only by the gold nanoparticle-decorated NDs and is not observed for either Au nanoparticles or NDs separately. Kinetic oxidative catalysis studies show that NDAus exhibit a ping-pong mechanism with an activation energy of 93.3 kJ mol -1 , with the oxidation reaction rate being proportional to the substrate concentration. NDAus retain considerable activity even after several instances of reuse and are compatible with a natural enzyme, allowing the detection of xanthine using cascade catalysis. Association with gold nanoparticles makes NDs a good carbonic catalyst due to charge transfer at the metal-carbon interface and facilitated substrate adsorption. The results of this study suggest that diverse carbonic catalysts can be obtained by interfacial incorporation of various metal/inorganic substances.

  11. Ultrastructural cytochemical prospective study of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: detection of peroxidase activity in patients failing to respond to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiffers, J; Darmendrail, V; Larrue, J; Villenave, I; Bernard, P; Boisseau, M; Broustet, A

    1981-08-15

    Ultrastructural cytochemical studies revealed peroxidase activity in five of 25 adult patients with apparent null lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in whom the peroxidase reaction studied with light microscopy was negative. None of these 5 patients responded to a chemotherapy regimen used for adult ALL. The importance of ultrastructural cytochemistry which allows the recognition of myeloblastic differentiation in undifferentiated blast cells is also demonstrated. The correct classification of such cases may be important for prognosis because they appear to be resistant to the chemotherapy used in treating ALL.

  12. ISOENZYMATIC POLYMORPHISM AND ACTIVITY OF PEROXIDASES OF COMMON BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris L. UNDER SALINE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. BROETTO

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the uses of the technique of tissue culture for plant breeding is the identification of cell lines tolerant to salt stress.In order to study the biochemical mechanisms involved in the genetic expression to salt tolerance, callus from embryo axis of four bean cultivars (cv. IAC-carioca; cv. IAPAR-14; cv. JALO-EEP558; CV. BAT-93 were grown in Murashige & Skoog (1962 medium, supplemented with NaCl in the concentrations of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mM. After 14 days callus were harvested and analyzed according to their isoenzymatic patterns and peroxidase activities. BAT and IAPAR cultivars showed two common activity zones in the anodic region, with only one specific enzymatic band to each one (the two fastest migration band; it is possible that the two middle anodic zones detected are products of the same enzymatic locus but from different alleles with different eletrophoretic mobilities. Cv. JALO showed two anodic activities in common with cvs IAC and IAPAR with an exclusive anodic zone of slower migration which showed the most intense activity of all cultivars analyzed. This cv. still showed a dimeric heterozygotic catodic zone in all treated samples. Probably this is the same zone which occurs in homozygosis with fixation of the slower allele for all cvs BAT and IAPAR submitted to all treatments. Cv. IAC showed two anodic bands in common with Cv. IAPAR and cv. JALO. It still showed a faster anodic band in common with cv. IAPAR and an exclusive anodic band of slower migration. It is interesting to say that for this cv. IAC resulting from cultivation in NaCl 20 mM did not show activity in the three slower anodic zones. Cv. IAC showed only one dimeric heterozygotic catodic zone in all treatments. This zone is probably composed by two different alleles from the same locus detected in cv. JALO. Samples from cv. IAC treated with 40 and 60 mM showed a more intense enzymatic activity in the catodic zone. Analyses of the peroxidase activity in the

  13. Chaperone-like activity of β-casein and its effect on residual in vitro activity of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria; Olsen, Karsten; Sørensen, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    , as similar experiment with bovine serum albumin resulted in residual activity of horseradish peroxidase that was significantly lower than without any addition. The effect of β-casein on HRP disappears when pH is below the isoelectric point of β-casein. It was also proven by light scattering studies that β...... proteins. Incubating HRP (0.1 mg mL-1) for 10 min at 72 °C resulted in residual activity of 59 ± 5%, while addition of 1 mg mL-1 β-casein resulted in increase in residual activity up to 85 ± 1%. Increased residual activity is not merely attributed to an effect of higher total protein concentration......-casein interacts with horseradish peroxidase when the temperature was increased from 25 to 70 °C whereas interactions seem to cease when temperature was lowered back to 25 °C. This study highlights how specific proteins can influence enzyme activity, which is of potential importance for various industries...

  14. The effect of intermittent hypobaric-hypoxia treatments on renal glutathione peroxidase activity of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramita, I. A.; Jusman, S. W. A.

    2017-08-01

    Many people living at high altitudes experiencing a condition called intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH). Some people even create IHH condition as an exercise for pilots, athletes, and mountaineers. In this experiment, we aimed to determine whether the protective effect of IHH is mediated through glutathione peroxidase (GPX) enzyme. The experiment’s sample is two-month-old healthy Sprague-Dawley rat kidneys weighing 200-250 g. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia treatment is done using a Hypobaric Chamber type I that can mimic air pressure at certain altitudes: 35,000 (one minute), 30,000 (three minutes), 25,000 (five minutes), and 18,000 (30 minutes) feet. The rats were divided into five treatment groups, including a control group, hypobaric-hypoxia group, and intermittent hypobaric-hypoxia 1x, 2x, and 3x groups with each group consisting of three rats. The specific activity of GPX was measured using RANDOX and RANSEL methods. The statistical analysis of one way-ANOVA did not show significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05), although specific activities of the renal GPX of rats exposed to hypobaric-hypoxia were higher than the control group. This may be caused by the other antioxidants’ activities. In conclusion, the IHH treatment did not affect GPX activity in the rat kidneys.

  15. Effect of cholesterol feeding on tissue lipid perioxidation, glutathione peroxidase activity and liver microsomal functions in rats and guinea pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TSAI, A. C.; THIE, G. M.; Lin, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of cholesterol feeding on liver and aortic nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation and glutathione peroxidase activities, and on liver microsomal NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation, codeine hydroxylation and cytochrome P-450 levels was examined in rats and guinea pigs. One percent cholesterol was

  16. Lignin biodegradation by the ascomycete Chrysonilia sitophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J; Ferraz, A; Nogueira, R F; Ferrer, I; Esposito, E; Durán, N

    1997-01-01

    The lignin biodegradation process has an important role in the carbon cycle of the biosphere. The study of this natural process has developed mainly with the use of basidiomycetes in laboratory investigations. This has been a logical approach since most of the microorganisms involved in lignocellulosic degradation belong to this class of fungi. However, other microorganisms such as ascomycetes and also some bacteria, are involved in the lignin decaying process. This work focuses on lignin biodegradation by a microorganism belonging to the ascomycete class, Chrysonilia sitophila. Lignin peroxidase production and characterization, mechanisms of lignin degradation (lignin model compounds and lignin in wood matrix) and biosynthesis of veratryl alcohol are outstanding. Applications of C. sitophila for effluent treatment, wood biodegradation and single-cell protein production are also discussed.

  17. Effect of γ-radiation on the activities of superoxide dimutase, catalase and peroxidase on the germinating wheat grain (Triticum aestivum,L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, M.; Chatterjee, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of γ-radiation on several enzymes like catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in different parts of germinating wheat seeds has been studied. It was found that superoxide dismutase activity under the influence of γ-radiation was highest in the embryo part and showed maximum activity, 24 hours after germination. The activity exhibited a gradual decline with time. catalase and peroxidase, the stimulatory efect being maximum in the case of catalase activity. The catalase and peroxidase activities were found to be maximally localised in the embryo part and the highest value was attained after 72 hrs. in the case of catalase and after 48 hrs in the case of peroxidase activity. The results indicate that γ-radiation stimulates free radical generation in the embryo along with subsequent increase in the activities of superoside dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. (author)

  18. Unveiling the water-associated conformational mobility in the active site of ascorbate peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wei-Chih; Lin, Li-Ju; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Han; Chen, Yi-Ting; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2018-03-01

    We carried out comprehensive spectroscopic studies of wild type and mutants of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) to gain understanding of the conformational mobility of the active site. In this approach, three unnatural tryptophans were applied to replace the distal tryptophan (W41) in an aim to probe polarity/water environment near the edge of the heme-containing active site. 7-azatryptophan ((7-aza)Trp) is sensitive to environment polarity, while 2,7-azatryptophan ((2,7-aza)Trp) and 2,6-diazatryptophan ((2,6-aza)Trp) undergo excited-state water-catalyzed double and triple proton transfer, respectively, and are sensitive to the water network. The combination of their absorption, emission bands and the associated relaxation dynamics of these fluorescence probes, together with the Soret-band difference absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, lead us to unveil the water associated conformational mobility in the active site of APX. The results are suggestive of the existence of equilibrium between two different environments surrounding W41 in APX, i.e., the water-rich and water-scant forms with distinct fluorescence relaxation. Our results thus demonstrate for the first time the power of integrating multiple sensors (7-aza)Trp, (2,7-aza)Trp and (2,6-aza)Trp in probing the water environment of a specifically targeted Trp in proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7 adr human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7 adr and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against 60 cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy

  20. Mechanism of the reaction of ebselen with endogenous thiols : dihydrolipoate is a better cofactor than glutathione in the peroxidase activity of ebselen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haenen, G R; De Rooij, B M; Vermeulen, N P; Bast, A

    The therapeutic effect of ebselen has been linked to its peroxidase activity. In the present study, the peroxidase activity of ebselen toward H2O2 with the endogenous thiols GSH and dihydrolipoate [L(SH)2] as cofactors was determined. When GSH was used, peroxide removal was described by a ter uni

  1. Obtenção de nova fonte de peroxidase de folha de Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. com alta atividade Obtention of a new source of peroxidase from Copaifera langsdorffii leaf, Desf. with high activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermelinda Penha Freire Maciel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho extrair peroxidase de folha de Copaifera langsdorffii (COP, medir sua atividade, compará-la com a peroxidase de raiz forte (Horseradish peroxidase - HRP e determinar o pH ótimo, a melhor solução extratora e o efeito de aditivos sobre a atividade da COP. Os resultados mostraram que a COP atingiu 81,6% da atividade de HRP e a faixa de pH ótimo foi de 5,5 a 6,0. A melhor solução extratora da enzima foi o tampão fosfato de sódio 50 mM, pH 6,0 e o melhor aditivo foi o PVPP. Concluindo, a COP apresenta atividade mais alta que outras peroxidases de diferentes fontes citadas na literatura.The purpose of this work was to extract peroxidase from Copaifera langsdorffii leaves (COP, measure its activity, compare it to that of Horseradish peroxidase and determine the optimum pH, the best extraction solution and the effect of additives on the COP activity. The results showed that COP has 81.6% of the activity of HRP and an optimum pH range between 5.5-6.0. The best extraction solution was a sodium phosphate buffer 50 mM, pH 6.0 and the best additive was PVPP. In conclusion, COP presents higher activity than peroxidases from different sources reported in the literature.

  2. High energy density supercapacitors from lignin derived submicron activated carbon fibers in aqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sixiao; Zhang, Sanliang; Pan, Ning; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2014-12-01

    Highly porous submicron activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were robustly generated from low sulfonated alkali lignin and fabricated into supercapacitors for capacitive energy storage. The hydrophilic and high specific surface ACFs exhibited large-size nanographites and good electrical conductivity to demonstrate outstanding electrochemical performance. ACFs from KOH activation, in particular, showed very high 344 F g-1 specific capacitance at low 1.8 mg cm-2 mass loading and 10 mV s-1 scan rate in aqueous electrolytes. Even at relatively high scan rate of 50 mV s-1 and mass loading of 10 mg cm-2, a decent specific capacitance of 196 F g-1 and a remarkable areal capacitance of 0.55 F cm-2 was obtained, leading to high energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 based on averaged electrodes mass. Furthermore, over 96% capacitance retention rates were achieved after 5000 charge/discharge cycles. Such excellent performance demonstrated great potential of lignin derived carbons for electrical energy storage.

  3. Differences in wound-induced changes in cell-wall peroxidase activities and isoform patterns between seedlings of Prosopis tamarugo and Prosopis chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Gabriele; Cardemil, Liliana

    2003-05-01

    We determined changes in cell-wall peroxidase activities and isoform patterns in response to wounding in seedlings of Prosopis tamarugo Phil. (an endemic species of the Atacama Desert) and Prosopis chilensis (Mol.) Stuntz (a native species of central Chile), to assess tolerance to predation. In seedlings of both species, the maximal increase in peroxidase activity occurred 48 h after wounding, reaching three times the control value in P. tamarugo and twice the control value in P. chilensis. The activity of ionically bound cell-wall peroxidases increased only locally in wounded embryonic axes, whereas the activity of soluble peroxidases increased systemically in unwounded cotyledons. Analysis of ionic peroxidases by isoelectrofocusing revealed two groups of peroxidases in the cell walls of both species: four distinct acidic isoforms and a group of basic isoforms. In response to wounding, there was a large increase in activity of the acidic isoforms in P. tamarugo, whereas there was an increase in the activity of the basic isoforms in P. chilensis. In P. chilensis, the wound-induced increase in activity of the basic isoforms corresponded with one of the two isoforms detected in P. tamarugo prior to wounding. Experiments with protein and RNA synthesis inhibitors indicated that a preexisting basic peroxidase is activated in P. chilensis after wounding. Assays of ionically bound peroxidase activity with four different substrates corroborated the differences found in isoform patterns between species. In P. tamarugo, the largest increases in activity were found with ortho-phenylenediamine and ferulic acid as substrates, whereas in P. chilensis the largest increase in activity was found with guaiacol as substrate. Because the same basic cell-wall peroxidase that accumulated after wounding in P. chilensis was present in P. tamarugo prior to wounding, and the activity of acidic cell-wall peroxidases increased after wounding in P. tamarugo but not in P. chilensis, we conclude

  4. Construction and Characterization of Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin (VHb) with Enhanced Peroxidase Activity for Efficient Degradation of Textile Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zidong; Li, Wei; Li, Haichao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yuebin; Cao, Yufeng; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, Zhengqiang

    2015-09-01

    Pollution resulting from the discharge of textile dyes into water systems has become a major global concern. Because peroxidases are known for their ability to decolorize and detoxify textile dyes, the peroxidase activity of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has recently been studied. It is found that VHb and variants of this enzyme show great promise for enzymatic decolorization of dyes and may play a role in achieving their successful removal from industrial wastewater. The level of VHb peroxidase activity correlates with two amino acid residues present within the conserved distal pocket, at positions 53 and 54. In this work, sitedirected mutagenesis of these residues was performed and resulted in improved VHb peroxidase activity. The double mutant, Q53H/P54C, shows the highest dye decolorization and removal efficiency, with 70% removal efficiency within 5 min. UV spectral studies of Q53H/P54C reveals a more compact structure and an altered porphyrin environment (λSoret = 413 nm) relative to that of wild-type VHb (λSoret = 406), and differential scanning calorimetry data indicate that the VHb variant protein structure is more stable. In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopic studies indicate that this variant's increased protein structural stability is due to an increase in helical structure, as deduced from the melting temperature, which is higher than 90°C. Therefore, the VHb variant Q53H/P54C shows promise as an excellent peroxidase, with excellent dye decolorization activity and a more stable structure than wild-type VHb under high-temperature conditions.

  5. Biotechnological modification of lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    A literature search of organisms capable of degrading lignin was conducted. Four fungi were selected for study and these were Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Chrysosporium pruinosum, Phlebia tremellosus and Trametes versicolor. Other organisms, Pleurotus ostreatus, Pleurotus florida and Lentinus edodes were also tested in preliminary experiments. All cultures were screened for their ability to degrade the lignin component of aspen sawdust and also lignin extracted from steam-exploded wood. This type of screen was followed by analysis of culture filtrates for the presence of ligninase, the marker enzyme for lignin degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium and consequently chosen for further studies in fermentors. Considerable efforts were directed to production of ligninase in fermentors. Only when Chrysosporium pruinosum was pre-cultured in a shake flask for 4 days and then transferred to a fermentor could ligninase activity be detected. The enzyme from shake flasks has been concentrated ready for use in bench-scale studies on cell-free depolymerization of lignin. 13 refs., 8 tabs.

  6. Direct Electrochemistry of Horseradish Peroxidase on NiO Nanoflower Modified Electrode and Its Electrocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper nickel oxide (NiO nanoflower was synthesized and used for the realization of direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP. By using carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE as the substrate electrode, NiO-HRP composite was casted on the surface of CILE with chitosan (CTS as the film forming material and the modified electrode was denoted as CTS/NiO-HRP/CILE. UV-Vis absorption and FT-IR spectra confirmed that HRP retained its native structure after mixed with NiO nanoflower. Direct electron transfer of HRP on the modified electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry with a pair of quasi-reversible redox waves appeared, indicating that the presence of NiO nanoflower on the electrode surface could accelerate the electron transfer rate between the electroactive center of HRP and the substrate electrode. Electrochemical behaviors of HRP on the modified electrode were carefully investigated. The HRP modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid with wider linear range and lower detection limit. Therefore the presence of NiO nanoflower could provide a friendly biocompatible interface for immobilizing biomolecules and keeping their native structure. The fabricated electrochemical biosensor displayed the advantages such as high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  7. Betacyanin accumulation and guaiacol peroxidase activity in Beta vulgaris L. leaves following copper stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M. León Morales

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of copper stress on betacyanin accumulation and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOD activity in leaves of different age was evaluated in red beet (Beta vulgaris L. var. Crosby Egyptian plants. In hydroponic culture, plants were treated with 0.3 μM (control, 50 μM, 100 μM, and 250 μM of CuSO4 for 6 days. Copper was taken up and accumulated in old roots but was not translocated to leaves. However in young leaves, the increase of lipid peroxidation and reduction of growth were evident from day 3 of copper exposure; whereas in old leaves, the lipid peroxidation and growth were the same from either copper-treated or control plants. In response to copper exposure, the betacyanin accumulation was evident in young leaves by day 3, and continued to increase until day 6. Betacyanin only were accumulated in old leaves until day 6, but the contents were from 4 to 5 times lower than those observed in young leaves at the same copper concentrations. GPOD activity increased 3.3- and 1.4-fold in young and old leaves from day 3 of copper treatment respectively, but only in the young leaves was sustained at the same level until day 6. Old roots shown betacyanin in the control plants, but the betacyanin level and growth were reduced with the copper exposure. In contrast, young roots emerged by copper effect also accumulated copper and showed the highest betacyanin content of all plant parts assayed. These results indicate that betacyanin accumulation and GPOD activity are defense responses to copper stress in actively growing organs.

  8. Leishmania mexicana amazonensis: heterogeneity in 5-nucleotidase and peroxidase activities of mononuclear phagocytes during in vivo and in vitro infection

    OpenAIRE

    Côrte-Real, Suzana; Grimaldi Junior, Gabriel; Meirelles, Maria de Nazareth Leal de

    1988-01-01

    The degree of maturation of cells of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS), during in vivo and in vitro infection by Leishmania mexicana amazonenesis, was evaluated in this study. The macrophages' differentiation was assayed by cytochemical characterization at the ultrastrctural level, using two well-established markers: 5'-nucleotidase enzyme activity, for revealing the mature cells, and the peroxidase activity present in the cell granules to demonstrate immature mononuclear phagocytes. onl...

  9. Investigation of glutathione peroxidase activity in chicken meat under different experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre José Cichoski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that previous studies on the enzymatic activity of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px diverge widely in their methodology and results, this study aimed to investigate the influence of different analytical conditions on GSH-Px activity in chicken thighs from broilers that were fed different diets with different sources and concentrations of selenium. GSH-Px activity was evaluated six hours after slaughter and 120 days after frozen storage at -18 ºC. The different analytical conditions included time of pre-incubation (0, 10 and 30 minutes, reaction medium, types of substrate (H2O2 (0.72 mM, 7.2 mM, and 72 mM and Terc-butil hydroperoxide 15 mM, and different buffer concentrations (buffer 1, potassium phosphate 50 mM pH 7.0 + EDTA 1 mM + mercaptoethanol 1 mM, and buffer 2, tris-HCl 50 mM pH 7.6 + EDTA 1 mM + mercapthanol 5 mM. The results show that the highest GSH-Px activity was observed when enzyme and substrate were in contact at 22 ºC without any pre-incubation, and that, when used at concentrations above 0.72 mM, hydrogen peroxide saturated the GSH-Px enzyme and inhibited its activity. The enzyme presented higher affinity to hydrogen peroxide when compared to terc-butil peroxide, and the addition of a buffer containing mercaptoethanol did not increase GSH-Px enzymatic activity. The activity of GSH-Px was not influenced by the source and concentration of selenium in the diet either. The obtained results allowed the determination of the best temperature of contact between the enzyme and substrate (22 ºC, the optimum concentration, and the type of substrate and buffer to be used. This information is extremely useful for future studies on GSH-Px activity in meat due to the divergence and little information found in the literature.

  10. Lignin-solubilizing ability of actinomycetes isolated from termite (Termitidae) gut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasti, M.B.; Crawford, D.L.; Pometto, A.L. III; Nuti, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    The lignocellulose-degrading abilities of 11 novel actinomycete strains isolated from termite gut were determined and compared with that of the well-characterized actinomycete, Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. Lignocellulose bioconversion was followed by (i) monitoring the degradation of [ 14 C]lignin- and [ 14 C]cellulose-labeled phloem of Abies concolor to 14 CO 2 and 14 C-labeled water-soluble products, (ii) determining lignocellulose, lignin, and carbohydrate losses resulting from growth on a lignocellulose substrate prepared from corn stalks (Zea mays), and (iii) quantifying production of a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate (acid-precipitable polymeric lignin). Of the assays used, total lignocellulose weight loss was most useful in determining overall bioconversion ability but not in identifying the best lignin-solubilizing strains. A screening procedure based on 14 CO 2 evolution from [ 14 C-lignin]lignocellulose combined with measurement of acid-precipitable polymeric lignin yield was the most effective in identifying lignin-solubilizing strains. For the termite gut strains, the pH of the medium showed no increase after 3 weeks of growth on lignocellulose. This is markedly different from the pattern observed with S. viridosporus T7A, which raises the medium pH considerably. Production of extracellular peroxidases by the 11 strains and S. viridosporus T7A was followed for 5 days in liquid cultures. On the basis of an increase of specific peroxidase activity in the presence of lignocellulose in the medium, the actinomycetes could be placed into the same three groups

  11. Conformation and activity alteration of horseradish peroxidase induced by the interaction with gene carrier polyethyleneimines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aimin; Wei, Bangzhi; Mo, Junyong; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Lin

    2018-01-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) has long been considered as "golden standard" for polymeric gene delivery carriers. However the molecular basis of the cytotoxicity of PEI is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy were conducted to investigate the influence of PEI of average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8 kDa (denoted as PEI25k, PEI10k and PEI1.8k) on the conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its catalytic efficiency. Zeta-potential measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to reveal the mechanism of the interaction between PEIs and HRP. PEIs were found to bind onto the surface of HRP predominantly via hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond or van der Waals interaction. The complex formation between HRP and PEI induced a more compact conformation of the enzyme and an increased hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding heme pocket. The conformational change of HRP had little impact on the affinity towards H2O2 and phenol. However, the increase in the non-planarity of porphyrin ring in the heme group led to an increase in the exposure degree of the active center and thus an enhancement of catalytic efficiency of HRP in the presence of high molecular weight PEIs (PEI25k and PEI10k). The polymer size played an important role in PEI-HRP interaction. PEI of low molecular weight (PEI1.8k) was less efficient to alter the conformation and catalytic activity of HRP in aqueous solutions.

  12. Effective Peroxidase-Like Activity of Co-Aminoclay [CoAC] and Its Application for Glucose Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Pill Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe a novel peroxidase-like activity of Co-aminoclay [CoAC] present at pH ~5.0 and its application to fluorescent biosensor for the determination of H2O2 and glucose. It is synthesized with aminoclays (ACs entrapping cationic metals such as Fe, Cu, Al, Co., Ce, Ni, Mn, and Zn to find enzyme mimicking ACs by sol–gel ambient conditions. Through the screening of catalytic activities by the typical colorimetric reaction employing 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic aciddiammonium salt (ABTS as a substrate with or without H2O2, Fe, Cu, and CoACs are found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity, as well as oxidase-like activity was observed from Ce and MnACs. Among them, CoAC shows exceptionally high peroxidase-like activity, presumably due to its ability to induce electron transfer between substrates and H2O2. CoAC is then used to catalyze the oxidation of Amplex® UltraRed (AUR into a fluorescent end product, which enables a sensitive fluorescent detection of H2O2. Moreover, a highly sensitive and selective glucose biosensing strategy is developed, based on enzyme cascade reaction between glucose oxidase (GOx and CoAC. Using this strategy, a highly linear fluorescence enhancement is verified when the concentration of glucose is increased in a wide range from 10 μM to 1 mM with a lower detection limit of 5 μM. The practical diagnostic capability of the assay system is also verified by its use to detect glucose in human blood serum. Based on these results, it is anticipated that CoAC can serve as potent peroxidase mimetics for the detection of clinically important target molecules.

  13. Accelerating the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoclusters at neutral pH for colorimetric detection of heparin and heparinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lianzhe; Liao, Hong; Feng, Lingyan; Wang, Min; Fu, Wensheng

    2018-04-26

    The peroxidase-like catalytic activity of gold nanoclusters (NCs) is quite low around physiological pH, which greatly limits their biological applications. Herein, we found heparin can greatly accelerate the peroxidase-like activity of Au-NCs at neutral pH. The catalytic activity of Au-NCs toward the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) oxidation by H2O2 was 25-fold increased in the presence of heparin at pH 7. The addition of heparin not only accelerated the initial catalytic rate of Au-NCs, but also prevented the Au-NCs from catalyst deactivation. This allows the sensitive colorimetric detection of heparin at neutral pH. In the presence of heparinase, heparin was hydrolyzed into small fragments, weakening the enhancement effect of catalytic activity. Based on this phenomenon, the sensitive colorimetric determination of heparinase in biological samples was also developed.

  14. Changes in Peroxidase Activity in the Peel of Unshiub Mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) Fruit with Different Storage Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Jozić, Marko; Štolfa, Ivna; Pavičić, Nikola; Hackenberger, Branimir K.; Cesar, Vera

    2005-01-01

    The Unshiu mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) is the major Citrus crop in Croatia. Limiting factors for longer consumption of Unshiu mandarin are low storage performance and the appearance of chilling injuries during storage. Previous studies indicated that oxidative stress might be involved in cold-induced peel damage of harvested Citrus fruit. The aim of the present study was to investigate peroxidase distribution, isoenzyme pattern and activity in the peel of Unshiu mandarin fruit. Special goa...

  15. Mutation of katG in a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: effects on catalase-peroxidase for isoniazid activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkan; Ihsanawati; Natalia, D; Syah, Y M; Retnoningrum, D S; Kusuma, H S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in katG gene are often associated with isoniazid (INH) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. This research was perfomed to identify the katG mutation in clinical isolate (L8) that is resistant to INH at 1 μg/ml. In addition to characterize the catalase-peroxidase of KatG L8 and perform the ab initio structural study of the protein to get a more complete understanding in drug activation and the resistan­ce mechanism. The katG gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, then followed by characterization of catalase-peroxidase of KatG. The structure modelling was performed to know a basis of alterations in enzyme activity. A substitution of A713G that correspond to Asn238Ser replacement was found in the L8 katG. The Asn238Ser modification leads to a decline in the activity of catalase-peroxidase and INH oxidation of the L8 KatG protein. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) of mutant KatGAsn238Ser respectively decreases to 41 and 52% for catalase and peroxidase. The mutant KatGAsn238Ser also shows a decrease of 62% in INH oxidation if compared to a wild type KatG (KatGwt). The mutant Asn238Ser might cause instability in the substrate binding­ site of KatG, because of removal of a salt bridge connecting the amine group of Asn238 to the carbo­xyl group of Glu233, which presents in KatGwt. The lost of the salt bridge in the substrate binding site in mutant KatGAsn238Ser created changes unfavorable for enzyme activities, which in turn emerge as INH resistan­ce in the L8 isolate of M. tuberculosis.

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of Amyloid β Derived and Amyloid β Independent Enhancers of the Peroxidase-like Activity of Heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wißbrock, Amelie; Kühl, Toni; Silbermann, Katja; Becker, Albert J; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Imhof, Diana

    2017-01-12

    Labile heme has been suggested to have an impact in several severe diseases. In the context of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, decreased levels of free heme have been reported. Therefore, we were looking for an assay system that can be used for heme concentration determination. From a biochemical point of view the peroxidase activity of the Aβ-heme complex seemed quite attractive to pursue this goal. As a consequence, a peptide that is able to increase the readout even in the case of a low heme concentration is favorable. The examination of Aβ- and non-Aβ-derived peptides in complex with heme revealed that the peroxidase-like activity significantly depends on the peptide sequence and length. A 23mer His-based peptide derived from human fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 in complex with heme exhibited a significantly higher peroxidase activity than Aβ(40)-heme. Structural modeling of both complexes demonstrated that heme binding via a histidine can be supported by hydrogen bond interactions of a basic residue near the propionate carboxyl function of protoporphyrin IX. Furthermore, the interplay of Aβ-heme and the lipoprotein LDL as a potential physiological effector of Aβ was examined.

  17. Colorimetric assay of copper ions based on the inhibition of peroxidase-like activity of MoS2 nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Li, Zhihong; Liu, Xueting; Zhong, Jianhai; Lin, Tianran; Guo, Liangqia; Fu, Fengfu

    2017-10-01

    The peroxidase-like catalytic activity of MoS2 nanomaterials has been utilized for colorimetric bioassays and medical diagnostics. However, the application of peroxidase-like catalytic activity of MoS2 nanomaterials in environmental analysis was seldom explored. Herein, copper ions were found to inhibit the peroxidase-like catalytic activity of MoS2 nanosheets, which can catalyze the oxidation of 3, 3‧, 5, 5‧-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2 to produce a colorimetric product. Based on this finding, a simple sensitive colorimetric method for the detection of copper ions was developed. In the presence of copper ions, the absorbance and color of the solution decreased with the increasing concentration of copper ions. The color of the solution can be used to semi-quantitative on-site assay of copper ions by naked eyes. A linear relationship between the absorbance and the concentration of copper ions was observed in the range of 0.4-4.0 μmol L- 1 with a detection limit of 92 nmol L- 1, which was much lower than the maximum contaminant level of copper in drinking water legislated by the Environmental Protection Agency of USA and the World Health Organization. The method was applied to detect copper ions in environmental water samples with satisfactory results.

  18. Molecular Modeling of Peroxidase and Polyphenol Oxidase: Substrate Specificity and Active Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalida Shank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases (POD and polyphenol oxidase (PPO are enzymes that are well known to be involved in the enzymatic browning reaction of fruits and vegetables with different catalytic mechanisms. Both enzymes have some common substrates, but each also has its specific substrates. In our computational study, the amino acid sequence of grape peroxidase (ABX was used for the construction of models employing homology modeling method based on the X-ray structure of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from pea (PDB ID:1APX, whereas the model of grape polyphenol oxidase was obtained directly from the available X-ray structure (PDB ID:2P3X. Molecular docking of common substrates of these two enzymes was subsequently studied. It was found that epicatechin and catechin exhibited high affinity with both enzymes, even though POD and PPO have different binding pockets regarding the size and the key amino acids involved in binding. Predicted binding modes of substrates with both enzymes were also compared. The calculated docking interaction energy of trihydroxybenzoic acid related compounds shows high affinity, suggesting specificity and potential use as common inhibitor to grape ascorbate peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase.

  19. Facile preparation of well-combined lignin-based carbon/ZnO hybrid composite with excellent photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Qiu, Xueqing; Liu, Weifeng; Yang, Dongjie

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a novel lignin-based carbon/ZnO (LC/ZnO) hybrid composite with excellent photocatalytic performance was prepared through a convenient and environment friendly method using alkali lignin (AL) as carbon source. The morphological, microstructure and optical properties of the as-prepared LC/ZnO hybrid composite was characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and UV-vis. The resulting LC/ZnO hybrid is composed of highly dispersed ZnO nanoparticles embedded on a lignin-based carbon nanosheet, showing excellent photogenerated electrons and holes separation and migration efficiency. The photocatalytic activity of LC/ZnO was much higher than the pure ZnO. The LC/ZnO hybrid composite showed different photocatalytic mechanism for degradation of negative methyl orange (MO) and positive Rhodamine B (RhB). It showed that h+ was the main photocatalytic active group during the degradation of MO, ·O2- and ·OH were the photocatalytic active groups during degradation of RhB. This reported photocatalyst with selective degradation of positive and negative organic dyes may have a great application prospect for photoelectric conversion and catalytic materials. Results of this work were of practical importance for high-valued utilization of lignin for carbon materials.

  20. Lignin Macromolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    plant or a structural component of a mature plant which is detected by certain colour reactions. An enzymologist has termed lignin as the ... a phenyl-propanoid structure. A soil chemist considers lignin to be the residue of .... refer to the hardness of wood, but to the botanical classifications. They are aptly called gymnosperms ...

  1. Purification and characterization of a novel anti-HSV-2 protein with antiproliferative and peroxidase activities from Stellaria media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shan; Yuhong Zheng; Fuqin Guan; Jianjian Zhou; Haiguang Zhao; Bing Xia; Xu Feng

    2013-01-01

    A novel antiviral protein,designated as Stellarmedin A,was purified from Stellaria media (L.) Vill.(Caryophyllaceae) by using ammonium sulfate precipitation,cation-exchange chromatography system.Gel electrophoresis analysis showed that Stellarmedin A is a highly basic glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 35.1 kDa and an isoelectric point of ~8.7.The Nterminal 14-amino acid sequence,MGNTGVLTGERNDR,is similar to those of other plant peroxidases.This protein inhibited herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) replication in vitro with an ICso of 13.18 μg/ml and a therapeutic index exceeding 75.9.It was demonstrated that Stellarmedin A affects the initial stage of HSV-2 infection and is able to inhibit the proliferation of promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 and colon carcinoma LoVo cells with an ICso of 9.09 and 12.32 μM,respectively.Moreover,Stellarmedin A has a peroxidase activity of 36.6 μmol/min/mg protein,when gualacol was used as substrate.To our knowledge,this is the first report about an anti-HSV-2 protein with antiproliferative and peroxidase activities from S.media.

  2. Structural characterization of lignin in the process of cooking of cornstalk with solid alkali and active oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiulin; Shi, Jianbin; Lin, Lu; Zhuang, Junping; Pang, Chunsheng; Xie, Tujun; Liu, Ying

    2012-05-09

    A novel, efficient, and environmentally friendly technology is used in cornstalk cooking, active oxygen (O₂ and H₂O₂) cooking with solid alkali (MgO). After the cooking, the milled wood lignin in the raw material and pulp and the water-soluble and insoluble lignin in the yellow liquor were all characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence NMR. The results showed that the cooking procedure with solid alkali and active oxygen had a high selectivity for delignification, which could remove 85.5% of the lignin from the raw material. The syringyl (S/S'/S') units could be dissolved preferentially because of their high reactivity, and a novel guaiacyl unit with a carbonyl group (G') was generated in the cooking process. Moreover, during the cooking, the β-O-4' (A/A'/A″) structures as the main side-chain linkages in all the lignins could be partly broken and the β-O-4' (A') with a ring-conjugated structure was readily attacked by oxygen, whereas the H unit and β-5' and β-β' structures were found to stay stable without characteristic reaction.

  3. Seasonal changes of peroxidase and catalase activities in leaves of several arborescent species subject to different industrial air pollutions in Upper Silesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczek, E.; Stolarek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Year-round investigations of seasonal patterns of peroxidase and catalase activities in leaves of several deciduous and coniferous arborescent species in forests of Upper Silesia subjected to various amounts of industrial gases and dusts were carried out. The samples of leaves of Betula verrucosa EHRH, Quercus robur L., Q. rubra L., Pinus nigra ARNOLD, and P. silvestris L. were collected at different distances from an iron smelting plant. It was found that raising level of the pollution enhances peroxidase activity in leaves and needles. The induction of peroxidase activity by pollutants exhibited seasonal changes specific for the species and was subjected to the effect of temperature of the environment and was also related to the natural resistivity of a given species. In contrast to peroxidase, the patterns of catalase activity changes did not appear to be specifically influenced by industrial air pollutants. 22 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  4. One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaofen; Cao, Rui; Lu, Aihua; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Li, Chaojun; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III) was investigated using some biophysical and biochemical methods. Firstly, it was found that a large amount of Tb(III) can be distributed on the cell wall, that some Tb(III) can enter into the horseradish cell, indicating that peroxidase was mainly distributed on cell wall, and thus that Tb(III) would interact with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the plant. In addition, peroxidase bioactivity was decreased in the presence of Tb(III). Secondly, a new peroxidase-containing Tb(III) complex (Tb-HRP) was obtained from horseradish after treatment with Tb(III); the molecular mass of Tb-HRP is near 44 kDa and the pI is about 8.80. Thirdly, the electrocatalytic activity of Tb-HRP is much lower than that of HRP obtained from horseradish without treatment with Tb(III). The decrease in the activity of Tb-HRP is due to the destruction (unfolding) of the conformation in Tb-HRP. The planarity of the heme active center in the Tb-HRP molecule was increased and the extent of exposure of Fe(III) in heme was decreased, leading to inhibition of the electron transfer. The microstructure change in Tb-HRP might be the result of the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish.

  5. Peroxidase activity in roots of arracacha affected by pH and temperature = Atividade da peroxidase em raízes de batata-baroa afetada pelo pH e temperatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Nunes Menolli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, roots of arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhyza Bancroft were stored at 5ºC to induce chilling injury symptoms and stress-related peroxidase activity. Later, peroxidase kinetic activity was determined in different pH and temperature conditions. For this, soluble crude extract was sequentially saturated with ammonium sulfate, obtaining a semi-purified enzyme solution used for the analysis. Activity of peroxidase induced by the chilling at 5oC was determined from pH 2.5 to 9.0 and at temperature ranging from 10 to80oC. The peroxidase had higher activity when the reaction occurred between pH 5.5 and 6.0 and at temperature of 30oC. Complete inactivation of the activity was observed in pH 2.5 after 60 minutes of pre-incubation or at 60oC for 10 minutes or alternatively at 70oCafter 5 minutes of pre-incubation. The enzyme is more susceptible to inactivation in acid than alkaline pHs or alternatively using heat treatment.Neste trabalho, raízes de batata-baroa (Arracacia xanthorrhiza Bancroft foram armazenadas a 5oC para induzir injúria por frio e expressar atividade da peroxidase de estresse. Posteriormente, a cinética de atividade foi determinada em diferentes condições depHs e temperatura. Para isto, extrato solúvel da raiz foi sequencialmente saturado com sulfato de amônio, obtendo-se uma preparação semi-purificada para a análise enzimática. Atividade peroxidativa induzida pela temperatura de armazenamento de 5oC foideterminada em pHs de 2,5 a 9,0 e a temperaturas de 10 a 80oC. A atividade da peroxidase foi maior quando a reação foi realizada nos pHs de 5,5 e 6,0 e temperatura de 30oC. A inativação completa da enzima ocorreu em pH de 2,5 após 60 min. de pré-incubação ou a60oC por 10 min., e alternativamente a 70oC após 5 min. de pré-incubação. A enzima foi mais susceptível à inativação em pH ácido do que alcalino, podendo também ser inativada pelo tratamento de calor.

  6. Anti-HIV and immunomodulation activities of cacao mass lignin-carbohydrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, Hiroshi; Kawano, Michiyo; Thet, May Maw; Hashimoto, Ken; Satoh, Kazue; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Haishima, Yuji; Maeda, Yuuichi; Sakurai, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a prominent antiviral and macrophage stimulatory activity of cacao lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) has been reported. However, the solubility and sterility of LCC have not been considered yet. In the present study, complete solubilisation and sterilisation was achieved by autoclaving under mild alkaline conditions and the previously reported biological activities were re-examined. LCCs were obtained by 1% NaOH extraction and acid precipitation, and a repeated extraction-precipitation cycle. Nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine productions were assayed by the Griess method and ELISA, respectively. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide radical-scavenging activity was determined by ESR spectroscopy. Cacao mass LCC showed reproducibly higher anti-HIV activity than cacao husk LCC. Cacao mass LCC, up to 62.5 μg/ml, did not stimulate mouse macrophage-like cells (RAW264.7 and J774.1) to produce NO, nor did it induce iNOS protein, in contrast to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cacao mass LCC and LPS synergistically stimulated iNOS protein expression, suggesting a different point of action. Cacao mass LCC induced tumour necrosis factor-α production markedly less than LPS, and did not induce interleukin-1β, interferon-α or interferon-γ. ESR spectroscopy showed that cacao mass LCC, but not LPS, scavenged NO produced from NOC-7. This study demonstrated several new biological activities of LCCs distinct from LPS and further confirmed the promising antiviral and immunomodulating activities of LCCs.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of K2CO3-Activated Kraft Lignin Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-fa Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of activated carbons (ACs were prepared by K2CO3 activation from kraft lignin (KL that was recovered from papermaking black liquor. The effects of process parameters such as the activation temperature (AT, activated period, K2CO3 to KL mass ratio, and N2 flow rate on the characteristics of the final product were determined. The ACs were characterized using nitrogen adsorption, morphology, and fractal dimension analyses. The results showed that the AT was the main factor influencing the yield, surface area, and pore structure. The yield of ACs obviously decreased from 50.6% to 20.5% with increasing AT from 600 °C to 1000 °C, and decreased with increasing K2CO3/KL mass ratio. Activation time and N2 flow rate had slight effect on the yield of ACs. The surface area and total pore volume increased as the AT rose to 900 °C and then decreased with further increases in temperature. The maximum surface area and total pore volume were 1816.3 m2/g and 1.26 cm3/g, respectively, at a K2CO3 to KL mass ratio of 3:1, AT of 900 °C, activation time of 2 h, and N2 flow rate of 70 cm3/min. The pore structure of the ACs could be tailored by controlling the AT. As the AT was increased from 700 to 1000 °C, the mesoporosity increased from 11.6% to 95.9%. SEM images indicated that the morphology of ACs was modified by the AT. The K2CO3 was partially recycled.

  8. Comparative study on the peroxidase activity from the floats of Caulerpa lentillifera (grapes seaweeds), roots of Tamarindus indica (tamarind), Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth) and Dracaena surculosa (spotted dracaena)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berosil, Maan Dyann N.; Magtibay, Cherrie Joy C.

    2005-02-01

    Peroxidase activities from four different varieties of plant roots were investigated through the use of UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Hydrogen peroxide was used as the substrate and phosphate buffer at a pH that have been determined to be the optimal pH for peroxidase activity for the specific sample type. The four plant root extracts showed an assay pH optimum of 7.5 for the Tamarindus indica (tamarind) and Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth), pH 5.5 for Dracaena surculosa (spotted dracaena) and pH 7.0 for Caulerpa lentillifera (grapes seaweeds) using Maehly and Chance method. Determination of peroxidase at 510 nm of the four extracts indicated that, spotted dracaena gave the highest peroxidase activity with 361.07 U ml -1 , followed by tamarind with 57.11 U ml -1 , then water hyacinth with 29.39 U m -1 and lastly, grapes seaweeds with 7.55 U ml -1 . The specific peroxidase activities of the spotted dracaena, water hyacinth, tamarind and grapes seaweeds are 0.3224, 0.2048, 0.0721 and 0.0341 U mg -1 respectively. The peroxidase of the four plant tissues that were kept at ultra low personal freezer for almost a week was degraded. (Authors)

  9. Selenium-Enriched Foods Are More Effective at Increasing Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) Activity Compared with Selenomethionine: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Hesketh, John E.; Sinclair, Bruce R.; Koolaard, John P.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium may play a beneficial role in multi-factorial illnesses with genetic and environmental linkages via epigenetic regulation in part via glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. A meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify the effects of dietary selenium supplementation on the activity of overall GPx activity in different tissues and animal species and to compare the effectiveness of different forms of dietary selenium. GPx activity response was affected by both the dose and form of selenium (p selenium supplementation on GPx activity (p selenium supply include red blood cells, kidney and muscle. The meta-analysis identified that for animal species selenium-enriched foods were more effective than selenomethionine at increasing GPx activity. PMID:25268836

  10. Three-Dimensional Graphene Supported Bimetallic Nanocomposites with DNA Regulated-Flexibly Switchable Peroxidase-Like Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Zhao, Huimin; Zang, Hongmei; Ye, Fei; Quan, Xie

    2016-04-20

    A synergistic bimetallic enzyme mimetic catalyst, three-dimensional (3D) graphene/Fe3O4-AuNPs, was successfully fabricated which exhibited flexibly switchable peroxidase-like activity. Compared to the traditional 2D graphene-based monometallic composite, the introduced 3D structure, which was induced by the addition of glutamic acid, and bimetallic anchoring approach dramatically improved the catalytic activity, as well as the catalysis velocity and its affinity for substrate. Herein, Fe3O4NPs acted as supporters for AuNPs, which contributed to enhance the efficiency of electron transfer. On the basis of the measurement of Mott-Schottky plots of graphene and metal anchored hybrids, the catalysis mechanism was elucidated by the decrease of Fermi level resulted from the chemical doping behavior. Notably, the catalytic activity was able to be regulated by the adsorption and desorption of single-stranded DNA molecules, which laid a basis for its utilization in the construction of single-stranded DNA-based colorimetric biosensors. This strategy not only simplified the operation process including labeling, modification, and imprinting, but also protected the intrinsic affinity between the target and biological probe. Accordingly, based on the peroxidase-like activity and its controllability, our prepared nanohybrids was successfully adopted in the visualized and label-free sensing detections of glucose, sequence-specific DNA, mismatched nucleotides, and oxytetracycline.

  11. Colorimetric detection of glucose based on ficin with peroxidase-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yanjiao; Huang, Zili; Yang, Yufang; Long, Yijuan; Zheng, Huzhi

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we developed a colorimetric biosensing system for glucose detection by coupling the peroxidase-like of ficin and the glucose oxidase (GOx). GOx can catalyze the oxidation of glucose to produce H2O2, then, ficin catalyzes the oxidation of peroxidase substrate 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a blue color reaction. The present sensing system showed a linear response toward glucose detection over range of 2.0-100 μM with a detection limit of 0.5 μM. This system is simple, low cost, highly sensitive and selective for glucose detection, and was also applied to measuring glucose in human serum. Furthermore, in order to expand the application of ficin in biological sensing, we immobilized ficin onto the SiO2@Fe3O4 NPs, which exhibited the merits of recycling as well as allowing the repeated detection of glucose. Thus it may provide great potential applications in biomedicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  12. Tobacco Mosaic Virus with Peroxidase-Like Activity for Cancer Cell Detection through Colorimetric Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiawang; Zhao, Xia; Hu, Jun; Lin, Yuan; Wang, Qian

    2018-01-22

    Cell-based ELISA (CELLISA) has been widely used in disease diagnosis due to its simplicity and low cost. Recently, peroxidase-like nanomaterials have emerged as promising systems for CELLISA applications. In this work, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was simultaneously tailored with peroxidase-like inorganic nanoparticles (platinum nanoparticles) and cancer cell target groups (folic acid, FA) to obtain TMV-FA-Pt nanoparticles for cancer cell detection. Induced by the uniformly distributed reactive groups and well-defined structure of the TMV particle, platinum nanoparticles could be grown in situ on the exterior surface of TMV with excellent monodispersity and uniform spatial distribution. Meanwhile, FA with a PEG 1000 linker was successfully conjugated to the coat proteins of TMV through the Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction, an efficient "click" chemistry. Our study demonstrated that the resultant TMV-FA-Pt had specific affinity to cancer cells and was successfully used to detect cancer cells through CELLISA. Less than 1.0 × 10 4 cells/mL of cancer cells could be readily detected.

  13. Change in catalase and peroxidase activity in rat blood in case of combined burn and radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramova, L.P.; Simonova, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The peroxidase activity of blood and catalase activity were studied in white rats, subjected to whole-body X-irradiation with the dose 129 mC/kg and burn injury (20% of body surface) of 3A-3B degree and also combined burn and radiation injury. It is established that catalase activity was decreased in all groups and at all terms of the investigation. The changes in the blood peroxide activity were of phase character and normalized only by 14th day. The peroxide activity restores to intact level only by 30th day in animals with burn and radiation injury, that testifies to heavier course of the desease and to protracted character of recovery processes

  14. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Jackson, Matthew I; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Combs, Gerald F

    2011-11-01

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability at nutritional doses. In this study, we found that two sources of L-selenomethionine (SeMet) and Se-enriched yeast each increased intracellular Se content more effectively than selenite or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Interestingly, SeMSC, SeMet, and digested Se-enriched yeast were transported at comparable efficacy from the apical to basolateral sides, each being about 3-fold that of selenite. In addition, these forms of Se, whether before or after traversing from apical side to basolateral side, did not change the potential to support glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Although selenoprotein P has been postulated to be a key Se transport protein, its intracellular expression did not differ when selenite, SeMSC, SeMet, or digested Se-enriched yeast was added to serum-contained media. Taken together, our data show, for the first time, that the chemical form of Se at nutritional doses can affect the absorptive (apical to basolateral side) efficacy and retention of Se by intestinal cells; but that, these effects are not directly correlated to the potential to support GPx activity.

  15. Peroxidase activity and sensory quality of ready to cook mixed vegetables for soup: combined effect of biopreservatives and refrigerated storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Victoria Alvarez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic senescence processes and browning of fresh cut vegetables negatively affect their sensory properties and nutritional value and finally result in the rejection of affected products by consumers. In order to prevent quality decay, the combined effects of natural antioxidants and storage temperature on peroxidase activity and sensory attributes (overall visual quality, browning and odor of individual and mixed vegetables for soup (butternut squash, leek and celery were evaluated. Fresh cut vegetables were treated with antioxidant solutions as tea tree essential oil (15 μl/mL, propolis extract (15 μl/mL and gallic acid (2 mg/mL and stored at optimal (5 °C and abusive (15 °C temperature for a maximum of 14 days. The application of natural preservatives, plus optimal storage conditions, exerted significant inhibitory effects in peroxidase activity of squash, celery and mixed vegetables throughout the storage. Furthermore, propolis treatment applied on mixed vegetables retarded browning appearance and preserved the visual quality for a longer period when compared to untreated product.

  16. A peroxidase mimic with atom transfer radical polymerization activity constructed through the grafting of heme onto metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Pan, Yue; Yang, Jiebing; Liu, Yong; Yang, Yan; Tang, Jun; Li, Quanshun

    2018-07-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been considered to be an efficient strategy for constructing functional macromolecules owing to its simple operation and versatile monomers, and thus it is of great significance to develop ideal catalysts with higher activity and perfect reusability. We constructed a peroxidase mimic through the grafting of heme onto metal-organic frameworks UiO-66-NH 2 (ZrMOF), namely Heme-ZrMOF. After the systematic characterization of structure, the composite Heme-ZrMOF was demonstrated to possess high peroxidase activity using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine as substrates. The enzyme mimic was then used as catalysts in the ATRP reactions of different monomers, in which favorable monomer conversion (44.6-98.0%) and product molecular weight (8600-25,600 g/mol) could be obtained. Compared to free heme, Heme-ZrMOF could efficiently achieve the easy separation of heme from the catalytic system and facilitate the ATRP reaction in an aqueous environment to avoid the utilization of organic solvents. In conclusion, the enzyme mimic Heme-ZrMOF could be potentially used as an effective catalyst for preparing well-defined polymers with biomedical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fenóis totais, peroxidase e suas relações com a compatibilidade de mudas de pessegueiro interenxertadas Total phenols content, peroxidase activity and their relationship with the compatibility of the intergrafted seedlings of peach tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Allan Telles

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento das relações entre porta-enxerto e copa é vital para produção de mudas sem problemas de compatibilidade. Nesse sentido, a atividade de peroxidases e a concentração de fenóis apresentam grande importância na união entre enxerto e porta-enxerto, influenciando na resposta de compatibilidade de enxertia. Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, avaliar a compatibilidade de enxertia em mudas de pessegueiro interenxertadas, quantificando a atividade da peroxidase e a concentração dos fenóis totais em cultivares do gênero Prunus, no período de crescimento vegetativo e de repouso. Amostras da casca foram processadas e quantificadas por espectrofotometria. Os tratamentos foram a combinação de dois porta-enxertos de pessegueiro ('Okinawa' e 'Capdeboscq', com dois interenxertos de ameixeira ('Irati' e 'Reubennel' e duas copas ('Chimarrita' e 'Coral', mais o damasqueiro Japonês e cerejeira 'Capulin', cultivados no viveiro da Embrapa Transferência de Tecnologia, Canoinhas-SC. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente ao acaso, com três repetições e três plantas por parcela. Concluiu-se que a atividade da peroxidase e os fenóis totais apresentaram baixa variação entre o pessegueiro e a ameixeira, sendo compatíveis entre si. A atividade da peroxidase e os fenóis totais foram superiores no período de repouso das mudas. O damasqueiro e a cerejeira apresentaram alta incompatibilidade, quando enxertados sobre porta-enxertos de pessegueiro.The understanding of the biochemical relation between rootstock and scion is very important for the production of seedlings without incompatibility problems. The activity of peroxidases and the phenol concentration are very important to the union between scion and rootstock, influencing the graft compatibility. This work aimed to analyze the compatibility of graft in peach tree intergrafted seedlings, to determine the peroxidase activity and total phenols in cultivars of Prunus, during the

  18. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Sofo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT, ascorbate peroxidases (APX, some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants.

  19. Peroxidase production and ligninolytic potentials of fresh water bacteria Raoultella ornithinolytica and Ensifer adhaerens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji O. Falade

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest in novel ligninolytic bacteria has remained topical due to, in part, the maneuverability of the bacterial genome. Conversely, the fungal genome lacks the dexterity for similar maneuverability thus, posing challenges in the fungal enzyme yield optimization process. Some impact of this situation includes the inability to commercialize the bio-catalytic process of lignin degradation by fungi. Consequently, this study assessed some fresh water bacteria isolates for ligninolytic and peroxidase properties through the utilization and degradation of model lignin compounds (guaiacol and veratryl alcohol and the decolourization of selected ligninolytic indicator dyes; Azure B (AZB, Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR and Congo Red (CR. Bacterial strains with appreciable ligninolytic and peroxidase production potentials were identified through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and the nucleotide sequences deposited in the GenBank. About 5 isolates were positive for the degradation of both guaiacol (GA and veratryl alcohol (VA thus, accounting for about 17% of the test isolates. Similarly, AZB, RBBR and CR were respectively decolorized by 3, 2 and 5 bacterial strains thus, accounting for 10%, 7% and 17% of the test isolates. Two of the test bacterial strains were able to decolourize AZB, RBBR and CR respectively and these bacterial strains were identified as Raoultella ornithinolytica OKOH-1 and Ensifer adhaerens NWODO-2 with respective accession numbers as KX640917 and KX640918. Upon quantitation of the peroxidase activities; 5250 ± 0.00 U/L was recorded against Raoultella ornithinolytica OKOH-1 and 5833 ± 0.00 U/L against Ensifer adhaerens NWODO-2. The ligninolytic and dye decolourization properties of Raoultella ornithinolytica OKOH-1 and Ensifer adhaerens NWODO-2 marks for novelty particularly, as dyes with arene substituents were decolourized. Consequently, the potentials for the industrial applicability of these test bacterial strains abound as

  20. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstruc...

  1. Magnetic Fe3S4 nanoparticles with peroxidase-like activity, and their use in a photometric enzymatic glucose assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Caiping; Yan, Yinghan; Zhang, Cuiling; Xian, Yuezhong; Xiang, Dongshan

    2016-01-01

    Greigite magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3 S 4 -MNPs) were prepared and reveal a peroxidase-like activity. Kinetic studies revealed a pseudo-enzymatic activity that is much higher than that of other magnetic nanomaterial-based enzyme mimetics. This finding was exploited to design a photometric enzymatic glucose assay based on the formation of H 2 O 2 during enzymatic oxidation of glucose by glucose oxidase, and the formation of a blue product from an enzyme substrate that is catalytically oxidized by H 2 O 2 in the presence of Fe 3 S 4 -MNPs. Glucose can be detected in the 2 to 100 μM concentration range, and the low detection limit is 0.16 μM. The method was applied to quantify glucose in human serum. In our perception, this enzyme mimetic has a large potential in that it may be used in other oxidase based assays, but also in ELISAs. (author)

  2. Arabidopsis ATP A2 peroxidase. Expression and high-resolution structure of a plant peroxidase with implications for lignification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Teilum, K; Mirza, O

    2000-01-01

    Lignins are phenolic biopolymers synthesized by terrestrial, vascular plants for mechanical support and in response to pathogen attack. Peroxidases have been proposed to catalyse the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols into lignins, although no specific isoenzyme has been shown...... to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Recently we isolated an extracellular anionic peroxidase, ATP A2, from rapidly lignifying Arabidopsis cell suspension culture and cloned its cDNA. Here we show that the Atp A2 promoter directs GUS reporter gene expression in lignified tissues of transgenic plants. Moreover......-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols are preferred by ATP A2, while the oxidation of sinapyl alcohol will be sterically hindered in ATP A2 as well as in all other plant peroxidases due to an overlap with the conserved Pro-139. We suggest ATP A2 is involved in a complex regulation of the covalent cross-linking in the plant...

  3. Wheat straw lignin degradation induction to aromatics by por Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltierra-Trejo Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wheat straw is a recalcitrant agricultural waste; incineration of this material represents an important environmental impact. Different reports have been made regarding the use of the structural components of wheat straw, i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin; however, lignin has been less exploited because it is largely considered the recalcitrant part. Residual wheat straw lignin (REWSLI has a potential biotech-nological value if depolymerization is attained to produce aromatics. Ligninolytic mitosporic fungus represent an alternative where very little research has been done, even though they are capable of depol-ymerize REWSLI in simple nutritional conditions in relatively short periods, when compared to basidio-mycetes. The aim of this research was to study the depolymerization activity of Aspergillus spp and Penicillium spp on semipurified REWSLI as the sole carbon source to produce aromatics. The depoly-merization capacity was determined by the activity of the laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase enzymes. The generated aromatics derived from the REWSLI depolymerization were identi-fied by gas chromatography. Obtained results revealed that Penicillium chrysogenum depolymerized the lignin material by 34.8% during the 28-day experimentation period. Laccase activity showed the largest activity with 111 U L-1 in a seven-day period, this enzyme induction was detected in a smaller period than that required by basidiomycetes to induce it. Moreover, the enzymatic activity was produced with-out the addition of an extra carbon source as metabolic inductor. Aspergillus spp and Penicillium spp generated guaiacol, vanillin, and hydroxybenzoic, vanillinic, syringic and ferulic acid with a maximum weekly production of 3.5, 3.3, 3.2, 3.3, 10.1 and 21.9 mg mL-1, respectively.

  4. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-01

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications.Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been

  5. Modification of lignin for the production of new compounded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttermann, A; Mai, C; Kharazipour, A

    2001-05-01

    The cell walls of woody plants are compounded materials made by in situ polymerization of a polyphenolic matrix (lignin) into a web of fibers (cellulose), a process that is catalysed by polyphenoloxidases (laccases) or peroxidases. The first attempt to transform the basic strategy of this natural process for use in human craftsmanship was the ancient lacquer method. The sap of the lacquer tree (Rhus verniciflua) contains large amounts of a phenol (urushiol), a polysaccharide and the enzyme laccase. This oil-in-water emulsion solidifies in the presence of oxygen. The Chinese began using this phenomenon for the production of highly creative artwork more than 6,000 years ago. It was the first example of an isolated enzyme being used as a catalyst to create an artificial plastic compound. In order to apply this process to the production of products on an industrial scale, an inexpensive phenol must be used, which is transferred by an enzyme to active radicals that react with different components to form a compounded material. At present, the following approaches have been studied: (1) In situ polymerization of lignin for the production of particle boards. Adhesive cure is based on the oxidative polymerization of lignin using phenoloxidases (laccase) as radical donors. This lignin-based bio-adhesive can be applied under conventional pressing conditions. The resulting particle boards meet German performance standards. By this process, 80% of the petrochemical binders in the wood-composite industry can be replaced by materials from renewable resources. (2) Enzymatic copolymerization of lignin and alkenes. In the presence of organic hydroperoxides, laccase catalyses the reaction between lignin and olefins. Detailed studies on the reaction between lignin and acrylate monomers showed that chemo-enzymatic copolymerization offers the possibility to produce defined lignin-acrylate copolymers. The system allows control of the molecular weights of the products in a way that has

  6. Copper-Based Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles with Peroxidase-Like Activity for Sensitive Colorimetric Detection of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuqin; Deng, Wenfang; Yang, Lu; Tan, Yueming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2017-07-26

    Cu-MOF nanoparticles with an average diameter of 550 nm were synthesized from 2-aminoterephthalic acid and Cu(NO 3 ) 2 by a mixed solvothermal method. The Cu-MOF nanoparticles can show peroxidase-like activity that can catalyze 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine to produce a yellow chromogenic reaction in the presence of H 2 O 2 . The presence of abundant amine groups on the surfaces of Cu-MOF nanoparticles enables facile modification of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) aptamer on Cu-MOF nanoparticles. By combining Cu-MOF-catalyzed chromogenic reaction with aptamer recognition and magnetic separation, a simple, sensitive, and selective colorimetric method for the detection of S. aureus was developed.

  7. Petunia peroxidase a: isolation, purification and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, T; Wijsman, H J; van Loon, L C

    1991-07-01

    The fast-moving anionic peroxidase isoenzyme variant PRXa was purified from leaves of petunia (Petunia hybrida). Over 1300-fold purification was achieved by subjecting extracellular extracts to two sequential acetone precipitations and resuspending the pellets at pH 5.0 and pH 8.0, respectively, followed by gel filtration and chromatofocusing. The purified enzyme had an absorbance ratio (A405 nm/A280 nm) of 3.6, a molecular mass of about 37 kDa and a pI of 3.8. Three molecular forms with slightly different molecular masses were separated by concanavalin-A--Sepharose affinity chromatography, indicating that these three forms differ in their carbohydrate moieties. The absorption spectrum of PRXa had maxima at 496 and 636 nm and a Soret band at 405 nm. Spectra of compounds I and IV were obtained by titrating a batch of PRXa stored for several months at -20 degrees C with H2O2. The addition of 1 mol H2O2/mol freshly purified PRXa caused the formation of compound II, indicating that freshly isolated PRXa contains a bound hydrogen donor which is lost upon storage. Compound III was obtained from both preparations in the presence of excess H2O2. The pH optimum of PRXa for the reaction with H2O2 and guaiacol was 5.0 and its specific activity 61 mkat/g protein. Among various aromatic compounds, coniferyl alcohol was polymerized by PRXa to presumed lignin-like material. The extracellular localization and high affinity of PRXa for the cinnamic acid derivatives suggest that this isoenzyme functions in the polymerization or cross-linking of lignin in the plant cell wall.

  8. Effects of acetylcysteine and probucol on contrast medium-induced depression of intrinsic renal glutathione peroxidase activity in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Lai, Wen-Te; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2007-04-01

    Antioxidants such as N-acetylcysteine and probucol have been used to protect patients from contrast media-induced nephrotoxicity. The mechanisms underlying these protective effects are not well understood. We hypothesized that acetylcysteine and probucol alter the activity of endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity. Four weeks after induction of diabetes with streptozotocin, diabetic and nondiabetic rats were divided into three groups. Group 1 rats did not receive any antioxidant agents. Group 2 rats were treated with acetylcysteine and group 3 rats with probucol for 1 week before injection of the contrast medium diatrizoate (DTZ). We found that diabetic rats had higher renal glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity than normal rats. DTZ suppressed renal GPx activity significantly in both group 1 diabetic and normal rats. Interestingly, renal GPx activity in both diabetic and normal rats pretreated with acetylcysteine or probucol was not inhibited by DTZ. Renal superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased significantly in normal rats after DTZ injection, but not in diabetic rats. Finally, acetylcysteine or probucol did not significantly influence renal SOD. These findings suggest that the renal protective effects of acetylcysteine and probucol against contrast-induced oxidative stress and nephrotoxicity may be mediated by altering endogenous GPx activity.

  9. Transmutation of human glutathione transferase A2-2 with peroxidase activity into an efficient steroid isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Par L; Johansson, Ann-Sofie; Mannervik, Bengt

    2002-08-16

    A major goal in protein engineering is the tailor-making of enzymes for specified chemical reactions. Successful attempts have frequently been based on directed molecular evolution involving libraries of random mutants in which variants with desired properties were identified. For the engineering of enzymes with novel functions, it would be of great value if the necessary changes of the active site could be predicted and implemented. Such attempts based on the comparison of similar structures with different substrate selectivities have previously met with limited success. However, the present work shows that the knowledge-based redesign restricted to substrate-binding residues in human glutathione transferase A2-2 can introduce high steroid double-bond isomerase activity into the enzyme originally characterized by glutathione peroxidase activity. Both the catalytic center activity (k(cat)) and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) match the values of the naturally evolved glutathione transferase A3-3, the most active steroid isomerase known in human tissues. The substrate selectivity of the mutated glutathione transferase was changed 7000-fold by five point mutations. This example demonstrates the functional plasticity of the glutathione transferase scaffold as well as the potential of rational active-site directed mutagenesis as a complement to DNA shuffling and other stochastic methods for the redesign of proteins with novel functions.

  10. The Catalase Activity of Catalase-Peroxidases Is Modulated by Changes in the pKa of the Distal Histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuqueiro, Miguel; Victor, Bruno; Switala, Jacek; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Rovira, Carme; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2017-05-02

    The unusual Met-Tyr-Trp adduct composed of cross-linked side chains along with an associated mobile Arg is essential for catalase activity in catalase-peroxidases. In addition, acidic residues in the entrance channel, in particular an Asp and a Glu ∼7 and ∼15 Å, respectively, from the heme, significantly enhance catalase activity. The mechanism by which these channel carboxylates influence catalase activity is the focus of this work. Seventeen new variants with fewer and additional acidic residues have been constructed and characterized structurally and for enzymatic activity, revealing that their effect on activity is roughly inversely proportional to their distance from the heme and adduct, suggesting that the electrostatic potential of the heme cavity may be affected. A discrete group of protonable residues are contained within a 15 Å sphere surrounding the heme iron, and a computational analysis reveals that the pK a of the distal His 112 , alone, is modulated within the pH range of catalase activity by the remote acidic residues in a pattern consistent with its protonated form having a key role in the catalase reaction cycle. The electrostatic potential also impacts the catalatic reaction through its influence on the charged status of the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct.

  11. Arabidopsis peroxidase-catalyzed copolymerization of coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols: kinetics of an endwise process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demont-Caulet, Nathalie; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise; Baumberger, Stéphanie; Méchin, Valérie

    2010-10-01

    In order to determine the mechanism of the earlier copolymerization steps of two main lignin precursors, sinapyl (S) alcohol and coniferyl (G) alcohol, microscale in vitro oxidations were carried out with a PRX34 Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase in the presence of H(2)O(2). This plant peroxidase was found to have an in vitro polymerization activity similar to the commonly used horseradish peroxidase. The selected polymerization conditions lead to a bulk polymerization mechanism when G alcohol was the only phenolic substrate available. In the same conditions, the presence of S alcohol at a 50/50 S/G molar ratio turned this bulk mechanism into an endwise one. A kinetics monitoring (size-exclusion chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the different species formed during the first 24h oxidation of the S/G mixture allowed sequencing the bondings responsible for oligomerization. Whereas G homodimers and GS heterodimers exhibit low reactivity, the SS pinoresinol structure act as a nucleating site of the polymerization through an endwise process. This study is particularly relevant to understand the impact of S units on lignin structure in plants and to identify the key step at which this structure is programmed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of non thermal coherent EMR with low intensity and extremely high frequency on total activity and isoenzyme composition of peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerkararyan, A.V.; Shahinyan, M.A.; Khachatryan, A.V.; Vardevanyan, P.O.

    2011-01-01

    In this work the influence of non-thermal coherent electromagnetic radiation (EMR) with low intensity and extremely high frequency on intensity of wheat developing germ metabolism has been investigated. Particularly, total activity and isoenzymatic composition of peroxidase of germ cells have been determined during their growth. The role of water in formation of organism response reaction to the external physical field effect has also been investigated. It has been shown, that water appears to be a primary element of extremely high frequency EMR effect on bio system. Extremely high frequency EMR irradiation of germinating seeds and the cultivation of dry seeds and their germs by irradiated water stimulate peroxidase synthesis in germ cells. The redistribution of quantitative composition of peroxidase molecular forms takes place in germ cells effected by EMR with extremely high frequency and low intensity

  13. Effects of carbon ion irradiation on survival rate, catalase and peroxidase activity of alfalfa M1 under low temperature stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuyang; Li Jinghua; Jiang Boling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three kinds of alfalfa including Zhonglan 1, BC-04-477 and Ta Cheng were treated with different doses of "1"2C"6"+ (75 keV) heavy ion radiation, and then the influence of survival rate, catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activity of M1 with low temperature stress were tested. The results showed that under the condition of 400 Gy radiation dose, the survival rate and CAT activity of Zhonglan 1 under low temperature stress have increased by 33.3%, 56.3% respectively compared with those of the control group, while there was no difference in POD activity between those two groups. The survival rate, CAT and POD activity of BC-04-477 treated with low temperature have been improved by 33.3%, 69.2%, 5.1% respectively compared with those of the control group when the radiation dose was 400 Gy. Compared with those of the control group, the survival rate, CAT and POD activity of Ta Cheng under low temperature stress have been improved by 25%, 26%,22.8% respectively when the radiation dose was 800 Gy. These results indicate that the viability and the cold resistance ability of Zhong Lan 1, BC-04-477 and Ta Cheng can be improved by "1"2C"6"+ radiation. (authors)

  14. The effect of excimer laser keratectomy on corneal glutathione peroxidase activities and aqueous humor selenium levels in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yis, Ozgür; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Bilgihan, Kamil; Yis, Nilgün Safak; Hasanreisoğlu, Berati

    2002-06-01

    The formation of free oxygen radicals has been demonstrated in the corneal tissue after 193 nm laser irradiation. Cornea has several defense mechanisms that protect against oxidative damage. One of them, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalyzes the destruction of hydrogen peroxide and lipid hydroperoxide. Selenium is a trace element which is incorporated into the selenoenzyme GPx. In the present study, the effect of excimer laser keratectomy on corneal GPx activities and aqueous humor selenium concentrations in rabbits was evaluated. Animals were divided into five groups, and all groups were compared: controls (group 1), after epithelial scraping (group 2), transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy(PRK; group 3), superficial traditional PRK (50 microm; group 4) and deep traditional PRK (100 microm; group 5). Corneal GPx activities were measured by a modification of the coupled assay procedure. Aqueous humor selenium concentrations were determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Corneal GPx activities were significantly lower only in group 5 ( P<0.05), and the selenium concentration in the aqueous humor did not change in any group. Deep corneal photoablation inhibits GPx enzyme activities in the cornea. Therefore, antioxidants may be useful in reducing free radical-mediated complications after excimer laser corneal photoablation.

  15. Effect of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate contents, catalase and peroxidase activities in three chickpea (Cicer arietinum) cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafakheri, A.; Siosemardeh, A.; Bahramnejad, B.; Struik, P.C.; Sohrabi, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the major abiotic stresses in agriculture worldwide. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate content, catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POX) activities in three varieties of chickpea (drought

  16. Decolorization of humic acids and alkaline lignin derivative by an anamorphic Bjerkandera adusta E59 strain isolated from soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornillowicz-Kowalska, T.; Ginalska, G.; Belcarz, A.; Iglik, H. [University of Life Sciences, Lublin (Poland). Dept. of Microbiology

    2008-07-01

    An anamorphic Bjerkandera adusta R59 strain, isolated from soil, was found to decolorize post-industrial lignin alkaline fraction, humic acids isolated from two kinds of soil and from brown coal. The drop of methoxyphenolic compound levels in liquid B. adusta cultures containing lignin or humic acids was correlated with decolorization of studied biopolymers, which suggests their partial biodegradation. It was shown that this process was Coupled with the induction of secondary metabolism (idiophase), and highest peroxidase activity in culture medium and appearance of aerial mycelium. Decolorization of lignin and humic acids from lessive soil and brown coal depended on glucose presence (cometabolism). Decolorization of humic acid from chernozem was related partially to adsorption by fungal mycelium.

  17. Seeing diabetes: visual detection of glucose based on the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of MoS2 nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tianran; Zhong, Liangshuang; Guo, Liangqia; Fu, Fengfu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-09-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted increasing research interest recently due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties, correlated with its 2D ultrathin atomic-layered structure. Until now, however, great efforts have focused on its applications such as lithium ion batteries, transistors, and hydrogen evolution reactions. Herein, for the first time, MoS2 nanosheets are discovered to possess an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and can catalytically oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a color reaction. The catalytic activity follows the typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and is dependent on temperature, pH, H2O2 concentration, and reaction time. Based on this finding, a highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose detection is developed and applied to detect glucose in serum samples. Moreover, a simple, inexpensive, instrument-free and portable test kit for the visual detection of glucose in normal and diabetic serum samples is constructed by utilizing agarose hydrogel as a visual detection platform.Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted increasing research interest recently due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties, correlated with its 2D ultrathin atomic-layered structure. Until now, however, great efforts have focused on its applications such as lithium ion batteries, transistors, and hydrogen evolution reactions. Herein, for the first time, MoS2 nanosheets are discovered to possess an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and can catalytically oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a color reaction. The catalytic activity follows the typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and is dependent on temperature, pH, H2O2 concentration, and reaction time. Based on this finding, a highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose detection is developed and applied to detect glucose in serum samples. Moreover, a simple, inexpensive

  18. Fungal Community and Ligninolytic Enzyme Activities in Quercus deserticola Trel. Litter from Forest Fragments with Increasing Levels of Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús A. Rosales-Castillo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Litter fungal communities and their ligninolytic enzyme activities (laccase, Mn-peroxidase, and lignin-peroxidase play a vital role in forest biogeochemical cycles by breaking down plant cell wall polymers, including recalcitrant lignin. However, litter fungal communities and ligninolytic enzyme activities have rarely been studied in Neotropical, non-coniferous forests. Here, we found no significant differences in litter ligninolytic enzyme activities from well preserved, moderately disturbed, and heavily disturbed Quercus deserticola Trel. forests in central Mexico. However, we did find seasonal effects on enzyme activities: during the dry season, we observed lower laccase, and increased Mn-peroxidase and lignin-peroxidase activities, and in the rainy season, Mn-peroxidase and lignin-peroxidase activities were lower, while laccase activity peaked. Fungal diversity (Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices based on ITS-rDNA analyses decreased with increased disturbance, and principal component analysis showed that litter fungal communities are structured differently between forest types. White-rot Polyporales and Auriculariales only occurred in the well preserved forest, and a high number of Ascomycota were shared between forests. While the degree of forest disturbance significantly affected the litter fungal community structure, the ligninolytic enzyme activities remained unaffected, suggesting functional redundancy and a possible role of generalist Ascomycota taxa in litter delignification. Forest conservation and restoration strategies must account for leaf litter and its associated fungal community.

  19. Expression and Activation of Horseradish Peroxidase-Protein A/G Fusion Protein in Silkworm Larvae for Diagnostic Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xxxx, Patmawati; Minamihata, Kosuke; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2018-06-01

    Recombinant protein production can create artificial proteins with desired functions by introducing genetic modifications to the target proteins. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been used extensively as a reporter enzyme in biotechnological applications; however, recombinant production of HRP has not been very successful, hampering the utilization of HRP with genetic modifications. A fusion protein comprising an antibody binding protein and HRP will be an ideal bio-probe for high-quality HRP-based diagnostic systems. A HRP-protein A/G fusion protein (HRP-pAG) is designed and its production in silkworm (Bombyx mori) is evaluated for the first time. HRP-pAG is expressed in a soluble apo form, and is activated successfully by incubating with hemin. The activated HRP-pAG is used directly for ELISA experiments and retains its activity over 20 days at 4 °C. Moreover, HRP-pAG is modified with biotin by the microbial transglutaminase (MTG) reaction. The biotinylated HRP-pAG is conjugated with streptavidin to form a HRP-pAG multimer and the multimeric HRP-pAG produced higher signals in the ELISA system than monomeric HRP-pAG. The successful production of recombinant HRP in silkworm will contribute to creating novel HRP-based bioconjugates as well as further functionalization of HRP by applying enzymatic post-translational modifications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Efficient, environmentally-friendly and specific valorization of lignin: promising role of non-radical lignolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenya; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Xinxiao; Su, Sisi; Li, Qiang; Linhardt, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant bio-resource in nature. It is increasingly important to convert lignin into high value-added chemicals to accelerate the development of the lignocellulose biorefinery. Over the past several decades, physical and chemical methods have been widely explored to degrade lignin and convert it into valuable chemicals. Unfortunately, these developments have lagged because of several difficulties, of which high energy consumption and non-specific cleavage of chemical bonds in lignin remain the greatest challenges. A large number of enzymes have been discovered for lignin degradation and these are classified as radical lignolytic enzymes and non-radical lignolytic enzymes. Radical lignolytic enzymes, including laccases, lignin peroxidases, manganese peroxidases and versatile peroxidases, are radical-based bio-catalysts, which degrade lignins through non-specific cleavage of chemical bonds but can also catalyze the radical-based re-polymerization of lignin fragments. In contrast, non-radical lignolytic enzymes selectively cleave chemical bonds in lignin and lignin model compounds and, thus, show promise for use in the preparation of high value-added chemicals. In this mini-review, recent developments on non-radical lignolytic enzymes are discussed. These include recently discovered non-radical lignolytic enzymes, their metabolic pathways for lignin conversion, their recent application in the lignin biorefinery, and the combination of bio-catalysts with physical/chemical methods for industrial development of the lignin refinery.

  1. Lignin nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole; Wheeler, David R.; Benko, David A.

    2015-08-11

    A method including reducing a particle size of lignin particles to an average particle size less than 40 nanometers; after reducing the particle size, combining the lignin particles with a polymeric material; and forming a structure of the combination. A method including exposing lignin to a diazonium precursor including a functional group; modifying the lignin by introducing the functional group to the lignin; and combining the modified lignin with a polymeric material to form a composite. An apparatus including a composite of a polymer and lignin wherein the lignin has an average particle size less than 100 micrometers.

  2. Photocatalytic Active Coatings for Lignin Degradation in a Continuous Packed Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Awungacha Lekelefac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of immobilized catalyst on porous glass support material via the sol-gel route is reported. TiO2-P25-SiO2 + Pt, TiO2-P25-SiO2, TiOSO4_30.6 wt%, and ZnO + TiO2-P25-SiO2 catalysts were synthesized and a comparative study is done regarding morphology of coatings, degradation rates, reaction rates, dissolved carbon (DC, formation of peaks, and fluorescence of products formed from the photocatalytic degradation of lignin sulfonate obtained from a local paper plant. Through simultaneous reaction-extraction pathways applying dialysis filtration and highly porous polystyrene divinylbenzene adsorbent resin (HR-P for solid phase extraction (SPE, an attempt has been made to isolate smaller molecules produced from photocatalytic degradation. Moreover relatively high lignin sulfonate (0.5 g/L concentrations are used in the reactions. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed a faster reduction in the concentration values for the aliphatic moiety compared to the aromatic moiety. Peaks were observed by both fluorescence spectroscopy and HPLC suggesting the production of new substances and fluorophores.

  3. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (POM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between the potency of flavonoids for cytochrome c reduction and inhibition of cardiolipin-induced peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoa, Ricardo; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K; Gutierrez-Merino, Carlos

    2017-05-06

    There are large differences between flavonoids to protect against apoptosis, a process in which cytochrome c (Cyt c) plays a key role. In this work, we show that 7 of 13 flavonoids studied have a capacity to reduce Cyt c similar or higher than ascorbate, the flavonols quercetin, kaempferol and myricetin, flavanol epigallocatechin-gallate, anthocyanidins cyanidin and malvidin, and the flavone luteolin. In contrast, the kaempferol 3(O)- and 3,4'(O)-methylated forms, the flavanone naringenin, and also apigenin and chrysin, had a negligible reducing capacity. Equilibrium dialysis and quenching of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence experiments showed that flavonoids did not interfere with Cyt c binding to cardiolipin (CL)/phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. However, the CL-induced loss of Cyt c Soret band intensity was largely attenuated by flavonoids, pointing out a stabilizing action against Cyt c unfolding in the complex. Moreover, flavonoids that behave as Cyt c reductants also inhibited the pro-apoptotic CL-induced peroxidase activity of Cyt c, indicating that modulation of Cyt c signaling are probable mechanisms behind the protective biological activities of flavonoids. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(3):451-468, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. The effect of seedling chilling on glutathione content, catalase and peroxidase activity in Brassica oleracea L. var. italica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Wojciechowska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to determine the possible relationship between Brassica oleracea var. italica seedlings stored at 2°C in the dark for seven and fourteen days, respectively, and the level of certain antioxidant parameters in particular organs. A parallel objective of the experiment was to determine if the reaction of seedlings to low temperature might be persistent in fully developed plants until harvest time. After 14 days of chilling a significant increase in the glutathione content was observed in the seedling leaves in comparison to the non-chilled plants. During vegetation in field conditions this effect was maintained in leaves up to the stage of formation of flower buds. At harvest the highest content of glutathione was demonstrated in broccoli heads, obtained from plants, which were previously chilled in the seedling phase for two weeks. Peroxidase activity in broccoli seedlings increased each year of the three-year study due to the duration of the cooling time, whereas in the case of catalase the changes were not so distinct. At harvest time the activity of both enzymes in the leaves and flower buds fluctuated according to the particular year of study.

  6. Influence of gamma rays radiation on lignin degradation potency of phanerochaete chrysosporium and ganoderma lucidum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Retno DL; Nana Mulyana; Nurhasni; Uswatun Hasanah

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to increase the activity of extracellular enzymes lignolitik fungi phanerochaete chrysosporium and ganoderma lucidum to degrade lignocellulosic waste. Lignocellulosic difficult to degrade because it is composed of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Phanerochaete chrysosporium and ganoderma lucidum group white rot fungi can degrade lignin because it is able to synthesize enzymes lignin peroxidase (LiP). Irradiation low dose gamma rays capable menstimulsi increase extracellular enzyme activity. Fungi phanerochaete chrysosporium and ganoderma lucidum in medium slent exposed to gamma irradiation at doses of 0 (control), 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 Gy. In a liquid medium containing Potatoes Dextrose Broth (PDB), mineral salts with the substrate lignin alkali 0 and 5 % w/v, fungi phanerochaete chrysosporium were exposed to a dose of 600 Gy of gamma rays have LiP activity (30 U/mL) by 2.5 times higher compared with controls (12 U/mL). While ganoderma lucidum that are exposed to gamma radiation at a dose of 800 Gy has LiP activity (34 U/mL) was 1.7 times higher than the control (20 U/mL). On a solid substrate fermentation of white teak powder (Gmelina arborea Roxb.) For 12 days at pH 6.4 and water content of 79 % by fungi phanerochaete chrysosporium were exposed to gamma ray dose of 600 Gy has an efficiency of lignin degradation by 42 %, whereas on fungi ganoderma lucidum that are exposed gamma ray dose of 800 Gy has an efficiency of lignin degradation by 21 % with optimal conditions of pH 7. And; water content of 71.3 %. (author)

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...

  8. Synthesis, structure, and glutathione peroxidase-like activity of amino acid containing ebselen analogues and diaryl diselenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, Karuthapandi; Shah, Poonam; Singh, Harkesh B; Butcher, Ray J

    2011-11-04

    The synthesis of some ebselen analogues and diaryl diselenides, which have amino acid functions as an intramolecularly coordinating group (Se···O) has been achieved by the DCC coupling procedure. The reaction of 2,2'-diselanediylbis(5-tert-butylisophthalic acid) or the activated ester tetrakis(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl) 2,2'-diselanediylbis(5-tert-butylisophthalate) with different C-protected amino acids (Gly, L-Phe, L-Ala, and L-Trp) afforded the corresponding ebselen analogues. The used precursor diselenides have been found to undergo facile intramolecular cyclization during the amide bond formation reaction. In contrast, the DCC coupling of 2,2'-diselanediyldibenzoic acid with C-protected amino acids (Gly, L/D-Ala and L-Phe) affords the corresponding amide derivatives and not the ebselen analogues. Some of the representative compounds have been structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like activities of the ebselen analogues and the diaryl diselenides have been evaluated by using the coupled reductase assay method. Intramolecularly stabilized ebselen analogues show slightly higher maximal velocity (V(max)) than ebselen. However, they do not show any GPx-like activity at low GSH concentrations at which ebselen and related diselenides are active. This could be attributed to the peroxide-mediated intramolecular cyclization of the corresponding selenenyl sulfide and diaryl diselenide intermediates generated during the catalytic cycle. Interestingly, the diaryl diselenides with alanine (L,L or D,D) amide moieties showed excellent catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) with low K(M) values in comparison to the other compounds. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Lignin-based active anode materials synthesized from low-cost renewable resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Orlando; Tenhaeff, Wyatt Evan; Daniel, Claus; Dudney, Nancy Johnston; Johs, Alexander; Nunnery, Grady Alexander; Baker, Frederick Stanley

    2016-06-07

    A method of making an anode includes the steps of providing fibers from a carbonaceous precursor, the carbon fibers having a glass transition temperature T.sub.g. In one aspect the carbonaceous precursor is lignin. The carbonaceous fibers are placed into a layered fiber mat. The fiber mat is fused by heating the fiber mat in the presence of oxygen to above the T.sub.g but no more than 20% above the T.sub.g to fuse fibers together at fiber to fiber contact points and without melting the bulk fiber mat to create a fused fiber mat through oxidative stabilization. The fused fiber mat is carbonized by heating the fused fiber mat to at least 650.degree. C. under an inert atmosphere to create a carbonized fused fiber mat. A battery anode formed from carbonaceous precursor fibers is also disclosed.

  10. Influence of air pollution by compounds of fluorine, sulphur and nitrogen on changes of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaves of trees and bushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prysedskyj

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The productive activity of man results in contamination of the environment which causes substantial damage to ecosystems, upsetting their balance, species composition, etc. Within industrial areas, plants suffer significant harm. At the same time, plant organisms play an important role in optimization of the environment, performing sanitary-hygienic, landscaping and aesthetic functions. In this context, we investigated the influence of industrial contamination of air by fluorine, sulphur and nitrogen compounds on the activity of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase in ten types of arboreal and shrub plants which differ in their resistance to air pollution. Our research was conducted on the basis of a full multivariate experiment with two levels of factors. Peroxidase activity was determined by a colorimetric method according to the duration of oxidization of benzidine. For determination of polyphenoloxidase activity we determined the duration of oxidization of p-phenilendiamin according to the change in optical density of the solution. Pollutants have a significant influence on activity of the investigated enzymes in the leaves of the plant species studied, which depends on the resistance of the plants to contamination, and also the composition and concentrations of pollutants. With resistant species (Ligustrum vulgare L., Quercus robur L., Lonicera tatarica L., Eleagnus angustifolia L., Philadelphus coronaria L. peroxidase activity either did not change or rose by 11.2–64.1% compared to the control, depending on the composition of pollutants, their concentrations and the duration of their activity. Polyphenoloxidase activity in these plants did not significantly change in most variants of the experiment, although high concentrations of pollutants resulted in suppression of the activity of this enzyme by 26.1–37.6%. In species with variable tolerance which did not experience damage, peroxidase function did not change. Species sensitive to

  11. Enhancement of protocatechuate decarboxylase activity for the effective production of muconate from lignin-related aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoki, Tomonori; Morooka, Miyuki; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Jellison, Jody; Goodell, Barry

    2014-12-20

    The decarboxylation reaction of protocatechuate has been described as a bottleneck and a rate-limiting step in cis,cis-muconate (ccMA) bioproduction from renewable feedstocks such as sugar. Because sugars are already in high demand in the development of many bio-based products, our work focuses on improving protocatechuate decarboxylase (Pdc) activity and ccMA production in particular, from lignin-related aromatic compounds. We previously had transformed an Escherichia coli strain using aroY, which had been used as a protocatechuate decarboxylase encoding gene from Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae A170-40, and inserted other required genes from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, to allow the production of ccMA from vanillin. This recombinant strain produced ccMA from vanillin, however the Pdc reaction step remained a bottleneck during incubation. In the current study, we identify a way to increase protocatechuate decarboxylase activity in E. coli through enzyme production involving both aroY and kpdB; the latter which encodes for the B subunit of 4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylase. This permits expression of Pdc activity at a level approximately 14-fold greater than the strain with aroY only. The expression level of AroY increased, apparently as a function of the co-expression of AroY and KpdB. Our results also imply that ccMA may inhibit vanillate demethylation, a reaction step that is rate limiting for efficient ccMA production from lignin-related aromatic compounds, so even though ccMA production may be enhanced, other challenges to overcome vanilate demethylation inhibition still remain.

  12. Structure, organization, and transcriptional regulation of a family of copper radical oxidase genes in the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber Vanden Wymelenberg; Grzegorz Sabat; Michael Mozuch; Philip J. Kersten; Dan Cullen; Robert A. Blanchette

    2006-01-01

    The white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces an array of nonspecific extracellular enzymes thought to be involved in lignin degradation, including lignin peroxidases, manganese peroxidases, and the H2O2-generating copper radical oxidase, glyoxal oxidase (GLX). Preliminary analysis of the P. chrysosporium draft genome had identified six sequences...

  13. Formation and action of lignin-modifying enzymes in cultures of Phlebia radiata supplemented with veratric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundell, T.; Hatakka, A.; Leonowicz, A.; Rogalski, J.

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of veratric (3,4-dimethoxybenzoic) acid by the white rot fungus Phlebia radiata was studied to elucidate the role of ligninolytic, reductive, and demeth(ox)ylating enzymes. Under both air and a 100% O 2 atmosphere, with nitrogen limitation and glucose as a carbon source, reducing activity resulted in the accumulation of veratryl alcohol in the medium. When the fungus was cultivated under air, veratric acid caused a rapid increase in laccase (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2) production, which indicated that veratic acid was first demethylated, thus providing phenolic compounds for laccase. After a rapid decline in laccase activity, elevated lignin peroxidase (ligninase) activity and manganese-dependent peroxidase production were detected simultaneously with extracellular release of methanol. This indicated apparent demethoxylation. When the fungus was cultivated under a continuous 100% O 2 flow and in the presence of veratric acid, laccase production was markedly repressed, whereas production of lignin peroxidase and degradation of veratryl compounds were clearly enhanced. In all cultures, the increases in lignin peroxidase titers were directly related to veratryl alcohol accumulation. Evolution of 14 CO 2 from 3-O 14 CH 3 -and 4-O 14 CH 3 -labeled veratric acids showed that the position of the methoxyl substituent in the aromatic ring only slightly affected demeth(ox)ylation activity. In both cases, more than 60% of the total 14 C was converted to 14 CO 2 under air in 4 weeks, and oxygen flux increased the degradation rate of the 14 C-labeled veratric acids just as it did with unlabeled cultures

  14. Lignin-modifying enzymes of the white rot basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D/Souza, T.M.; Merritt, C.S.; Reddy, C.A.

    1999-12-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a white rot basidiomycete widely distributed worldwide, was studied for the production of the lignin-modifying enzymes laccase, manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP), and lignin peroxidase (LiP). Laccase levels observed in high-nitrogen shaken cultures were much greater than those seen in low-nitrogen, malt extract, or wool-grown cultures and those reported for most other white rot fungi to date. Laccase production was readily seen in cultures grown with pine or poplar as the sole carbon and energy source. Cultures containing both pine and poplar showed 5- to 10-fold-higher levels of laccase than cultures containing pine or poplar alone. Since syringyl units are structural components important in poplar lignin and other hardwoods but much less so in pine lignin and other softwoods, pine cultures were supplemented with syringic acid, and this resulted in laccase levels comparable to those seen in pine-plus-poplar cultures. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of concentrated extracellular culture fluid from HM cultures showed two laccase activity bands, where as isoelectric focusing revealed five major laccase activity bands with estimated pIs of 3.0, 4.25, 4.5, and 5.1. Low levels of MnP activity were detected in poplar-grown cultures but not in cultures grown with pine, with pine plus syringic acid, or in HN medium. No LiP activity was seen in any of the media tested; however, probing the genomic DNA with the LiP cDNA (CLG4) from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium showed distinct hybridization bands suggesting the presence of lip-like sequences in G. lucidum.

  15. The effects of the sulfonylurea glyburide on glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the heart tissue of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukan, N; Sancak, B; Bilgihan, A; Kosova, F; Buğdayci, G; Altan, N

    2004-09-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been suggested to be a contributory factor in diabetes complications. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of glyburide on the antioxidant enzyme activities in the heart tissue of diabetic rats. We investigated the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) in the hearts of both control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In the heart of diabetic rats, the activity of total superoxide dismutase decreased significantly (p < 0.005), whereas the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase increased to a large extent (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.05, respectively) at the end of the fourth week compared with the control group. Glyburide treatment of diabetic rats for 4 weeks corrected the changes observed in diabetic heart. In addition, blood glucose levels of untreated diabetic rats decreased following the glyburide treatment. These results demonstrate that the sulfonylurea glyburide is capable of exerting direct insulin-like effect on heart superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities of diabetic rats in vivo.

  16. Class III peroxidases in cellulose deficient cultured maize cells during cell wall remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rubio, Romina; Acebes, José Luis; Encina, Antonio; Kärkönen, Anna

    2018-02-21

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells habituated to a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) have a modified cell wall, in which the reduction in the cellulose content is compensated by a network of highly cross-linked feruloylated arabinoxylans and the deposition of lignin-like polymers. For both arabinoxylan cross-linking and lignin polymerization, class III peroxidases (POXs) have been demonstrated to have a prominent role. For the first time, a comparative study of POX activity and isoforms in control and cellulose-impaired cells has been addressed, also taking into account their cellular distribution in different compartments. Proteins from the spent medium (SM), soluble cellular (SC), ionically (ICW) and covalently bound cell wall protein fractions were assayed for total and specific peroxidase activity by using coniferyl and sinapyl alcohol and ferulic acid as substrates. The isoPOX profile was obtained by isoelectric focusing. POX activity was higher in DCB-habituated than in non-habituated cells in all protein fractions at all cell culture stages. For all substrates assayed, SC and ICW fractions showed higher activity at the early-log growth phase than at the late-log phase. However, the highest POX activity in the spent medium was found at the late-log phase. According to the isoPOX profiles, the highest diversity of isoPOXs was detected in the ICW and SM protein fractions. The latter fraction contained isoPOXs with higher activity in DCB-habituated cells. Some of the isoPOXs detected could be involved in cross-linking of arabinoxylans and in the lignin-like polymer formation in DCB-habituated cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Fabrication of environmentally biodegradable lignin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangville, Camille; Rutkevičius, Marius; Richter, Alexander P; Velev, Orlin D; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2012-12-21

    We developed a method for the fabrication of novel biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) from lignin which are apparently non-toxic for microalgae and yeast. We compare two alternative methods for the synthesis of lignin NPs which result in particles of very different stability upon change of pH. The first method is based on precipitation of low-sulfonated lignin from an ethylene glycol solution by using diluted acidic aqueous solutions, which yields lignin NPs that are stable over a wide range of pH. The second approach is based on the acidic precipitation of lignin from a high-pH aqueous solution which produces NPs stable only at low pH. Our study reveals that lignin NPs from the ethylene glycol-based precipitation contain densely packed lignin domains which explain the stability of the NPs even at high pH. We characterised the properties of the produced lignin NPs and determined their loading capacities with hydrophilic actives. The results suggest that these NPs are highly porous and consist of smaller lignin domains. Tests with microalgae like Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and yeast incubated in lignin NP dispersions indicated that these NPs lack measurable effect on the viability of these microorganisms. Such biodegradable and environmentally compatible NPs can find applications as drug delivery vehicles, stabilisers of cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations, or in other areas where they may replace more expensive and potentially toxic nanomaterials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Isolation of Thermophilic Lignin Degrading Bacteria from Oil-Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) Compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. M. T.; Chua, H. B.; Danquah, M. K.; Saptoro, A.

    2017-06-01

    Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) is a potential and sustainable feedstock for bioethanol production due to its high cellulosic content and availability in Malaysia. Due to high lignin content of EFB and the lack of effective delignification process, commercial bioethanol production from EFB is presently not viable. Enzymatic delignification has been identified as one of the key steps in utilising EFB as a feedstock for bioethanol conversion. To date, limited work has been reported on the isolation of lignin degrading bacteria. Hence, there is a growing interest to search for new lignin degrading bacteria with greater tolerance to temperature and high level of ligninolytic enzymes for more effective lignin degradation. This study aimed to isolate and screen thermophilic ligninolytic microorganisms from EFB compost. Ten isolates were successfully isolated from EFB compost. Although they are not capable of decolorizing Methylene Blue (MB) dye under agar plate assay method, they are able to utilize lignin mimicked compound - guaiacol as a sole carbon on the agar plate assay. This infers that there is no correlation of ligninolytic enzymes with dye decolourization for all the isolates that have been isolated. However, they are able to produce ligninolytic enzymes (Lignin peroxidase, Manganese peroxidase, Laccase) in Minimal Salt Medium with Kraft Lignin (MSM-KL) with Lignin Peroxidase (LiP) as the predominant enzyme followed by Manganese Peroxidase (MnP) and Laccase (Lac). Among all the tested isolates, CLMT 29 has the highest LiP production up to 8.7673 U/mL following 24 h of growth.

  19. Msn2p/Msn4p act as a key transcriptional activator of yeast cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Cha, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Yong-Soo; Kim, Won-Cheol; Kim, Il-Han

    2002-04-05

    We observed that the transcription of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase type II (cTPx II) (YDR453C) is regulated in response to various stresses (e.g. oxidative stress, carbon starvation, and heat-shock). It has been suggested that both transcription-activating proteins, Yap1p and Skn7p, regulate the transcription of cTPx II upon exposure to oxidative stress. However, a dramatic loss of transcriptional response to various stresses in yeast mutant strains lacking both Msn2p and Msn4p suggests that the transcription factors act as a principal transcriptional activator. In addition to two Yap1p response elements (YREs), TTACTAA and TTAGTAA, the presence of two stress response elements (STREs) (CCCCT) in the upstream sequence of cTPx II also suggests that Msn2p/Msn4p could control stress-induced expression of cTPx II. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of site-directed mutagenesis of the putative STREs (STRE1 and STRE2) and YREs (TRE1 and YRE2) in terms of the activity of a lacZ reporter gene under control of the cTPx II promoter indicates that STRE2 acts as a principal binding element essential for transactivation of the cTPx II promoter. The transcriptional activity of the cTPx II promoter was exponentially increased after postdiauxic growth. The transcriptional activity of the cTPx II promoter is greatly increased by rapamycin. Deletion of Tor1, Tor2, Ras1, and Ras2 resulted in a considerable induction when compared with their parent strains, suggesting that the transcription of cTPx II is under negative control of the Ras/cAMP and target of rapamycin signaling pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that cTPx II is a target of Msn2p/Msn4p transcription factors under negative control of the Ras-protein kinase A and target of rapamycin signaling pathways. Furthermore, the accumulation of cTPx II upon exposure to oxidative stress and during the postdiauxic shift suggests an important antioxidant role in stationary phase yeast cells.

  20. Recent advances in the molecular genetics of the lignin degrading fungus, phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covert, S.F.

    1991-01-01

    During the past several years, molecular genetics research on phanerochaete chrysosporium, a white-rot basidiomycete, has increased dramatically. It is known that families of highly homologous, clustered genes encode the lignin peroxidases. The same appears to be true with the exocellobiohydrolase genes. Functional domains and active sites have been tentatively identified from the deduced amino acid sequences of these genes. Current investigations focus on elucidating the genomic organization of gene families, the mechanism(s) of gene regulation, and the role and interaction of specific gene products in lignocellulose degradation. (author)

  1. Nitroxides protect horseradish peroxidase from H2O2-induced inactivation and modulate its catalase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Amram; Maimon, Eric; Goldstein, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes H 2 O 2 dismutation while undergoing heme inactivation. The mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effects of nitroxides, which protect metmyoglobin and methemoglobin against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation, have been investigated. HRP reaction with H 2 O 2 was studied by following H 2 O 2 depletion, O 2 evolution and heme spectral changes. Nitroxide concentration was followed by EPR spectroscopy, and its reactions with the oxidized heme species were studied using stopped-flow. Nitroxide protects HRP against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation. The rate of H 2 O 2 dismutation in the presence of nitroxide obeys zero-order kinetics and increases as [nitroxide] increases. Nitroxide acts catalytically since its oxidized form is readily reduced to the nitroxide mainly by H 2 O 2 . The nitroxide efficacy follows the order 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPO)>4-OH-TPO>3-carbamoyl proxyl>4-oxo-TPO, which correlates with the order of the rate constants of nitroxide reactions with compounds I, II, and III. Nitroxide catalytically protects HRP against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 while modulating its catalase-like activity. The protective role of nitroxide at μM concentrations is attributed to its efficient oxidation by P940, which is the precursor of the inactivated form P670. Modeling the dismutation kinetics in the presence of nitroxide adequately fits the experimental data. In the absence of nitroxide the simulation fits the observed kinetics only if it does not include the formation of a Michaelis-Menten complex. Nitroxides catalytically protect heme proteins against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 revealing an additional role played by nitroxide antioxidants in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Caracterização isozimática e atividade de peroxidase em folhas de plantas hiperídrica, intermediária e normal de Bidens pilosa L. mantidas in vitro Isoezymatic characterization and peroxidase activity in leaves of hyperhydric, intermediary and normal plants of Bidens pilosa L. grown in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Emílio Zanzirolani de Oliveira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram caracterizadas as plantas: hiperídrica, intermediária e normal de um clone de Bidens pilosa mantido em cultivo in vitro por meio de isozimas e da atividade de peroxidase. Empregando-se a eletroforese em géis de amido a 12%, testou-se seis isozimas, sendo detectado polimorfismo em peroxidase e fosfatase ácida, permitindo caracterizar cada tipo de planta. Não houve polimorfismo em fosfogluco isomerase, fosfoglucomutase, glutamato oxaloacetato transaminase e malato desidrogenase. A atividade da peroxidase foi maior nas plantas hiperídricas e intermediárias. Conclui-se que a variabilidade enzimática tem potencial como marcador de hiperidricidade em plantas mantidas in vitro.Activity of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7 and isozymes analysis of a Bidens pilosa clone maintained in vitro culture were characterized in hyperhydric, intermediary and normal plants. Electrophorese in starch gels (12% of six isozymes systems was tested, polymorphisms in peroxidase and acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2 were detected. There was absence of polymorphism in phosphoglucoisomerase (EC 5.3.1.9, phosphoglucomutase (EC 5.4.2.2, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1 and malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37. Comparing the activity of peroxidase enzyme, it was higher in hyperhydric and intermediary plants in relation to normal ones. Enzymatic variability is a potential tool as hyperhydricity marker in plants grown in vitro.

  3. An oxidative burst and its attenuation by bacterial peroxidase activity is required for optimal establishment of the Arachis hypogaea-Bradyrhizobium sp. symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, V; Ibáñez, F; Figueredo, M S; Fabra, A

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether the Arachis hypogaea L. root oxidative burst, produced at early stages of its symbiotic interaction with Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144, and the bacterial antioxidant system are required for the successful development of this interaction. Pharmacological approaches were used to reduce both plant oxidative burst and bacterial peroxidase enzyme activity. In plants whose H2 O2 levels were decreased, a low nodule number, a reduction in the proportion of red nodules (%) and an increase in the bacteroid density were found. The symbiotic phenotype of plants inoculated with a Bradyrhizobium sp. SEMIA 6144 culture showing decreased peroxidase activity was also affected, since the biomass production, nodule number and percentage of red nodules in these plants were lower than in plants inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. control cultures. We demonstrated for the first time that the oxidative burst triggered at the early events of the symbiotic interaction in peanut, is a prerequisite for the efficient development of root nodules, and that the antioxidant system of bradyrhizobial peanut symbionts, particularly the activity of peroxidases, is counteracting this oxidative burst for the successful establishment of the symbiosis. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the development of the symbiotic interaction established in A. hypogaea L. a legume infected in an intercellular way. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Regenerative Capacity of Cacti Schlumbergera and Rhipsalidopsis in Relation to Endogenous Phytohormones, Cytokinin Oxidase/Dehydrogenase, and Peroxidase Activities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sriskandarajah, S.; Prinsen, E.; Motyka, Václav; Dobrev, Petre; Serek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2006), s. 79-88 ISSN 0721-7595 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/0313 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cytokinin dehydrogenase * Cytokinin oxidase * Endogenous phytohormones * In vitro regeneration * Peroxidase * Rhipsalidopsis * Schlumbergera Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.107, year: 2006

  5. A redox-dependent dimerization switch regulates activity and tolerance for reactive oxygen species of barley seed glutathione peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric and dimeric forms of recombinant barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) glutathione peroxidase 2 (HvGpx2) are demonstrated to display distinctly different functional properties in vitro. Monomeric HvGpx2 thus has five fold higher catalytic efficiency than the dimer towards tert-butyl h...

  6. The peroxidase and oxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} mesoporous spheres: Mechanistic understanding and colorimetric biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Li, E-mail: suli@htu.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Province for Green Manufacturing of Fine Chemicals, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Henan Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Dong, Wenpei; Wu, Chengke; Gong, Yijun; Zhang, Yan; Li, Ling; Mao, Guojiang; Feng, Suling [Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Province for Green Manufacturing of Fine Chemicals, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Henan Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2017-01-25

    The synthesized NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} mesoporous spheres (MS) displayed intrinsic peroxidase and oxidase-like activity were firstly reported. The catalytic mechanism of the oxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS was analyzed in detail using the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. It is found that NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS could directly oxidize 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) but did not produce {sup 1}O{sub 2} and ·OH. And the mechanism of the peroxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS was also verified that the oxidation of TMB stemmed from not only ·OH but also {sup 1}O{sub 2}. Based on the NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS showed excellent peroxidase-like activity over a broad temperature range, especially at normal body temperature, a detection tool was designed for glucose determination in diabetics' serum samples. And this detection method based on NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS gave a lower limit of detection than the method using Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs and NiO NPs, as the single-component oxides of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Our study may open up the possibility to make a great influence on the next generation of enzyme mimetics system. - Highlights: • NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS were found to possess the peroxidase and oxidase-like activity. • The peroxidase-like activity of NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS was stemmed from not only ·OH but also {sup 1}O{sub 2}. • The oxidase-like activity may stem from NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} MS′ oxidation rather than ·OH and {sup 1}O{sub 2}. • A colorimetric detection tool is designed for glucose determination in serum samples.

  7. Template-mediated synthesis and bio-functionalization of flexible lignin-based nanotubes and nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Hector M.; Dempere, Luisa A.; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2012-03-01

    Limitations of cylindrical carbon nanotubes based on the buckminsterfullerene structure as delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents include their chemical inertness, sharp edges and toxicological concerns. As an alternative, we have developed lignin-based nanotubes synthesized in a sacrificial template of commercially available alumina membranes. Lignin is a complex phenolic plant cell wall polymer that is generated as a waste product from paper mills and biorefineries that process lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals. We covalently linked isolated lignin to the inner walls of activated alumina membranes and then added layers of dehydrogenation polymer onto this base layer via a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. By using phenolic monomers displaying different reactivities, we were able to change the thickness of the polymer layer deposited within the pores, resulting in the synthesis of nanotubes with a wall thickness of approximately 15 nm or nanowires with a nominal diameter of 200 nm. These novel nanotubes are flexible and can be bio-functionalized easily and specifically, as shown by in vitro assays with biotin and Concanavalin A. Together with their intrinsic optical properties, which can also be varied as a function of their chemical composition, these lignin-based nanotubes are expected to enable a variety of new applications including as delivery systems that can be easily localized and imaged after uptake by living cells.

  8. Template-mediated synthesis and bio-functionalization of flexible lignin-based nanotubes and nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, Hector M; Vermerris, Wilfred; Dempere, Luisa A

    2012-01-01

    Limitations of cylindrical carbon nanotubes based on the buckminsterfullerene structure as delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents include their chemical inertness, sharp edges and toxicological concerns. As an alternative, we have developed lignin-based nanotubes synthesized in a sacrificial template of commercially available alumina membranes. Lignin is a complex phenolic plant cell wall polymer that is generated as a waste product from paper mills and biorefineries that process lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals. We covalently linked isolated lignin to the inner walls of activated alumina membranes and then added layers of dehydrogenation polymer onto this base layer via a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. By using phenolic monomers displaying different reactivities, we were able to change the thickness of the polymer layer deposited within the pores, resulting in the synthesis of nanotubes with a wall thickness of approximately 15 nm or nanowires with a nominal diameter of 200 nm. These novel nanotubes are flexible and can be bio-functionalized easily and specifically, as shown by in vitro assays with biotin and Concanavalin A. Together with their intrinsic optical properties, which can also be varied as a function of their chemical composition, these lignin-based nanotubes are expected to enable a variety of new applications including as delivery systems that can be easily localized and imaged after uptake by living cells. (paper)

  9. Efeito do cobre na atividade da enzima pirogalol peroxidase em plantas de Myriophyllum aquaticum cultivadas em solução nutritiva Effect of copper on the activity of pirogalol peroxidase in Myriophyllum aquaticum plants cultivated in nutritives solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D. Domingos

    2005-06-01

    . The objective of the present work was to verify the effect of copper on the activity of pirogalol peroxidase in M. aquaticum plants submitted to nutritive solution containing copper concentrations of 1.2; 11.2; 21.2; 31.2 and 41.2 µg L-1. The experiment was carried out in a randomized complete design with 4 replicates and 5 treatments for 21 days Eighty-one days later, the leaves were collected starting from the apex of the plant to the end of the branch, which was not in contact with the solution. This fresh material was involved by transparent plastic and aluminum foil, frozen in liquid nitrogen, stored in freezer to -20 °C until determination of the enzyme activity. Enzyme activity increased with the increase of the copper doses. The plants cultivated with 40 µg L-1 of Cu2+ showed a reduced development, after three weeks, based on visual examination..

  10. Probucol increases striatal glutathione peroxidase activity and protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced pro-oxidative damage in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirleise Colle

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP, an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p. once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx, an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great

  11. Structural Alterations of Lignins in Transgenic Poplars with Depressed Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase or Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase Activity Have an Opposite Impact on the Efficiency of Industrial Kraft Pulping1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Catherine; Pollet, Brigitte; Petit-Conil, Michel; Toval, Gabriel; Romero, Javier; Pilate, Gilles; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Boerjan, Wout; Ferret, Valérie; De Nadai, Véronique; Jouanin, Lise

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated lignin profiles and pulping performances of 2-year-old transgenic poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba) lines severely altered in the expression of caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) or cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). Transgenic poplars with CAD or COMT antisense constructs showed growth similar to control trees. CAD down-regulated poplars displayed a red coloration mainly in the outer xylem. A 90% lower COMT activity did not change lignin content but dramatically increased the frequency of guaiacyl units and resistant biphenyl linkages in lignin. This alteration severely lowered the efficiency of kraft pulping. The Klason lignin level of CAD-transformed poplars was slightly lower than that of the control. Whereas CAD down-regulation did not change the frequency of labile ether bonds or guaiacyl units in lignin, it increased the proportion of syringaldehyde and diarylpropane structures and, more importantly with regard to kraft pulping, of free phenolic groups in lignin. In the most depressed line, ASCAD21, a substantially higher content in free phenolic units facilitated lignin solubilization and fragmentation during kraft pulping. These results point the way to genetic modification of lignin structure to improve wood quality for the pulp industry. PMID:9880356

  12. Atividade peroxidásica em basófilos de Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines Chelidae Peroxidase activity in the basophils of Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines: Chelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Afonso da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As peroxidases, presentes nos peroxissomos e lisossomos, pertencem às oxidases e atuam como catalítico para o peróxido de hidrogênio (H2O2, posteriormente decomposto pela oxidação de cossubstratos, evitando danos celulares.(¹ Foi aplicada a técnica da peroxidase(2 em esfregaços sanguíneos de Phrynops geoffroanus, comparando com sangue humano, para avaliação da atividade e controle da reação. O esfregaço sanguíneo humano apresentou marcações em neutrófilos, fagócitos com muitos lisossomos e peroxissomos (Figura 1. Nos esfregaços sanguíneos de Phrynops geoffroanus, as marcações apresentaram-se nos basófilos (Figura 2, que representam de 10% a 25% dos leucócitos de quelônios e possuem grande número de granulações citoplasmáticas,(3 sugerindo a presença de grande quantidade de enzimas e organelas como lisossomos e peroxissomos, possivelmente associadas a sua participação em reações imunes. A atividade peroxidásica representa resposta do organismo a ações ambientais danosas, servindo como marcador biológico.Peroxidase, present in peroxisomes and lysosomes, belongs to the oxidases and acts as a catalyst for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and is later decomposed by oxidation of cosubstrates thereby preventing cell damage.(1 The peroxidase technique(2 was applied to blood smears of Phrynops geoffroanus and the results compared with human blood to evaluate the activity and control of the reaction. The human blood film showed markings in neutrophils and phagocytes with many lysosomes and peroxisomes (Figure 1. In blood smears of Phrynops geoffroanus, the markings were on the basophils (Figure 2, that represent 10% to 25% of leukocytes of turtles and have a large number of cytoplasmatic granules(3 suggesting the presence of large amounts of enzymes and organelles such as lysosomes and peroxisomes, possibly associated with their participation in immune reactions. Peroxidase activity is the body's response to harmful

  13. Wound-induced expression of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaoka, A; Kawamoto, T; Ohta, H; Sekine, M; Takano, M; Shinmyo, A

    1994-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in the responses of plants to physiological stress and to pathogens. Wound-induced peroxidase of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) was studied. Total peroxidase activity was increased by wounding in cell wall fractions extracted from roots, stems and leaves of horseradish. On the other hand, wounding decreased the peroxidase activity in the soluble fraction from roots. The enzyme activities of the basic isozymes were induced by wounding in horseradish leaves based on data obtained by fractionation of crude enzyme in isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis followed by activity staining. We have previously isolated genomic clones for four peroxidase genes, namely, prxC1a, prxC1b, prxC2 and prxC3. Northern blot analysis using gene-specific probes showed that mRNA of prxC2, which encodes a basic isozyme, accumulated by wounding, while the mRNAs for other peroxidase genes were not induced. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were transformed with four chimeric gene constructs, each consisting of a promoter from one of the peroxidase genes and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) structural gene. High level GUS activity induced in response to wounding was observed in tobacco plants containing the prxC2-GUS construct.

  14. Modulating lignin in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  15. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Catalytic and peroxidase-like activity of carbon based-AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite produced using carbon dots as the reductant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Liuqing; Liu, Xiaoying; Lu, Qiujun; Huang, Na; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this report, carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite (AuPd/C NC) was synthesized using carbon dots (C-dots) as the reducing agent and stabilizer by a simple green sequential reduction strategy, without adding other agents. The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like property. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were clearly characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuPd/C NC catalyst exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity than Pd and Au nanoparticles in catalysis reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Moreover, based on the high peroxidase-like property of AuPd/C NC, a new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) has been designed using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) as the substrate, which provides a simple and sensitive means to detect H 2 O 2 in wide linear range of 5 μM–500 μM and 500 μM–4 mM with low detection limit of 1.6 μM (S/N = 3). Therefore, the facile synthesis strategy for bimetallic nanoparticles by the mild reductant of carbon dot will provide some new thoughts for preparing of carbon-based metal nanomaterials and expand their application in catalysis and analytical chemistry areas. - Highlights: • Carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite was synthesized using carbon dots. • The green sequential reduction strategy synthesis method is simple, green, convenient and effective. • The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like activity. • The AuPd/C NC exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. • A new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide based on AuPd/C NC was proposed.

  17. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, R. S. S.; Yadav, K. S.; Yadav, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K m values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydroge...

  18. Characterization of changes of lignin structure in the processes of cooking with solid alkali and different active oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiulin; Shi, Jianbin; Lin, Lu; Peng, Lincai; Zhuang, Junping

    2012-11-01

    The cooking with solid alkali and active oxygen has a high selectivity for delignification. In the present work, the O(2) and H(2)O(2) were separately combined with MgO used in cornstalk cooking for investigating their effects on delignification. After cooking, the lignins in raw material, pulp, and yellow liquor were all characterized by HSQC NMR. The results showed that the syringyl (S/S'/S″) units and β-O-4' (A/A'/A″) structures had different reactivity in the cooking with MgO and H(2)O(2) due to their different structures on side-chains. Whereas the syringyl (S/S'/S″) units could be completely decomposed when the MgO and O(2) were used, and the β-O-4' (A/A'/A″) structures could be partly degraded. A novel structure G' unit with a carbonyl group was only generated in the cooking with MgO and O(2). In addition, the H unit, non-phenolic β-β' (B) and β-5' (C) structures were all stable in both of the two cooking processes. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization and genomic analysis of kraft lignin biodegradation by the beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus basilensis B-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for biofuel production. Development of an efficient lignin degradation process has considerable potential for the production of a variety of chemicals, including bioethanol. However, lignin degradation using current methods is inefficient. Given their immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility, bacterial could be used as a valuable tool for the rapid degradation of lignin. Kraft lignin (KL is a polymer by-product of the pulp and paper industry resulting from alkaline sulfide treatment of lignocellulose, and it has been widely used for lignin-related studies. Results Beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus basilensis B-8 isolated from erosive bamboo slips displayed substantial KL degradation capability. With initial concentrations of 0.5–6 g L-1, at least 31.3% KL could be degraded in 7 days. The maximum degradation rate was 44.4% at the initial concentration of 2 g L-1. The optimum pH and temperature for KL degradation were 7.0 and 30°C, respectively. Manganese peroxidase (MnP and laccase (Lac demonstrated their greatest level of activity, 1685.3 U L-1 and 815.6 U L-1, at the third and fourth days, respectively. Many small molecule intermediates were formed during the process of KL degradation, as determined using GC-MS analysis. In order to perform metabolic reconstruction of lignin degradation in this bacterium, a draft genome sequence for C. basilensis B-8 was generated. Genomic analysis focused on the catabolic potential of this bacterium against several lignin-derived compounds. These analyses together with sequence comparisons predicted the existence of three major metabolic pathways: β-ketoadipate, phenol degradation, and gentisate pathways. Conclusion These results confirmed the capability of C. basilensis B-8 to promote KL degradation. Whole genomic sequencing and systematic analysis of the C. basilensis B-8 genome

  20. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway and Lignin in Defense against Ganoderma boninense Colonized Root Tissues in Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha T. Govender

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Basal stem rot, caused by the basidiomycete fungus, Ganoderma boninense, is an economically devastating disease in Malaysia. Our study investigated the changes in lignin content and composition along with activity and expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes and genes in oil palm root tissues during G. boninense infection. We sampled control (non-inoculated and infected (inoculated seedlings at seven time points [1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-inoculation (wpi] in a randomized design. The expression profiles of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD, and peroxidase (POD genes were monitored at 1, 2, and 3 wpi using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Seedlings at 4, 8, and 12 wpi were screened for lignin content, lignin composition, enzyme activities (PAL, CAD, and POD, growth (weight and height, and disease severity (DS. Gene expression analysis demonstrated up-regulation of PAL, CAD, and POD genes in the infected seedlings, relative to the control seedlings at 1, 2, and 3 wpi. At 2 and 3 wpi, CAD showed highest transcript levels compared to PAL and POD. DS increased progressively throughout sampling, with 5, 34, and 69% at 4, 8, and 12 wpi, respectively. Fresh weight and height of the infected seedlings were significantly lower compared to the control seedlings at 8 and 12 wpi. Lignin content of the infected seedlings at 4 wpi was significantly higher than the control seedlings, remained elicited with no change at 8 wpi, and then collapsed with a significant reduction at 12 wpi. The nitrobenzene oxidation products of oil palm root lignin yielded both syringyl and guaiacyl monomers. Accumulation of lignin in the infected seedlings was in parallel to increased syringyl monomers, at 4 and 8 wpi. The activities of PAL and CAD enzymes in the infected seedlings at DS = 5–34% were significantly higher than the control seedlings and thereafter collapsed at DS = 69%.

  1. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway and Lignin in Defense against Ganoderma boninense Colonized Root Tissues in Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Nisha T; Mahmood, Maziah; Seman, Idris A; Wong, Mui-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Basal stem rot, caused by the basidiomycete fungus, Ganoderma boninense , is an economically devastating disease in Malaysia. Our study investigated the changes in lignin content and composition along with activity and expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes and genes in oil palm root tissues during G. boninense infection. We sampled control (non-inoculated) and infected (inoculated) seedlings at seven time points [1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-inoculation (wpi)] in a randomized design. The expression profiles of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and peroxidase (POD) genes were monitored at 1, 2, and 3 wpi using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Seedlings at 4, 8, and 12 wpi were screened for lignin content, lignin composition, enzyme activities (PAL, CAD, and POD), growth (weight and height), and disease severity (DS). Gene expression analysis demonstrated up-regulation of PAL, CAD, and POD genes in the infected seedlings, relative to the control seedlings at 1, 2, and 3 wpi. At 2 and 3 wpi, CAD showed highest transcript levels compared to PAL and POD. DS increased progressively throughout sampling, with 5, 34, and 69% at 4, 8, and 12 wpi, respectively. Fresh weight and height of the infected seedlings were significantly lower compared to the control seedlings at 8 and 12 wpi. Lignin content of the infected seedlings at 4 wpi was significantly higher than the control seedlings, remained elicited with no change at 8 wpi, and then collapsed with a significant reduction at 12 wpi. The nitrobenzene oxidation products of oil palm root lignin yielded both syringyl and guaiacyl monomers. Accumulation of lignin in the infected seedlings was in parallel to increased syringyl monomers, at 4 and 8 wpi. The activities of PAL and CAD enzymes in the infected seedlings at DS = 5-34% were significantly higher than the control seedlings and thereafter collapsed at DS = 69%.

  2. Intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots and their application in the colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Yiru; Jiang, Yaqi; Chen, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The highly intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity of N-GQDs is revealed. • The activity of N-GQDs depended on pH, temperature and H 2 O 2 concentration. • The activity of N-GQDs has been used to the detection of H 2 O 2 and glucose. • This assay was suitable for the detection of glucose concentrations in real samples. - Abstract: In this paper, the highly intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) is revealed. This activity was greatly dependent on pH, temperature and H 2 O 2 concentration. The experimental results showed that the stable N-GQDs could be used for the detection of H 2 O 2 and glucose over a wide range of pH and temperature, offering a simple, highly selective and sensitive approach for their colorimetric sensing. The linearity between the analyte concentration and absorption ranged from 20 to 1170 μM for H 2 O 2 and 25 to 375 μM for glucose with a detection limit of 5.3 μM for H 2 O 2 and 16 μM for glucose. This assay was also successfully applied to the detection of glucose concentrations in diluted serum and fruit juice samples

  3. Lignin Valorization: Emerging Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Lignin, an aromatic biopolymer found in plant cell walls, is a key component of lignocellulosic biomass and generally utilized for heat and power. However, lignin's chemical composition makes it an attractive source for biological and catalytic conversion to fuels and chemicals. Bringing together experts from biology, catalysis, engineering, analytical chemistry, and techno-economic/life-cycle analysis, Lignin Valorization presents a comprehensive, interdisciplinary picture of how lignocellulosic biorefineries could potentially employ lignin valorization technologies. Chapters will specifically focus on the production of fuels and chemicals from lignin and topics covered include (i) methods for isolating lignin in the context of the lignocellulosic biorefinery, (ii) thermal, chemo-catalytic, and biological methods for lignin depolymerization, (iii) chemo-catalytic and biological methods for upgrading lignin, (iv) characterization of lignin, and (v) techno-economic and life-cycle analysis of integrated processes to utilize lignin in an integrated biorefinery. The book provides the latest breakthroughs and challenges in upgrading lignin to fuels and chemicals for graduate students and researchers in academia, governmental laboratories, and industry interested in biomass conversion.

  4. Enzymatic activities for lignin monomer intermediates highlight the biosynthetic pathway of syringyl monomers in Robinia pseudoacacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeto, Jun; Ueda, Yukie; Sasaki, Shinya; Fujita, Koki; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Most of the known 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) isoforms lack CoA-ligation activity for sinapic acid. Therefore, there is some doubt as to whether sinapic acid contributes to sinapyl alcohol biosynthesis. In this study, we characterized the enzyme activity of a protein mixture extracted from the developing xylem of Robinia pseudoacacia. The crude protein mixture contained at least two 4CLs with sinapic acid 4-CoA ligation activity. The crude enzyme preparation displayed negligible sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase activity, but showed ferulic acid 5-hydroxylation activity and 5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase activity; these activities were retained in the presence of competitive substrates (coniferaldehyde and 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde, respectively). 5-Hydroxyferulic acid and sinapic acid accumulated in the developing xylem of R. pseudoacacia, suggesting, in part at least, sinapic acid is a sinapyl alcohol precursor in this species.

  5. Multienzyme Immobilized Polymeric Membrane Reactor for the Transformation of a Lignin Model Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupam Sarma

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an integrated, multienzyme functionalized membrane reactor for bioconversion of a lignin model compound involving enzymatic catalysis. The membrane bioreactors were fabricated through the layer-by-layer assembly approach to immobilize three different enzymes (glucose oxidase, peroxidase and laccase into pH-responsive membranes. This novel membrane reactor couples the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide (by glucose oxidase to oxidative conversion of a lignin model compound, guaiacylglycerol-β-guaiacyl ether (GGE. Preliminary investigation of the efficacy of these functional membranes towards GGE degradation is demonstrated under convective flow mode. Over 90% of the initial feed could be degraded with the multienzyme immobilized membranes at a residence time of approximately 22 s. GGE conversion product analysis revealed the formation of oligomeric oxidation products upon reaction with peroxidase, which may be a potential hazard to membrane bioreactors. These oxidation products could further be degraded by laccase enzymes in the multienzymatic membranes, explaining the potential of multi enzyme membrane reactors. The multienzyme incorporated membrane reactors were active for more than 30 days of storage time at 4 °C. During this time span, repetitive use of the membrane reactor was demonstrated involving 5–6 h of operation time for each cycle. The membrane reactor displayed encouraging performance, losing only 12% of its initial activity after multiple cycles of operation.

  6. A Facile synthesis of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanofibers with superior peroxidase-like catalytic activity for sensitive colorimetric detection of L-cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sihui; Chi, Maoqiang; Zhu, Yun; Gao, Mu; Wang, Ce; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2018-05-01

    Superaramagnetic Fe3O4 nanomaterials are good candidates as enzyme mimics due to their excellent catalytic activity, high stability and facile synthesis. However, the morphology of Fe3O4 nanomaterials has much influence on their enzyme-like catalytic activity. In this work, we have developed a simple polymer-assisted thermochemical reduction approach to prepare Fe3O4 nanofibers for peroxidase-like catalytic applications. The as-prepared Fe3O4 nanofibers show a higher catalytic activity than commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The steady-state kinetic assay result shows that the Michaelis-Menten constant value of the as-obtained Fe3O4 nanofibers is similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), indicating their superior affinity to the 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2 substrate. Based on the outstanding catalytic activity, a sensing platform for the detection of L-cysteine has been performed and the limit of detection is as low as 0.028 μM. In addition, an excellent selectivity toward L-cysteine over other types of amino acids, glucose and metal ions has been achieved as well. This work offers an original means for the fabrication of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanofibers and demonstrates their delightful potential applications in the fields of biosensing, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics.

  7. COMPARED ANALYSIS OF CATALASE AND PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY IN CELLULOLYTIC FUNGUS TRICHODERMA REESEI GROWN ON MEDIUM WITH DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF GRINDED WHEAT AND BARLEY STRAWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Cristica

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the evolution of catalase and peroxidase activity in Trichoderma reesei grown on medium containing grinded wheat and barley straws. Carbon source of cultivation medium - glucose was replaced by various concentrations of grinded wheat and barley straws, finally resulting three experimental variants as follows: V1 = 20 g/l, V2 = 30 g/l, V3 = 40 g/l. ĂŽn addition to these variants a control sample was added in which composition remainded unchanged. The catalase activity was determined by spectrophotometric Sinha method (Artenie et al., 2008 while peroxidase activity was assesed using the o-dianisidine method (Cojocaru, 2009. Enzymatic determinations were carried out at 7 and 14 days from inoculation, in both fungus mycelium and culture liquid. The enzymatic assay showed significant differences between determinations intervals and work variants. Enzyme activity is influenced by the age of fungus and by the different nature of the substrate used.

  8. Analysis of five rice 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity and stress response for potential roles in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis in rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haiyan [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); School of Biology and Food Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Li, Ying; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Guo, Kai [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fan, Chunfen [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Si, Shengli [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); and others

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► 4CLs play important roles in both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. ► PA and FA are the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for lignin biosynthesis. ► Os4CL2 is suggested for flavonoid formation in defense against UV radiation. -- Abstract: 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamates into corresponding CoA esters for biosynthesis of flavonoids and lignin. In this study, five members of the 4CL gene family from rice were cloned and analyzed. Recombinant 4CL data revealed that 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid were the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for monolignol biosynthesis in rice. Os4CL2 was specifically expressed in the anther and was strongly activated by UV irradiation, suggesting its potential involvement in flavonoid formation. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis showed that the existence of valine residue at the substrate-binding pocket may mainly affect rice 4CL activities toward sinapic acid.

  9. Analysis of five rice 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity and stress response for potential roles in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Haiyan; Li, Ying; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua; Guo, Kai; Fan, Chunfen; Si, Shengli

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► 4CLs play important roles in both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. ► PA and FA are the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for lignin biosynthesis. ► Os4CL2 is suggested for flavonoid formation in defense against UV radiation. -- Abstract: 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamates into corresponding CoA esters for biosynthesis of flavonoids and lignin. In this study, five members of the 4CL gene family from rice were cloned and analyzed. Recombinant 4CL data revealed that 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid were the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for monolignol biosynthesis in rice. Os4CL2 was specifically expressed in the anther and was strongly activated by UV irradiation, suggesting its potential involvement in flavonoid formation. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis showed that the existence of valine residue at the substrate-binding pocket may mainly affect rice 4CL activities toward sinapic acid

  10. Determination of metallothioneins based on the enhanced peroxidase-like activity of mercury-coated gold nanoparticles aggregated by metallothioneins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xue-Jiao; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Sheng-Yuan; Tang, Xian; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Huang, Yan-Qin; He, Shun-Zhen; Liu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    We report on a photometric method for the determination of the metallothioneins (MTs). It is known that citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated with traces of mercury possess peroxidase-like properties that can catalyze the oxidation of 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulfonate) (ABTS) to form a blue product in acetate buffer of pH 4.5. It is found that if the AuNPs are first aggregated by the cysteine-rich metallothioneins, the peroxidase-like properties of the resulting aggregates (AuNP-Hg-MTs) cause a largely accelerated oxidation of ABTS. The effect of adding MTs to such a solution is used to quantify the MTs by a kinetic assay. Changes in absorbance at 416 nm are linearly correlated to the concentration of MTs in the 4.3 to 49 nM range, and the detection limit is 1.3 nM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of MTs in (spiked) human urine. The strategy may pave the way for related detection platforms. (author)

  11. Dual-functional Pt-on-Pd supported on reduced graphene oxide hybrids: peroxidase-mimic activity and an enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiahong; Wu, Genghuang; Cai, Zhixiong; Chen, Xi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a facile hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize Pt-on-Pd supported on reduced graphene oxide (Pt-on-Pd/RGO) hybrids. Because of the synergistic effect between Pt-on-Pd and RGO, the obtained Pt-on-Pd/RGO had superior peroxidase-mimic activities in H2O2 reduction and TMB oxidation. The reaction medium was optimized and a sensing approach for H2O2 was developed with a linear range from 0.98 to 130.7 μM of H2O2. In addition, the characteristic of electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol was investigated. The peak current density value, j(f), for the Pt-on-Pd/RGO hybrid (328 mA mg(Pt)(-1)) was about 1.85 fold higher than that of commercial Pt black (177 mA mg(Pt)(-1)) and, also, more durable electrocatalytic activity could be obtained. For the first time, the dual-functional Pt-on-Pd/RGO with peroxidase-mimic activity and an enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation characteristic was reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-carboxyl phenyl)porphyrin–CdS nanocomposites with intrinsic peroxidase-like activity for glucose colorimetric detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingyun, E-mail: qyliu@sdust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Jia, Qingyan; Zhu, Renren; Shao, Qian; Wang, Dongmei; Cui, Peng [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Ge, Jiechao, E-mail: jchge2010@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Here, we describe the design of a novel mimic peroxidase, nanocomposites composed by 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyl phenyl)-porphyrin (H{sub 2}TCPP) and cadmium sulfide (CdS). The H{sub 2}TCPP–CdS nanocomposites can catalyze oxidation of substrate 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and form a blue product which can be seen by the naked eye in 5 min. The mechanism of the catalytic reaction originated from the generation of hydroxyl radical (·OH), which is a powerful oxidizing agent to oxidize TMB to produce a blue product. Then, we developed a colorimetric method that is highly sensitive and selective to detect glucose, combined with glucose oxidase (GOx). The proposed method allowed the detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration in the range of 4 × 10{sup −6}–1.4 × 10{sup −5} M and glucose in the range of 1.875 × 10{sup −5}–1 × 10{sup −4} M with detectable H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration as low as 4.6 × 10{sup −7} M and glucose as low as 7.02 × 10{sup −6} M, respectively. The results provided the theoretical basis of practical application in glucose detecting and peroxidase mimetic enzymes. - Graphical abstract: 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyl phenyl)-porphyrin (H{sub 2}TCPP)–CdS nanohybrids were demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and used for a glucose colorimetric sensor. - Highlights: • H{sub 2}TCPP–CdS nanocomposites were synthesized by a facile one step under mild condition. • H{sub 2}TCPP–CdS nanocomposites possess excellent intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. • A sensitive and selective colorimetric sensor for glucose is provided based on H{sub 2}TCPP–CdS nanocomposites. • The generation of hydroxyl radical (·OH) decomposed from H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is contributed to efficient catalytic.

  13. Analytical methodology for sulfonated lignins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brudin, S.; Schoenmakers, P.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant need to characterize and classify lignins and sulfonated lignins. Lignins have so far received a good deal of attention, whereas this is not true for sulfonated lignins. There is a clear demand for a better understanding of sulfonated lignins on a chemical as well as physical

  14. Enzyme Technology of Peroxidases: Immobilization, Chemical and Genetic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoria, Adriana; Tinoco, Raunel; Torres, Eduardo

    An overview of enzyme technology applied to peroxidases is made. Immobilization on organic, inorganic, and hybrid supports; chemical modification of amino acids and heme group; and genetic modification by site-directed and random mutagenesis are included. Different strategies that were carried out to improve peroxidase performance in terms of stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity are analyzed. Immobilization of peroxidases on inorganic and organic materials enhances the tolerance of peroxidases toward the conditions normally found in many industrial processes, such as the presence of an organic solvent and high temperature. In addition, it is shown that immobilization helps to increase the Total Turnover Number at levels high enough to justify the use of a peroxidase-based biocatalyst in a synthesis process. Chemical modification of peroxidases produces modified enzymes with higher thermostability and wider substrate variability. Finally, through mutagenesis approaches, it is possible to produce modified peroxidases capable of oxidizing nonnatural substrates with high catalytic activity and affinity.

  15. Investigation of glutathione peroxidase activity in chicken meat under different experimental conditions Investigação da atividade de glutationa peroxidase em carne de frango submetida a diferentes condições experimentais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre José Cichoski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that previous studies on the enzymatic activity of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px diverge widely in their methodology and results, this study aimed to investigate the influence of different analytical conditions on GSH-Px activity in chicken thighs from broilers that were fed different diets with different sources and concentrations of selenium. GSH-Px activity was evaluated six hours after slaughter and 120 days after frozen storage at -18 ºC. The different analytical conditions included time of pre-incubation (0, 10 and 30 minutes, reaction medium, types of substrate (H2O2 (0.72 mM, 7.2 mM, and 72 mM and Terc-butil hydroperoxide 15 mM, and different buffer concentrations (buffer 1, potassium phosphate 50 mM pH 7.0 + EDTA 1 mM + mercaptoethanol 1 mM, and buffer 2, tris-HCl 50 mM pH 7.6 + EDTA 1 mM + mercapthanol 5 mM. The results show that the highest GSH-Px activity was observed when enzyme and substrate were in contact at 22 ºC without any pre-incubation, and that, when used at concentrations above 0.72 mM, hydrogen peroxide saturated the GSH-Px enzyme and inhibited its activity. The enzyme presented higher affinity to hydrogen peroxide when compared to terc-butil peroxide, and the addition of a buffer containing mercaptoethanol did not increase GSH-Px enzymatic activity. The activity of GSH-Px was not influenced by the source and concentration of selenium in the diet either. The obtained results allowed the determination of the best temperature of contact between the enzyme and substrate (22 ºC, the optimum concentration, and the type of substrate and buffer to be used. This information is extremely useful for future studies on GSH-Px activity in meat due to the divergence and little information found in the literature.Uma vez que estudos anteriores sobre a atividade enzimática da glutationa peroxidase (GSH-Px divergem acerca da metodologia e dos resultados, este estudo teve por objetivo investigar a influência de

  16. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  17. Relationship between glutation peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity and the uptake of 75-Se by erytrocytes for practical assesment of selenium status in dairy cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danius, J.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to study the relationship between glutation peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and the uptake of 75-Se by erytrocytes was conducted for practical assesment of selenium status in Holstein-Friesian (HF) dairy cows. The blood used in the experiment was stored in refrigerator for 7 and 10 days. Radioselenium with a specific activity at about 0.84 mCi/m was used. A high negative correlatin (r = -0.86 and r = -0.98) was found between red blood cell GSH-Px activity and red blood cell uptake of 75-Se. Results indicated that red blood cell uptake of 75-Se can be used for determination of Se status in dairy cattle, although some factors which might affect red blood cell uptake of 75-Se should be calculated first. (author). 21 refs, 2 figs

  18. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  19. Catalytic and peroxidase-like activity of carbon based-AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite produced using carbon dots as the reductant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liuqing [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Xiaoying [College of Science, Science and Technological Innovation Platform, Hunan Agricultural University, Hunan, Changsha 410128 (China); Lu, Qiujun; Huang, Na [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Liu, Meiling, E-mail: liumeilingww@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo [Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology & Traditional Chinese Medicine Research (Ministry of Education, China), College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-08-03

    In this report, carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite (AuPd/C NC) was synthesized using carbon dots (C-dots) as the reducing agent and stabilizer by a simple green sequential reduction strategy, without adding other agents. The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like property. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were clearly characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The AuPd/C NC catalyst exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity than Pd and Au nanoparticles in catalysis reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Moreover, based on the high peroxidase-like property of AuPd/C NC, a new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been designed using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) as the substrate, which provides a simple and sensitive means to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in wide linear range of 5 μM–500 μM and 500 μM–4 mM with low detection limit of 1.6 μM (S/N = 3). Therefore, the facile synthesis strategy for bimetallic nanoparticles by the mild reductant of carbon dot will provide some new thoughts for preparing of carbon-based metal nanomaterials and expand their application in catalysis and analytical chemistry areas. - Highlights: • Carbon-based AuPd bimetallic nanocomposite was synthesized using carbon dots. • The green sequential reduction strategy synthesis method is simple, green, convenient and effective. • The as synthesized AuPd/C NC showed good catalytic activity and peroxidase-like activity. • The AuPd/C NC exhibits noticeably higher catalytic activity in reduction of 4-nitrophenol. • A new colorimetric detection method for hydrogen peroxide based on AuPd/C NC was proposed.

  20. Can laccases catalyze bond cleavage in lignin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Sitarz, Anna Katarzyna; Kalyani, Dayanand

    2015-01-01

    illustrations of the putative laccase catalyzed reactions, including the possible reactions of the reactive radical intermediates taking place after the initial oxidation of the phenol-hydroxyl groups, we show that i) Laccase activity is able to catalyze bond cleavage in low molecular weight phenolic lignin......-substituted phenols, benzenethiols, polyphenols, and polyamines, which may be oxidized. In addition, the currently available analytical methods that can be used to detect enzyme catalyzed changes in lignin are summarized, and an improved nomenclature for unequivocal interpretation of the action of laccases on lignin...

  1. DNA-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of layered double hydroxide nanosheets and applications in H2O2 and glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijian; Sun, Kaifang; Li, Peipei; Fan, Xianzhong; Sun, Jianchao; Ai, Shiyun

    2013-11-21

    LDH nanosheets were obtained via continuous impaction and exfoliation by herring sperm DNA molecules using a constant vibration method. DNA-LDH nanohybrids were composed by electrostatic forces and they exhibited DNA-enhanced peroxidase-like activity. The morphology and structure of DNA-LDH nanohybrids were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization. On the basis of the high catalytic activity of DNA/CuAl-LDH nanosheets, a rapid, sensitive, and convenient approach was developed for colorimetric detection of H2O2 and blood glucose. This method can be potentially applied in medical diagnostics and biotechnology fields.

  2. Effects of lignin and surfactant on adsorption and hydrolysis of cellulases on cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yanfei; Sun, Zongping; Ge, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Background Considerable works have been reported concerning the obstruction of enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency by lignin. However, there is a lack of information about the influence of lignin on the adsorption of cellulases on cellulose, along with the hydrolytic activity of the cellulases adsorbed on lignin. In addition, limited discovery has been reported about the influence of additives on cellulase desorption from lignin and lignocellulosic materials. In this work, the effects of lignin o...

  3. Colorimetric detection of urea, urease, and urease inhibitor based on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hao-Hua; Hong, Guo-Lin; Lin, Feng-Lin; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-07

    Herein, we reported for the first time that gold nanoparticles-catalyzed 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine-H2O2 system can serve as an ultrasensitive colorimetric pH indicator. Gold nanoparticles acted as a catalyst and imitated the function of horseradish peroxidase. The absorbance at 450 nm of the yellow-color product in the catalytic reaction exhibited a linear fashion over the pH range of 6.40-6.60. On the basis of this property, we constructed a novel sensing platform for the determination of urea, urease, and urease inhibitor. The limit of detection for urea and urease was 5 μM and 1.8 U/L, respectively. The half-maximal inhibition value IC50 of acetohydroxamic acid was found to be 0.05 mM. Urea in human urine and urease in soil were detected with satisfied results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Leishmania mexicana amazonensis: heterogeneity in 5-nucleotidase and peroxidase activities of mononuclear phagocytes during in vivo and in vitro infection Leishmania mexicana amazonensis: heterogeneidade da 5’-Nucleotidase e da peroxidase em fagócitos mononucleares durante infecção in vivo e in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Suzana Côrte-Real; Gabriel Grimaldi Junior; Maria de Nazareth Leal de Meirelles

    1988-01-01

    The degree of maturation of cells of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS), during in vivo and in vitro infection by Leishmania mexicana amazonenesis, was evaluated in this study. The macrophages' differentiation was assayed by cytochemical characterization at the ultrastrctural level, using two well-established markers: 5'-nucleotidase enzyme activity, for revealing the mature cells, and the peroxidase activity present in the cell granules to demonstrate immature mononuclear phagocytes. onl...

  5. The catalytic activity of Ag{sub 2}S-montmorillonites as peroxidase mimetic toward colorimetric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingyun, E-mail: qyliu@sdust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Jiang, Yanling; Zhang, Leyou; Zhou, Xinpei [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Lv, Xintian [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Ding, Yanyuan; Sun, Lifang; Chen, Pengpeng [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Yin, Hailiang [Academy of Science & Technology, China University of Petroleum, Dongying 257061 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites based on silver sulfide (Ag{sub 2}S) and Ca-montmorillonite (Ca{sup 2+}-MMT) were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The as-prepared Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites were firstly demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and could rapidly catalytically oxidize the substrate 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to produce a blue product which can be seen by the naked eye in only one minute. The experimental results revealed that the Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites exhibit higher thermal durance. Based on the TMB–H{sub 2}O{sub 2} catalyzed color reaction, the Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites were exploited as a new type of biosensor for detection and estimation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} through a simple, cheap and selective colorimetric method. - Highlights: • Ag{sub 2}S – montmorillonites (MMT) was synthesized by a facile one step method. • The as-prepared Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites firstly demonstrate to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. • Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites showed highly catalytic activity. • Ag{sub 2}S-MMT could rapidly catalytically oxidize substrates TMB in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in 1 min. • The catalytic mechanism is from the generation of hydroxyl radical (·OH) decomposed from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  6. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  8. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Protein-directed in situ synthesis of platinum nanoparticles with superior peroxidase-like activity, and their use for photometric determination of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lijian; Wang, Nan; Wang, Xindong; Ai, Shiyun

    2013-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) with sizes in the range from 10 to 30 nm were synthesized using protein-directed one-pot reduction. The model globular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was exploited as the template, and the resulting BSA/Pt-NPs were studied by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy. The modified nanoparticles display a peroxidase-like activity that was exploited in a rapid method for the colorimetric determination of hydrogen peroxide which can be detected in the 50 μM to 3 mM concentration range. The limit of detection is 7.9 μM, and the lowest concentration that can be visually detected is 200 μM. (author)

  10. Reduction of Diphenyl Diselenide and Analogs by Mammalian Thioredoxin Reductase Is Independent of Their Gluthathione Peroxidase-Like Activity: A Possible Novel Pathway for Their Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Teixeira Rocha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the successful use of the organoselenium drug ebselen in clinical trials for the treatment of neuropathological conditions associated with oxidative stress, there have been concerted efforts geared towards understanding the precise mechanism of action of ebselen and other organoselenium compounds, especially the diorganyl diselenides such as diphenyl diselenide, and its analogs. Although the mechanism of action of ebselen and other organoselenium compounds has been shown to be related to their ability to generally mimic native glutathione peroxidase (GPx, only ebselen however has been shown to serve as a substrate for the mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TrxR, demonstrating another component of its pharmacological mechanisms. In fact, there is a dearth of information on the ability of other organoselenium compounds, especially diphenyl diselenide and its analogs, to serve as substrates for the mammalian enzyme thioredoxin reductase. Interestingly, diphenyl diselenide shares several antioxidant and neuroprotective properties with ebselen. Hence in the present study, we tested the hypothesis that diphenyl diselenide and some of its analogs (4,4’-bistrifluoromethyldiphenyl diselenide, 4,4’-bismethoxy-diphenyl diselenide, 4.4’-biscarboxydiphenyl diselenide, 4,4’-bischlorodiphenyl diselenide, 2,4,6,2’,4’,6’-hexamethyldiphenyl diselenide could also be substrates for rat hepatic TrxR. Here we show for the first time that diselenides are good substrates for mammalian TrxR, but not necessarily good mimetics of GPx, and vice versa. For instance, bis-methoxydiphenyl diselenide had no GPx activity, whereas it was a good substrate for reduction by TrxR. Our experimental observations indicate a possible dissociation between the two pathways for peroxide degradation (either via substrate for TrxR or as a mimic of GPx. Consequently, the antioxidant activity of diphenyl diselenide and analogs can be attributed to their capacity to be

  11. Structure and Heme-Independent Peroxidase Activity of a Fully-Coordinated Mononuclear Mn(II) Complex with a Schiff-Base Tripodal Ligand Containing Three Imidazole Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Shuranjan; Lee, Hong In [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Do Hyun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lah, Myoung Soo [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    New complex [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sub 2}[Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 5}·3H{sub 2}O, where H{sub 3}L is tris{2-(4-imidazolyl)methyliminoethyl} amine (imtren), has been prepared by reacting manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate with the imtren ligand in methanol. X-ray crystallographic study revealed that the imtren ligand hexadentately binds to Mn(II) ion through the three Schiff-base imine N atoms and three imidazole N atoms with a distorted octahedral geometry, and the apical tertiary amine N atom of the ligand pseudo-coordinates to Mn(II), forming overall a pseudo-seven coordination environment. The hydrogen-bonds between imidazole and imidazolate of [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sup 0.5+} complex ions are extended to build a 2D puckered network with trigonal voids. [Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sup 2+} complex ions constitutes another extended 2D puckered layer without hydrogen bonds. Two layers are wedged each other to constitute overall stack of the crystal. Peroxidase activity of complex 1 was examined by observing the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)- 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of complex 1. Generation of ABTS{sup +·} was observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies, indicating that the complex 1, a fully-coordinated mononuclear Mn(II) complex with nitrogen-only ligand, has a heme-independent peroxidase activity.

  12. Preparation and characterization of a carbon-based magnetic nanostructure via co-precipitation method: Peroxidase-like activity assay with 3,3ʹ,5,5ʹ-tetramethylbenzidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navvabeh Salarizadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(S: Natural and artificial enzymes have shown important roles in biotechnological processes. Recently, design and synthesis of artificial enzymes especially peroxidase mimics has been interested by many researchers. Due to disadvantages of natural peroxidases, there is a desirable reason of current research interest in artificial peroxidase mimics. Methods: In this study, magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes with a structure of Fe3O4/MWCNTs as enzyme mimetic were fabricated using in situ co-precipitation method. The structure, composition, and morphology of Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposite were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The magnetic properties were investigated by the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of nanocomposite was investigated using colorimetric and electrochemical tests with 3,3ʹ,5,5ʹ-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB substrate. Results: The obtained data proved the synthesis of Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposite. The average crystallite size of nanostructures was estimated about 12 nm by Debye–Scherer equation. It was found that Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposite exhibit peroxidase-like activity. Colorimetric and electrochemical data demonstrated that prepared nanocomplex has higher catalytic activity toward H2O2 than pure MWCNT nanocatalyst. From electrochemical tests concluded that the Fe3O4/MWCNTs electrode exhibited the better redox response to H2O2, which is ~ 2 times larger than that of the MWCNTs. Conclusions: The synthesis of Fe3O4nanoparticles on MWCNTs was successfully performed by in situ co-precipitation process. Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocatalyst exhibited a good peroxidase-like activity. These biomimetic catalysts have some advantages such as simplicity, stability and cost effectiveness that can be used in the design of enzyme-based devices for various applied fields.

  13. Glycine post-synthetic modification of MIL-53(Fe) metal-organic framework with enhanced and stable peroxidase-like activity for sensitive glucose biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenfei; Yang, Liaoyuan; Huang, Yuming

    2017-05-15

    A facile and rapid post-synthetic strategy was proposed to prepare a glycine functionalized MIL-53(Fe), namely glycine-MIL-53(Fe), by a simple mixing of water dispersible MIL-53(Fe) and glycine. The FT-IR, SEM, XRD and zeta potential were used to characterize the glycine-MIL-53(Fe). The result showed that glycine post-synthetic modification of MIL-53(Fe) did not change in the morphology and crystal structure of MIL-53(Fe). Interestingly, compared with MIL-53(Fe), the glycine-MIL-53(Fe) exhibits an enhanced peroxidase-like activity, which could catalyze the oxidation of TMB by H 2 O 2 to produce an intensive color reaction. Kinetic analysis indicated that the K m of glycine-MIL-53(Fe) for TMB was one-tenth of that of MIL-53(Fe). The glycine-MIL-53(Fe) as peroxidase mimetic displays better stability under alkaline or acidic conditions than MIL-53(Fe). The good performance of glycine-MIL-53(Fe) over MIL-53(Fe) may be attributed to the increase of affinity between TMB and the glycine-MIL-53(Fe). With these characteristics, a simple and sensitive method was developed for the detection of H 2 O 2 and glucose. The linear detection range for H 2 O 2 is 0.10-10μM with a detection limit of 49nM, and glucose could be linearly detected in the range from 0.25 to 10μM with a detection limit of 0.13μM. The proposed method was successfully used for glucose detection in human serum samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In situ detection of microbial c-type cytochrome based on intrinsic peroxidase-like activity using screen-printed carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Junlin; He, Daigui; Yu, Zhen; Zhou, Shungui

    2018-08-15

    C-type cytochromes (c-cyts) facilitate microbial extracellular electron transfer and play critical roles in biogeochemical cycling, bioelectricity generation and bioremediation. In this study, a simple and effective method has been developed to detect microbial c-cyts by means of peroxidase mimetic reaction on screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). To this end, bacteria cells were immobilized onto the working electrode surface of SPCE by a simple drop casting. After introducing 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) solution, microbial c-cyts with peroxidase-like activity catalyze the oxidation of TMB in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The oxidized TMB was electrochemically determined and the current signal was employed to calculate the c-cyts content. This electrochemical method is highly sensitive for microbial c-cyts with a low detection limit of 40.78 fmol and a wide detection range between 51.70 fmol and 6.64 pmol. Moreover, the proposed technique can be universally expanded to detect c-cyts in other bacteria species such as Fontibacter ferrireducens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Comamonas guangdongensis and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the proposed method confers an in situ facile and quantitative c-cyts detection without any destructive sample preparations, complex electrode modifications and expensive enzyme- or metal particle- based signal amplification. The suggested method advances an intelligent strategy for in situ quantification of microbial c-cyts and consequently holds promising application potential in microbiology and environmental science. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulation of the Activities of Catalase, Cu-Zn, Mn Superoxide Dismutase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Adipocyte from Ovariectomised Female Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Cambray Guerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between estrogen removal, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress generated by obesity in a MS female rat model. Thirty two female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Control (C, MS, MS ovariectomized (Ovx, and MS Ovx plus estradiol (E2. MS was induced by administering 30% sucrose to drinking water for 24 weeks. After sacrifice, intra-abdominal fat was dissected; adipocytes were isolated and lipid peroxidation, non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, and the activities of Cu-Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were determined. There were no significant differences in the activities of Cu-Zn, Mn SOD, CAT, and GPx between the C and MS groups, but in the MS Ovx group there was a statistically significant decrease in the activities of these enzymes when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. The increased lipid peroxidation and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity found in MS Ovx was significantly decreased when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. In conclusion, the removal of E2 by ovariectomy decreases the activity of the antioxidant enzymes in the intra-abdominal tissue of MS female rats; this is reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity.

  16. Disruption of AtWNK8 Enhances Tolerance of Arabidopsis to Salt and Osmotic Stresses via Modulating Proline Content and Activities of Catalase and Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With no lysine kinases (WNKs play important roles in plant growth and development. However, its role in salt and osmotic stress tolerance is unclear. Here, we report that AtWNK8 is mainly expressed in primary root, hypocotyl, stamen and pistil and is induced by NaCl and sorbitol treatment. Compared to the wild-type, the T-DNA knock-out wnk8 mutant was more tolerant to severe salinity and osmotic stresses, as indicated by 27% and 198% more fresh weight in the NaCl and sorbitol treatment, respectively. The wnk8 mutant also accumulated 1.43-fold more proline than the wild-type in the sorbitol treatment. Under NaCl and sorbitol stresses, catalase (CAT activity in wnk8 mutant was 1.92- and 3.7-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Similarly, under salt and osmotic stress conditions, peroxidase (POD activities in wnk8 mutant were 1.81- and 1.58-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Taken together, we revealed that maintaining higher CAT and POD activities might be one of the reasons that the disruption of AtWNK8 enhances the tolerance to salt stress, and accumulating more proline and higher activities of CAT and POD might result in the higher tolerance of WNK8 to osmotic stress.

  17. Dietary fish oil replacement with palm or poultry oil increases fillet oxidative stability and decreases liver glutathione peroxidase activity in barramundi (Lates calcarifer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Ahmad, Wan A R; Stone, David A J; Schuller, Kathryn A

    2013-12-01

    Complete dietary fish oil replacement with palm or poultry oil in barramundi (Lates calcarifer) had no detrimental effects on growth or hepatosomatic index of juvenile fish up to an average size of ~50 g. However, it significantly decreased the omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid content of the fish muscle (fillet) lipids. This was particularly true for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) which are recognised for their health beneficial effects in the human diet. As a result of their decreased EPA and DHA content, the peroxidation index of the muscle lipids was also decreased. This was associated with increased simulated retail storage shelf life as indicated by decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in muscle samples from fish fed the palm or poultry oil-based diets. Concomitantly, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, but not glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity or reduced glutathione concentration, was significantly reduced in the liver of barramundi fed the palm or poultry oil-based diets as compared with the fish fed the fish oil-based diet. Furthermore, GPx and GST activity were very low in muscle, much lower than in gastrointestinal tract, liver or swim bladder. Therefore, we propose that liver GPx activity may be a good predictor of fillet shelf life in barramundi and other fish species.

  18. Conditions for selective degradation of lignin by the fungus Ganoderma australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, S.; Eyzaguirre, J. (Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Lab. de Bioquimica)

    1992-08-01

    The white-rot fungus Ganoderma australis selectively degrades lignin in the ecosystem 'palo podrido'. Using conditions that simulate those of 'palo podrido' in the laboratory, it was found that low nitrogen content and low O{sub 2} tension stimulate the production of manganese peroxidase and lignin degradation, and depress cellulose degradation and cellulase production. The inverse is found at high nitrogen concentration and high O{sub 2} tension. This agrees with previous results indicating that low O{sub 2} tension and low nitrogen stimulate selective lignin degradation by this fungus. (orig.).

  19. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  20. Carotene-degrading activities from Bjerkandera adusta possess an application in detergent industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Diana; Leonhardt, Robin; Eisele, Nadine; Petersen, Laura M; Riemer, Stephanie; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2015-06-01

    Four extracellular enzymes, a versatile peroxidase, a manganese peroxidase, a dye-decolorizing peroxidase and a lignin peroxidase were discovered in liquid cultures of the basidiomycete Bjerkandera adusta. All of them cleaved β-carotene effectively. Expression was enhanced in the presence of β-carotene or Coomassie Brilliant Blue and peaked after 7-9 days. The monomeric proteins were purified by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography and exhibited molecular masses of 41, 43, 51 and 43 kDa, respectively. The coding sequences showed homologies from 61 to 89 % to peroxidases from other basidiomycetes. The novel enzymes retained strong activity even in the absence of hydrogen peroxide and at alkaline pH. De-staining of fabrics using detergent-tolerant enzymes may help to save the most important bio-resources, energy and water, in washing processes and led to green processes in textile cleaning.

  1. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex; Coutinho, Pedro M.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Findley, Keisha; Foster, Brian; Gaskell, Jill; Glotzer, Dylan; Gorecki, Pawel; Heitman, Joseph; Hesse, Cedar; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jurgens, Joel A.; Kallen, Nathan; Kersten, Phil; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Kumar, T. K. Arun; Kuo, Alan; LaButti, Kurt; Larrondo, Luis F.; Lindquist, Erika; Ling, Albee; Lombard, Vincent; Lucas, Susan; Lundell, Taina; Martin, Rachael; McLaughlin, David J.; Morgenstern, Ingo; Morin, Emanuelle; Murat, Claude; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Nolan, Matt; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Rokas, Antonis; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Salamov, Asaf; Samejima, Masahiro; Schmutz, Jeremy; Slot, Jason C.; John, Franz; Stenlid, Jan; Sun, Hui; Sun, Sheng; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tsang, Adrian; Wiebenga, Ad; Young, Darcy; Pisabarro, Antonio; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

    2012-03-12

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

  2. Biosynthesis and incorporation of side-chain-truncated lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization and enhance saccharification

    OpenAIRE

    Eudes, Aymerick; George, Anthe; Mukerjee, Purba; Kim, J.S.; Pollet, B.; Bnke, P.I.; Persil Çetinkol, Özgül

    2012-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is utilized as a renewable feedstock in various agro-industrial activities. Lignin is an aromatic, hydrophobic and mildly branched polymer integrally associated with polysaccharides within the biomass, which negatively affects their extraction and hydrolysis during industrial processing. Engineering the monomer composition of lignins offers an attractive option towards new lignins with reduced recalcitrance. The presented work describes a new strategy developed in Arab...

  3. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  4. Preparation of a Superhydrophobic and Peroxidase-like Activity Array Chip for H2O2 Sensing by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi; Park, Yeonju; Chen, Lei; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee; Cong, Qian

    2015-10-28

    In this paper, we propose a novel and simple method for preparing a dual-biomimetic functional array possessing both superhydrophobic and peroxidase-like activity that can be used for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensing. The proposed method is an integration innovation that combines the above two properties and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We integrated a series of well-ordered arrays of Au points (d = 1 mm) onto a superhydrophobic copper (Cu)/silver (Ag) surface by replicating an arrayed molybdenum template. Instead of using photoresists and the traditional lithography method, we utilized a chemical etching method (a substitution reaction between Cu and HAuCl4) with a Cu/Ag superhydrophobic surface as the barrier layer, which has the benefit of water repellency. The as-prepared Au points were observed to possess peroxidase-like activity, allowing for catalytic oxidation of the chromogenic molecule o-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD). Oxidation was evidenced by a color change in the presence of H2O2, which allows the array chip to act as an H2O2 sensor. In this study, the water repellency of the superhydrophobic surface was used to fabricate the array chip and increase the local reactant concentration during the catalytic reaction. As a result, the catalytic reaction occurred when only 2 μL of an aqueous sample (OPD/H2O2) was placed onto the Au point, and the enzymatic product, 2,3-diaminophenazine, showed a SERS signal distinguishable from that of OPD after mixing with 2 μL of colloidal Au. Using the dual-biomimetic functional array chip, quantitative analysis of H2O2 was performed by observing the change in the SERS spectra, which showed a concentration-dependent behavior for H2O2. This method allows for the detection of H2O2 at concentrations as low as 3 pmol per 2 μL of sample, which is a considerable advantage in H2O2 analysis. The as-prepared substrate was convenient for H2O2 detection because only a small amount of sample was required in

  5. Oxidation of the tryptophan 32 residue of human superoxide dismutase 1 caused by its bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity triggers the non-amyloid aggregation of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Fernando R; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F; Lima, Filipe S; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-10-31

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1(WT) and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp(32) residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp(32) residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1(WT) and hSOD1(G93A) mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp(32) residue in the process. The results showed that Trp(32) residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp(32) residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1(W32F) mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp(32) residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Multi-time series RNA-seq analysis of Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth in lignin-amended medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orellana, Roberto; Chaput, Gina; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh; Gaffrey, Matt; Orr, Galya; DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Yang, Shihui

    2017-10-19

    The production of lignocellulosic-derived biofuels is a highly promising source of alternative energy, but it has been constrained by the lack of a microbial platform capable to efficiently degrade this recalcitrant material and cope with by-products that can be toxic to cells. Species that naturally grow in environments where carbon is mainly available as lignin are promising for finding new ways of removing the lignin that protects cellulose for improved conversion of lignin to fuel precursors. Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 is a facultative anaerobic Gammaproteobacteria isolated from tropical rain forest soil collected in El Yunque forest, Puerto Rico under anoxic growth conditions with lignin as sole carbon source. Whole transcriptome analysis of SCF1 during E.lignolyticus SCF1 lignin degradation was conducted on cells grown in the presence (0.1%, w/w) and the absence of lignin, where samples were taken at three different times during growth, beginning of exponential phase, midexponential phase and beginning of stationary phase. Lignin-amended cultures achieved twice the cell biomass as unamended cultures over three days, and in this time degraded 60% of lignin. Transcripts in early exponential phase reflected this accelerated growth. A complement of laccases, aryl-alcohol dehydrogenases, and peroxidases were most up-regulated in lignin amended conditions in mid-exponential and early stationary phases compared to unamended growth. The association of hydrogen production by way of the formate hydrogenlyase complex with lignin degradation suggests a possible value added to lignin degradation in the future.

  7. Change in catalase and peroxidase activity in rat blood in case of combined radiation and mechanical injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovaya, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Changes of catalase and peroxide activity of blood in rats in case of irradiation at 2.0 and 7.0 Gy, mechanical injury of animal chest and combined radiation injury were studied. The given data testify to considerable increase of the above enzymes activity in case of all these effects. The less decrease of catalase and peroxide activity was observed after infliction of mechanical injury alone. Aggravating effect of mechanical injury on the irradiated organism leads to more noticeable decrease of catalase activity (at early periods of observation) in comparison with radiation effect. Peroxide changes in case of combined radiation and mechanical injury of rats differ slightly from similar factors observed in case of irradiation alone

  8. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  9. Biosynthesis and incorporation of side-chain-truncated lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization and enhance saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; George, Anthe; Mukerjee, Purba; Kim, Jin S; Pollet, Brigitte; Benke, Peter I; Yang, Fan; Mitra, Prajakta; Sun, Lan; Cetinkol, Ozgül P; Chabout, Salem; Mouille, Grégory; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Balzergue, Sandrine; Singh, Seema; Holmes, Bradley M; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D; Simmons, Blake A; Lapierre, Catherine; Ralph, John; Loqué, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is utilized as a renewable feedstock in various agro-industrial activities. Lignin is an aromatic, hydrophobic and mildly branched polymer integrally associated with polysaccharides within the biomass, which negatively affects their extraction and hydrolysis during industrial processing. Engineering the monomer composition of lignins offers an attractive option towards new lignins with reduced recalcitrance. The presented work describes a new strategy developed in Arabidopsis for the overproduction of rare lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization degree (DP). Biosynthesis of these 'DP reducers' is achieved by expressing a bacterial hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase-lyase (HCHL) in lignifying tissues of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. HCHL cleaves the propanoid side-chain of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA lignin precursors to produce the corresponding hydroxybenzaldehydes so that plant stems expressing HCHL accumulate in their cell wall higher amounts of hydroxybenzaldehyde and hydroxybenzoate derivatives. Engineered plants with intermediate HCHL activity levels show no reduction in total lignin, sugar content or biomass yield compared with wild-type plants. However, cell wall characterization of extract-free stems by thioacidolysis and by 2D-NMR revealed an increased amount of unusual C₆C₁ lignin monomers most likely linked with lignin as end-groups. Moreover the analysis of lignin isolated from these plants using size-exclusion chromatography revealed a reduced molecular weight. Furthermore, these engineered lines show saccharification improvement of pretreated stem cell walls. Therefore, we conclude that enhancing the biosynthesis and incorporation of C₆C₁ monomers ('DP reducers') into lignin polymers represents a promising strategy to reduce lignin DP and to decrease cell wall recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied

  10. Effect of high levels of organic selenium on glutation-peroxidase (GSH-Px activity in blood plasma of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksimović-Todorović Mirjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment lasting 45 days was performed on 125 Hybro broilers divided into five groups. All compounds for broiler feed mixes used in the experiment contained 0.15 mg Se/kg, in the form of sodium selenite. The control group (K-group of broilers was fed mixes without added organic selenium, and the experimental groups with mixes to which selenium, in the form of selenized-yeast, was added in quantities of 2, 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg. Selenized yeast (ICN - Gaienika was obtained from beer yeast and contained 1.51, or 1.45 mg/g total, or organically bound selenium. At the beginning of the fattening period, GSH-Px plasma activity in broilers of the K-group ranged around 16.55 μkat/L, while GSH-Px plasma activity in broilers of experimental groups was statistically significantly higher, but without any major differences among the individual groups (on the average 25.53fjkat/L. In the blood plasma of K-group, GSH-Px activity dropped already in the second week of life and was maintained at a relatively constant level (about 10 μkat/L until the end of the experiment. The same phenomenon was observed in the experimental groups, but the trend of declining GSH-Px activity in blood plasma was more expressed, and, contrary to the control group, was expressed also in the later phases of the experiment. In the 3rd week of the fattening period, GSH-Px plasma activity in broilers of the control and experimental groups was relatively equal, and then the plasma activity of GSH-Px in broilers of the experimental groups decreased, but there were no major differences among the individual groups.

  11. Heat stable peroxidases from Vigna species (V) | Mbassi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoots of three landraces of a Vigna species from two climatic areas of Cameroon were evaluated for their content of heat-resistant peroxidases. The peroxidase activity in the three landraces was detected with a greater catalytic efficiency for oxidation of O-dianisidine relative to ABTS (2, 2'-azino-bis-(3- ...

  12. "Chitin-specific" peroxidases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, I V; Cherepanova, E A; Khairullin, R M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of various plant peroxidases and the ability of their individual isoforms to bind chitin was studied. Some increase in peroxidase activity was observed in crude extracts in the presence of chitin. Activated peroxidases of some species fell in the fraction not sorbed on chitin and those of other species can bind chitin. Only anionic isoperoxidases from oat (Avena sativa), rice (Oryza sativa), horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), garden radish (Raphanus sativus var. radicula), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Link et Otto) were sorbed on chitin. Both anionic and cationic isoforms from pea (Pisum sativum), galega(Galega orientalis), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were sorbed on chitin. Peroxidase activation under the influence of chitin was correlated to the processes that occur during hypersensitive reaction and lignification of sites, in which pathogenic fungus penetrates into a plant. The role of chitin-specific isoperoxidases in inhibition of fungal growth and connection of this phenomenon with structural characteristics of isoperoxidases are also discussed.

  13. Study of electron transport in the functionalized nanotubes and their impact on the electron transfer in the active site of horseradish peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizabadi, Mina; Ajloo, Davood; Soleymanpour, Ahmad; Faridnouri, Hassan

    2018-05-01

    Electrochemical characterization of functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNT) including carboxyl (CNT-COOH), amine (CNT-NH2) and hydroxyl (CNT-OH) functional groups were studied using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The current-voltage (I-V) curves were obtained from each system and the effect of f-CNT on redox interaction of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilized on the electrode surface was investigated. The non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) combined with density functional theory (DFT) were used to study the transport properties of f-CNT. Additionally, the effect of the number of functional groups on transport properties of CNT, I-V characteristics, electronic transmission coefficients and spatial distribution of f-CNTs have been calculated and analyzed. The results showed that the carboxyl derivative has larger transmission coefficients and current value than other f-CNTs. Then, the effect of functional groups on the electron transport in heme group of HRP is discussed. Finally, the effect of a covalent bond between active site amino acids and amine functional group of CNT was investigated and discussed.

  14. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities and risk of coronary heart disease in generally healthy women: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuman; Jensen, Majken K; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter; Wu, Tianying

    2014-11-01

    Erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes are major circulating antioxidant enzymes in the oxidative stress defense system. Few prospective studies have assessed the association between these enzymes and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in generally healthy adults. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study of CHD among 32,826 women at baseline with 15 years of follow-up from 1989 to 2004 in the Nurses' Health Study. We investigated the association of baseline erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities with the risk of CHD. A total of 365 cases and 728 controls were included in the analysis. Overall, the relative risks of CHD associated with 1-standard deviation higher SOD, GPx, and CAT activities were 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 1.22), 1.04 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.18), and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.17), respectively. Multivariable adjustments did not change the associations appreciably. Fasting status did not modify the associations, with the exception that SOD activity was positively associated with the risk of CHD among participants who provided blood samples within 12 hours of fasting. Overall, activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were not associated with CHD among women who were generally healthy at the time of blood collection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Dissolution of lignin in green urea aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Li, Ying; Qiu, Xueqing; Liu, Di; Yang, Dongjie; Liu, Weifeng; Qian, Yong

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution problem is the main obstacle for the value-added modification and depolymerization of industrial lignin. Here, a green urea aqueous solution for complete dissolution of various lignin is presented and the dissolution mechanism is analyzed by AFM, DLS and NMR. The results show that the molecular interaction of lignin decreases from 32.3 mN/m in pure water to 11.3 mN/m in urea aqueous solution. The immobility of 1H NMR spectra and the shift of 17O NMR spectra of urea in different lignin/urea solutions indicate that the oxygen of carbonyl in urea and the hydrogen of hydroxyl in lignin form new hydrogen bonds and break the original hydrogen bonds among lignin molecules. The shift of 1H NMR spectra of lignin and the decrease of interactions in model compound polystyrene indicate that urea also breaks the π-π interactions between aromatic rings of lignin. Lignin dissolved in urea aqueous has good antioxidant activity and it can scavenge at least 63% free radicals in 16 min.

  16. Analysis of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymatic activity by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection combined with an assay of oxidation with a peroxidase and its application to MAO inhibitors from foods and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Tomás; Flores, Andrea; Fernández, Lidia

    2018-01-15

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes catalyze the oxidative deamination of biogenic amines and neurotransmitters and produce ammonia, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide which is involved in oxidative processes. Inhibitors of MAO-A and -B isozymes are useful as antidepressants and neuroprotectants. The assays of MAO usually measure amine oxidation products or hydrogen peroxide by spectrophotometric techniques. Those assays are often compromised by interfering compounds resulting in poor results. This research describes a new method that combines in the same assay the oxidative deamination of kynuramine to 4-hydroxyquinoline analyzed by HPLC-DAD with the oxidation of tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) (or Amplex Rex) by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in presence of hydrogen peroxide. The new method was applied to study the inhibition of human MAO-A and -B by bioactive compounds including β-carboline alkaloids and flavonoids occurring in foods and plants. As determined by HPLC-DAD, β-carbolines, methylene blue, kaempferol and clorgyline inhibited MAO-A and methylene blue, 5-nitroindazole, norharman and deprenyl inhibited MAO-B, and all of them inhibited the oxidation of TMB in the same extent. The flavonoids catechin and cyanidin were not inhibitors of MAO by HPLC-DAD but highly inhibited the oxidation of TMB (or Amplex Red) by peroxidase whereas quercetin and resveratrol were moderate inhibitors of MAO-A by HPLC-DAD, but inhibited the peroxidase assay in a higher level. For some phenolic compounds, using the peroxidase-coupled assay to measure MAO activity led to mistaken results. The new method permits to discern between true inhibitors of MAO from those that are antioxidants and which interfere with peroxidase assays but do not inhibit MAO. For true inhibitors of MAO, inhibition as determined by HPLC-DAD correlated well with inhibition of the oxidation of TMB and this approach can be used to assess the in vitro antioxidant activity (less hydrogen peroxide production) resulting

  17. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  18. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  19. Effect of periodate on lignin for wood adhesive application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Jong, de E.; Gellerstedt, G.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Development of eco-friendly binders with no harmful emission during its complete life cycle is of high interest for the wood-based industry. In this paper, a fully renewable binder based on activated lignin and poly-furfuryl alcohol and a partly renewable lignin based phenol-formaldehyde (PF) binder

  20. Daily rhythms of catalase and glutathione peroxidase expression and activity are endogenously driven in the hippocampus and are modified by a vitamin A-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navigatore-Fonzo, Lorena S; Delgado, Silvia M; Gimenez, Maria Sofia; Anzulovich, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in enzymatic antioxidant defense systems lead to a deficit of cognitive functions and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity. The objectives of this study were to investigate endogenous rhythms of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) expression and activity, as well as CREB1 mRNA, in the rat hippocampus, and to evaluate to which extent the vitamin A deficiency could affect those temporal patterns. Rats from control and vitamin A-deficient (VAD) groups received a diet containing 4000 IU of vitamin A/kg diet, or the same diet devoid of vitamin A, respectively, during 3 months. Rats were maintained under 12-hour-dark conditions, during 10 days before the sacrifice. Circadian rhythms of CAT, GPx, RXRγ, and CREB1 mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcriptrase polymerase chain reaction in hippocampus samples isolated every 4 hours during a 24-hour period. CAT and GPx enzymatic activities were also determined by kinetic assays. Regulatory regions of clock and antioxidant enzymes genes were scanned for E-box, RXRE, and CRE sites. E-box, RXRE, and CRE sites were found on regulatory regions of GPx and CAT genes, which display a circadian expression in the rat hippocampus. VAD phase shifted CAT, GPx, and RXRγ endogenous rhythms without affecting circadian expression of CREB1. CAT and GPx expression and enzymatic activity are circadian in the rat hippocampus. The VAD affected the temporal patterns antioxidant genes expression, probably by altering circadian rhythms of its RXR receptors and clock factors; thus, it would impair the temporal orchestration of hippocampal daily cognitive performance.

  1. Reduced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and tyrosine ammonia-lyase activities and lignin synthesis in wheat grown under low pressure sodium lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, D.; Anderson, A. J.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Fremont) grown in hydroponic culture under 24-hour continuous irradiation at 560 to 580 micromoles per square meter per second from either metalhalide (MH), high pressure sodium (HPS), or low pressure sodium (LPS) lamps reached maturity in 70 days. Grain yields were similar under all three lamps, although LPS-grown plants lodged at maturity. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and a tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL) with lesser activity were detected in all extracts of leaf, inflorescence, and stem. Ammonia-lyase activities increased with age of the plant, and plants grown under the LPS lamp displayed PAL and TAL activities lower than wheat cultured under MH and HPS radiation. Greenhouse solar-grown wheat had the highest PAL and TAL activities. Lignin content of LPS-grown wheat was also significantly reduced from that of plants grown under MH or HPS lamps or in the greenhouse, showing a correlation with the reduced PAL and TAL activities. Ratios of far red-absorbing phytochrome to total phytochrome were similar for all three lamps, but the data do not yet warrant a conclusion about specific wavelengths missing from the LPS lamps that might have induced PAL and TAL activities in plants under the other lamps.

  2. Reactivity of lignin and problems of its oxidative destruction with peroxy reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, Valerii A; Shereshovets, Valerii V; Monakov, Yurii B

    1999-01-01

    Published data on reactivity and oxidation of lignin and model compounds with hydrogen peroxide, ozone and chlorine dioxide as well as on oxidative destruction of the sulfate pulp lignin with various reagents during bleaching are systematised and generalised. Concepts of lignin activation towards its selective oxidation and kinetic features of sulfate pulp oxidative delignification are considered. The bibliography includes 157 references.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable lignin nanoparticles with tunable surface properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Alexander P.; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Armstrong, Hinton B.; Brown, Joseph S.; Plemmons, Dayne; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin nanoparticles can serve as biodegradable carriers of biocidal actives with minimal environmental footprint. Here we describe the colloidal synthesis and interfacial design of nanoparticles with tunable surface properties using two different lignin precursors, Kraft (Indulin AT) lignin and

  4. A novel amperometric alcohol biosensor developed in a 3rd generation bioelectrode platform using peroxidase coupled ferrocene activated alcohol oxidase as biorecognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadayyala, Somasekhar R; Kakoti, Ankana; Santhosh, Mallesh; Goswami, Pranab

    2014-05-15

    Alcohol oxidase (AOx) with a two-fold increase in efficiency (Kcat/Km) was achieved by physical entrapment of the activator ferrocene in the protein matrix through a simple microwave based partial unfolding technique and was used to develop a 3rd generation biosensor for improved detection of alcohol in liquid samples. The ferrocene molecules were stably entrapped in the AOx protein matrix in a molar ratio of ~3:1 through electrostatic interaction with the Trp residues involved in the functional activity of the enzyme as demonstrated by advanced analytical techniques. The sensor was fabricated by immobilizing ferrocene entrapped alcohol oxidase (FcAOx) and sol-gel chitosan film coated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon electrode through layer-by-layer technique. The bioelectrode reactions involved the formation of H2O2 by FcAOx biocatalysis of substrate alcohol followed by HRP-catalyzed reduction of the liberated H2O2 through MWCNT supported direct electron transfer mechanism. The amperometric biosensor exhibited a linear response to alcohol in the range of 5.0 × 10(-6) to 30 × 10(-4)mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), and a sensitivity of 150 µA mM(-1) cm(-2). The biosensor response was steady for 28 successive measurements completed in a period of 5h and retained ~90% of the original response even after four weeks when stored at 4 °C. The biosensor was successfully applied for the determination of alcohol in commercial samples and its performance was validated by comparing with the data obtained by GC analyses of the samples. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Chapter 16: Lignin Visualization: Advanced Microscopy Techniques for Lignin Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yining [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Donohoe, Bryon S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Visualization of lignin in plant cell walls, with both spatial and chemical resolution, is emerging as an important tool to understand lignin's role in the plant cell wall's nanoscale architecture and to understand and design processes intended to modify the lignin. As such, this chapter reviews recent advances in advanced imaging methods with respect to lignin in plant cell walls. This review focuses on the importance of lignin detection and localization for studies in both plant biology and biotechnology. Challenges going forward to identify and delineate lignin from other plant cell wall components and to quantitatively analyze lignin in whole cell walls from native plant tissue and treated biomass are also discussed.

  6. Comparison studies on soda lignin and soda-anthraquinone lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.N.M; Yusof, N.N.M.; Hashim, A.

    2007-01-01

    Soda lignin and soda anthraquinone lignin were compared in this study. The physico-chemical properties and structural features of the isolated lignin were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultraviolet (UV), ash test, Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen (CHN) analyzer, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ( 13 C-NMR) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Nitrobenzene oxidation was performed on these two types of lignin especially for the HPLC analysis. Based on the CHN, 13 C-NMR and UV results there were no significant differences between soda lignin and soda anthraquinone lignin. The FTIR results also showed that there were no significant differences in terms of functional groups that exist in both lignins. (author)

  7. Mutual synergy between catalase and peroxidase activities of the bifunctional enzyme KatG is facilitated by electron hole-hopping within the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuma, Olive J; Davis, Ian; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Krewall, Jessica R; Liu, Aimin; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2017-11-10

    KatG is a bifunctional, heme-dependent enzyme in the front-line defense of numerous bacterial and fungal pathogens against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damage from host immune responses. Contrary to the expectation that catalase and peroxidase activities should be mutually antagonistic, peroxidatic electron donors (PxEDs) enhance KatG catalase activity. Here, we establish the mechanism of synergistic cooperation between these activities. We show that at low pH values KatG can fully convert H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O only if a PxED is present in the reaction mixture. Stopped-flow spectroscopy results indicated rapid initial rates of H 2 O 2 disproportionation slowing concomitantly with the accumulation of ferryl-like heme states. These states very slowly returned to resting ( i.e. ferric) enzyme, indicating that they represented catalase-inactive intermediates. We also show that an active-site tryptophan, Trp-321, participates in off-pathway electron transfer. A W321F variant in which the proximal tryptophan was replaced with a non-oxidizable phenylalanine exhibited higher catalase activity and less accumulation of off-pathway heme intermediates. Finally, rapid freeze-quench EPR experiments indicated that both WT and W321F KatG produce the same methionine-tyrosine-tryptophan (MYW) cofactor radical intermediate at the earliest reaction time points and that Trp-321 is the preferred site of off-catalase protein oxidation in the native enzyme. Of note, PxEDs did not affect the formation of the MYW cofactor radical but could reduce non-productive protein-based radical species that accumulate during reaction with H 2 O 2 Our results suggest that catalase-inactive intermediates accumulate because of off-mechanism oxidation, primarily of Trp-321, and PxEDs stimulate KatG catalase activity by preventing the accumulation of inactive intermediates. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  9. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin [West Lebanon, NH; Wyman, Charles E [Norwich, VT

    2011-01-25

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  10. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R S S; Yadav, K S; Yadav, H S

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K(m) values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with K(i) value of 3.35 mM.

  11. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. S. Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with Ki value of 3.35 mM.

  12. Guaiacol peroxidase zymography for the undergraduate laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically detect peroxidase activity and furthermore, to analyze the total protein profile. After the assay, students may estimate the apparent molecular mass of the enzyme and discuss its structure. After the 4-h experiment, students gain knowledge concerning biological sample preparation, gel preparation, electrophoresis, and the importance of specific staining procedures for the detection of enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Production and Purification of Peroxidase from Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Jebor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in the laboratories of Biology Department, College of Science, which deals with isolation and purification of peroxidase and optimization of process parameters to achieve maximum yield of peroxidase by Aspergillus niger. Solid-state fermentation of Aspergillus niger was carried out for enhanced production of peroxidase using hydrogen peroxide as the substrate of enzyme maximum activity of the enzyme was achieved under optimum growth conditions. The optimum conditions were the isolated of Aspergillus niger from soil and growth in synthetic medium, it gave high titer of peroxidase activity, the fructose as carbon source, peptone as nitrogen source, after 12 days of incubation, incubation temperature 25 °C and pH = 6.5. Peroxidase purified in four purification steps; precipitation with 70% saturation of ammonium sulfate, step of dialysis, the third by ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Cellulose and fourth by gel filtration throughout Sephadex G-100. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 150U/mg with 7.75 folds. The peroxidase was shown to have molecular weight of 40kDa in SDS-PAGA and about 40kDa in gel filtration.The optimum pH and temperature for peroxidase activity 7 and 35 C0 respectively.

  14. Catalytic depolymerization of lignin in supercritical ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.; Koranyi, T.I.; Boot, M.D.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    One-step valorization of soda lignin in supercritical ethanol using a CuMgAlOx catalyst results in high monomer yield (23 wt¿%) without char formation. Aromatics are the main products. The catalyst combines excellent deoxygenation with low ring-hydrogenation activity. Almost half of the monomer

  15. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näätsaari, Laura; Krainer, Florian W; Schubert, Michael; Glieder, Anton; Thallinger, Gerhard G

    2014-03-24

    Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group of isoenzymes.

  16. Study of lignin biotransformation by Aspergillus fumigatus and white-rot fungi using 14C-labeled and unlabeled kraft lignins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadam, K.K.; Drew, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    The biodegradation of lignin by fungi was studied in shake flasks using 14 C-labeled kraft lignin and in a deep-tank fermentor using unlabeled kraft lignin. Among the fungi screened, A. fumigatus - isolated in our laboratories - was most potent in lignin biotransformation. Dialysis-type fermentation, designed to study possible accumulation of low MW lignin-derived products, showed no such accumulation. Recalcitrant carbohydrates like microcrystalline cellulose supported higher lignolytic activity than easily metabolized carbohydrates like cellobiose. An assay developed to distinguish between CO 2 evolved from lignin and carbohydrate substrates demonstrated no stoichiometric correlation between the metabolism of the two cosubstrates. The submerged fermentations with unlabeled liqnin are difficult to monitor since chemical assays do not give accurate and true results. Lignolytic efficiencies that allowed monitoring of such fermentations were defined. Degraded lignins were clearly superior to C. versicolor in all aspects of lignin degradation; A fumigatus brought about substantial demethoxylation and dehydroxylation, whereas C. versicolor degraded lignins closely resembled undegraded kraft lignin. There was a good agreement among the different indices of lignin degradation, namely, 14 CO evolution, OCH 3 loss, OH loss, and monomer and dimer yield after permanganate oxidation

  17. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... enzymes in plant and its resistance to heat has been reported by a ... sintered glass funnel and washed with cold acetone under low vacuum ... Peroxidase activity was determined by measuring the colour deve- lopment at ...

  18. Cloning and characterization of an ascorbate peroxidase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to explore expression patterns of. MaAPX1 in ... and the activity of a number of enzymatic systems, including ... peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase and catalase.

  19. Physicochemical characteristcs and enzymatic activity of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase in four genotypes of cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum Willd ex-Spreng Schum submitted to freezingCaracterísticas físico-químicas e atividade da peroxidase e polifenoloxidase em genótipos de cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum Willd ex-Spreng Schum submetidos ao congelamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomão Rocha Martim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the freezing of fruits pulps, the enzyme activity is not finished completely. Sensory, nutritional and coloring changes may occur on fruits due to the action of oxidative enzymes such as peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase. The frozen cupuaçu pulps, sold in Brazil, have a shelf life of one year and become browned during this period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of frozen storage on the physicochemical characteristics, polyphenoloxidase activity and soluble and ionically bound peroxidases presented in the pulps of four new cupuaçu genotypes over twelve months. The cupuaçu genotypes developed by the West Amazonian Agroforestry Research Center (EMBRAPA were pulped, frozen and stored at – 30 °C. The polyphenoloxidase of the four cupuaçu genotypes showed an increase in activity according to the storage time with peaks in the sixth, ninth and tenth months, but the peroxidases exhibited oscillations in the enzyme activity. The physicochemical properties of the pulps showed variations during the twelve months of storage under freezing. The vitamin C content of D 28-10 and P 3-10 genotypes decreased from the fourth and tenth months, respectively. Moreover P 9-8 e B 28-7 genotypes remained stable. In relation the acidity of citric acid, the B-28-7, D 28-10 and P 9-8 samples were not different, but P 3-10 genotype presented a reduction. The pH and total soluble solids of all genotypes decreased over the study period. There was an increase in sugar concentration of B 28-7, P 3-10 and P 9-8 genotypes, except for D 28-10 sample which remained unchanged. All genotypes were in accordance with physical-chemicals standards required by legislation, except for P 3-10 genotype that showed a lower acidity. In respect of the enzymatic parameters, there were variations in the activity of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidases of all genotypes. No congelamento de polpas de frutas a atividade enzimática não é completamente cessada. Podem

  20. Nucleotide diversity of the ZmPox3 maize peroxidase gene: Relationships between a MITE insertion in exon 2 and variation in forage maize digestibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigau Joan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms were investigated within the ZmPox3 maize peroxidase gene, possibly involved in lignin biosynthesis because of its colocalization with a cluster of QTL related to lignin content and cell wall digestibility. The purpose of this study was to identify, on the basis of 37 maize lines chosen for their varying degrees of cell wall digestibility and representative of temperate regions germplasm, ZmPox3 haplotypes or individual polymorphisms possibly associated with digestibility. Results Numerous haplotypes with high diversity were identified. Frequency of nucleotide changes was high with on average one SNP every 57 bp. Nucleotide diversity was not equally distributed among site categories: the estimated π was on average eight times higher for silent sites than for non-synonymous sites. Numerous sites were in linkage disequilibrium that decayed with increasing physical distance. A zmPox3 mutant allele, carrying an insertion of a transposable element in the second exon, was found in lines derived from the early flint inbred line, F7. This element possesses many structural features of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITE. The mutant allele encodes a truncated protein lacking important functional sites. An ANOVA performed with a subset of 31 maize lines indicated that the transposable element was significantly associated with cell wall digestibility. This association was confirmed using an additional set of 25 flint lines related to F7. Moreover, RT-PCR experiments revealed a decreased amount of corresponding mRNA in plants with the MITE insertion. Conclusion These results showed that ZmPox3 could possibly be involved in monolignol polymerisation, and that a deficiency in ZmPox3 peroxidase activity seemingly has a negative effect on cell wall digestibility. Also, genetic diversity analyses of ZmPox3 indicated that this peroxidase could be a relevant target for grass digestibility improvement using

  1. NMR analysis of lignins in CAD-deficient plants. Part 1. Incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes and hydroxybenzaldehydes into lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, Sally A; Boudet, Alain M; MacKay, John J; Sederoff, Ronald R; Ito, Takashi; Kawai, Shingo; Ohashi, Hideo; Higuchi, Takayoshi

    2003-01-21

    Peroxidase/H2O2-mediated radical coupling of 4-hydroxycinnamaldehydes produces 8-O-4-, 8-5-, and 8-8-coupled dehydrodimers as has been documented earlier, as well as the 5-5-coupled dehydrodimer. The 8-5-dehydrodimer is however produced kinetically in its cyclic phenylcoumaran form at neutral pH. Synthetic polymers produced from mixtures of hydroxycinnamaldehydes and normal monolignols provide the next level of complexity. Spectral data from dimers, oligomers, and synthetic polymers have allowed a more substantive assignment of aldehyde components in lignins isolated from a CAD-deficient pine mutant and an antisense-CAD-downregulated transgenic tobacco. CAD-deficient pine lignin shows enhanced levels of the typical benzaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde end-groups, along with evidence for two types of 8-O-4-coupled coniferaldehyde units. The CAD-downregulated tobacco also has higher levels of hydroxycinnamaldehyde and hydroxybenzaldehyde (mainly syringaldehyde) incorporation, but the analogous two types of 8-O-4-coupled products are the dominant features. 8-8-Coupled units are also clearly evident. There is clear evidence for coupling of hydroxycinnamaldehydes to each other and then incorporation into the lignin, as well as for the incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomers into the growing lignin polymer. Coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde (as well as vanillin and syringaldehyde) co-polymerize with the traditional monolignols into lignins and do so at enhanced levels when CAD-deficiency has an impact on the normal monolignol production. The implication is that, particularly in angiosperms, the aldehydes behave like the traditional monolignols and should probably be regarded as authentic lignin monomers in normal and CAD-deficient plants.

  2. AP2/ERF Transcription Factor, Ii049, Positively Regulates Lignan Biosynthesis in Isatis indigotica through Activating Salicylic Acid Signaling and Lignan/Lignin Pathway Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Ma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lignans, such as lariciresinol and its derivatives, have been identified as effective antiviral ingredients in Isatis indigotica. Evidence suggests that the APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF family might be related to the biosynthesis of lignans in I. indigotica. However, the special role played by the AP2/ERF family in the metabolism and its underlying putative mechanism still need to be elucidated. One novel AP2/ERF gene, named Ii049, was isolated and characterized from I. indigotica in this study. The quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that Ii049 was expressed highest in the root and responded to methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid treatments to various degrees. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that Ii049 protein was localized in the nucleus. Knocking-down the expression of Ii049 caused a remarkable reduction of lignan/lignin contents and transcript levels of genes involved in the lignan/lignin biosynthetic pathway. Ii049 bound to the coupled element 1, RAV1AAT and CRTAREHVCBF2 motifs of genes IiPAL and IiCCR, the key structural genes in the lignan/lignin pathway. Furthermore, Ii049 was also essential for SA biosynthesis, and SA induced lignan accumulation in I. indigotica. Notably, the transgenic I. indigotica hairy roots overexpressing Ii049 showed high expression levels of lignan/lignin biosynthetic genes and SA content, resulting in significant accumulation of lignan/lignin. The best-engineered line (OVX049-10 produced 425.60 μg·g−1 lariciresinol, an 8.3-fold increase compared with the wild type production. This study revealed the function of Ii049 in regulating lignan/lignin biosynthesis, which had the potential to increase the content of valuable lignan/lignin in economically significant medicinal plants.

  3. Lignin biodegradation and industrial implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulose, which comprises the cell walls of plants, is the Earth’s most abundant renewable source of convertible biomass. However, in order to access the fermentable sugars of the cellulose and hemicellulose fraction, the extremely recalcitrant lignin heteropolymer must be hydrolyzed and removed—usually by harsh, costly thermochemical pretreatments. Biological processes for depolymerizing and metabolizing lignin present an opportunity to improve the overall economics of the lignocellulosic biorefinery by facilitating pretreatment, improving downstream cellulosic fermentations or even producing a valuable effluent stream of aromatic compounds for creating value-added products. In the following review we discuss background on lignin, the enzymology of lignin degradation, and characterized catabolic pathways for metabolizing the by-products of lignin degradation. To conclude we survey advances in approaches to identify novel lignin degrading phenotypes and applications of these phenotypes in the lignocellulosic bioprocess.

  4. Effect of lignin content on a GH11 endoxylanase acting on glucuronoarabinoxylan-lignin nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukari, Imen; Rémond, Caroline; O'Donohue, Michael; Chabbert, Brigitte

    2012-06-20

    The effects of lignin content on the activity and action pattern of GH11 endoxylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus were investigated using in vitro reconstituted non-covalent glucuronoarabinoxylan-model lignin (GAX-DHP) nanocomposites. Four types of nanocomposites were prepared, each displaying different lignin contents. Variations in the DHP (model lignin) polymerization process were induced by increasing the coniferyl alcohol concentration. Examination of the morphology of the nanocomposites revealed globular particles enrobed in a matrix. The size of these particles increased in line with the lignin concentration. Physicochemical characterization of the in vitro reconstituted GAX-DHPs strongly suggested that increased particle size is directly related to the solubility and reactivity of coniferyl alcohol, as reflected by changes in the amount of β-O-4 linkages. Evaluation of the impact of the GH11 endoxylanase on the GAX-DHP nanocomposites revealed a negative correlation between the proportion and organization patterns of DHP in the nanocomposites and enzyme activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tetra(p-tolyl)borate-functionalized solvent polymeric membrane: a facile and sensitive sensing platform for peroxidase and peroxidase mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewei; Qin, Wei

    2013-07-22

    The determination of peroxidase activities is the basis for enzyme-labeled bioaffinity assays, peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes- and nanoparticles-based assays, and characterization of the catalytic functions of peroxidase mimetics. Here, a facile, sensitive, and cost-effective solvent polymeric membrane-based peroxidase detection platform is described that utilizes reaction intermediates with different pKa values from those of substrates and final products. Several key but long-debated intermediates in the peroxidative oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (o-PD) have been identified and their charge states have been estimated. By using a solvent polymeric membrane functionalized by an appropriate substituted tetraphenylborate as a receptor, those cationic intermediates could be transferred into the membrane from the aqueous phase to induce a large cationic potential response. Thus, the potentiometric indication of the o-PD oxidation catalyzed by peroxidase or its mimetics can be fulfilled. Horseradish peroxidase has been detected with a detection limit at least two orders of magnitude lower than those obtained by spectrophotometric techniques and traditional membrane-based methods. As an example of peroxidase mimetics, G-quadruplex DNAzymes were probed by the intermediate-sensitive membrane and a label-free thrombin detection protocol was developed based on the catalytic activity of the thrombin-binding G-quadruplex aptamer. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Sharma, Deepak; Varney, Rebecca; Simmons, Blake A.; Isern, Nancy G.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Robinson, Errol W.

    2013-08-29

    The anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolated bacteria was from tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, making it likely that bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes play an important role in decomposition. We have examined differential expression of the anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth on lignin. After 48 hours of growth, we used transcriptomics and proteomics to define the enzymes and other regulatory machinery that these organisms use to degrade lignin, as well as metabolomics to measure lignin degradation and monitor the use of lignin and iron as terminal electron acceptors that facilitate more efficient use of carbon. Proteomics revealed accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, and lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Our data shows the advantages of a multi-omics approach, where incomplete pathways identified by genomics were completed, and new observations made on coping with poor carbon availability. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in bacterial anaerobic litter deconstruction makes these soils useful templates for improving biofuel production.

  7. Leishmania mexicana amazonensis: heterogeneity in 5-nucleotidase and peroxidase activities of mononuclear phagocytes during in vivo and in vitro infection Leishmania mexicana amazonensis: heterogeneidade da 5’-Nucleotidase e da peroxidase em fagócitos mononucleares durante infecção in vivo e in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Côrte-Real

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available The degree of maturation of cells of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS, during in vivo and in vitro infection by Leishmania mexicana amazonenesis, was evaluated in this study. The macrophages' differentiation was assayed by cytochemical characterization at the ultrastrctural level, using two well-established markers: 5'-nucleotidase enzyme activity, for revealing the mature cells, and the peroxidase activity present in the cell granules to demonstrate immature mononuclear phagocytes. only a few mcrophages, demonstrating 5'-nucleotidase positive reaction in both the plasma membrane and within their cytoplasmic vesicles, were found scattered in the chronic inflammation at the L. m. amazonensis lesions in albino mice. However, by the peroxidase activity analysis, we were also able to demonstrate the presence of immature MPS cells, which predominate, together with parasitized vacuolated macrophages, in chronic lesions induced in this systemby L. m. amazonensis. The implications of these results on the pathogenesis of murine cutaneous leishmaniasis are discussed.Um estudo sobre o grau de maturação das células do Sistema Fagocítico Mononuclear foi realizado durante a infecção in vivo e in vitro com a Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. A caracterização da diferenciação das células fagocíticas foi obtida com a localização ultraestrutural de dois marcadores enzimáticos bam conhecidos: a enzima 5'-Nucleotidase marcadora de membrana plasmática de células maduras e a enzima peroxidase, presente em grânulos, marcadora de células imaturas. A atividade da enzima 5'-Nucleotidase foi encontrada apenas em alguns macrófagos, presentes no foco inflamatório, em projeções da membrana plasmática e em algumas vesículas citoplasmáticas. Macrófagos peritoneais de camundongo apresentaram a mesma reatividade para este marcador. Contudo a análise da atividade peroxidásica demonstrou a predominância da presença de fagócitos mononucleares

  8. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Dongre, Prajakta; Driscoll, Mark; Amidon, Thomas; Bujanovic, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple ( Acer saccharum ) is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1), ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of...

  9. Studies of peroxidase isozyme profile in mungbean mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auti, S.G.; Apparao, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Peroxidase is an important oxygen-scavenging enzyme. The activity of peroxidase is often correlated with growth, development and hormonal activity. Traditional methods of cultivar identification usually involve observation and recording of morphological characters or description such as yield, height, weight, earliness etc. which vary with environmental conditions and often misleading. So molecular markers like protein and isozymes profiles, RFLP, RAPDs markers etc. are widely employed in varietal identification of cultivars. It plays important role in respiration and is an indicator of oxidative status of plants. Electrophoretic techniques have been used to group species and identify cultivars. Such identification has various advantages including the unique pattern of protein or isozymes bands for each pure cultivar under any set of environmental conditions. Peroxidase isozyme serves as very good marker for any mutational studies. In the present investigation, peroxidase isozyme profiles of various mutants of mungbean was studied employing the technique of electrophoresis

  10. H2O2 can Increase Lignin Disintegration and Decrease Cellulose Decomposition in the Process of Solid-State Fermentation (SSF) by Aspergillus oryzae Using Corn Stalk as Raw Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhicai Zhang; Jun Jia; Ming Li; Qiaoxia Pang

    2014-01-01

    H2O2 is both bactericidal and the main oxidant responsible for lignin degradation reaction catalyzed by manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). Thus, H2O2 treatment of corn stalk and the implementation of solid-substrate fermentation (SSF) is possible to increase the removal rate of lignin from stalk in the process of SSF and after SSF, while avoiding the need to sterilize the raw materials. To demonstrate this approach, SSF was initially carried out using corn stalk pretreate...

  11. Lignin derivatives from desilicated rice straw soda black liquor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Taraboulsi, M A; Nasser, M M

    1979-01-01

    Carboxymethyl lignin, cyanoethyl lignin, carboxyethyl lignin, and aminopropyl lignin were prepared from alkali lignin of rice straw black liquor (after disilication by storage for 1 wk to 1 yr) and used as sizes for paper, drilling fluid additives and flocculants.

  12. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  13. Structural Changes of Lignin after Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment and Its Effect on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During liquid hot water (LHW pretreatment, lignin is mostly retained in the pretreated biomass, and the changes in the chemical and structural characteristics of lignin should probably refer to re-/depolymerization, solubilization, or glass transition. The residual lignin could influence the effective enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The pure lignin was used to evaluate the effect of LHW process on its structural and chemical features. The surface morphology of LHW-treated lignin observed with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM was more porous and irregular than that of untreated lignin. Compared to the untreated lignin, the surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of LHW-treated lignin tested with the Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET measurement were increased. FTIR analysis showed that the chemical structure of lignin was broken down in the LHW process. Additionally, the impact of untreated and treated lignin on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was also explored. The LHW-treated lignin had little impact on the cellulase adsorption and enzyme activities and somehow could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

  14. Influence of Phytophthora capsici L. inoculation on disease severity, necrosis length, peroxidase and catalase activity, and phenolic content of resistant and susceptible pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants

    OpenAIRE

    KOÇ, Esra; ÜSTÜN, Ayşen Sülün

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the level of infection caused by different inoculum concentrations (102, 103, and 104 zoospores mL-1) of Phytophthora capsici in 3 pepper cultivars at days 2, 4, and 6. The effect that the infection induced on the peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), and phenolics of resistant and sensitive seedlings, as well as the defense mechanism against the pathogen, were also investigated. The resistance of PM-702 against the isolate used was high, whereas KM-Hot and DEM-8 displayed sen...

  15. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Theoretical Approaches to Lignin Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    1994-01-01

    A critical review is presented of the applications of theoretical methods to the studies of the structure and chemical reactivity of lignin, including simulation of macromolecular properties, conformational calculations, quantum chemical analyses of electronic structure, spectra and chemical reactivity. Modern concepts of spatial organization and chemical reactivity of lignins are discussed.

  17. Identifying new lignin bioengineering targets: 1. Monolignol-substitute impacts on lignin formation and cell wall fermentability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fachuang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries highlighting the metabolic malleability of plant lignification indicate that lignin can be engineered to dramatically alter its composition and properties. Current plant biotechnology efforts are primarily aimed at manipulating the biosynthesis of normal monolignols, but in the future apoplastic targeting of phenolics from other metabolic pathways may provide new approaches for designing lignins that are less inhibitory toward the enzymatic hydrolysis of structural polysaccharides, both with and without biomass pretreatment. To identify promising new avenues for lignin bioengineering, we artificially lignified cell walls from maize cell suspensions with various combinations of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols plus a variety of phenolic monolignol substitutes. Cell walls were then incubated in vitro with anaerobic rumen microflora to assess the potential impact of lignin modifications on the enzymatic degradability of fibrous crops used for ruminant livestock or biofuel production. Results In the absence of anatomical constraints to digestion, lignification with normal monolignols hindered both the rate and extent of cell wall hydrolysis by rumen microflora. Inclusion of methyl caffeate, caffeoylquinic acid, or feruloylquinic acid with monolignols considerably depressed lignin formation and strikingly improved the degradability of cell walls. In contrast, dihydroconiferyl alcohol, guaiacyl glycerol, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate readily formed copolymer-lignins with normal monolignols; cell wall degradability was moderately enhanced by greater hydroxylation or 1,2,3-triol functionality. Mono- or diferuloyl esters with various aliphatic or polyol groups readily copolymerized with monolignols, but in some cases they accelerated inactivation of wall-bound peroxidase and reduced lignification; cell wall degradability was influenced by lignin content and the degree

  18. Mechanistic Insights into Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase Revealed by Solvent Isotope and Viscosity Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Ruben [Department; Huang, Gaochao [Department; Meekins, David A. [Department; Geisbrecht, Brian V. [Department; Li, Ping [Department

    2017-08-18

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) are a family of H2O2-dependent heme peroxidases that have shown potential applications in lignin degradation and valorization. However, the DyP kinetic mechanism remains underexplored. Using structural biology and solvent isotope (sKIE) and viscosity effects, many mechanistic characteristics have been determined for the B-class ElDyP from Enterobacter lignolyticus. Its structure revealed that a water molecule acts as the sixth axial ligand and two channels at diameters of ~3.0 and 8.0 Å lead to the heme center. A conformational change of ERS* to ERS, which have identical spectral characteristics, was proposed as the final step in DyPs’ bisubstrate Ping-Pong mechanism. This step is also the rate-determining step in ABTS oxidation. The normal KIE of wild-type ElDyP with D2O2 at pD 3.5 suggested that compound 0 deprotonation by the distal aspartate is rate-limiting in the formation of compound I, which is more reactive under acidic pH than under neutral or alkaline pH. The viscosity effects and other biochemical methods implied that the reducing substrate binds with compound I instead of the free enzyme. The significant inverse sKIEs of kcat/KM and kERS* suggested that the aquo release in ElDyP is mechanistically important and may explain the enzyme’s adoption of two-electron reduction for compound I. The distal aspartate is catalytically more important than the distal arginine and plays key roles in determining ElDyP’s optimum acidic pH. The kinetic mechanism of D143H-ElDyP was also briefly studied. The results obtained will pave the way for future protein engineering to improve DyPs’ lignolytic activity.

  19. Aktivitas Ligninolitik Beberapa Jamur Aphyllophorales dan Kemampuannya Mendegradasi Lignin pada Lindi Hitam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atria Martina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen local isolate Aphyllophorales fungi were screened their ligninolytic activity. The isolate with highest ligninolytic activity was tested it capability to degrade kraft blackliquor lignin. The biodegradability of black liquor is low because the presence of lignin and lignin derivative in the wastewater. These fungal were screened for ligninolytic activity by decolorization on solid mediacontaining RBBR dye. The ability of the fungal strains to biodegrade kraft black liquor lignin was performed by submerged fermentation condition with agitation and incubation time as treatment. The solid culture result in 3 isolates had ligninolytic activity and Ganoderma sp.BTA1 gave the highest ligninolytic. Agitation and incubation time influenced ligninbiodegradation of blackliquor significantly. Optimum condition for lignin biodegradation was at 200 rpm during 25 days with lignin reduction was 45,786%.

  20. Structure of soybean seed coat peroxidase: a plant peroxidase with unusual stability and haem-apoprotein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A; Mirza, O; Indiani, C

    2001-01-01

    Soybean seed coat peroxidase (SBP) is a peroxidase with extraordinary stability and catalytic properties. It belongs to the family of class III plant peroxidases that can oxidize a wide variety of organic and inorganic substrates using hydrogen peroxide. Because the plant enzyme is a heterogeneous...... glycoprotein, SBP was produced recombinant in Escherichia coli for the present crystallographic study. The three-dimensional structure of SBP shows a bound tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane molecule (TRIS). This TRIS molecule has hydrogen bonds to active site residues corresponding to the residues that interact...... with the small phenolic substrate ferulic acid in the horseradish peroxidase C (HRPC):ferulic acid complex. TRIS is positioned in what has been described as a secondary substrate-binding site in HRPC, and the structure of the SBP:TRIS complex indicates that this secondary substrate-binding site could...

  1. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from aqueous media by the marine fungus NIOCC 312: Involvement of lignin-degrading enzymes and exopolysaccharides

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Shailaja, M.S.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Singh, S.K.

    (Shimadzu, Model RF 1501, Japan). The fungal biomass was extracted in a Soxhlet apparatus in 20 volumes of alkaline methanol (by addition of 1% KOH) twice, each for 3 h, pooled, concentrated, dried over anhydrous Na 2 SO 4 and the residual... of the lignin- degrading enzymes, lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase in a marine isolate of the white-rot fungus, NIOCC #312 obtained from decaying seagrass in a coral lagoon. This fungus efficiently decolorized bleach plant...

  2. Isolation, identification and characterization of lignin-degrading bacteria from Qinling, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C-X; Wang, T; Gao, L-N; Yin, H-J; Lü, X

    2017-12-01

    Lignin is an aromatic heteropolymer forming a physical barrier and it is a big challenge in biomass utilization. This paper first investigated lignin-degradation bacteria from rotten wood in Qinling Mountain. Nineteen potential strains were selected and ligninolytic enzyme activities were determined over 84 h. Strains that had higher enzyme activities were selected. Further, the biodegradation of wheat straw lignin and alkali lignin was evaluated indicating that Burkholderia sp. H1 had the highest capability. It was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography and field emission scanning electron microscope that alkali lignin was depolymerized into small fragments. The degraded products were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total ion chromatograph of products treated for 7 days showed the formation of aromatic compounds, an important intermediate from lignin degradation. Interestingly, they disappeared in 15 days while the aldehyde and ester compounds increased. The results suggest that the lignin-degrading bacteria are abundant in rotten wood and strain H1 has high potential to break down lignin. The diversity of lignin-degrading bacteria in Qinling Mountain is revealed. The study of Burkholderia sp. H1 expands the range of bacteria for lignin degradation and provides novel bacteria for application to lignocellulosic biomass. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M DeAngelis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolated bacteria was from tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, making it likely that bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes play an important role in decomposition. We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to examine the increased growth of the anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 when grown on media amended with lignin compared to unamended growth. Proteomics revealed accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, and lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. We detected significant lignin degradation over time by absorbance, and also used metabolomics to demonstrate increased xylose utilization in lignin-amended compared to unamended growth. Our data shows the advantages of a multi-omics approach, where incomplete pathways identified by genomics were completed, and new observations made on coping with poor carbon availability. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in bacterial anaerobic litter deconstruction makes these soils useful templates for improving biofuel production.

  4. Multi-time series RNA-seq analysis of Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth in lignin-amended medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Roberto; Chaput, Gina; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh; Gaffrey, Matt; Orr, Galya; DeAngelis, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    The production of lignocellulosic-derived biofuels is a highly promising source of alternative energy, but it has been constrained by the lack of a microbial platform capable to efficiently degrade this recalcitrant material and cope with by-products that can be toxic to cells. Species that naturally grow in environments where carbon is mainly available as lignin are promising for finding new ways of removing the lignin that protects cellulose for improved conversion of lignin to fuel precursors. Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 is a facultative anaerobic Gammaproteobacteria isolated from tropical rain forest soil collected in El Yunque forest, Puerto Rico under anoxic growth conditions with lignin as sole carbon source. Whole transcriptome analysis of SCF1 during E.lignolyticus SCF1 lignin degradation was conducted on cells grown in the presence (0.1%, w/w) and the absence of lignin, where samples were taken at three different times during growth, beginning of exponential phase, mid-exponential phase and beginning of stationary phase. Lignin-amended cultures achieved twice the cell biomass as unamended cultures over three days, and in this time degraded 60% of lignin. Transcripts in early exponential phase reflected this accelerated growth. A complement of laccases, aryl-alcohol dehydrogenases, and peroxidases were most up-regulated in lignin amended conditions in mid-exponential and early stationary phases compared to unamended growth. The association of hydrogen production by way of the formate hydrogenlyase complex with lignin degradation suggests a possible value added to lignin degradation in the future.

  5. Polymerization of different lignins by laccase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattinen, M.L.; Suortti, T.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Argyropoulos, D.S.; Evtuguin, D.; Suurnäkki, A.; Jong, de E.; Tamminen, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this study the oxidative polymerization of different lignins, i.e. Flax Soda lignin, Spruce EMAL, and Eucalyptus Dioxane lignin by Trametes hirsuta laccase was compared. Initially the structures of the different lignins were compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The reactivity of

  6. Raman spectra of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Ashok K. Pandey; Sally A. Ralph; Kolby C. Hirth; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    To fully exploit the value of Raman spectroscopy for analyzing lignins and lignin containing materials, a detailed understanding of lignins’ Raman spectra needs to be achieved. Although advances made thus far have led to significant growth in application of Raman techniques, further developments are needed to improve upon the existing knowledge. Considering that lignin...

  7. Investigation on Possibility of Transferring OysterMushroom (Pleurotusostreatus Manganese Peroxidase Gene (mnp to the White Button Mushroom (Agaricusbisporus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Parvandi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The white button mushroom does not produce remarkable yield in the third flash. Nutritional deficiency and the inability of this mushroom to efficient use of compost are mentioned as its reasons. Basically, compost includes two major food components, lignocellulose and microbial biomass. But this microbial biomass provides just 10% of button mushroom food needs. According to research studies, differentenzymes in both white button mushroom and oyster mushroom are responsible for decomposition of lignin compounds in compost media, from begin of mycelium grows to the end of fruiting. Lacasse, manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, glyoxal oxidase enzymes contribute to degradation of lignin compounds in degradation mushroom has proven by researchers however itis dependent on mushroom types. Manganese peroxidase enzyme (EC. 1.11.1.13 is an extracellular parser lignin enzyme that has a central peroxidase core. Manganese peroxidase enzyme oxidizesMn2+ to Mn3+ and then Mn3+ oxidizes phenolic structure to fonoxile radical. Produced Mn3+ is very active and makes complex by chelating organic acids that is produced by mushrooms such as oxalate or malate. Mn3+ ions become stable by helping of these chelates and it can penetrate through materials such as wood. On the other hand, in recent years, plant biotechnology provides new solutions for old problems such as use of microorganisms, particularly using bacteria for gene transfer and improvement of superlatives. For a sample of this method, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system can be noted. In addition, the use of suitable promoters for heterologous genes expression in suitable hosts is an important strategy in functional biotechnology that has been raised in edible mushroom genetic engineering. The lack of efficient and sufficient use of compost, low power of white button mushroom in competition with other rivals, lack of yield per area unit due to production costs, pests and diseases

  8. Purification, characterization and stability of barley grain peroxidase BP1, a new type of plant peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christine B; Henriksen, Anette; Abelskov, A. Katrine

    1997-01-01

    peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRP C). However, when measuring the specific activity of BP 1 at pH 4.0 in the presence of 1 mM CaCl2, the enzyme was as competent as HRP C at neutral pH towards a variety of substrates (mM mg(-1) min(-1)): coniferyl alcohol (930+/-48), caffeic acid (795+/-53), ABTS (2,2(1)-azino...

  9. Oxidation of NAD dimers by horseradish peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Avigliano, L; Carelli, V; Casini, A; Finazzi-Agrò, A; Liberatore, F

    1985-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase catalyses the oxidation of NAD dimers, (NAD)2, to NAD+ in accordance with a reaction that is pH-dependent and requires 1 mol of O2 per 2 mol of (NAD)2. Horseradish peroxidase also catalyses the peroxidation of (NAD)2 to NAD+. In contrast, bacterial NADH peroxidase does not catalyse the peroxidation or the oxidation of (NAD)2. A free-radical mechanism is proposed for both horseradish-peroxidase-catalysed oxidation and peroxidation of (NAD)2.

  10. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant...... cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  11. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  12. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Chengrong; Clarke, Kimberley; Li, Kecheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups invo...

  13. Chemical reactivity of alkali lignin modified with laccase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yong; Qiu, Xueqing; Liu, Yunquan

    2013-01-01

    The modification of alkali lignin with laccase was investigated. The structural change of lignin was analyzed. The sulfonation reactivity was measured by the content of sulfonic group. The results showed the sulfonation reactivity increased to some extent under the condition of atmosphere pressure, but decreased under the condition of 0.3 MPa oxygen pressure. The analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) showed the cleavage of various ether linkages and demethylation took place in the structure of lignin to certain extent during modification with laccase, which contributed to the improvement of sulfonation reactivity. Under the condition of 0.3 MPa oxygen pressure, the ratio of s/g (guaiacyl/syringyl) increased after modification, which reduced the sulfonation reactivity of lignin. Simultaneously partial polymerization reaction, such as 4-O-5′, β-5, 5-5 and other reaction in the aromatic ring decreased the activity sites of C 2 , C 5 and C 6 . Abundant polymerization reaction of α-O increased steric hindrance of C 2 and C 6 in aromatic ring, resulting in low sulfonation reactivity of lignin. -- Highlights: ► The modification of alkali lignin with laccase was investigated. ► The sulfonation reactivity increased under the condition of atmosphere pressure. ► More content of guaiacyl and hydroxy, the less content of methoxyl, syringyl can enhance the sulfonation reactivity of lignin. ► Partial moieties polymerized each other with α-O linkgages during treatment with laccase under oxygen pressure. ► The steric hindrance on C 2 and C 6 in aromatic ring resulted in low sulfonation reaction reactivity of lignin

  14. Dissolved Vanillin as Tracer for Estuarine Lignin Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelkraut, F.

    1996-12-01

    Lignin is produced only by vascular plants and therefore can be used as a tracer for terrestrial organic carbon input to the estuarine and marine environments. Lignin measurements have been done by analyses of the oxidation products such as vanillin or 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. In the Elbe Estuary, free dissolved vanillin was analysed in order to test whether such measurements yield information on terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary and on the vanillin derived from lignin oxidation. In the period 1990-1992, concentrations of dissolved vanillin in the Elbe ranged from 0 to 60 μ g l -1(mean: 8 μg l -1). Higher values were found in areas of increased microbial activity such as the turbidity zone and the river mouth where the water chemistry is influenced by large tidal flats. No correlation was found between dissolved vanillin and suspended matter concentrations, although lignin is normally associated with suspended particulate matter, nor was a covariance seen between dissolved vanillin and the terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary. Apparently, biological conversion of lignin was faster than the transport processes, and local sources were more dominant for the vanillin concentration than riverine sources. The dissolved vanillin turnover was fast and, consequently, a significant amount of lignin may be converted within an estuary. In sediments from the Estuary, the concentrations of dissolved vanillin were similar to those found in the water phase and showed no clear vertical profile. The sediment is unlikely to be the source for vanillin.

  15. Abundance and reactivity of dibenzodioxocins in softwood lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, Dimitris S; Jurasek, Lubo; Kristofová, Lívia; Xia, Zhicheng; Sun, Yujun; Palus, Ernest

    2002-02-13

    To define the abundance and comprehend the reactivity of dibenzodioxocins in lignin, model compound studies, specific degradation experiments on milled wood lignin, and molecular modeling calculations have been performed. Quantitative (31)P NMR measurements of the increase of biphenolic hydroxyl groups formed after a series of alkaline degradations in the presence of hydrosulfide anions (kraft conditions) showed the presence of 3.7 dibenzodioxocin rings/100 C9 units in milled wood lignin. The DFRC degradation protocol (Derivatization Followed by Reductive Cleavage) was chosen as an independent means to estimate their abundance. Initial experiments with a dibenzodioxocin model compound, trans-6,7-dihydro-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-4,9-dimethoxy-2,11-dipropyldibenzo[e,g][1,4]dioxocin-6-ylmethanol, showed that it is not cleaved under DFRC conditions, but rather it isomerizes into a cyclic oxepine structure. Steric effects precluded this isomerization from occurring when DFRC was applied to milled wood lignin. Instead, monoacetylated biphenolic moieties were released and quantified by (31)P NMR, at 4.3 dibenzodioxocin rings/100 C9 units. The dibenzodioxocin content in residual lignins isolated from kraft pulps delignified to various degrees showed that during pulp delignification, the initial rate of dibenzodioxocin removal was considerably greater than the cleavage rate of arylglycerol-beta-aryl ether bonds. The activation energy for the degradation of dibenzodioxocins under kraft conditions in milled wood lignin was 96 +/- 9 kJ/mol, similar to that of arylglycerol-beta-aryl ether bond cleavage.

  16. A radioimmunoassay for lignin in plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawley, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lignin detection and determination in herbaceous tissue requires selective, specific assays which are not currently available. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed to study lignin metabolism in these tissues. A β-aryl ether lignin model compound was synthesized, linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin using a water-soluble carbodiimide, and injected into rabbits. The highest titer of the antiserum obtained was 34 ηg/mL of model derivatized BSA. An in vitro system was developed to characterize the RIA. The model compound was linked to amino activated polyacrylamide beads to mimic lignin in the cell walls. 125 I Radiolabelled protein A was used to detect IgG antibody binding. The RIA was shown in the in vitro system to exhibit saturable binding. The amount of antibody bound decreased when the serum was diluted. Immunoelectrophoresis and competitive binding experiments confirmed that both aromatic rings of the lignin model compound had been antigenic. Chlorogenic acid, a phenolic known to be present in plant cells, did not compete for antibody binding. The RIA was used to measure lignin in milled plant samples and barley seedlings. Antiserum binding to wheat cell walls and stressed barley segments was higher than preimmune serum binding. Antibody binding to stressed barley tissue decreased following NaClO 2 delignification. The RIA was found to be less sensitive than expected, so several avenues for improving the method are discussed

  17. Lignin-solubilizing ability of actinomycetes isolated from termite (Termitidae) gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasti, M B; Pometto, A L; Nuti, M P; Crawford, D L

    1990-01-01

    The lignocellulose-degrading abilities of 11 novel actinomycete strains isolated from termite gut were determined and compared with that of the well-characterized actinomycete, Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. Lignocellulose bioconversion was followed by (i) monitoring the degradation of [14C]lignin- and [14C]cellulose-labeled phloem of Abies concolor to 14CO2 and 14C-labeled water-soluble products, (ii) determining lignocellulose, lignin, and carbohydrate losses resulting from growth on a lignocellulose substrate prepared from corn stalks (Zea mays), and (iii) quantifying production of a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate (acid-precipitable polymeric lignin). The actinomycetes were all Streptomyces strains and could be placed into three groups, including a group of five strains that appear superior to S. viridosporus T7A in lignocellulose-degrading ability, three strains of approximately equal ability, and three strains of lesser ability. Strain A2 was clearly the superior and most effective lignocellulose decomposer of those tested. Of the assays used, total lignocellulose weight loss was most useful in determining overall bioconversion ability but not in identifying the best lignin-solubilizing strains. A screening procedure based on 14CO2 evolution from [14C-lignin]lignocellulose combined with measurement of acid-precipitable polymeric lignin yield was the most effective in identifying lignin-solubilizing strains. For the termite gut strains, the pH of the medium showed no increase after 3 weeks of growth on lignocellulose. This is markedly different from the pattern observed with S. viridosporus T7A, which raises the medium pH considerably. Production of extracellular peroxidases by the 11 strains and S. viridosporus T7A was followed for 5 days in liquid cultures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2167628

  18. Activity of the C-terminal-dependent vacuolar sorting signal of horseradish peroxidase C1a is enhanced by its secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeshi; Tabayashi, Ayako; Iwano, Megumi; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Kato, Ko; Nakayama, Hideki

    2011-02-01

    Plant class III peroxidase (PRX) catalyzes the oxidation and oxidative polymerization of a variety of phenolic compounds while reducing hydrogen peroxide. PRX proteins are classified into apoplast type and vacuole type based on the absence or the presence of C-terminal propeptides, which probably function as vacuolar sorting signals (VSSs). In this study, in order to improve our understanding of vacuole-type PRX, we analyzed regulatory mechanisms of vacuolar sorting of a model vacuole-type PRX, the C1a isozyme of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) (HRP C1a). Using cultured transgenic tobacco cells and protoplasts derived from horseradish leaves, we characterized HRP C1a's VSS, which is a 15 amino acid C-terminal propeptide (C15). We found that the C-terminal hexapeptide of C15 (C6), which is well conserved among vacuole-type PRX proteins, forms the core of the C-terminal-dependent VSS. We also found that the function of C6 is enhanced by the remaining N-terminal part of C15 which probably folds into an amphiphilic α-helix.

  19. Biomimetic Catalysts for Oxidation of Veratryl Alcohol, a Lignin Model Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelino Maneiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kraft pulp has to be bleached to eliminate the chromophoric structures, which cause a darkening of the pulp. In Nature, an equivalent role is assumed by ligninolytic enzymes such as lignin peroxidases, manganese peroxidases and laccases. The development of low molecular weight manganese peroxidase mimics may achieve environmentally-safe bleaching catalysts for the industry. Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of six manganese(III complexes 1–6, incorporating dianionic hexadentate Schiff base ligands (H2L1-H2L4 and different anions. Complex 4, Mn2L22(H2O2(DCA2 was crystallographically characterized. Complexes 1–4 behave as more efficient mimics of peroxidase in contrast to 5–6. We have studied the use of these complexes as catalysts for the degradation of the lignin model compound veratryl alcohol. The biomimetic catalysts were used in conjunction with chlorine-free inexpensive co-oxidants as dioxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Yields up to 30% of veratryl alcohol conversion to veratraldehyde have been achieved at room temperature in presence of air flow using 0.5% of catalyst.

  20. Identification of Surface-Exposed Protein Radicals and A Substrate Oxidation Site in A-Class Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase from Thermomonospora curvata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Ruben; Chen, Xuejie; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Hayati, Zahra; Carlson, Eric A.; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Song, Likai; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Li, Ping (FSU); (KSU)

    2016-12-12

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) are a family of heme peroxidases in which a catalytic distal aspartate is involved in H2O2 activation to catalyze oxidations under acidic conditions. They have received much attention due to their potential applications in lignin compound degradation and biofuel production from biomass. However, the mode of oxidation in bacterial DyPs remains unknown. We have recently reported that the bacterial TcDyP from Thermomonospora curvata is among the most active DyPs and shows activity toward phenolic lignin model compounds. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structure solved at 1.75 Å, sigmoidal steady-state kinetics with Reactive Blue 19 (RB19), and formation of compound II like product in the absence of reducing substrates observed with stopped-flow spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we hypothesized that the TcDyP catalyzes oxidation of large-size substrates via multiple surface-exposed protein radicals. Among 7 tryptophans and 3 tyrosines in TcDyP consisting of 376 residues for the matured protein, W263, W376, and Y332 were identified as surface-exposed protein radicals. Only the W263 was also characterized as one of the surface-exposed oxidation sites. SDS-PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that W376 represents an off-pathway destination for electron transfer, resulting in the cross-linking of proteins in the absence of substrates. Mutation of W376 improved compound I stability and overall catalytic efficiency toward RB19. While Y332 is highly conserved across all four classes of DyPs, its catalytic function in A-class TcDyP is minimal, possibly due to its extremely small solvent-accessible areas. Identification of surface-exposed protein radicals and substrate oxidation sites is important for understanding the DyP mechanism and modulating its catalytic functions for improved activity on phenolic lignin.

  1. Biochemical and molecular characterization of an atypical manganese peroxidase of the litter-decomposing fungus Agrocybe praecox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildén, Kristiina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Steffen, Kari T; Hofrichter, Martin; Hatakka, Annele; Archer, David B; Lundell, Taina K

    2014-11-01

    Agrocybe praecox is a litter-decomposing Basidiomycota species of the order Agaricales, and is frequently found in forests and open woodlands. A. praecox grows in leaf-litter and the upper soil and is able to colonize bark mulch and wood chips. It produces extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) activities and mineralizes synthetic lignin. In this study, the A. praecox MnP1 isozyme was purified, cloned and enzymatically characterized. The enzyme catalysed the oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), which is the specific reaction for manganese-dependent class II heme-peroxidases, in the presence of malonate as chelator with an activity maximum at pH 4.5; detectable activity was observed even at pH 7.0. The coding sequence of the mnp1 gene demonstrates a short-type of MnP protein with a slightly modified Mn(2+) binding site. Thus, A. praecox MnP1 may represent a novel group of atypical short-MnP enzymes. In lignocellulose-containing cultures composed of cereal bran or forest litter, transcription of mnp1 gene was followed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. On spruce needle litter, mnp1 expression was more abundant than on leaf litter after three weeks cultivation. However, the expression was constitutive in wheat and rye bran cultures. Our data show that the atypical MnP of A. praecox is able to catalyse Mn(2+) oxidation, which suggests its involvement in lignocellulose decay by this litter-decomposer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biodegradation of softwood lignin and guaiacylglycerol-beta-guiacyl ether by extracellular enzyme in shiitake Lentinus edodes (Berk) Sing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, T.; Senba, Y.; Ishikawa, H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to explain the biodegradation of softwood lignin by shiitake (Lentinus edodes Berk. Sing.), akamatsu (Pinus densiflora Sekb. and Zucc.) dioxane lignin (NDL) and guaicylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether (I) were degraded by extracellular enzyme from the NDL-contained potato and malt extracts cultures of shiitake TMI-563 and 655 at 25 degrees C for a prolonged period. The main results on the basis of a functional group analysis and gel-filtration of NDL before and after the enzymatic degradation showed that the degraded DL had a higher content of phenolic OH groups than sound lignin, whereas the methoxyl or aromatic aldehyde-yielding group content was lower in the degraded lignin. The main degradation products formed from I in a crude enzyme solution were guaiacol, guaiacylglycerol, guaiacylglycol-beta-guaiacyl ether (II), and guaiacoxyacetoguaiacone (III), although the polymer was formed at pH 4.0, which is the optimum pH of peroxidase and laccase. It also was clarified that the oxidative polymerization of NDL and I occurred preferably in a crude enzyme solution at pH 4.0, and that these compounds were degraded to lower molecular fragments at pH 6.8 under the same conditions. From the above results, it is suggested that softwood lignin is more effectively degraded by the other enzyme than polyphenoloxidase, such as laccase and peroxidase, in a crude enzyme solution of L. edodes. (Refs. 9).

  3. Lipoic acid increases glutathione peroxidase, Na+, K+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase activities in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures? O ácido lipóico aumenta as atividades da glutationa peroxidase, da Na+, K+-ATPase e da acetilcolinesterase no hipocampo de ratos após convulsões induzidas por pilocarpina?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geane Felix de Souza

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the effects of lipoic acid (LA on acetylcholinesterase (AChE, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and Na+, K+-ATPase activities in rat hippocampus during seizures. Wistar rats were treated with 0.9% saline (i.p., control group, lipoic acid (20 mg/kg, i.p., LA group, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., P400 group, and the association of pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p. plus LA (20 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min before of administration of P400 (LA plus P400 group. After the treatments all groups were observed for 1 h. In P400 group, there was a significant increase in GPx activity as well as a decrease in AChE and Na+, K+-ATPase activities after seizures. In turn, LA plus P400 abolished the appearance of seizures and reversed the decreased in AChE and Na+, K+-ATPase activities produced by seizures, when compared to the P400 seizing group. The results from the present study demonstrate that preadministration of LA abolished seizure episodes induced by pilocarpine in rat, probably by increasing AChE and Na+, K+-ATPase activities in rat hippocampus.No presente estudo nós investigamos os efeitos do ácido lipóico (AL sobre as atividades da acetilcolinesterase (AChE, da glutationa peroxidase (GPx e da Na+, K+-ATPase no hipocampo de ratos durante crises convulsivas. Ratos Wistar foram tratados com solução salina a 0,9% (i.p., grupo controle, ácido lipóico (20 mg/kg, i.p., grupo AL, pilocarpina (400 mg/kg, i.p., grupo P400, e a associação de AL (20 mg/kg, i.p. com a pilocarpina (400 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min antes da administração de pilocarpina (grupo AL + P400. Após os tratamentos todos os grupos foram observados durante 1 h. No grupo P400, houve um aumento significativo na atividade da GPx, assim como uma diminuição das atividades da AChE e Na+, K+-ATPase. Por sua vez, o pré-tratamento com AL aboliu o aparecimento de convulsões e reverteu a diminuição das atividades da AChE e da Na+, K+-ATPase causadas pelas convulsões, quando

  4. Inhibition and kinetic studies of lignin degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Arthy; Siddiqui, Yasmeen; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2018-05-22

    Lignolytic (Lignin degrading) enzyme, from oil palm pathogen Ganoderma boninense Pat. (Syn G. orbiforme (Ryvarden), is involved in the detoxification and the degradation of lignin in the oil palm and is the rate-limiting step in the infection process of this fungus. Active inhibition of lignin degrading enzymes secreted by G. boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of efficiency on pathogen suppression was aimed at. In our work, ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory potential towards the lignolytic enzymes of G.boninense. Additionally, the lignin degrading enzymes were characterised. Most of the peholic compounds exhibited an uncompetitive inhibition towards the lignin degrading enzymes. Benzoic acid was the superior inhibitor to the production of lignin degrading enzymes, when compared between the ten phenolic compounds. The inhibitory potential of the phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes are higher than that of the conventional metal ion inhibitor. The lignin degrading enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH but were sensitive to higher to temperature. The study demonstrated the inhibitor potential of ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes of G. boninense with different efficacies. The study has shed a light towards a new management strategy to control BSR in oil palm. It serves as replacement for the existing chemical control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Disruption of Mediator rescues the stunted growth of a lignin-deficient Arabidopsis mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Kim, Jeong Im; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N; Anderson, Nickolas A; Ximenes, Eduardo; Maeda, Junko; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2014-05-15

    Lignin is a phenylpropanoid-derived heteropolymer important for the strength and rigidity of the plant secondary cell wall. Genetic disruption of lignin biosynthesis has been proposed as a means to improve forage and bioenergy crops, but frequently results in stunted growth and developmental abnormalities, the mechanisms of which are poorly understood. Here we show that the phenotype of a lignin-deficient Arabidopsis mutant is dependent on the transcriptional co-regulatory complex, Mediator. Disruption of the Mediator complex subunits MED5a (also known as REF4) and MED5b (also known as RFR1) rescues the stunted growth, lignin deficiency and widespread changes in gene expression seen in the phenylpropanoid pathway mutant ref8, without restoring the synthesis of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin subunits. Cell walls of rescued med5a/5b ref8 plants instead contain a novel lignin consisting almost exclusively of p-hydroxyphenyl lignin subunits, and moreover exhibit substantially facilitated polysaccharide saccharification. These results demonstrate that guaiacyl and syringyl lignin subunits are largely dispensable for normal growth and development, implicate Mediator in an active transcriptional process responsible for dwarfing and inhibition of lignin biosynthesis, and suggest that the transcription machinery and signalling pathways responding to cell wall defects may be important targets to include in efforts to reduce biomass recalcitrance.

  6. Oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Kulkarni, K A; Kulkarni, A P

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase (HTPP) was examined. Spectral analyses indicated that, similar to horseradish peroxidase, HTPP is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of eugenol. The accumulated stable product in the reaction medium due to eugenol oxidation by HTPP was tentatively identified as quinone methide of eugenol (EQM). The EQM formation exhibited a pH optimum of 8.0 and was dependent on incubation time, amount of HTPP and the concentration of both eugenol and hydrogen peroxide. The specific activity of approx 2.8 micromoles of EQM/min/mg protein was observed with different preparations of HTPP. The EQM formation was significantly suppressed by glutathione and ascorbic acid. The classical peroxidase inhibitors viz. potassium cyanide and sodium azide blocked the reaction in a concentration manner. Collectively, the results suggest that eugenol may undergo peroxidative metabolism in human placenta. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  7. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Gonzalez-Vila, F J

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  8. Lignin poly(lactic acid) copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johan Vilhelm; Chung, Yi-Lin; Li, Russell Jingxian; Waymouth, Robert; Sattely, Elizabeth; Billington, Sarah; Frank, Curtis W.

    2017-02-14

    Provided herein are graft co-polymers of lignin and poly(lactic acid) (lignin-g-PLA copolymer), thermoset and thermoplastic polymers including them, methods of preparing these polymers, and articles of manufacture including such polymers.

  9. Experimental Studies on the Hydrotreatment of Kraft Lignin to Aromatics and Alkylphenolics Using Economically Viable Fe-Based Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Limonite, a low-cost iron ore, was investigated as a potential hydrotreatment catalyst for kraft lignin without the use of an external solvent (batch reactor, initial H2 pressure of 100 bar, 4 h). The best results were obtained at 450 °C resulting in 34 wt % of liquefied kraft lignin (lignin oil) on lignin intake. The composition of the lignin oil was determined in detail (elemental composition, GC-MS, GC×GC-FID, and GPC). The total GC-detectable monomeric species amounts up to 31 wt % on lignin intake, indicating that 92 wt % of the products in the lignin oil are volatile and thus of low molecular weight. The lignin oil was rich in low-molecular-weight alkylphenolics (17 wt % on lignin) and aromatics (8 wt % on lignin). Performance of the limonite catalyst was compared to other Fe-based catalysts (goethite and iron disulfide) and limonite was shown to give the highest yields of alkylphenolics and aromatics. The limonite catalyst before and after reaction was characterized using XRD, TEM, and nitrogen physisorption to determine changes in structure during reaction. Catalyst recycling tests were performed and show that the catalyst is active after reuse, despite the fact that the morphology changed and that the surface area of the catalyst particles was decreased. Our results clearly reveal that cheap limonite catalysts have the potential to be used for the depolymerization/hydrodeoxygenation of kraft lignin for the production of valuable biobased phenolics and aromatics. PMID:28413733

  10. Radioimmunoassays for catalase and glutathion peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baret, A.; Courtiere, A.; Lorry, D.; Puget, K.; Michelson, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Specific and sensitive radioimmunoassays for human, bovine and rat catalase (CAT) and glutathion Peroxidase (GPX) are described. The obtained values are expressed as enzymatic units per μg of immunoreactive protein. They appear to closely correspond to specific activities of the purified enzymes determined by colorimetric protein-assay. Indeed, the values of the specific activities of purified human CAT is 57.9 k/mg and that of purified rat GPX is 180 units/mg. This result validates the present RIAs and the association of the two techniques allows the determination of a further parameter. In conclusion, RIAs for CAT and GPX can be applied with great specificity and sensitivity to a wide variety of human, rat and bovine medias

  11. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  12. Improved lignin pyrolysis for phenolics production in a bubbling bed reactor--Effect of bed materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbing; Briens, Cedric; Berruti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lignin pyrolysis was studied in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor equipped with a fractional condensation train, using nitrogen as the fluidization gas. The effect of different bed materials (silica sand, lignin char, activated lignin char, birch bark char, and foamed glass beads) on bio-oil yield and quality was investigated for a pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C. Results how that a bed of activated lignin char is preferable to the commonly used silica sand: pyrolysis of Kraft lignin with a bed of activated lignin char not only provides a pure char product, but also a higher dry bio-oil yield (with a relative increase of 43%), lower pyrolytic water production, and better bio-oil quality. The bio-oil obtained from Kraft lignin pyrolysis with a bed of activated lignin char has a lower average molecular weight, less tar, more phenolics, and less acidity than when sand is used as bed material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Studies of lignin transformation in polyoxometalate (POM) bleaching of kraft pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biljana Bujanovic; Richard S. Reiner; Kolby C. Hirth; Sally A. Ralph; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    In order to elucidate changes occurring in lignin during polyoxometalate delignification of kraft pulp, residual lignins of a series of POM- delignified kraft pulps of decreasing kappa number were isolated and characterized. Oxidative treatment of commercial unbleached kraft pulp was performed using complex POM solutions containing the active [SiVW11O40]anion. For...

  14. Epigallocatechin gallate incorporation into lignin enhances the alkaline delignification and enzymatic saccharification of cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elumalai Sasikumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin is an integral component of the plant cell wall matrix but impedes the conversion of biomass into biofuels. The plasticity of lignin biosynthesis should permit the inclusion of new compatible phenolic monomers such as flavonoids into cell wall lignins that are consequently less recalcitrant to biomass processing. In the present study, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG was evaluated as a potential lignin bioengineering target for rendering biomass more amenable to processing for biofuel production. Results In vitro peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization experiments revealed that both gallate and pyrogallyl (B-ring moieties in EGCG underwent radical cross-coupling with monolignols mainly by β–O–4-type cross-coupling, producing benzodioxane units following rearomatization reactions. Biomimetic lignification of maize cell walls with a 3:1 molar ratio of monolignols and EGCG permitted extensive alkaline delignification of cell walls (72 to 92% that far exceeded that for lignified controls (44 to 62%. Alkali-insoluble residues from EGCG-lignified walls yielded up to 34% more glucose and total sugars following enzymatic saccharification than lignified controls. Conclusions It was found that EGCG readily copolymerized with monolignols to become integrally cross-coupled into cell wall lignins, where it greatly enhanced alkaline delignification and subsequent enzymatic saccharification. Improved delignification may be attributed to internal trapping of quinone-methide intermediates to prevent benzyl ether cross-linking of lignin to structural polysaccharides during lignification, and to the cleavage of ester intra-unit linkages within EGCG during pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that apoplastic deposition of EGCG for incorporation into lignin would be a promising plant genetic engineering target for improving the delignification and saccharification of biomass crops.

  15. Purification and characterization of an intracellular catalase-peroxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Roubroeks, Hanno P.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1996-01-01

    The first dimeric catalase-peroxidase of eucaryotic origin, an intracellular hydroperoxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum which exhibited both catalase and peroxidase activities, has been isolated. The enzyme has an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa and is composed of two identical

  16. Lignin recovery. A resource to value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimbardi, P.; Cardinale, G.; Demichele, M.; Nanna, F.; Viggiano, D.; Bonini, C.; D'Alessio, L.; D'Auria, M.; Teghil, R.; Tofani, D.

    1999-01-01

    In the present paper, the effects of the steam explosion (ES) pretreatment conditions on recovery and chemical structure of wheat straw lignin are reported. The experimental data of lignin recovery by caustic extraction, followed by acid precipitation, have been interpolated to obtain the dependence on the time and temperature of SE. The lignin has been characterised by using several methods. Preliminary results on the synthesis of copolymers lignin-styrene are also reported [it

  17. Lignin biopolymer based triboelectric nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yukai; Wang, Ruoxing; Lu, Yunmei; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2017-07-01

    Ongoing research in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) focuses on increasing power generation, but obstacles concerning economical and eco-friendly utilization of TENGs continue to prevail. Being the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, lignin offers a valuable opportunity for low-cost TENG applications in biomedical devices, benefitting from its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Here, we develop for the first time a lignin biopolymer based TENGs for harvesting mechanical energy in the environment, which shows great potential for self-powered biomedical devices among other applications and opens doors to new technologies that utilize otherwise wasted materials for economically feasible and ecologically friendly production of energy devices.

  18. Structure variations of carbonizing lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.; Polidoro, H.A.; Otani, S.; Craievich, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    The studied lignin is a by-product of the process of ethanol production from eucaliptus. It was heat-treated under inert atmosphere conditions at increasing temperatures from 300C up to 2400C. The structural variations were studied by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The bulk and 'real' density of the compacted materials have also been determined as functions of the final temperature. These experimental results enabled us to establish a mechanism of structure variation based on the formation of a turbostratic graphite-like and porous structure within the initially amorphous lignin matrix. (Author) [pt

  19. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of heat treatment (55°C/20 min) on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activities and total phenolic compounds was investigated in Algerian dates (Deglet Nour variety) at Tamar (fully ripe) stage and in dates stored for 5 months at ambient temperature and in cold storage (10°C). Results obtained ...

  20. Effect of industrial wastewater ontotal protein and the peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of industrial wastewaters on protein and the peroxidase activity in Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., Capsicum annuum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Vicia faba L. Industrial wastewaters were taken from Dardanel Fisheries Company, Tekel alcoholic drinks companies' ...

  1. Efficient production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, B.C.; Joosten, V.; Hovenkamp, J.; Gouka, R.J.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    The heterologous production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) was analysed in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori under control of the inducible endoxylanase promoter. Secretion of active ARP was achieved up to 800 mg l-1 in shake flask cultures. Western blot analysis showed that an

  2. Lignin pyrolysis for profitable lignocellulosic biorefineries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de P.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based industries (pulp and paper and biorefineries) produce > 50 Mt/yr of lignin that results from fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is world's second biopolymer and a major potential source for production of performance materials and aromatic chemicals. Lignin valorization is

  3. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  4. Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

  5. Converting lignin to aromatics: step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.I.

    2014-01-01

    Lignin, the glue that holds trees together, is the most abundant natural resource of aromatics. In that respect, it is a far more advanced resource than crude oil. This is because lignin already contains the aromatic functional groups. Thus, catalytic conversion of lignin to high-value aromatics is

  6. Iron addition to soil specifically stabilized lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven J. Hall; Whendee L. Silver; Vitaliy I. Timokhin; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2016-01-01

    The importance of lignin as a recalcitrant constituent of soil organic matter (SOM) remains contested. Associations with iron (Fe) oxides have been proposed to specifically protect lignin from decomposition, but impacts of Fe-lignin interactions on mineralization rates remain unclear. Oxygen (O2) fluctuations characteristic of humid tropical...

  7. Oxidative degradation of alkylphenols by horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuyama, Hisae; Endo, Yasushi; Fujimoto, Kenshiro; Hatana, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Alkylphenols such as bisphenol A (2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane; BPA), p-nonylphenol (p-NP), and p-octylphenol (p-OP) that are known as endocrine disrupters were oxidized by horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase (HRP) with H2O2. The optimal pHs for BPA, p-NP, and p-OP were 8.0, 7.0, and 5.0, respectively. The optimal temperature for BPA was 20 degrees C. Although BPA was rapidly degraded by HRP, its degradation depended on the concentration of HRP. Most of the oxidation products of BPA were polymers, although some 4-isopropenylphenol was produced. When male Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to BPA, vitellogenin in the blood increased. However, no increased vitellogenin was observed in medaka exposed to HRP-oxidized BPA. The enzymatic oxidation of BPA using HRP was able to eliminate its estrogen-like activity.

  8. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  9. Lignin Sulfonation - A different Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørkmann, Anders

    2001-01-01

    The research on sulfite pulping has been characterized by the attempts to explain its chemistry. The. different approach presented is incited by perceptions about the (still) unsolved problem of the ultrastructural features of lignin in wood. A simple kinetic model has been chosen to describe the...

  10. Effects of Gram-negative Bacteria, E.coli and Cold Exposure on Free Radicals Production, Lactate Dehydrogenase and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in the Lungs of Rats, Rattus norvigicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlSaid, A Haffor

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of LPS-gram negative bacteria and low ambient temperature on free radicals (FR) production, the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the lungs of rats, Rattus norvigisu. Twenty four male rats, matched with age and weigh, were divided randomly into four groups namely control (C), Bacteria (B), cold temperature (T), and bacteria plus cold (BT). The T group was exposed to 10-12degree C ambient temperature for 3 days. Animals of the BT was injected LPS bacteria (IP, 500 micron g/kg) during the last five hour of cold exposure to 10-12 degree C for 3 days. In comparison with C group FR increased significantly (p<0.05) in the experimental groups, indicating high rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The activity of LDH increased significantly (p<0.05) in the T and BT groups, which demonstrated that bacteria and exposure to cold are causes for cellular injury in the lungs. The synergetic effect of both bacteria and cold on LDH was more intense, as compared with the single effect. The activity of GPx increased significantly (p<0.05) in the B and BT, as compared with the C group. The results of the present study is the first worldwide report to demonstrate that both cold exposure and bacteria infection are mediated by elevation in FR generation. (author)

  11. Lignin biosynthesis in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): its response to waterlogging and association with hormonal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tran-Nguyen; Son, SeungHyun; Jordan, Mark C; Levin, David B; Ayele, Belay T

    2016-01-25

    Lignin is an important structural component of plant cell wall that confers mechanical strength and tolerance against biotic and abiotic stressors; however it affects the use of biomass such as wheat straw for some industrial applications such as biofuel production. Genetic alteration of lignin quantity and quality has been considered as a viable option to overcome this problem. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying lignin formation in wheat biomass has not been studied. Combining molecular and biochemical approaches, the present study investigated the transcriptional regulation of lignin biosynthesis in two wheat cultivars with varying lodging characteristics and also in response to waterlogging. It also examined the association of lignin level in tissues with that of plant hormones implicated in the control of lignin biosynthesis. Analysis of lignin biosynthesis in the two wheat cultivars revealed a close association of lodging resistance with internode lignin content and expression of 4-coumarate:CoA ligase1 (4CL1), p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase1 (C3H1), cinnamoyl-CoA reductase2 (CCR2), ferulate 5-hydroxylase2 (F5H2) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase2 (COMT2), which are among the genes highly expressed in wheat tissues, implying the importance of these genes in mediating lignin deposition in wheat stem. Waterlogging of wheat plants reduced internode lignin content, and this effect is accompanied by transcriptional repression of three of the genes characterized as highly expressed in wheat internode including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase6 (PAL6), CCR2 and F5H2, and decreased activity of PAL. Expression of the other genes was, however, induced by waterlogging, suggesting their role in the synthesis of other phenylpropanoid-derived molecules with roles in stress responses. Moreover, difference in internode lignin content between cultivars or change in its level due to waterlogging is associated with the level of cytokinin. Lodging resistance, tolerance against

  12. Fungal peroxidases : molecular aspects and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductases that utilize hydrogen peroxide to catalyze oxidative reactions. A large number of peroxidases have been identified in fungal species and are being characterized at the molecular level. In this manuscript we review the current knowledge on the molecular aspects of this

  13. Lignin from Micro- to Nanosize: Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Beisl

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanosize lignin has recently gained interest due to improved properties compared to standard lignin available today. As the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose, lignin is readily available but used for rather low-value applications. This review focuses on the application of micro- and nanostructured lignin in final products or processes that all show potential for high added value. The fields of application are ranging from improvement of mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites, bactericidal and antioxidant properties and impregnations to hollow lignin drug carriers for hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances. Also, a carbonization of lignin nanostructures can lead to high-value applications such as use in supercapacitors for energy storage. The properties of the final product depend on the surface properties of the nanomaterial and, therefore, on factors like the lignin source, extraction method, and production/precipitation methods, as discussed in this review.

  14. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1994-01-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organo pollutants in soils and aqueous media. Most of the organic compounds are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, bio pulping, bio bleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated, or are hyper producers or super secretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through UV-light and γ-ray mutagenesis, we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants, 76UV, produced 272 U of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity/L after 9 d under high nitrogen (although the parent strain does not produce this enzyme under these conditions). The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments, the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 d

  15. 14C-labeled lignins as substrates for the study of lignin biodegradation and transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.L.; Robinson, L.E.; Chen, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Methods, both classical and isotopic, for quantifying lignin degradation are reviewed. Preparation and chemical characterization of 14 C-labeled lignins (both synthetic and plant-synthesized) are reviewed, with emphasis on the utilization of these 14 C-labeled substrates in biodegradation and biotransformation experiments. The scientific literature is reviewed concerning the use of 14 C-lignins to examine the following: microbial groups that are able to degrade lignins; lignin degradation in natural environments; biochemistry and microbial physiology of lignin degradation; biodegradability of industrial lignins and their by-products; and screening for industrially valuable, lignin-modifying microorganisms. Recent results obtained in our laboratory concerning lignin degradation by eubacteria are presented. Future directions for 14 C-methodology are examined

  16. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12 h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43 N/mm"2 and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. - Highlights: • Cellulose hydrogel films with trace lignin were obtained from sugarcane bagasse. • Lignin content was found to be in the range of 1.62 − 0.68% by UV–Vis spectroscopy. • Higher lignin content strengthened mechanical properties of the hydrogel films. • Trace lignin affected the hydrogel morphology such as roughness and porosity. • High cell proliferation was observed in the hydrogel containing 1.68% lignin.

  17. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi, E-mail: takaomi@nagaoakut.ac.jp

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12 h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43 N/mm{sup 2} and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. - Highlights: • Cellulose hydrogel films with trace lignin were obtained from sugarcane bagasse. • Lignin content was found to be in the range of 1.62 − 0.68% by UV–Vis spectroscopy. • Higher lignin content strengthened mechanical properties of the hydrogel films. • Trace lignin affected the hydrogel morphology such as roughness and porosity. • High cell proliferation was observed in the hydrogel containing 1.68% lignin.

  18. Chilling effect on soluble sugars, respiration rate, total phenolics, peroxidase activity and dormancy of onion bulbs Efeito do resfriamento sobre açúcares solúveis, taxa de respiração, fenóis totais, atividade de peroxidase e dormência de bulbos de cebola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Benkeblia

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Besides onions being one of the most cultivated and consumed vegetables, during storage onion bulbs are still affected by many physiological, biochemical and technological factors which can influence their quality. Respiration rate (RR O2, soluble sugars (SS, total phenolics (TP, and peroxidase (POD activity were measured in inner bud tissues during a dormancy break of onion bulbs treated four weeks at 0ºC and stored in the dark at 20ºC. Control bulbs were stored simultaneously in the same condition. Breakage of dormancy was checked by the appearance of first green internal leaves by cutting longitudinally 30 bulbs. After eight weeks, RR O2 of sprouted onions was 52% higher than that of freshly harvested and dormant bulbs. One week after cooling SS decreased from 15 to 9 mg g-1 fresh weight, and then peaked from 9 to 19 mg g-1 after three weeks. For control bulbs, a similar peak was observed after six weeks. For inner buds of cold-treated onions, a slight increase of TP (from 0.17 to 0.2 mg g-1; fresh weight was observed during the first two weeks of cooling, and then a decrease to 0.11 mg g-1 was observed after eight weeks. For inner buds of control bulbs, TP also increased slightly from 0.17 to 0.2 mg g-1 after five weeks, and decreased to 0.15 mg g-1 after seven weeks when bulbs began to sprout. POD activity showed a similar pattern in relation to TP. For cold-treated bulbs, POD activity increased to 1.7 U g-1 fresh weight after two weeks, and decreased to 1.1 U g-1 during the last four weeks. For control samples, POD activity was stable during 4 weeks and decreased progressively by 29% during the last four weeks. This decrease in POD activity coincided with the decrease in TP, and coincided with onset of sprouting. With cold treatment, first sprouts were observed during the third week, while total sprouting was observed after eight weeks. In comparison, only 20% of the control bulbs sprouted after the period of 8 weeks.Além de ser uma das

  19. Exploring the antioxidant potential of lignin isolated from black liquor of oil palm waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rajeev; Khalil, H P S A; Karim, A A

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the potential antioxidant activity of lignin obtained from black liquor, a hazardous waste product generated during the extraction of palm oil. Antioxidant potential of the extracted lignin was evaluated by dissolving the extracted samples in 2 different solvent systems, namely, 2-methoxy ethanol and DMSO. Results revealed high percent inhibition of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical in the lignin sample dissolved in 2-methoxy ethanol over DMSO (concentration range of 1-100 microg/ml). Lignin extracted in 2-methoxy ethanol exhibited higher inhibition percentage (at 50 microg/ml, 84.2%), whereas a concentration of 100 microg/ml was found to be effective in the case of the DMSO solvent (69.8%). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry revealed that the functional groups from the extracted lignin and commercial lignin were highly similar, indicating the purity of the lignin extracted from black liquor. These results provide a strong basis for further applications of lignin in the food industry and also illustrate an eco-friendly approach to utilize oil palm black liquor.

  20. Enzymes in Commercial Cellulase Preparations Bind Differently to Dioxane Extracted Lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, Larry E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd

    2017-04-24

    Commercial fungal cellulases used in biomass-to-biofuels processes can be grouped into three general classes: native, augmented, and engineered. To evaluate lignin binding affinities of different enzyme activities in various commercial cellulase formulations in order to determine if enzyme losses due to lignin binding can be modulated by using different enzymes of the same activity We used water:dioxane (1:9) to extract lignin from pretreated corn stover. Commercial cellulases were incubated with lignin and the unbound supernatants were evaluated for individual enzyme loss by SDS=PAGE and these were correlated with activity loss using various pNP-sugar substrates. Colorimetric assays for general glycosyl hydrolase activities showed distinct differences in enzyme binding to lignin for each enzyme activity. Native systems demonstrated low binding of endo- and exo-cellulases, high binding of xylanase, and moderate ..beta..-glucosidase binding. Engineered cellulase mixtures exhibited low binding of exo-cellulases, very strong binding of endocellulases and ..beta..- glucosidase, and mixed binding of xylanase activity. The augmented cellulase had low binding of exocellulase, high binding of endocellulase and xylanase, and moderate binding of ..beta..-glucosidase activities. Bound and unbound activities were correlated with general molecular weight ranges of proteins as measured by loss of proteins bands in bound fractions on SDS-PAGE gels. Lignin-bound high molecular weight bands correlated with binding of ..beta..-glucosidase activity. While ..beta..-glucosidases demonstrated high binding in many cases, they have been shown to remain active. Bound low molecular weight bands correlated with xylanase activity binding. Contrary to other literature, exocellulase activity did not show strong lignin binding. The variation in enzyme activity binding between the three classes of cellulases preparations indicate that it is certainly possible to alter the binding of specific

  1. Expression of manganese peroxidase by Lentinula edodes and Lentinula boryana in solid state and submerged system fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATIA L. HERMANN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass is referred as a second generation biofuel, whose processing is one of the most promising technologies under development. There are few available studies on the use of enzymes produced by fungi as active for the biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass. However, the manganese peroxidase (MnP enzyme presents high potential to degrade lignin and the basidiomycetes are the major producers of this oxidase. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating the ability of fungi Lentinula edodes and Lentinula boryana to produce this enzyme when cultivated in submerged fermentation system (SS and also in solid-state fermentation system (SSF containing Eucalyptus benthamii sawdust with or without corn cob meal. In the SS the greatest MnP expression occurred on the 25th day, being of 70 UI.L–1 for L. boryana and of 20 UI.L–1 for L. edodes. In the SSF, the best results were obtained on the 10th day for L. edodes, while for L. boryana it happened between the 20th and the 25th days, despite both species presented values close to 110 UI.L–1. Therefore, the results indicated that the studied fungi express the enzyme of interest and that its production is enhanced when cultivated in solid system.

  2. INFLUENCE OF BIOPRETREATMENT ON THE CHARACTER OF CORN STOVER LIGNIN AS SHOWN BY THERMOGRAVIMETRIC AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURAL ANALYSES

    OpenAIRE

    Xuewei Yang; Yelin Zeng; Xiaoyu Zhang

    2010-01-01

    The effect of corn stover lignin structure alteration caused by white-rot fungi pretreatment on the pyrolysis kinetics was studied by FTIR and TG/DTA. Results showed that biopretreatment had a remarkable effect on lignin pyrolysis. Biopretreatment can decrease the activation energy and increase the pre-exponential factor in the initial stage of pyrolysis, which makes it possible to start the lignin pyrolysis at a relatively gentle condition and improve the availability of biomass pyrolysis as...

  3. Development of a genetically programed vanillin-sensing bacterium for high-throughput screening of lignin-degrading enzyme libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, Barindra; Chia, Kuan Hui Burton; Raghavan, Sarada S; Ramalingam, Balamurugan; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Seayad, Jayasree; Ghadessy, Farid J

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is a potential biorefinery feedstock for the production of value-added chemicals including vanillin. A huge amount of lignin is produced as a by-product of the paper industry, while cellulosic components of plant biomass are utilized for the production of paper pulp. In spite of vast potential, lignin remains the least exploited component of plant biomass due to its extremely complex and heterogenous structure. Several enzymes have been reported to have lignin-degrading properties and could be potentially used in lignin biorefining if their catalytic properties could be improved by enzyme engineering. The much needed improvement of lignin-degrading enzymes by high-throughput selection techniques such as directed evolution is currently limited, as robust methods for detecting the conversion of lignin to desired small molecules are not available. We identified a vanillin-inducible promoter by RNAseq analysis of Escherichia coli cells treated with a sublethal dose of vanillin and developed a genetically programmed vanillin-sensing cell by placing the 'very green fluorescent protein' gene under the control of this promoter. Fluorescence of the biosensing cell is enhanced significantly when grown in the presence of vanillin and is readily visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis further enhances the sensitivity, enabling dose-dependent detection of as low as 200 µM vanillin. The biosensor is highly specific to vanillin and no major response is elicited by the presence of lignin, lignin model compound, DMSO, vanillin analogues or non-specific toxic chemicals. We developed an engineered E. coli cell that can detect vanillin at a concentration as low as 200 µM. The vanillin-sensing cell did not show cross-reactivity towards lignin or major lignin degradation products including vanillin analogues. This engineered E. coli cell could potentially be used as a host cell for screening lignin-degrading enzymes that

  4. Biochemical Properties of Soluble and Bound Peroxidases from Artichoke Heads and Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cardinali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble (SP, ionically bound (IBP and covalently bound (CBP peroxidases (POD from artichoke leaves and heads have been characterized for the main biochemical parameters. The three PODs, in both leaves and heads, showed the major apparent catalytic efficiency (vmax,app/Km,app towards ferulic acid, even though, in some cases, they showed higher affinity (Km,app for other substrates. In leaves, SP and IBP showed higher Km,app for ferulic and chlorogenic acids, and CBP for ferulic and caffeic acids. In heads, SP showed higher Km,app for chlorogenic acid, IBP for caffeic and ferulic acids, and CBP for ferulic acid. It was shown that pH optimum for PODs ranged between 5.0 and 6.0 in leaves. In heads, pH optimum for SP and IBP was 5.5, while CBP presented a very low activity in a wide pH range. All PODs showed high thermal stability but different ability to regenerate: the bound forms were more able to regenerate than the soluble one. The results obtained show that (i CBP from heads is able to work under very different cellular conditions, (ii all PODs, in both tissues, have a high apparent catalytic efficiency for ferulic acid, which could explain the effective involvement of POD in lignin biosynthesis, (iii in heads, high Km,app of SP for chlorogenic acid, particularly abundant in artichoke, could justify the possible involvement of PODs in browning mechanism, and (iv in heat-processed artichoke, the ability of PODs to regenerate could contribute to oxidation and loss of product quality.

  5. Two oxidation sites for low redox potential substrates: a directed mutagenesis, kinetic, and crystallographic study on Pleurotus eryngii versatile peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María; Mate, María J; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2012-11-30

    Versatile peroxidase shares with manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase the ability to oxidize Mn(2+) and high redox potential aromatic compounds, respectively. Moreover, it is also able to oxidize phenols (and low redox potential dyes) at two catalytic sites, as shown by biphasic kinetics. A high efficiency site (with 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone catalytic efficiencies of ∼70 and ∼700 s(-1) mM(-1), respectively) was localized at the same exposed Trp-164 responsible for high redox potential substrate oxidation (as shown by activity loss in the W164S variant). The second site, characterized by low catalytic efficiency (∼3 and ∼50 s(-1) mM(-1) for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and p-hydroquinone, respectively) was localized at the main heme access channel. Steady-state and transient-state kinetics for oxidation of phenols and dyes at the latter site were improved when side chains of residues forming the heme channel edge were removed in single and multiple variants. Among them, the E140G/K176G, E140G/P141G/K176G, and E140G/W164S/K176G variants attained catalytic efficiencies for oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) at the heme channel similar to those of the exposed tryptophan site. The heme channel enlargement shown by x-ray diffraction of the E140G, P141G, K176G, and E140G/K176G variants would allow a better substrate accommodation near the heme, as revealed by the up to 26-fold lower K(m) values (compared with native VP). The resulting interactions were shown by the x-ray structure of the E140G-guaiacol complex, which includes two H-bonds of the substrate with Arg-43 and Pro-139 in the distal heme pocket (at the end of the heme channel) and several hydrophobic interactions with other residues and the heme cofactor.

  6. Glycosylation and thermodynamic versus kinetic stability of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tams, J.W.; Welinder, Karen G.

    1998-01-01

    Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability......Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability...

  7. H2O2 can Increase Lignin Disintegration and Decrease Cellulose Decomposition in the Process of Solid-State Fermentation (SSF by Aspergillus oryzae Using Corn Stalk as Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicai Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available H2O2 is both bactericidal and the main oxidant responsible for lignin degradation reaction catalyzed by manganese peroxidase (MnP and lignin peroxidase (LiP. Thus, H2O2 treatment of corn stalk and the implementation of solid-substrate fermentation (SSF is possible to increase the removal rate of lignin from stalk in the process of SSF and after SSF, while avoiding the need to sterilize the raw materials. To demonstrate this approach, SSF was initially carried out using corn stalk pretreated with different concentrations of H2O2 as a substrate. A. oryzae was found to grow well in the 3% H2O2-pretreated corn stalk. H2O2-pretreated corn stalk showed increased MnP and LiP synthesis and disintegration of lignin, but inhibited cellulase synthesis and cellulose degradation. Production of the SSF (200 g on the 10th day was hydrolyzed in the presence of additional 600 mL different concentration of H2O2 aqueous solution. The total removal of lignin (73.15% of hydrolysis for 10 h at 3% H2O2 solution was highest and far higher than that at the 12th day, as achieved by conventional SSF. Applying this strategy in practice may shorten the time of lignin degradation, increase the removal of lignin, and decrease the loss of cellulose. Thus, this study has provided a foundation for further study saccharification of corn stalk.

  8. Conformational analysis of lignin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Helio F. dos

    2001-01-01

    The conformational equilibrium for two 5,5' biphenyl lignin models have been analyzed using a quantum mechanical semiempirical method. The gas phase and solution structures are discussed based on the NMR and X-ray experimental data. The results obtained showed that the observed conformations are solvent-dependent, being the geometries and the thermodynamic properties correlated with the experimental information. This study shows how a systematic theoretical conformational analysis can help to understand chemical processes at a molecular level. (author)

  9. The effect of coumaryl alcohol incorporation on the structure and composition of lignin dehydrogenation polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman-Ware, Anne E; Happs, Renee M; Davison, Brian H; Davis, Mark F

    2017-01-01

    Lignin dehydrogenation polymers (DHPs) are polymers generated from phenolic precursors for the purpose of studying lignin structure and polymerization processes. Here, DHPs were synthesized using a Zutropfverfahren method with horseradish peroxidase and three lignin monomers, sinapyl (S), coumaryl (H), and coniferyl (G) alcohols, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The H monomer was reacted with G and a 1:1 molar mixture of S:G monomers at H molar compositions of 0, 5, 10, and 20 mol% to study how the presence of the H monomer affected the structure and composition of the recovered polymers. At low H concentrations, solid-state NMR spectra suggest that the H and G monomers interact to form G:H polymers that have a lower average molecular weight than the solely G-based polymer or the G:H polymer produced at higher H concentrations. Solid-state NMR and pyrolysis-MBMS analyses suggest that at higher H concentrations, the H monomer primarily self-polymerizes to produce clusters of H-based polymer that are segregated from clusters of G- or S:G-based polymers. Thioacidolysis generally showed higher recoveries of thioethylated products from S:G or S:G:H polymers made with higher H content, indicating an increase in the linear ether linkages. Overall, the experimental results support theoretical predictions for the reactivity and structural influences of the H monomer on the formation of lignin-like polymers.

  10. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK -1 , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m -3 (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. Long-term impact of land management in soil biological processes can be assessed by fingerprint of dissolved organic carbon and peroxidase activity in topsoil and subsoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Maclean, Jamie L.; Dalal, Ram C.; Menzies, Neal W.; Kopittke, Peter M.

    2015-04-01

    The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a highly dynamic pool, directly related to biological functions and to the stabilization of organic carbon (OC) through interaction with the mineral phase. Therefore, the characterization of the main components of DOC can be linked to the metabolic status of soil and the turnover of OC and provides a sensitive approach to evaluate the impact of land use on OC turnover in soils. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to derive relationships between DOC characteristics and biochemical activity in soils under contrasting land management. The soil solution was isolated from topsoil and subsoil for three soils (Vertisol, Ferralsol, Acrisol, World Reference Base 2014) collected from undisturbed areas and from a location(s) immediately adjacent which has a long history of agricultural, pasture or afforestation use (>20 years) by centrifugation at 4000 rpm (20 min, 25 °C. The fingerprint of DOC was obtained to identify OC functionalities by spectrofluorometric analyses and Excitation-Emission matrices (EEM) were obtained for all samples. The excitation wavelengths were increased from 250 to 400 nm in 5-nm steps for each excitation wavelength, and emission was detected from 250 to 500 nm in 0.5-nm steps and. Humification index (HIX), freshness index (FrI), fluorescence index (FI) and redox index (RI) were derived from the EEMs. Extracellular laccase activity was examined by monitoring the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) at 420 nm. The EEMs revealed a depletion of the humic-like component (250enzyme activity was determined for soils collected from the corresponding adjacent crop land. The rate of ABTS oxidation varied for the different soils following the order Vertisol>Acrisol>Ferralsol and was always higher for the topsoils compared to the corresponding subsoils. Overall, results indicate that land management has a strong impact on soil biological activity. Importantly, such impact is

  12. Ferricyanide-based analysis of aqueous lignin suspension revealed sequestration of water-soluble lignin moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua, CJ; Simmons, BA; Singer, SW

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. This study describes the application of a ferricyanide-based assay as a simple and inexpensive assay for rapid analysis of aqueous lignin samples. The assay measures the formation of Prussian blue from the redox reaction between a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ferric chloride, and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin or lignin-derived phenolic moieties. This study revealed that soluble lignin moieties exhibited stronger ferricyanide reactivity than...

  13. Environmental economics of lignin derived transport fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Obydenkova, SV; Kouris, P Panagiotis; Hensen, EJM Emiel; Heeres, Hero J; Boot, MD Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the environmental and economic aspects of fast pyrolytic conversion of lignin, obtained from 2G ethanol plants, to transport fuels for both the marine and automotive markets. Various scenarios are explored, pertaining to aggregation of lignin from several sites, alternative energy carries to replace lignin, transport modalities, and allocation methodology. The results highlight two critical factors that ultimately determine the economic and/or environmental fuel viability....

  14. Radical nature of C- lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura Berstis; Thomas Elder; Michael Crowley; Gregg T. Beckham

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered lignin composed of caffeoyl alcohol monolignols or C-lignin is particularly intriguing given its homogeneous, linear polymeric structure and exclusive benzodioxane linkage between monomers. By virtue of this simplified chemistry, the potential emerges for improved valorization strategies with C-lignin relative to other natural heterogeneous...

  15. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  16. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mliki, A; Zimmermann, W

    1992-01-01

    An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a Km of 17.8 microM and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a Km of 2.07 mM H2O2 and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C alpha-C beta bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydr...

  17. Multifarious activities of cellulose degrading bacteria from Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surender; Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose degrading bacteria from koala faeces were isolated using caboxymethylcellulose-Congo red agar, screened in vitro for different hydrolytic enzyme activities and phylogenetically characterized using molecular tools. Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were the most prominent bacteria from koala faeces. The isolates demonstrated good xylanase, amylase, lipase, protease, tannase and lignin peroxidase activities apart from endoglucanase activity. Furthermore many isolates grew in the presence of phenanthrene, indicating their probable application for bioremediation. Potential isolates can be exploited further for industrial enzyme production or in bioremediation of contaminated sites.

  18. Biological and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars and Lignin Publications |

    Science.gov (United States)

    biorefinery lignins, ACS Sust. Chem. Eng. Lignin depolymerization with nitrate-intercalated hydrotalcite catalysts, ACS Catalysis Pyrolysis reaction networks for lignin model compounds: Unraveling thermal Free Energy, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic

  19. The effect of acid rain stress on chlorophyll, peroxidase of the conservation of rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chongling, Y.; Yetang, H.; Xianke, Y.; Shunzhen, F.; Shanql, W.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Based on pot experiment, the effect of acid rain stress on chlorophyll, peroxidase of wheat, the relationship of them and the conservation of rare earth elements has been studied. The result showed: stress of acid rain resulted in decrease of chlorophyll content and a/b values, chlorophyll a/b value and chlorophyll content is positive correlation with pH value of acid rain: peroxidase activity was gradually rise with pH value decrease, which indirectly increased decomposition intensity of chlorophyll. Decreased content and a/b value of chlorophyll further speeded blade decay affected the transport and transformation of light energy and metabolism of carbohydrates. After being treated by rare earth elements content and pH value of chlorophyll and peroxidase activity could be relatively stable. Therefore, under lower acidity condition, rare earth elements can influence the effect of acid rain on chlorophyll and peroxidase activity of wheat

  20. Studies on Lignin-Based Adhesives for Particleboard Panels

    OpenAIRE

    ÇETİN, Nihat Sami; ÖZMEN, Nilgül

    2003-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this work was to develop a phenolic resin for partially replacing phenol with modified organosolv lignin in phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin production. The lignin-formaldehyde relationship was determined in a reactivity test. Organosolv lignin-phenol-formaldehyde (LPF) resins were produced in a two-step preparation with different additions of lignin. The method selected for the manufacture of lignin resins dealt with modification of the lignin by the methylolation route. Th...

  1. Slow and fast pyrolysis of Douglas-fir lignin: Importance of liquid-intermediate formation on the distribution of products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Shuai; Pecha, Brennan; Kuppevelt, Michiel van; McDonald, Armando G.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The formation of liquid intermediates and the distribution of products were studied under slow and fast pyrolysis conditions. Results indicate that monomers are formed from lignin oligomeric products during secondary reactions, rather than directly from the native lignin. Lignin from Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) wood was extracted using the milled wood enzyme lignin isolation method. Slow pyrolysis using a microscope with hot-stage captured the liquid formation (>150 °C), shrinking, swelling (foaming), and evaporation behavior of lignin intermediates. The activation energy (E a ) for 5–80% conversions was 213 kJ mol −1 , and the pre-exponential factor (log A) was 24.34. Fast pyrolysis tests in a wire mesh reactor were conducted (300–650 °C). The formation of the liquid intermediate was visualized with a fast speed camera (250 Hz), showing the existence of three well defined steps: formation of lignin liquid intermediates, foaming and liquid intermediate swelling, and evaporation and droplet shrinking. GC/MS and UV-Fluorescence of the mesh reactor condensate revealed lignin oligomer formation but no mono-phenols were seen. An increase in pyrolytic lignin yield was observed as temperature increased. The molar mass determined by ESI-MS was not affected by pyrolysis temperature. SEM of the char showed a smooth surface with holes, evidence of a liquid intermediate with foaming; bursting from these foams could be responsible for the removal of lignin oligomers. Py-GC/MS studies showed the highest yield of guaiacol compounds at 450–550 °C. - Highlights: • The formation of a liquid intermediate phase is a critical step during lignin pyrolysis. • The lignin oligomers are thermally ejected from the liquid intermediate phase. • The mono-phenols are formed mainly from the secondary reactions of lignin oligomers

  2. Lignin as a Binder Material for Eco-Friendly Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huiran; Cornell, Ann; Alvarado, Fernando; Behm, Mårten; Leijonmarck, Simon; Li, Jiebing; Tomani, Per; Lindbergh, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The industrial lignin used here is a byproduct from Kraft pulp mills, extracted from black liquor. Since lignin is inexpensive, abundant and renewable, its utilization has attracted more and more attention. In this work, lignin was used for the first time as binder material for LiFePO4 positive and graphite negative electrodes in Li-ion batteries. A procedure for pretreatment of lignin, where low-molecular fractions were removed by leaching, was necessary to obtain good battery performance. The lignin was analyzed for molecular mass distribution and thermal behavior prior to and after the pretreatment. Electrodes containing active material, conductive particles and lignin were cast on metal foils, acting as current collectors and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles. Good reversible capacities were obtained, 148 mAh·g−1 for the positive electrode and 305 mAh·g−1 for the negative electrode. Fairly good rate capabilities were found for both the positive electrode with 117 mAh·g−1 and the negative electrode with 160 mAh·g−1 at 1C. Low ohmic resistance also indicated good binder functionality. The results show that lignin is a promising candidate as binder material for electrodes in eco-friendly Li-ion batteries. PMID:28773252

  3. Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin: Effects of process and upgrading parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liangliang; Zhang, Yaning; Liu, Shiyu; Zhou, Nan; Chen, Paul; Cheng, Yanling; Addy, Min; Lu, Qian; Omar, Muhammad Mubashar; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Anderson, Erik; Peng, Peng; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Effects of process parameters on the yield and chemical profile of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin and the processes for lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading were reviewed. Various process parameters including pyrolysis temperature, reactor types, lignin characteristics, residence time, and feeding rate were discussed and the optimal parameter conditions for improved bio-oil yield and quality were concluded. In terms of lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading, three routes including pretreatment of lignin, catalytic upgrading, and co-pyrolysis of hydrogen-rich materials have been investigated. Zeolite cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) treatment are two main methods for catalytic upgrading of lignin-derived bio-oil. Factors affecting zeolite activity and the main zeolite catalytic mechanisms for lignin conversion were analyzed. Noble metal-based catalysts and metal sulfide catalysts are normally used as the HDO catalysts and the conversion mechanisms associated with a series of reactions have been proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A) + RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L- 35 S-methionine. The 35 S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues

  5. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  6. Fabrication of Environmentally Biodegradable Lignin Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frangville, C.; Rutkevicius, M.; Richter, A.P.; Velev, O.D.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method for the fabrication of novel biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) from lignin which are apparently non-toxic for microalgae and yeast. We compare two alternative methods for the synthesis of lignin NPs which result in particles of very different stability upon change of pH. The

  7. Environmental economics of lignin derived transport fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obydenkova, Svetlana V.; Kouris, Panos D.; Hensen, Emiel J. M.; Heeres, Hero J.; Boot, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the environmental and economic aspects of fast pyrolytic conversion of lignin, obtained from 2G ethanol plants, to transport fuels for both the marine and automotive markets. Various scenarios are explored, pertaining to aggregation of lignin from several sites, alternative

  8. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the

  9. Inhibition of lignin-derived phenolic compounds to cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Liu, Li; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Xia; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lignin-derived phenolic compounds are universal in the hydrolysate of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. The phenolics reduce the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis and increase the cost of ethanol production. We investigated inhibition of phenolics on cellulase during enzymatic hydrolysis using vanillin as one of the typical lignin-derived phenolics and Avicel as cellulose substrate. As vanillin concentration increased from 0 to 10 mg/mL, cellulose conversion after 72-h enzymatic hydrolysis decreased from 53 to 26 %. Enzyme deactivation and precipitation were detected with the vanillin addition. The enzyme concentration and activity consecutively decreased during hydrolysis, but the inhibition degree, expressed as the ratio of the cellulose conversion without vanillin to the conversion with vanillin (A 0 /A), was almost independent on hydrolysis time. Inhibition can be mitigated by increasing cellulose loading or cellulase concentration. The inhibition degree showed linear relationship with the vanillin concentration and exponential relationship with the cellulose loading and the cellulase concentration. The addition of calcium chloride, BSA, and Tween 80 did not release the inhibition of vanillin significantly. pH and temperature for hydrolysis also showed no significant impact on inhibition degree. The presence of hydroxyl group, carbonyl group, and methoxy group in phenolics affected the inhibition degree. Besides phenolics concentration, other factors such as cellulose loading, enzyme concentration, and phenolic structure also affect the inhibition of cellulose conversion. Lignin-blocking agents have little effect on the inhibition effect of soluble phenolics, indicating that the inhibition mechanism of phenolics to enzyme is likely different from insoluble lignin. The inhibition of soluble phenolics can hardly be entirely removed by increasing enzyme concentration or adding blocking proteins due to the dispersity and multiple binding sites of phenolics

  10. Lignin Biodegradation with Laccase-Mediator Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christopher, Lew Paul; Yao, Bin; Ji, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Lignin has a significant and largely unrealized potential as a source for the sustainable production of fuels and bulk high-value chemicals. It can replace fossil-based oil as a renewable feedstock that would bring about socio-economic and environmental benefits in our transition to a biobased economy. The efficient utilization of lignin however requires its depolymerization to low-molecular weight phenolics and aromatics that can then serve as the building blocks for chemical syntheses of high-value products. The ability of laccase to attack and degrade lignin in conjunction with laccase mediators is currently viewed as one of the potential “breakthrough” applications for lignin valorization. Here, we review the recent progress in lignin biodegradation with laccase-mediator systems, and research needs that need to be addressed in this field.

  11. Lignin Biodegradation with Laccase-Mediator Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher, Lew Paul, E-mail: lew.christopher@sdsmt.edu [Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Yao, Bin [Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Ji, Yun [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Lignin has a significant and largely unrealized potential as a source for the sustainable production of fuels and bulk high-value chemicals. It can replace fossil-based oil as a renewable feedstock that would bring about socio-economic and environmental benefits in our transition to a biobased economy. The efficient utilization of lignin however requires its depolymerization to low-molecular weight phenolics and aromatics that can then serve as the building blocks for chemical syntheses of high-value products. The ability of laccase to attack and degrade lignin in conjunction with laccase mediators is currently viewed as one of the potential “breakthrough” applications for lignin valorization. Here, we review the recent progress in lignin biodegradation with laccase-mediator systems, and research needs that need to be addressed in this field.

  12. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, w...

  13. Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

    2014-09-01

    for the C-O bond hydrogenolysis in model compounds, which mimic the b-O-4, a-O-4, and 4-O-5 linkages of natural lignin. The versatile IRMOF-74(n) series is proposed as a platform for creating efficient hydrogenolysis catalysts as it not only displays tunable pore sizes, but also has the required thermal and chemical stability. The catalytic C-O bond cleavage occurs at 10 bar hydrogen pressure and temperatures as low as 120 degC. The conversion efficiency of the aromatic ether substrates into the corresponding hydrocarbons and phenols varies as PhCH 2 CH 2 OPh > PhCH 2 OPh > PhOPh (Ph = phenyl), while the catalytic activity generally follows the following trend Ni@IRMOF-74>Ti@IRMOF-74>IRMOF-74. Conversions as high as 80%, coupled with good selectivity for hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation, highlight the potential of MOF-based catalysts for the selective cleavage of recalcitrant aryl-ether bonds found in lignin and other biopolymers. This project supports the DOE Integrated Biorefinery Program goals, the objective of which is to convert biomass to fuels and high-value chemicals, by addressing an important technology gap: the lack of low-temperature catalysts suitable for industrial lignin degradation. Biomass, which is %7E30 wt% lignin, constitutes a potentially major source of platform chemicals that could improve overall profitability and productivity of all energy-related products, thereby benefiting consumers and reducing national dependence on imported oil. Additionally, DoD has a strong interest in low-cost drop-in fuels (Navy Biofuel Initiative) and has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with DOE and USDA to develop a sustainable biofuels industry.

  14. Anti-HCV effect of Lentinula edodes mycelia solid culture extracts and low-molecular-weight lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Koji; Yamane, Seiji; Okamoto, Toru; Watari, Akihiro; Kondoh, Masuo; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2015-06-19

    Lentinula edodes mycelia solid culture extract (MSCE) contains several bioactive molecules, including some polyphenolic compounds, which exert immunomodulatory, antitumor, and hepatoprotective effects. In this study, we examined the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity of MSCE and low-molecular-weight lignin (LM-lignin), which is the active component responsible for the hepatoprotective effect of MSCE. Both MSCE and LM-lignin inhibited the entry of two HCV pseudovirus (HCVpv) types into Huh7.5.1 cells. LM-lignin inhibited HCVpv entry at a lower concentration than MSCE and inhibited the entry of HCV particles in cell culture (HCVcc). MSCE also inhibited HCV subgenome replication. LM-lignin had no effect on HCV replication, suggesting that MSCE contains additional active substances. We demonstrate here for the first time the anti-HCV effects of plant-derived LM-lignin and MSCE. The hepatoprotective effect of LM-lignin suggests that lignin derivatives, which can be produced in abundance from existing plant resources, may be effective in the treatment of HCV-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Eosinophil peroxidase signals via epidermal growth factor-2 to induce cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Marie-Therese

    2011-11-01

    Eosinophils exert many of their inflammatory effects in allergic disorders through the degranulation and release of intracellular mediators, including a set of cationic granule proteins that include eosinophil peroxidase. Studies suggest that eosinophils are involved in remodeling. In previous studies, we showed that eosinophil granule proteins activate mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. In this study, we investigated the receptor mediating eosinophil peroxidase-induced signaling and downstream effects. Human cholinergic neuroblastoma IMR32 and murine melanoma B16.F10 cultures, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoprecipitations, and Western blotting were used in the study. We showed that eosinophil peroxidase caused a sustained increase in both the expression of epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) and its phosphorylation at tyrosine 1248, with the consequent activation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1\\/2. This, in turn, promoted a focal adhesion kinase-dependent egress of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Eosinophil peroxidase induced a HER2-dependent up-regulation of cell proliferation, indicated by an up-regulation of the nuclear proliferation marker Ki67. This study identifies HER2 as a novel mediator of eosinophil peroxidase signaling. The results show that eosinophil peroxidase, at noncytotoxic levels, can drive cell-cycle progression and proliferation, and contribute to tissue remodeling and cell turnover in airway disease. Because eosinophils are a feature of many cancers, these findings also suggest a role for eosinophils in tumorigenesis.

  16. Halide peroxidase in tissues that interact with bacteria in the host squid Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1999-03-15

    An enzyme with similarities to myeloperoxidase, the antimicrobial halide peroxidase in mammalian neutrophils, occurs abundantly in the light organ tissue of Euprymna scolopes, a squid that maintains a beneficial association with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Using three independent assays typically applied to the analysis of halide peroxidase enzymes, we directly compared the activity of the squid enzyme with that of human myeloperoxidase. One of these methods, the diethanolamine assay, confirmed that the squid peroxidase requires halide ions for its activity. The identification of a halide peroxidase in a cooperative bacterial association suggested that this type of enzyme can function not only to control pathogens, but also to modulate the interactions of host animals with their beneficial partners. To determine whether the squid peroxidase functions under both circumstances, we examined its distribution in a variety of host tissues, including those that typically interact with bacteria and those that do not. Tissues interacting with bacteria included those that have specific cooperative associations with bacteria (i.e., the light organ and accessory nidamental gland) and those that have transient nonspecific interactions with bacteria (i.e., the gills, which clear the cephalopod circulatory system of invading microorganisms). These bacteria-associated tissues were compared with the eye, digestive gland, white body, and ink-producing tissues, which do not typically interact directly with bacteria. Peroxidase enzyme assays, immunocytochemical localization, and DNA-RNA hybridizations showed that the halide-dependent peroxidase is consistently expressed in high concentration in tissues that interact bacteria. Elevated levels of the peroxidase were also found in the ink-producing tissues, which are known to have enzymatic pathways associated with antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the host uses a common biochemical response to

  17. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  18. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Sáez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103 near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  19. Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

    2004-11-10

    As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

  20. Modulation of interferon-γ synthesis by the effects of lignin-like enzymatically polymerized polyphenols on antigen-presenting cell activation and the subsequent cell-to-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Daisuke; Motoi, Masuro; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Miura, Noriko N; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Naohito

    2013-12-15

    Lignin-like polymerized polyphenols strongly activate lymphocytes and induce cytokine synthesis. We aimed to characterise the mechanisms of action of polymerized polyphenols on immunomodulating functions. We compared the reactivity of leukocytes from various organs to that of polymerized polyphenols. Splenocytes and resident peritoneal cavity cells (PCCs) responded to polymerized polyphenols and released several cytokines, whereas thymocytes and bone-marrow cells showed no response. Next, we eliminated antigen-presenting cells (APCs) from splenocytes to study their involvement in cytokine synthesis. We found that APC-negative splenocytes showed significantly reduced cytokine production induced by polymerized polyphenols. Additionally, adequate interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induction by polymerized polyphenols was mediated by the coexistence of APCs and T cells because the addition of T cells to PCCs increased IFN-γ production. Furthermore, inhibition of the T cell-APC interaction using neutralising antibodies significantly decreased cytokine production. Thus, cytokine induction by polymerized polyphenols was mediated by the interaction between APCs and T cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Changes in peroxidases associated with radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croci, C.A.; Curvetto, N.R.; Orioli, G.A.; Arguello, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of an acute dose of γ-rays (10 Gy) to post-dormant garlic cloves on inner sprout growth and changes in peroxidases and soluble proteins were evaluated up to 100 days of storage in darkness at 19±1 0 C and 42±2% relative humidity. Radiation-induced inhibition of sprout growth became evident after 25 days of treatment and was synchronous with a marked increase in peroxidase activity. Thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed that radiation induced an increase in the number of anodic peroxidase isoenzymes at 100 days, suggesting modifications in the vascularization process. Neither the soluble protein content nor the protein pattern were affected by irradiation. These results are discussed in terms of a possible mediating effect of peroxidase on radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic. (author)

  2. Changes in peroxidases associated with radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic (Allium sativum L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, C.A.; Curvetto, N.R.; Orioli, G.A. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)); Arguello, J.A. (Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Dept. de Biologia Aplicada)

    1991-02-01

    The effects of an acute dose of {gamma}-rays (10 Gy) to post-dormant garlic cloves on inner sprout growth and changes in peroxidases and soluble proteins were evaluated up to 100 days of storage in darkness at 19+-1{sup 0}C and 42+-2% relative humidity. Radiation-induced inhibition of sprout growth became evident after 25 days of treatment and was synchronous with a marked increase in peroxidase activity. Thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed that radiation induced an increase in the number of anodic peroxidase isoenzymes at 100 days, suggesting modifications in the vascularization process. Neither the soluble protein content nor the protein pattern were affected by irradiation. These results are discussed in terms of a possible mediating effect of peroxidase on radiation-induced sprout inhibition in garlic. (author).

  3. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase. © 2014 The Authors.

  4. Engineering a Monolignol 4-O-Methyltransferase with High Selectivity for the Condensed Lignin Precursor Coniferyl Alcohol*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuanheng; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Shanklin, John; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create an enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. The resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta. PMID:26378240

  5. Lignin solubilisation and gentle fractionation in liquid ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Prinsen, P.; Klis, van der F.; Es, van D.S.; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for solubilising lignin using liquid ammonia. Unlike water, which requires harsh conditions, ammonia can solubilise technical lignins, in particular kraft lignin. A commercial pine wood Kraft lignin (Indulin AT) was solubilized instantaneously at room temperature and 7–11

  6. The Use of Esterified Lignin for Synthesis of Durable Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Olsson; E. Ostmark; R.E. Ibach; C.M. Clemons; K.B. Segerholm; F. Englund

    2011-01-01

    Lignin is a natural polymer and one of the most abundant materials on earth. Despite this fact, lignin is often viewed as a by-product in chemical pulp processing and the use of lignin as a sustainable material is low. However, research and public awareness of sustainability have opened up new possibilities for using lignin as a material.

  7. Metabolic regulation at the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles of the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium against exogenous addition of vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motoyuki; Yuda, Naoki; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2005-10-01

    A proteomic differential display technique was utilized to study cellular responses of Phanerochaete chrysosporium exposed to vanillin, one of the key intermediates found during lignin biodegradation. Intracellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE and target protein spots were identified using MALDI-MS after in-gel tryptic digestions. Upon addition of vanillin to P. chrysosporium, up-regulation of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, 1,4-benzoquinone reductases, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase, which seem to play roles in vanillin metabolism, was observed. Furthermore, enzymes involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pentose-phosphate cycle, and heme biosynthesis were also activated. Up-regulation of extracellular peroxidase was also observed. One of the most unique phenomena against exogenous vanillin was a switch from the glyoxylate cycle to the tricarboxylic acid cycle, where a drastic increase in isocitrate dehydrogenase activity was observed. The exogenous addition of other aromatic compounds also caused an increase in its activity, which in turn triggered NAD(P)H production via the action of dehydrogenases in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, heme biosynthesis via the action of aminolevulinic acid synthase on succinyl-CoA, and energy production via activation of the mitochondrial electron transfer system. These metabolic shifts seem to be required for activating a metabolic system for aromatic compounds.

  8. Activity of the ligninolytic enzymes of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium and its variation with the Mn+2 addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez T, Gloria Alicia; Mejia G, Amanda I; Lopez O, Betty Lucy

    1999-01-01

    The activity of the ligninolytic enzymes, lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and Laccase, in submerged cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, with limited amounts of carbon and nitrogen, were affected by the addition of Mn+2. In cultures with o and 1,25 ppm of Mn+2, only the lip was detected and its higher activity level was observed in the cultures with 1.25 ppm of Mn+2. The cultures with 40 ppm of Mn+2 showed activities of lip, MnP and Laccase. The presence of the three enzymes in the same culture had not been reported and it is of great importance because is shows that the fungus and its lignolitic machinery can act sequentially

  9. Animal bioavailability of defined xenobiotic lignin metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandermann, H. Jr.; Arjmand, M.; Gennity, I.; Winkler, R.; Struble, C.B.; Aschbacher, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    Lignin has been recognized as a major component of bound pesticide residues in plants and is thought to be undigestible in animals. Two defined ring-U- 14 C-labeled chloroaniline/lignin metabolites have now been fed to rats, where a release of ∼66% of the bound xenobiotic occurred in the form of simple chloroaniline derivatives. The observed high degree of bioavailability indicates that bound pesticidal residues may possess ecotoxicological significance. In parallel studies, the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium was more efficient, and a soil system was much less efficient, in the degradation of the [ring-U- 14 C]chloroaniline/lignin metabolites

  10. The synthesis and analysis of lignin-bound Hibbert ketone structures in technical lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Barrett, Daniel M; Neal, Andrew R; Hand, Calum; Montgomery, James R D; Panovic, Isabella; Ojo, O Stephen; Lancefield, Christopher S; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Lebl, Tomas; Westwood, Nicholas J

    2016-10-25

    Understanding the structure of technical lignins resulting from acid-catalysed treatment of lignocellulosic biomass is important for their future applications. Here we report an investigation into the fate of lignin under acidic aqueous organosolv conditions. In particular we examine in detail the formation and reactivity of non-native Hibbert ketone structures found in isolated organosolv lignins from both Douglas fir and beech woods. Through the use of model compounds combined with HSQC, HMBC and HSQC-TOCSY NMR experiments we demonstrate that, depending on the lignin source, both S and G lignin-bound Hibbert ketone units can be present. We also show that these units can serve as a source of novel mono-aromatic compounds following an additional lignin depolymerisation reaction.

  11. Effect of Lignin-Containing Media on Growth of Medicinal Mushroom Lentinula Edodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjuškova Nataļja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of lignocellulose and lignin on growth of mycelium of mushroom Lentinula edodes and laccase activity in cultivation medium was studied. It was shown that cultivation of L. edodes mycelium in liquid nutrient medium with addition of 0.25-0.5% of kraft lignin increased mycelium biomass yield approximately two times compared with reference conditions without addition of lignin. Similar results were obtained in experiments in which 0.5% lignocellulose that remained after obtaining furfural, and 0.5% lignin that remained after obtaining furfural and glucose from wheat straw, were added to the nutrient medium. This effect was greater in the conditions of cultivation with good aeration, compared with static culture. Laccase activity in medium increased after addition of wheat straw lignocellulose or lignin only in the case of mycelium cultivation with aeration. In the case of mushroom cultivation on solid nutrient medium, addition of wheat straw lignocellulose and lignin promoted growth of mycelium only during the first 7 days of cultivation.

  12. Red Xylem and Higher Lignin Extractability by Down-Regulating a Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucher, M.; Chabbert, B.; Pilate, G.; Van Doorsselaere, J.; Tollier, M. T.; Petit-Conil, M.; Cornu, D.; Monties, B.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.; Jouanin, L.; Boerjan, W.

    1996-12-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of the lignin precursors, the monolignols. We have down-regulated CAD in transgenic poplar (Populus tremula X Populus alba) by both antisense and co-suppression strategies. Several antisense and sense CAD transgenic poplars had an approximately 70% reduced CAD activity that was associated with a red coloration of the xylem tissue. Neither the lignin amount nor the lignin monomeric composition (syringyl/guaiacyl) were significantly modified. However, phloroglucinol-HCl staining was different in the down-regulated CAD plants, suggesting changes in the number of aldehyde units in the lignin. Furthermore, the reactivity of the cell wall toward alkali treatment was altered: a lower amount of lignin was found in the insoluble, saponified residue and more lignin could be precipitated from the soluble alkali fraction. Moreover, large amounts of phenolic compounds, vanillin and especially syringaldehyde, were detected in the soluble alkali fraction of the CAD down-regulated poplars. Alkaline pulping experiments on 3-month-old trees showed a reduction of the kappa number without affecting the degree of cellulose degradation. These results indicate that reducing the CAD activity in trees might be a valuable strategy to optimize certain processes of the wood industry, especially those of the pulp and paper industry.

  13. Knocking on wood: base metal complexes as catalysts for selective oxidation of lignin models and extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Susan K; Baker, R Tom

    2015-07-21

    This work began as part of a biomass conversion catalysis project with UC Santa Barbara funded by the first NSF Chemical Bonding Center, CATSB. Recognizing that catalytic aerobic oxidation of diol C-C bonds could potentially be used to break down lignocellulose, we began to synthesize oxovanadium complexes and explore their fundamental reactivity. Of course there were theories regarding the oxidation mechanism, but our mechanistic studies soon revealed a number of surprises of the type that keep all chemists coming back to the bench! We realized that these reactions were also exciting in that they actually used the oxygen-on-every-carbon property of biomass-derived molecules to control the selectivity of the oxidation. When we found that these oxovanadium complexes tended to convert sugars predominantly to formic acid and carbon dioxide, we replaced one of the OH groups with an ether and entered the dark world of lignin chemistry. In this Account, we summarize results from our collaboration and from our individual labs. In particular, we show that oxidation selectivity (C-C vs C-O bond cleavage) of lignin models using air and vanadium complexes depends on the ancillary ligands, the reaction solvent, and the substrate structure (i.e., phenolic vs non-phenolic). Selected vanadium complexes in the presence of added base serve as effective alcohol oxidation catalysts via a novel base-assisted dehydrogenation pathway. In contrast, copper catalysts effect direct C-C bond cleavage of these lignin models, presumably through a radical pathway. The most active vanadium catalyst exhibits unique activity for the depolymerization of organosolv lignin. After Weckhuysen's excellent 2010 review on lignin valorization, the number of catalysis studies and approaches on both lignin models and extracts has expanded rapidly. Today we are seeing new start-ups and lignin production facilities sprouting up across the globe as we all work to prove wrong the old pulp and paper chemist

  14. Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in different sugarcane cultivars, in Presidente Prudente region; Polifenoloxidases e peroxidase em diferentes variedades de cana-de-acucar na regiao de Presidente Prudente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Tadeu A.; Gomes, Danilo B.; Marques, Patricia A.A.; Alves, Vagner C. [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Curso de Agronomia], Emails: tmarques@unoeste.br, pmarques@unoeste.br, vagner@unoeste.br

    2009-07-01

    The objective in present work was compare three sugarcane cultivars (RB 72-454, RB 86-7515, IAC 86-2480), evaluating the content of polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase. These determinations had aimed at to detect possible differences between varieties thus and being to differentiate them with regard to the products most interesting to be elaborated, ethanol production or sugar production. The varieties had presented differences of behavior for studied enzymes. The activity of polyphenoloxidase was superior the activity of peroxidase. The enzyme peroxidase was presented in bigger indices in the dry and cold periods. The enzyme polyphenoloxidase was presented well changeable, but with strong trend of bigger values in the rainy periods. It can be said that distinct periods for the best use of the varieties in the sugar production or alcohol exist. (author)

  15. Characterization of the effects of lignin and lignin complex particles as filler on a polystyrene film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zawawy, Waleed K., E-mail: wkzawawy@yahoo.com [Cellulose and Paper Department, National Research Center, El-Tahrir St., Giza (Egypt); Ibrahim, Maha M. [Cellulose and Paper Department, National Research Center, El-Tahrir St., Giza (Egypt); Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Dufresne, Alain [Grenoble Institute of Technology (INP) - The International School of Paper, Print Media and Biomaterials (PAGORA), BP 65, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres cedex, Grenoble (France)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have studied the use of Co(II) to form a complex with the lignin. We use first vanillin as the lignin model and we observed a change in color for the produced complex depending on the light wavelength. The use of other transition metals does not give the same observation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of the transition metal with the lignin precipitated from the black liquor after pulping of agricultural residues, gave a fluorescent color under fluorescent microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We applied the resulted lignin complex to prepare polymer film that can be used as special polymer packaging which can be color changed under different wavelengths. - Abstract: The work in this research outlines the use of lignin precipitated from lignocellulosic substrate as fillers after modified with transition metal cations, Fe(III), Ni(II) and Co(II), in the production of a polystyrene based composite for polymer packaging applications. Virgin polystyrene was compared with lignin and lignin complex filled composites with loading of 5% by weight prepared using twin screw extrusion. The lignin complexes were first characterized by the UV spectra to identify the new absorption bands occurred due to the complex formation. Moreover, lignin model, namely vanillin, was used to notify the geometric structure of the resulting complexes applying the GC mass spectra. Scanning electron microscopy was used to indicate the change in the morphological structure of the filler particles. On the other hand, the mechanical and thermal analysis for the resulting polymer composites was studied and it was noticed that the type of lignin or lignin complex plays a roll in the results. The inclusion of the Co(II)-lignin complex was observed to increase the tensile strength of the resulting polymer composite and a decrease of the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, light wave lengths and UV fluorescent microscope were used to identify

  16. Characterization of the effects of lignin and lignin complex particles as filler on a polystyrene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawawy, Waleed K.; Ibrahim, Maha M.; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Dufresne, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have studied the use of Co(II) to form a complex with the lignin. We use first vanillin as the lignin model and we observed a change in color for the produced complex depending on the light wavelength. The use of other transition metals does not give the same observation. ► The use of the transition metal with the lignin precipitated from the black liquor after pulping of agricultural residues, gave a fluorescent color under fluorescent microscope. ► We applied the resulted lignin complex to prepare polymer film that can be used as special polymer packaging which can be color changed under different wavelengths. - Abstract: The work in this research outlines the use of lignin precipitated from lignocellulosic substrate as fillers after modified with transition metal cations, Fe(III), Ni(II) and Co(II), in the production of a polystyrene based composite for polymer packaging applications. Virgin polystyrene was compared with lignin and lignin complex filled composites with loading of 5% by weight prepared using twin screw extrusion. The lignin complexes were first characterized by the UV spectra to identify the new absorption bands occurred due to the complex formation. Moreover, lignin model, namely vanillin, was used to notify the geometric structure of the resulting complexes applying the GC mass spectra. Scanning electron microscopy was used to indicate the change in the morphological structure of the filler particles. On the other hand, the mechanical and thermal analysis for the resulting polymer composites was studied and it was noticed that the type of lignin or lignin complex plays a roll in the results. The inclusion of the Co(II)–lignin complex was observed to increase the tensile strength of the resulting polymer composite and a decrease of the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, light wave lengths and UV fluorescent microscope were used to identify the change of color for the resulting polymer film.

  17. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases : Chapter 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christien Lokman; S. de Weert

    2010-01-01

    This monograph describes many applications of peroxidase-based biocatalysis in the biotechnology industry. The need for such a book emerges from the considerable amount of new data regarding the phylogeny, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamic characterization and structural features of fungal and

  18. Occurrence and properties of Petunia peroxidase a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, T.

    1989-01-01

    Peroxidases are probably the most extensively studied enzymes in higher plants. Various isoenzymes occur as soluble proteins in the apoplast and in the vacuole, or are bound to membranes and cell walls. Their occurrence is often organ-specific and developmentally controlled, and there is

  19. Thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a key enzyme in the formation of thyroid hormones and a major autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Titers of TPO antibodies also correlate with the degree of lymphocytic infiltration in euthyroid subjects, and they are frequently present in euthyroid subjects

  20. Extracellular enzyme activities during lignocellulose degradation by Streptomyces spp.: a comparative study of wild-type and genetically manipulated strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandra, M.; Crawford, D.L.; Pometto, A.L. III

    1987-01-01

    The wild-type ligninolytic actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A and two genetically manipulated strains with enhanced abilities to produce a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate, an acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL), were grown on lignocellulose in solid-state fermentation cultures. Culture filtrates were periodically collected, analyzed for APPL, and assayed for extracellular lignocellulose-catabolizing enzyme activities. Two APPL-overproducing strains, UV irradiation mutant T7A-81 and protoplast fusion recombinant SR-10, had higher and longer persisting peroxidase, esterase, and endoglucanase activities than did the wild-type strain T7A. Results implicated one or more of these enzymes in lignin solubilization. Only mutant T7A-81 had higher xylanase activity than the wild type. The peroxidase was induced by both lignocellulose and APPL. This extracellular enzyme has some similarities to previously described ligninases in fungi. This is the first report of such an enzyme in Streptomyces spp. Four peroxidase isozymes were present, and all catalyzed the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, while one also catalyzed hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of homoprotocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. Three constitutive esterase isozymes were produced which differed in substrate specificity toward α-naphthyl acetate and α-naphthyl butyrate. Three endoglucanase bands, which also exhibited a low level of xylanase activity, were identified on polyacrylamide gels as was one xylanase-specific band. There were no major differences in the isoenzymes produced by the different strains. The probable role of each enzyme in lignocellulose degradation is discussed

  1. Lignine als grondstof voor asfalt en dakbedekking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, D. van

    2014-01-01

    Zet een chemicus en een wegenbouwer bij elkoor en je kunt het onverwachte verwachten. Somen brouwden dr. Ted Sloghek en ing. Dave van Vliet van TNO een type bitumen met verbeterde eigenschoppen. Het basismateriaal: lignine

  2. Lignin biomass conversion into chemicals and fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melián Rodríguez, Mayra

    Second-generation biomass or lignocellulosic biomass, which is mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, is a very important and promising feedstock for the renewable production of fuels and chemicals of the future. Lignin is the second most abundant natural polymer, representing 30...... and show similar, although simplified, characteristics to the natural biopolymer. Among them, the most abundant structural unit is the β-O-4, representing approximately 60% of the bonds in hardwood and 45-50% of those in softwood. Oxidative depolymerization is one of the most viable methods for lignin...... valorization. It involves the cleavage of ether bonds, such as β-O-4 and other linkages present in lignin and its model compounds, giving aldehydes or carboxylic acids as products, depending on the reaction conditions used. In Chapter 2 of this thesis, the preparation, characterization and catalytic...

  3. Composition comprising lignin and antidi arrheal component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising lignin and at least one compound selected from the group consisting of bromelain, papain, tannin, carvacrol, thymol, alliin, allicin, fenugreek seed, egg, poppy, poppy seeds, humic acid, roots, kaolin, catechu, cellulase, flavonoid...

  4. Selective Oxidation of Lignin Model Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruili; Li, Yanding; Kim, Hoon; Mobley, Justin K; Ralph, John

    2018-05-02

    Lignin, the planet's most abundant renewable source of aromatic compounds, is difficult to degrade efficiently to welldefined aromatics. We developed a microwave-assisted catalytic Swern oxidation system using an easily prepared catalyst, MoO 2 Cl 2 (DMSO) 2 , and DMSO as the solvent and oxidant. It demonstrated high efficiency in transforming lignin model compounds containing the units and functional groups found in native lignins. The aromatic ring substituents strongly influenced the selectivity of β-ether phenolic dimer cleavage to generate sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde, monomers not usually produced by oxidative methods. Time-course studies on two key intermediates provided insight into the reaction pathway. Owing to the broad scope of this oxidation system and the insight gleaned with regard to its mechanism, this strategy could be adapted and applied in a general sense to the production of useful aromatic chemicals from phenolics and lignin. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Isolation and Physicochemical Characterization of Lignin from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muzakir

    and properties, lignin offers a perspective for higher value-added ... priority for the development and implementation of the lignocellulosic ... of about 2.5 m and adaptable to most soils. It had ..... in young versus adult Eucalyptus globulus plants.

  6. Characteristics of estrogen-induced peroxidase in mouse uterine luminal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellinck, P.H.; Newbold, R.R.; McLachlan, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Peroxidase activity in the uterine luminal fluid of mice treated with diethylstilbestrol was measured by the guaiacol assay and also by the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol. In the radiometric assay, the generation of 3H2O and 3H-labeled water-soluble products was dependent on H2O2 (25 to 100 microM), with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Tyrosine or 2,4-dichlorophenol strongly enhanced the reaction catalyzed either by the luminal fluid peroxidase or the enzyme in the CaCl2 extract of the uterus, but decreased the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol by lactoperoxidase in the presence of H2O2 (80 microM). NADPH, ascorbate, and cytochrome c inhibited both luminal fluid and uterine tissue peroxidase activity to the same extent, while superoxide dismutase showed a marginal activating effect. Lactoferrin, a major protein component of uterine luminal fluid, was shown not to contribute to its peroxidative activity, and such an effect by prostaglandin synthase was also ruled out. However, it was not possible to exclude eosinophil peroxidase, brought to the uterus after estrogen stimulation, as being the source of peroxidase activity in uterine luminal fluid

  7. Sugarcane expressed sequences tags (ESTs encoding enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Rose Lucia Braz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignins are phenolic polymers found in the secondary wall of plant conductive systems where they play an important role by reducing the permeability of the cell wall to water. Lignins are also responsible for the rigidity of the cell wall and are involved in mechanisms of resistance to pathogens. The metabolic routes and enzymes involved in synthesis of lignins have been largely characterized and representative genes that encode enzymes involved in these processes have been cloned from several plant species. The synthesis of lignins is liked to the general metabolism of the phenylpropanoids in plants, having enzymes (e.g. phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT common to other processes as well as specific enzymes such as cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD. Some maize and sorghum mutants, shown to have defective in CAD and/or COMT activity, are easier to digest because they have a reduced lignin content, something which has motivated different research groups to alter the lignin content and composition of model plants by genetic engineering try to improve, for example, the efficiency of paper pulping and digestibility. In the work reported in this paper, we have made an inventory of the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (EST coding for enzymes involved in lignin metabolism which are present in the sugarcane EST genome project (SUCEST database. Our analysis focused on the key enzymes ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT, caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT, hydroxycinnamate CoA ligase (4CL, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD. The comparative analysis of these genes with those described in other species could be used as molecular markers for breeding as well as for the manipulation of lignin metabolism in sugarcane.

  8. Catalytic Depolymerization of Lignin and Woody Biomass in Supercritical Ethanol: Influence of Reaction Temperature and Feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Atay, Ceylanpinar; Zhu, Jiadong; Palstra, Sanne W L; Korányi, Tamás I; Boot, Michael D; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2017-11-06

    The one-step ethanolysis approach to upgrade lignin to monomeric aromatics using a CuMgAl mixed oxide catalyst is studied in detail. The influence of reaction temperature (200-420 °C) on the product distribution is investigated. At low temperature (200-250 °C), recondensation is dominant, while char-forming reactions become significant at high reaction temperature (>380 °C). At preferred intermediate temperatures (300-340 °C), char-forming reactions are effectively suppressed by alkylation and Guerbet and esterification reactions. This shifts the reaction toward depolymerization, explaining high monomeric aromatics yield. Carbon-14 dating analysis of the lignin residue revealed that a substantial amount of the carbon in the lignin residue originates from reactions of lignin with ethanol. Recycling tests show that the activity of the regenerated catalyst was strongly decreased due to a loss of basic sites due to hydrolysis of the MgO function and a loss of surface area due to spinel oxide formation of the Cu and Al components. The utility of this one-step approach for upgrading woody biomass was also demonstrated. An important observation is that conversion of the native lignin contained in the lignocellulosic matrix is much easier than the conversion of technical lignin.

  9. Aromatic chemicals by iron-catalyzed hydrotreatment of lignin pyrolysis vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcese, Roberto Nicolas; Lardier, George; Bettahar, Mohammed; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Fontana, Sébastien; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Petitjean, Dominique; Dufour, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Lignin is a potential renewable material for the production of bio-sourced aromatic chemicals. We present the first hydrotreatment of lignin pyrolysis vapors, before any condensation, using inexpensive and sustainable iron-silica (Fe/SiO2 ) and iron-activated carbon (Fe/AC) catalysts. Lignin pyrolysis was conducted in a tubular reactor and vapors were injected in a fixed bed of catalysts (673 K, 1 bar) with stacks to investigate the profile of coke deposit. More than 170 GC-analyzable compounds were identified by GCxGC (heart cutting)/flame ionization detector mass spectrometry. Lignin oligomers were analyzed by very high resolution mass spectrometry, called the "petroleomic" method. They are trapped by the catalytic fixed bed and, in particular, by the AC. The catalysts showed a good selectivity for the hydrodeoxygenation of real lignin vapors to benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, cresols, and alkyl phenols. The spent catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and N2 sorption. Micropores in the Fe/AC catalyst are completely plugged by coke deposits, whereas the mesoporous structure of Fe/SiO2 is unaffected. TEM images reveal two different types of coke deposit: 1) catalytic coke deposited in the vicinity of iron particles and 2) thermal coke (carbonaceous particles ≈1 μm in diameter) formed from the gas-phase growth of lignin oligomers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Peroxidase isozyme profiles in some sweet cherry rootstocks and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PERS

    2012-01-10

    , 2005). Santamour (1980) defined role of peroxidase in graft compatibility as; 1) lignification is essential for a strong and permanent graft union; 2) peroxidase isoenzymes mediate the polymeri- zation of cinnamic alcohols to ...

  11. Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Davison, Brian H; Standaert, Robert F; Davis, Mark F; Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-01-09

    Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic, and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S), and p-hydroxyphenyl (H) subunits. It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular weight lignin polymers and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di-, and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p-electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages (β-β or β-5) react poorly and tend to "cap" the polymer. In general, β-5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

  12. Comparative study of peroxidase purification from apple and orange ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the isolation and purification of peroxidase from low cost material; moreover, no significant work has been done on the isolation and purification of peroxidase from such cost effective sources (apple and orange seeds). Peroxidases had attracted considerable interest in recent years because of their ...

  13. Identification of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase from Sphingobacterium sp. T2 as a Novel Bacterial Enzyme for Lignin Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Goran M M; Taylor, Charles R; Liu, Yangqingxue; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Rea, Dean; Fülöp, Vilmos; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-10-16

    The valorization of aromatic heteropolymer lignin is an important unsolved problem in the development of a biomass-based biorefinery, for which novel high-activity biocatalysts are needed. Sequencing of the genomic DNA of lignin-degrading bacterial strain Sphingobacterium sp. T2 revealed no matches to known lignin-degrading genes. Proteomic matches for two manganese superoxide dismutase proteins were found in partially purified extracellular fractions. Recombinant MnSOD1 and MnSOD2 were both found to show high activity for oxidation of Organosolv and Kraft lignin, and lignin model compounds, generating multiple oxidation products. Structure determination revealed that the products result from aryl-Cα and Cα-Cβ bond oxidative cleavage and O-demethylation. The crystal structure of MnSOD1 was determined to 1.35 Å resolution, revealing a typical MnSOD homodimer harboring a five-coordinate trigonal bipyramidal Mn(II) center ligated by three His, one Asp, and a water/hydroxide in each active site. We propose that the lignin oxidation reactivity of these enzymes is due to the production of a hydroxyl radical, a highly reactive oxidant. This is the first demonstration that MnSOD is a microbial lignin-oxidizing enzyme.

  14. Chapter 1: A Brief Introduction to Lignin Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katahira, Rui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beckham, Gregg T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elder, Thomas J. [USDA-Forest Service

    2018-04-03

    Lignin is an alkyl-aromatic polymer found in the cell walls of terrestrial plants. Lignin provides structure and rigidity to plants, is a natural, highly effective barrier against microbial attack, and enables water and nutrient transport through plant tissues. Depending on the plant species, the constituents of lignin can vary considerably, leading to substantial diversity in lignin chemistry and structure. Despite nearly a century of research and development attempting to convert lignin into valuable products, lignin in most current and planned biorefinery contexts remains underutilized, most often being burned to generate heat and power. However, the drive towards effective lignin valorization processes has witnessed a significant resurgence in the past decade, catalyzed by advances in improved understanding of lignin chemistry, structure, and plasticity in parallel with new catalytic and biological approaches to valorize this important, prevalent biopolymer. As a preface to the subsequent chapters in this book, this chapter briefly highlights the known aspects of lignin structure.

  15. Systematic Parameterization of Lignin for the CHARMM Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Joshua; Petridis, Loukas; Beckham, Gregg; Crowley, Michael

    2017-07-06

    Plant cell walls have three primary components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, the latter of which is a recalcitrant, aromatic heteropolymer that provides structure to plants, water and nutrient transport through plant tissues, and a highly effective defense against pathogens. Overcoming the recalcitrance of lignin is key to effective biomass deconstruction, which would in turn enable the use of biomass as a feedstock for industrial processes. Our understanding of lignin structure in the plant cell wall is hampered by the limitations of the available lignin forcefields, which currently only account for a single linkage between lignins and lack explicit parameterization for emerging lignin structures both from natural variants and engineered lignin structures. Since polymerization of lignin occurs via radical intermediates, multiple C-O and C-C linkages have been isolated , and the current force field only represents a small subset of lignin the diverse lignin structures found in plants. In order to take into account the wide range of lignin polymerization chemistries, monomers and dimer combinations of C-, H-, G-, and S-lignins as well as with hydroxycinnamic acid linkages were subjected to extensive quantum mechanical calculations to establish target data from which to build a complete molecular mechanics force field tuned specifically for diverse lignins. This was carried out in a GPU-accelerated global optimization process, whereby all molecules were parameterized simultaneously using the same internal parameter set. By parameterizing lignin specifically, we are able to more accurately represent the interactions and conformations of lignin monomers and dimers relative to a general force field. This new force field will enables computational researchers to study the effects of different linkages on the structure of lignin, as well as construct more accurate plant cell wall models based on observed statistical distributions of lignin that differ between

  16. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Reyes, José O; Robles-Olvera, Victor; Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Castro Matinez, Claudia; Waliszewski, Krzysztof N; Aguilar-Uscanga, María Guadalupe

    2014-07-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass) fruit ranks tenth in terms of the most important products for Mexico. Avocado products are quite unstable due to the presence of oxidative enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The present study is to characterize the activity of purified avocado peroxidase from avocado in order to ascertain the biochemical and kinetic properties and their inhibition conditions. Purification was performed by Sephacryl S 200 HR gel filtration chromatography and its estimated molecular weight was 40 kDa. The zymogram showed an isoelectric point of 4.7. Six substrates were tested in order to ascertain the affinity of the enzyme for these substrates. The purified peroxidase was found to have low Km (0.296 mM) and high catalytic efficiency (2688 mM(-1) s(-1)) using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), optimum activity being reached at 51°C, pH 3.8. The addition of dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, ascorbic acid, sodium azide, L-cysteine and Tween-20 had high inhibitory effects, while metals ions such as Cu(+), Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) had weak inhibitory activity on purified avocado peroxidase. The purified avocado peroxidase exhibits high inhibition (Ki = 0.37 µM) with 1.97 µM n-propyl gallate using ABTS as substrate at 51°C, pH 3.8 for 10 min. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Musa paradisiaca stem juice as a source of peroxidase and ligninperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernwal, S K; Yadav, R S; Yadav, K D

    2000-10-01

    Musa paradisiaca stem juice has been shown to contain peroxidase activity of the order of 0.1 enzyme unit/ml. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide are 2.4 and 0.28 mM respectively. The pH and temperature optima are 4.5 and 62.5 degrees C respectively. Like other peroxidases, it follows double displacement type mechanism. At low pH, Musa paradisiaca stem juice exhibits ligninperoxidase type activity. The pH optimum for ligninperoxidase type activity is 2.0 and the temperature optimum is 24 degrees C. The Km values for veratryl alcohol and n-propanol are 66 and 78 microM respectively.

  18. Erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase: Its relationship to plasma selenium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, G.; Cellerino, R.; Guidi, G.C.; Moschini, G.; Stievano, B.M.; Tregnaghi, C.

    1977-01-01

    Erythrocytic glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and plasma selenium concentrations were measured in 14 patients: 7 with iron deficiency and 7 with raised serum iron levels. The decreased enzymatic activity in iron deficiency was confirmed. Plasma selenium was significantly lower in patients with lower serum iron; furthermore there is a significant correlation between serum iron and plasma selenium concentrations. Another correlation even more significant was found between plasma selenium and enzyme activity in all the cases we studied. These data suggests that the importance of iron for GSH-Px activity may be merely due to its relationship with selenium and that plasma selenium concentration may be of critical importance for enzyme activity. (author)

  19. NMR characterization of altered lignins extracted from tobacco plants down-regulated for lignification enzymes cinnamylalcohol dehydrogenase and cinnamoyl-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, J; Hatfield, R D; Piquemal, J; Yahiaoui, N; Pean, M; Lapierre, C; Boudet, A M

    1998-10-27

    Homologous antisense constructs were used to down-regulate tobacco cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) and cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR; EC 1.2.1.44) activities in the lignin monomer biosynthetic pathway. CCR converts activated cinnamic acids (hydroxycinnamoyl-SCoAs) to cinnamaldehydes; cinnamaldehydes are then reduced to cinnamyl alcohols by CAD. The transformations caused the incorporation of nontraditional components into the extractable tobacco lignins, as evidenced by NMR. Isolated lignin of antisense-CAD tobacco contained fewer coniferyl and sinapyl alcohol-derived units that were compensated for by elevated levels of benzaldehydes and cinnamaldehydes. Products from radical coupling of cinnamaldehydes, particularly sinapaldehyde, which were barely discernible in normal tobacco, were major components of the antisense-CAD tobacco lignin. Lignin content was reduced in antisense-CCR tobacco, which displayed a markedly reduced vigor. That lignin contained fewer coniferyl alcohol-derived units and significant levels of tyramine ferulate. Tyramine ferulate is a sink for the anticipated build-up of feruloyl-SCoA, and may be up-regulated in response to a deficit of coniferyl alcohol. Although it is not yet clear whether the modified lignins are true structural components of the cell wall, the findings provide further indications of the metabolic plasticity of plant lignification. An ability to produce lignin from alternative monomers would open new avenues for manipulation of lignin by genetic biotechnologies.

  20. Horseradish peroxidase-modified porous silicon for phenol monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermad, A., E-mail: amina_energetique@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Sam, S., E-mail: Sabrina.sam@polytechnique.edu [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (CRTSE), 02 Bd. Frantz-Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 merveilles, Algiers (Algeria); Ghellai, N., E-mail: na_ghellai@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Khaldi, K., E-mail: Khadidjaphy@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Gabouze, N., E-mail: ngabouze@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (CRTSE), 02 Bd. Frantz-Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 merveilles, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: • Horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface. • Multistep strategy was used allowing the maintaining of the enzymatic activity of the immobilized enzyme. • Direct electron transfer has occurred between the immobilized enzyme and the surface. • Electrochemical measurements showed a response of HRP-modified PSi toward phenol in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. -- Abstract: In this study, horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface using multistep strategy. First, acid terminations were generated on hydrogenated PSi surface by thermal hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid. Then, the carboxyl-terminated monolayer was transformed to active ester (succinimidyl ester) using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the presence of the coupling agent N-ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Subsequently, the enzyme was anchored on the surface via an amidation reaction. The structure of the PSi layers was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and contact angle measurements confirmed the efficiency of the modification at each step of the functionalization. Cyclic voltammetry was recorded using the HRP-modified PSi as working electrode. The results show that the enzymatic activity of the immobilized HRP is preserved and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme oxidizes phenolic molecules which were subsequently reduced at the modified-PSi electrode.

  1. Horseradish peroxidase-modified porous silicon for phenol monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermad, A.; Sam, S.; Ghellai, N.; Khaldi, K.; Gabouze, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface. • Multistep strategy was used allowing the maintaining of the enzymatic activity of the immobilized enzyme. • Direct electron transfer has occurred between the immobilized enzyme and the surface. • Electrochemical measurements showed a response of HRP-modified PSi toward phenol in the presence of H 2 O 2 . -- Abstract: In this study, horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface using multistep strategy. First, acid terminations were generated on hydrogenated PSi surface by thermal hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid. Then, the carboxyl-terminated monolayer was transformed to active ester (succinimidyl ester) using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the presence of the coupling agent N-ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Subsequently, the enzyme was anchored on the surface via an amidation reaction. The structure of the PSi layers was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and contact angle measurements confirmed the efficiency of the modification at each step of the functionalization. Cyclic voltammetry was recorded using the HRP-modified PSi as working electrode. The results show that the enzymatic activity of the immobilized HRP is preserved and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme oxidizes phenolic molecules which were subsequently reduced at the modified-PSi electrode

  2. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri [School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada); Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-22

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 – 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  3. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri

    2015-01-01

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 – 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems

  4. Use of Agave tequilana-lignin and zinc oxide nanoparticles for skin photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Escalante, Alfredo; Murillo-Vázquez, Raquel Nalleli; Delgado, Ezequiel; González, Francisco Javier; Toríz, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The use of sunscreens is essential for preventing skin damage and the potential appearance of skin cancer in humans. Inorganic active components such as zinc oxide (ZnO) have been used commonly in sunscreens due to their ability to block UVA radiation. This ultraviolet (UV) protection might be enhanced to cover the UVB and UVC bands when combined with other components such as titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work we evaluate the photoprotection properties of organic nanoparticles made from lignin in combination with ZnO nanoparticles as active ingredients for sunscreens. Lignin nanoparticles were synthesized from Agave tequilana lignin. Two different pulping methods were used for dissolving lignin from agave bagasse. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by the precipitation method. All nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were mixed with a neutral vehicle in different concentrations and in-vitro sun protection factor (SPF) values were calculated. Different sizes of spherical lignin nanoparticles were obtained from the spent liquors of two different pulping methods. ZnO nanoparticles resulted with a flake shape. The mixture of all components gave SPF values in a range between 4 and 13. Lignin nanoparticles showed absorption in the UVB and UVC regions which can enhance the SPF value of sunscreens composed only of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Lignin nanoparticles have the added advantage of being of organic nature and its brown color can be used to match the skin tone of the person using it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. EFFECT OF LIGNIN CONTENT OF Eucalyptus globulus WOOD IN KRAFT PULPING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Valim Cardoso

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, it was analyzed the lignin content effect of Eucalyptus globulus wood in kraft pulping optimization. Seventy-two laboratory cooking were made with wood chips obtained from six Eucalyptus globulus trees selected from a group of 50 trees. The wood chips from three trees with the lowest lignin content, with average 20,53%, were mixed proportionally based on the tree weights, obtaining the sample of low lignin content wood. The same was made to obtain the sample for wood chips with the highest lignin content, with average 23,02%. The two lignin levels were statistically different. The two wood samples had basic densities statistically not different. Using three maximum temperatures levels (160, 165 and 170ºC, and three active alkali charged (17, 18,5 and 20%, the wood chips were converted to kraft pulps. The pulps were then characterized to analyze the influence of the distinct treatments employed in the cooking on their properties. The effect of the cooking conditions was expressed by mathematical models in order to determine the optimum points for each of the evaluated properties. The optimization process indicated maximum temperature of 168ºC, and active alkali of 19%, for maximum kraft pulping yield to achieve kappa number 18; this result was for woods with low lignin content. For woods containing the high lignin content, the optimization showed maximum cooking temperature of 169ºC and active alkali of 19% for kappa number of 18. The average reduction of 2,49% in wood lignin content resulted a correspondent gain of 2,2% in the kraft yield (o.d. basis and a reduction on the active alkali charge of 1,2% (o.d. basis to achieve kappa numbers from 16 to 19, preserving pulp properties. If the option is to work with kappa number 19 instead of 16, the gain in kraft yield is approximately 2%. Therefore, when working with low lignin content wood and kappa number 19 instead of 16, a substantial gain of approximately 4,2% is obtained

  6. Induction of 33-kD and 60-kD peroxidases during ethylene-induced senescence of cucumber cotyledons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeles, F.B.; Dunn, L.J.; Morgens, P.; Callahan, A.; Dinterman, R.E.; Schmidt, J.

    1988-01-01

    Ethylene enhanced the senescence of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv Poinsett 76) cotyledons. The effect of 10 microliters per liter ethylene was inhibited by 1 millimolar silver thiosulfate, an inhibitor of ethylene action. An increase in proteins with molecular weights of 33 to 30 kilodaltons and lower molecular weights (25, 23, 20, 16, 12 and 10 kilodaltons) were observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels after ethylene enhanced senescence. The measurement of DNase and RNase activity in gels indicated that these new proteins were not nucleases. Two proteins from ethylene-treated cotyledons were purified on the basis of their association with a red chromaphore and subsequently were identified as peroxidases. The molecular weights and isoelectric points (pI) of two of these peroxidases were 33 kilodaltons (cationic, pI = 8.9) and 60 kilodaltons (anionic, pI = 4.0). The observation that [ 35 S]Na 2 SO 4 was incorporated into these proteins during ethylene-enhanced senescence suggests that these peroxidases represent newly synthesized proteins. Antibodies to the 33-kilodalton peroxidase precipitated two in vitro translation products from RNA isolated from ethylene-treated but not from control cucumber seedlings. This indicates that the increase in 33-kilodalton peroxidase activity represents de novo protein synthesis. Both forms of peroxidase degraded chlorophyll in vitro, which is consistent with the hypothesis that peroxidases have catabolic or scavenging functions in senescent tissues

  7. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking all eight thiol peroxidases were viable and withstood redox stresses. They transcriptionally responded to various redox treatments, but were unable to activate and repress gene expression in response to H2O2. Further studies involving redox transcription factors suggested that thiol peroxidases are major regulators of global gene expression in response to H2O2. The data suggest that thiol peroxidases sense and transfer oxidative signals to the signaling proteins and regulate transcription, whereas a direct interaction between H2O2 and other cellular proteins plays a secondary role. PMID:21282621

  8. A peroxidase related to the mammalian antimicrobial protein myeloperoxidase in the Euprymna-Vibrio mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, V M; Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1996-11-26

    Many animal-bacteria cooperative associations occur in highly modified host organs that create a unique environment for housing and maintaining the symbionts. It has been assumed that these specialized organs develop through a program of symbiosis-specific or -enhanced gene expression in one or both partners, but a clear example of this process has been lacking. In this study, we provide evidence for the enhanced production of an enzyme in the symbiotic organ of the squid Euprymna scolopes, which harbors a culture of the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Our data show that this enzyme has a striking biochemical similarity to mammalian myeloperoxidase (MPO; EC 1.11.17), an antimicrobial dianisidine peroxidase that occurs in neutrophils. MPO and the squid peroxidase catalyze the same reaction, have similar apparent subunit molecular masses, and a polyclonal antibody to native human MPO specifically localized a peroxidase-like protein to the bacteria-containing regions of the symbiotic organ. We also provide evidence that a previously described squid cDNA encodes the protein (LO4) that is responsible for the observed dianisidine peroxidase activity. An antibody made against a fragment of LO4 immunoprecipiated dianisidine peroxidase activity from extracts of the symbiotic organ, and reacted against these extracts and human MPO in Western blot analysis. These data suggest that related biochemical mechanisms for the control of bacterial number and growth operate in associations that are as functionally diverse as pathogenesis and mutualism, and as phylogenetically distant as molluscs and mammals.

  9. Effects of lignin-derived phenolic compounds on xylitol production and key enzyme activities by a xylose utilizing yeast Candida athensensis SB18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinming; Geng, Anli; Yao, Chuanyi; Lu, Yinghua; Li, Qingbiao

    2012-10-01

    Candida athensensis SB18 is potential xylitol producing yeast isolated in Singapore. It has excellent xylose tolerance and is able to produce xylitol in high titer and yield. However, by-products, such as phenolic compounds, derived in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysate might negatively influence the performance of this strain for xylitol production. In this work, four potential phenolic inhibitors, such as vanillin, syringaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and phenol, were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on xylitol production by C. athensensis SB18. Phenol was shown to be the most toxic molecule on this microorganism followed by syringaldehyde. Vanillin and 4-hydroxylbenzaldehyde was less toxic than phenol and syringaldehyde, with vanillin being the least toxic. Inhibition was insignificant when the total content of inhibitors was below 1.0 g/L. The presence of phenolic compounds affected the activity of xylose reductase, however not on that of xylitol dehydrogenase. C. athensensis SB18 is therefore a potential xylitol producer from hemicellulosic hydrolysate due to its assimilation of such phenolic inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  11. Becoming a Peroxidase: Cardiolipin-Induced Unfolding of Cytochrome c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Julia; Toffey, Jason R.; Hong, Yuning; Pletneva, Ekaterina V.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of cytochrome c (cyt c) with a unique mitochondrial glycerophospholipid cardiolipin (CL) are relevant for the protein’s function in oxidative phosphorylation and apoptosis. Binding to CL-containing membranes promotes cyt c unfolding and dramatically enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity, which is critical in early stages of apoptosis. We have employed a collection of seven dansyl variants of horse heart cyt c to probe the sequence of steps in this functional transformation. Kinetic measurements have unraveled four distinct processes during CL-induced cyt c unfolding: rapid protein binding to CL liposomes; rearrangements of protein substructures with small unfolding energies; partial insertion of the protein into the lipid bilayer; and extensive protein restructuring leading to “open” extended structures. While early rearrangements depend on a hierarchy of foldons in the native structure, the later process of large-scale unfolding is influenced by protein interactions with the membrane surface. The opening of the cyt c structure exposes the heme group, which enhances the protein’s peroxidase activity and also frees the C-terminal helix to aid in the translocation of the protein through CL membranes. PMID:23713573

  12. Understanding the fast pyrolysis of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Pushkaraj R; Brown, Robert C; Shanks, Brent H

    2011-11-18

    In the present study, pyrolysis of corn stover lignin was investigated by using a micro-pyrolyzer coupled with a GC-MS/FID (FID=flame ionization detec